WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolved protoplanetary disks

  1. Gas in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Gas makes up the bulk of the mass in a protoplanetary disk, but it is much more difficult to observe than the smaller dust component. The l ifetime of gas in a disk has far-reaching consequences. including lim iting the time available for giant planet formation and controlling t he migration of planetary bodies of all sizes, from Jupiters to meter-sized planetesimals. Here I will discuss what is known about the gas component of protoplanetary disks, highlighting recent results from i nfrared studies with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Exciting upcoming o pportunities for gas studies will also be discussed. In particular, the first large far-IR survey of gas tracers from young disks will be p erformed using the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (GASPS) Open Time Key Project.

  2. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kastner, Joel, E-mail: dgraninger@cfa.harvard.edu [Center for Imaging Science, School of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  3. Hydrogen Cyanide In Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashley L.; Oberg, Karin; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore

    2018-01-01

    The chemistry behind star and planet formation is extremely complex and important in the formation of habitable planets. Life requires molecules containing carbon, oxygen, and importantly, nitrogen. Hydrogen cyanide, or HCN, one of the main interstellar nitrogen carriers, is extremely dangerous here on Earth. However, it could be used as a vital tool for tracking the chemistry of potentially habitable planets. As we get closer to identifying other habitable planets, we must understand the beginnings of how those planets are formed in the early protoplanetary disk. This project investigates HCN chemistry in different locations in the disk, and what this might mean for forming planets at different distances from the star. HCN is a chemically diverse molecule. It is connected to the formation for other more complex molecules and is commonly used as a nitrogen tracer. Using computational chemical models we look at how the HCN abundance changes at different locations. We use realistic and physically motivated conditions for the gas in the protoplanetary disk: temperature, density, and radiation (UV flux). We analyze the reaction network, formation, and destruction of HCN molecules in the disk environment. The disk environment informs us about stability of habitable planets that are created based on HCN molecules. We reviewed and compared the difference in the molecules with a variety of locations in the disk and ultimately giving us a better understanding on how we view protoplanetary disks.

  4. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  5. Dust Migration in Gravitationally Active Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, I.; Quinn, T.

    2017-05-01

    Solid growth and planet formation may require dense regions of dust. I investigate dust migration concentration, in gravitationally active protoplanetary disks using high resolution, 3D SPH simulations.

  6. Protoplanetary disks and exoplanets in scattered light

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    Stolker, T.

    2017-01-01

    High-contrast imaging facilitates the direct detection of protoplanetary disks in scattered light and self-luminous exoplanets on long-period orbits. The combined power of extreme adaptive optics and differential imaging techniques delivers high spatial resolution images of disk morphologies down to

  7. The short circuit instability in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbard, A.; McNally, C.P.; Mac Low, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a magneto-hydrodynamic instability which occurs, among other locations, in the inner, hot regions of protoplanetary disks, and which alters the way in which resistive dissipation of magnetic energy into heat proceeds. This instability can be likened to both an electrical short circui...

  8. Formulas for Radial Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

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    Desch, Steven J.; Estrada, Paul R.; Kalyaan, Anusha; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2017-05-01

    The quantification of the radial transport of gaseous species and solid particles is important to many applications in protoplanetary disk evolution. An especially important example is determining the location of the water snow lines in a disk, which requires computing the rates of outward radial diffusion of water vapor and the inward radial drift of icy particles; however, the application is generalized to evaporation fronts of all volatiles. We review the relevant formulas using a uniform formalism. This uniform treatment is necessary because the literature currently contains at least six mutually exclusive treatments of radial diffusion of gas, only one of which is correct. We derive the radial diffusion equations from first principles using Fick's law. For completeness, we also present the equations for radial transport of particles. These equations may be applied to studies of diffusion of gases and particles in protoplanetary and other accretion disks.

  9. Empirical Temperature Measurement in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Erik; Isella, Andrea; Boehler, Yann

    2018-02-01

    The accurate measurement of temperature in protoplanetary disks is critical to understanding many key features of disk evolution and planet formation, from disk chemistry and dynamics, to planetesimal formation. This paper explores the techniques available to determine temperatures from observations of single, optically thick molecular emission lines. Specific attention is given to issues such as the inclusion of optically thin emission, problems resulting from continuum subtraction, and complications of real observations. Effort is also made to detail the exact nature and morphology of the region emitting a given line. To properly study and quantify these effects, this paper considers a range of disk models, from simple pedagogical models to very detailed models including full radiative transfer. Finally, we show how the use of the wrong methods can lead to potentially severe misinterpretations of data, leading to incorrect measurements of disk temperature profiles. We show that the best way to estimate the temperature of emitting gas is to analyze the line peak emission map without subtracting continuum emission. Continuum subtraction, which is commonly applied to observations of line emission, systematically leads to underestimation of the gas temperature. We further show that once observational effects such as beam dilution and noise are accounted for, the line brightness temperature derived from the peak emission is reliably within 10%–15% of the physical temperature of the emitting region, assuming optically thick emission. The methodology described in this paper will be applied in future works to constrain the temperature, and related physical quantities, in protoplanetary disks observed with ALMA.

  10. The Rossby wave instability in protoplanetary disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meheut H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rossby wave instability has been proposed as a mechanism to transport angular momentum in the dead zone of protoplanetary disks and to form vortices. These vortices are of particular interest to concentrate solids in their centres and eventually to form planetesimals. Here we summarize some recent results concerning the growth and structure of this instability in radially and vertically stratified disks, its saturation and non-linear evolution. We also discuss the concentration of solids in the Rossby vortices including vertical settling.

  11. Imaging polarimetry of protoplanetary disks: feasibility and usability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, M.; Jeffers, S.V.; Rodenhuis, M.; Canovas, H.; Buenzli, E.; Keller, C.U.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Dominik, C.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging polarimetry is one of the most promising tools to map the structure of faint protoplanetary disks. In order to assess the feasibility of imaging polarimetry of protoplanetary disks and the usability to answer the scientific questions in the field we perform numerical simulations of disks of

  12. SPH simulations of structures in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, T. V.; Grinin, V. P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the GADGET-2 code modified by us, we have computed hydrodynamic models of a protoplanetary disk perturbed by a low-mass companion. We have considered the cases of circular and eccentric orbits coplanar with the disk and inclined relative to its midplane. During our simulations we computed the column density of test particles on the line of sight between the central star and observer. On this basis we computed the column density of circumstellar dust by assuming the dust and gas to be well mixed with a mass ratio of 1: 100. To study the influence of the disk orientation relative to the observer on the interstellar extinction, we performed our computations for four inclinations of the line of sight to the disk plane and eight azimuthal directions. The column densities in the circumstellar disk of the central star and the circumbinary disk were computed separately. Our computations have shown that periodic column density oscillations can arise in both inner and circumbinary disks. The amplitude and shape of these oscillations depend on the system's parameters (the orbital eccentricity and inclination, the component mass ratio) and its orientation in space. The results of our simulations can be used to explain the cyclic brightness variations of young UX Ori stars.

  13. Probing Protoplanetary Disks: From Birth to Planets

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    Guilfoil Cox, Erin

    2018-01-01

    Disks are very important in the evolution of protostars and their subsequent planets. How early disks can form has implications for early planet formation. In the youngest protostars (i.e., Class 0 sources) magnetic fields can control disk growth. When the field is parallel to the collapsing core’s rotation axis, infalling material loses angular momentum and disks form in later stages. Sub-/millimeter polarization continuum observations of Class 0 sources at ~1000 au resolution support this idea. However, in the inner (~100 au), denser regions, it is unknown if the polarization only traces aligned dust grains. Recent theoretical studies have shown that self-scattering of thermal emission in the disk may contribute significantly to the polarization. Determining the scattering contribution in these sources is important to disentangle the magnetic field. At older times (the Class II phase), the disk structure can both act as a modulator and signpost of planet formation, if there is enough of a mass reservoir. In my dissertation talk, I will present results that bear on disk evolution at both young and late ages. I will present 8 mm polarization results of two Class 0 protostars (IRAS 4A and IC348 MMS) from the VLA at ~50 au resolution. The inferred magnetic field of IRAS 4A has a circular morphology, reminiscent of material being dragged into a rotating structure. I will show results from SOFIA polarization data of the area surrounding IRAS 4A at ~4000 au. I will also present ALMA 850 micron polarization data of ten protostars in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. Most of these sources show very ordered patterns and low (~0.5%) polarization in their inner regions, while having very disordered patterns and high polarization patterns in their extended emission that may suggest different mechanisms in the inner/outer regions. Finally, I will present results from our ALMA dust continuum survey of protoplanetary disks in Rho Ophiuchus; we measured both the sizes and fluxes of

  14. THE EVOLUTION OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN THE ARCHES CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olczak, C. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut (ARI), Zentrum fuer Astronomie Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kaczmarek, T.; Pfalzner, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 7, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Harfst, S. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Zentrum fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Portegies Zwart, S., E-mail: olczak@ari.uni-heidelberg.de [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-09-10

    Most stars form in a cluster environment. These stars are initially surrounded by disks from which potentially planetary systems form. Of all cluster environments, starburst clusters are probably the most hostile for planetary systems in our Galaxy. The intense stellar radiation and extreme density favor rapid destruction of circumstellar disks via photoevaporation and stellar encounters. Evolving a virialized model of the Arches cluster in the Galactic tidal field, we investigate the effect of stellar encounters on circumstellar disks in a prototypical starburst cluster. Despite its proximity to the deep gravitational potential of the Galactic center, only a moderate fraction of members escapes to form an extended pair of tidal tails. Our simulations show that encounters destroy one-third of the circumstellar disks in the cluster core within the first 2.5 Myr of evolution, preferentially affecting the least and most massive stars. A small fraction of these events causes rapid ejection and the formation of a weaker second pair of tidal tails that is overpopulated by disk-poor stars. Two predictions arise from our study. (1) If not destroyed by photoevaporation protoplanetary disks of massive late B- and early O-type stars represent the most likely hosts of planet formation in starburst clusters. (2) Multi-epoch K- and L-band photometry of the Arches cluster would provide the kinematically selected membership sample required to detect the additional pair of disk-poor tidal tails.

  15. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Ca-, Al-Rich Inclusions and Ameoboid Olivine Aggregates: What We Know and Don t Know About Their Origin. Aluminium-26 and Oxygen Isotopic Distributions of Ca-Al-rich Inclusions from Acfer 214 CH Chondrite. The Trapping Efficiency of Helium in Fullerene and Its Implicatiion to the Planetary Science. Constraints on the Origin of Chondritic Components from Oxygen Isotopic Compositions. Role of Planetary Impacts in Thermal Processing of Chondrite Materials. Formation of the Melilite Mantle of the Type B1 CAIs: Flash Heating or Transport? The Iodine-Xenon System in Outer and Inner Portions of Chondrules from the Unnamed Antarctic LL3 Chondrite. Nucleosynthesis of Short-lived Radioactivities in Massive Stars. The Two-Fluid Analysis of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in the Dust Layer of a Protoplanetary Disk: A Possible Path to the Planetesimal Formation Through the Gravitational Instability. Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chonodrule Formation: Heating Rate and Cooling Rate Constraints. Glycine Amide Hydrolysis with Water and OH Radical: A Comparative DFT Study. Micron-sized Sample Preparation for AFM and SEM. AFM, FE-SEM and Optical Imaging of a Shocked L/LL Chondrite: Implications for Martensite Formation and Wave Propagation. Infrared Spectroscopy of Chondrites and Their Components: A Link Between Meteoritics and Astronomy? Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of CAI and Their Mineral Components. The Origin of Iron Isotope Fractionation in Chondrules, CAIs and Matrix from Allende (CV3) and Chainpur (LL3) Chondrites. Protoplanetary Disk Evolution: Early Results from Spitzer. Kinetics of Evaporation-Condensation in a Melt-Solid System and Its Role on the Chemical Composition and Evolution of Chondrules. Oxygen Isotope Exchange Recorded Within Anorthite Single Crystal in Vigarano CAI: Evidence for Remelting by High Temperature Process in the Solar Nebula. Chondrule Forming Shock Waves in Solar Nebula by X-Ray Flares. Organic Globules with Anormalous

  16. Levitation of dust at the surface of protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Haack, Henning

    2009-01-01

    In recent years photophoretic forces acting on dust particles have been shown to be important for optically thin parts of protoplanetary disks. The optical surface (photosphere) of protoplanetary disks is a transitional region where the thermal radiation of the disk can escape. We show here...... that photophoresis by the thermal radiation is sufficient to levitate dust particles at several pressure scale heights. Under certain conditions these particles can constitute the surface layer. In this case only the particles which are most susceptible to photophoresis are observed at the surface of protoplanetary...

  17. Water Vapor in the Protoplanetary Disk of DG Tau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podio, L.; Kamp, I.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Nisini, B.; Dougados, C.; Sandell, G.; Williams, J. P.; Testi, L.; Thi, W. -F.; Woitke, P.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Aresu, G.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.

    2013-01-01

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are

  18. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitke, P.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. -F.

    Context. Emission lines from protoplanetary disks originate mainly in the irradiated surface layers, where the gas is generally warmer than the dust. Therefore, interpreting emission lines requires detailed thermo-chemical models, which are essential to converting line observations into

  19. EFFECTS OF DUST FEEDBACK ON VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lubow, Stephen, E-mail: wf5@rice.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We carried out two-dimensional, high-resolution simulations to study the effect of dust feedback on the evolution of vortices induced by massive planets in protoplanetary disks. Various initial dust to gas disk surface density ratios (0.001-0.01) and dust particle sizes (Stokes number 4 × 10{sup –4}-0.16) are considered. We found that while dust particles migrate inward, vortices are very effective at collecting them. When dust density becomes comparable to gas density within the vortex, a dynamical instability is excited and it alters the coherent vorticity pattern and destroys the vortex. This dust feedback effect is stronger with a higher initial dust/gas density ratio and larger dust grain. Consequently, we found that the disk vortex lifetime can be reduced up to a factor of 10. We discuss the implications of our findings on the survivability of vortices in protoplanetary disks and planet formation.

  20. A Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks in Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Marie; Andrews, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The sizes of the 340 GHz continuum emission from 56 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star-forming region were measured by modeling their ALMA visibility profiles. We describe the mechanism for these measurements and some preliminary results regarding the correlation between the continuum luminosities and sizes.

  1. The Evolution of CO in Protoplanetary Disks During Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kamber; Bergin, Edwin

    2018-01-01

    CO has long been used as a tracer of gas mass. However, recent observations have revealed a low CO to dust mass ratio in numerous protoplanetary disks. In at least some of these systems it is the CO, rather than the total gas mass, which is missing. During my PhD I have used models of protoplanetary disk chemistry as well as millimeter observations to explore the causes and extent of CO depletion in disks. My ALMA observations of CO isotopologues in the TW Hya protoplanetary disk revealed that CO is under-abundant in that system by nearly two orders of magnitude, failing to return to ISM abundances even inside the midplane CO snow line. I have also explored the physical conditions needed to remove carbon from gas phase CO via chemically process using a large grid of chemical models. My analysis reveals that in the warm molecular layer, a wide range of physical conditions can result in an order of magnitude reduction of CO in the outer disk. In the inner disk, ionization, such as from cosmic rays, is needed for chemical reprocessing to occur. However, it is very difficult for chemical processes alone to result in two orders of magnitude of depletion, such as is seen in TW Hya and inferred for other disks. In the midplane, where planets form, it is even more difficult to remove carbon from CO without invoking cosmic rays. My work shows that while CO is missing from the gas in protoplanetary disks, chemistry is unlikely to be the sole cause.

  2. Mineral processing by short circuits in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcnally, C.P.; Hubbard, A.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2013-01-01

    the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including...... global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from......Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks...

  3. Self-consistent dynamical and thermodynamical evolutions of protoplanetary disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, K.; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading... Simulating all these processes simultaneously is beyond the capacity of modern computers. However, by modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution. In order to generate the most realistic protoplanetary disk, we minimize the number of input parameters and try to calculate most of them from self-consistent processes, as early as possible in the history of the disk; starting with the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk in gas. We start from the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 [2] model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 [1] allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk which midplane temperature is defined by an irradiation term form the central star and a viscous heating term depending on the optical depth of the disk. Our new model of the disk photosphere profile allows us to estimate self-consistent photosphere heights and midplane temperatures at the same time. We then follow the disk evolution using an upgrade of the viscous spreading equation from Lynden-Bell and Pringle, 1981 [3]. In particular, the molecular cloud collapse adds a time varying term to the temporal variation of the surface mass density of the disk, in the same manner that photo-evaporation introduces a density loss term. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011 [4]. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of

  4. A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Mayra; Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Zapata, Luis; Rodríguez, Luis F. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 825 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nagel, Erick [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Gto 36240 (Mexico); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC)-Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB)/IEEC, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ∼3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ∼1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.

  5. Stochastic charging of dust grains in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin Ashrafi, Khandaker; Esparza, Samuel; Xiang, Chuchu; Matthews, Lorin; Carballido, Augusto; Hyde, Truell

    2017-06-01

    Micron-sized dust grains are abundant in the early stages of protoplanetary disks. Not only do such solid particles provide the seeds for planetesimal formation through collisional growth and collective effects, they also modify the overall ionization levels of the surrounding plasma through the accumulation of charge. If the local dust density is large enough that charge is removed from the nebular gas through deposition on grain surfaces, magnetic fields can detach from the gas making the MRI process inoperative. For highly porous dust aggregates, MRI quenching can become even more efficient since porous aggregates accumulate charge more efficiently than do compact spherical grains having the same mass. The primary goal of this work is to develop a numerical model of dust coagulation and charging in a magnetized protoplanetary disk to answer the question: What role does the porosity and/or electrical charge state of dust aggregates play in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) structure of protoplanetary disks? The collisional charging of a grain is affected by its surface area and morphology. Here we compare the electron and ion currents incident on micron and submicron aggregate grains made of spherical monomers to the currents incident on spherical grains of equivalent mass. The electrons and ions are absorbed on the dust grain surface at random times; as a result charge fluctuates stochastically. We calculate the average charge and charge probability distribution for (i) aggregates composed of monomers of 10 nm, 20 nm and 50 nm monomers with an effective aggregate radius of 0.1 m, and (ii) aggregates consisting of up to 100 monomers with monomer radius of 0.1 micron. The implications of our results for non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics in protoplanetary disks are briefly discussed in terms of the effect of disk ionization fraction and chemical networks.

  6. Diagnosing the Structure of the HD 163296 Protoplanetary Disk Via Coronagraphic Imaging Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Clampin, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Fukagawa, M.; Hines, D. C.; Katoh, E.; Whitney, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    Coronagraphic imaging polarimetry is a high contrast imaging technique which can diagnose both the spatial distribution and size distribution of dust grains which comprise primordial protoplanetary disks. It can therefore be a useful tool to test our understanding of how the structure of young disks evolves through the era of gas giant planet formation. We report our initial analysis of the H-band polarized and total intensity of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 163296, and characterize the morphology of the scattered light disk in the context of previous optical HST coronagraphic imagery. Our observations were obtained as part of a multi-epoch campaign designed to diagnose and correlate the behavior of the inner and outer regions of select protoplanetary disks. This campaign will help test recent suggestions (Sitko et al. 2008; Wisniewski et al. 2008) that that HD 163296 dis experiences the novel phenomenon of time-variable self-shadowing, whereby occasional changes in the scale height of the inner disk wall induces changes in the illumination of the outer disk.

  7. The formation of rings and gaps in protoplanetary disks by magnetic disk winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, Scott; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2018-01-01

    ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks have revealed previously unresolved radial substructure. These observations, along with the need to fully understand the effects of magnetic fields on the angular momentum transport and global evolution of disks, motivate the study of radial substructure formation in protoplanetary disks. Through 2D-axisymmetric, resistive MHD simulations, we show that rings and gaps can be formed in disks purely through MHD processes in one of two ways: (1) from the removal of angular momentum via a disk wind if the wind torque (and, therefore, the wind-driven mass accretion rate) varies as a function of disk radius, and (2) via the transport of mass through so-called “avalanche accretion streams,” which are a manifestation of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) channel flows in two dimensions. When including ambipolar diffusion (AD), we find that the bulk of the accretion in AD-dominated regions of the disk is concentrated in a thin current sheet near the midplane. Accretion through this current sheet drags magnetic field lines inward with the flow, resulting in a pronounced radial pinch of the magnetic field. Eventually, this radial pinch becomes elongated enough for the magnetic field to reconnect, forming a poloidal magnetic field loop where mass can be concentrated into a dense ring. These mechanisms provide plausible explanations for the radial substructure observed in protoplanetary disks on the tens of au scale.

  8. Probing the turbulent mixing strength in protoplanetary disks across the stellar mass range: no significant variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, G. D.; Dominik, C.

    2012-03-01

    Context. Dust settling and grain growth are the first steps in the planet-formation process in protoplanetary disks. These disks are observed around stars with different spectral types, and there are indications that the disks around lower mass stars are significantly flatter, which could indicate that they settle and evolve faster, or in a different way. Aims: We aim to test this hypothesis by modeling the median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of three samples of protoplanetary disks: around Herbig stars, T Tauri stars and brown dwarfs. We focus on the turbulent mixing strength to avoid a strong observational bias from disk and stellar properties that depend on stellar mass. Methods: We generated SEDs with the radiative transfer code MCMax, using a hydrostatic disk structure and settling the dust in a self-consistent way with the α-prescription to probe the turbulent mixing strength. Results: We are able to fit all three samples with a disk with the same input parameters, scaling the inner edge to the dust evaporation radius and disk mass to millimeter photometry. The Herbig stars require a special treatment for the inner rim regions, while the T Tauri stars require viscous heating, and the brown dwarfs lack a good estimate of the disk mass because only few millimeter detections exist. Conclusions: We find that the turbulent mixing strength does not vary across the stellar mass range for a fixed grain size distribution and gas-to-dust ratio. Regions with the same temperature have a self-similar vertical structure independent of stellar mass, but regions at the same distance from the central star appear more settled in disks around lower mass stars. We find a relatively low turbulent mixing strength of α = 10-4 for a standard grain size distribution, but our results are also consistent with α = 10-2 for a grain size distribution with fewer small grains or a lower gas-to-dust ratio.

  9. Gravitational Instabilities in a Young Protoplanetary Disk with Embedded Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Karna M.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational Instabilities (GIs), a mechanism for angular momentum transport, are more prominent during the early phases of protoplanetary disk evolution when the disk is relatively massive. In my dissertation work, I performed radiative 3D hydrodynamics simulations (by employing the code, CHYMERA) and extensively studied GIs by inserting different objects in the ‘control disk’ (a 0.14 M⊙ protoplanetary disk around a 1 M⊙ star).Studying planetary migration helps us better constrain planet formation models. To study the migration of Jovian planets, in 9 separate simulations, each of the 0.3 MJ, 1 MJ, and 3 MJ planets was inserted near the Inner and Outer Lindblad Resonances and the Corotation Radius (CR) of the dominant GI-induced two-armed spiral density wave in the disk. I found the migration timescales to be longer in a GI-active disk when compared to laminar disks. The 3 MJ planet controls its own orbital evolution, while the migration of a 0.3 MJ planet is stochastic in nature. I defined a ‘critical mass’ as the mass of an arm of the dominant two-armed spiral density wave within the planet’s Hill diameter. Planets above this mass control their own destiny, and planets below this mass are scattered by the disk. This critical mass could provide a recipe for predicting the migration behavior of planets in GI-active disks.To understand the stochastic migration of low-mass planets, I performed a simulation of 240 zero-mass planet-tracers (hereafter, planets) by inserting these at a range of locations in the control disk (an equivalent of 240 simulations of Saturn-mass or lower-mass objects). I calculated a Diffusion Coefficient (3.6 AU2/ 1000 yr) to characterize the stochastic migration of planets. I analyzed the increase in the eccentricity dispersion and compared it with the observed exoplanet eccentricities. The diffusion of planets can be a slow process, resulting in the survival of small planetary cores. Stochastic migration of planets is

  10. DUST EVOLUTION CAN PRODUCE SCATTERED LIGHT GAPS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pinilla, Paola; Kama, Mihkel, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: pinilla@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: mkama@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-01

    Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular “gaps.” The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple scenario without any gravitational or hydrodynamical disturbances to the gas disk structure. Even with a smooth and continuous gas density profile, we find that the scattered light emission produced by small dust grains can exhibit ring-like depressions similar to those presented in recent observations. The physical mechanisms responsible for these features rely on the inefficient fragmentation of dust particles. The occurrence and position of the proposed “gap” features depend most strongly on the dust-to-gas ratio, the fragmentation threshold velocity, the strength of the turbulence, and the age of the disk, and should be generic (at some radius) for typically adopted disk parameters. The same physical processes can affect the thermal emission at optically thin wavelengths (∼1 mm), although the behavior can be more complex; unlike for disk–planet interactions, a “gap” should not be present at these longer wavelengths.

  11. Dust growth under different plasma conditions in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chuchu; Matthews, Lorin; Carballido, Augusto; Hyde, Truell

    2017-10-01

    Coagulation of dust aggregates plays an important role in the formation of planets and the evolution of protoplanetary disks. As cosmic dust becomes charged in the radiative plasma environment, the trajectories of colliding dust grains can be altered by the electrostatic force acting between them, affecting their coagulation probability. This study compares the dust growth in protoplanetary disks with different turbulence strengths and different plasma conditions, i.e. the ratio of free electrons to free ions. A Monte Carlo approach with a simple kernel based on the radius of the grains is used to choose potential colliding pairs and calculate the elapsed time between collisions. The actual collision outcome is determined using a detailed model of the collision which takes into account the aggregate morphology, trajectory, orientation, and all forces acting on the colliding grains. A statistical analysis of the collision outcomes is used to determine collision probability as well as the physical characteristics of the resulting aggregates for both charged and uncharged grains. Preliminary results show that charged aggregates tend to be more porous than neutral particles, and more highly charged particles experience less restructuring as a result of gentler collisions. In regions with weak turbulence, both the collision rate and the number of bouncing collisions are lower for highly charged grains, and the probability of hit-and-stick collisions leading to aggregate growth is a balance of the collision and bouncing rates. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1414523.

  12. A deeply embedded young protoplanetary disk around L1489 IRS observed by the Submillimeter Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, C.; Crapsi, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    aim to identify whether an embedded Keplerian protoplanetary disk resides in the L1489 IRS system. Given the amount of envelope material still present, such a disk would respresent a very young example of a protoplanetary disk. Methods. Using the Submillimeter Array we have observed the HCO + J = 3......-2 line with a resolution of about 1". At this resolution a protoplanetary disk with a radius of a few hundred AUs should be detectable, if present. Radiative transfer tools are used to model the emission from both continuum and line data. Results. We find that these data are consistent with theoretical...

  13. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}⊙ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  14. Childhood to adolescence: dust and gas clearing in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanna Margaret

    Disks are ubiquitous around young stars. Over time, disks dissipate, revealing planets that formed hidden by their natal dust. Since direct detection of young planets at small orbital radii is currently impossible, other tracers of planet formation must be found. One sign of disk evolution, potentially linked to planet formation, is the opening of a gap or inner hole in the disk. In this thesis, I have identified and characterized several cold disks with large inner gaps but retaining massive primordial outer disks. While cold disks are not common, with ~5% of disks showing signs of inner gaps, they provide proof that at least some disks evolve from the inside-out. These large gaps are equivalent to dust clearing from inside the Earth's orbit to Neptune's orbit or even the inner Kuiper belt. Unlike more evolved systems like our own, the central star is often still accreting and a large outer disk remains. I identified four cold disks in Spitzer 5-40 μm spectra and modeled these disks using a 2-D radiative transfer code to determine the gap properties. Outer gap radii of 20-45 AU were derived. However, spectrophotometric identification is indirect and model-dependent. To validate this interpretation, I observed three disks with a submillimeter interferometer and obtained the first direct images of the central holes. The images agree well with the gap sizes derived from the spectrophotometry. One system, LkH&alpha 330, has a very steep outer gap edge which seems more consistent with gravitational perturbation rather than gradual processes, such as grain growth and settling. Roughly 70% of cold disks show CO v=1&rarr 0 gas emission from the inner 1 AU and therefore are unlikely to have evolved due to photoevaporation. The derived rotation temperatures are significantly lower for the cold disks than disks without gaps. Unresolved (sub)millimeter photometry shows that cold disks have steeper colors, indicating that they are optically thin at these wavelengths, unlike

  15. Detecting the cold water reservoir in a protoplanetary disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerheijde, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Brinch, C.; Cleeves, L.; Fogel, J.; Blake, G.; Cernicharo, J.; Dominik, C.; Lis, D. C.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Panic, O.; Pearson, J.; Kristensen, L.; Yildiz, U.; van Dishoeck, E.

    2011-05-01

    Water plays a pivotal role in planet-forming disks around newly formed stars. Frozen out onto dust grains in the cold and dense disk interior, water ice likely aids coagulation of grains and enables planet formation. The ice mantles are also a locus of complex chemistry, and provide a potentially rich source of water to be delivered to early Earth-like planets. The observational evidence for the presence of water in protoplanetary disks has so-far been limited to mid-infrared emission lines of hot water in the inner regions of several disks (<3 AU) and a few rare occasions of the water-ice feature at 3 μm in absorption or in scattered light. The infrared water emission lines indicate that the water gas-phase abundance drops sharply outside a few AU, possibly because the water freezes out efficiently onto cold dust grains outside the `snow line'. We present the first detections of the rotational ground-state emission lines of both spin-isomers of water, obtained with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on-board the Herschel Space Observatory toward the disk around the young, low-mass star TW Hya. These velocity-resolved spectra show that cold water vapor is present throughout the entire radial extent of the disk. Efficient photodesorption of water-ice molecules by stellar ultraviolet radiation is a likely explanation for the presence of water vapor beyond a few AU, and our detections proof that a water-ice reservoir extends throughout the disk. The strength of the emission lines is lower than expected based on recent laboratory measurements of photodesorption and a fiducial model for the TW Hya disk. This suggests that grains carrying as much as 80--90% of the water ice content have settled toward the disk mid-plane, and are outside the reach of the stellar ultraviolet radiation. From our calculations and the detection of both ortho- and para-water, we derive the `spin temperature' of the cold water vapor in the TW Hya disk, which we compare to

  16. COMPACT DUST CONCENTRATION IN THE MWC 758 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, S.; Casassus, S.; Perez, S.; Avenhaus, H. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Lyra, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Roman, P. E. [Millenium Nucleus “Protoplanetary Disks in ALMA Early Science,” Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Wright, C. M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW@ADFA, Canberra ACT 2600 (Australia); Maddison, S. T., E-mail: smarino@das.uchile.cl [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to kilometer-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka and Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk, indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the northwest of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. The compactness of the Ka emission is expected in the context of dust trapping, as big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a nonaxisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady-state vortex solution with parameters adequately selected to reproduce the observations, including the spectral energy distribution. Finally, we compare the radio continuum with SPHERE scattered light data. The ALMA continuum spatially coincides with a spiral-like feature seen in scattered light, while the VLA clump is offset from the scattered light maximum. Moreover, the ALMA map shows a decrement that matches a region devoid of scattered polarized emission. Continuum observations at a different wavelength are necessary to conclude whether the VLA-ALMA difference is an opacity or a real dust segregation.

  17. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Yang, Chao-Chin, E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  18. Dust-driven viscous ring-instability in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullemond, C. P.; Penzlin, A. B. T.

    2018-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks often appear as multiple concentric rings in dust continuum emission maps and scattered light images. These features are often associated with possible young planets in these disks. Many non-planetary explanations have also been suggested, including snow lines, dead zones and secular gravitational instabilities in the dust. In this paper we suggest another potential origin. The presence of copious amounts of dust tends to strongly reduce the conductivity of the gas, thereby inhibiting the magneto-rotational instability, and thus reducing the turbulence in the disk. From viscous disk theory it is known that a disk tends to increase its surface density in regions where the viscosity (i.e. turbulence) is low. Local maxima in the gas pressure tend to attract dust through radial drift, increasing the dust content even more. We have investigated mathematically if this could potentially lead to a feedback loop in which a perturbation in the dust surface density could perturb the gas surface density, leading to increased dust drift and thus amplification of the dust perturbation and, as a consequence, the gas perturbation. We find that this is indeed possible, even for moderately small dust grain sizes, which drift less efficiently, but which are more likely to affect the gas ionization degree. We speculate that this instability could be triggered by the small dust population initially, and when the local pressure maxima are strong enough, the larger dust grains get trapped and lead to the familiar ring-like shapes. We also discuss the many uncertainties and limitations of this model.

  19. Effect of Different Angular Momentum Transport Mechanisms on the Radial Volatile Distribution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyaan, Anusha; Desch, Steven

    2018-01-01

    How circumstellar disks evolve and transport angular momentum is a mystery even until today. Magnetorotational instability (MRI; [1]) earlier thought to be a primary driver of disk evolution, has been found to be not as strong a candidate in cold insufficiently ionized protoplanetary disks where non-ideal MHD effects take over to efficiently suppress the instability [2][3]. In the past few years, recent studies have proposed different mechanisms such as magnetically-driven disk winds [4][5], convective overstability [6], and the vertical shear instability (VSI)[7] to be likely drivers of disk evolution. In this work, we consider numerically [8] and/or parametrically derived radial α profiles of three different mechanisms of angular momentum transport (hydrodynamic instabilities such as VSI, disk winds, and MRI) to understand how the underlying disk structure changes and evolves with each mechanism. We overlay our snowline model that incorporates the advection and diffusion of volatiles as well as radial drift of solids [9] to understand how different α profiles can affect the distribution of water in the disk. References: [1] Balbus, S.A., & Hawley, J.F.,1998, Rev. of Mod. Phys., 70, 1 [2] Bai, X.-N., & Stone, J.M. 2011, ApJ, 736, 144 [3] Bai, X.-N., & Stone, J.M., 2013, ApJ, 769, 76 [4] Bai, X.-N., 2016, ApJ, 821, 80 [5] Suzuki, T.K., Ogihara, M., Morbidelli, A., Crida, A., & Guillot, T., 2016, A&A, 596, A74 [6] Klahr, H., & Hubbard, A. 2014, ApJ, 788, 21 [7] Stoll, M.H.R., & Kley, W. 2014, A&A, 572, A77 [8] Kalyaan, A., Desch, S.J., & Monga, N., 2015, ApJ, 815, 112 [9] Desch, S.J., Estrada, P.R., Kalyaan, A., & Cuzzi, J.N., 2017, ApJ, 840, 86

  20. Earths in Other Solar Systems: Fundamental Protoplanetary Disk Properties and Their Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Pascucci, I.; Allen, L.; Apai, D.; Bergin, T.; Ciesla, F.; Eisner, J.; Fang, M.; Krijt, S.; Najita, J.; Rieke, G.; Salyk, C.

    2017-11-01

    Earths in Other Solar Systems is a NASA interdisciplinary exoplanet research program aiming at understanding how and where habitable planets form. We present an overview of objective 2: How are volatiles and organics processed in protoplanetary disks?

  1. Photometric Search of Protoplanetary Disks in Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Azucena; Perez-Rendon, B.; Contreras, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Approximately half of the young stars with ages of about 1 million years are still embedded in its parent molecular cloud showing strong emission in the infrared region. This emission is believed to be produced in the dusty optically-thick disk surrounding the star. However, the optically-thick disk emission disappears at ages of about 30 Myr. The explanation for this is that dust grains agglomerate in larger bodies, forming planetesimals and ultimately planets, which sweep up much of the remaining gas and dust. To characterize the evolution of protoplanetary disk it is necessary to study samples of stars in the appropiate age range. However, the lack of suitable samples has been a problem to carry out such studies. In this work, one of our goals is to determine the age of various young clusters by means of UBVRI photometric observations. Once we have derived ages for the clusters in the sample, we will select the best stellar candidates whose age ranges between 3 and 10 million years. We present preliminary results of the UBVRI photometry for one of our young clusters in the sample, NGC 6823. Observations were taken at the 1.5 m at the San Pedro Martir Observatory, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in 2009 March 27 to April 1. Data reduction was performed using IRAF standard procedures. We have obtained a color-magnitude diagram for NGC 6823 and we have compared it with the Girardi et al. (2000) isochrones in order to derive stellar ages. This work was supported by grants CONACYT 103914 and Programa de Colaboracion Academica y Cultural UNISON-UNAM U38P167.

  2. CN rings in full protoplanetary disks around young stars as probes of disk structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoletti, P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Visser, R.; Facchini, S.; Bruderer, S.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Bright ring-like structure emission of the CN molecule has been observed in protoplanetary disks. We investigate whether such structures are due to the morphology of the disk itself or if they are instead an intrinsic feature of CN emission. With the intention of using CN as a diagnostic, we also address to which physical and chemical parameters CN is most sensitive. Methods: A set of disk models were run for different stellar spectra, masses, and physical structures via the 2D thermochemical code DALI. An updated chemical network that accounts for the most relevant CN reactions was adopted. Results: Ring-shaped emission is found to be a common feature of all adopted models; the highest abundance is found in the upper outer regions of the disk, and the column density peaks at 30-100 AU for T Tauri stars with standard accretion rates. Higher mass disks generally show brighter CN. Higher UV fields, such as those appropriate for T Tauri stars with high accretion rates or for Herbig Ae stars or for higher disk flaring, generally result in brighter and larger rings. These trends are due to the main formation paths of CN, which all start with vibrationally excited H_2^* molecules, that are produced through far ultraviolet (FUV) pumping of H2. The model results compare well with observed disk-integrated CN fluxes and the observed location of the CN ring for the TW Hya disk. Conclusions: CN rings are produced naturally in protoplanetary disks and do not require a specific underlying disk structure such as a dust cavity or gap. The strong link between FUV flux and CN emission can provide critical information regarding the vertical structure of the disk and the distribution of dust grains which affects the UV penetration, and could help to break some degeneracies in the SED fitting. In contrast with C2H or c-C3H2, the CN flux is not very sensitive to carbon and oxygen depletion.

  3. Hydrodynamic Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks with Consistent Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lile; Goodman, Jeremy

    2017-09-01

    Photoevaporation is an important dispersal mechanism for protoplanetary disks. We conduct hydrodynamic simulations coupled with ray-tracing radiative transfer and consistent thermochemistry to study photoevaporative winds driven by ultraviolet and X-ray radiation from the host star. Most models have a three-layer structure: a cold midplane, warm intermediate layer, and hot wind, the last having typical speeds ˜ 40 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and mass-loss rates ˜ {10}-9 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1 when driven primarily by ionizing UV radiation. Observable molecules, including CO, {OH}, and {{{H}}}2{{O}} re-form in the intermediate layer and survive at relatively high wind temperatures due to reactions being out of equilibrium. Mass-loss rates are sensitive to the intensity of radiation in energy bands that interact directly with hydrogen. Comparison with previous works shows that mass-loss rates are also sensitive to the treatment of both the hydrodynamics and thermochemistry. Divergent results concerning the efficiency of X-ray photoevaporation are traced in part to differing assumptions about dust and other coolants.

  4. Optical Imaging Polarimetry of the LkCa 15 Protoplanetary Disk with SPHERE ZIMPOL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thalmann, C.; Mulders, G.D.; Janson, M.; Olofsson, J.; Benisty, M.; Avenhaus, H.; Quanz, S.P.; Schmid, H.M.; Henning, T.; Buenzli, E.; Ménard, F.; Carson, J.C.; Garufi, A.; Messina, S.; Dominik, C.; Leisenring, J.; Chauvin, G.; Meyer, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first optical (590-890 nm) imaging polarimetry observations of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the young solar analog LkCa 15, addressing a number of open questions raised by previous studies. We detect the previously unseen far side of the disk gap, confirming the

  5. The structure and appearance of irradiated protoplanetary disks : The role of chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, I.; Aresu, G.; Chaparro Molano, German; Woitke, P.; Thi, W. F.

    We use thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks calculated with the code ProDiMo to study the chemical and physical structure of UV and X-ray irradiated disks. Since the chemical composition and the gas heating/cooling are closely intertwined, we aim to study (1) the impact of the chemistry on

  6. HST/WFC3 Imaging and Multi-Wavelength Characterization of Edge-On Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Carolina; Williams, Hayley; Duchene, Gaspard

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the imaging detail in resolved protoplanetary disks has vastly improved and created a critical mass of objects to survey and compare properties, leading us to better understandings of system formation. In particular, disks with an edge-on inclination offer an important perspective, not only for the imaging convenience since the disk blocks stellar light, but scientifically an edge-on disk provides an otherwise impossible opportunity to observe vertical dust structure of a protoplanetary system. In this contribution, we compare seven HST-imaged edge-on protoplanetary disks in the Taurus, Chamaeleon and Ophiuchus star-forming regions, making note the variation in morphology (settled vs flared), dust properties revealed by multiwavelength color mapping, brightness variability over years timescales, and the presence in some systems of a blue-colored atmosphere far above the disk midplane. By using a uniform approach for their analysis, together these seven edge-on protoplanetary disk systems can give insights on evolutionary processes and inform future projects that explore this critical stage of planet formation.

  7. GASPS—A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics : Summary and Initial Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Williams, J. P.; Menard, F.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D.; Aresu, G.; Augereau, J. -C.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; Brittain, S.; Carmona, A.; Ciardi, D.; Danchi, W.; Donaldson, J.; Duchene, G.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; Grady, C.; de Gregorio-Molsalvo, I.; Howard, C.; Huelamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Mathews, G.; Meeus, G.; Mendigutia, I.; Montesinos, B.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Mora, A.; Nomura, H.; Pantin, E.; Pascucci, I.; Phillips, N.; Pinte, C.; Podio, L.; Ramsay, S. K.; Riaz, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Roberge, A.; Sandell, G.; Solano, E.; Tilling, I.; Torrelles, J. M.; Vandenbusche, B.; Vicente, S.; White, G. J.; Woitke, P.

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted ~250 young

  8. GASPS-A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Dent, W. R. F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Williams, J.P.; Menard, F; S.; Andrews; Ardila, D.; Aresu, G.; Augereau, J. -C.; Barrado y Navascues, D; Brittain, S.; Carmona, A.; Ciardi, D.; Danchi, W.; Donaldson, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted ~250 young stars in narrow wavelength regions covering the [OI] fine structure line at 63 μm, the brightest far-infrared line in such objects. A subset of the brightest targets were also surveyed in [OI]145 μ...

  9. GASPS—A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Dent, W. R. F.; Ardila, D.; Ciardi, D.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted ∼250 young stars in narrow wavelength regions covering the [OI] fine structure line at 63 μm the brightest far-infrared line in such objects. A subset of the brightest targets were also surveyed in [OI]145 μm...

  10. Physical properties of dusty protoplanetary disks in Lupus: evidence for viscous evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.; Ansdell, M.; Carpenter, J.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Manara, C. F.; Miotello, A.; van der Marel, N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Williams, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The formation of planets strongly depends on the total amount as well as on the spatial distribution of solids in protoplanetary disks. Thanks to the improvements in resolution and sensitivity provided by ALMA, measurements of the surface density of mm-sized grains are now possible on large samples of disks. Such measurements provide statistical constraints that can be used to inform our understanding of the initial conditions of planet formation. Aims: We aim to analyze spatially resolved observations of 36 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star forming complex from our ALMA survey at 890 μm, aiming to determine physical properties such as the dust surface density, the disk mass and size, and to provide a constraint on the temperature profile. Methods: We fit the observations directly in the uv-plane using a two-layer disk model that computes the 890 μm emission by solving the energy balance at each disk radius. Results: For 22 out of 36 protoplanetary disks we derive robust estimates of their physical properties. The sample covers stellar masses between 0.1 and 2 M⊙, and we find no trend in the relationship between the average disk temperatures and the stellar parameters. We find, instead, a correlation between the integrated sub-mm flux (a proxy for the disk mass) and the exponential cut-off radii (a proxy of the disk size) of the Lupus disks. Comparing these results with observations at similar angular resolution of Taurus-Auriga and Ophiuchus disks found in literature and scaling them to the same distance, we observe that the Lupus disks are generally fainter and larger at a high level of statistical significance. Considering the 1-2 Myr age difference between these regions, it is possible to tentatively explain the offset in the disk mass-size relation with viscous spreading, however with the current measurements other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.

  11. Variable Circumstellar Extinction in a Protoplanetary Disk with an Embedded Low-Mass Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, T. V.; Grinin, V. P.

    2017-06-01

    The motion of the low-mass companion embedded in a protoplanetary disk perturbs the disk matter periodically. It leads to the large-scale inhomogenity formation. Such structures in the disk have to influence on the propagation of the radiation from a star to an observer. If the protoplanetary disk is observed almost edge-on the structures will intersect the line of sight periodically. We use the hydrodynamic simulations of such disks to explore how an invisible low-mass companions in protoplanetary disks can affect on the circumstellar extinction and the light curves of the young star. The models with circular and eccentric, inclined and coplanar companions orbits were calculated. Our modification of the GADGET-2 code is used for the calculations. The column density of the test particles on the line of sight was calculated as a function of phase of the orbital period. If we propose the dust is well mixed with gas in the ratio 1:100 the column density function determines the behaviour the circumstellar extinction. Our calculations show the periodic variations of the circumstellar extinction can originate in the CB-disk as well in the CS-disk. The results can be used for the explanation of the cyclic activity of UX Ori type stars.

  12. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN ORION A. I. DISK PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. H. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Watson, Dan M.; Manoj, P.; Forrest, W. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Furlan, Elise [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Najita, Joan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sargent, Benjamin [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Hernández, Jesús [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, Apdo. Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Adame, Lucía [Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Av. Universidad S/N, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451, México (Mexico); Espaillat, Catherine [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Megeath, S. T. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Muzerolle, James, E-mail: quarkosmos@kasi.re.kr [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2016-09-01

    We present our investigation of 319 Class II objects in Orion A observed by Spitzer /IRS. We also present the follow-up observations of 120 of these Class II objects in Orion A from the Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX. We measure continuum spectral indices, equivalent widths, and integrated fluxes that pertain to disk structure and dust composition from IRS spectra of Class II objects in Orion A. We estimate mass accretion rates using hydrogen recombination lines in the SpeX spectra of our targets. Utilizing these properties, we compare the distributions of the disk and dust properties of Orion A disks with those of Taurus disks with respect to position within Orion A (Orion Nebular Cluster [ONC] and L1641) and with the subgroups by the inferred radial structures, such as transitional disks (TDs) versus radially continuous full disks (FDs). Our main findings are as follows. (1) Inner disks evolve faster than the outer disks. (2) The mass accretion rates of TDs and those of radially continuous FDs are statistically significantly displaced from each other. The median mass accretion rate of radially continuous disks in the ONC and L1641 is not very different from that in Taurus. (3) Less grain processing has occurred in the disks in the ONC compared to those in Taurus, based on analysis of the shape index of the 10 μ m silicate feature ( F {sub 11.3}/ F {sub 9.8}). (4) The 20–31 μ m continuum spectral index tracks the projected distance from the most luminous Trapezium star, θ {sup 1} Ori C. A possible explanation is UV ablation of the outer parts of disks.

  13. Time Evolution of a Viscous Protoplanetary Disk with a Free Geometry: Toward a More Self-consistent Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillié, Kévin; Charnoz, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Observations of protoplanetary disks show that some characteristics seem recurrent, even in star formation regions that are physically distant such as surface mass density profiles varying as r -1 or aspect ratios of about 0.03-0.23. Accretion rates are also recurrently found around 10-8-10-6 M ⊙ yr-1 for disks that have already evolved. Several models have been developed in order to recover these properties. However, most of them usually simplify the disk geometry if not its mid-plane temperature. This has major consequences for modeling the disk evolution over millions of years and consequently planet migration. In the present paper, we develop a viscous evolution hydrodynamical numerical code that simultaneously determines the disk photosphere geometry and the mid-plane temperature. We then compare our results of long-term simulations with similar simulations of disks with a constrained geometry along the Chiang & Goldreich prescription (d lnH/d lnr = 9/7). We find that the constrained geometry models provide a good approximation of the disk surface density evolution. However, they differ significantly regarding the temperature-time evolution. In addition, we find that shadowed regions naturally appear at the transition between viscously dominated and radiation-dominated regions that falls in the region of planetary formation. We show that χ (photosphere height to pressure scale height ratio) cannot be considered a constant, which is consistent with the findings of Watanabe & Lin. Comparisons with observations show that all disks naturally evolve toward a shallow surface density disk (Σvpropr -1). The mass flux across the disk typically stabilizes in about 1 Myr.

  14. An ALMA Survey of CO Isotopologue Emission from Protoplanetary Disks in Chamaeleon I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Feng; Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, 100871 Beijing (China); Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel; Hendler, Nathan; Mulders, Gijs D. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Drabek-Maunder, Emily; Mohanty, Subhanjoy [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Testi, Leonardo [ESO/European Southern Observatory, Garching bei München (Germany); Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Manara, Carlo F., E-mail: longfeng@pku.edu.cn [Scientific Support Office, Directorate of Science, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2017-08-01

    The mass of a protoplanetary disk limits the formation and future growth of any planet. Masses of protoplanetary disks are usually calculated from measurements of the dust continuum emission by assuming an interstellar gas-to-dust ratio. To investigate the utility of CO as an alternate probe of disk mass, we use ALMA to survey {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O J = 3–2 line emission from a sample of 93 protoplanetary disks around stars and brown dwarfs with masses from in the nearby Chamaeleon I star-forming region. We detect {sup 13}CO emission from 17 sources and C{sup 18}O from only one source. Gas masses for disks are then estimated by comparing the CO line luminosities to results from published disk models that include CO freeze-out and isotope-selective photodissociation. Under the assumption of a typical interstellar medium CO-to-H{sub 2} ratio of 10{sup −4}, the resulting gas masses are implausibly low, with an average gas mass of ∼0.05 M {sub Jup} as inferred from the average flux of stacked {sup 13}CO lines. The low gas masses and gas-to-dust ratios for Cha I disks are both consistent with similar results from disks in the Lupus star-forming region. The faint CO line emission may instead be explained if disks have much higher gas masses, but freeze-out of CO or complex C-bearing molecules is underestimated in disk models. The conversion of CO flux to CO gas mass also suffers from uncertainties in disk structures, which could affect gas temperatures. CO emission lines will only be a good tracer of the disk mass when models for C and CO depletion are confirmed to be accurate.

  15. INWARD RADIAL MIXING OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICES IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves; Villeneuve, Johan [CRPG, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, UMR 7358, Vandoeuvre-lés-Nancy, F-54501 (France); Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J.; Gounelle, Matthieu, E-mail: lvacher@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr [IMPMC, MNHN, UPMC, UMR CNRS 7590, 61 rue Buffon, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-08-10

    The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%–35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10{sup −6}) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10{sup −6}) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10{sup −6}). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.

  16. The absolute chronology and thermal processing of solids in the solar protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin; Krot, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Transient heating events that formed calcium-aluminum - rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules are fundamental processes in the evolution of the solar protoplanetary disk, but their chronology is not understood. Using U-corrected Pb-Pb dating, we determined absolute ages of individual CAIs and cho...

  17. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. II. Gas-rich environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro Molano, G.; Kamp, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims: Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the

  18. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks : II. Gas-rich environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro-Molano, German; Kamp, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims. Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the

  19. The protoplanetary disk of FT Tauri : Multiwavelength data analysis and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garufi, A.; Podio, L.; Kamp, I.; Ménard, F.; Brittain, S.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.; Alonso-Martínez, M.; Thi, W. F.; Woitke, P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Investigating the evolution of protoplanetary disks is crucial for our understanding of star and planet formation. There have been several theoretical and observational studies in past decades to advance this knowledge. The launch of satellites operating at infrared wavelengths, such as the

  20. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. I. Hydrostatic disk structure and inner rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, P.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Emission lines from protoplanetary disks originate mainly in the irradiated surface layers, where the gas is generally warmer than the dust. Therefore, interpreting emission lines requires detailed thermo-chemical models, which are essential to converting line observations into understanding disk physics. Aims: We aim at hydrostatic disk models that are valid from 0.1 AU to 1000 AU to interpret gas emission lines from UV to sub-mm. In particular, our interest lies in interpreting far IR gas emission lines, such as will be observed by the Herschel observatory, related to the Gasps open time key program. This paper introduces a new disk code called ProDiMo. Methods: We combine frequency-dependent 2D dust continuum radiative transfer, kinetic gas-phase and UV photo-chemistry, ice formation, and detailed non-LTE heating & cooling with the consistent calculation of the hydrostatic disk structure. We include Fe ii and CO ro-vibrational line heating/cooling relevant to the high-density gas close to the star, and apply a modified escape-probability treatment. The models are characterised by a high degree of consistency between the various physical, chemical, and radiative processes, where the mutual feedbacks are solved iteratively. Results: In application to a T Tauri disk extending from 0.5 AU to 500 AU, the models show that the dense, shielded and cold midplane (z/r ⪉ 0.1, T g≈ T d) is surrounded by a layer of hot (T g≈ 5000 K) and thin (n ≈10 7 to 10 8 cm-3) atomic gas that extends radially to about 10 AU and vertically up to z/r≈0.5. This layer is predominantly heated by the stellar UV (e.g. PAH-heating) and cools via Fe ii semi-forbidden and Oi 630 nm optical line emission. The dust grains in this “halo” scatter the starlight back onto the disk, which affects the photochemistry. The more distant regions are characterised by a cooler flaring structure. Beyond r ⪆ 100 AU, T g decouples from T d even in the midplane and reaches values of about T

  1. Organic molecules in protoplanetary disks: new insights and directions with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    The current era of exoplanet detection and characterisation has revealed the ubiquity and diversity of (exo)planetary systems around stars in the solar neighbourhood. Protoplanetary disks around young stars contain the matter - dust, gas, and ice - which will go into forming new (exo)planetary systems. One open question regarding this planet-building material is the degree of chemical complexity inherited and/or attained in the protoplanetary disk prior to planet formation. Is it possible that our chemical origins lie as far back as the molecular cloud from which the sun formed? The superior sensitivity and resolution of ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array is allowing us, for the first time, to detect and resolve emission from complex organic molecules (> 5 atoms) in protoplanetary disks around nearby young stars. In this talk, I will review recent exciting detections of chemical complexity in disks with ALMA, and discuss the implications of these observations on our understanding of chemistry (in the gas and solid phase) in the planet- and comet-forming zones. I will also speculate on the potential for ALMA to observe molecules on higher 'rungs' on the 'ladder' of complexity in nearby planet-forming disks, and describe how such detections can provide insight on the importance of interstellar chemistry on our origins.

  2. Gas Mass Tracers in Protoplanetary Disks: CO is Still the Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyarova, Tamara; Akimkin, Vitaly; Semenov, Dmitry; Henning, Thomas; Vasyunin, Anton; Wiebe, Dmitri

    2017-11-01

    Protoplanetary disk mass is a key parameter controlling the process of planetary system formation. CO molecular emission is often used as a tracer of gas mass in the disk. In this study, we consider the ability of CO to trace the gas mass over a wide range of disk structural parameters, and we search for chemical species that could possibly be used as alternative mass tracers to CO. Specifically, we apply detailed astrochemical modeling to a large set of models of protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars to select molecules with abundances correlated with the disk mass and being relatively insensitive to other disk properties. We do not consider sophisticated dust evolution models, restricting ourselves to the standard astrochemical assumption of 0.1 μm dust. We find that CO is indeed the best molecular tracer for total gas mass, despite the fact that it is not the main carbon carrier, provided reasonable assumptions about CO abundance in the disk are used. Typically, chemical reprocessing lowers the abundance of CO by a factor of 3, compared to the case where photodissociation and freeze-out are the only ways of CO depletion. On average, only 13% C atoms reside in gas-phase CO, albeit with variations from 2% to 30%. CO2, H2O, and H2CO can potentially serve as alternative mass tracers, with the latter two only applicable if disk structural parameters are known.

  3. The Effects of Protostellar Disk Turbulence on CO Emission Lines: A Comparison Study of Disks with Constant CO Abundance versus Chemically Evolving Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mo; Evans, Neal J., II; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Willacy, Karen; Turner, Neal J.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence is the leading candidate for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks and therefore influences disk lifetimes and planet formation timescales. However, the turbulent properties of protoplanetary disks are poorly constrained observationally. Recent studies have found turbulent speeds smaller than what fully-developed MRI would produce (Flaherty et al.). However, existing studies assumed a constant CO/H2 ratio of 10-4 in locations where CO is not frozen-out or photo-dissociated. Our previous studies of evolving disk chemistry indicate that CO is depleted by incorporation into complex organic molecules well inside the freeze-out radius of CO. We consider the effects of this chemical depletion on measurements of turbulence. Simon et al. suggested that the ratio of the peak line flux to the flux at line center of the CO J = 3-2 transition is a reasonable diagnostic of turbulence, so we focus on that metric, while adding some analysis of the more complex effects on spatial distribution. We simulate the emission lines of CO based on chemical evolution models presented in Yu et al., and find that the peak-to-trough ratio changes as a function of time as CO is destroyed. Specifically, a CO-depleted disk with high turbulent velocity mimics the peak-to-trough ratios of a non-CO-depleted disk with lower turbulent velocity. We suggest that disk observers and modelers take into account the possibility of CO depletion when using line profiles or peak-to-trough ratios to constrain the degree of turbulence in disks. Assuming that {CO}/{{{H}}}2={10}-4 at all disk radii can lead to underestimates of turbulent speeds in the disk by at least 0.2 km s-1.

  4. Protoplanetary Disks in the Orion OMC1 Region Imaged with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, J. A.; Bally, J. M.; Ginsburg, A.; Sheehan, P. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present ALMA observations of the Orion Nebula that cover the OMC1 outflow region. Our focus in this paper is on compact emission from protoplanetary disks. We mosaicked a field containing ˜600 near-IR-identified young stars, around which we can search for sub-millimeter emission tracing dusty disks. Approximately 100 sources are known proplyds identified with the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect continuum emission at 1 mm wavelengths toward ˜20% of the proplyd sample, and ˜8% of the larger sample of near-IR objects. The noise in our maps allows 4σ detection of objects brighter than ˜1.5 mJy, corresponding to protoplanetary disk masses larger than 1.5 M J (using standard assumptions about dust opacities and gas-to-dust ratios). None of these disks are detected in contemporaneous CO(2-1) or C18O(2-1) observations, suggesting that the gas-to-dust ratios may be substantially smaller than the canonical value of 100. Furthermore, since dust grains may already be sequestered in large bodies in Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) disks, the inferred masses of disk solids may be underestimated. Our results suggest that the distribution of disk masses in this region is compatible with the detection rate of massive planets around M dwarfs, which are the dominant stellar constituent in the ONC.

  5. Mass constraint for a planet in a protoplanetary disk from the gap width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake

    2016-06-01

    A giant planet creates a gap in a protoplanetary disk, which might explain the observed gaps in protoplanetary disks. The width and depth of the gaps depend on the planet mass and disk properties. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for various planet masses, disk aspect ratios, and viscosities, to obtain an empirical formula for the gap width. The gap width is proportional to the square root of the planet mass, -3/4 the power of the disk aspect ratio and -1/4 the power of the viscosity. This empirical formula enables us to estimate the mass of a planet embedded in the disk from the width of an observed gap. We have applied the empirical formula for the gap width to the disk around HL Tau, assuming that each gap observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations is produced by planets, and discussed the planet masses within the gaps. The estimate of planet masses from the gap widths is less affected by the observational resolution and dust filtration than that by the gap depth.

  6. Probing protoplanetary disk evolution with the HI 21 cm line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, Inga; Freudling, Wolfram; Robberto, Massimo; Chengalur, Jayaram; Keto, Eric

    Little is known about the gas disk dispersal timescales in the planet formation process. Disks have a complex chemical structure and a wide range of excitation conditions, making the interpretation of line observations difficult. Here, we use detailed chemo-physical models to predict the Hi

  7. ROTATIONAL LINE EMISSION FROM WATER IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, R.; Poelman, D. R.; Spaans, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Glassgold, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Circumstellar disks provide the material reservoir for the growth of young stars and for planet formation. We combine a high-level radiative transfer program with a thermal-chemical model of a typical T Tauri star disk to investigate the diagnostic potential of the far-infrared lines of water for

  8. The evolution of the protoplanetary disk with mass influx from a molecular cloud core and the photoevaporation winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunjian; Yao, Zhen; Li, Hongna; Wang, Haosen

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the formation, evolution, and dispersal processes of protoplanetary disks with mass influx from the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core and the photoevaporation winds. Due to the initial angular momentum of the molecular cloud core, the gravitational collapse of the molecular cloud core forms a protostar+protoplanetary disk system. We calculate the evolution of the protoplanetary disk from the gravitational collapse of the molecular cloud core to the dispersal stage. In our calculation, we include the mass influx from a molecular cloud core, the irradiation from the central star, the viscosity due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and the gravitational instability, and the effect of photoevaporation. We find that the protoplanetary disk has some interesting properties, which are different from the previous studies. Firstly, with particular values of parameters of the molecular cloud core, the gravitational instability does not occur during the whole evolution of the resultant protoplanetary disk. With some other parameters of the molecular cloud core, the gravitational instability occurs all the time of the lifetime of the resultant protoplanetary disk. Secondly, the radial distribution of the α parameter exhibits a nearly ladder-like shape, which is different from the three regions' shape in previous studies. Thirdly, the value of the surface density is increased significantly (about a factor of 8.0) compared with that in the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula (MMSN) model. We suggest that this increased surface density can provide enough material for the formation of giant planets within the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk, and may provide a routine for reducing the timescale of the formation of giant planets. We also discuss the influence of the photoevaporation winds on the evolution of the protoplanetary disk.

  9. Characterizing Protoplanetary Disks in a Young Binary in Orion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonas; Hughes, A. Meredith; Mann, Rita; Flaherty, Kevin; Di Francesco, James; Williams, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Planetary systems form in circumstellar disks of gas and dust surrounding young stars. One open question in the study of planet formation involves understanding how different environments affect the properties of the disks and planets they generate. Understanding the properties of disks in high-mass star forming regions (SFRs) is critical since most stars - probably including our Sun - form in those regions. By comparing the disks in high-mass SFRs to those in better-studied low-mass SFRs we can learn about the role environment plays in planet formation. Here we present 0.5" resolution observations of the young two-disk binary system V2434 Ori in the Orion Nebula from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in molecular line tracers of CO(3-2), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3) and CS(7-6). We model each disk’s mass, radius, temperature structure, and molecular abundances, by creating synthetic images using an LTE ray-tracing code and comparing simulated observations with the ALMA data in the visibility domain. We then compare our results to a previous study of molecular line emission from a single Orion proplyd, modeled using similar methods, and to previously characterized disks in low-mass SFRs to investigate the role of environment in disk chemistry and planetary system formation.

  10. Can we measure protoplanetary disk masses with CO observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mo; Evans, Neal J.; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.

    2017-06-01

    Gas in protostellar disks provides the raw material for giant planet formation and controls the dynamics of the planetesimal-building dust grains. Accurate gas-mass measurements provide insight into disk evolution and also help us to understand the formation environments of planets. While carbon monoxide (CO) is usually too optically thick to probe the entire mass budget in giant-planet forming regions, rare isotopologues of CO have been used as gas mass tracers for disks, assuming an interstellar CO/H2 abundance ratio. However, our chemical models of T-Tauri disks show that CO beyond 20 AU around a solar-type star is dissociated by He+, with the carbon becoming sequestered in complex organic molecules. Over million-year time scale, CO dissociation leads to a CO/H2 ratio that decreases both with distance from the star and as a function of time.In this dissertation talk, I will present radiative transfer simulations that assess the accuracy of CO-based disk mass measurements. The combination of CO chemical depletion in the outer disk and optically thick emission from the inner disk leads to gas mass estimates that are too low by over an order of magnitude, given the standard assumptions of interstellar CO/H2 ratio and optically thin emission. Furthermore, the million-year timescale of CO depletion introduces an age/mass degeneracy into observations. To reach factor of a few accuracy for CO-based disk mass measurements, we suggest that observers and modelers adopt the following strategies: (1) select the low-J transitions; (2) observe multiple CO isotopologues and use either intensity ratios or normalized line profiles to diagnose CO depletion; and (3) use spatially resolved observations to measure the CO abundance distribution.

  11. DETECTIONS OF TRANS-NEPTUNIAN ICE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Bergin, E.; Cleeves, L. I. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad NacionalAUtónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Sargent, B., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu, E-mail: cleeves@umich.edu, E-mail: cce@bu.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj.puravankara@tifr.res.in, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of T Tauri stars, in which we detect amorphous and crystalline water ice features. Using irradiated accretion disk models, we determine the disk structure and ice abundance in each of the systems. Combining a model-independent comparison of the ice feature strength and disk size with a detailed analysis of the model ice location, we estimate that the ice emitting region is at disk radii >30 AU, consistent with a proto-Kuiper belt. Vertically, the ice emits most below the photodesorption zone, consistent with Herschel observations of cold water vapor. The presence of crystallized water ice at a disk location (1) colder than its crystallization temperature and (2) where it should have been re-amorphized in ∼1 Myr suggests that localized generation is occurring; the most likely cause appears to be micrometeorite impact or planetesimal collisions. Based on simple tests with UV models and different ice distributions, we suggest that the SED shape from 20 to 50 μm may probe the location of the water ice snowline in the disk upper layers. This project represents one of the first extra-solar probes of the spatial structure of the cometary ice reservoir thought to deliver water to terrestrial planets.

  12. PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND HL TAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Masahiko; Iguchi, Satoru, E-mail: eiji.akiyama@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: yasuhiro.hasegawa@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    We reprocess the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) long-baseline science verification data taken toward HL Tauri. Assuming the observed gaps are opened up by currently forming, unseen bodies, we estimate the mass of such hypothetical bodies based on the following two approaches: the Hill radius analysis and a more elaborate approach developed from the angular momentum transfer analysis in gas disks. For the former, the measured gap widths are used for estimating the mass of the bodies, while for the latter, the measured gap depths are utilized. We show that their masses are comparable to or less than the mass of Jovian planets. By evaluating Toomre’s gravitational instability (GI) condition and cooling effect, we find that the GI might be a mechanism to form the bodies in the outer region of the disk. As the disk might be gravitationally unstable only in the outer region of the disk, inward planetary migration would be needed to construct the current architecture of the observed disk. We estimate the gap-opening mass and show that type II migration might be able to play such a role. Combining GIs with inward migration, we conjecture that all of the observed gaps may be a consequence of bodies that might have originally formed at the outer part of the disk, and have subsequently migrated to the current locations. While ALMA’s unprecedented high spatial resolution observations can revolutionize our picture of planet formation, more dedicated observational and theoretical studies are needed to fully understand the HL Tauri images.

  13. Star and protoplanetary disk properties in Orion's suburbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M.; van Boekel, R.; Wang, W.; Carmona, A.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Henning, Th.

    2009-09-01

    Context: Knowledge of the evolution of circumstellar accretion disks is pivotal to our understanding of star and planet formation; and yet despite intensive theoretical and observational studies, the disk dissipation process is not well understood. Infrared observations of large numbers of young stars, as performed by the Spitzer Space Telescope, may advance our knowledge of this inherently complex process. While infrared data reveal the evolutionary status of the disk, they hold little information on the properties of the central star and the accretion characteristics. Aims: Existing 2MASS and Spitzer archive data of the Lynds 1630N and 1641 clouds in the Orion GMC provide disk properties of a large number of young stars. We wish to complement these data with optical data that provide the physical stellar parameters and accretion characteristics. Methods: We performed a large optical spectroscopic and photometric survey of the aforementioned clouds. Spectral types, as well as accretion and outflow characteristics, are derived from our VLT/VIMOS spectra. Optical SDSS and CAHA/LAICA imaging was combined with 2MASS, Spitzer IRAC, and MIPS imaging to obtain spectral energy distributions from 0.4 to 24 μm. Reddened model atmospheres were fitted to the optical/NIR photometric data, keeping Teff fixed at the spectroscopic value. Mass and age estimates of individual objects were made through placement in the HR diagram and comparison to several sets of pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks. Results: We provide a catalog of 132 confirmed young stars in L1630N and 267 such objects in L1641. We identify 28 transition disk systems, 20 of which were previously unknown, as well as 42 new transition disk candidates for which we have broad-band photometry but no optical spectroscopy. We give mass and age estimates for the individual stars, as well as equivalent widths of optical emission lines, the extinction, and measures of the evolutionary state of the circumstellar dusty

  14. PROTOPLANETARY DISK MASSES FROM STARS TO BROWN DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Mortlock, Daniel [Imperial College London, 1010 Blackett Lab, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Greaves, Jane [SUPA, Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Scholz, Aleks [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Thompson, Mark [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Lodato, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Looper, Dagny, E-mail: s.mohanty@imperial.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    We present SCUBA-2 850 {mu}m observations of seven very low mass stars (VLMS) and brown dwarfs (BDs). Three are in Taurus and four in the TW Hydrae Association (TWA), and all are classical T Tauri (cTT) analogs. We detect two of the three Taurus disks (one only marginally), but none of the TWA ones. For standard grains in cTT disks, our 3{sigma} limits correspond to a dust mass of 1.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} in Taurus and a mere 0.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} in the TWA (3-10 Multiplication-Sign deeper than previous work). We combine our data with other submillimeter/millimeter (sub-mm/mm) surveys of Taurus, {rho} Oph, and the TWA to investigate the trends in disk mass and grain growth during the cTT phase. Assuming a gas-to-dust mass ratio of 100:1 and fiducial surface density and temperature profiles guided by current data, we find the following. (1) The minimum disk outer radius required to explain the upper envelope of sub-mm/mm fluxes is {approx}100 AU for intermediate-mass stars, solar types, and VLMS, and {approx}20 AU for BDs. (2) While the upper envelope of apparent disk masses increases with M{sub *} from BDs to VLMS to solar-type stars, no such increase is observed from solar-type to intermediate-mass stars. We propose this is due to enhanced photoevaporation around intermediate stellar masses. (3) Many of the disks around Taurus and {rho} Oph intermediate-mass and solar-type stars evince an opacity index of {beta} {approx} 0-1, indicating significant grain growth. Of the only four VLMS/BDs in these regions with multi-wavelength measurements, three are consistent with considerable grain growth, though optically thick disks are not ruled out. (4) For the TWA VLMS (TWA 30A and B), combining our 850 {mu}m fluxes with the known accretion rates and ages suggests substantial grain growth by 10 Myr, comparable to that in the previously studied TWA cTTs Hen 3-600A and TW Hya. The degree of grain growth in the TWA BDs (2M1207A and SSPM1102) remains largely unknown. (5) A

  15. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CO SNOW LINE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Rebecca G. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Livio, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    CO is thought to be a vital building block for prebiotic molecules that are necessary for life. Thus, understanding where CO existed in a solid phase within the solar nebula is important for understanding the origin of life. We model the evolution of the CO snow line in a protoplanetary disk. We find that the current observed location of the CO snow line in our solar system, and in the solar system analog TW Hydra, cannot be explained by a fully turbulent disk model. With time-dependent disk models we find that the inclusion of a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) can resolve this problem. Furthermore, we obtain a fully analytic solution for the CO snow line radius for late disk evolutionary times. This will be useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics and predict the composition and habitability of exoplanets.

  16. Observational Studies of Protoplanetary Disks at Mid-Infrared Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Telesco, Charles; Wright, Christopher; Packham, Christopher; Marinas, Naibi

    2013-07-01

    We have used mid-infrared cameras on 8-to-10 m class telescopes to study the properties of young circumstellar disks. During the initial phases of this program we examined a large sample of mid-IR images of standard stars delivered by T-ReCS at Gemini South to evaluate its on-sky performance as characterized by, for example the angular resolution, the PSF shape, and the PSF temporal stability, properties that are most relevant to our high-angular resolution study of disks. With this information we developed an Interactive Data Language (IDL) package of routines optimized for reducing the data and correcting for image defects commonly seen in ground-based mid-IR data. We obtained, reduced, and analyzed mid-IR images and spectra of several Herbig Ae/Be disks (including HD 259431, MWC 1080, VV Ser) and the debris disk (β Pic), and derived their physical properties by means of radiative transfer modeling or spectroscopic decomposition and analyses. These results are highlighted here. During this study, we also helped commission CanariCam, a new mid-IR facility instrument built by the University of Florida for the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) on La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. CanariCam is an imager with spectroscopic, polarimetric, and coronagraphic capabilities, with the dual-beam polarimetry being a unique mode introduced with CanariCam for the first time to a 10 m telescope at mid-IR wavelengths. It is well known that measurements of polarization, originating from aligned dust grains in the disks and their environments, have the potential to shed light on the morphologies of the magnetic fields in these regions, information that is critical to understanding how stars and planets form. We have obtained polarimetric data of several Herbig Ae/Be disks and YSOs, and the data reduction and analyses are in process. We present preliminary results here. This poster is based upon work supported by the NSF under grant AST-0903672 and AST-0908624 awarded to C.M.T.

  17. Accretion outbursts in self-gravitating protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Zhu, Zhaohuan [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Nelson, Richard P., E-mail: jaehbae@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: zhuzh@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk [Astronomy Unit, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01

    We improve on our previous treatments of the long-term evolution of protostellar disks by explicitly solving disk self-gravity in two dimensions. The current model is an extension of the one-dimensional layered accretion disk model of Bae et al. We find that gravitational instability (GI)-induced spiral density waves heat disks via compressional heating (i.e., PdV work), and can trigger accretion outbursts by activating the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the magnetically inert disk dead zone. The GI-induced spiral waves propagate well inside of the gravitationally unstable region before they trigger outbursts at R ≲ 1 AU where GI cannot be sustained. This long-range propagation of waves cannot be reproduced with the previously used local α treatments for GI. In our standard model where zero dead-zone residual viscosity (α{sub rd}) is assumed, the GI-induced stress measured at the onset of outbursts is locally as large as 0.01 in terms of the generic α parameter. However, as suggested in our previous one-dimensional calculations, we confirm that the presence of a small but finite α{sub rd} triggers thermally driven bursts of accretion instead of the GI + MRI-driven outbursts that are observed when α{sub rd} = 0. The inclusion of non-zero residual viscosity in the dead zone decreases the importance of GI soon after mass feeding from the envelope cloud ceases. During the infall phase while the central protostar is still embedded, our models stay in a 'quiescent' accretion phase with M-dot {sub acc}∼10{sup −8}--10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} over 60% of the time and spend less than 15% of the infall phase in accretion outbursts. While our models indicate that episodic mass accretion during protostellar evolution can qualitatively help explain the low accretion luminosities seen in most low-mass protostars, detailed tests of the mechanism will require model calculations for a range of protostellar masses with some constraint on the

  18. Zooming in on the formation of protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, Åke; Haugbølle, Troels; Küffmeier, Michael

    2014-01-01

    . The accretion rate from a 1.5 solar mass envelope peaks near $10^{-4}$ $\\mspy$ about 6 kyr after sink particle formation and then decays approximately exponentially, reaching $10^{-6}$ $\\mspy$ in 100 kyr. The models suggest universal scalings of physical properties with radius during the main accretion phase...... to less than 1 mG at 100 AU, and drives a time dependent bipolar outflow, with a collimated jet and a broader disk wind....

  19. CONSTRAINED EVOLUTION OF A RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY MIGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Thompson, Christopher [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-12-10

    We consider the inner ∼1 AU of a protoplanetary disk (PPD) at a stage where angular momentum transport is driven by the mixing of a radial magnetic field into the disk from a T Tauri wind. Because the radial profile of the imposed magnetic field is well constrained, a constrained calculation of the disk mass flow becomes possible. The vertical disk profiles obtained in Paper I imply a stronger magnetization in the inner disk, faster accretion, and a secular depletion of the disk material. Inward transport of solids allows the disk to maintain a broad optical absorption layer even when the grain abundance becomes too small to suppress its ionization. Thus, a PPD may show a strong mid- to near-infrared spectral excess even while its mass profile departs radically from the minimum-mass solar nebula. The disk surface density is buffered at ∼30 g cm{sup −2}; below this, X-rays trigger magnetorotational turbulence at the midplane strong enough to loft millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles high in the disk, followed by catastrophic fragmentation. A sharp density gradient bounds the inner depleted disk and propagates outward to ∼1–2 AU over a few megayears. Earth-mass planets migrate through the inner disk over a similar timescale, whereas the migration of Jupiters is limited by the supply of gas. Gas-mediated migration must stall outside 0.04 AU, where silicates are sublimated and the disk shifts to a much lower column. A transition disk emerges when the dust/gas ratio in the MRI-active layer falls below X{sub d} ∼ 10{sup −6} (a{sub d}/μm), where a{sub d} is the grain size.

  20. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96816 (United States); Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Bally, John, E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu [CASA, University of Colorado, CB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ∼9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ∼72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  1. ELECTRON HEATING IN MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR TURBULENCE STRENGTH IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Shoji; Okuzumi, Satoshi, E-mail: mori.s@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan)

    2016-01-20

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the “e-heating zone,” the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out up to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is ∼20 AU in the same disk model. Scaling arguments show that the MRI turbulence in the e-heating zone should have a significantly lower saturation level. Submicron-sized grains in the e-heating zone are so negatively charged that their collisional growth is unlikely to occur. Our present model neglects ambipolar and Hall diffusion, but our estimate shows that ambipolar diffusion would also affect the MRI in the e-heating zone.

  2. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models. II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  3. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models : II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W. -F; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  4. Far-ultraviolet and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks : a grid of models II. Gas diagnostic line emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Kamp, I.; Spaans, M.; Thi, W. -F.; Woitke, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Most of the mass in protoplanetary disks is in the form of gas. The study of the gas and its diagnostics is of fundamental importance in order to achieve a detailed description of the thermal and chemical structure of the disk. Both radiation from the central star (from optical to X-ray

  5. Planetary influence in the gap of a protoplanetary disk: structure formation and an application to V1247 Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Meraz, R.; Nagel, E.; Rendon, F.; Barragan, O.

    2017-10-01

    We present a set of hydrodynamical models of a planetary system embedded in a protoplanetary disk in order to extract the number of dust structures formed in the disk, their masses and sizes, within optical depth ranges τ≤0.5, 0.5SED and is consistent with interferometric observations of structures.

  6. Evolution of protoplanetary disks from their taxonomy in scattered light: Group I vs. Group II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, A.; Meeus, G.; Benisty, M.; Quanz, S. P.; Banzatti, A.; Kama, M.; Canovas, H.; Eiroa, C.; Schmid, H. M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; Rigliaco, E.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M. R.; van Boekel, R.; Dominik, C.

    2017-07-01

    Context. High-resolution imaging reveals a large morphological variety of protoplanetary disks. To date, no constraints on their global evolution have been found from this census. An evolutionary classification of disks was proposed based on their IR spectral energy distribution, with the Group I sources showing a prominent cold component ascribed to an earlier stage of evolution than Group II. Aims: Disk evolution can be constrained from the comparison of disks with different properties. A first attempt at disk taxonomy is now possible thanks to the increasing number of high-resolution images of Herbig Ae/Be stars becoming available. Methods: Near-IR images of six Group II disks in scattered light were obtained with VLT/NACO in polarimetric differential imaging, which is the most efficient technique for imaging the light scattered by the disk material close to the stars. We compare the stellar/disk properties of this sample with those of well-studied Group I sources available from the literature. Results: Three Group II disks are detected. The brightness distribution in the disk of HD 163296 indicates the presence of a persistent ring-like structure with a possible connection with the CO snowline. A rather compact (compact). HD 163296 could be the primordial version of a typical Group I disk. Other Group II disks, like AK Sco and HD 142666, could be smaller counterparts of Group I unable to open cavities as large as those of Group I. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program number 095.C-0658(A).

  7. ON THE COMMONALITY OF 10–30 AU SIZED AXISYMMETRIC DUST STRUCTURES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ke; Bergin, Edwin A.; Schwarz, Kamber R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Blake, Geoffrey A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, MC 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cleeves, L. Ilsedore [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hogerheijde, Michiel; Salinas, Vachail, E-mail: kezhang@umich.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-02-10

    An unsolved problem in step-wise core-accretion planet formation is that rapid radial drift in gas-rich protoplanetary disks should drive millimeter-/meter-sized particles inward to the central star before large bodies can form. One promising solution is to confine solids within small-scale structures. Here, we investigate dust structures in the (sub)millimeter continuum emission of four disks (TW Hya, HL Tau, HD 163296, and DM Tau), a sample of disks with the highest spatial resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations to date. We retrieve the surface brightness distributions using synthesized images and fitting visibilities with analytical functions. We find that the continuum emission of the four disks is ∼axisymmetric but rich in 10–30 AU-sized radial structures, possibly due to physical gaps, surface density enhancements, or localized dust opacity variations within the disks. These results suggest that small-scale axisymmetric dust structures are likely to be common, as a result of ubiquitous processes in disk evolution and planet formation. Compared with recent spatially resolved observations of CO snow lines in these same disks, all four systems show enhanced continuum emission from regions just beyond the CO condensation fronts, potentially suggesting a causal relationship between dust growth/trapping and snow lines.

  8. Evolution of protoplanetary disks: Constraints from DM Tau and GM Aur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Guillot, T.

    2004-11-01

    We present a one-dimensional model of the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks and we confront it with observational constraints from DM Tau and GM Aur, two classical T-Tauri stars with relatively well characterized disks. The disk early formation is modeled as the result of the gravitational collapse of an isothermal molecular cloud and the disk viscous evolution is integrated according to two parameterizations of turbulence: The classical alpha and a beta parameterization, representative of non-linear turbulence driven by the keplerian shear. We perform a systematic Monte-Carlo exploration of the parameter space (values of the alpha-beta parameters and initial angular momentum of the molecular cloud) to find the values that fit the present disk surface density distribution, star and disk masses, age of the systems and their accretion rates. The large incertitude in the observational data allows only an order of magnitude determination of the key parameters for both systems. We find that DM Tau require viscosities characterized by alpha values of 0.003 < alpha < 0.2 while GM Aur requires 3 times lower viscosities. Both disks are also compatible with viscosities applied under the beta parameterization. We show that the mechanism responsible for turbulent diffusion at large orbital distances most probably cannot be convection because of its suppression at low optical depths.

  9. Tomographic Sounding of Protoplanetary and Transitional Disks: Using Inner Disk Variability at Near to Mid-IR Wavelengths to Probe Conditions in the Outer Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Spitzer synoptic monitoring of young stellar associations has demonstrated that variability among young stars and their disks is ubiquitous. The Spitzer studies have been limited by target visibility windows and cover only a short temporal baseline in years. A complementary approach is to focus on stars chosen for high-value observations (e.g. high-contrast imaging, interferometry, or access to wavelengths which are difficult to achieve from the ground) where the synoptic data can augment the imagery or interferometry as well as probing disk structure. In this talk, we discuss how synoptic data for two protoplanetary disks, MWC 480 and HD 163296, constrain the dust disk scale height, account for variable disk illumination, and can be used to locate emission features, such as the IR bands commonly associated with PAHs in the disk, as part of our SOFIA cycle 1 study. Similar variability is now known for several pre-transitional disks, where synoptic data can be used to identify inner disks which are not coplanar with the outer disk, and which may be relicts of giant planet-giant planet scattering events. Despite the logistical difficulties in arranging supporting, coordinated observations in tandem with high-value observations, such data have allowed us to place imagery in context, constrained structures in inner disks not accessible to direct imagery, and may be a tool for identifying systems where planet scattering events have occurred.

  10. Herschel observations of cold water vapor and ammonia in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C.; Kristensen, Lars; Yíldíz, Umut A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a Herschel/HIFI study into the presence of cold water vapor in a sample of protoplanetary disks, carried out as part of the Guaranteed Time Key Program `Water in Star Forming Regions with Herschel' (WISH). While toward most disks only upper limits are obtained, rotational ground-state emission lines of ortho-H_2O and para-H_2O are clearly detected toward the disk of TW Hya. The detection of cold water vapor, extending to at least 115 AU, in this disk indicates the presence of a vast reservoir of water ice totalling ˜ 1028 g or thousands of Earth Oceans. Photodesorption by stellar ultraviolet radiation likely liberates a small amount of water vapor from icy grains. Significant settling of such icy grains toward the disk midplane is required to match the detected amount of water vapor. The water ortho-to-para ratio of 0.77 is significantly different from that observed in Solar System comets where a range of 1.5--3 is found. If this reflects the temperature regime of the water ice (formation), this finding suggests that long-range mixing of volatiles has occured in the Solar Nebula. The same Herschel/HIFI data also detect the emission of NH_3 in TW Hya's disk, and the implications of this finding are discussed.

  11. Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, J A

    2007-05-31

    Planetary systems (ours included) formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner-disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. Although the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star-forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-infrared interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-infrared emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-infrared interferometric observations that probe the gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to the dust, within one astronomical unit (1 au, the Sun-Earth distance) of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapour and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapour is probably produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

  12. Herschel survey and modelling of externally-illuminated photoevaporating protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, J.; Berné, O.; Vicente, S.; Kamp, I.; Le Petit, F.; Gusdorf, A.; Joblin, C.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks undergo substantial mass-loss by photoevaporation, a mechanism that is crucial to their dynamical evolution. However, the processes regulating the gas energetics have not so far been well constrained by observations. Aims: We aim to study the processes involved in disk photoevaporation when it is driven by far-UV photons (i.e. 6 electric effect and cooling by [OI] and [CII] FIR lines. This specific energetic regime is associated to an equilibrium dynamical point of the photoevaporation flow: the mass-loss rate is self-regulated to keep the envelope column density at a value that maintains the temperature at the disk surface around 1000 K. From the physical parameters derived from our best-fit models, we estimate mass-loss rates - of the order of 10-7M⊙/yr - that are in agreement with earlier spectroscopic observation of ionised gas tracers. This holds only if we assume photoevaporation in the supercritical regime where the evaporation flow is launched from the disk surface at sound speed. Conclusions: We have identified the energetic regime regulating FUV-photoevaporation in proplyds. This regime could be implemented into models of the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables of observational data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A69

  13. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. II. Line diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W.-F.; Hogerheijde, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: In this paper, we explore the diagnostic power of the far-IR fine-structure lines of [Oi] 63.2 μm, 145.5 μm, [Cii] 157.7 μm, as well as the radio and sub-mm lines of CO J=1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 in application to disks around Herbig Ae stars. We aim at understanding where the lines originate from, how the line formation process is affected by density, temperature and chemical abundance in the disk, and to what extent non-LTE effects are important. The ultimate aim is to provide a robust way to determine the gas mass of protoplanetary disks from line observations. Methods: We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the physico-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and apply the Monte-Carlo line radiative transfer code Ratran to predict observable line profiles and fluxes. We consider a series of Herbig Ae type disk models ranging from 10-6 M_⊙ to 2.2 × 10-2 M_⊙ (between 0.5 and 700 AU) to discuss the dependency of the line fluxes and ratios on disk mass for otherwise fixed disk parameters. This paper prepares for a more thorough multi-parameter analysis related to the Herschel open time key program Gasps. Results: We find the [Cii] 157.7 μm line to originate in LTE from the surface layers of the disk, where The total emission is dominated by surface area and hence depends strongly on disk outer radius. The [Oi] lines can be very bright (>10-16 W/m2) and form in slightly deeper and closer regions under non-LTE conditions. For low-mass models, the [Oi] lines come preferentially from the central regions of the disk, and the peak separation widens. The high-excitation [Oi] 145.5 μm line, which has a larger critical density, decreases more rapidly with disk mass than the 63.2 μm line. Therefore, the [Oi] 63.2 μm/145.5 μm ratio is a promising disk mass indicator, especially as it is independent of disk outer radius for R_out>200 AU. CO is abundant only in deeper layers AV ⪆ 0.05. For too low disk masses (M_disk⪉10-4~M_⊙) the dust

  14. A possible mechanism to detect super-earth formation in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruobing; Chiang, Eugene; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2017-06-01

    Using combined gas+dust global hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we calculate the distribution of gas and sub-mm-sized dust in protoplanetary disks with a super-Earth at tens of AU, and examine observational signatures of such systems in resolved observations. We confirm previous results that in a typical disk with a low viscosity ($\\alpha\\lesssim10^{-4}$), a super-Earth is able to open two gaps at $\\sim$scale-height away around its orbit in $\\sim$mm-sized dust (St$\\sim$0.01), due to differential dust drift in a perturbed gas background. Additional rings and gaps may also be produced under certain conditions. These features, particularly a signature ``double-gap'' feature, can be detected in a Taurus target by ALMA in dust continuum under an angular resolution of $\\sim0\\arcsec.025$ with two hours of integration. The features are robust --- it can survive in a variety of background disk profiles, withstand modest planetary radial migration ($|r/\\dot{r}|\\sim$ a few Myr), and last for thousands of orbits. Multiple ring/gap systems observed by ALMA were typically modeled using multiple (Saturn-to-Jupiter sized) planets. Here, we argue that a single super-Earth in a low viscosity disk could produce multiple rings and gaps as well. By examining the prevalence of such features in nearby disks, upcoming high angular resolution ALMA surveys may infer how common super-Earth formation events are at tens of au.

  15. Zoom-in Simulations of Protoplanetary Disks Starting from GMC Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffmeier, Michael; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the formation of protoplanetary disks around nine solar-mass stars formed in the context of a (40 pc)3 Giant Molecular Cloud model, using ramses adaptive mesh refinement simulations extending over a scale range of about 4 million, from an outer scale of 40 pc down to cell sizes of 2 au. Our most important result is that the accretion process is heterogeneous in multiple ways: in time, in space, and among protostars of otherwise similar mass. Accretion is heterogeneous in time, in the sense that accretion rates vary during the evolution, with generally decreasing profiles, whose slopes vary over a wide range, and where accretion can increase again if a protostar enters a region with increased density and low speed. Accretion is heterogeneous in space, because of the mass distribution, with mass approaching the accreting star-disk system in filaments and sheets. Finally, accretion is heterogeneous among stars, since the detailed conditions and dynamics in the neighborhood of each star can vary widely. We also investigate the sensitivity of disk formation to physical conditions and test their robustness by varying numerical parameters. We find that disk formation is robust even when choosing the least favorable sink particle parameters, and that turbulence cascading from larger scales is a decisive factor in disk formation. We also investigate the transport of angular momentum, finding that the net inward mechanical transport is compensated for mainly by an outward-directed magnetic transport, with a contribution from gravitational torques usually subordinate to the magnetic transport.

  16. From Dust Grains to Planetesimals: The Importance of the Streaming Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Youdin, Andrew N.; Li, Rixin

    2016-01-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of protoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  17. Ionization of protoplanetary disks by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, and supernova remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuho Kataoka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays and solar protons ionize the present terrestrial atmosphere, and the air showers are simulated by well-tested Monte-Carlo simulations, such as PHITS code. We use the latest version of PHITS to evaluate the possible ionization of protoplanetary disks by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs, solar protons, and by supernova remnants. The attenuation length of GCR ionization is updated as 118 g cm−2, which is approximately 20% larger than the popular value. Hard and soft possible spectra of solar protons give comparable and 20% smaller attenuation lengths compared with those from standard GCR spectra, respectively, while the attenuation length is approximately 10% larger for supernova remnants. Further, all of the attenuation lengths become 10% larger in the compound gas of cosmic abundance, e.g. 128 g cm−2 for GCRs, which can affect the minimum estimate of the size of dead zones in protoplanetary disks when the incident flux is unusually high.

  18. Silicate-SiO reaction in a protoplanetary disk recorded by oxygen isotopes in chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Eizo

    2017-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals and planetary embryos during the earliest stages of the solar protoplanetary disk largely determined the composition and structure of the terrestrial planets. Within a few million years of the birth of the Solar System, chondrule formation and the accretion of the parent bodies of differentiated achondrites and the terrestrial planets took place in the inner protoplanetary disk 1,2 . Here we show that, for chondrules in unequilibrated enstatite chondrites, high-precision Δ17O values (where Δ17O is the deviation of the δ17O value from a terrestrial silicate fractionation line) vary significantly (ranging from -0.49 to +0.84‰) and fall on an array with a steep slope of 1.27 on a three-oxygen-isotope plot. This array can be explained by the reaction between an olivine-rich chondrule melt and an SiO-rich gas derived from vaporized dust and nebular gas. Our study suggests that a large proportion of the building blocks of planetary embryos formed by successive silicate-gas interaction processes: silicate-H2O followed by silicate-SiO interactions under more oxidized and reduced conditions, respectively, within a few million years of the formation of the Solar System.

  19. Modelling the gas and dust of protoplanetary disks in the Herschel-GASPS sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, W. F.; Herschel GASPS Team

    2011-05-01

    We will review the current modelling and data analysis efforts undertaken in the framework of the Herschel-GASPS program. We have simultaneously modelled in details the atomic and molecular gas and dust contents of two TTauri disks (TW Hya^1 and Eta Cha Recx 15^2) and two HerbigAe disks (HD 169142^3 and HD 163296^4). The gas observations were taken as part of the open time key program GaS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS, P.I. Dent^5). The program aims at a systematic study of the gas and dust in over 250 protoplanetary disks. We observed the OI and CII fine-structure emission lines as well as a few high-J CO, OH, CH^+, and water lines. We have complemented the gas constraints with ancilliary data from the literature and from our own observation programs: CO millimetre and H_2 observations, continuum fluxes, optical spectra, etc. The modelling uses the combination of two state-of-the-art codes: the Monte-Carlo continuum radiative transfer code MCFOST^6 and the photo-chemical radiative code ProDiMo^7 for the gas emission. We can provide for the first time consistent estimates of the gas and dust properties. We have calculated a large dedicated grid (DENT grid) for quick comparison and statistical analysis purposes. The gas-to-dust mass ratios range from 0.1 to 1000 and may reflect the large variety of disks. However, the GASPS team has only modelled a handful of objects so far. The modelling of many other objects as well as statistical studies are ongoing. Time permitting, I will present some of the prospects for future research within GASPS.

  20. Water Formation and Destruction by 'Super' X-ray Flares from a T-Tauri Star in a Protoplanetary Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Abygail R.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore

    2018-01-01

    We present models of H2O chemistry is protoplanetary disks in the presence of 'super' X-ray flares emitted by a T-Tauri star. We examine the time-evolving chemistry of H2O at radial locations from 1 to 20 AU at various vertical heights from the mid-plane to the surface of the disk. We find the gas-phase H2O abundance can be enhanced in the surface (Z/R ≥ 0.3) by more than a factor of approximately 3 - 5 by strong flares, i.e., those that increase the ionization rate by a factor of 100. Dissociative recombination of H3O+ , H2O adsorption onto grain, and photolysis of H2O are found to be the three dominant processes leading to a change in H2O abundance. We find X-ray flares have predominantly short- term (days) effects on gaseous H2O abundance, but some regions show a long-term (for the duration of the test about 15 days) decrease in gaseous H2O due to adsorption onto grains, which results in an increase (up to 200%) in ice H2O in regions where ice H2O is 10-8 abundance no are response in the ice is observed.Thanks to the National Science Foundation for funding this research as a part of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Research Experience for Undergraduates (SAO REU).

  1. Structure, stability, and evolution of 3D Rossby vortices in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S.; Barge, P.; Le Dizès, S.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Large-scale persistent vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead zone where no turbulence associated with a magnetic field is expected. These vortices are known to form easily in 2D disks via the Rossby wave or the baroclinic instability. In three dimensions, however, their formation and stability is a complex problem and still a matter of debate. Aims: We study the formation of vortices by the Rossby wave instability in a stratified inviscid disk and describe their 3D structure, stability, and long-term evolution. Methods: Numerical simulations were performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second-order finite volume method. We assumed a perfect-gas law and a non-homentropic adiabatic flow. Results: The Rossby wave instability is found to proceed in 3D in a similar way as in 2D. Vortices produced by the instability look like columns of vorticity in the whole disk thickness; the weak vertical motions are related to the weak inclination of the vortex axis that appears during the development of the RWI. Vortices with aspect ratios higher than 6 are unaffected by the elliptical instability. They relax into a quasi-steady columnar structure that survives hundreds of rotations while slowly migrating inward toward the star at a rate that reduces with the vortex aspect ratio. Vortices with a lower aspect ratio are by contrast affected by the elliptic instability. Short aspect ratio vortices (χ < 4) are completely destroyed in a few orbital periods. Vortices with an intermediate aspect ratio (4 < χ < 6) are partially destroyed by the elliptical instability in a region away from the midplane where the disk stratification is sufficiently strong. Conclusions: Elongated Rossby vortices can survive many orbital periods in protoplanetary disks in the form of vorticity columns. They could play a significant role in the evolution of the gas and the gathering of solid particles to form

  2. Measuring the level of interstellar inheritance in the solar protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Conel M. O'd.; Nittler, Larry R.; Davidson, Jemma; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2017-09-01

    The timing and extent to which the initial interstellar material was thermally processed provide fundamental constraints for models of the formation and early evolution of the solar protoplanetary disk. We argue that the nonsolar (solar Δ17O ≈ -29‰) and near-terrestrial (Δ17O ≈ 0‰) O-isotopic compositions of the Earth and most extraterrestrial materials (Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comet dust) were established very early by heating of regions of the disk that were modestly enriched (dust/gas ≥ 5-10 times solar) in primordial silicates (Δ17O ≈ -29‰) and water-dominated ice (Δ17O ≈ 24‰) relative to the gas. Such modest enrichments could be achieved by grain growth and settling of dust to the midplane in regions where the levels of turbulence were modest. The episodic heating of the disk associated with FU Orionis outbursts were the likely causes of this early thermal processing of dust. We also estimate that at the time of accretion the CI chondrite and interplanetary dust particle parent bodies were composed of 5-10% of pristine interstellar material. The matrices of all chondrites included roughly similar interstellar fractions. Whether this interstellar material avoided the thermal processing experienced by most dust during FU Orionis outbursts or was accreted by the disk after the outbursts ceased to be important remains to be established.

  3. The unusual protoplanetary disk around the T Tauri star ET Chamaeleontis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, P.; Riaz, B.; Duchêne, G.; Pascucci, I.; Lyo, A.-R.; Dent, W. R. F.; Phillips, N.; Thi, W.-F.; Ménard, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Bergin, E.; Brown, A.; Mora, A.; Kamp, I.; Aresu, G.; Brittain, S.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Sandell, G.

    2011-10-01

    We present new continuum and line observations, along with modelling, of the faint (6-8) Myr old T Tauri star ET Cha belonging to the η Chamaeleontis cluster. We have acquired Herschel/PACS photometric fluxes at 70 μm and 160 μm, as well as a detection of the [OI] 63 μm fine-structure line in emission, and derived upper limits for some other far-IR OI, CII, CO and o-H2O lines. These observations were carried out in the frame of the open time key programme GASPS, where ET Cha was selected as one of the science demonstration phase targets. The Herschel data is complemented by new simultaneous ANDICAM B - K photometry, new HST/COS and HST/STIS UV-observations, a non-detection of CO J = 3 → 2 with APEX, re-analysis of a UCLES high-resolution optical spectrum showing forbidden emission lines like [OI] 6300 Å, [SII] 6731 Å and 6716 Å, and [NII] 6583 Å, and a compilation of existing broad-band photometric data. We used the thermo-chemical disk code ProDiMo and the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code MCFOST to model the protoplanetary disk around ET Cha. The paper also introduces a number of physical improvements to the ProDiMo disk modelling code concerning the treatment of PAH ionisation balance and heating, the heating by exothermic chemical reactions, and several non-thermal pumping mechanisms for selected gas emission lines. By applying an evolutionary strategy to minimise the deviations between model predictions and observations, we find a variety of united gas and dust models that simultaneously fit all observed line and continuum fluxes about equally well. Based on these models we can determine the disk dustmass with confidence, Mdust ≈ (2-5) × 10-8 M⊙ whereas the total disk gas mass is found to be only little constrained, Mgas ≈ (5 × 10-5-3 × 10-3) M⊙. Both mass estimates are substantially lower than previously reported. In the models, the disk extends from 0.022 AU (just outside of the co-rotation radius) to only about 10 AU, remarkably small

  4. Ringed Structures of the HD 163296 Protoplanetary Disk Revealed by ALMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Andrea; Guidi, Greta; Testi, Leonardo; Liu, Shangfei; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Weaver, Erik; Boehler, Yann; Carperter, John M; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Manara, Carlo F; Natta, Antonella; Pérez, Laura M; Ricci, Luca; Sargent, Anneila; Tazzari, Marco; Turner, Neal

    2016-12-16

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter and Submillimeter Array observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 that trace the spatial distribution of millimeter-sized particles and cold molecular gas on spatial scales as small as 25 astronomical units (A.U.). The image of the disk recorded in the 1.3 mm continuum emission reveals three dark concentric rings that indicate the presence of dust depleted gaps at about 60, 100, and 160 A.U. from the central star. The maps of the ^{12}CO, ^{13}CO, and C^{18}O J=2-1 emission do not show such structures but reveal a change in the slope of the radial intensity profile across the positions of the dark rings in the continuum image. By comparing the observations with theoretical models for the disk emission, we find that the density of CO molecules is reduced inside the middle and outer dust gaps. However, in the inner ring there is no evidence of CO depletion. From the measurements of the dust and gas densities, we deduce that the gas-to-dust ratio varies across the disk and, in particular, it increases by at least a factor 5 within the inner dust gap compared to adjacent regions of the disk. The depletion of both dust and gas suggests that the middle and outer rings could be due to the gravitational torque exerted by two Saturn-mass planets orbiting at 100 and 160 A.U. from the star. On the other hand, the inner dust gap could result from dust accumulation at the edge of a magnetorotational instability dead zone, or from dust opacity variations at the edge of the CO frost line. Observations of the dust emission at higher angular resolution and of molecules that probe dense gas are required to establish more precisely the origins of the dark rings observed in the HD 163296 disk.

  5. Far-infrared HD emission as a measure of protoplanetary disk mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapman, L.; Miotello, A.; Kama, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bruderer, S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Protoplanetary disks around young stars are the sites of planet formation. While the dust mass can be estimated using standard methods, determining the gas mass - and thus the amount of material available to form giant planets - has proven to be very difficult. Hydrogen deuteride (HD) is a promising alternative to the commonly used gas mass tracer, carbon monoxide. However, the potential of HD has not yet been investigated with models incorporating both HD and CO isotopologue-specific chemistry, and its sensitivity to uncertainties in disk parameters has not yet been quantified. Aims: We examine the robustness of HD as tracer of the disk gas mass, specifically the effect of gas mass on HD far-infrared emission and its sensitivity to the vertical structure. Also, we seek to provide requirements for future far-infrared missions such as SPICA. Methods: Deuterium chemistry reactions relevant for HD were implemented in the thermochemical code DALI and more than 160 disk models were run for a range of disk masses and vertical structures. Results: The HD J = 1-0 line intensity depends directly on the gas mass through a sublinear power law relation with a slope of 0.8. Assuming no prior knowledge about the vertical structure of a disk and using only the HD 1-0 flux, gas masses can be estimated to within a factor of two for low mass disks (Mdisk ≤ 10-3M⊙). For more massive disks, this uncertainty increases to more than an order of magnitude. Adding the HD 2-1 line or independent information about the vertical structure can reduce this uncertainty to a factor of 3 for all disk masses. For TW Hya, using the radial and vertical structure from the literature, the observations constrain the gas mass to 6 × 10-3M⊙ ≤ Mdisk ≤ 9 × 10-3M⊙. Future observations require a 5σ sensitivity of 1.8 × 10-20 W m-2 (2.5 × 10-20 W m-2) and a spectral resolving power R ≥ 300 (1000) to detect HD 1-0 (HD 2-1) for all disk masses above 10-5M⊙ with a line

  6. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woitke, P; Min, M; Pinte, C; Thi, W. -F; Kamp, I; Rab, C; Anthonioz, F; Antonellini, S; Baldovin-Saavea, C; Carmona, A; Dominik, C; Dionatos, O; Greaves, J; Güdel, M; Ilee, J. D; Liebhart, A; Ménard, F; Rigon, L; Waters, L. B. F. M; Aresu, G; Meijerink, R; Spaans, M

    2016-01-01

    ..., and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs...

  7. GASPS--A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, W.R.F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Williams, J. P.; Menard, F.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D.; Aresu, G.; Augereau, J.-C.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted approx. 250 young stars in narrow wavelength regions covering the [OI] fine structure line at 63 micron the brightest far-infrared line in such objects. A subset of the brightest targets were also surveyed in [OI]145 micron, [CII] at 157 µm, as well as several transitions of H2O and high-excitation CO lines at selected wavelengths between 78 and 180 micron. Additionally, GASPS included continuum photometry at 70, 100 and 160 micron, around the peak of the dust emission. The targets were SED Class II– III T Tauri stars and debris disks from seven nearby young associations, along with a comparable sample of isolated Herbig AeBe stars. The aim was to study the global gas and dust content in a wide sample of circumstellar disks, combining the results with models in a systematic way. In this overview paper we review the scientific aims, target selection and observing strategy of the program. We summarize some of the initial results, showing line identifications, listing the detections, and giving a first statistical study of line detectability. The [OI] line at 63 micron was the brightest line seen in almost all objects, by a factor of 10. Overall [OI] 63 micron detection rates were 49%, with 100% of HAeBe stars and 43% of T Tauri stars detected. A comparison with published disk dust masses (derived mainly from sub-mm continuum, assuming standard values of the mm mass opacity) shows a dust mass threshold for [OI] 63 µm detection of approx.10(exp -5) Solar M.. Normalizing to a distance of 140 pc, 84% of objects with dust masses =10 (exp -5) Solar M can be detected in this line in the present survey; 32% of those of mass 10(exp -6) – 10 (exp -5) Solar M, and only a very small number

  8. GASPS—A Herschel Survey of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks: Summary and Initial Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Williams, J. P.; Menard, F.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D.; Aresu, G.; Augereau, J.-C.; Barrado y Navascues, D.; Brittain, S.; Carmona, A.; Ciardi, D.; Danchi, W.; Donaldson, J.; Duchene, G.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; Grady, C.; de Gregorio-Molsalvo, I.; Howard, C.; Huélamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Mathews, G.; Meeus, G.; Mendigutía, I.; Montesinos, B.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Mora, A.; Nomura, H.; Pantin, E.; Pascucci, I.; Phillips, N.; Pinte, C.; Podio, L.; Ramsay, S. K.; Riaz, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Roberge, A.; Sandell, G.; Solano, E.; Tilling, I.; Torrelles, J. M.; Vandenbusche, B.; Vicente, S.; White, G. J.; Woitke, P.

    2013-05-01

    We describe a large-scale far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary disk through to young debris disk systems carried out using the ACS instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This Open Time Key program, known as GASPS (Gas Survey of Protoplanetary Systems), targeted ~250 young stars in narrow wavelength regions covering the [OI] fine structure line at 63 μm the brightest far-infrared line in such objects. A subset of the brightest targets were also surveyed in [OI]145 μm, [CII] at 157 μm, as well as several transitions of H2O and high-excitation CO lines at selected wavelengths between 78 and 180 μm. Additionally, GASPS included continuum photometry at 70, 100 and 160 μm, around the peak of the dust emission. The targets were SED Class II-III T Tauri stars and debris disks from seven nearby young associations, along with a comparable sample of isolated Herbig AeBe stars. The aim was to study the global gas and dust content in a wide sample of circumstellar disks, combining the results with models in a systematic way. In this overview paper we review the scientific aims, target selection and observing strategy of the program. We summarise some of the initial results, showing line identifications, listing the detections, and giving a first statistical study of line detectability. The [OI] line at 63 μm was the brightest line seen in almost all objects, by a factor of ~10. Overall [OI]63 μm detection rates were 49%, with 100% of HAeBe stars and 43% of T Tauri stars detected. A comparison with published disk dust masses (derived mainly from sub-mm continuum, assuming standard values of the mm mass opacity) shows a dust mass threshold for [OI]63 μm detection of ~10-5 Msolar. Normalising to a distance of 140 pc, 84% of objects with dust masses >=10-5 Msolar can be detected in this line in the present survey; 32% of those of mass 10-6-10-5 Msolar, and only a very small number of unusual objects with lower masses can be detected. This is

  9. Does Intrinsic T Tauri X-Ray Luminosity Control Protoplanetary Disk Evolution and Planet Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2013-09-01

    Surveys of young clusters have found a surprisingly large X-ray luminosity spread among otherwise similar T Tauri stars - by more than two orders of magnitude. It cannot be explained by flares or variability on timescales of < 10 days, and points to large intrinsic Lx differences. T Tauri X-rays and associated energetic particles dominate the ionization of protoplanetary disks, driving MHD turbulent viscosity, accretion and photoevaporation. The types of planets formed in coagulation models depends on the viscosity, implying the X-ray luminosity of the star determines the outcome of planet formation. We propose a crucial test of this: whether Chandra observations of young clusters that have been observed at least twice, years apart, reveal larger Lx variations on longer timescales.

  10. Evidence for a late supernova injection of 60Fe into the protoplanetary disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Ulfbeck, David; Trinquier, Anne; Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James N; Meyer, Bradley S

    2007-05-25

    High-precision 60Fe-60Ni isotope data show that most meteorites originating from differentiated planetesimals that accreted within 1 million years of the solar system's formation have 60Ni/58Ni ratios that are approximately 25 parts per million lower than samples from Earth, Mars, and chondrite parent bodies. This difference indicates that the oldest solar system planetesimals formed in the absence of 60Fe. Evidence for live 60Fe in younger objects suggests that 60Fe was injected into the protoplanetary disk approximately 1 million years after solar system formation, when 26Al was already homogeneously distributed. Decoupling the first appearance of 26Al and 60Fe constrains the environment where the Sun's formation could have taken place, indicating that it occurred in a dense stellar cluster in association with numerous massive stars.

  11. Survey of Cold Water Lines in Protoplanetary Disks: Indications of Systematic Volatile Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin Anthony; Hogerheijde, Michiel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Blake, Geoff; Bruderer, Simon; Cleeves, Ilse; Dominik, Carsten; Fedele, Davide; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pearson, John; Yıldız, Umut

    2017-06-01

    We performed very deep searches for 2 ground-state water transitions in 13 protoplanetary disks with the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory, with integration times up to 12 hr per line. We also searched for, with shallower integrations, two other water transitions that sample warmer gas. The detection rate is low, and the upper limits provided by the observations are generally much lower than predictions of thermo-chemical models with canonical inputs. One ground-state transition is newly detected in the stacked spectrum of AA Tau, DM Tau, LkCa 15, and MWC 480. We run a grid of models to show that the abundance of gas-phase oxygen needs to be reduced by a factor of at least ∼ 100 to be consistent with the observational upper limits (and positive detections) if a dust-to-gas mass ratio of 0.01 were to be assumed. As a continuation of previous ideas, we propose that the underlying reason for the depletion of oxygen (hence the low detection rate) is the freeze-out of volatiles such as water and CO onto dust grains followed by grain growth and settling/migration, which permanently removes these gas-phase molecules from the emissive upper layers of the outer disk. Such depletion of volatiles is likely ubiquitous among different disks, though not necessarily to the same degree. The volatiles might be returned back to the gas phase in the inner disk (≲ 15 au), which is consistent with current constraints. Comparison with studies on disk dispersal due to photoevaporation indicates that the timescale for volatile depletion is shorter than that of photoevaporation.

  12. ARE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BORN WITH VORTICES? ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY PROTOSTELLAR INFALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee [Deptartment of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: jaehbae@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: zhuzh@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We carry out two-fluid, two-dimensional global hydrodynamic simulations to test whether protostellar infall can trigger the Rossby wave instability (RWI) in protoplanetry disks. Our results show that infall can trigger the RWI and generate vortices near the outer edge of the mass landing on the disk (i.e., centrifugal radius). We find that the RWI is triggered under a variety of conditions, although the details depend on the disk parameters and the infall pattern. The common key feature of triggering the RWI is the steep radial gradient of the azimuthal velocity induced by the local increase in density at the outer edge of the infall region. Vortices form when the instability enters the nonlinear regime. In our standard model where self-gravity is neglected, vortices merge together to a single vortex within ∼20 local orbital times, and the merged vortex survives for the remaining duration of the calculation (>170 local orbital times). The vortex takes part in outward angular momentum transport, with a Reynolds stress of ≲10{sup −2}. Our two-fluid calculations show that vortices efficiently trap dust particles with stopping times of the order of the orbital time, locally enhancing the dust to gas ratio for particles of the appropriate size by a factor of ∼40 in our standard model. When self-gravity is considered, however, vortices tend to be impeded from merging and may eventually dissipate. We conclude it may well be that protoplanetary disks have favorable conditions for vortex formation during the protostellar infall phase, which might enhance early planetary core formation.

  13. CO/H{sub 2} abundance ratio ≈ 10{sup –4} in a protoplanetary disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin; McJunkin, Matthew [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Penton, Steven V., E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The relative abundances of atomic and molecular species in planet-forming disks around young stars provide important constraints on photochemical disk models and provide a baseline for calculating disk masses from measurements of trace species. A knowledge of absolute abundances, those relative to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), are challenging because of the weak rovibrational transition ladder of H{sub 2} and the inability to spatially resolve different emission components within the circumstellar environment. To address both of these issues, we present new contemporaneous measurements of CO and H{sub 2} absorption through the 'warm molecular layer' of the protoplanetary disk around the Classical T Tauri Star RW Aurigae A. We use a newly commissioned observing mode of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to detect warm H{sub 2} absorption in this region for the first time. An analysis of the emission and absorption spectrum of RW Aur shows components from the accretion region near the stellar photosphere, the molecular disk, and several outflow components. The warm H{sub 2} and CO absorption lines are consistent with a disk origin. We model the 1092-1117 Å spectrum of RW Aur to derive log{sub 10} N(H{sub 2}) = 19.90{sub −0.22}{sup +0.33} cm{sup –2} at T {sub rot}(H{sub 2}) = 440 ± 39 K. The CO A - X bands observed from 1410 to 1520 Å are best fit by log{sub 10} N(CO) = 16.1 {sub −0.5}{sup +0.3} cm{sup –2} at T {sub rot}(CO) = 200{sub −125}{sup +650} K. Combining direct measurements of the H I, H{sub 2}, and CO column densities, we find a molecular fraction in the warm disk surface of f {sub H2} ≥ 0.47 and derive a molecular abundance ratio of CO/H{sub 2} = 1.6{sub −1.3}{sup +4.7} × 10{sup –4}, both consistent with canonical interstellar dense cloud values.

  14. Observations and modelling of CO and [C i] in protoplanetary disks. First detections of [C i] and constraints on the carbon abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Güsten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J. -P; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The gas-solid budget of carbon in protoplanetary disks is related to the composition of the cores and atmospheres of the planets forming in them. The principal gas-phase carbon carriers CO, C0, and C+ can now be observed regularly in disks. Aims: The gas-phase carbon abundance in disks has

  15. Sensitive limits on the abundance of cold water vapor in the DM Tauri protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, E. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Brinch, C.; Fogel, J.; Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bell, T. A.; Blake, G. A.; Cernicharo, J.; Dominik, C.; Lis, D.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Panić, O.; Pearson, J. C.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Caselli, P.; Codella, C.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Herpin, F.; Jacq, T.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Larsson, B.; Liseau, R.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Nisini, B.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Tafalla, M.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wyrowski, F.; van der Tak, F.; Jellema, W.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hartogh, P.; Stützki, J.; Szczerba, R.

    2010-10-01

    We performed a sensitive search for the ground-state emission lines of ortho- and para-water vapor in the DM Tau protoplanetary disk using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. No strong lines are detected down to 3σ levels in 0.5 km s-1 channels of 4.2 mK for the 110-101 line and 12.6 mK for the 111-000 line. We report a very tentative detection, however, of the 110-101 line in the wide band spectrometer, with a strength of Tmb = 2.7 mK, a width of 5.6 km s-1 and an integrated intensity of 16.0 mK km s-1. The latter constitutes a 6σ detection. Regardless of the reality of this tentative detection, model calculations indicate that our sensitive limits on the line strengths preclude efficient desorption of water in the UV illuminated regions of the disk. We hypothesize that more than 95-99% of the water ice is locked up in coagulated grains that have settled to the midplane. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with participation important from NASA.

  16. Effects of discrete stochastic charging of dust grains in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, K. S.; Esparza, S.; Xiang, C.; Matthews, L.; Carballido, A.; Hyde, T.; Shotorban, B.

    2017-10-01

    The stochastic nature of grain charging can play a significant role in the development of dust aggregate structure when the grains have a small charge. In this work, we use a model of discrete stochastic charging to calculate time-dependent electric charging of dust aggregates. We compare the electron and ion currents to micron and submicron aggregate grains, which consist of spherical monomers, to the currents to spherical grains of equivalent mass. The average charge and charge distribution are compared for aggregates composed of different monomer sizes. The aggregate morphology (whether the grain is compact or porous) affects the amount of charge collected and the available surface area for recombination on dust grains. Thus, the aggregate morphology as well as the dust fraction can affect the overall ionization balance in a plasma. The implications of our results for non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics in protoplanetary disks are briefly discussed in terms of the effect of disk ionization fraction and chemical networks. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1414523.

  17. Non-linear development of secular gravitational instability in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Ryosuke T.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.

    2018-01-01

    We perform non-linear simulation of secular gravitational instability (GI) in protoplanetary disks, which has been proposed as a mechanism of planetesimal and multiple ring formation. Since the timescale of the growth of the secular GI is much longer than the Keplerian rotation period, we develop a new numerical scheme for a long-term calculation utilizing the concept of symplectic integration. With our new scheme, we first investigate the non-linear development of the secular GI in a disk without a pressure gradient in the initial state. We find that the surface density of dust increases by more than a factor of 100 while that of gas does not increase even by a factor of 2, which results in the formation of dust-dominated rings. A line mass of the dust ring tends to be very close to the critical line mass of a self-gravitating isothermal filament. Our results indicate that the non-linear growth of the secular GI provides a powerful mechanism to concentrate the dust. We also find that the dust ring formed via the non-linear growth of the secular GI migrates inward with a low velocity, which is driven by the self-gravity of the ring. We give a semi-analytical expression for the inward migration speed of the dusty ring.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR THE OBSERVATION OF LIGHTNING IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS USING ION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muranushi, Takayuki [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science,7-1-26, Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan); Nomura, Hideko; Okuzumi, Satoshi, E-mail: takayuki.muranushi@riken.jp, E-mail: eiji.akiyama@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: nomura@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2015-12-20

    In this paper, we propose observational methods for detecting lightning in protoplanetary disks. We do so by calculating the critical electric field strength in the lightning matrix gas (LMG), the parts of the disk where the electric field is strong enough to cause lightning. That electric field accelerates multiple positive ion species to characteristic terminal velocities. In this paper, we present three distinct discharge models with corresponding critical electric fields. We simulate the position–velocity diagrams and the integrated emission maps for the models. We calculate the measure-of-sensitivity values for detection of the models and for distinguishing between the models. At the distance of TW Hya (54 pc), LMG that occupies 2π in azimuth and has 25 AU < r < 50 AU is detectable at 1200σ to 4000σ. The lower limits of the radii of 5σ-detectable LMG clumps are between 1.6 AU and 5.3 AU, depending on the models.

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE INSTABILITY DUE TO GAS–DUST FRICTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen, E-mail: m.shadmehri@gu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Golestan University, Gorgan 49138-15739 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    We study the stability of a dust layer in a gaseous disk subject to linear axisymmetric perturbations. Instead of considering single-size particles, however, the population of dust particles is assumed to consist of two grain species. Dust grains exchange momentum with the gas via the drag force and their self-gravity is also considered. We show that the presence of two grain sizes can increase the efficiency of the linear growth of drag-driven instability in the protoplanetary disks (PPDs). A second dust phase with a small mass, compared to the first dust phase, would reduce the growth timescale by a factor of two or more, especially when its coupling to the gas is weak. This means that once a certain amount of large dust particles form, even though it is much smaller than that of small dust particles, the dust layer becomes more unstable and dust clumping is accelerated. Thus, the presence of dust particles of various sizes must be considered in studies of dust clumping in PPDs where both large and small dust grains are present.

  20. Analytic Expressions for the Inner-rim Structure of Passively Heated Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Flock, Mario, E-mail: t_ueda@geo.titech.ac.jp [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We analytically derive the expressions for the structure of the inner region of protoplanetary disks based on the results from the recent hydrodynamical simulations. The inner part of a disk can be divided into four regions: a dust-free region with a gas temperature in the optically thin limit, an optically thin dust halo, an optically thick condensation front, and the classical, optically thick region, in order from the innermost to the outermost. We derive the dust-to-gas mass ratio profile in the dust halo using the fact that partial dust condensation regulates the temperature relative to the dust evaporation temperature. Beyond the dust halo, there is an optically thick condensation front where all the available silicate gas condenses out. The curvature of the condensation surface is determined by the condition that the surface temperature must be nearly equal to the characteristic temperature ∼1200 K. We derive the midplane temperature in the outer two regions using the two-layer approximation, with the additional heating by the condensation front for the outermost region. As a result, the overall temperature profile is step-like, with steep gradients at the borders between the outer three regions. The borders might act as planet traps where the inward migration of planets due to gravitational interaction with the gas disk stops. The temperature at the border between the two outermost regions coincides with the temperature needed to activate magnetorotational instability, suggesting that the inner edge of the dead zone must lie at this border. The radius of the dead zone inner edge predicted from our solution is ∼2–3 times larger than that expected from the classical optically thick temperature.

  1. Impact of Ice on Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks and Formation of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, William; Gorti, Uma

    2018-01-01

    We use a 1+1D model of disk evolution, where gas and dust evolve under the influence of viscous evolution and photoevaporation. Planetesimal formation is simulated using a simple criterion for triggering the streaming instability. We modeled the disk around a young M3 star of mass 0.25M⊙, a characteristic Milky Way main sequence star. We carried out simulations of the disk with and without water ice to determine the impact of ice on the formation of planetesimals and retention of solids in the disk, but found little impact of ice, leading to the conclusion that the presence of ice alone does not significantly facilitate planetesimal growth in these models. The majority of initial dust in the disk drifts into the star. We investigated the range of possible viscous parameter (α) values and photoevaporation mass loss rates (M'pe) that could mitigate the drift problem. Both these values were treated as free parameters constant in time. We varied α between 10-4 and 10-2 M'pe between 10-10 and 10-7 M⊙/yr. Based on estimated disk lifetimes between 2 and 6 Myr, and estimated solid retention rates of 30-70% from the literature, we determined the range of α and M'pe for which this is possible. Results indicate a region of overlap exists, in which the disk evolves into planetesimals totaling tens of Earth masses. This region is defined by α in the range [7x10-4, 3x10-3] and M'pe in the range [2x10-8, 8x10-8] M⊙/yr.

  2. Electron Heating and Saturation of Self-regulating Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shoji; Muranushi, Takayuki; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2017-11-01

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) has the potential to generatevigorous turbulence in protoplanetary disks, although its turbulence strength and accretion stress remain debatable because of the uncertainty of MRI with a low ionization fraction. We focus on the heating of electrons by strong electric fields, which amplifies nonideal magnetohydrodynamic effects. The heated electrons frequently collide with and stick to dust grains, which in turn decreases the ionization fraction and is expected to weaken the turbulent motion driven by MRI. In order to quantitatively investigate the nonlinear evolution of MRI, including the electron heating, we perform magnetohydrodynamical simulation with the unstratified shearing box. We introduce a simple analytic resistivity model depending on the current density by mimicking the resistivity given by the calculation of ionization. Our simulation confirms that the electron heating suppresses magnetic turbulence when the electron heating occurs with low current density. We find a clear correlation between magnetic stress and current density, which means that the magnetic stress is proportional to the squared current density. When the turbulent motion is completely suppressed, laminar accretion flow is caused by an ordered magnetic field. We give an analytical description of the laminar stateusing a solution of linear perturbation equations with resistivity. We also propose a formula that successfully predicts the accretion stress in the presence of the electron heating.

  3. Polarimetric Imaging Of Protoplanetary Disks From The Optical To Sub-Mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Jos; Ménard, F.; Pinte, C.; van der Plas, G.; Snik, F.

    2017-10-01

    To learn how planets form from the smallest building blocks within protoplanetary disks, we first need to know how dust grains grow from micron to mm sizes. Polarimetry across the spectrum has proven to be sensitive to grain properties like dust size distribution and composition and thus can be used to characterize the scattering grains. However, polarization measured with radio interferometric arrays is rarely studied in concert with optical polarimetry. Our team has successfully calibrated the NIR polarimetric imaging mode of VLT/SPHERE, hence upgrading the instrument from a high-contrast imager to a robust tool for quantitative characterization. In this presentation, we will discuss which lessons can be learned by comparing polarimetry in the optical and sub-mm and explore for which science cases both techniques can complement each other. When we combine the polarimetric capabilities of the most advanced optical high-contrast imagers (e.g., Gemini GPI or VLT SPHERE) with that of ALMA we will be able to study the spatial distribution of an extensive range of different grains, which allows us to take an essential step towards a deeper understanding of planet formation.

  4. An ALMA Survey of DCN/H13CN and DCO+/H13CO+ in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jane; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Furuya, Kenji; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Loomis, Ryan A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Wilner, David J.

    2017-02-01

    The deuterium enrichment of molecules is sensitive to their formation environment. Constraining patterns of deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks is therefore useful for probing how material is inherited or reprocessed throughout the stages of star and planet formation. We present ALMA observations at ˜0.″6 resolution of DCO+, H13CO+, DCN, and H13CN in the full disks around T Tauri stars AS 209 and IM Lup, in the transition disks around T Tauri stars V4046 Sgr and LkCa 15, and in the full disks around Herbig Ae stars MWC 480 and HD 163296. We also present ALMA observations of HCN in the IM Lup disk. DCN, DCO+, and H13CO+ are detected in all disks, and H13CN in all but the IM Lup disk. We find efficient deuterium fractionation for the sample, with estimates of disk-averaged DCO+/HCO+ and DCN/HCN abundance ratios ranging from ˜0.02-0.06 and ˜0.005-0.08, respectively, which is comparable to values reported for other interstellar environments. The relative distributions of DCN and DCO+ vary between disks, suggesting that multiple formation pathways may be needed to explain the diverse emission morphologies. In addition, gaps and rings observed in both H13CO+ and DCO+ emission provide new evidence that DCO+ bears a complex relationship with the location of the midplane CO snowline.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ALMA survey of protoplanetary disks in sigma Ori (Ansdell+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; Manara, C. F.; Miotello, A.; Facchini, S.; van der Marel, N.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-08-01

    Our sample consists of the 92 Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in σ Orionis with infrared excesses consistent with the presence of a protoplanetary disk. hese sources are identified by cross-matching the Class II and transition disk (TD) candidates from the Spitzer survey of Hernandez et al. 2007 (Cat. J/ApJ/662/1067) with the Mayrit catalog (Caballero 2008, Cat. J/A+A/478/667). Both catalogs are expected to be complete down to the brown dwarf limit. Disk classifications are based on the Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) slope, as described in Hernandez et al. 2007 (Cat. J/ApJ/662/1067). We also include in our sample a Class I disk (source 1153), as it is located near the Spitzer/IRAC color cutoff for Class II disks. Our Band 6 Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) observations were obtained on 2016 July 30 and 31 during Cycle 3 (Project ID: 2015.1.00089.S; PI: Williams). The array configuration used 36 and 37 12m antennas on July 30 and 31, respectively, with baselines of 15-1124m on both runs. The correlator setup included two broadband continuum windows centered on 234.293 and 216.484GHz with bandwidths of 2.000 and 1.875GHz and channel widths of 15.625 and 0.976MHz, respectively. The bandwidth-weighted mean continuum frequency was 225.676GHz (1.33mm). The spectral windows covered the 12CO (230.538GHz), 13CO (220.399GHz), and C18O (219.560GHz) J=2-1 transitions at velocity resolutions of 0.16-0.17km/s. These spectral windows were centered on 230.531, 220.392, and 219.554GHz with bandwidths of 11.719MHz and channel widths of 0.122MHz. On-source integration times were 1.2 minutes per object for an average continuum rms of 0.15mJy/beam (Table1). This sensitivity was based on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT)/Submillimeter Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA)-2 survey of σ Orionis disks by Williams et al. 2013 (Cat. J/MNRAS/435/1671), who found that stacking their individual non-detections revealed a mean 850

  6. X-Ray-induced Deuterium Enrichment of N-rich Organics in Protoplanetary Disks: An Experimental Investigation Using Synchrotron Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, Lisseth; Remusat, Laurent; Roskosz, Mathieu; Popescu, Horia; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sandt, Christophe; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas; Simionovici, Alexandre; Lemaire, Jean Louis; Mangin, Denis; Carrasco, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    The deuterium enrichment of organics in the interstellar medium, protoplanetary disks, and meteorites has been proposed to be the result of ionizing radiation. The goal of this study is to simulate and quantify the effects of soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV), an important component of stellar radiation fields illuminating protoplanetary disks, on the refractory organics present in the disks. We prepared tholins, nitrogen-rich organic analogs to solids found in several astrophysical environments, e.g., Titan’s atmosphere, cometary surfaces, and protoplanetary disks, via plasma deposition. Controlled irradiation experiments with soft X-rays at 0.5 and 1.3 keV were performed at the SEXTANTS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, and were immediately followed by ex-situ infrared, Raman, and isotopic diagnostics. Infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential loss of singly bonded groups (N-H, C-H, and R-N≡C) and the formation of sp3 carbon defects with signatures at ˜1250-1300 cm-1. Raman analysis revealed that, while the length of polyaromatic units is only slightly modified, the introduction of defects leads to structural amorphization. Finally, tholins were measured via secondary ion mass spectrometry to quantify the D, H, and C elemental abundances in the irradiated versus non-irradiated areas. Isotopic analysis revealed that significant D-enrichment is induced by X-ray irradiation. Our results are compared to previous experimental studies involving the thermal degradation and electron irradiation of organics. The penetration depth of soft X-rays in μm-sized tholins leads to volume rather than surface modifications: lower-energy X-rays (0.5 keV) induce a larger D-enrichment than 1.3 keV X-rays, reaching a plateau for doses larger than 5 × 1027 eV cm-3. Synchrotron fluences fall within the expected soft X-ray fluences in protoplanetary disks, and thus provide evidence of a new non-thermal pathway to deuterium fractionation of organic matter.

  7. CO emission tracing a warp or radial flow within ≲100 au in the HD 100546 protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine; Daley, Cail; Facchini, Stefano; Juhász, Attila

    2017-11-01

    We present spatially resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) images of 12CO J = 3-2 emission from the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae star, HD 100546. We expand upon earlier analyses of this data and model the spatially-resolved kinematic structure of the CO emission. Assuming a velocity profile which prescribes a flat or flared emitting surface in Keplerian rotation, we uncover significant residuals with a peak of ≈7δv, where δv = 0.21 km s-1 is the width of a single spectral resolution element. The shape and extent of the residuals reveal the possible presence of a severely warped and twisted inner disk extending to at most 100 au. Adapting the model to include a misaligned inner gas disk with (I) an inclination almost edge-on to the line of sight, and (II) a position angle almost orthogonal to that of the outer disk reduces the residuals to speeds and inwards of ≈50 au results in residuals of ≈4δv. Hence, the model including a radial velocity component only does not reproduce the data as well as that including a twisted and misaligned inner gas disk. Molecular emission data at a higher spatial resolution (of order 10 au) are required to further constrain the kinematics within ≲100 au. HD 100546 joins several other protoplanetary disks for which high spectral resolution molecular emission shows that the gas velocity structure cannot be described by a purely Keplerian velocity profile with a universal inclination and position angle. Regardless of the process, the most likely cause is the presence of an unseen planetary companion.

  8. Sensitive limits on the abundance of cold water vapor in the DM Tauri protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergin, E. A.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Brinch, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We performed a sensitive search for the ground-state emission lines of ortho- and para-water vapor in the DM Tau protoplanetary disk using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. No strong lines are detected down to 3σ levels in 0.5 km s-1 channels of 4.2 mK for the 110-101 line and 12.6 mK for the 111......, model calculations indicate that our sensitive limits on the line strengths preclude efficient desorption of water in the UV illuminated regions of the disk. We hypothesize that more than 95-99% of the water ice is locked up in coagulated grains that have settled to the midplane. Herschel is an ESA...

  9. Calcium and titanium isotope fractionation in refractory inclusions: Tracers of condensation and inheritance in the early solar protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Schauble, E. A.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2017-08-01

    Measured and modeled Ca and Ti isotopic fractionation effects in a diverse suite of refractory inclusions are used to understand processes of condensation in the solar protoplanetary disk where they and their precursor materials formed. This coordinated approach reveals largely decoupled isotopic signatures and implies that few, if any, of the studied inclusions can be considered primary condensates. All studied inclusions are enriched in light Ca isotopes (∼-0.2 to - 2.8 ‰ /amu), but only two show correspondingly light Ti isotopes. Studied inclusions exhibit both heavy and light Ti isotope enrichments (∼0.3 to - 0.4 ‰ /amu). These refractory element isotopic signatures, therefore, suggest admixture and reprocessing of earlier formed materials with distinct condensation histories. Along with coordinated measurements of 50Ti isotopic anomalies, which span a range from ∼0 to ∼40 epsilon-unit excesses, the comparison of measured and modeled fractionation of Ca and Ti isotopes provides a powerful approach to understanding primitive nebular processes and environments in the protoplanetary disk. Remarkable evidence for Ca isotopic zoning within a typical Type B1 inclusion exemplifies the potential record of the earliest solar nebula that is likely lost and/or overprinted in the isotopic compositions of more volatile elements (e.g., Mg, Si, and O) by later modification processes.

  10. Terrestrial planet formation in a protoplanetary disk with a local mass depletion: A successful scenario for the formation of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Univ. Estadual Paulista - Grupo de Dinâmica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratinguetá, CEP 12.516-410, São Paulo (Brazil); Haghighipour, N. [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Tsuchida, M., E-mail: izidoro@feg.unesp.br, E-mail: nader@ifa.hawaii.edu [UNESP, Univ. Estadual Paulista, DCCE-IBILCE, São José do Rio Preto, CEP 15.054-000, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-02-10

    Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ∼ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system, or alternately, if the protoplanetary disk is truncated at 1.0 AU, simulations have been able to produce Mars-like bodies in the correct location. In this paper, we examine an alternative scenario for the formation of Mars in which a local depletion in the density of the protosolar nebula results in a non-uniform formation of planetary embryos and ultimately the formation of Mars-sized planets around 1.5 AU. We have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the formation of terrestrial planets in such a disk for different scales of the local density depletion, and for different orbital configurations of the giant planets. Our simulations point to the possibility of the formation of Mars-sized bodies around 1.5 AU, specifically when the scale of the disk local mass-depletion is moderately high (50%-75%) and Jupiter and Saturn are initially in their current orbits. In these systems, Mars-analogs are formed from the protoplanetary materials that originate in the regions of disk interior or exterior to the local mass-depletion. Results also indicate that Earth-sized planets can form around 1 AU with a substantial amount of water accreted via primitive water-rich planetesimals and planetary embryos. We present the results of our study and discuss their implications for the formation of terrestrial planets in our solar system.

  11. Molecular diagnostics of FUV and accretion-related heating in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamkovics, Mate; Najita, Joan R.

    2017-10-01

    Emission lines from the terrestrial planet forming regions of disks are diagnostic of both the physical processes that heat the gas and the chemistry that determines the inventory of nebular material available during the epoch of planet formation. Interpreting emission spectra is informed by models of radiative, thermal, physical, and chemical processes, such as: (i) the radiation transfer of X-rays and FUV --- both continuum and Ly-alpha, (ii) direct and indirect heating processes such as the photoelectric effect and photochemical heating, (iii) heating related to turbulent processes and viscous dissipation, and (iv) gas phase chemical reaction kinetics. Many of these processes depend on a the spatial distribution of dust grains and their properties, which temporally evolve during the lifetime of the disk and the formation of planets. Studies of disks atmospheres often predict a layered structure of hot (a few thousand K) atomic gas overlying warm (a few hundred K) molecular gas, which is generally consistent with the isothermal slab emission models that are used to interpret emission spectra. However, detailed comparison between observed spectra and models (e.g., comparing the total columns and the radial extent of warm emitting species) is rare.We present results including the implementation of Ly-alpha scattering, which is an important part of the photochemical heating and FUV heating radiation budget. By including these processes we find a new component of the disk atmosphere; hot molecular gas at ~2000K within radial distances of ~0.5AU, which is consistent with observations of UV-fluorescent H2 emission (Ádámkovics, Najita & Glassgold, 2016). Constraining the most optimistic contribution of radiative heating mechanisms via X-rays and FUV together with a favorable comparison to observations, allows us to explore and evaluate additional heating mechanisms. We find that the total columns of warm (90-400K) emitting molecules such as CO, arising directly below

  12. DUST DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISK WINDS DRIVEN BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE: A MECHANISM FOR FLOATING DUST GRAINS WITH CHARACTERISTIC SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: miyake.tomoya@e.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: stakeru@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-04-10

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains of various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well-coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate-size grains float near the sonic point of the disk wind located at several scale heights from the midplane, where the grains are loosely coupled to the background gas. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 au, dust grains with size of 25–45 μm float around 4 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. We also discuss the implications of our result for observations of dusty material around young stellar objects.

  13. On the signatures of companion formation in the spectral energy distributions of Sz54 and Sz59—the young stars with protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhozhay, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    We study spectral energy distributions of two young systems Sz54 and Sz59, that belong to Chameleon II star forming region. The results of the modeling indicate that protoplanetary disks of these systems contain gaps in the dust component. These gaps could be a result of a planetary or brown dwarf companion formation, because the companion would accumulate a disk material, moving along its orbit. In a present work we have determined physical characteristics of the disks. We also discuss possible companion characteristics, based on the geometrical parameters of the gaps.

  14. High-Contrast Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of the Protoplanetary Disk around RY Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Michihiro; Karr, Jennifer L.; Hashimoto, Jun; Kim, Hyosun; Wisenewski, John; Henning, Thomas; Grady, Carol; Kandori, Ryo; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kudo, Tomoyuki; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared coronagraphic imaging polarimetry of RY Tau. The scattered light in the circumstellar environment was imaged at H-band at a high resolution (approx. 0.05) for the first time, using Subaru-HiCIAO. The observed polarized intensity (PI) distribution shows a butterfly-like distribution of bright emission with an angular scale similar to the disk observed at millimeter wavelengths. This distribution is offset toward the blueshifted jet, indicating the presence of a geometrically thick disk or a remnant envelope, and therefore the earliest stage of the Class II evolutionary phase. We perform comparisons between the observed PI distribution and disk models with: (1) full radiative transfer code, using the spectral energy distribution (SED) to constrain the disk parameters; and (2) monochromatic simulations of scattered light which explore a wide range of parameters space to constrain the disk and dust parameters. We show that these models cannot consistently explain the observed PI distribution, SED, and the viewing angle inferred by millimeter interferometry. We suggest that the scattered light in the near-infrared is associated with an optically thin and geometrically thick layer above the disk surface, with the surface responsible for the infrared SED. Half of the scattered light and thermal radiation in this layer illuminates the disk surface, and this process may significantly affect the thermal structure of the disk.

  15. PHOTO-REVERBERATION MAPPING OF A PROTOPLANETARY ACCRETION DISK AROUND A T TAURI STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Huan Y. A.; Plavchan, Peter; Ciardi, David [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, 770 S. Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rieke, George H. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cody, Ann Marie [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Güth, Tina [Department of Physics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Pl., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stauffer, John; Carey, Sean; Rebull, Luisa M. [Infrared Science Archive and Spitzer Science Center, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Covey, Kevin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-9164, Western Washington University, 516 High St., Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Duran-Rojas, Maria C. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 106, 22800, Ensenada, Baja California, México (Mexico); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Morales-Calderón, María, E-mail: hyameng@lpl.arizona.edu [Centro de Astrobiología, Departamento de Astrofísica, INTA-CSIC, P.O. Box 78, E-28691, ESAC Campus, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2016-05-20

    Theoretical models and spectroscopic observations of newborn stars suggest that protoplantary disks have an inner “wall” at a distance set by the disk interaction with the star. Around T Tauri stars, the size of this disk hole is expected to be on a 0.1 au scale that is unresolved by current adaptive optics imaging, though some model-dependent constraints have been obtained by near-infrared interferometry. Here we report the first measurement of the inner disk wall around a solar-mass young stellar object, YLW 16B in the ρ Ophiuchi star-forming region, by detecting the light-travel time of the variable radiation from the stellar surface to the disk. Consistent time lags were detected on two nights, when the time series in H (1.6 μ m) and K (2.2 μ m) bands were synchronized while the 4.5 μ m emission lagged by 74.5 ± 3.2 s. Considering the nearly edge-on geometry of the disk, the inner rim should be 0.084 au from the protostar on average, with an error of order 0.01 au. This size is likely larger than the range of magnetospheric truncations and consistent with an optically and geometrically thick disk front at the dust sublimation radius at ∼1500 K. The widths of the cross-correlation functions between the data in different wavebands place possible new constraints on the geometry of the disk.

  16. Dust capture and long-lived density enhancements triggered by vortices in 2d protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Surville, Clément; Mayer, Lucio; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-01-01

    We study dust capture by vortices and its long-term consequences in global two-fluid inviscid disk simulations using a new polar grid code RoSSBi. We perform the longest integrations so far, several hundred disk orbits, at the highest resolution attainable in global disk simulations with dust, namely, 2048 × 4096 grid points. We vary a wide range of dust parameters, most notably the initial dust-to-gas ratio ɛ varies in the range of 10-4-10-2. Irrespective of the value of ɛ, we find rapid con...

  17. Dust capture and long-lived density enhancements triggered by vortices in 2D protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Surville, Clément; Mayer, Lucio; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-01-01

    We study dust capture by vortices and its long-term consequences in global two-fluid inviscid disk simulations using a new polar grid code RoSSBi. We perform the longest integrations so far, several hundred disk orbits, at the highest resolution attainable in global simulations of disks with dust, namely 2048x4096 grid points. This allows to study the dust evolution well beyond vortex dissipation. We vary a wide range of parameters, most notably the dust-to-gas ratio in the initial setup vari...

  18. FUV Irradiation and the Heat Signature of Accretion in Protoplanetary Disk Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najita, Joan R.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2017-09-01

    Although stars accrete mass throughout the first few million years of their lives, the physical mechanism that drives disk accretion in the T Tauri phase is uncertain, and diagnostics that probe the nature of disk accretion have been elusive, particularly in the planet formation region of the disk. Here we explore whether an accretion process such as the magnetorotational instability (MRI) could be detected through its “heat signature,” the energy it deposits in the disk atmosphere. To examine this possibility, we investigate the impact of accretion-related mechanical heating and energetic stellar irradiation (FUV and X-rays) on the thermal-chemical properties of disk atmospheres at planet formation distances. We find that stellar FUV irradiation ({Ly}α and continuum), through its role in heating and photodissociation, affects much of the upper warm (400-2000 K) molecular layer of the atmosphere, and the properties of the layer are generally in good agreement with the observed molecular emission features of disks at UV, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. At the same time, the effect of FUV irradiation is restricted to the upper molecular layer of the disk, even when irradiation by {Ly}α is included. The region immediately below the FUV-heated layer is potentially dominated by accretion-related mechanical heating. As cooler (90-400 K) CO, water, and other molecules are potential diagnostics of the mechanically heated layer, emission line studies of these diagnostics might be used to search for evidence of the MRI in action.

  19. On the Formation of Multiple Concentric Rings and Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jaehan; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Hartmann, Lee

    2017-12-01

    As spiral waves driven by a planet in a gaseous disk steepen into a shock, they deposit angular momentum, opening a gap in the disk. This has been well studied using both linear theory and numerical simulations, but so far only for the primary spiral arm: the one directly attached to the planet. Using 2D hydrodynamic simulations, we show that the secondary and tertiary arms driven by a planet can also open gaps as they steepen into shocks. The depths of the secondary/tertiary gaps in surface density grow with time in a low-viscosity disk (α =5× {10}-5), so even low-mass planets (e.g., super-Earth or mini-Neptune-mass) embedded in the disk can open multiple observable gaps, provided that sufficient time has passed. Applying our results to the HL Tau disk, we show that a single 30 Earth-mass planet embedded in the ring at 68.8 au (B5) can reasonably well reproduce the positions of the two major gaps at 13.2 and 32.3 au (D1 and D2), and roughly reproduce two other major gaps at 64.2 and 74.7 au (D5 and D6) seen in the mm continuum. The positions of secondary/tertiary gaps are found to be sensitive to the planetary mass and the disk temperature profile, so with accurate observational measurements of the temperature structure, the positions of multiple gaps can be used to constrain the mass of the planet. We also comment on the gaps seen in the TW Hya and HD 163296 disk.

  20. On the Formation of Planetesimals: Radial Contraction of the Dust Layer Interacting with the Protoplanetary Disk Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makalkin, A. B.; Artyushkova, M. E.

    2017-11-01

    Radial contraction of the dust layer in the midplane of a gas-dust protoplanetary disk that consists of large dust aggregates is modeled. Sizes of aggregates vary from centimeters to meters assuming the monodispersion of the layer. The highly nonlinear continuity equation for the solid phase of the dust layer is solved numerically. The purpose of the study is to identify the conditions under which the solid matter is accumulated in the layer, which contributes to the formation of planetesimals as a result of gravitational instability of the dust phase of the layer. We consider the collective interaction of the layer with the surrounding gas of the protoplanetary disk: shear stresses act on the gas in the dust layer that has a higher orbital velocity than the gas outside the layer, this leads to a loss of angular momentum and a radial drift of the layer. The stress magnitude is determined by the turbulent viscosity, which is represented as the sum of the α-viscosity associated with global turbulence in the disk and the viscosity associated with turbulence that is localized in a thin equatorial region comprising the dust layer and is caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The evaporation of water ice and the continuity of the mass flux of the nonvolatile component on the ice line is also taken into account. It is shown that the accumulation of solid matter on either side of the ice line and in other regions of the disk is determined primarily by the ratio of the radii of dust aggregates on either side of the ice line. If after the ice evaporation the sizes (or density) of dust aggregates decrease by an order of magnitude or more, the density of the solid phase of the layer's matter in the annular zone adjacent to the ice line from the inside increases sharply. If, however, the sizes of the aggregates on the inner side of the ice line are only a few times smaller than behind the ice line, then in the same zone there is a deficit of mass at the place of the

  1. THE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN THE NEARBY MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGION CYGNUS OB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Drake, J. J.; Wright, N. J.; Hora, J. L.; Aldcroft, T.; Fruscione, A.; Kashyap, V. L. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-67, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Drew, J. E. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Gutermuth, R. A. [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Naylor, T.; King, R. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alvarez, D. [Dpto. de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-08-20

    The formation of stars in massive clusters is one of the main modes of the star formation process. However, the study of massive star-forming regions is hampered by their typically large distances to the Sun. One exception to this is the massive star-forming region Cygnus OB2 in the Cygnus X region, at the distance of {approx}1400 pc. Cygnus OB2 hosts very rich populations of massive and low-mass stars, being the best target in our Galaxy to study the formation of stars, circumstellar disks, and planets in the presence of massive stars. In this paper, we combine a wide and deep set of photometric data, from the r band to 24 {mu}m, in order to select the disk-bearing population of stars in Cygnus OB2 and identify the class I, class II, and stars with transition and pre-transition disks. We selected 1843 sources with infrared excesses in an area of 1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign centered on Cyg OB2 in several evolutionary stages: 8.4% class I, 13.1% flat-spectrum sources, 72.9% class II, 2.3% pre-transition disks, and 3.3% transition disks. The spatial distribution of these sources shows a central cluster surrounded by an annular overdensity and some clumps of recent star formation in the outer region. Several candidate subclusters are identified, both along the overdensity and in the rest of the association.

  2. Tracing the Evolution of Dust in Protoplanetary Disks — The First Steps of Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, I.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Merin, B.

    2012-05-01

    I will present results from my PhD thesis, focused on surveys of young stars and their dusty disks in nearby clusters. The results inform on timescales and mechanisms of giant planet formation, in context with characteristics of planetary systems.

  3. Radiation Hydrodynamical Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks: Numerical Models and Observational Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, Mario; Nelson, Richard P.; Turner, Neal J.; Bertrang, Gesa H.-M.; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Henning, Thomas; Lyra, Wladimir; Teague, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Planets are born in protostellar disks, which are now observed with enough resolution to address questions about internal gas flows. Magnetic forces are possibly drivers of the flows, but ionization state estimates suggest that much of the gas mass decouples from magnetic fields. Thus, hydrodynamical instabilities could play a major role. We investigate disk dynamics under conditions typical for a T Tauri system, using global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with embedded particles and a resolution of 70 cells per scale height. Stellar irradiation heating is included with realistic dust opacities. The disk starts in joint radiative balance and hydrostatic equilibrium. The vertical shear instability (VSI) develops into turbulence that persists up to at least 1600 inner orbits (143 outer orbits). Turbulent speeds are a few percent of the local sound speed at the midplane, increasing to 20%, or 100 m s-1, in the corona. These are consistent with recent upper limits on turbulent speeds from optically thin and thick molecular line observations of TW Hya and HD 163296. The predominantly vertical motions induced by the VSI efficiently lift particles upward. Grains 0.1 and 1 mm in size achieve scale heights greater than expected in isotropic turbulence. We conclude that while kinematic constraints from molecular line emission do not directly discriminate between magnetic and nonmagnetic disk models, the small dust scale heights measured in HL Tau and HD 163296 favor turbulent magnetic models, which reach lower ratios of the vertical kinetic energy density to the accretion stress.

  4. AN ALMA DISK MASS FOR THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANETARY COMPANION TO FW TAU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Adam L. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bowler, Brendan P. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Herczeg, Gregory [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); Ireland, Michael J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Liu, Michael C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cruz, Kelle L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA observations of the FW Tau system, a close binary pair of M5 stars with a wide-orbit (300 AU projected separation) substellar companion. The companion is extremely faint and red in the optical and near-infrared, but boasts a weak far-infrared excess and optical/near-infrared emission lines indicative of a primordial accretion disk of gas and dust. The component-resolved 1.3 mm continuum emission is found to be associated only with the companion, with a flux (1.78 ± 0.03 mJy) that indicates a dust mass of 1-2 M {sub ⊕}. While this mass reservoir is insufficient to form a giant planet, it is more than sufficient to produce an analog of the Kepler-42 exoplanetary system or the Galilean satellites. The mass and geometry of the disk-bearing FW Tau companion remains unclear. Near-infrared spectroscopy shows deep water bands that indicate a spectral type later than M5, but substantial veiling prevents a more accurate determination of the effective temperature (and hence mass). Both a disk-bearing ''planetary-mass'' companion seen in direct light or a brown dwarf tertiary viewed in light scattered by an edge-on disk or envelope remain possibilities.

  5. X-ray Ionization of Heavy Elements Applied to Protoplanetary Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Meijerink, Rowin

    The consequences of the Auger effect on the population of heavy-element ions are analyzed for the case of relatively cool gas irradiated by keV X-rays with intended applications to the accretion disks of young stellar objects. Highly charged ions are rapidly reduced to the doubly charged state in

  6. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical networks and rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Rab, C.; Bouma, S.; Ménard, F.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We aim to define a small and large chemical network which can be used for the quantitative simultaneous analysis of molecular emission from the near-IR to the submm. We also aim to revise reactions of excited molecular hydrogen, which are not included in UMIST, to provide a homogeneous database for future applications. Methods: We have used the thermo-chemical disk modeling code ProDiMo and a standard T Tauri disk model to evaluate the impact of various chemical networks, reaction rate databases and sets of adsorption energies on a large sample of chemical species and emerging line fluxes from the near-IR to the submm wavelength range. Results: We find large differences in the masses and radial distribution of ice reservoirs when considering freeze-out on bare or polar ice coated grains. Most strongly the ammonia ice mass and the location of the snow line (water) change. As a consequence molecules associated to the ice lines such as N2H+ change their emitting region; none of the line fluxes in the sample considered here changes by more than 25% except CO isotopologues, CN and N2H+ lines. The three-body reaction N+H2+M plays a key role in the formation of water in the outer disk. Besides that, differences between the UMIST 2006 and 2012 database change line fluxes in the sample considered here by less than a factor of two (a subset of low excitation CO and fine structure lines stays even within 25%); exceptions are OH, CN, HCN, HCO+ and N2H+ lines. However, different networks such as OSU and KIDA 2011 lead to pronounced differences in the chemistry inside 100 au and thus affect emission lines from high excitation CO, OH and CN lines. H2 is easily excited at the disk surface and state-to-state reactions enhance the abundance of CH+ and to a lesser extent HCO+. For sub-mm lines of HCN, N2H+ and HCO+, a more complex larger network is recommended. Conclusions: More work is required to consolidate data on key reactions leading to the formation of water, molecular

  7. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks. II. Line diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, I.; Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Thi, W. -F.; Hogerheijde, M.

    Aims. In this paper, we explore the diagnostic power of the far-IR fine-structure lines of [Oi] 63.2 mu m, 145.5 mu m, [Cii] 157.7 mu m, as well as the radio and sub-mm lines of CO J = 1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 in application to disks around Herbig Ae stars. We aim at understanding where the lines originate

  8. Dust Capture and Long-lived Density Enhancements Triggered by Vortices in 2D Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surville, Clément; Mayer, Lucio; Lin, Douglas N. C.

    2016-11-01

    We study dust capture by vortices and its long-term consequences in global two-fluid inviscid disk simulations using a new polar grid code RoSSBi. We perform the longest integrations so far, several hundred disk orbits, at the highest resolution attainable in global disk simulations with dust, namely, 2048 × 4096 grid points. We vary a wide range of dust parameters, most notably the initial dust-to-gas ratio ɛ varies in the range of 10-4-10-2. Irrespective of the value of ɛ, we find rapid concentration of the dust inside vortices, reaching dust-to-gas ratios of the order of unity inside the vortex. We present an analytical model that describes this dust capture process very well, finding consistent results for all dust parameters. A vortex streaming instability develops, which invariably causes vortex destruction. After vortex dissipation large-scale dust rings encompassing a disk annulus form in most cases, which sustain very high dust concentration, approaching ratios of the order of unity they persist as long as the duration of the simulations. They are sustained by a streaming instability, which manifests itself in high-density dust clumps at various scales. When vortices are particularly long-lived, rings do not form but dust clumps inside vortices can survive a long time and would likely undergo collapse by gravitational instability. Rings encompass almost an Earth mass of solid material, while even larger masses of dust do accumulate inside vortices in the earlier stage. We argue that rapid planetesimal formation would occur in the dust clumps inside the vortices as well as in the post-vortex rings.

  9. Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Ryan; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Jin, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A number of transition disks exhibit significant azimuthal asymmetries in thermal dust emission. One possible origin for these asymmetries is dust trapping in vortices formed at the edges of dead zones. We carry out high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario, including the effects of dust feedback. We find that, although feedback weakens the vortices and slows down the process of dust accumulation, the dust distribution in the disk can nonetheless remain asymmetric for many thousands of orbits. We show that even after 104 orbits, or 2.5 Myr when scaled to the parameters of Oph IRS 48 (a significant fraction of its age), the dust is not dispersed into an axisymmetric ring, in contrast to the case of a vortex formed by a planet. This is because accumulation of mass at the dead zone edge constantly replenishes the vortex, preventing it from being fully destroyed. We produce synthetic dust emission images using our simulation results. We find that multiple small clumps of dust may be distributed azimuthally. These clumps, if not resolved from one another, appear as a single large feature. A defining characteristic of a disk with a dead zone edge is that an asymmetric feature is accompanied by a ring of dust located about twice as far from the central star.

  10. THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRIES, DIFFERENT RADIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF LARGE AND SMALL DUST GRAINS IN PDS 70 {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, J.; Wisniewski, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Tsukagoshi, T. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Brown, J. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dong, R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Zhu, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kusakabe, N.; Akiyama, E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandt, T. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Currie, T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grady, C. A., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@ou.edu [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); and others

    2015-01-20

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and {sup 12}CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ∼65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ∼80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  11. X-ray Ionization of Heavy Elements Applied to Protoplanetary Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Meijerink, Rowin

    2011-01-01

    The consequences of the Auger effect on the population of heavy element ions are analyzed for the case of relatively cool gas irradiated by keV X-rays, with intended applications to the accretion disks of young stellar ob jects. Highly charged ions are rapidly reduced to the doubly-charged state in neutral gas, so the aim here is to derive the production rates for these singly- and doubly-charged ions and to specify their transformation by recombination, charge transfer, and molecular reactio...

  12. FIRST DETECTION OF [C I] {sup 3}P{sub 1}–{sup 3}P{sub 0} EMISSION FROM A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito 310-8512 (Japan); Saito, Masao [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Kitamura, Yoshimi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Yoshinodai 3-1-1, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris, Diderot, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kawabe, Ryohei, E-mail: ttsuka@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa 2-21-1, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    We performed single point [C i] {sup 3}P{sub 1}–{sup 3}P{sub 0} and CO J = 4–3 observations toward three T Tauri stars (TTSs), DM Tau, LkCa 15, and TW Hya, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 8 qualification model receiver installed on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment. Two protostars (PSs) in the Taurus L1551 region, L1551 IRS 5 and HL Tau, were also observed. We successfully detected [C i] emission from the protoplanetary disk around DM Tau as well as the protostellar targets. The spectral profile of the [C i] emission from the protoplanetary disk is marginally single-peaked, suggesting that atomic carbon (C) extends toward the outermost disk. The detected [C i] emission is optically thin and the column densities of C are estimated to be ≲10{sup 16} and ∼10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} for the TTS targets and the PSs, respectively. We found a clear difference in the total mass ratio of C to dust, M(C)/M(dust), between the TTSs and protostellar targets; the M(C)/M(dust) ratio of the TTSs is one order of magnitude smaller than that of the PSs. The decrease of the estimated M(C)/M(dust) ratios for the disk sources is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the atomic C can survive only in the near surface layer of the disk and C{sup +}/C/CO transition occurs deeper into the disk midplane.

  13. Prebiological Synthesis Organic Matter and Origin of Life in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snytnikov, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Processes and conditions around new born Sun and possibly other young stars led to the origin of life in the circumstellar disc in a few million years. Than the circumsolar biosphere evolved to its current earth state. In agreement with the main results of the natural sciences and the theory of self-organization, several stages are necessary for the life to emerge on the Earth. Nowday we can specify "The cold prehistiry of the life", "RNA-world", "Preplanet biosphere", "Destructive biosphere", "Earth of bacteria".

  14. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, B. A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); D' Alessio, P.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pontoppidan, K., E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  15. Carbon and Oxygen in Nearby Stars: Keys to Protoplanetary Disk Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2011-07-01

    We present carbon and oxygen abundances for 941 FGK stars—the largest such catalog to date. We find that planet-bearing systems are enriched in these elements. We self-consistently measure NC /NO , which is thought to play a key role in planet formation. We identify 46 stars with NC /NO >= 1.00 as potential hosts of carbon-dominated exoplanets. We measure a downward trend in [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] and find distinct trends in the thin and thick disks, supporting the work of Bensby et al. Finally, we measure sub-solar NC /NO = 0.40+0.11 - 0.07, for WASP-12, a surprising result as this star is host to a transiting hot Jupiter whose dayside atmosphere was recently reported to have NC /NO >= 1 by Madhusudhan et al. Our measurements are based on 15,000 high signal-to-noise spectra taken with the Keck 1 telescope as part of the California Planet Search. We derive abundances from the [O I] and C I absorption lines at λ = 6300 and 6587 Å using the SME spectral synthesizer. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. A mid-IR interferometric survey with MIDI/VLTI: resolving the second-generation protoplanetary disks around post-AGB binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, M.; Van Winckel, H.; Menu, J.; Manick, R.; Debosscher, J.; Min, M.; de Wit, W.-J.; Verhoelst, T.; Kamath, D.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: We present a mid-IR interferometric survey of the circumstellar environment of a specific class of post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) binaries. For this class the presence of a compact dusty disk has been postulated on the basis of various spatially unresolved measurements. The aim is to determine the angular extent of the N-band emission directly and to resolve the compact circumstellar structures. Methods: Our interferometric survey was performed with the MIDI instrument on the VLTI. In total 19 different systems were observed using variable baseline configurations. Combining all the visibilities at a single wavelength at 10.7 μm, we fitted two parametric models to the data: a uniform disk and a ring model mimicking a temperature gradient. We compared our observables of the whole sample, with synthetic data computed from a grid of radiative transfer models of passively irradiated disks in hydrostatic equilibrium. These models are computed with a Monte Carlo code that has been widely applied to describe the structure of protoplanetary disks around young stellar objects (YSO). Results: The spatially resolved observations show that the majority of our targets cluster closely together in the distance-independent size-colour diagram, and have extremely compact N-band emission regions. The typical uniform disk diameter of the N-band emission region is 40 mas, which corresponds to a typical brightness temperature of 400-600 K. The resolved objects display very similar characteristics in the interferometric observables and in the spectral energy distributions. Therefore, the physical properties of the disks around our targets must be similar. Our results are discussed in the light of recently published sample studies of YSOs to compare quantitatively the secondary discs around post-AGB stars to the ones around YSOs. Conclusions: Our high-angular-resolution survey further confirms the disk nature of the circumstellar structures present around wide post

  17. The Transitional Protoplanetary Disk Frequency as a Function of Age: Disk Evolution in the Coronet Cluster, Taurus, and Other 1--8 Myr-old Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Sicilia-Aguilar, Auora

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-24 micron photometry and spectroscopy for stars in the 1-3 Myr-old Coronet Cluster, expanding upon the survey of Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008). Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyze these new data and those from Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2008) to identify disks with evidence for substantial dust evolution consistent with disk clearing: transitional disks. We then analyze data in Taurus and others young clusters - IC 348, NGC 2362, and eta Cha -- to constrain the transitional disk frequency as a function of time. Our analysis confirms previous results finding evidence for two types of transitional disks -- those with inner holes and those that are homologously depleted. The percentage of disks in the transitional phase increases from approx.15-20% at 1-2 Myr to > 50% at 5-8 Myr; the mean transitional disk lifetime is closer to approx. 1 Myr than 0.1-0.5 Myr, consistent with previous studies by Currie et al. (2009) and Sicilia-Aguilar et al. (2009). In the Coronet Cluster and IC 348, transitional disks are more numerous for very low-mass M3--M6 stars than for more massive K5-M2 stars, while Taurus lacks a strong spectral type-dependent frequency. Assuming standard values for the gas-to-dust ratio and other disk properties, the lower limit for the masses of optically-thick primordial disks is Mdisk approx. 0.001-0.003 M*. We find that single color-color diagrams do not by themselves uniquely identify transitional disks or primordial disks. Full SED modeling is required to accurately assess disk evolution for individual sources and inform statistical estimates of the transitional disk population in large samples using mid-IR colors.

  18. Giant planet formation from disk instability; cooling and heating

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Lucio; Wadsley, James; Quinn, Thomas; Stadel, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of high resolution SPH simulations of the evolution of gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disks. We report on calculations in which the disk is evolved using a locally isothermal or adiabatic equation of state (with shock heating), and also on new simulations in which cooling and heating by radiation are explicitly modeled. We find that disks with a minimum Toomre parameter $< 1.4$ fragment into several gravitationally bound protoplanets with masses from below to a...

  19. Herschel/PACS Survey of protoplanetary disks in Taurus/ Auriga- Investigating the source of [OI] 63 μm line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, G.{ö.}ran; Vacca, William

    2012-03-01

    GASPS is a large Herschel Open time Key project studying the evolution of gas in protoplanetary disks. We target about 240 nearby objects in Taurus and young associations covering stellar ages between 0.3 - 30 Myr. We use the PACS instrument to observe continuum and selected gas tracers, like [{O}{I}] at 63 and 145 μm, [{C}{II}] at 158 μm as well as several molecular lines like OH, H_2O and CO. The strongest line we see is the [{O}{I}] at 63 μm. However, although it is clear that [{O}{I}] 63 μm traces gas in the disk, it is also strong in jets and outflows. Using the sources observed so far (42 sources detected in both line and continuum of 75 sources observed in spectroscopy and 92 in photometry) in Taurus/Auriga we explore how the [{O}{I}] 63 μm line strength correlates with 63 μm continuum, disk mass, accretion rate, stellar luminosity, and strength of the [{O}{I}] 6300 Å emission for both outflow and non-outflow sources. We find a clear, tight correlation between the strength of the [{O}{I}] 63 μm line emission and 63 μm continuum for non-outflow sources and a weaker correlation for outflow sources. In outflow sources the line can be up to 20 times stronger than in non-outflow sources, indicating that the [{O}{I}] 63 μm emission from the outflow will dominate over the disk emission. For the few sources where we also detect the [{O}{I}] 145 μm line, we find line ratios of 145 to 63 μm of 0.04 - 0.05, suggesting optically thin lines originating from gas with a temperature of a few 100 K, which suggests that the emission comes from the inner part/surface layers of the disk or from the shock regions in the outflow.

  20. The 1600 Å Emission Bump in Protoplanetary Disks: A Spectral Signature of H{sub 2}O Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Hervé, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, F-92190, Meudon (France)

    2017-08-01

    The FUV continuum spectrum of many accreting pre-main sequence stars, Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), does not continue smoothly from the well-studied Balmer continuum emission in the NUV, suggesting that additional processes contribute to the short-wavelength emission in these objects. The most notable spectral feature in the FUV continuum of some CTTSs is a broad emission approximately centered at 1600 Å, which has been referred to as the “1600 Å Bump.” The origin of this feature remains unclear. In an effort to better understand the molecular properties of planet-forming disks and the UV spectral properties of accreting protostars, we have assembled archival FUV spectra of 37 disk-hosting systems observed by the Hubble Space Telescope -Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Clear 1600 Å Bump emission is observed above the smooth, underlying 1100–1800 Å continuum spectrum in 19/37 Classical T Tauri disks in the HST -COS sample, with the detection rate in transition disks (8/8) being much higher than that in primordial or non-transition sources (11/29). We describe a spectral deconvolution analysis to separate the Bump (spanning 1490–1690 Å) from the underlying FUV continuum, finding an average Bump luminosity L (Bump) ≈ 7 × 10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1}. Parameterizing the Bump with a combination of Gaussian and polynomial components, we find that the 1600 Å Bump is characterized by a peak wavelength λ {sub o} = 1598.6 ± 3.3 Å, with FWHM = 35.8 ± 19.1 Å. Contrary to previous studies, we find that this feature is inconsistent with models of H{sub 2} excited by electron -impact. We show that this Bump makes up between 5%–50% of the total FUV continuum emission in the 1490–1690 Å band and emits roughly 10%–80% of the total fluorescent H{sub 2} luminosity for stars with well-defined Bump features. Energetically, this suggests that the carrier of the 1600 Å Bump emission is powered by Ly α photons. We argue that the most likely mechanism

  1. Calcium and Titanium Isotope Fractionation in CAIS: Tracers of Condensation and Inheritance in the Early Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) can be used to understand the conditions present in the protoplantary disk where they formed. The isotopic compositions of these early-formed nebular materials are largely controlled by chemical volatility. The isotopic effects of evaporation/sublimation, which are well explained by both theory and experimental work, lead to enrichments of the heavy isotopes that are often exhibited by the moderately refractory elements Mg and Si. Less well understood are the isotopic effects of condensation, which limits our ability to determine whether a CAI is a primary condensate and/or retains any evidence of its primordial formation history.

  2. Convergence of the Critical Cooling Rate for Protoplanetary Disk Fragmentation Achieved: The Key Role of Numerical Dissipation of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongping; Mayer, Lucio; Meru, Farzana

    2017-09-01

    We carry out simulations of gravitationally unstable disks using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and the novel Lagrangian meshless finite mass (MFM) scheme in the GIZMO code. Our aim is to understand the cause of the nonconvergence of the cooling boundary for fragmentation reported in the literature. We run SPH simulations with two different artificial viscosity implementations and compare them with MFM, which does not employ any artificial viscosity. With MFM we demonstrate convergence of the critical cooling timescale for fragmentation at {β }{crit}≈ 3. Nonconvergence persists in SPH codes. We show how the nonconvergence problem is caused by artificial fragmentation triggered by excessive dissipation of angular momentum in domains with large velocity derivatives. With increased resolution, such domains become more prominent. Vorticity lags behind density, due to numerical viscous dissipation in these regions, promoting collapse with longer cooling times. Such effect is shown to be dominant over the competing tendency of artificial viscosity to diminish with increasing resolution. When the initial conditions are first relaxed for several orbits, the flow is more regular, with lower shear and vorticity in nonaxisymmetric regions, aiding convergence. Yet MFM is the only method that converges exactly. Our findings are of general interest, as numerical dissipation via artificial viscosity or advection errors can also occur in grid-based codes. Indeed, for the FARGO code values of {β }{crit} significantly higher than our converged estimate have been reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss implications for giant planet formation via disk instability.

  3. Cannibals in the thick disk: the young α-rich stars as evolved blue stragglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jofré, P.; Jorissen, A.; Van Eck, S.; Izzard, R. G.; Masseron, T.; Hawkins, K.; Gilmore, G.; Paladini, C.; Escorza, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Manick, R.

    2016-10-01

    Spectro-seismic measurements of red giants enabled the recent discovery of stars in the thick disk that are more massive than 1.4 M⊙. While it has been claimed that most of these stars are younger than the rest of the typical thick disk stars, we show evidence that they might be products of mass transfer in binary evolution, notably evolved blue stragglers. We took new measurements of the radial velocities in a sample of 26 stars from APOKASC, including 13 "young" stars and 13 "old" stars with similar stellar parameters but with masses below 1.2 M⊙ and found that more of the young starsappear to be in binary systems with respect to the old stars.Furthermore, we show that the young stars do not follow the expected trend of [C/H] ratios versus mass for individual stars. However, with a population synthesis of low-mass stars including binary evolution and mass transfer, we can reproduce the observed [C/N] ratios versus mass. Our study shows how asteroseismology of solar-type red giants provides us with a unique opportunity to study the evolution of field blue stragglers after they have left the main-sequence.

  4. Redistribution of CO at the location of the CO ice line in evolving gas and dust disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammler, Sebastian Markus; Birnstiel, Tilman; Panić, Olja; Dullemond, Cornelis Petrus; Dominik, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Context. Ice lines are suggested to play a significant role in grain growth and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks. Evaporation fronts directly influence the gas and ice abundances of volatile species in the disk and therefore the coagulation physics and efficiency and the chemical composition of the resulting planetesimals. Aims: In this work, we investigate the influence of the existence of the CO ice line on particle growth and on the distribution of CO in the disk. Methods: We include the possibility of tracking the CO content and/or other volatiles in particles and in the gas in our existing dust coagulation and disk evolution model and present a method for studying evaporation and condensation of CO using the Hertz-Knudsen equation. Our model does not yet include fragmentation, which will be part of further investigations. Results: We find no enhanced grain growth immediately outside the ice line where the particle size is limited by radial drift. Instead, we find a depletion of solid material inside the ice line, which is solely due to evaporation of the CO. Such a depression inside the ice line may be observable and may help to quantify the processes described in this work. Furthermore, we find that the viscosity and diffusivity of the gas heavily influence the re-distribution of vaporized CO at the ice line and can lead to an increase in the CO abundance by up to a factor of a few in the region just inside the ice line. Depending on the strength of the gaseous transport mechanisms, the position of the ice line in our model can change by up to 10 AU and consequently, the temperature at that location can range from 21 to 23 K.

  5. The pathways of C: from AGB stars, to the Interstellar Medium, and finally into the protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-05-01

    The origin, and role of C in the formation of first solar system aggregates is described. Stellar grains evidence demonstrates that Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars were nearby to the solar nebula at the time of solar system formation. Such stars continue to burn H and He in shells that surround the C-O core. During their evolution, flashes occur in the He shell and the C, and O produced are eventually dredged up into the star's envelop and then to the stellar surface, and finally masively ejected to the interstellar medium (IM). Once in a molecular cloud, the electrophilicity of C makes this element reactable with the surrounding gas to produce different molecular species. Primitive meteorites, particularly these known as chondrites, preserved primeval materials of the disk. The abundances of short-lived radionuclides (SLN), inferred to have been present in the early solar system (ESS), are a constraint on the birth and early evolution of the solar system as their relatively short half lives do not allow the observed abundances to be explained by galactic chemical evolution processes. We present a model of a 6.5 solar masses star of solar metallicity that simultaneously match the abundances of SLNs inferred to have been present in the ESS by using a dilution factor of 1 part of AGB material per 300 parts of original solar nebula material, and taking into account a time interval between injection of SLNs and consolidation of chondrites equal to 0.53 Myr [2]. Such a polluting source does not overproduce 53Mn, as supernova models do, and only marginally affects isotopic ratios of stable elements. The AGB stars released O- and C-rich gas with important oxidizing implications to first solar system materials as recently detected in circumstellar environments [3]. REF: [1] Lada C.J. and Lada E.A. 2003. Ann. Rev. A&A. 41: 57; [2] Trigo-Rodriguez J.M. et al. 2009. MAPS 44: 627; [3] Decin L. et al. 2010. Nature 467: 64.

  6. Angular Momentum Transport in Protoplanetary and Black Hole Accretion Disks: The Role of Parasitic Modes in the Saturation of MHD Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias

    2010-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered a key process for driving efficient angular momentum transport in astrophysical disks. Understanding its nonlinear saturation constitutes a fundamental problem in modern accretion disk theory. The large dynamical range in physical conditions i...

  7. Herschel/PACS Survey of Protoplanetary Disks in Taurus/Auriga—Observations of [O I] and [C II], and Far-infrared Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barrado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ~120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H2O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  8. The protoplanetary system HD 100546 in Hα polarized light from SPHERE/ZIMPOL. A bar-like structure across the disk gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendigutía, I.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Garufi, A.; Lumsden, S. L.; Huélamo, N.; Cheetham, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Norris, B.; Olguin, F. A.; Tuthill, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. HD 100546 is one of the few known pre-main-sequence stars that may host a planetary system in its disk. Aims: This work aims to contribute to our understanding of HD 100546 by analyzing new polarimetric images with high spatial resolution. Methods: Using VLT/SPHERE/ZIMPOL with two filters in Hα and the adjacent continuum, we have probed the disk gap and the surface layers of the outer disk, covering a region outer disk are more polarized than the SW and NE regions. This asymmetry can be explained from a preferential scattering angle close to 90° and is consistent with previous polarization images. The outer disk in our observations extends from 13 ± 2 to 45 ± 9 au, with a position angle and inclination of 137 ± 5° and 44 ± 8°, respectively. The comparison with previous estimates suggests that the disk inclination could increase with the stellocentric distance, although the different measurements are still consistent within the error bars. In addition, no direct signature of the innermost candidate companion is detected from the polarimetric data, confirming recent results that were based on intensity imagery. We set an upper limit to its mass accretion rate 3σ) of a 20 au bar-like structure that crosses the gap through the central region of HD 100546. Conclusions: In the absence of additional data, it is tentatively suggested that the bar could be dust dragged by infalling gas that radially flows from the outer disk to the inner region. This could represent an exceptional case in which a small-scale radial inflow is observed in a single system. If this scenario is confirmed, it could explain the presence of atomic gas in the inner disk that would otherwise accrete on to the central star on a timescale of a few months/years, as previously indicated from spectro-interferometric data, and could be related with additional (undetected) planets.

  9. Herschel - PACS Survey Of Protoplanetary Disks In Taurus - Auriga Observations Of [O I] And [C Ii], And Far-Infrared Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christian; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Matthews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barbado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe approx. 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 micron, [O I] 145 micron, [C II] 158, micron OH, H2O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 micron. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 micron line and the 63 micron continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 micron is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 micron emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 micron to [O I] 145 micron are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 micron and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  10. HERSCHEL/PACS SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN TAURUS/AURIGA—OBSERVATIONS OF [O I] AND [C II], AND FAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D. [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Rm. 146, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Duchêne, Gaspard [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Mathews, Geoffrey [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Augereau, Jean-Charles; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Thi, Wing-Fai [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Barrado, David; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo [Centro de Astrobiología, Depto. Astrofísica (CSIC/INTA), ESAC Campus, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Dent, William R. F. [ALMA SCO, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Eiroa, Carlos; Meeus, Gwendolyn [Dep. de Física Teórica, Fac. de Ciencias, UAM Campus Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Grady, Carol; Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kamp, Inga; Vicente, Silvia [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy (IfA), University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ∼120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H{sub 2}O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  11. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  12. Titanium isotopes and rare earth patterns in CAIs: Evidence for thermal processing and gas-dust decoupling in the protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew M.; Zhang, Junjun; Greber, Nicolas D.; Hu, Jingya; Tissot, François L. H.; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    Titanium isotopic compositions (mass-dependent fractionation and isotopic anomalies) were measured in 46 calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the Allende CV chondrite. After internal normalization to 49Ti/47Ti, we found that ε50Ti values are somewhat variable among CAIs, and that ε46Ti is highly correlated with ε50Ti, with a best-fit slope of 0.162 ± 0.030 (95% confidence interval). The linear correlation between ε46Ti and ε50Ti extends the same correlation seen among bulk solar objects (slope 0.184 ± 0.007). This observation provides constraints on dynamic mixing of the solar disk and has implications for the nucleosynthetic origin of titanium isotopes, specifically on the possible contributions from various types of supernovae to the solar system. Titanium isotopic mass fractionation, expressed as δ‧49Ti, was measured by both sample-standard bracketing and double-spiking. Most CAIs are isotopically unfractionated, within a 95% confidence interval of normal, but a few are significantly fractionated and the range δ‧49Ti is from ∼-4 to ∼+4. Rare earth element patterns were measured in 37 of the CAIs. All CAIs with significant titanium mass fractionation effects have group II and related REE patterns, implying kinetically controlled volatility fractionation during the formation of these CAIs.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION 25 μM IMAGING OF THE DISKS AROUND HERBIG AE/BE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Maaskant, K. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Okamoto, Y. K. [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kataza, H. [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Yamashita, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Miyata, T.; Sako, S.; Kamizuka, T. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, T.; Fujiwara, H. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Sakon, I.; Onaka, T. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mulders, G. D. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 μm using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of an equal number of objects from each of the two categories defined by Meeus et al.; 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (flat disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is difficult to resolve with 8 m class telescopes in the Q band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. This indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 μm, we suggest that many, but not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 μm supports the idea that group II disks have a continuous flat disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through the settling of dust grains into the mid-plane of the protoplanetary disk. However, considering the growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gap in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks.

  14. Accretion disks before (?) the main planet formation phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominik, C.

    2009-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the sites of planet formation and therefore one of the foremost targets of future facilities in astronomy. In this review, I will discuss the main options for using JWST and concurrent facilities to study the early, gas-rich, massive phases of protoplanetary disks. We

  15. Rossby Waves in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Daniel P.

    1998-01-01

    Fluid waves and instabilities are considered critical to the evolution of protoplanetary nebulae, particularly for their roles in mass, angular momentum, and energy transport. A number have been identified, however, notably absent, is an influential wave commonly found in planetary atmospheres and oceans: the planetary Rossby wave (PRW). Since, in the Earth's atmosphere, the PRW is of primary importance in shaping large-scale meteorological phenomena, it is reasonable to consider whether it might have similar importance in the protoplanetary nebula. The thrust of the research project this summer (1998) was to determine whether a nebular analog to the PRW is viable, a so-called nebular Rossby wave (NRW), and if so, to explore possible ramifications of this wave to the evolution of the nebula. This work was carried out primarily by S. Davis, J. Cuzzi and me, with significant discussions with P. Cassen. We believe we have established a good case for the NRW and as a result believe we have opened up a new and possibly interesting line of research in regard to the nebular development, in particular with regard to zonal jet formation, a potent accretion mechanism, and possible ties to vortex formation. The standard model of the protoplanetary nebula consists of a large disk of gas with about 1% entrained dust gravitationally bound to a large central mass, m(sub c) i.e., the protostar. The planet-forming region of the disk extends to roughly 100 A.U. in radius. Disk thickness, H, is believed to be on the order of 10-100 times less than disk radius. Disk lifetime is on the order of a million years.

  16. Hydrodynamic Instability and Enhanced Transport in Protoplanetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Denis T.

    2003-01-01

    The nature of turbulence (and the enhanced transport it provides) is a key element to comprehend the dynamics, physics and chemistry of the protoplanetary nebulae and consequently the planet formation process. Early accretion disk models postulated the turbulent transport through the well-known "alpha-viscosity" model, introduced by Shakura and Sunyaev in 1973. Since then, the nature of the turbulence in disks has been a subject of investigation. In 1991, the rediscovery by Balbus and Hawley of Chandrasekhar's linear instability in magnetized disks was a breakthrough in the discipline. Unfortunately, the mechanisms leading to turbulence in non-magnetized disks, such as protoplanetary nebulae, remain poorly understood. We will present results from laboratory experiments along with analytical arguments showing that, despite skepticism in the Astrophysical community, differential rotation may indeed be sufficient to trigger and sustain turbulence. We will also propose an alternative viscosity prescription derived from both experiments and analysis.

  17. Molecular Gas in Debris Disks around Young A-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, Attila; Curé, Michel; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Csengeri, Timea; Eiroa, Carlos; Gunawan, Diah; Henning, Thomas; Hughes, A. Meredith; Juhász, Attila; Pawellek, Nicole; Wyatt, Mark

    2017-11-01

    According to the current paradigm of circumstellar disk evolution, gas-rich primordial disks evolve into gas-poor debris disks that are composed of second-generation dust. To explore the transition between these phases, we searched for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O emission in seven dust-rich debris disks around young A-type stars, using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Band 6. We discovered molecular gas in three debris disks. In all of these disks, the 12CO line was optically thick, highlighting the importance of less abundant molecules in reliable mass estimates. By supplementing our target list with literature data, we compiled a volume-limited sample of dust-rich debris disks around young A-type stars within 150 pc. We obtained a CO detection rate of 11/16 above a 12CO J = 2–1 line luminosity threshold of ∼1.4 × 104 Jy km s‑1pc2 in the sample. This high incidence implies that the presence of CO gas in the bright debris disks around young A-type stars is more likely the rule than the exception. Interestingly, dust-rich debris disks around young FG-type stars exhibit, with the same detectability threshold as A-type stars, a significantly lower gas incidence. While the transition from the protoplanetary phase to the debris phase is associated with a drop in the dust content, our results exhibit a large spread in the CO mass in our debris sample, with peak values that are comparable to those in the protoplanetary Herbig Ae disks. In the particularly CO-rich debris systems, the gas may have a primordial origin, which is a characteristic of a hybrid disk.

  18. Evolution of PAHs in Protoplanetary Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, I.; Joblin, C; Tielens, AGGM

    Depending on whom you ask, PAHs are either the smallest dust particles or the largest gas-phase molecules in space. Whether referred to as gas or dust, these PAHs can contain up to 20% of the total cosmic carbon abundance and as such also play an important role in the carbon chemistry of

  19. Large scale dynamics of protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béthune, William

    2017-08-01

    Planets form in the gaseous and dusty disks orbiting young stars. These protoplanetary disks are dispersed in a few million years, being accreted onto the central star or evaporated into the interstellar medium. To explain the observed accretion rates, it is commonly assumed that matter is transported through the disk by turbulence, although the mechanism sustaining turbulence is uncertain. On the other side, irradiation by the central star could heat up the disk surface and trigger a photoevaporative wind, but thermal effects cannot account for the observed acceleration and collimation of the wind into a narrow jet perpendicular to the disk plane. Both issues can be solved if the disk is sensitive to magnetic fields. Weak fields lead to the magnetorotational instability, whose outcome is a state of sustained turbulence. Strong fields can slow down the disk, causing it to accrete while launching a collimated wind. However, the coupling between the disk and the neutral gas is done via electric charges, each of which is outnumbered by several billion neutral molecules. The imperfect coupling between the magnetic field and the neutral gas is described in terms of "non-ideal" effects, introducing new dynamical behaviors. This thesis is devoted to the transport processes happening inside weakly ionized and weakly magnetized accretion disks; the role of microphysical effects on the large-scale dynamics of the disk is of primary importance. As a first step, I exclude the wind and examine the impact of non-ideal effects on the turbulent properties near the disk midplane. I show that the flow can spontaneously organize itself if the ionization fraction is low enough; in this case, accretion is halted and the disk exhibits axisymmetric structures, with possible consequences on planetary formation. As a second step, I study the launching of disk winds via a global model of stratified disk embedded in a warm atmosphere. This model is the first to compute non-ideal effects from

  20. A Panchromatic Study of Molecular Gas in the Protoplanetary System RY Lupi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulanantham, Nicole; France, Kevin; Hoadley, Keri

    2018-01-01

    To understand how planet formation occurs in protoplanetary disks, we must first characterize the behavior of material within 10 AU of the central star. We present a study of molecular gas at these radii in the disk around the young star RY Lupi, through spectra from HST-COS, HST-STIS, and VLT-CRIRES. We model the radial distribution of flux from hot (T ~ 2000 K) molecular gas in a surface layer between r = 0.1-10 AU, as traced by LyA-pumped H2. The result indicates that the H2 emission originates in a narrow ring centered at 1 AU, with a sharp decline in flux at r statistically better fit to the H2 emission lines than the single-component model of a smooth disk. This two-component profile includes broad (FWHMbroad, H2 = 105 +/- 15 km/s) and narrow (FWHMnarrow, H2 = 43 +/- 13 km/s) lines, corresponding to average gas radii of ~ 0.4 AU and ~ 3 AU. An analysis of the spatial origin of 4.7 micron 12CO emission shows that this population of warm (T ~ 1500 K) gas also produces two-component emission line profiles ( ~ 0.4 AU, ~ 15 AU), indicating again that the inner disk is radially stratified. Despite the evidence that this is a transitional disk system, we detect UV CO absorption that is not typically seen in more evolved systems. We model these features along with IR CO absorptions to constrain the properties of the cooler (T ~ 100-300 K) disk atmosphere.

  1. Lupus Alma Disk Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present the first unbiased ALMA survey of both dust and gas in a large sample of protoplanetary disks. We surveyed 100 sources in the nearby (150-200 pc), young (1-2 Myr) Lupus region to constrain M_dust to 2 M_Mars and M_gas to 1 M_Jup. Most disks have masses < MMSN and gas-to-dust ratios < ISM. Such rapid gas depletion may explain the prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  2. Theory of Disk Accretion onto Magnetic Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disk accretion onto magnetic stars occurs in a variety of systems, including accreting neutron stars (with both high and low magnetic fields, white dwarfs, and protostars. We review some of the key physical processes in magnetosphere-disk interaction, highlighting the theoretical uncertainties. We also discuss some applications to the observations of accreting neutron star and protostellar systems, as well as possible connections to protoplanetary disks and exoplanets.

  3. Heating and cooling processes in disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This chapter summarises current theoretical concepts and methods to determine the gas temperature structure in protoplanetary disks by balancing all relevant heating and cooling rates. The processes considered are non-LTE line heating/cooling based on the escape probability method, photo-ionisation heating and recombination cooling, free-free heating/cooling, dust thermal accommodation and high-energy heating processes such as X-ray and cosmic ray heating, dust photoelectric and PAH heating, a number of particular follow-up heating processes starting with the UV excitation of H2, and the release of binding energy in exothermal reactions. The resulting thermal structure of protoplanetary disks is described and discussed. 10th Lecture from Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  4. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, A.; Dent, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planetforming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  5. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki; Dent, W.; Herschel GASPS Team

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planet-forming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  6. A SYMMETRIC INNER CAVITY IN THE HD 141569A CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazoyer, J.; Choquet, É.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Debes, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States); Boccaletti, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC and Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Augereau, J.-C.; Lagrange, A.-M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Planétologie et d´Astrophysique (IPAG) F-38000 Grenoble (France); Wolff, S. G., E-mail: jmazoyer@stsci.edu [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Some circumstellar disks, called transitional or hybrid disks, present characteristics of both protoplanetary disks (significant amount of gas) and debris disks (evolved structures around young main-sequence stars, composed of second generation dust, from collisions between planetesimals). Therefore, they are ideal astrophysical laboratories to witness the last stages of planet formation. The circumstellar disk around HD 141569A was intensively observed and resolved in the past from space, but also from the ground. However, the recent implementation of high contrast imaging systems has opened up new opportunities to re-analyze this object. We analyzed Gemini archival data from the Near-infrared Coronagraphic Imager obtained in 2011 in the H band, using several angular differential imaging techniques (classical ADI, LOCI, KLIP). These images reveal the complex structures of this disk with an unprecedented resolution. We also include archival Hubble Space Telescope images as an independent data set to confirm these findings. Using an analysis of the inner edge of the disk, we show that the inner disk is almost axisymmetrical. The measurement of an offset toward the east observed by previous authors is likely due to the fact that the eastern part of this disk is wider and more complex in substructure. Our precise reanalysis of the eastern side shows several structures, including a splitting of the disk and a small finger detached from the inner edge to the southeast. Finally, we find that the arc at 250 AU is unlikely to be a spiral, at least not at the inclination derived from the first ring, but instead could be interpreted as a third belt at a different inclination. If the very symmetrical inner disk edge is carved by a companion, the data presented here put additional constraints on its position. The observed very complex structures will be confirmed by the new generation of coronagraphic instrument (GPI, SPHERE). However, a full understanding of this system will

  7. Spectral signatures of disk eccentricity in young binary systems. I. Circumprimary case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regály, Zs.; Sándor, Zs.; Dullemond, C. P.; Kiss, L. L.

    2011-04-01

    Context. Star formation occurs via fragmentation of molecular clouds, which means that the majority of stars born are members of binary systems. There is growing evidence that planets might form in circumprimary disks of medium-separation (≲50 AU) binaries. The tidal forces caused by the secondary generally act to distort the originally circular circumprimary disk to an eccentric one. Since the disk eccentricity might play a major role in planet formation, it is of great importance to understand how it evolves. Aims: We investigate disk eccentricity evolution to reveal its dependence on the physical parameters of the binary system and the protoplanetary disk. To infer the disk eccentricity from high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy, we calculate the fundamental band (4.7 μm) emission lines of the CO molecule emerging from the atmosphere of the eccentric disk. Methods: We model circumprimary disk evolution under the gravitational perturbation of the orbiting secondary using a 2D grid-based hydrodynamical code, assuming α-type viscosity. The hydrodynamical results are combined with our semianalytical spectral code to calculate the CO molecular line profiles. Our thermal disk model is based on the double-layer disk model approximation. We assume LTE and canonical dust and gas properties for the circumprimary disk. Results: We find that the orbital velocity distribution of the gas parcels differs significantly from the circular Keplerian fashion. The line profiles are double-peaked and asymmetric in shape. The magnitude of asymmetry is insensitive to the binary mass ratio, the magnitude of viscosity (α), and the disk mass. In contrast, the disk eccentricity, thus the magnitude of the line profile asymmetry, is influenced significantly by the binary eccentricity and the disk geometrical thickness. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the disk eccentricity profile in the planet-forming region can be determined by fitting the high-resolution CO line profile asymmetry

  8. Gas in Protoplanetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Peter; GAP Consortium

    The Herschel open time key programme GASPS is the first large survey of gas in 250 disks around young stars in the critical age range between 1 and 30 Myrs. It uses PACS line scans to detect atomic finestructure lines of [OI] and [CII], and molecular lines of CO, OH and H2O, altogether 450 hours of Herschel observing time. In a large modelling effort, a grid of 300000 thermo-chemical disk models with detailed con-tinuum and line transfer has been computed to interpret the results. In my talk, I will show how the first results fit into the models, and I will discuss how this new atomic and molecular inventory can be used to improve our understanding of disk evolution and planet formation. —

  9. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Natta, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Scholz, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  10. WFIRST: CGI Detection and Characterization of Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debes, John; Chen, Christine; Dawson, Bekki; Douglas, Ewan S.; Duchene, Gaspard; Jang-Condell, Hannah; hines, Dean C.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Macintosh, Bruce; Mazoyer, Johan; Meshkat, Tiffany; Nemati, Bijan; Patel, Rahul; Perrin, Marshall; Poteet, Charles; Pueyo, Laurent; Ren, Bin; Rizzo, Maxime; Roberge, Aki; Stark, Chris; Turnbull, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    The WFIRST Coronagraphic Instrument (CGI) will be capable of obtaining up to 5×10-9 contrast to an inner working angle of ~150 mas for a selection of medium band visible light filters using shaped pupil coronagraph and hybrid Lyot coronagraph designs. We present initial work at defining the scientific capabilities of the CGI with respect to different types of circumstellar disks, including warm exo-zodiacal disks, cold debris disks, and protoplanetary disks. With the above designs, CGI will be able to detect bright protoplanetary and debris disks with sizes of >100 AU beyond 500 pc. Additionally, it will be able to discover warm exozodiacal dust disks ten times more massive than that of the Solar System for over 100 nearby solar-type stars. Finally, it will be able to characterize resolved circumstellar dust disks in multiple filters of visible light, providing constraints on the size, shape, and composition of the dust.

  11. Orbital Evolution of Moons in Weakly Accreting Circumplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuri I.; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Gressel, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation of hot and massive circumplanetary disks (CPDs) and the orbital evolution of satellites formed in these disks. Because of the comparatively small size-scale of the sub-disk, quick magnetic diffusion prevents the magnetorotational instability (MRI) from being well developed at ionization levels that would allow MRI in the parent protoplanetary disk. In the absence of significant angular momentum transport, continuous mass supply from the parental protoplanetary disk leads to the formation of a massive CPD. We have developed an evolutionary model for this scenario and have estimated the orbital evolution of satellites within the disk. We find, in a certain temperature range, that inward migration of a satellite can be stopped by a change in the structure due to the opacity transitions. Moreover, by capturing second and third migrating satellites in mean motion resonances, a compact system in Laplace resonance can be formed in our disk models.

  12. Infrared Observational Studies of Gas Molecules in Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyk, C.

    2011-12-01

    There remain many fundamental unanswered questions about protoplanetary disks, including how (and if?) they form planets, how mass is transferred through the disk and onto the star, and how they ultimately disperse. Also, a major goal of protoplanetary disk studies is to understand the relationship between disk properties and the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems. IR molecular spectroscopy is a particularly powerful tool for probing the conditions and physical process in protoplanetary disks, which are too small and close to their parent stars to be imaged with ease. I will discuss the suite of infrared molecular transitions observed to date, which highlight the following three techniques of IR spectroscopy. Firstly, line shapes and strengths can be used as tracers of disk physics, including volatile condensation/evaporation, photo-processes, grain growth and turbulence. Secondly, observations of multiple molecular abundances provide constraints for disk chemical models, which may ultimately help explain the great diversity of planetary bodies. Finally, resolved line shapes and spectro-astrometry provide a means to study disk structure on extremely small size scales. Because IR observations are typically sensitive to radii of a few AU or smaller, the processes and structures being probed are relevant to the birth and growth of terrestrial and giant planets. Recent results that I will highlight include the discovery of a multitude of molecules in disks around sun-like stars (including H2O, OH, HCN, C2H2 and CO2), with detection rates that depend on stellar mass, constraints on gas mass and location in transitional disks, detection and characterization of `snow lines', measurements of inner disk rims, and detections of inner disk asymmetries. I will also discuss how IR spectroscopy will remain relevant even with the emergence of facilities such as ALMA, as it allows us to connect the conditions in terrestrial-planet-forming regions with those in

  13. Herschel Observations of Gas and Dust in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberge, A.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Dent, W. R. F.; Meeus, G.; Donaldson, J. K.; Olofsson, J.; Moor, A.; Augereau, J. -C.; Howard, C.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Ardila, D. R.; Sandell, G.; Woitke, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space

  14. Disk Masses of Class I Protostars in Taurus and Ophiuchus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick; Eisner, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that many protoplanetary disks around pre-main sequence stars with inferred ages of 1-5 Myr (known as Class II protostars) contain insufficient mass to form giant planets. This may be because by this stage much of the material in the disk has already grown into larger bodies, hiding the material from sight. To test this hypothesis, we have observed every protostar in the Taurus and Ophiuchus star forming regions identified as Class I in multiple independent surveys, whose young (< 1 Myr old) disks are more likely to represent the initial mass budget of protoplanetary disks. For my dissertation I have used detailed radiative transfer modeling of CARMA and ALMA millimeter images, broadband SEDs, and near-infrared scattered light images to determine the geometry of the circumstellar material and measure the mass of the disks around these protostars. By comparing the inferred disk mass distribution with results for the existing 1-5 Myr old disk sample, we constrain the initial mass budget for forming planets in protoplanetary disks. We find that the younger Class I disks are, on average, more massive than the older disk sample, but still may be shy of the necessary mass for forming planets. It may be that even by this early stage, planet formation is well underway.

  15. Gaps and rings carved by vortices in protoplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Pierre; Ricci, Luca; Carilli, Christopher Luke; Previn-Ratnasingam, Rathish

    2017-09-01

    Context. Large-scale vortices in protoplanetary disks are thought to form and survive for long periods of time. Hence, they can significantly change the global disk evolution and particularly the distribution of the solid particles embedded in the gas, possibly explaining asymmetries and dust concentrations recently observed at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution of dust grains using a simple model of protoplanetary disk hosted by a giant gaseous vortex. We explore the dependence of the results on grain size and deduce possible consequences and predictions for observations of the dust thermal emission at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Methods: Global 2D simulations with a bi-fluid code are used to follow the evolution of a single population of solid particles aerodynamically coupled to the gas. Possible observational signatures of the dust thermal emission are obtained using simulators of ALMA and Nest Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) observations. Results: We find that a giant vortex not only captures dust grains with Stokes number St< 1 but can also affect the distribution of larger grains (with St 1) carving a gap associated with a ring composed of incompletely trapped particles. The results are presented for different particle sizes and associated with their possible signatures in disk observations. Conclusions: Gap clearing in the dust spatial distribution could be due to the interaction with a giant gaseous vortex and their associated spiral waves without the gravitational assistance of a planet. Hence, strong dust concentrations at short sub-mm wavelengths associated with a gap and an irregular ring at longer mm and cm wavelengths could indicate the presence of an unseen gaseous vortex.

  16. TW Hydrae: multi-wavelength interferometry of a transition disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menu, J.; van Boekel, R.; Henning, T.; Benisty, M.; Chandler, C. J.; Linz, H.; Waelkens, C.; Andrews, S. M.; Calvet, N.; Carpenter, J. M.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Isella, A.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; Perez, L. M.; Ricci, L.; Sargent, A. I.; Storm, S.; Testi, L.; Wilner, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    For over a decade, the structure of the inner ``hole'' in the transition disk around TW Hydrae has been a subject of debate. To probe the innermost regions of the protoplanetary disk, observations at the highest possible spatial resolution are required. We present new interferometric data of TW Hya from near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths. We confront existing models of the disk structure with the complete data set and develop a new, detailed radiative-transfer model. This model is characterized by: 1) a spatial separation of the largest grains from the small disk grains; and 2) a smooth inner rim structure, rather than a sharp disk edge.

  17. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; authors, Community

    2016-01-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent

  18. An Archival Study of Atomic Constituents in Four Edge-on Debris Disk Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edward

    2017-08-01

    Debris disks around stars are thought to evolve from gas-rich protoplanetary disks and eventually lead to the formation of exoplanet systems. Millimeter, sub-millimeter and far IR observations tell us much about the nature of solid and molecular constituents, but UV absorptions in the spectra of stars central to edge-on disks reveal the nature of atomic gas constituents that lie within such systems. The debris disks around the stars Beta Pictoris and 49 Ceti have already been studied in some detail. We propose to expand the sample by studying four more such targets that were observed with STIS in the highest resolution echelle modes, and this investigation will significantly expand our understanding of intrinsically different systems or ones with different angles of inclination with respect to our sightline. We plan to measure element abundances, which should lead to insights on the composition of the orbiting material. Also, we expect to learn more about the local physical conditions by evaluating the relative populations of atoms in metastable electronic states and fine-structure levels of the ground states.

  19. AN IONIZED OUTFLOW FROM AB AUR, A HERBIG AE STAR WITH A TRANSITIONAL DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    AB Aur is a Herbig Ae star with a transitional disk. Transitional disks present substantial dust clearing in their inner regions, most probably because of the formation of one or more planets, although other explanations are still viable. In transitional objects, accretion is found to be about an order of magnitude smaller than in classical full disks. Since accretion is believed to be correlated with outflow activity, centimeter free-free jets are expected to be present in association with these systems, at weaker levels than in classical protoplanetary (full) systems. We present new observations of the centimeter radio emission associated with the inner regions of AB Aur and conclude that the morphology, orientation, spectral index, and lack of temporal variability of the centimeter source imply the presence of a collimated, ionized outflow. The radio luminosity of this radio jet is, however, about 20 times smaller than that expected for a classical system of similar bolometric luminosity. We conclude that centimeter continuum emission is present in association with stars with transitional disks, but at levels than are becoming detectable only with the upgraded radio arrays. On the other hand, assuming that the jet velocity is 300 km s{sup –1}, we find that the ratio of mass loss rate to accretion rate in AB Aur is ∼0.1, similar to that found for less evolved systems.

  20. Evidence for magnesium isotope heterogeneity in the solar protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie; Paton, Chad

    2011-01-01

    assumption that the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of ~5 × 10-5 recorded by the oldest dated solids, calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), represents the initial abundance of 26 Al for the solar system as a whole. Here, we report high-precision Mg-isotope measurements of inner solar system solids, asteroids...

  1. Weakly Accreting Circumplanetary Disks and Satellites in Resonant Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuri I.; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Gressel, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    During the formation phase of gas giants, circumplanetary gaseous disks form around the planets. Circumplanetary disks are important not only for mass supply to gas giants but also for formation of regular satellites. The size-scale of circumplanetary disks is smaller than that of protoplanetary disks and this makes magnetic diffusion quicker. Thus, it is more difficult to sustain the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in circumplanetary disks. In the absence of significant angular momentum transport, continuous mass flow from the parental protoplanetary disk leads to the formation of a massive circumplanetary disk. We have developed an evolutionary disk model for this scenario and have estimated the orbital evolution of moons within the disk. In a certain temperature range, we find that inward migration of a satellite can be stopped by a disk structure resulting from the opacity transitions. We also find that the second and third migrating satellites can be captured in mean motion resonances. In this way, a compact system in Laplace resonance, which are similar to inner three bodies of Galilean satellites, can be formed in our disk models.

  2. The Physics of Protoplanetary Dust Agglomerates. X. High-velocity Collisions between Small and Large Dust Agglomerates as a Growth Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schräpler, Rainer; Blum, Jürgen; Krijt, Sebastiaan; Raabe, Jan-Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, dust aggregates in the μm to mm size range possess mean collision velocities of 10–60 m s‑1 with respect to dm- to m-sized bodies. We performed laboratory collision experiments to explore this parameter regime and found a size- and velocity-dependent threshold between erosion and growth. By using a local Monte Carlo coagulation calculation and along with a simple semi-analytical timescale approach, we show that erosion considerably limits particle growth in protoplanetary disks and leads to a steady-state dust-size distribution from μm- to dm-sized particles.

  3. Disk Evolution and the Fate of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee; Ciesla, Fred; Gressel, Oliver; Alexander, Richard

    2017-10-01

    We review the general theoretical concepts and observational constraints on the distribution and evolution of water vapor and ice in protoplanetary disks, with a focus on the Solar System. Water is expected to freeze out at distances greater than 1-3 AU from solar-type central stars; more precise estimates are difficult to obtain due to uncertainties in the complex processes involved in disk evolution, including dust growth, settling, and radial drift, and the level of turbulence and viscous dissipation within disks. Interferometric observations are now providing constraints on the positions of CO snow lines, but extrapolation to the unresolved regions where water ice sublimates will require much better theoretical understanding of mass and angular momentum transport in disks as well as more refined comparison of observations with sophisticated disk models.

  4. Mind the gap : gas and dust in planet-forming disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, Nienke van der

    2015-01-01

    This thesis discusses the structure of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks around young stars, in which the planets are formed, using ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) observations. Primary targets of this study are the so-called 'transition disks', with a central cavity in the

  5. Millimetre spectral indices of transition disks and their relation to the cavity radius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinilla, Ortiz P.A.; Benisty, M.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Dullemond, C.P.; Quiroga, Nunez L.H.; Henning, T.; Testi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transition disks are protoplanetary disks with inner depleted dust cavities that are excellent candidates for investigating the dust evolution when there is a pressure bump. A pressure bump at the outer edge of the cavity allows dust grains from the outer regions to stop their rapid inward

  6. [O I] disk emission in the Taurus star-forming region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresu, G.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Vicente, S.; Podio, L.; Woitke, P.; Menard, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Güdel, M.; Liebhart, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The structure of protoplanetary disks is thought to be linked to the temperature and chemistry of their dust and gas. Whether the disk is flat or flaring depends on the amount of radiation that it absorbs at a given radius and on the efficiency with which this is converted into thermal

  7. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  8. Molecules in Protoplanetary HAEBE discs as seen with Herschel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, G.

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of planets around other stars has revealed that planet formation is ubiquitous. However, the mechanisms determining planet formation are not (yet) well-understood. Primordial protoplanetary discs consist 99% out of gas, and only 1% out of dust. With time, those discs are believed to evolve from a flaring geometry into a flat geometry, as the initially small dust grains grow to larger sizes and settle towards the mid-plane. In the mean time, the gas will disperse, until so little is left that giant planets no longer can form. It is thus important to understand the chemical composition of the disc and the influence of the gas heating/cooling processes on the disc structure, and finally how gas gets dispersed as a pieces of the puzzle of planet formation. In this contribution, we study the protoplanetary discs around Herbig Ae/Be stars, young objects of intermediate mass, in the context of gas chemistry. We present Herschel PACS spectroscopic observations for a sample that was obtained within the GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems) Open Time Key Project, concentrating on the detection and characterisation of emission lines of the molecules H20, CO and CH+ (besides [OI] and [CII]), tracing the disc between 5 and 500 AU. We look for correlations between the observed line fluxes and stellar properties such as effective temperature, Halpha emission, accretion rates and UV flux, as well as the disc properties: degree of flaring, presence and strength of PAH emission and disc mass. We will present a few cases to show how simultaneous modeling (using the thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo) of the atomic fine structure lines and both Space Telescope and ground-based molecular lines can constrain the disc gas mass, once the disc structure is derived (here with the radiative transfer code MCFost). Finally, we compare our gas line observations with those of young debris disc stars, for which the HAEBE stars are thought to be progenitors.

  9. Heating of protostellar accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, R. R.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2017-07-01

    The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is believed to be the mechanism responsible for a magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence that could lead to the accretion observed in protoplanetary disks. The need of a minimum amount of ionization in protostellar accretion disks is necessary for the MRI to take place. There are in the literature several studies that include the damping of Alfvén waves as an additional heating source besides the viscous heating mechanism in a geometrically thin and optically thick disk. The damping of the waves transfers energy to the disk increasing the temperature and consequently its ionization fraction, making possible the presence of the MRI in a large part of the disk. We analyzed the contribution of non-ideal effects such as Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion for the disk heating and compare these heating rates with those obtained by damping of Alfvén waves. In order to study these non-ideal effects, we have estimated the radiation emission of each effect through the energy conservation equation, and associated each emission with a black body radiation, which enabled us to assign a temperature contribution of each effect. Using the ATHENA code we were able to simulate the disk at different radial distances, and estimate the electric current density needed to calculate the radiation emission associated with each effect. Once we have those data, we were able to compare the results with other heating sources, like viscosity and Alfvén waves damping, and we concluded that the Ohmic and ambipolar diffusions do not heat the disk in any significant way.

  10. Herniated disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pulposus Herniated disk repair Lumbar spinal surgery - series Herniated lumbar disk References Gardocki RJ, Park AL. Lower back pain and disorders of intervertebral discs. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative ...

  11. Galaxy Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruit, P. C.; Freeman, K. C.

    The disks of disk galaxies contain a substantial fraction of their baryonic matter and angular momentum, and much of the evolutionary activity in these galaxies, such as the formation of stars, spiral arms, bars and rings, and the various forms of secular evolution, takes place in their disks. The

  12. MODELING DUST EMISSION OF HL TAU DISK BASED ON PLANET–DISK INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sheng; Ji, Jianghui [Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Shengtai; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Isella, Andrea [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 M{sub Jup} at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  13. Subaru SEEDS Survey of Exoplanets and Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks at Subaru (SEEDS) is the first strategic observing program (SSOPs) awarded by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). SEEDS targets a broad sample of stars that span a wide range of masses and ages to explore the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This survey has been awarded 120 nights over five years time to observe nearly 500 stars. Currently in the second year, SEEDS has already produced exciting new results for the protoplanetary disk AB Aur, transitional disk LkCa15, and nearby companion to GJ 758. We present the survey architecture, performance, recent results, and the projected sample. Finally, we will discuss planned upgrades to the high contrast instrumentation at the Subaru Telescope

  14. WL 17: A Young Embedded Transition Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.

    2017-05-01

    We present the highest spatial resolution ALMA observations to date of the Class I protostar WL 17 in the ρ Ophiuchus L1688 molecular cloud complex, which show that it has a 12 au hole in the center of its disk. We consider whether WL 17 is actually a Class II disk being extincted by foreground material, but find that such models do not provide a good fit to the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and also require such high extinction that it would presumably arise from dense material close to the source, such as a remnant envelope. Self-consistent models of a disk embedded in a rotating collapsing envelope can nicely reproduce both the ALMA 3 mm observations and the broadband SED of WL 17. This suggests that WL 17 is a disk in the early stages of its formation, and yet even at this young age the inner disk has been depleted. Although there are multiple pathways for such a hole to be created in a disk, if this hole was produced by the formation of planets it could place constraints on the timescale for the growth of planets in protoplanetary disks.

  15. Hydrodynamical processes in planet-forming accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Min-Kai

    Understanding the physics of accretion flows in circumstellar disk provides the foundation to any theory of planet formation. The last few years have witnessed dramatic a revision in the fundamental fluid dynamics of protoplanetary accretion disks. There is growing evidence that the key to answering some of the most pressing questions, such as the origin of disk turbulence, mass transport, and planetesimal formation, may lie within, and intimately linked to, purely hydrodynamical processes in protoplanetary disks. Recent studies, including those from the proposal team, have discovered and highlighted the significance of several new hydrodynamical instabilities in the planet-forming regions of these disks. These include, but not limited to: the vertical shear instability, active between 10 to 100 AU; the zombie vortex instability, operating in regions interior to about 1AU; and the convective over-stability at intermediate radii. Secondary Rossbywave and elliptic instabilities may also be triggered, feeding off the structures that emerge from the above primary instabilities. The result of these hydrodynamic processes range from small-scale turbulence that transports angular momentum, to large-scale vortices that concentrate dust particles and enhance planetesimal formation. Hydrodynamic processes pertain to a wide range of disk conditions, meaning that at least one of these processes are active at any given disk location and evolutionary epoch. This remains true even after planet formation, which affects their subsequent orbital evolution. Hydrodynamical processes also have direct observable consequences. For example, vortices have being invoked to explain recent ALMA images of asymmetric `dust-traps' in transition disks. Hydrodynamic activities thus play a crucial role at every stage of planet formation and disk evolution. We propose to develop theoretical models of the above hydrodynamic processes under physical disk conditions by properly accounting for disk

  16. MIGRATION TRAPS IN DISKS AROUND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellovary, Jillian M.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, NY 10024 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contain stars, stellar mass black holes, and other stellar remnants, which perturb the disk gas gravitationally. The resulting density perturbations exert torques on the embedded masses causing them to migrate through the disk in a manner analogous to planets in protoplanetary disks. We determine the strength and direction of these torques using an empirical analytic description dependent on local disk gradients, applied to two different analytic, steady-state disk models of SMBH accretion disks. We find that there are radii in such disks where the gas torque changes sign, trapping migrating objects. Our analysis shows that major migration traps generally occur where the disk surface density gradient changes sign from positive to negative, around 20–300R{sub g}, where R{sub g} = 2GM/c{sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius. At these traps, massive objects in the AGN disk can accumulate, collide, scatter, and accrete. Intermediate mass black hole formation is likely in these disk locations, which may lead to preferential gap and cavity creation at these radii. Our model thus has significant implications for SMBH growth as well as gravitational wave source populations.

  17. A young massive planet in a star-disk system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, J; Henning, Th; Launhardt, R; Müller, A; Weise, P; Kürster, M

    2008-01-03

    There is a general consensus that planets form within disks of dust and gas around newly born stars. Details of their formation process, however, are still a matter of ongoing debate. The timescale of planet formation remains unclear, so the detection of planets around young stars with protoplanetary disks is potentially of great interest. Hitherto, no such planet has been found. Here we report the detection of a planet of mass (9.8+/-3.3)M(Jupiter) around TW Hydrae (TW Hya), a nearby young star with an age of only 8-10 Myr that is surrounded by a well-studied circumstellar disk. It orbits the star with a period of 3.56 days at 0.04 au, inside the inner rim of the disk. This demonstrates that planets can form within 10 Myr, before the disk has been dissipated by stellar winds and radiation.

  18. Lupus disks with faint CO isotopologues: low gas/dust or high carbon depletion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Williams, J. P.; Ansdell, M.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Manara, C. F.; Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; van der Marel, N.; van Terwisga, S.

    2017-03-01

    Context. An era has started in which gas and dust can be observed independently in protoplanetary disks, thanks to the recent surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA). The first near-complete high-resolution disk survey in both dust and gas in a single star-forming region has been carried out in Lupus, finding surprisingly low gas-to-dust ratios. Aims: The goal of this work is to fully exploit CO isotopologue observations in Lupus, comparing them with physical-chemical model results, in order to obtain gas masses for a large number of disks and compare gas and dust properties. Methods: We have employed the grid of physical-chemical models presented previously to analyze continuum and CO isotopologue (13CO J = 3-2 and C18O J = 3-2) observations of Lupus disks, including isotope-selective processes and freeze-out. We also employed the ALMA 13CO-only detections to calculate disk gas masses for a total of 34 sources, which expands the sample of 10 disks reported earlier, where C18O was also detected. Results: We confirm that overall gas-masses are very low, often lower than 1MJ, when volatile carbon is not depleted. Accordingly, global gas-to-dust ratios are much lower than the expected interstellar-medium value of 100, which is predominantly between 1 and 10. Low CO-based gas masses and gas-to-dust ratios may indicate rapid loss of gas, or alternatively chemical evolution, for example, through sequestering of carbon from CO to more complex molecules, or carbon locked up in larger bodies. Conclusions: Current ALMA observations of 13CO and continuum emission cannot distinguish between these two hypotheses. We have simulated both scenarios, but chemical model results do not allow us to rule out one of the two, pointing to the need to calibrate CO-based masses with other tracers. Assuming that all Lupus disks have evolved mainly as a result of viscous processes over the past few Myr, the previously observed correlation between the current mass

  19. Inclination evolution of protoplanetary discs around eccentric binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanazzi, J. J.; Lai, Dong

    2018-01-01

    It is usually thought that viscous torque works to align a circumbinary disc with the binary's orbital plane. However, recent numerical simulations suggest that the disc may evolve to a configuration perpendicular to the binary orbit ('polar alignment) if the binary is eccentric and the initial disc-binary inclination is sufficiently large. We carry out a theoretical study on the long-term evolution of inclined discs around eccentric binaries, calculating the disc warp profile and dissipative torque acting on the disc. For discs with aspect ratio H/r larger than the viscosity parameter α, bending wave propagation effectively makes the disc precess as a quasi-rigid body, while viscosity acts on the disc warp and twist to drive secular evolution of the disc-binary inclination. We derive a simple analytic criterion (in terms of the binary eccentricity and initial disc orientation) for the disc to evolve towards polar alignment with the eccentric binary. When the disc has a non-negligible angular momentum compared to the binary, the final 'polar alignment' inclination angle is reduced from 90°. For typical protoplanetary disc parameters, the time-scale of the inclination evolution is shorter than the disc lifetime, suggesting that highly inclined discs and planets may exist orbiting eccentric binaries.

  20. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the

  1. Herschel PACS Observations and Modeling of Debris Disks in the Tucana-Horologium Association

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, J. K.; Roberge, A.; Chen, C H; Augereau, J. -C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Eiroa, C.; Krivov, A. V.; Mathews, G. S.; Meeus, G.; Ménard, F.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Sandell, G.

    2012-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS photometry of seventeen B- to M-type stars in the 30 Myr-old Tucana-Horologium Association. This work is part of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (GASPS). Six of the seventeen targets were found to have infrared excesses significantly greater than the expected stellar IR fluxes, including a previously unknown disk around HD30051. These six debris disks were fitted with single-temperature blackbody models to estimate the temperatures...

  2. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  3. Pacs Observations of Dust and Gas in Transition Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, F.

    2012-03-01

    The GASPS Open Time Key Programme has observed a large sample of about 250 protoplanetary disks with the PACS instrument in both the continuum and atomic and molecular emission lines. The sample spans a range in mass and ages in several star forming regions. It also contains a significant number of so-called transition disks. In this contribution we will discuss the transition disks that show clear signs of inner holes or gaps in dust thermal emission. We will revisit them in view of the new Herschel PACS continuum and line observations. We will re-examine the geometry of the disks and the properties of their central gaps using full radiative transfer models of the continuum emission (SED fitting). When available, (sub-) millimeter interferometry data, as well as constraints from NIR long-baseline interferometry and/or high-resolution imaging of the disks (and their associated gaps) will be used. The gas properties (Tgas, abundances, level population) will then be calculated and line fluxes compared with the PACS line data for a few species. Finally, trends will be discussed, e.g., the [OI] 63 micron line fluxes with respect to the nearby continuum. Transition disks around T Tauri stars will be compared to those around Herbig AeBe stars. The transition disks will be compared to other "normal" protoplanetary disks around samples of single T Tauri stars (with or without jets/outflows) or located in binary systems with circumbinary disks (e.g., GG Tau, UY Aur). We will discuss the differences and propose interpretations.

  4. [O I] disk emission in the Taurus star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresu, G.; Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Vicente, S.; Podio, L.; Woitke, P.; Menard, F.; Thi, W.-F.; Güdel, M.; Liebhart, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. The structure of protoplanetary disks is thought to be linked to the temperature and chemistry of their dust and gas. Whether the disk is flat or flaring depends on the amount of radiation that it absorbs at a given radius and on the efficiency with which this is converted into thermal energy. The understanding of these heating and cooling processes is crucial for providing a reliable disk structure for interpreting dust continuum emission and gas line fluxes. Especially in the upper layers of the disk, where gas and dust are thermally decoupled, the infrared line emission is strictly related to the gas heating/cooling processes. Aims: We aim to study the thermal properties of the disk in the oxygen line emission region and to investigate the relative importance of X-ray (1-120 Å) and far-UV radiation (FUV, 912-2070 Å) for the heating balance there. Methods: We use [O i] 63 μm line fluxes observed in a sample of protoplanetary disks of the Taurus/Auriga star-forming region and compare it to the model predictions presented in our previous work. The data were obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory as part of the Herschel open time key program GAS in Protoplanetary diskS (GASPS). Results: Our theoretical grid of disk models can reproduce the [O i] absolute fluxes and predict a correlation between [O i] and the sum LX + LFUV. The data show no correlation between the [O i] line flux and the X-ray luminosity, the FUV luminosity or their sum. Conclusions: The data show that the FUV or X-ray radiation has no notable impact on the region where the [O i] line is formed. This contrasts with what is predicted from our models. Possible explanations are that the disks in Taurus are less flaring than the hydrostatic models predict and/or that other disk structure aspects that were left unchanged in our models are important. Disk models should include flat geometries, varying parameters such as outer radius, dust settling, and the

  5. Herschel Observations of Gas and Dust in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, A.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Dent, W. R. F.; Meeus, G.; Donaldson, J. K.; Olofsson, J.; Moór, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Howard, C.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Ardila, D. R.; Sandell, G.; Woitke, P.

    2013-07-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, largely as part of the "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. Disk dust emission is detected in images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm 49 Cet is significantly extended in the 70 μm image, spatially resolving the outer dust disk for the first time. Spectra covering small wavelength ranges centered on eight atomic and molecular emission lines were obtained, including [O I] 63 μm and [C II] 158 μm. The C II line was detected at the 5σ level—the first detection of atomic emission from the disk. No other emission lines were seen, despite the fact that the O I line is the brightest one observed in Herschel protoplanetary disk spectra. We present an estimate of the amount of circumstellar atomic gas implied by the C II emission. The new far-IR/sub-mm data fills in a large gap in the previous spectral energy distribution (SED) of 49 Cet. A simple model of the new SED confirms the two-component structure of the disk: warm inner dust and cold outer dust that produces most of the observed excess. Finally, we discuss preliminary thermochemical modeling of the 49 Cet gas/dust disk and our attempts to match several observational results simultaneously. Although we are not yet successful in doing so, our investigations shed light on the evolutionary status of the 49 Cet gas, which might not be primordial gas but rather secondary gas coming from comets.

  6. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN THE UNUSUAL 49 Ceti DEBRIS DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberge, A. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kamp, I. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Montesinos, B. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (INTA-CSIC), ESAC Campus, PO Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA, Avda Apoquindo 3846, Piso 19, Edificio Alsacia, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Meeus, G.; Eiroa, C. [Departmento Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Donaldson, J. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Olofsson, J. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Moor, A. [Konkoly Observatory of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Augereau, J.-C.; Thi, W.-F. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble, UMR 5274, F-38041, Grenoble (France); Howard, C.; Sandell, G. [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, Building N232, PO Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ardila, D. R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Mail Stop 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Woitke, P., E-mail: Aki.Roberge@nasa.gov [University of Vienna, Department of Astronomy, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    We present far-IR/sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy of 49 Ceti, an unusual circumstellar disk around a nearby young A1V star. The system is famous for showing the dust properties of a debris disk, but the gas properties of a low-mass protoplanetary disk. The data were acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, largely as part of the ''Gas in Protoplanetary Systems'' (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. Disk dust emission is detected in images at 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m; 49 Cet is significantly extended in the 70 {mu}m image, spatially resolving the outer dust disk for the first time. Spectra covering small wavelength ranges centered on eight atomic and molecular emission lines were obtained, including [O I] 63 {mu}m and [C II] 158 {mu}m. The C II line was detected at the 5{sigma} level-the first detection of atomic emission from the disk. No other emission lines were seen, despite the fact that the O I line is the brightest one observed in Herschel protoplanetary disk spectra. We present an estimate of the amount of circumstellar atomic gas implied by the C II emission. The new far-IR/sub-mm data fills in a large gap in the previous spectral energy distribution (SED) of 49 Cet. A simple model of the new SED confirms the two-component structure of the disk: warm inner dust and cold outer dust that produces most of the observed excess. Finally, we discuss preliminary thermochemical modeling of the 49 Cet gas/dust disk and our attempts to match several observational results simultaneously. Although we are not yet successful in doing so, our investigations shed light on the evolutionary status of the 49 Cet gas, which might not be primordial gas but rather secondary gas coming from comets.

  7. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-06

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars.

  8. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Jeffrey [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Masset, Frédéric; Velasco, David [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad s/n, 62210 Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Lega, Elena, E-mail: jeffrey.fung@berkeley.edu [Université de la Côte d’Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange UMR 7293, Nice (France)

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential ( r {sub s}), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk ( γ ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r {sub s} or γ , up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r {sub s} and γ in our study.

  9. Observability of characteristic binary-induced structures in circumbinary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramenko, R.; Wolf, S.; Illenseer, T. F.

    2017-07-01

    Context. A substantial fraction of protoplanetary disks form around stellar binaries. The binary system generates a time-dependent non-axisymmetric gravitational potential, inducing strong tidal forces on the circumbinary disk. This leads to a change in basic physical properties of the circumbinary disk, which should in turn result in unique structures that are potentially observable with the current generation of instruments. Aims: The goal of this study is to identify these characteristic structures, constrain the physical conditions that cause them, and evaluate the feasibility of observing them in circumbinary disks. Methods: To achieve this, first we perform 2D hydrodynamic simulations. The resulting density distributions are post-processed with a 3D radiative transfer code to generate re-emission and scattered light maps. Based on these distributions, we study the influence of various parameters, such as the mass of the stellar components, mass of the disk, and binary separation on observable features in circumbinary disks. Results: We find that the Atacama Large (sub-)Millimetre Array (ALMA) as well as the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) are capable of tracing asymmetries in the inner region of circumbinary disks, which are affected most by the binary-disk interaction. Observations at submillimetre/millimetre wavelengths allow the detection of the density waves at the inner rim of the disk and inner cavity. With the E-ELT one can partially resolve the innermost parts of the disk in the infrared wavelength range, including the disk's rim, accretion arms, and potentially the expected circumstellar disks around each of the binary components.

  10. A SPITZER IRS SURVEY OF NGC 1333: INSIGHTS INTO DISK EVOLUTION FROM A VERY YOUNG CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, L. A.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Manoj, P.; Remming, I.; Sheehan, P.; Forrest, W. J.; Mamajek, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Adame, L.; McClure, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 264-723, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ausfeld, K.; Rapson, V. A., E-mail: laa@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    We report on the {lambda} = 5-36 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling and the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using 'extinction-free' spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects that show disk-dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well-studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.

  11. On the structure of the transition disk around TW Hydrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menu, J.; van Boekel, R.; Henning, Th.; Chandler, C. J.; Linz, H.; Benisty, M.; Lacour, S.; Min, M.; Waelkens, C.; Andrews, S. M.; Calvet, N.; Carpenter, J. M.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Isella, A.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Ménard, F.; Mundy, L. G.; Pérez, L. M.; Ricci, L.; Sargent, A. I.; Storm, S.; Testi, L.; Wilner, D. J.

    2014-04-01

    Context. For over a decade, the structure of the inner cavity in the transition disk of TW Hydrae has been a subject of debate. Modeling the disk with data obtained at different wavelengths has led to a variety of proposed disk structures. Rather than being inconsistent, the individual models might point to the different faces of physical processes going on in disks, such as dust growth and planet formation. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the structure of the transition disk again and to find to what extent we can reconcile apparent model differences. Methods: A large set of high-angular-resolution data was collected from near-infrared to centimeter wavelengths. We investigated the existing disk models and established a new self-consistent radiative-transfer model. A genetic fitting algorithm was used to automatize the parameter fitting, and uncertainties were investigated in a Bayesian framework. Results: Simple disk models with a vertical inner rim and a radially homogeneous dust composition from small to large grains cannot reproduce the combined data set. Two modifications are applied to this simple disk model: (1) the inner rim is smoothed by exponentially decreasing the surface density in the inner ~3 AU, and (2) the largest grains (>100 μm) are concentrated towards the inner disk region. Both properties can be linked to fundamental processes that determine the evolution of protoplanetary disks: the shaping by a possible companion and the different regimes of dust-grain growth, respectively. Conclusions: The full interferometric data set from near-infrared to centimeter wavelengths requires a revision of existing models for the TW Hya disk. We present a new model that incorporates the characteristic structures of previous models but deviates in two key aspects: it does not have a sharp edge at 4 AU, and the surface density of large grains differs from that of smaller grains. This is the first successful radiative-transfer-based model for a full set of

  12. Probing the Origin and Evolution of Interstellar and Protoplanetary Biogenic Ices with SPHEREx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Gary; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    Many of the most important building blocks of life are locked in interstellar and protoplanetary ices. Examples include H2O, CO, CO2, and CH3OH, among others. There is growing evidence that within the cores of dense molecular clouds and the mid-plane of protoplanetary disks the abundance of these species in ices far exceeds that in the gas phase. As a result, collisions between ice-bearing bodies and newly forming planets are thought to be a major means of delivering these key species to young planets. There currently exist fewer than 250 ice absorption spectra toward Galactic molecular clouds, which is insufficient to reliably trace the ice content of clouds through the various evolutionary stages of collapse to form stars and planets. Likewise, the current number of spectra is inadequate to assess the effects of environment, such as cloud density and temperature, presence or absence of embedded sources, external FUV and X-ray radiation, gas-phase composition, or cosmic-ray ionization rate, on the ice composition of clouds at similar stages of evolution. Ultimately, our goal is to understand how these findings connect to our own Solar System.SPHEREx will be a game changer for the study of interstellar, circumstellar, and protoplanetary disk ices. SPHEREx will obtain spectra over the entire sky in the optical and near-IR, including the 2.5 to 5.0 micron region, which contains the above biogenic ice features. SPHEREx will detect millions of potential background continuum point sources already catalogued by NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) at 3.4 and 4.6 microns for which there is evidence for intervening gas and dust based on the 2MASS+WISE colors with sufficient sensitivity to yield ice absorption spectra with SNR ≥ 100 per spectral resolution element. The resulting > 100-fold increase in the number of high-quality ice absorption spectra toward a wide variety of regions distributed throughout the Galaxy will reveal correlations between ice

  13. The Gas Content Of Protoplanetary Herbig Ae/be Discs As Seen With Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Gwendolyn; (Herschel OTKP, GASPS; Dent), PI B.

    2011-09-01

    The mechanisms determining planet formation are not (yet) well-understood. Primordial protoplanetary discs consist 99% out of gas, and only 1% out of dust. With time, those discs are believed to evolve from a flaring geometry into a flat geometry, as the initially small dust grains grow to larger sizes and settle towards the mid-plane. In the mean time, the gas will disperse, until so little is left that giant planets no longer can form. As an important piece of the puzzle of planet formation, it is important to understand the influence of the gas heating/cooling processes on the young disc structure, its chemical composition and finally how fast gas gets dispersed. In this talk, we study the protoplanetary discs around Herbig Ae/Be stars, young objects of intermediate mass, in the context of its gas content. We present Herschel PACS spectroscopic observations for a sample that was obtained within the GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems) Open Time Key Project, concentrating on the detection and characterisation of emission lines of the [OI], [CII], and CO, tracing the disc between 5 and 500 AU. We look for correlations between the observed line fluxes and stellar properties such as effective temperature, Halpha emission, accretion rates and UV flux, as well as the disc properties: degree of flaring, presence and strength of PAH emission and disc mass. We will present a few cases to show how simultaneous modeling (using the thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo) of the atomic fine structure lines and both molecular lines can constrain the disc gas mass, once the disc structure is derived. Finally, we compare our gas line observations with those of young debris disc stars, for which the HAEBE stars are thought to be progenitors.

  14. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  15. CYANIDE PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND NITROGEN FRACTIONATION IN THE MWC 480 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C., E-mail: vguzman@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    HCN is a commonly observed molecule in Solar System bodies and in interstellar environments. Its abundance with respect to CN is a proposed tracer of UV exposure. HCN is also frequently used to probe the thermal history of objects, by measuring its degree of nitrogen fractionation. To address the utility of HCN as a probe of disks, we present Atacama Large (sub-) Millimeter Array observations of CN, HCN, H{sup 13}CN, and HC{sup 15}N toward the protoplanetary disk around Herbig Ae star MWC 480, and of CN and HCN toward the disk around T Tauri star DM Tau. Emission from all molecules is clearly detected and spatially resolved, including the first detection of HC{sup 15}N in a disk. Toward MWC 480, CN emission extends radially more than 1″ exterior to the observed cut-off of HCN emission. Quantitative modeling further reveals very different radial abundance profiles for CN and HCN, with best-fit outer cut-off radii of >300 AU and 110 ± 10 AU, respectively. This result is in agreement with model predictions of efficient HCN photodissociation into CN in the outer-part of the disk where the vertical gas and dust column densities are low. No such difference in CN and HCN emission profiles are observed toward DM Tau, suggestive of different photochemical structures in Herbig Ae and T Tauri disks. We use the HCN isotopologue data toward the MWC 480 disk to provide the first measurement of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in a disk. We find a low disk averaged {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of 200 ± 100, comparable to what is observed in cloud cores and comets, demonstrating interstellar inheritance and/or efficient nitrogen fractionation in this disk.

  16. First Results from the Disk Eclipse Search with KELT (DESK) Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2016-01-01

    Using time-series photometry from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) exoplanet survey, we are looking for eclipses of stars by their protoplanetary disks, specifically in young stellar associations. To date, we have discovered two previously unknown, large dimming events around the young stars RW Aurigae and V409 Tau. We attribute the dimming of RW Aurigae to an occultation by its tidally disrupted disk, with the disruption perhaps resulting from a recent flyby of its binary companion. Even with the dynamical environment of RW Aurigae, the distorted disk material remains very compact and presumably capable of forming planets. This system also shows that strong binary interactions with disks can also influence planet and core composition by stirring up and mixing materials during planet formation. We interpret the dimming of V409 Tau to be due to a feature, possibly a warp or perturbation, lying at least 10 AU from the host star in its nearly edge-on circumstellar disk.

  17. DiskDetective.org: Finding Homes for Exoplanets Through Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    The Disk Detective project is scouring the data archive from the WISE all-sky survey to find new debris disks and protoplanetary disks-the dusty dens where exoplanets form and dwell. Volunteers on this citizen science website have already performed 1.6 million classifications, searching a catalog 8x the size of any published WISE survey. We follow up candidates using ground based telescopes in California, Arizona, Chile, Hawaii, and Argentina. We ultimately expect to increase the pool of known debris disks by approx. 400 and triple the solid angle in clusters of young stars examined with WISE, providing a unique new catalog of isolated disk stars, key planet-search targets, and candidate advanced extraterrestrial civilizations. Come to this talk to hear the news about our latest dusty discoveries and the trials and the ecstasy of launching a new citizen science project. Please bring your laptop or smartphone if you like!

  18. Hydrodynamic ablation of protoplanetary discs via supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, J. L.; Pittard, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations of a protoplanetary disc subject to the effect of a nearby (0.3 pc distant) supernova (SN), using a time-dependent flow from a one-dimensional numerical model of the supernova remnant (SNR), in addition to constant peak ram pressure simulations. Simulations are performed for a variety of disc masses and inclination angles. We find disc mass-loss rates that are typically 10-7-10-6 M⊙ yr-1 (but they peak near 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 during the 'instantaneous' stripping phase) and are sustained for around 200 yr. Inclination angle has little effect on the mass-loss unless the disc is close to edge-on. Inclined discs also strip asymmetrically with the trailing edge ablating more easily. Since the interaction lasts less than one outer rotation period, there is not enough time for the disc to restore its symmetry, leaving the disc asymmetrical after the flow has passed. Of the low-mass discs considered, only the edge-on disc is able to survive interaction with the SNR (with 50 per cent of its initial mass remaining). At the end of the simulations, discs that survive contain fractional masses of SN material up to 5 × 10-6. This is too low to explain the abundance of short-lived radionuclides in the early Solar system, but a larger disc and the inclusion of radiative cooling might allow the disc to capture a higher fraction of SN material.

  19. Spiral arms in thermally stratified protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Attila; Rosotti, Giovanni P.

    2018-02-01

    Spiral arms have been observed in nearly a dozen protoplanetary discs in near-infrared scattered light and recently also in the submillimetre continuum. While one of the most compelling explanations is that they are driven by planetary or stellar companions, in all but one cases such companions have not yet been detected and there is even ambiguity on whether the planet should be located inside or outside the spirals. Here, we use 3D hydrodynamic simulations to study the morphology of spiral density waves launched by embedded planets taking into account the vertical temperature gradient, a natural consequence of stellar irradiation. Our simulations show that the pitch angle of the spirals in thermally stratified discs is the lowest in the disc mid-plane and increases towards the disc surface. We combine the hydrodynamic simulations with 3D radiative transfer calculations to predict that the pitch angle of planetary spirals observed in the near-infrared is higher than in the submillimetre. We also find that in both cases the spirals converge towards the planet. This provides a new powerful observational method to determine if the perturbing planet is inside or outside the spirals, as well as map the thermal stratification of the disc.

  20. Gravito-turbulence in irradiated protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Shigenobu; Shi, Ji-Ming

    2017-07-01

    Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a local stratified shearing box with realistic equations of state and opacities, we explored the outcome of self-gravity at 50 au in a protoplanetary disc irradiated by the central star. We found that gravito-turbulence is sustained for a finite range of the surface density, from ˜80 to ˜ 250 g cm-2. The disc is laminar below the range while fragments above it. In the range of gravito-turbulence, the Toomre parameter decreases monotonically from ˜1 to ˜0.7 as the surface density increases while an effective cooling time is almost constant at ˜4 in terms of the inverse of the orbital frequency. The turbulent motions are supersonic at all heights, which dissipates through both shock waves and compressional heating. The compressional motions, occurring near the mid-plane, create upward flows, which not only contribute to supporting the disc but also to transporting the dissipated energy to the disc surfaces. The irradiation does not affect much the gravito-turbulence near the mid-plane unless the grazing angle is larger than 0.32. We also show that a simple cooling function with a constant cooling time does not approximate the realistic cooling.

  1. Transitional Disks Associated with Intermediate-Mass Stars: Results of the SEEDS YSO Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; McElwain, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are where planets form, grow, and migrate to produce the diversity of exoplanet systems we observe in mature systems. Disks where this process has advanced to the stage of gap opening, and in some cases central cavity formation, have been termed pre-transitional and transitional disks in the hope that they represent intermediate steps toward planetary system formation. Recent reviews have focussed on disks where the star is of solar or sub-solar mass. In contrast to the sub-millimeter where cleared central cavities predominate, at H-band some T Tauri star transitional disks resemble primordial disks in having no indication of clearing, some show a break in the radial surface brightness profile at the inner edge of the outer disk, while others have partially to fully cleared gaps or central cavities. Recently, the Meeus Group I Herbig stars, intermediate-mass PMS stars with IR spectral energy distributions often interpreted as flared disks, have been proposed to have transitional and pre-transitional disks similar to those associated with solar-mass PMS stars, based on thermal-IR imaging, and sub-millimeter interferometry. We have investigated their appearance in scattered light as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS), obtaining H-band polarimetric imagery of 10 intermediate-mass stars with Meeus Group I disks. Augmented by other disks with imagery in the literature, the sample is now sufficiently large to explore how these disks are similar to and differ from T Tauri star disks. The disk morphologies seen in the Tauri disks are also found for the intermediate-mass star disks, but additional phenomena are found; a hallmark of these disks is remarkable individuality and diversity which does not simply correlate with disk mass or stellar properties, including age, including spiral arms in remnant envelopes, arms in the disk, asymmetrically and potentially variably shadowed outer disks, gaps, and one disk

  2. Internal and environmental secular evolution of disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2015-03-01

    This Special Session is devoted to the secular evolution of disk galaxies. Here `secular' means `slow' i.e., evolution on time scales that are generally much longer than the galaxy crossing or rotation time. Internal and environmentally driven evolution both are covered. I am indebted to Albert Bosma for reminding me at the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School on Secular Evolution that our subject first appeared in print in a comment made by Ivan King (1977) in his introductory talk at the Yale University meeting on The Evolution of Galaxies and Stellar Populations: `John Kormendy would like us to consider the possibility that a galaxy can interact with itself.. . . I'm not at all convinced, but John can show you some interesting pictures.' Two of the earliest papers that followed were Kormendy (1979a, b); the first discusses the interaction of galaxy components with each other, and the second studies these phenomena in the context of a morphological survey of barred galaxies. The earliest modeling paper that we still use regularly is Combes & Sanders (1981), which introduces the now well known idea that box-shaped bulges in edge-on galaxies are side-on, vertically thickened bars. It is gratifying to see how this subject has grown since that time. Hundreds of papers have been written, and the topic features prominently at many meetings (e.g., Block et al. 2004; Falcoń-Barroso & Knapen 2012, and this Special Session). My talk here introduces both internal and environmental secular evolution; a brief abstract follows. My Canary Islands Winter School review covers both subjects in more detail (Kormendy 2012). Kormendy & Kennicutt (2004) is a comprehensive review of internal secular evolution, and Kormendy & Bender (2012) covers environmental evolution. Both of these subject make significant progress at this meeting. Secular evolution happens because self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable by the evolution processes

  3. Capture of Planetesimals by Gas Drag from Circumplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, K.; Tanigawa, T.

    2012-10-01

    The regular satellites of the giant planets (e.g. Galilean satellites) have nearly circular and coplanar prograde orbits, and are thought to have formed by accretion of solid particles in the circumplanetary disk. Because a significant amount of gas and solids are likely to be supplied to growing giant planets through the circumplanetary disk, the amount of solid material in circumplanetary disks is important not only for satellite formation but also for the growth and the origin of the heavy element content of giant planets. Solid particles smaller than meter-scale are strongly coupled with the gas flow from the protoplanetary disk and delivered into the disk with the gas. On the other hand, trajectories of large planetesimals are decoupled from the gas. When these large planetesimals approach a growing giant planet, their orbits can be perturbed by gas drag from the circumplanetary disk depending on their size and random velocity, and some of them would be captured by the disk. In the present work, we examine orbital evolution of planetesimals approaching a growing giant planet with a circumplanetary disks by integrating Hill’s equation including the gas drag term. We assume that the gas in the disk rotates in circular orbits around the planet. We found that the condition for capture of planetesimals approaching in the prograde direction (i.e., trajectory in the same direction as the circular motion of the gas) is different from that for those approaching in the retrograde trajectories. We obtained analytic expressions for energy dissipation, critical approach distance from the planet for capture, and capture probability for prograde and retrograde orbits in the coplanar case. We will discuss results of orbital integration for capture rates, including the cases of inclined orbits of planetesimals.

  4. Increased H$_2$CO production in the outer disk around HD 163296

    OpenAIRE

    Carney, M. T.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Loomis, R. A.; Salinas, V. N.; Öberg, K.I.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Three formaldehyde lines were observed (H$_2$CO 3$_{03}$--2$_{02}$, H$_2$CO 3$_{22}$--2$_{21}$, and H$_2$CO 3$_{21}$--2$_{20}$) in the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 with ALMA at 0.5 arcsecond (60 AU) spatial resolution. H$_2$CO 3$_{03}$--2$_{02}$ was readily detected via imaging, while the weaker H$_2$CO 3$_{22}$--2$_{21}$ and H$_2$CO 3$_{21}$--2$_{20}$ lines required matched filter analysis to detect. H$_2$CO is present throughout most of the gaseous disk, extending...

  5. Constraining the disk masses of the class I binary protostar GV Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A., E-mail: psheehan@email.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We present new spatially resolved 1.3 mm imaging with CARMA of the GV Tau system. GV Tau is a Class I binary protostar system in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, the components of which are separated by 1.''2. Each protostar is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk, and the pair may be surrounded by a circumbinary envelope. We analyze the data using detailed radiative transfer modeling of the system. We create synthetic protostar model spectra, images, and visibilities and compare them with CARMA 1.3 mm visibilities, a Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared scattered light image, and broadband spectral energy distributions from the literature to study the disk masses and geometries of the GV Tau disks. We show that the protoplanetary disks around GV Tau fall near the lower end of estimates of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, and may have just enough mass to form giant planets. When added to the sample of Class I protostars from Eisner, we confirm that Class I protostars are on average more massive than their Class II counterparts. This suggests that substantial dust grain processing occurs between the Class I and Class II stages, and may help to explain why the Class II protostars do not appear to have, on average, enough mass in their disks to form giant planets.

  6. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  7. What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Gáspár, András, E-mail: ballerin@email.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    The architectures of debris disks encode the history of planet formation in these systems. Studies of debris disks via their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have found infrared excesses arising from cold dust, warm dust, or a combination of the two. The cold outer belts of many systems have been imaged, facilitating their study in great detail. Far less is known about the warm components, including the origin of the dust. The regularity of the disk temperatures indicates an underlying structure that may be linked to the water snow line. If the dust is generated from collisions in an exo-asteroid belt, the dust will likely trace the location of the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk where planetesimal growth was enhanced. If instead the warm dust arises from the inward transport from a reservoir of icy material farther out in the system, the dust location is expected to be set by the current snow line. We analyze the SEDs of a large sample of debris disks with warm components. We find that warm components in single-component systems (those without detectable cold components) follow the primordial snow line rather than the current snow line, so they likely arise from exo-asteroid belts. While the locations of many warm components in two-component systems are also consistent with the primordial snow line, there is more diversity among these systems, suggesting additional effects play a role.

  8. What Sets the Radial Locations of Warm Debris Disks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballering, Nicholas P.; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Gáspár, András

    2017-08-01

    The architectures of debris disks encode the history of planet formation in these systems. Studies of debris disks via their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have found infrared excesses arising from cold dust, warm dust, or a combination of the two. The cold outer belts of many systems have been imaged, facilitating their study in great detail. Far less is known about the warm components, including the origin of the dust. The regularity of the disk temperatures indicates an underlying structure that may be linked to the water snow line. If the dust is generated from collisions in an exo-asteroid belt, the dust will likely trace the location of the water snow line in the primordial protoplanetary disk where planetesimal growth was enhanced. If instead the warm dust arises from the inward transport from a reservoir of icy material farther out in the system, the dust location is expected to be set by the current snow line. We analyze the SEDs of a large sample of debris disks with warm components. We find that warm components in single-component systems (those without detectable cold components) follow the primordial snow line rather than the current snow line, so they likely arise from exo-asteroid belts. While the locations of many warm components in two-component systems are also consistent with the primordial snow line, there is more diversity among these systems, suggesting additional effects play a role.

  9. The unusual protoplanetary disk around the T Tauri star ET Chamaeleontis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitke, P.; Riaz, B.; Duchene, G.; Pascucci, I.; Lyo, A. -R.; Dent, W. R. F.; Phillips, N.; Thi, W. -F.; Menard, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Bergin, E.; Brown, A.; Mora, A.; Kamp, I.; Aresu, G.; Brittain, S.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Sandell, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present new continuum and line observations, along with modelling, of the faint (6-8) Myr old T Tauri star ET Cha belonging to the eta Chamaeleontis cluster. We have acquired Herschel/PACS photometric fluxes at 70 mu m and 160 mu m, as well as a detection of the [OI] 63 mu m fine-structure line

  10. The Cosmic-Ray Dominated Midplane of Protoplanetary Disks : The Solar System Connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro Molano, German

    2013-01-01

    De chemie van het prille zonnestelsel In zijn proefschrift probeert Germán Chaparro Molano de chemische omstandigheden van het prille zonnestelsel vast te leggen. Dit doet hij door modellen van de chemische evolutie van protoplanetaire schijven te analyseren en te vergelijken met onze huidige kennis

  11. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro, G.; Kamp, I.

    The history of trapping important quantities of carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules onto the grains is of special significance for the formation of more complex (organic) molecules in the early solar system. Among other processes, cosmic ray-induced UV photo-processes can lead to the efficient

  12. Origin and Distribution of 26Al and Mg Isotopes in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    Understanding when and how our solar system formed is perhaps one of the most fundamental questions in natural sciences. The prime cosmochemical tools to achieve this goal are the remnants of the earliest stages of planet formation; meteorites and their components. Evidence for the former presence...... of short-lived radioactive nuclides in these ancient materials is a direct reflection of their recent nucleosynthetic origin prior to or during formation of our young solar system 4.6 Myr ago. Disentangling the origin and distribution of this nucleosynthetic heritage provides a fossil record of the dynamic...... birth environment of our Sun and a unique time-window into the very earliest history of our solar system. Ever since the discovery of its decay product, 26Mg, in primitive solar system objects more than 30 years ago, the short-lived radioactive nuclide, 26Al (t1/2 = 0.73 Myr), has been the optimal...

  13. Nature vs. Nurture: The influence of OB star environments on proto-planetary disk evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    We propose a combined IRAC/IRS study of a large, well-defined and unbiased X-ray selected sample of pre-main-sequence stars in three OB associations: Pismis 24 in NGC 6357, NGC 2244 in the Rosette Nebula, and IC 1795 in the W3 complex. The samples are based on recent Chandra X-ray Observatory studies which reliably identify hundreds of cluster members and were carefully chosen to avoid high infrared nebular background. A new Chandra exposure of IC 1795 is requested, and an optical followup to characterise the host stars is planned.

  14. Distribution of 26Al in the CR chondrite chondrule-forming region of the protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Devin L.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Ogliore, Ryan C.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Amelin, Yuri; Stirling, Claudine H.; Kaltenbach, Angela

    2017-03-01

    We report on the mineralogy, petrography, and in situ measured oxygen- and magnesium-isotope compositions of eight porphyritic chondrules (seven FeO-poor and one FeO-rich) from the Renazzo-like carbonaceous (CR) chondrites Graves Nunataks 95229, Grosvenor Mountains 03116, Pecora Escarpment 91082, and Queen Alexandra Range 99177, which experienced minor aqueous alteration and very mild thermal metamorphism. We find no evidence that these processes modified the oxygen- or Al-Mg isotope systematics of chondrules in these meteorites. Olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, and plagioclase within an individual chondrule have similar O-isotope compositions, suggesting crystallization from isotopically uniform melts. The only exceptions are relict grains in two of the chondrules; these grains are 16O-enriched relative to phenocrysts of the host chondrules. Only the FeO-rich chondrule shows a resolvable excesses of 26Mg, corresponding to an inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratio [(26Al/27Al)0] of (2.5 ± 1.6) × 10-6 (±2SE). Combining these results with the previously reported Al-Mg isotope systematics of CR chondrules (Nagashima et al., 2014, Geochem. J. 48, 561), 7 of 22 chondrules (32%) measured show resolvable excesses of 26Mg; the presence of excess 26Mg does not correlate with the FeO content of chondrule silicates. In contrast, virtually all chondrules in weakly metamorphosed (petrologic type 3.0-3.1) unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs), Ornans-like carbonaceous (CO) chondrites, and the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 show resolvable excesses of 26Mg. The inferred (26Al/27Al)0 in CR chondrules with resolvable excesses of 26Mg range from (1.0 ± 0.4) × 10-6 to (6.3 ± 0.9) × 10-6, which is typically lower than (26Al/27Al)0 in the majority of chondrules from UOCs, COs, and Acfer 094. Based on the inferred (26Al/27Al)0, three populations of CR chondrules are recognized; the population characterized by low (26Al/27Al)0 (4.0-0.3+0.5 Ma after the formation of CAIs with the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio, although rapid accretion after formation of the major population of CR chondrules is not required by our data.

  15. The building blocks of planets within the `terrestrial' region of protoplanetary disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boekel, R.J.H.M.; Min, M.; Leinert, C.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Richichi, A.; Chesneau, O.; Dominik, C.; Jaffe, W.; Dutrey, A.; Graser, U.; Henning, T.; de Jong, J.; Köhler, R.; de Koter, A.; Lopez, B.; Malbet, F.; Morel, S.; Paresce, F.; Perrin, G.; Preibisch, T.; Przygodda, F.; Schöller, M.; Wittkowski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Our Solar System was formed from a cloud of gas and dust. Most of the dust mass is contained in amorphous silicates, yet crystalline silicates are abundant throughout the Solar System, reflecting the thermal and chemical alteration of solids during planet formation. (Even primitive bodies such as

  16. GAS GAPS IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND THE YOUNG PROTOSTAR HL TAU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Gu, Pin-Gao; Hirano, Naomi; Lee, Chin-Fei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, Hauyu Baobab [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Puspitaningrum, Evaria, E-mail: hwyen@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Astronomy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-01

    We have analyzed the HCO{sup +} (1–0) data of the Class I–II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO{sup +} image cube at an angular resolution of ∼0.″07 (∼10 au) and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO{sup +} integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ∼28 and ∼69 au and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO{sup +} gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 au. The outer HCO{sup +} gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 au and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 and 74 au. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO{sup +} gas. We derived the HCO{sup +} column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the FWHM widths of the inner and outer HCO{sup +} gaps are both estimated to be ∼14 au, and their depths are estimated to be ∼2.4 and ∼5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.

  17. Accretion timescales and style of asteroidal differentiation in an 26Al-poor protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The decay of radioactive 26Al to 26Mg (half-life of 730,000years) is postulated to have been the main energy source promoting asteroidal melting and differentiation in the nascent solar system. High-resolution chronological information provided by the 26Al-26Mg decay system is, therefore, intrins......The decay of radioactive 26Al to 26Mg (half-life of 730,000years) is postulated to have been the main energy source promoting asteroidal melting and differentiation in the nascent solar system. High-resolution chronological information provided by the 26Al-26Mg decay system is, therefore......, intrinsically linked to the thermal evolution of early-formed planetesimals. In this paper, we explore the timing and style of asteroidal differentiation by combining high-precision Mg isotope measurements of meteorites with thermal evolution models for planetesimals. In detail, we report Mg isotope data...

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ALMA survey of Lupus protoplanetary disks. I. (Ansdell+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; van der Marel, N.; Carpenter, J. M.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Mathews, G. S.; Manara, C. F.; Miotello, A.; Natta, A.; Oliveira, I.; Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Terwisga, S. E.

    2016-11-01

    Our ALMA Cycle 2 observations (Project ID: 2013.1.00220.S) were obtained on 2015 June 14 (AGK-type sources and unknown spectral types) and 2015 June 15 (M-type sources). The continuum spectral windows were centered on 328.3, 340.0, and 341.8GHz with bandwidths of 1.875, 0.938, and 1.875 GHz and channel widths of 15.625, 0.244, and 0.977MHz, respectively. The bandwidth-weighted mean continuum frequency was 335.8GHz (890um). The spectral setup included two windows covering the 13CO and C18O 3-2 transitions; these spectral windows were centered on 330.6 and 329.3GHz, respectively, with bandwidths of 58.594MHz, channel widths of 0.122MHz, and velocity resolutions of 0.11km/s. (3 data files).

  19. Disk Storage Server

    CERN Multimedia

    This model was a disk storage server used in the Data Centre up until 2012. Each tray contains a hard disk drive (see the 5TB hard disk drive on the main disk display section - this actually fits into one of the trays). There are 16 trays in all per server. There are hundreds of these servers mounted on racks in the Data Centre, as can be seen.

  20. Variable H13CO+ Emission in the IM Lup Disk: X-Ray Driven Time-dependent Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean; Wilner, David; Loomis, Ryan

    2017-07-01

    We report the first detection of a substantial brightening event in an isotopologue of a key molecular ion, HCO+, within a protoplanetary disk of a T Tauri star. The H13CO+ J=3-2 rotational transition was observed three times toward IM Lup between 2014 July and 2015 May with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The first two observations show similar spectrally integrated line and continuum fluxes, while the third observation shows a doubling in the disk-integrated J=3-2 line flux compared to the continuum, which does not change between the three epochs. We explore models of an X-ray active star irradiating the disk via stellar flares, and find that the optically thin H13CO+ emission variation can potentially be explained via X-ray-driven chemistry temporarily enhancing the HCO+ abundance in the upper layers of the disk atmosphere during large or prolonged flaring events. If the HCO+ enhancement is indeed caused by an X-ray flare, future observations should be able to spatially resolve these events and potentially enable us to watch the chemical aftermath of the high-energy stellar radiation propagating across the face of protoplanetary disks, providing a new pathway to explore ionization physics and chemistry, including electron density, in disks.

  1. Disk Masses for Embedded Class I Protostars in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.

    2017-12-01

    Class I protostars are thought to represent an early stage in the lifetime of protoplanetary disks, when they are still embedded in their natal envelope. Here we measure the disk masses of 10 Class I protostars in the Taurus Molecular Cloud to constrain the initial mass budget for forming planets in disks. We use radiative transfer modeling to produce synthetic protostar observations and fit the models to a multi-wavelength data set using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo fitting procedure. We fit these models simultaneously to our new Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 1.3 mm observations that are sensitive to the wide range of spatial scales that are expected from protostellar disks and envelopes so as to be able to distinguish each component, as well as broadband spectral energy distributions compiled from the literature. We find a median disk mass of 0.018 {M}ȯ on average, more massive than the Taurus Class II disks, which have median disk mass of ∼ 0.0025 {M}ȯ . This decrease in disk mass can be explained if dust grains have grown by a factor of 75 in grain size, indicating that by the Class II stage, at a few Myr, a significant amount of dust grain processing has occurred. However, there is evidence that significant dust processing has occurred even during the Class I stage, so it is likely that the initial mass budget is higher than the value quoted here.

  2. Modeling the HD 32297 Debris Disk with Far-IR Herschel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Jessica; Roberge, A.

    2012-01-01

    SED modeling of debris disks is an important tool for revealing information about disk structure and the dust composition. Combining SED modeling and resolved imaging can constrain disk parameters and break degeneracies that plague SED modeling efforts. This allows us to constrain the location of the planetesimal belt and determine the composition of the dust grains. We apply these techniques to the disk of HD 32297. HD 32297 is a 30-Myr-old A0 star 112 pc away with a nearly edge-on debris disk that extends hundreds of AUs from the star. The HD 32297 debris disk has been resolved at several wavelengths (near-IR with HST NICMOS, mid-IR with Gemini South, and millimeter wavelengths with CARMA). We combine resolved imagery of the disk with archive data from Hipparcos, 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and IRAS to model the disk. Additionally, we use Herschel PACS data from the Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme. The PACS photometry at 70, 100, and 160 microns further constrains the SED, and the PACS spectroscopy places upper limits on the gas abundance.

  3. STABILITY OF THE OUTER PLANETS IN MULTIRESONANT CONFIGURATIONS WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING PLANETESIMAL DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Aceves, H. [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Astronomía, Apdo.Postal 106, Ensenada, B.C. 22860 México (Mexico); Chavez, C. E., E-mail: maurey@astro.unam.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, 66451, México (Mexico)

    2015-05-10

    We study the effect of a massive planetesimal disk on the dynamical stability of the outer planets in a system representing the early solar system assuming, as has been suggested recently, that these planets were initially locked in a compact and multiresonant configuration as a result of gas-driven migration in a protoplanetary disk. The planetesimal disk is represented by an ensemble of 2000 lunar mass bodies for which the gravitational interaction is calculated self-consistently using the Mercury6.5 code. Several initial multiresonant configurations and planetesimal disk models are considered. Under such conditions a strong dynamical instability, manifested as a rapid giant planet migration and planetesimal disk dispersal, develops on a timescale of less than 40 Myr in most cases. Dynamical disk heating due to the gravitational interactions among planetesimals leads to more frequent interactions between the planetesimals and the ice giants, in comparison to models in which planetesimal–planetesimal interactions are neglected. The number of particles used to represent the planetesimal disk has implications for our results, and although our studies represent the first self-consistent calculations of unstable planetesimal-driven migration, our results point toward the need for using more realistic treatments of the planetesimal disk. Finally, in the framework of our model, we discuss the possible implications of our results on the early evolution of the solar system.

  4. GRAVITATIONAL DRAG ON A POINT MASS IN HYPERSONIC MOTION WITHIN A GAUSSIAN DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, J.; Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-468, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C., E-mail: jsanchez@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.una.mx, E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-01-01

    We develop an analytical model for the accretion and gravitational drag on a point mass that moves hypersonically in the midplane of a gaseous disk with a Gaussian vertical density stratification. Such a model is of interest for studying the interaction between a planet and a protoplanetary disk, as well as the dynamical decay of massive black holes in galactic nuclei. The model assumes that the flow is ballistic, and gives fully analytical expressions for both the accretion rate onto the point mass and the gravitational drag it suffers. The expressions are further simplified by taking the limits of a thick and of a thin disk. The results for the thick disk reduce correctly to those for a uniform density environment. We find that for a thin disk (small vertical scaleheight compared to the gravitational radius), the accretion rate is proportional to the mass of the moving object and to the surface density of the disk, while the drag force is independent of the velocity of the object. The gravitational deceleration of the hypersonic perturber in a thin disk was found to be independent of its parameters (i.e., mass or velocity) and depends only on the surface mass density of the disk. The predictions of the model are compared to the results of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, with reasonable agreement.

  5. Regression of lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu Evzikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the spinal nerve root, giving rise to pain and sensory and motor disorders in the area of its innervation is the most vivid manifestation of herniated intervertebral disk. Different treatment modalities, including neurosurgery, for evolving these conditions are discussed. There has been recent evidence that spontaneous regression of disk herniation can regress. The paper describes a female patient with large lateralized disc extrusion that has caused compression of the nerve root S1, leading to obvious myotonic and radicular syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the clinical manifestations of discogenic radiculopathy, as well myotonic syndrome and morphological changes completely regressed 8 months later. The likely mechanism is inflammation-induced resorption of a large herniated disk fragment, which agrees with the data available in the literature. A decision to perform neurosurgery for which the patient had indications was made during her first consultation. After regression of discogenic radiculopathy, there was only moderate pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases (facet syndrome, piriformis syndrome that were successfully eliminated by minimally invasive techniques. 

  6. ALMA unveils rings and gaps in the protoplanetary system HD 169142: signatures of two giant protoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, D.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Walsh, C.; Miotello, A.; Klaassen, P.; Bruderer, S.; Henning, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-04-01

    The protoplanetary system HD 169142 is one of the few cases where a potential candidate protoplanet has recently been detected by direct imaging in the near-infrared. To study the interaction between the protoplanet and the disk itself, observations of the gas and dust surface density structure are needed. This paper reports new ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm, 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 2-1 emission from the system HD 169142 (which is observed almost face-on) at an angular resolution of 0.3 arcsec × 0.2 arcsec ( 35 × 20 au). The dust continuum emission reveals a double-ring structure with an inner ring between 0.17 arcsec{-0.28 arcsec} ( 20-35 au) and an outer ring between 0.48 arcsec{-0.64 arcsec} ( 56-83 au). The size and position of the inner ring is in good agreement with previous polarimetric observations in the near-infrared and is consistent with dust trapping by a massive planet. No dust emission is detected inside the inner dust cavity (R ≲ 20 au) or within the dust gap ( 35-56 au) down to the noise level. In contrast, the channel maps of the J = 2-1 line of the three CO isotopologs reveal gas inside the dust cavity and dust gap. The gaseous disk is also much larger than the compact dust emission; it extends to 1.5 arcsec ( 180 au) in radius. This difference and the sharp drop of the continuum emission at large radii point to radial drift of large dust grains (>μm size). Using the thermo-chemical disk code dali, we modeled the continuum and the CO isotopolog emission to quantitatively measure the gas and dust surface densities. The resulting gas surface density is reduced by a factor of 30-40 inward of the dust gap. The gas and dust distribution indicate that two giant planets shape the disk structure through dynamical clearing (dust cavity and gap) and dust trapping (double-ring dust distribution).

  7. An asymmetric jet-launching model for the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velázquez, Pablo F.; Raga, Alejandro C.; Toledo-Roy, Juan C. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-543, C.P. 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Riera, Angels, E-mail: pablo@nucleares.unam.mx [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, EUETIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Comte d' Urgell 187, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-10-20

    We propose an asymmetrical jet-ejection mechanism in order to model the mirror symmetry observed in the lobe distribution of some protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs), such as the pPN CRL 618. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet launched from an orbiting source were carried out, including an alternation in the ejections of the two outflow lobes, depending on which side of the precessing accretion disk is hit by the accretion column from a Roche lobe-filling binary companion. Both synthetic optical emission maps and position-velocity diagrams were obtained from the numerical results with the purpose of carrying out a direct comparison with observations. Depending on the observer's point of view, multipolar morphologies are obtained that exhibit a mirror symmetry at large distances from the central source. The obtained lobe sizes and their spatial distributions are in good agreement with the observed morphology of the pPN CRL 618. We also obtain that the kinematic ages of the fingers are similar to those obtained in the observations.

  8. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  9. Exploring Disks Around Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Giant planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks surrounding young stars, but material may also accrete into a smaller disk around the planet. Weve never detected one of these circumplanetary disks before but thanks to new simulations, we now have a better idea of what to look for.Image from previous work simulating a Jupiter-mass planet forming inside a circumstellar disk. The planet has its own circumplanetary disk of accreted material. [Frdric Masset]Elusive DisksIn the formation of giant planets, we think the final phase consists of accretion onto the planet from a disk that surrounds it. This circumplanetary disk is important to understand, since it both regulates the late gas accretion and forms the birthplace of future satellites of the planet.Weve yet to detect a circumplanetary disk thus far, because the resolution needed to spot one has been out of reach. Now, however, were entering an era where the disk and its kinematics may be observable with high-powered telescopes (like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array).To prepare for such observations, we need models that predict the basic characteristics of these disks like the mass, temperature, and kinematic properties. Now a researcher at the ETH Zrich Institute for Astronomy in Switzerland, Judit Szulgyi, has worked toward this goal.Simulating CoolingSzulgyi performs a series of 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations of 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-mass (MJ) giant planets and their surrounding circumplanetary disks, embedded within the larger circumstellar disk around the central star.Density (left column), temperature (center), and normalized angular momentum (right) for a 1 MJ planet over temperatures cooling from 10,000 K (top) to 1,000 K (bottom). At high temperatures, a spherical circumplanetary envelope surrounds the planet, but as the planet cools, the envelope transitions around 64,000 K to a flattened disk. [Szulgyi 2017]This work explores the effects of different planet temperatures and

  10. Isolated unilateral disk edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varner P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul VarnerJohn J Pershing VAMC, Poplar Bluff, MO, USAAbstract: Isolated unilateral disk edema is a familiar clinical presentation with myriad associations. Related, non-consensus terminology is a barrier to understanding a common pathogenesis. Mechanisms for the development of disk edema are reviewed, and a new framework for clinical differentiation of medical associations is presented.Keywords: disk edema, axoplasmic flow, clinical multiplier, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, papilledema

  11. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  12. Dynamics of the inner edge of the dead zone in protoplanetaty disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Fromang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In protoplanetary disks, the inner boundary between an MRI active and inactive region has recently been suggested to be a promising site for planet formation. A set of numerical simulations has indeed shown that vortex formation mediated by the Rossby wave instability is a natural consequence of the disk dynamics at that location. However, such models have so far considered only the case of an isothermal equation of state, while the more complex thermodynamics of this region may have strong consequences on disk properties because of thermal ionization. Gas is heated by turbulent dissipation and radiatively cools on long timescales because disks are optically thick. Using a mean field model of the dynamics of that boundary, Latter and Balbus (2012 have shown that this complexity can lead to situations in which the active/dead interface moves systematically inward or outward, depending on the initial conditions. This is because turbulent activity is controlled by ohmic resistivity that is itself a sensitive function of temperature. Such a behavior suggests, as observed in young stellar object, a nonsteady accretion onto the central star. Using the Godunov code Ramses, we have performed 3D global numerical simulations of protoplanetary disks that relax the isothermal hypothesis in order to check the above scenario. We confirm the existence of such MRI fronts, thus validating the mean field approach described above. As shown by Latter and Balbus (2012, MRI fronts tend to stop at a critical radius. We argue that the typical front velocity crucially depends on turbulent diffusion of temperature. The diffusivity of temperature due to turbulence is measured to be order of H2/Ω where Ω is the local orbital time and H the typical height of the disk.

  13. An SMA Continuum Survey of Circumstellar Disks in the Serpens Star-forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Charles J.; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Qi, Chunhua

    2017-12-01

    We present observations with the Submillimeter Array of the continuum emission at λ =1.3 {mm} from 62 young stars surrounded by a protoplanetary disk in the Serpens star-forming region. The typical angular resolution for the survey in terms of beam size is 3\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5× 2\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 with a median rms noise level of 1.6 mJy beam‑1. These data are used to infer the dust content in disks around low-mass stars (0.1{--}2.5 {M}ȯ ) at a median stellar age of 1–3 Myr. Thirteen sources were detected in the 1.3 mm dust continuum with inferred dust masses of ≈ 10{--}260 {M}\\oplus and an upper limit to the median dust mass of {5.1}-4.3+6.1 {M}\\oplus , derived using survival analysis. Comparing the protoplanetary disk population in Serpens to those of other nearby star-forming regions, we find that the populations of dust disks in Serpens and Taurus, which have a similar age, are statistically indistinguishable. This is potentially surprising as Serpens has a stellar surface density two orders of magnitude in excess of Taurus. Hence, we find no evidence that dust disks in Serpens have been dispersed as a result of more frequent and/or stronger tidal interactions due to its elevated stellar density. We also report that the fraction of Serpens disks with {M}{dust}≥slant 10 {M}\\oplus is less than 20%, which supports the notion that the formation of giant planets is likely inherently rare or has substantially progressed by a few Myr.

  14. Detection of warm water vapour in Taurus protoplanetary discs by Herschel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Menard, F.; Thi, W. F.; Kamp, I.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Woitke, P.; Howard, C.; Sandell, G.; Podio, L.; Dent, W. R. F.; Mendigutia, I.; Pinte, C.; White, G. J.; Barrado, D.

    Line spectra of 68 Taurus T Tauri stars were obtained with the Herschel-PACS (Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer) instrument as part of the GASPS (GAS evolution in Protoplanetary Systems) survey of protoplanetary discs. A careful examination of the linescans centred on the [OI] 63.18 mu m

  15. Evolution and precession of accretion disk in tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matzner C.D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a supermassive black hole (BH tidal disruption event (TDE, the tidally disrupted star feeds the BH via an accretion disk. Most often it is assumed that the accretion rate history, hence the emission light curve, tracks the rate at which new debris mass falls back onto the disk, notably the t−5/3 power law. But this is not the case when the disk evolution due to viscous spreading - the driving force for accretion - is carefully considered. We construct a simple analytical model that comprehensively describes the accretion rate history across 4 different phases of the disk evolution, in the presence of mass fallback and disk wind loss. Accretion rate evolves differently in those phases which are governed by how the disk heat energy is carried away, early on by advection and later by radiation. The accretion rate can decline as steeply as t−5/3 only if copious disk wind loss is present during the early advection-cooled phase. Later, the accretion rate history is t−8/7 or shallower. These have great implications on the TDE flare light curve. A TDE accretion disk is most likely misaligned with the equatorial plane of the spinning BH. Moreover, in the TDE the accretion rate is super- or near-Eddington thus the disk is geometrically thick, for which case the BH’s frame dragging effect may cause the disk precess as a solid body, which may manifest itself as quasi-periodic signal in the TDE light curve. Our disk evolution model predicts the disk precession period increases with time, typically as ∝ t. The results are applied to the recently jetted TDE flare Swift transient J1644 + 57 which shows numerous, quasi-periodic dips in its long-term X-ray light curve. As the current TDE sample increases, the identification of the disk precession signature provides a unique way of measuring BH spin and studying BH accretion physics.

  16. disk historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Jakob Egholm

    2012-01-01

    Review essay om nye værker indenfor jødisk kulturhistorie. Diskussion af værker af Jay Geller, Boaz Neumann og Daniel Greene......Review essay om nye værker indenfor jødisk kulturhistorie. Diskussion af værker af Jay Geller, Boaz Neumann og Daniel Greene...

  17. Observing the Formation of Disks: ALMA and HST Observations of Edge-On Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megeath, Tom

    In the next several years, the number of known planetary systems will approach 1000. With this large number of examples, we are poised to make substantial progress in explaining the diverse architectures of planetary systems. A critical step in this process is to understand the origins of these systems through observations of the dusty circumstellar disks that mark the beginning of planet formation. By leveraging the results of our Herschel Orion Protostar Survey, a recent multi-observatory survey of 400 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, we are in a unique position to characterize protoplanetary disks at their earliest evolutionary stages, when infall from a rotating and collapsing cloud core forms the disk. We propose here a two part observational study of protoplanetary disks targeting an exceptional sample of rare edge-on protostars in Orion. From HST images of these edge-on protostars, we will determine the basic structural properties of the disks, and, through ALMA observations, directly connect for the first time the rotation of infalling protostellar envelopes to the properties of the nascent disks. This proposal is divided into two primary activities: The first activity is a survey of protostellar disk properties using HST images of edge- on protostars, viewed within 5 degrees of their disk planes. The edge-on protostars were identified in a recent HST near-IR survey of 400 Orion protostars with the NICMOS and WFC3 cameras. The HST images are able to resolve with 100 AU resolution the light scattered by dust grains in the envelopes and disks surrounding the protostars. In these images, 15 rare edge-on protostars were identified, where the outer disk can be seen in absorption against the scattered light and the shadow of the disk cast into the surrounding envelope is also visible. This is the largest, least biased sample of edge-on disks to date. Using radiative transfer codes to model the HST images, the basic properties of the disks, in particular

  18. Star Formation Modes in Low-Mass Disk Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, J. S.; Matthews, L. D.

    2001-01-01

    Low-mass disk galaxies with well-organized structures are relatively common in low density regions of the nearby Universe. They display a wide range in levels of star formation activity, extending from sluggishly evolving `superthin' disk systems to nearby starbursts. Investigations of this class of galaxy therefore provides opportunities to test and define models of galactic star formation processes. In this paper we briefly explore characteristics of examples of quiescent and starbursting l...

  19. Thick Disks of Lenticular Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlen, M.; Balcells, M.; Luetticke, R.; Dettmar, R. -J.

    2004-01-01

    Thick disks are faint and extended stellar components found around several disk galaxies including our Milky Way. The Milky Way thick disk, the only one studied in detail, contains mostly old disk stars (~10 Gyr), so that thick disks are likely to trace the early stages of disk evolution. Previous detections of thick disk stellar light in external galaxies have been originally made for early-type, edge-on galaxies but detailed 2D thick/thin disk decompositions have been reported for only a sc...

  20. Protoplanetary disc `isochrones' and the evolution of discs in the M˙-Md plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Giuseppe; Scardoni, Chiara E.; Manara, Carlo F.; Testi, Leonardo

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we compare simple viscous diffusion models for the disc evolution with the results of recent surveys of the properties of young protoplanetary discs. We introduce the useful concept of 'disc isochrones' in the accretion rate-disc mass plane and explore a set of Monte Carlo realization of disc initial conditions. We find that such simple viscous models can provide a remarkable agreement with the available data in the Lupus star forming region, with the key requirement that the average viscous evolutionary time-scale of the discs is comparable to the cluster age. Our models produce naturally a correlation between mass accretion rate and disc mass that is shallower than linear, contrary to previous results and in agreement with observations. We also predict that a linear correlation, with a tighter scatter, should be found for more evolved disc populations. Finally, we find that such viscous models can reproduce the observations in the Lupus region only in the assumption that the efficiency of angular momentum transport is a growing function of radius, thus putting interesting constraints on the nature of the microscopic processes that lead to disc accretion.

  1. An ALMA continuum survey of circumstellar disks in the upper Scorpius OB association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, John M.; Ricci, Luca; Isella, Andrea [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present ALMA 880 μm continuum observations of 20 K- and M-type stars in the Upper Scorpius OB association (Upper Sco) that are surrounded by protoplanetary disks. These data are used to measure the dust content in disks around low-mass stars (0.1-1.6 M {sub ☉}) at a stellar age of 5-11 Myr. Thirteen sources were detected in the 880 μm dust continuum at ≥3σ with inferred dust masses between 0.3 and 52 M {sub ⊕}. The dust masses tend to be higher around the more massive stars, but the significance is marginal in that the probability of no correlation is p ≈ 0.03. The evolution in the dust content in disks was assessed by comparing the Upper Sco observations with published continuum measurements of disks around ∼1-2 Myr stars in the Class II stage in the Taurus molecular cloud. While the dust masses in the Upper Sco disks are on average lower than in Taurus, any difference in the dust mass distributions is significant at less than 3σ. For stellar masses between 0.49 M {sub ☉} and 1.6 M {sub ☉}, the mean dust mass in disks is lower in Upper Sco relative to Taurus by Δlog M {sub dust} = 0.44 ± 0.26.

  2. Accretion onto Protoplanetary Discs: Implications for Globular Cluster Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Thomas; Pols, Onno; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, observational evidence that Globular Clusters (GCs) harbour multiple stellar populations has grown steadily. These observations are hard to reconcile with the classic picture of star formation in GCs, which approximates them as a single generation of stars. However, Bastian et al. recently suggested an evolutionary scenario in which a second (and higher order) population is formed by the accretion of chemically enriched material onto the low-mass stars in the initial GC population. In this early disc accretion scenario the low-mass, pre-main sequence stars sweep up gas expelled by the more massive stars of the same generation into their protoplanetary disc as they move through the cluster centre.Using assumptions that represent the (dynamical) conditions in a typical GC, we investigate whether a low-mass star surrounded by a protoplanetary disc can indeed accrete sufficient enriched material to account for the observed abundances in 'second generation' stars. We compare the outcome of two different smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes and check for consistency. In particular, we focus on the lifetime and stability of the disc and on the gas accretion rate onto both the star and the disc.

  3. An opening criterion for dust gaps in protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipierro, Giovanni; Laibe, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    We aim to understand under which conditions a low-mass planet can open a gap in viscous dusty protoplanetary discs. For this purpose, we extend the theory of dust radial drift to include the contribution from the tides of an embedded planet and from the gas viscous forces. From this formalism, we derive (I) a grain-size-dependent criterion for dust gap opening in discs, (II) an estimate of the location of the outer edge of the dust gap and (III) an estimate of the minimum Stokes number above which low-mass planets are able to carve gaps that appear only in the dust disc. These analytical estimates are particularly helpful to appraise the minimum mass of a hypothetical planet carving gaps in discs observed at long wavelengths and high resolution. We validate the theory against 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of planet-disc interaction in a broad range of dusty protoplanetary discs. We find a remarkable agreement between the theoretical model and the numerical experiments.

  4. Disk Defect Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — How Data Was Acquired: The data presented is from a physical simulator that simulated engine disks. Sample Rates and Parameter Description: All parameters are...

  5. Verbatim Floppy Disk

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    Introduced under the name "Verbatim", Latin for "literally", these disks that sized more than 5¼ inches have become almost universal on dedicated word processing systems and personal computers. This format was replaced more slowly by the 3½-inch format, introduced for the first time in 1982. Compared to today, these large format disks stored very little data. In reality, they could only contain a few pages of text.

  6. 2TB hard disk drive

    CERN Multimedia

    This particular object was used up until 2012 in the Data Centre. It slots into one of the Disk Server trays. Hard disks were invented in the 1950s. They started as large disks up to 20 inches in diameter holding just a few megabytes (link is external). They were originally called "fixed disks" or "Winchesters" (a code name used for a popular IBM product). They later became known as "hard disks" to distinguish them from "floppy disks (link is external)." Hard disks have a hard platter that holds the magnetic medium, as opposed to the flexible plastic film found in tapes and floppies.

  7. First detection of gas-phase ammonia in a planet-forming disk. NH3, N2H+, and H2O in the disk around TW Hydrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Vachail N.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Brinch, Christian; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary J.; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C.; Kristensen, Lars; Yıldız, Umut A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Nitrogen chemistry in protoplanetary disks and the freeze-out on dust particles is key for understanding the formation of nitrogen-bearing species in early solar system analogs. In dense cores, 10% to 20% of the nitrogen reservoir is locked up in ices such as NH3, NH4+ and OCN-. So far, ammonia has not been detected beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. Aims: We aim to find gas-phase ammonia in a protoplanetary disk and characterize its abundance with respect to water vapor. Methods: Using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, we detected for the first time the ground-state rotational emission of ortho-NH3 in a protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. We used detailed models of the disk's physical structure and the chemistry of ammonia and water to infer the amounts of gas-phase molecules of these species. We explored two radial distributions (extended across the disk and confined to water is expected to photodesorb off icy grains) to describe the (unknown) location of the molecules. These distributions capture the effects of radial drift and vertical settling of ice-covered grains. Results: The NH310-00 line is detected simultaneously with H2O 110-101 at an antenna temperature of 15.3 mK in the Herschel beam; the same spectrum also contains the N2H+ 6-5 line with a strength of 18.1 mK. We use physical-chemical models to reproduce the fluxes and assume that water and ammonia are cospatial. We infer ammonia gas-phase masses of 0.7-11.0 × 1021 g, depending on the adopted spatial distribution, in line with previous literature estimates. For water, we infer gas-phase masses of 0.2-16.0 × 1022 g, improving upon earlier literature estimates This corresponds to NH3/H2O abundance ratios of 7%-84%, assuming that water and ammonia are co-located. The inferred N2H+ gas mass of 4.9 × 1021 g agrees well with earlier literature estimates that were based on lower excitation transitions. These masses correspond to a disk-averaged abundances of 0.2-17.0 × 10-11, 0

  8. Testing dust trapping in the circumbinary disk around GG Tauri A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoletti, P.; Ricci, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Lodato, G.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The protoplanetary disk around the GG Tau A binary system is one of the most studied young circumbinary disk, and it has been observed at many different wavelengths. Observations of the dust continuum emission at sub-mm/mm wavelengths have detected a dust ring located between 200 AU and 300 AU from the center of mass of the system. According to the classical theory of tidal interaction between a binary system and its circumbinary disk, the measured inner radius of the mm-sized dust ring is significantly larger than the predicted truncation radius, given the observed projected separation of the stars in the binary system (0.25'', corresponding to 34 AU). A possible explanation for this apparent tension between observations and theory is that a local maximum in the gas radial pressure is created at the location of the center of the dust ring in the disk as a result of the tidal interaction with the binary. An alternative scenario invokes the presence of a misalignment between the disk and the stellar orbital planes. Aims: We investigate the origin of this dust ring structure in the GG Tau A circumbinary disk, test whether the interaction between the binary and the disk can produce a gas pressure radial bump at the location of the observed ring, and discuss whether the alternative hypothesis of a misaligned disk offers a more viable solution. Methods: We run a set of 3D hydrodynamical simulations for an orbit consistent with the astrometric solutions for the GG Tau A stellar proper motions, different disk temperature profiles, and for different levels of viscosity. Using the obtained gas surface density and radial velocity profiles, we then apply a dust evolution model in post-processing in order to to retrieve the expected distribution of mm-sized grains. Results: We compare the results of our models with the observational results and show that, if the binary orbit and the disk were coplanar, not only would the tidal truncation of the circumbinary disk occur

  9. Shadows cast on the transition disk of HD 135344B. Multiwavelength VLT/SPHERE polarimetric differential imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, T.; Dominik, C.; Avenhaus, H.; Min, M.; de Boer, J.; Ginski, C.; Schmid, H. M.; Juhasz, A.; Bazzon, A.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Garufi, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Benisty, M.; Boccaletti, A.; Henning, Th.; Langlois, M.; Maire, A.-L.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M. R.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Thalmann, C.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Carbillet, M.; Costille, A.; Dohlen, K.; Feldt, M.; Gisler, D.; Mouillet, D.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Pragt, J.; Rochat, S.; Roelfsema, R.; Salasnich, B.; Soenke, C.; Wildi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The protoplanetary disk around the F-type star HD 135344B (SAO 206462) is in a transition stage and shows many intriguing structures both in scattered light and thermal (sub-)millimeter emission which are possibly related to planet formation processes. Aims: We aim to study the morphology and surface brightness of the disk in scattered light to gain insight into the innermost disk regions, the formation of protoplanets, planet-disk interactions traced in the surface and midplane layers, and the dust grain properties of the disk surface. Methods: We have carried out high-contrast polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) observations with VLT/SPHERE and obtained polarized scattered light images with ZIMPOL in the R and I-bands and with IRDIS in the Y and J-bands. The scattered light images and surface brightness profiles are used to study in detail structures in the disk surface and brightness variations. We have constructed a 3D radiative transfer model to support the interpretation of several detected shadow features. Results: The scattered light images reveal with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity the spiral arms as well as the 25 au cavity of the disk. Multiple shadow features are discovered on the outer disk with one shadow only being present during the second observation epoch. A positive surface brightness gradient is observed in the stellar irradiation corrected (r2-scaled) images in southwest direction possibly due to an azimuthally asymmetric perturbation of the temperature and/or surface density by the passing spiral arms. The disk integrated polarized flux, normalized to the stellar flux, shows a positive trend towards longer wavelengths which we attribute to large (2πa ≳ λ) aggregate dust grains in the disk surface. Part of the non-azimuthal polarization signal in the Uφ image of the J-band observation can be attributed to multiple scattering in the disk. Conclusions: The detected shadow features and their possible variability

  10. A WISE survey of circumstellar disks in Taurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mamajek, E. E., E-mail: taran.esplin@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We have compiled photometry at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm from the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for all known members of the Taurus complex of dark clouds. Using these data and photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have identified members with infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks and have estimated the evolutionary stages of the detected disks, which include 31 new full disks and 16 new candidate transitional, evolved, evolved transitional, and debris disks. We have also used the WISE All-Sky Source Catalog to search for new disk-bearing members of Taurus based on their red infrared colors. Through optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we have confirmed 26 new members with spectral types of M1-M7. The census of disk-bearing stars in Taurus should now be largely complete for spectral types earlier than ∼M8 (M ≳ 0.03 M {sub ☉}).

  11. Premixed direct injection disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  12. Gas Cavities inside Dust Cavities in Disks Inferred from ALMA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Nienke; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Bruderer, Simon; Pinilla, Paola; van Kempen, Tim; Perez, Laura; Isella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks with cavities in their dust distribution, also named transitional disks, are expected to be in the middle of active evolution and possibly planet formation. In recent years, millimeter-dust rings observed by ALMA have been suggested to have their origin in dust traps, caused by pressure bumps. One of the ways to generate these is by the presence of planets, which lower the gas density along their orbit and create pressure bumps at the edge. We present spatially resolved ALMA Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 observations of CO and CO isotopologues of several famous transitional disks. Gas is found to be present inside the dust cavities, but at a reduced level compared with the gas surface density profile of the outer disk. The dust and gas emission are quantified using the physical-chemical modeling code DALI. In the majority of these disks we find clear evidence for a drop in gas density of at least a factor of 10 inside the cavity, whereas the dust density drops by at least a factor 1000. The CO isotopologue observations reveal that the gas cavities are significantly smaller than the dust cavities. These gas structures suggest clearing by one or more planetary-mass companions.

  13. Lupus Disks with Faint CO Isotopologues: Low Gas/Dust or High Carbon Depletion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, Anna

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of ALMA, complete surveys of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks are being carried out in different star forming regions. In particular, continuum emission is used to trace the large (mm-sized) dust grains and CO isotopologues are observed in order to trace the bulk of the gas. The attempt is to simultaneously constrain the gas and dust disk mass as well as the gas/dust mass ratio. In this presentation I will present the Lupus disk survey observations, analyzed with thermo-chemical disk models, including radiative transfer, CO isotope-selective processes and freeze-out. The main result is that CO-based gas masses are very low, often smaller than Jupiter Mass. Moreover, gas/dust mass ratios are much lower than value of 100 found in the ISM, being mainly between 1 and 10. This result can be interpreted either as rapid loss of gas, or as a chemical effect removing carbon from CO and locking it into more complex molecules or in larger bodies. Previous data cannot distinguish between the two scenarios (except for sources with detected HD lines), but new Cycle 4 observations of hydrocarbon lines will be presented and they can help to calibrate CO-based gas masses and to constrain disk gas masses.

  14. Bulge-Disk Evolution in Interacting Bulgeless Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, M.; Ramya, S.; Sengupta, C.; Mishra, K.

    2013-10-01

    Bulgeless galaxies are an extreme class of late type spiral galaxies that have practically no bulge and are nearly pure disk in morphology. Their lack of evolution is a puzzle for theories of galaxy formation and the secular evolution of galaxy disks. However, one of the processes by which these galaxies could evolve is through interactions with other galaxies. In this study we present radio (GMRT) observations of star formation in a sample of bulgeless galaxies. We did followup Hα imaging and optical spectroscopy of two galaxies, NGC 3445 and NGC 4027. Both galaxies have extended emission associated with their tidal interactions. Their nuclei show ongoing star formation but no signs of AGN activity. The R band images suggest that their centers have oval distortions or pseudobulges that may later evolve into larger bulges. Thus interactions are an important trigger for the formation of bulges in such disk dominated systems.

  15. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  16. Variability in Proto-planetary Nebulae. I. Light Curve Studies of 12 Carbon-rich Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Maupin, Richard E.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.

    2010-02-01

    We have carried out long-term (14 years) V and R photometric monitoring of 12 carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae. The light and color curves display variability in all of them. The light curves are complex and suggest multiple periods, changing periods, and/or changing amplitudes, which are attributed to pulsation. A dominant period has been determined for each and found to be in the range of ~150 days for the coolest (G8) to 35-40 days for the warmest (F3). A clear, linear inverse relationship has been found in the sample between the pulsation period and the effective temperature and also an inverse relationship between the amplitude of light variation and the effective temperature. These are consistent with the expectation for a pulsating post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star evolving toward higher temperature at constant luminosity. The published spectral energy distributions and mid-infrared images show these objects to have cool (200 K), detached dust shells and published models imply that intensive mass loss ended 400-2000 years ago. The detection of periods as long as 150 days in these requires a revision in the published post-AGB evolution models that couple the pulsation period to the mass loss rate and that assume that intensive mass loss ended when the pulsation period had decreased to 100 days. This revision will have the effect of extending the timescale for the early phases of post-AGB evolution. It appears that real time evolution in the pulsation periods of individual objects may be detectable on the timescale of two or three decades.

  17. Evolving digital ecological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    Full Text Available "It is hard to realize that the living world as we know it is just one among many possibilities" [1]. Evolving digital ecological networks are webs of interacting, self-replicating, and evolving computer programs (i.e., digital organisms that experience the same major ecological interactions as biological organisms (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism. Despite being computational, these programs evolve quickly in an open-ended way, and starting from only one or two ancestral organisms, the formation of ecological networks can be observed in real-time by tracking interactions between the constantly evolving organism phenotypes. These phenotypes may be defined by combinations of logical computations (hereafter tasks that digital organisms perform and by expressed behaviors that have evolved. The types and outcomes of interactions between phenotypes are determined by task overlap for logic-defined phenotypes and by responses to encounters in the case of behavioral phenotypes. Biologists use these evolving networks to study active and fundamental topics within evolutionary ecology (e.g., the extent to which the architecture of multispecies networks shape coevolutionary outcomes, and the processes involved.

  18. HST/ACS Coronagraphic Observations of the HD 163296 Circumstellar Disk: Evidence of Time-Variable Self-Shadowing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, J.; Dowling, Lorraine; Clampin, Mark; Grady, C.; Ardila, D.; Golimowski, D.; Illingworth, G.; Krist, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) coronagraphic observations of the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HD 163296's scattered light disk was resolved in the F606W and F814W filters in observations obtained In 2003 and in the F435W filter in observations obtained in 2004. Analysis of single-epoch data indicates that the disk (V-I) color is redder than the observed stellar (V-I) color. This spatially uniform red disk color might be indicative of either an evolution in the grain size distribution (i.e. grain growth) and/or composition. Both of these processes would be consistent with the observed flat geometry of the outer disk, as diagnosed by the observed r$(exp -3)$ power law behavior of its median azimuthally averaged disk surface brightness, which suggest that grain evolution is occurring. Comparison of ACS and STIS epoch scattered light data reveals differences in the observed disk surface brightnesses, of order 1 mag arcsec$(exp -2)$, in both V and white-light filter bandpasses. Along with the observed variability in the visibility and surface brightness of the ansa(e) in the disk, and spectropolarimetric variability of the system, these results suggest that the resolved scattered light disk is variable, a phenomenon not previously observed in any other Herbig protoplanetary system We speculate that the observed behavior might be attributable to the variable inflation of the scale height of the inner disk wall, which results in variable self-shadowing of the outer disk.

  19. First detection of hydrogen in the β Pictoris gas disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. A.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Bourrier, V.; Hébrard, G.; Kiefer, F.; Beust, H.; Ferlet, R.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2017-03-01

    The young and nearby star β Pictoris (β Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the H I Lyman α (Ly-α) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-α line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-α line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. This new AVM technique, together with subtraction of an airglow emission map, allows us to analyse the shape of the β Pic Ly-α emission line profile and from it, calculate the column density of neutral hydrogen surrounding β Pic. The column density of hydrogen in the β Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be log (NH/ 1 cm2) ≪ 18.5. The Ly-α emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by H I falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of 41 ± 6 km s-1 relative to β Pic and a column density of log (NH/ 1 cm2) = 18.6 ± 0.1. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of

  20. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... large groundbased telescopes, mm and radiowave interferometry have been used to image disks around a large number of YSOs revealing disk structure with ever-increasing detail and variety. The disks around YSOs are believed to be the sites of planet formation and a few such associations have now been confirmed.

  1. Identifying Likely Disk-hosting M dwarfs with Disk Detective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Steven; Wisniewski, John; Kuchner, Marc J.; Disk Detective Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    M dwarfs are critical targets for exoplanet searches. Debris disks often provide key information as to the formation and evolution of planetary systems around higher-mass stars, alongside the planet themselves. However, less than 300 M dwarf debris disks are known, despite M dwarfs making up 70% of the local neighborhood. The Disk Detective citizen science project has identified over 6000 new potential disk host stars from the AllWISE catalog over the past three years. Here, we present preliminary results of our search for new disk-hosting M dwarfs in the survey. Based on near-infrared color cuts and fitting stellar models to photometry, we have identified over 500 potential new M dwarf disk hosts, nearly doubling the known number of such systems. In this talk, we present our methodology, and outline our ongoing work to confirm systems as M dwarf disks.

  2. Probing for Exoplanets Hiding in Dusty Debris Disks: Disk Imaging, Characterization, and Exploration with HST-STIS Multi-roll Coronagraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Glenn; Grady, Carol A.; Hines, Dean C.; Stark, Christopher C.; Debes, John; Carson, Joe; Kuchner, Marc J.; Perrin, Marshall; Weinberger, Alycia; Wisniewski, John P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Spatially resolved scattered-light images of circumstellar debris in exoplanetary systems constrain the physical properties and orbits of the dust particles in these systems. They also inform on co-orbiting (but unseen) planets, the systemic architectures, and forces perturbing the starlight-scattering circumstellar material. Using HST/STIS broadband optical coronagraphy, we have completed the observational phase of a program to study the spatial distribution of dust in a sample of ten circumstellar debris systems, and one "mature" protoplanetrary disk all with HST pedigree, using PSF-subtracted multi-roll coronagraphy. These observations probe stellocentric distances greater than or equal to 5 AU for the nearest systems, and simultaneously resolve disk substructures well beyond corresponding to the giant planet and Kuiper belt regions within our own Solar System. They also disclose diffuse very low-surface brightness dust at larger stellocentric distances. Herein we present new results inclusive of fainter disks such as HD92945 (F (sub disk) /F (sub star) = 5x10 (sup -5) confirming, and better revealing, the existence of a narrow inner debris ring within a larger diffuse dust disk. Other disks with ring-like sub-structures and significant asymmetries and complex morphologies include: HD181327 for which we posit a spray of ejecta from a recent massive collision in an exo-Kuiper belt; HD61005 suggested to be interacting with the local ISM; HD15115 and HD32297, discussed also in the context of putative environmental interactions. These disks, and HD15745, suggest that debris system evolution cannot be treated in isolation. For AU Mic's edge-on disk we find out-of-plane surface brightness asymmetries at greater than or equal to 5 AU that may implicate the existence of one or more planetary perturbers. Time resolved images of the MP Mus proto-planetary disk provide spatially resolved temporal variability in the disk illumination. These and other new images from our HST

  3. Cervical Total Disk Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy T; Filler, Ryan J; Savage, Jason W; Benzel, Edward C

    2018-02-01

    In the United States, cervical total disk arthroplasty (TDA) is US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved for use in both 1 and 2-level constructions for cervical disk disease resulting in myelopathy and/or radiculopathy. TDA designs vary in form, function, material composition, and even performance in?vivo. However, the therapeutic goals are the same: to remove the painful degenerative/damaged elements of the intervertebral discoligamenous joint complex, to preserve or restore the natural range of spinal motion, and to mitigate stresses on adjacent spinal segments, thereby theoretically limiting adjacent segment disease (ASDis). Cervical vertebrae exhibit complex, coupled motions that can be difficult to artificially replicate. Commonly available TDA designs include ball-and-socket rotation-only prostheses, ball-and-trough rotation and anterior-posterior translational prostheses, as well as unconstrained elastomeric disks that can rotate and translate freely in all directions. Each design has its respective advantages and disadvantages. At this time, available clinical evidence does not favor 1 design philosophy over another. The superiority of cervical TDA over the gold-standard anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a subject of great controversy. Although most studies agree that cervical TDA is at least as effective as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion at reducing or eliminating preoperative pain and neurological symptoms, the clinical benefits of motion preservation- that is, reduced incidence of ASDis-are far less clear. Several short-to-mid-term studies suggest that disk arthroplasty reduces the radiographic incidence of adjacent segment degeneration; however, the degree to which this is clinically significant is disputed. At this time, TDA has not been clearly demonstrated to reduce symptomatic?ASDis.

  4. Exploring Our Galaxy's Thick Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    What is the structure of the Milky Ways disk, and how did it form? A new study uses giant stars to explore these questions.A View from the InsideSchematic showing an edge-on, not-to-scale view of what we think the Milky Ways structurelookslike. The thick disk is shown in yellow and the thin disk is shown in green. [Gaba p]Spiral galaxies like ours are often observed to have disks consisting of two components: a thin disk that lies close to the galactic midplane, and a thick disk that extends above and below this. Past studies have suggested that the Milky Ways disk hosts the same structure, but our position embedded in the Milky Way makes this difficult to confirm.If we can measure the properties of a broad sample of distant tracer stars and use this to better understand the construction of the Milky Ways disk, then we can start to ask additional questions like, how did the disk components form? Formation pictures for the thick disk generally fall into two categories:Stars in the thick disk formed within the Milky Way either in situ or by migrating to their current locations.Stars in the thick disk formed in satellite galaxies around the Milky Way and then accreted when the satellites were disrupted.Scientists Chengdong Li and Gang Zhao (NAO Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) have now used observations of giant stars which can be detected out to great distances due to their brightness to trace the properties of the Milky Ways thick disk and address the question of its origin.Best fits for the radial (top) and vertical (bottom) metallicity gradients of the thick-disk stars. [Adapted from Li Zhao 2017]Probing OriginsLi and Zhao used data from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) in China to examine a sample of 35,000 giant stars. The authors sorted these stars into different disk components halo, thin disk, and thick disk based on their kinematic properties, and then explored how the orbital and

  5. Vibration of imperfect rotating disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the theoretical and numerical calculations of the flexural vibrations of a bladed disk. The main focus of this study is to elaborate the basic background for diagnostic and identification methods for ascertaining the main properties of the real structure or an experimental model of turbine disks. The reduction of undesirable vibrations of blades is proposed by using damping heads, which on the experimental model of turbine disk are applied only on a limited number of blades. This partial setting of damping heads introduces imperfection in mass, stiffness and damping distribution on the periphery and leads to more complicated dynamic properties than those of a perfect disk. Calculation of FEM model and analytic—numerical solution of disk behaviour in the limited (two modes frequency range shows the splitting of resonance with an increasing speed of disk rotation. The spectrum of resonance is twice denser than that of a perfect disk.

  6. The chemistry of protoplanetary fragments formed via gravitational instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilee, J. D.; Forgan, D. H.; Evans, M. G.; Hall, C.; Booth, R.; Clarke, C. J.; Rice, W. K. M.; Boley, A. C.; Caselli, P.; Hartquist, T. W.; Rawlings, J. M. C.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we model the chemical evolution of a 0.25 M⊙ protoplanetary disc surrounding a 1 M⊙ star that undergoes fragmentation due to self-gravity. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics including a radiative transfer scheme, along with a time-dependent chemical evolution code to follow the composition of the disc and resulting fragments over approximately 4000 yr. Initially, four quasi-stable fragments are formed, of which two are eventually disrupted by tidal torques in the disc. From the results of our chemical modelling, we identify species that are abundant in the fragments (e.g. H2O, H2S, HNO, N2, NH3, OCS, SO), species that are abundant in the spiral shocks within the disc (e.g. CO, CH4, CN, CS, H2CO) and species that are abundant in the circumfragmentary material (e.g. HCO+). Our models suggest that in some fragments it is plausible for grains to sediment to the core before releasing their volatiles into the planetary envelope, leading to changes in, e.g., the C/O ratio of the gas and ice components. We would therefore predict that the atmospheric composition of planets generated by gravitational instability should not necessarily follow the bulk chemical composition of the local disc material.

  7. Protoplanetary Disc Response to Distant Tidal Encounters in Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A. J.; Clarke, C. J.; Rosotti, G.; Booth, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    The majority of stars form in a clustered environment. This has an impact on the evolution of surrounding protoplanetary discs (PPDs) due to either photoevaporation or tidal truncation. Consequently, the development of planets depends on formation environment. Here we present the first thorough investigation of tidally induced angular momentum loss in PPDs in the distant regime, partly motivated by claims in the literature for the importance of distant encounters in disc evolution. We employ both theoretical predictions and dynamical/hydrodynamical simulations in 2D and 3D. Our theoretical analysis is based on that of Ostriker (1994) and leads us to conclude that in the limit that the closest approach distance xmin ≫ r, the radius of a particle ring, the fractional change in angular momentum scales as (xmin/r)-5. This asymptotic limit ensures that the cumulative effect of distant encounters is minor in terms of its influence on disc evolution. The angular momentum transfer is dominated by the m = 2 Lindblad resonance for closer encounters and by the m = 1, ω = 0 Lindblad resonance at large xmin/r. We contextualise these results by comparing expected angular momentum loss for the outer edge of a PPD due to distant and close encounters. Contrary to the suggestions of previous works we do not find that distant encounters contribute significantly to angular momentum loss in PPDs. We define an upper limit for closest approach distance where interactions are significant as a function of arbitrary host to perturber mass ratio M2/M1.

  8. DVD - digital versatile disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG

  9. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  10. Measurably evolving populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drummond, Alexei James; Pybus, Oliver George; Rambaut, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    processes through time. Populations for which such studies are possible � measurably evolving populations (MEPs) � are characterized by sufficiently long or numerous sampled sequences and a fast mutation rate relative to the available range of sequence sampling times. The impact of sequences sampled through...... understanding of evolutionary processes in diverse organisms, from viruses to vertebrates....

  11. Tungsten isotopes in bulk meteorites and their inclusions-Implications for processing of presolar components in the solar protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jesper Christian; Paton, Chad; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel

    2015-01-01

    We present high precision, low- and high-resolution tungsten isotope measurements of iron meteorites Cape York (IIIAB), Rhine Villa (IIIE), Bendego (IC), and the IVB iron meteorites Tlacotepec, Skookum, and Weaver Mountains, as well as CI chondrite Ivuna, a CV3 chondrite refractory inclusion (CAI...

  12. Experiments on the photophoretic motion of chondrules and dust aggregates -indications for the transport of matter in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Teiser, Jens; Bischoff, Addi

    2010-01-01

    In a set of 16 drop tower experiments the motion of sub-millimeter to millimeter-sized particles under microgravity was observed. Illumination by a halogen lamp induced acceleration of the particles due to photophoresis. Photophoresis on dust-free chondrules, on chondrules, glass spheres and meta....... The strength of the photophoretic force varies for chondrules, dust covered particles and pure dust from low to strong, respectively. The measurements support the idea that photophoresis in the early Solar System can be efficient to transport solid particles outward....

  13. Chronological study of oxygen isotope composition for the solar protoplanetary disk recorded in a fluffy Type A CAI from Vigarano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Noriyuki; Itoh, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Fluffy Type A Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) containing reversely zoned melilite crystals are suggested to be aggregates of direct condensates from solar nebular gas. We conducted an investigation of 26Al-26Mg systematics of a fluffy Type A CAI from Vigarano, named V2-01, with known oxygen isotopic distributions of reversely zoned melilite crystals; we also conducted oxygen isotope measurements of coexisting minerals. Two of six reversely zoned melilite crystals show continuous variations in magnesium isotopic composition, with δ25Mg decreasing along the inferred direction of crystal growth, which supports the idea that they originated through condensation. Petrography suggests that the constituent minerals of V2-01 formed in the following order: first spinel and fassaite enclosed by melilite, then reversely zoned melilite crystals, and spinel and diopside in the Wark-Lovering rim. The spinel enclosed by melilite has 16O-rich compositions (Δ17O ∼ -24‰) and on an Al-Mg evolutionary diagram plots along model isochron with an initial value of (26Al/27Al)0 = (5.6 ± 0.2) × 10-5. The fassaite enclosed by melilite crystals shows variable oxygen isotopic compositions (Δ17O ∼ -12‰ and -17‰) and plots on an isochron with (26Al/27Al)0 = (5.6 ± 0.2) × 10-5. The oxygen isotopic compositions of reversely zoned melilite showed continuous variations in Δ17O along the inferred direction of crystal growth, suggesting that surrounding nebular gas, during the formation of the reversely zoned melilite, changed from 16O-poor (Δ17O values larger than -10‰) to 16O-rich (Δ17O ∼ -25‰). The six reversely zoned melilite crystals show indistinguishable initial 26Al/27Al values with an average (26Al/27Al)0 of (4.7 ± 0.3) × 10-5, which is clearly distinguishable from the value of enclosed spinel and fassaite, indicating a younger formation age than the enclosed spinel and fassaite. The spinel and diopside from the Wark-Lovering rim show 16O-rich compositions (Δ17O ∼ -23‰) with (26Al/27Al)0 = (4.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5. The values of (26Al/27Al)0 are consistent with the formation sequence inferred from petrography. The formation period for the V2-01 CAI is estimated to be 0.18 ± 0.07 Myr from the difference in initial 26Al/27Al values. These data suggest that the oxygen isotopic composition of solar nebular gas surrounding the CAI changed from 16O-rich to 16O-poor and back to 16O-rich during the first ∼0.2 Myr of Solar System formation.

  14. High energy irradiated protoplanetary disks : the X-rays and FUV role in thermo-chemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresu, Giambattista

    2012-12-01

    In de laatste twee decennia hebben sterrenkundigen een enorme hoeveelheid informatie kunnen vergaren over het scenario waarin leven kan ontstaan. Onderzoek naar de vorming van planeten speelt daarin een belangrijke rol. Het proces van stervorming begint in donkere wolken (Dark Clouds) waar gravitationele ineenstorting leidt tot de formatie van een schijf die de ster omgeeft, de zogenaamde circumstellar schijf. Die kan materiaal (gas en stof) bevatten waaruit planeten ontstaan. Er is dan sprake van een protoplanetaire schijf. Giambattista Aresu onderzocht de impact van hoog energetische straling (röntgenstraling en ver-uv) van de centrale ster op de chemische en thermische structuur van dergelijk omringende protoplanetaire schijven.

  15. Audit: Automated Disk Investigation Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Karabiyik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Software tools designed for disk analysis play a critical role today in forensics investigations. However, these digital forensics tools are often difficult to use, usually task specific, and generally require professionally trained users with IT backgrounds. The relevant tools are also often open source requiring additional technical knowledge and proper configuration. This makes it difficult for investigators without some computer science background to easily conduct the needed disk analysis. In this paper, we present AUDIT, a novel automated disk investigation toolkit that supports investigations conducted by non-expert (in IT and disk technology and expert investigators. Our proof of concept design and implementation of AUDIT intelligently integrates open source tools and guides non-IT professionals while requiring minimal technical knowledge about the disk structures and file systems of the target disk image.

  16. Face-on accretion onto a protoplanetary disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pols, O. R.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars are generally born in clustered stellar environments, which can affect their subsequent evolution. An example of this environmental influence can be found in globular clusters (GCs) harbouring multiple stellar populations. An evolutionary scenario in which a second (and possibly higher order) population is formed by the accretion of chemically enriched material onto the low-mass stars in the initial GC population has been suggested to explain the multiple stellar populations. The idea, dubbed early disc accretion, is that the low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars sweep up gas expelled by the more massive stars of the same generation into their protoplanetary disc as they move through the cluster core. The same process could also occur, to a lesser extent, in embedded stellar systems that are less dense. Aims: Using assumptions that represent the (dynamical) conditions in a typical GC, we investigate whether a low-mass star of 0.4 M⊙ surrounded by a protoplanetary disc can accrete a sufficient amount of enriched material to account for the observed abundances in so-called second generation GC stars. In particular, we focus on the gas-loading rate onto the disc and star, as well as on the lifetime and stability of the disc. Methods: We perform simulations at multiple resolutions with two different smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes and compare the results. Each code uses a different implementation of the artificial viscosity. Results: We find that the gas-loading rate is about a factor of two smaller than the rate based on geometric arguments, because the effective cross-section of the disc is smaller than its surface area. Furthermore, the loading rate is consistent for both codes, irrespective of resolution. Although the disc gains mass in the high-resolution runs, it loses angular momentum on a timescale of 104 yr. Two effects determine the loss of (specific) angular momentum in our simulations: (1) continuous ram pressure stripping and (2

  17. CHEMICAL IMAGING OF THE CO SNOW LINE IN THE HD 163296 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Chunhua; Öberg, Karin I.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Hogherheijde, Michiel [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); D’Alessio, Paola [Centro de Radioastronomi´a y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2015-11-10

    The condensation fronts (snow lines) of H{sub 2}O, CO, and other abundant volatiles in the midplane of a protoplanetary disk affect several aspects of planet formation. Locating the CO snow line, where the CO gas column density is expected to drop substantially, based solely on CO emission profiles, is challenging. This has prompted an exploration of chemical signatures of CO freeze-out. We present ALMA Cycle 1 observations of the N{sub 2}H{sup +} J = 3−2 and DCO{sup +} J = 4−3 emission lines toward the disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 at ∼0.″5 (60 AU) resolution, and evaluate their utility as tracers of the CO snow line location. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is distributed in a ring with an inner radius at 90 AU, corresponding to a midplane temperature of 25 K. This result is consistent with a new analysis of optically thin C{sup 18}O data, which implies a sharp drop in CO abundance at 90 AU. Thus N{sub 2}H{sup +} appears to be a robust tracer of the midplane CO snow line. The DCO{sup +} emission also has a ring morphology, but neither the inner nor the outer radius coincide with the CO snow line location of 90 AU, indicative of a complex relationship between DCO{sup +} emission and CO freeze-out in the disk midplane. Compared to TW Hya, CO freezes out at a higher temperature in the disk around HD 163296 (25 versus 17 K in the TW Hya disk), perhaps due to different ice compositions. This highlights the importance of actually measuring the CO snow line location, rather than assuming a constant CO freeze-out temperature for all disks.

  18. A deep Spitzer survey of circumstellar disks in the young double cluster, h and χ Persei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Currie, Thayne; Jayawardhana, Ray [University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2J7 (Canada); Rieke, George H. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02140 (United States); Balog, Zoltan, E-mail: cloutier@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: currie@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: grieke@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    We analyze very deep Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) photometry of ∼12, 500 members of the 14 Myr old Double Cluster, h and χ Persei, building upon our earlier, shallower Spitzer Cycle 1 studies. Numerous likely members show infrared (IR) excesses at 8 μm and 24 μm, indicative of circumstellar dust. The frequency of stars with 8 μm excess is at least 2% for our entire sample, slightly lower (higher) for B/A stars (later type, lower mass stars). Optical spectroscopy also identifies gas in about 2% of systems, but with no clear trend between the presence of dust and gas. Spectral energy distribution modeling of 18 sources with detections at optical wavelengths through MIPS 24 μm reveals a diverse set of disk evolutionary states, including a high fraction of transitional disks, though similar data for all disk-bearing members would provide constraints. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we combine our results with those for other young clusters to study the global evolution of dust/gas disks. For nominal cluster ages, the e-folding times (τ{sub 0}) for the frequency of warm dust and gas are 2.75 Myr and 1.75 Myr, respectively. Assuming a revised set of ages for some clusters, these timescales increase to 5.75 and 3.75 Myr, respectively, implying a significantly longer typical protoplanetary disk lifetime than previously thought. In both cases, the transitional disk duration, averaged over multiple evolutionary pathways, is ≈1 Myr. Finally, 24 μm excess frequencies for 4-6 M {sub ☉} stars appear lower than for 1-2.5 M {sub ☉} stars in other 10-30 Myr old clusters.

  19. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  20. The Shadow Knows: Using Shadows to Investigate the Structure of the Pretransitional Disk of HD 100453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zachary C.; Fernandes, Rachel B.; Sitko, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Wagner, Kevin [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 163-8677 (Japan); Hashimoto, Jun; Oh, Daehyon; Tamura, Motohide; Yang, Yi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Follette, Katherine [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland CA 96402 (United States); Fukagawa, Misato [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kluska, Jacques; Kraus, Stefan [University of Exeter Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, Stocker Road, Exeter, Devon EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Mayama, Satoshi [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); McElwain, Michael W. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Uyama, Taichi [Department of Astronomy and RESCUE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Wisniewski, John P. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73071 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We present Gemini Planet Imager polarized intensity imagery of HD 100453 in Y , J , and K 1 bands that reveals an inner gap (9–18 au), an outer disk (18–39 au) with two prominent spiral arms, and two azimuthally localized dark features that are also present in Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) total intensity images. Spectral energy distribution fitting further suggests that the radial gap extends to 1 au. The narrow, wedge-like shape of the dark features appears similar to predictions of shadows cast by an inner disk that is misaligned with respect to the outer disk. Using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code HOCHUNCK3D, we construct a model of the disk that allows us to determine its physical properties in more detail. From the angular separation of the features, we measure the difference in inclination between the disks (45°) and their major axes, PA = 140° east of north for the outer disk, and 100° for the inner disk. We find an outer-disk inclination of 25° ± 10° from face-on, in broad agreement with the Wagner et al. measurement of 34°. SPHERE data in J and H bands indicate a reddish disk, which indicates that HD 100453 is evolving into a young debris disk.

  1. Probing dust settling in proto-planetary discs with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Y.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Piétu, V.

    2013-05-01

    Investigating the dynamical evolution of dust grains in proto-planetary discs is a key issue to understand how planets should form. We identify under which conditions dust settling can be constrained by high angular resolution observations at mm wavelengths, and which observational strategies are suited for such studies. Exploring a large range of models, we generate synthetic images of discs with different degrees of dust settling, and simulate high angular resolution (˜0.05-0.3 arcsec) Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of these synthetic discs. The resulting data sets are then analysed blindly with homogeneous disc models (where dust and gas are totally mixed) and the derived disc parameters are used as tracers of the settling factor. Our dust discs are partially resolved by ALMA and present some specific behaviours on radial and mainly vertical directions, which can be used to quantify the level of settling. We find out that an angular resolution better than or equal to ˜0.1 arcsec (using 2.3 km baselines at 0.8mm) allows us to constrain the dust scale height and flaring index with sufficient precision to unambiguously distinguish between settled and non-settled discs, provided the inclination is close enough to edge-on (i ≥ 75°). Ignoring dust settling and assuming hydrostatic equilibrium when analysing such discs affect the derived dust temperature and the radial dependency of the dust emissivity index. The surface density distribution can also be severely biased at the highest inclinations. However, the derived dust properties remain largely unaffected if the disc scale height is fitted separately. ALMA has the potential to test some of the dust settling mechanisms, but for real discs, deviations from ideal geometry (warps, spiral waves) may provide an ultimate limit on the dust settling detection.

  2. IBM 3390 Hard Disk Platter

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The 3390 disks rotated faster than those in the previous model 3380. Faster disk rotation reduced rotational delay (ie. the time required for the correct area of the disk surface to move to the point where data could be read or written). In the 3390's initial models, the average rotational delay was reduced to 7.1 milliseconds from 8.3 milliseconds for the 3380 family.

  3. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  4. Disk storage at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mascetti, L; Chan, B; Espinal, X; Fiorot, A; Labrador, H Gonz; Iven, J; Lamanna, M; Presti, G Lo; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S; Rousseau, H; van der Ster, D

    2015-01-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  5. Searching for Faint Traces of CO(2-1) and HCN(4-3) Gas In Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford Lambros, Zachary; Hughes, A. Meredith

    2018-01-01

    The surprising presence of molecular gas in the debris disks around main sequence stars provides an opportunity to study the dissipation of primordial gas and, potentially, the composition of gas in other solar systems. Molecular gas is not expected to survive beyond the pre-main sequence phase, and it is not yet clear whether the gas is a remnant of the primordial protoplanetary material or whether the gas, like the dust, is second-generation material produced by collisional or photodesorption from planetesimals, exocomets, or the icy mantles of dust grains. Here we present two related efforts to characterize the prevalence and properties of gas in debris disks. First, we place the lowest limits to date on the CO emission from an M star debris disk, using 0.3" resolution observations of CO(2-1) emission from the AU Mic system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We place a 3-sigma upper limit on the integrated flux of 0.39 Jy km/s, corresponding to a maximum CO mass of 5e10-6 (Earth Masses) if the gas is in LTE. We also present the results of an ALMA search for HCN(4-3) emission from the prototypical gas-rich debris disk around 49 Ceti at a spatial resolution of 0.3". Despite hosting one of the brightest CO-rich debris disks yet discovered, our observations of 49 Ceti also yield a low upper limit of 0.057 Jy km/s in the HCN line, leaving CO as the only molecule clearly detected in emission from a debris disk. We employ several methods of detecting faint line emission from debris disks, including a model based on Keplerian kinematics as well as a spectral shifting method previously used to detect faint CO emission from the Fomalhaut debris disk, and compare our results.

  6. SMA Spectral Line Survey of the Proto-Planetary Nebula CRL 618

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Gottlieb, Carl; Young, Ken; (Tomek) Kaminski, Tomasz; McCarthy, Michael; Menten, Karl; Primiani, Rurik; Lee, Chin-Fei; Gupta, Harshal

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are major sources of gas and dust in the interstellar medium. AGB stars remain in their evolutionary stage for 1 to 10 Myrs, during which they have very high mass loss rates that increase at the end. During the brief (~1000 yr) period in the evolution from the AGB to the Planetary Nebula (PN) stage there are dramatic changes in the morphology from nearly spherical symmetry, to bipolar, quadrupolar and more complex structures, with the development of both slow and fast (100 km/s) outflows. The molecular composition of these objects' cirumstellar envelopes also evolves from being similar to that of parent AGB star (mainly diatomic and small polyatomic species), to more complex molecules (including ions).We have started an observational study of a sample of Proto-Planetary nebulae (PPN) with the Submillimeter Array to carry out spectral-line surveys of ~60 GHz frequency coverage in the 345 GHz band (similar to our published IRC+10216 line survey of 2011). Here we present preliminary results from the line survey of the carbon-rich PPN CRL 618, covering a frequency range of 281.9 to 359.4 GHz. Observations were carried out in January 2016 and September 2017, with the SMA in compact (3" angular resolution) and very extended (0.5") configurations, respectively.More than 1100 lines were detected in CRL 618. The majority of them can be attributed to HC3N and c-C3H2, and their isotopologues. About 350 lines are as yet unassigned. The continuum emission is unresolved even at 0.5" resolution. Several hydrogen recombination lines are detected from the central HII region. Lines of CO, HCO+, CS show the fast outflow wings, while the majority of molecular emission arises from a compact region of about 1" diameter. We present LTEmodeling and rotation temperature diagram analysis of HC3N, c-C3H2, CH3CN, and their isotopologues. We plan to observe another PPN, CRL 2688 with the SMA in 2018. Together, these imaging line surveys will

  7. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Helling

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. PRODIMO protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The DRIFT cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models.

  8. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  9. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (1734), Immanuel Kant (1755) and by Pierre-Simon Laplace (1796) in the 18th century. 4. The circumstantial evidence for circumstellar disks. Till around early 1980s, the evidence for the existence of circumstellar disks around YSOs had been indirect, based on the interpretation of optical-infrared spectral energy distribu-.

  10. Imaging polarimetry for the characterisation of exoplanets and protoplanetary discs : scientific and technical challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juan Ovelar, Maria de

    2013-01-01

    The study of exoplanets and the protoplanetary discs in which they form is a very challenging task. In this thesis we present several studies in which we investigate the potential of imaging polarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths to reveal the characteristics of these objects and

  11. Disk Modeling: Arts and Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayley, K. G.; Porter, J. M.

    2005-11-01

    This article summarizes the focus session on disk modeling arts and phenomenology, which was devoted to the types of interesting physics a disk modeler may wish to include, and how best to include it. It is assumed that the modeling goal is to guide the process of falsification of various hypotheses with data accessible by existing and planned observations. Appropriate modeling choices depend on the conditions and aspects of the problem under study, but the expectation is that observations will yield to correct interpretation only when the key physics is properly understood, and effectively simulated in the models. This focus review first sketches several potentially relevant phenomena that disk modelers may wish to incorporate, especially in regard to the role of magnetic vs. inertial support of disks, and the source of disk angular momentum. It then concludes with some comments on effective numerical modeling strategies for incorporating these effects.

  12. Gas in the protoplanetary disc of HD 169142: Herschel's view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, G.; Pinte, C.; Woitke, P.; Montesinos, B.; Mendigutía, I.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Mathews, G. S.; Vandenbussche, B.; Howard, C. D.; Roberge, A.; Sandell, G.; Duchêne, G.; Ménard, F.; Grady, C. A.; Dent, W. R. F.; Kamp, I.; Augereau, J. C.; Thi, W. F.; Tilling, I.; Alacid, J. M.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D. R.; Aresu, G.; Barrado, D.; Brittain, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Danchi, W.; Fedele, D.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Heras, A.; Huelamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Mora, A.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Nomura, H.; Pantin, E.; Pascucci, I.; Phillips, N.; Podio, L.; Poelman, D. R.; Ramsay, S.; Riaz, B.; Rice, K.; Solano, E.; Walker, H.; White, G. J.; Williams, J. P.; Wright, G.

    2010-07-01

    In an effort to simultaneously study the gas and dust components of the disc surrounding the young Herbig Ae star HD 169142, we present far-IR observations obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. This work is part of the open time key program GASPS, which is aimed at studying the evolution of protoplanetary discs. To constrain the gas properties in the outer disc, we observed the star at several key gas-lines, including [OI] 63.2 and 145.5 μm, [CII] 157.7 μm, CO 72.8 and 90.2 μm, and o-H2O 78.7 and 179.5 μm. We only detect the [OI] 63.2 μm line in our spectra, and derive upper limits for the other lines. We complement our data set with PACS photometry and 12/13CO data obtained with the Submillimeter Array. Furthermore, we derive accurate stellar parameters from optical spectra and UV to mm photometry. We model the dust continuum with the 3D radiative transfer code MCFOST and use this model as an input to analyse the gas lines with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo. Our dataset is consistent with a simple model in which the gas and dust are well-mixed in a disc with a continuous structure between 20 and 200 AU, but this is not a unique solution. Our modelling effort allows us to constrain the gas-to-dust mass ratio as well as the relative abundance of the PAHs in the disc by simultaneously fitting the lines of several species that originate in different regions. Our results are inconsistent with a gas-poor disc with a large UV excess; a gas mass of 5.0 ± 2.0 × 10-3 M⊙ is still present in this disc, in agreement with earlier CO observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  13. Harvesting the decay energy of 26Al to drive lightning discharge in protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    Chondrules in primitive meteorites likely formed by recrystallisation of dust aggregates that were flash-heated to nearly complete melting. Chondrules may represent the building blocks of rocky planetesimals and protoplanets in the inner regions of protoplanetary discs, but the source of ubiquitous thermal processing of their dust aggregate precursors remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that escape of positrons released in the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al leads to a large-scale charging of dense pebble structures, resulting in neutralisation by lightning discharge and flash-heating of dust and pebbles. This charging mechanism is similar to a nuclear battery where a radioactive source charges a capacitor. We show that the nuclear battery effect operates in circumplanetesimal pebble discs. The extremely high pebble densities in such discs are consistent with conditions during chondrule heating inferred from the high abundance of sodium within chondrules. The sedimented mid-plane layer of the protoplanetary disc may also be prone to charging by the emission of positrons, if the mass density of small dust there is at least an order of magnitude above the gas density. Our results imply that the decay energy of 26Al can be harvested to drive intense lightning activity in protoplanetary discs. The total energy stored in positron emission is comparable to the energy needed to melt all solids in the protoplanetary disc. The efficiency of transferring the positron energy to the electric field nevertheless depends on the relatively unknown distribution and scale-dependence of pebble density gradients in circumplanetesimal pebble discs and in the protoplanetary disc mid-plane layer.

  14. Comparison of Multi Disk Exponential Gas Distribution vs. Single Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Erica; O'Brien, James

    2013-04-01

    In fitting galactic rotation curves to data, most standard theories make use of a single exponential disk approximation of the gas distribution to account for the HI synthesis data observed at various radio telescope facilities. We take a sample of surface brightness profiles from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS), and apply both single disk exponentials and Multi-Disk exponentials, and use these various models to see how the modelling procedure changes the Newtonian prediction of the mass of the galaxy. Since the missing mass problem has not been fully explained in large spiral galaxies, different modelling procedures could account for some of the missing matter.

  15. Variable Dynamics in the Inner Disk of HD 135344B Revealed with Multi-epoch Scattered Light Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolker, Tomas; Sitko, Mike; Lazareff, Bernard; Benisty, Myriam; Dominik, Carsten; Waters, Rens; Min, Michiel; Perez, Sebastian; Milli, Julien; Garufi, Antonio; de Boer, Jozua; Ginski, Christian; Kraus, Stefan; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Avenhaus, Henning

    2017-11-01

    We present multi-epoch Very Large Telescope/Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (VLT/SPHERE) observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD 135344B (SAO 206462). The J-band scattered light imagery reveal, with high spatial resolution (˜41 mas, 6.4 au), the disk surface beyond ˜20 au. Temporal variations are identified in the azimuthal brightness distributions of all epochs, presumably related to the asymmetrically shading dust distribution in the inner disk. These shadows manifest themselves as narrow lanes, cast by localized density enhancements, and broader features which possibly trace the larger scale dynamics of the inner disk. We acquired visible and near-infrared photometry which shows variations up to 10% in the JHK bands, possibly correlated with the presence of the shadows. Analysis of archival Very Large Telescope Interferometer/Precision Integrated-Optics Near-infrared Imaging ExpeRiment (VLTI/PIONIER) H-band visibilities constrain the orientation of the inner disk to I=18\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {2}-4.1+3.4 and {PA}=57\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 3+/- 5\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7, consistent with an alignment with the outer disk or a minor disk warp of several degrees. The latter scenario could explain the broad, quasi-stationary shadowing in north-northwest direction in case the inclination of the outer disk is slightly larger. The correlation between the shadowing and the near-infrared excess is quantified with a grid of radiative transfer models. The variability of the scattered light contrast requires extended variations in the inner disk atmosphere (H/r≲ 0.2). Possible mechanisms that may cause asymmetric variations in the optical depth ({{Δ }}τ ≲ 1) through the atmosphere of the inner disk include turbulent fluctuations, planetesimal collisions, or a dusty disk wind, possibly enhanced by a minor disk warp. A fine temporal sampling is required to follow day-to-day changes of the shadow patterns which may be a face

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INNER DISK AROUND HD 141569 A FROM KECK/NIRC2 L-BAND VORTEX CORONAGRAPHY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Bottom, Michael; Matthews, Keith [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Choquet, Élodie; Serabyn, Eugene [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Absil, Olivier; Huby, Elsa; Gonzalez, Carlos A. Gomez; Wertz, Olivier; Carlomagno, Brunella; Christiaens, Valentin; Defrère, Denis; Delacroix, Christian; Habraken, Serge; Jolivet, Aissa [Space sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute, Université de Liège, 19 Allée du Six Août, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Femenia, Bruno [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Lebreton, Jérémy [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Forsberg, Pontus; Karlsson, Mikael [Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Milli, Julien, E-mail: dmawet@astro.caltech.edu [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordóva 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2017-01-01

    HD 141569 A is a pre-main sequence B9.5 Ve star surrounded by a prominent and complex circumstellar disk, likely still in a transition stage from protoplanetary to debris disk phase. Here, we present a new image of the third inner disk component of HD 141569 A made in the L ′ band (3.8 μ m) during the commissioning of the vector vortex coronagraph that has recently been installed in the near-infrared imager and spectrograph NIRC2 behind the W.M. Keck Observatory Keck II adaptive optics system. We used reference point-spread function subtraction, which reveals the innermost disk component from the inner working distance of ≃23 au and up to ≃70 au. The spatial scale of our detection roughly corresponds to the optical and near-infrared scattered light, thermal Q , N , and 8.6 μ m PAH emission reported earlier. We also see an outward progression in dust location from the L ′ band to the H band (Very Large Telescope/SPHERE image) to the visible ( Hubble Space Telescope ( HST )/STIS image), which is likely indicative of dust blowout. The warm disk component is nested deep inside the two outer belts imaged by HST-NICMOS in 1999 (at 406 and 245 au, respectively). We fit our new L ′-band image and spectral energy distribution of HD 141569 A with the radiative transfer code MCFOST. Our best-fit models favor pure olivine grains and are consistent with the composition of the outer belts. While our image shows a putative very faint point-like clump or source embedded in the inner disk, we did not detect any true companion within the gap between the inner disk and the first outer ring, at a sensitivity of a few Jupiter masses.

  17. 8-inch IBM floppy disk

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The 8-inch floppy disk was a magnetic storage disk for the data introduced commercially by IBM in 1971. It was designed by an IBM team as an inexpensive way to load data into the IBM System / 370. Plus it was a read-only bare disk containing 80 KB of data. The first read-write version was introduced in 1972 by Memorex and could contain 175 KB on 50 tracks (with 8 sectors per track). Other improvements have led to various coatings and increased capacities. Finally, it was surpassed by the mini diskette of 5.25 inches introduced in 1976.

  18. The Tilt between Acretion Disk and Stellar Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... large sample of Type 2 AGNs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, York et al. 2000) to a control galaxy sample. Given that the Type 2 AGN fraction is in the range of 70–90 percent for low luminosity AGNs as a priori, we find that the mean tilt between the accretion disk and stellar disk is ∼ 30 degrees (Shen et al.

  19. Fat: an evolving issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2012-09-01

    Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65% of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come.

  20. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  1. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Asymmetric evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, S.; Bauer, M.

    2003-10-01

    We generalize the Poissonian evolving random graph model of M. Bauer and D. Bernard (2003), to deal with arbitrary degree distributions. The motivation comes from biological networks, which are well-known to exhibit non Poissonian degree distributions. A node is added at each time step and is connected to the rest of the graph by oriented edges emerging from older nodes. This leads to a statistical asymmetry between incoming and outgoing edges. The law for the number of new edges at each time step is fixed but arbitrary. Thermodynamical behavior is expected when this law has a large time limit. Although (by construction) the incoming degree distributions depend on this law, this is not the case for most qualitative features concerning the size distribution of connected components, as long as the law has a finite variance. As the variance grows above 1/4, the average being < 1/2, a giant component emerges, which connects a finite fraction of the vertices. Below this threshold, the distribution of component sizes decreases algebraically with a continuously varying exponent. The transition is of infinite order, in sharp contrast with the case of static graphs. The local-in-time profiles for the components of finite size allow to give a refined description of the system.

  3. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  4. Probing the Cold Dust Emission in the AB Aur Disk: A Dust Trap in a Decaying Vortex?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, Asunción; Bachiller, Rafael [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (OAN, IGN), Apdo 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Baruteau, Clément; Carmona, Andrés; Berné, Olivier [IRAP, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, UPS, Toulouse (France); Neri, Roberto [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM), 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d’Hères (France); Agúndez, Marcelino; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: a.fuente@oan.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    One serious challenge for planet formation is the rapid inward drift of pebble-sized dust particles in protoplanetary disks. Dust trapping at local maxima in the disk gas pressure has received much theoretical attention but still lacks observational support. The cold dust emission in the AB Aur disk forms an asymmetric ring at a radius of about 120 au, which is suggestive of dust trapping in a gas vortex. We present high spatial resolution (0.″58 × 0.″78 ≈ 80 × 110 au) NOEMA observations of the 1.12 mm and 2.22 mm dust continuum emission from the AB Aur disk. Significant azimuthal variations of the flux ratio at both wavelengths indicate a size segregation of the large dust particles along the ring. Our continuum images also show that the intensity variations along the ring are smaller at 2.22 mm than at 1.12 mm, contrary to what dust trapping models with a gas vortex have predicted. Our two-fluid (gas+dust) hydrodynamical simulations demonstrate that this feature is well explained if the gas vortex has started to decay due to turbulent diffusion, and dust particles are thus losing the azimuthal trapping on different timescales depending on their size. The comparison between our observations and simulations allows us to constrain the size distribution and the total mass of solid particles in the ring, which we find to be of the order of 30 Earth masses, enough to form future rocky planets.

  5. Planet formation in transition disks: Modeling, spectroscopy, and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowsky, Joseph Paul

    An important field of modern astronomy is the study of planets. Literally for millennia, careful observers of the night sky have tracked these 'wanderers', with their peculiar motions initiating avenues of inquiry not able to elucidated by a study of the stars alone: we have discovered that the planets (as well as Earth) orbit the sun and that the stars are so far away, even their relative positions do not seem to shift perceptibly when Earth's position moves hundreds of millions of miles. With the advent of the telescope, and subsequent improvements upon it over the course of centuries, accelerating to the dramatically immense telescopes available today and those on the horizon, we have been able to continuously probe farther and in more detail than the previous generation of scientists and telescopes allowed. Now, we are just entering the time when detection of planets outside of our own solar system has become possible, and we have found that planets are extraordinarily common in the galaxy (and by extrapolation, the universe). At the time of this document's composition, there are several thousand such examples of planets around other stars (being dubbed 'exoplanets'). We have discovered that planets are plentiful, but multiple open questions remain which are relevant to this work: How do planets form and, when a planet does form from its circumstellar envelope, what are the important processes that influence its formation? This work adds to the understanding of circumstellar disks, the intermediate stage between a cold collapsing cloud (of gas and dust) and a mature planetary system. Specifically, we study circumstellar disks in an evolved state termed 'transition disks'. This state corresponds to a time period where the dust in the disk has either undergone grain growth—where the microscopic grains have clumped together to form far fewer dust particles of much higher mass, or the inner portion (or an inner annulus) of the disk has lost a large amount of gas

  6. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-04-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    We consider new versions of the two-center problem where the input consists of a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. We give exact and approximation algorithms for these versions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Tidal tearing of circumstellar disks in Be/X-ray and gamma-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Atsuo T.

    2017-11-01

    About one half of high-mass X-ray binaries host a Be star [an OB star with a viscous decretion (slowly outflowing) disk]. These Be/X-ray binaries exhibit two types of X-ray outbursts (Stella et al. 1986), normal X-ray outbursts (L X~1036-37 erg s-1) and occasional giant X-ray outbursts (L X > 1037 erg s-1). The origin of giant X-ray outbursts is unknown. On the other hand, a half of gamma-ray binaries have a Be star as the optical counterpart. One of these systems [LS I +61 303 (P orb = 26.5 d)] shows the superorbital (1,667 d) modulation in radio through X-ray bands. No consensus has been obtained for its origin. In this paper, we study a possibility that both phenomena are caused by a long-term, cyclic evolution of a highly misaligned Be disk under the influence of a compact object, by performing 3D hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the Be disk cyclically evolves in mildly eccentric, short-period systems. Each cycle consists of the following stages: 1) As the Be disk grows with time, the initially circular disk becomes eccentric by the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. 2) At some point, the disk is tidally torn off near the base and starts precession. 3) Due to precession, a gap opens between the disk base and mass ejection region, which allows the formation of a new disk in the stellar equatorial plane (see Figure 1). 4) The newly formed disk finally replaces the precessing old disk. Such a cyclic disk evolution has interesting implications for the long-term behavior of high energy emission in Be/X-ray and gamma-ray binaries.

  9. Harvesting the decay energy of $^{26}$Al to drive lightning discharge in protoplanetary discs

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Anders; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Chondrules in primitive meteorites likely formed by recrystallisation of dust aggregates that were flash-heated to nearly complete melting. Chondrules may represent the building blocks of rocky planetesimals and protoplanets in the inner regions of protoplanetary discs, but the source of ubiquitous thermal processing of their dust aggregate precursors remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that escape of positrons released in the decay of the short-lived radionuclide $^{26}$Al leads to a large-...

  10. Structure and Spectroscopy of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedahl, D; Mauche, C

    2005-02-14

    The warped spacetime near black holes is one of the most exotic observable environments in the Universe. X-ray spectra from active galaxies obtained with the current generation of X-ray observatories reveal line emission that is modified by both special relativistic and general relativistic effects. The interpretation is that we are witnessing X-ray irradiated matter orbiting in an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, as it prepares to cross the event horizon. This interpretation, however, is based upon highly schematized models of accretion disk structure. This report describes a project to design a detailed computer model of accretion disk atmospheres, with the goal of elucidating the high radiation density environments associated with mass flows in the curved spacetime near gravitationally collapsed objects. We have evolved the capability to generate realistic theoretical X-ray line spectra of accretion disks, thereby providing the means for a workable exploration of the behavior of matter in the strong-field limit of gravitation.

  11. IMAGING THE INNER AND OUTER GAPS OF THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK OF HD 169142 AT 7 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Macías, Enrique; Gómez, José F.; Mayen-Gijon, Juan M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.; D' Alessio, Paola [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC)-Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB)/IEEC, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 825 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nagel, Erick [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Gto 36240 (Mexico); Dent, William R. F. [ALMA SCO, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Quanz, Sascha P.; Reggiani, Maddalena, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-08-20

    We present Very Large Array observations at 7 mm that trace the thermal emission of large dust grains in the HD 169142 protoplanetary disk. Our images show a ring of enhanced emission of radius ∼25-30 AU, whose inner region is devoid of detectable 7 mm emission. We interpret this ring as tracing the rim of an inner cavity or gap, possibly created by a planet or a substellar companion. The ring appears asymmetric, with the western part significantly brighter than the eastern one. This azimuthal asymmetry is reminiscent of the lopsided structures that are expected to be produced as a consequence of trapping of large dust grains. Our observations also reveal an outer annular gap at radii from ∼40 to ∼70 AU. Unlike other sources, the radii of the inner cavity, the ring, and the outer gap observed in the 7 mm images, which trace preferentially the distribution of large (millimeter/centimeter sized) dust grains, coincide with those obtained from a previous near-infrared polarimetric image, which traces scattered light from small (micron-sized) dust grains. We model the broadband spectral energy distribution and the 7 mm images to constrain the disk physical structure. From this modeling we infer the presence of a small (radius ∼0.6 AU) residual disk inside the central cavity, indicating that the HD 169142 disk is a pre-transitional disk. The distribution of dust in three annuli with gaps in between them suggests that the disk in HD 169142 is being disrupted by at least two planets or substellar objects.

  12. Simultaneity on the Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koks, Don

    2017-04-01

    The disk that rotates in an inertial frame in special relativity has long been analysed by assuming a Lorentz contraction of its peripheral elements in that frame, which has produced widely varying views in the literature. We show that this assumption is unnecessary for a disk that corresponds to the simplest form of rotation in special relativity. After constructing such a disk and showing that observers at rest on it do not constitute a true rotating frame, we choose a "master" observer and calculate a set of disk coordinates and spacetime metric pertinent to that observer. We use this formalism to resolve the "circular twin paradox", then calculate the speed of light sent around the periphery as measured by the master observer, to show that this speed is a function of sent-direction and disk angle traversed. This result is consistent with the Sagnac Effect, but constitutes a finer analysis of that effect, which is normally expressed using an average speed for a full trip of the periphery. We also use the formalism to give a resolution of "Selleri's paradox".

  13. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  14. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  15. Organic materials in planetary and protoplanetary systems: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ore, C. M.; Fulchignoni, M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Barucci, M. A.; Brunetto, R.; Campins, H.; de Bergh, C.; Debes, J. H.; Dotto, E.; Emery, J. P.; Grundy, W. M.; Jones, A. P.; Mennella, V.; Orthous-Daunay, F. R.; Owen, T.; Pascucci, I.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Quirico, E.; Strazzulla, G.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: The objective of this work is to summarize the discussion of a workshop aimed at investigating the properties, origins, and evolution of the materials that are responsible for the red coloration of the small objects in the outer parts of the solar system. Because of limitations or inconsistencies in the observations and, until recently, the limited availability of laboratory data, there are still many questions on the subject. Our goal is to approach two of the main questions in a systematic way: - Is coloring an original signature of materials that are presolar in origin ("nature") or stems from post-formational chemical alteration, or weathering ("nurture")? - What is the chemical signature of the material that causes spectra to be sloped towards the red in the visible? We examine evidence available both from the laboratory and from observations sampling different parts of the solar system and circumstellar regions (disks). Methods: We present a compilation of brief summaries gathered during the workshop and describe the evidence towards a primordial vs. evolutionary origin for the material that reddens the small objects in the outer parts of our, as well as in other, planetary systems. We proceed by first summarizing laboratory results followed by observational data collected at various distances from the Sun. Results: While laboratory experiments show clear evidence of irradiation effects, particularly from ion bombardment, the first obstacle often resides in the ability to unequivocally identify the organic material in the observations. The lack of extended spectral data of good quality and resolution is at the base of this problem. Furthermore, that both mechanisms, weathering and presolar, act on the icy materials in a spectroscopically indistinguishable way makes our goal of defining the impact of each mechanism challenging. Conclusions: Through a review of some of the workshop presentations and discussions, encompassing laboratory experiments as well

  16. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile.

  17. Why Do Disks Form Jets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    It is argued that jet modelers have given insufficient study to the natural magneto-static configurations of field wound up in the presence of a confining general pressure. Such fields form towers whose height grows with each twist at a velocity comparable to the circular velocity of the accretion disk that turns them. A discussion of the generation of such towers is preceded by a brief history of the idea that quasars, active galaxies, and galactic nuclei contain giant black holes with accretion disks.

  18. The Disk Mass Project: breaking the disk-halo degeneracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Swaters, Rob A.; Andersen, David R.; Westfall, Kyle B.; DE JONG, R. S.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the content and distribution of dark matter in spiral galaxies. To break the degeneracy in galaxy rotation curve decompositions, which allows a wide range of dark matter halo density profiles, an independent measure of the mass surface density of stellar disks is needed. Here,

  19. A CANDIDATE PLANETARY-MASS OBJECT WITH A PHOTOEVAPORATING DISK IN ORION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Apai, Dániel [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Pascucci, Ilaria [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Manara, Carlo Felice [Scientific Support Office, Directorate of Science, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2016-12-20

    In this work, we report the discovery of a candidate planetary-mass object with a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk, Proplyd 133-353, which is near the massive star θ {sup 1} Ori C at the center of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The object was known to have extended emission pointing away from θ {sup 1} Ori C, indicating ongoing external photoevaporation. Our near-infrared spectroscopic data and the location on the H–R diagram suggest that the central source of Proplyd 133-353 is substellar (∼M9.5) and has a mass probably less than 13 Jupiter mass and an age younger than 0.5 Myr. Proplyd 133-353 shows a similar ratio of X-ray luminosity to stellar luminosity to other young stars in the ONC with a similar stellar luminosity and has a similar proper motion to the mean one of confirmed ONC members. We propose that Proplyd 133-353 formed in a very low-mass dusty cloud or an evaporating gas globule near θ {sup 1} Ori C as a second generation of star formation, which can explain both its young age and the presence of its disk.

  20. Structure Formation inside Triaxial Dark Matter Halos: Galactic Disks, Bulges, and Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Clayton H.; Shlosman, Isaac; Athanassoula, E.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate formation and evolution of galactic disks immersed in assembling live DM halos. Models have been evolved from cosmological initial conditions and represent the collapse of an isolated density perturbation. The baryons include gas participating in star formation (SF) and stars with the energy feedback onto the ISM. We find that (1) the triaxial halo figure tumbling is insignificant and the angular momentum (J) is channeled into the internal circulation, while the baryonic collapse is stopped by the centrifugal barrier; (2) density response of the (disk) baryons is out of phase with DM, thus washing out the inner halo ellipticity; (3) the total J is neatly conserved, even in models accounting for stellar feedback; (4) the specific J for DM is nearly constant, while that for baryons is decreasing; (5) early stage of disk formation resembles the cat's cradle-a small amorphous disk fueled via radial string patterns-followed by growing oval disk whose shape varies with its orientation to the halo major axis; (6) the disk gas layer thins when the SF rate drops below ~5 Msolar yr-1 (7) about half of the baryons remain outside the disk SF region or in the halo as a hot gas; (8) rotation curves appear to be flat and account for the observed disk/halo contributions; (9) a range of bulge-dominated to bulgeless disks was obtained, depending on the stellar feedback parameter, ɛSF: smaller ɛSF leads to a larger and earlier bulge; lower density threshold for SF leads to a smaller, thicker disk; gas gravitational softening mimics a number of intrinsic processes within the ISM; (10) models are characterized by an extensive bar-forming activity; (11) nested bars form in response to the gas inflow along the primary bars, as shown by Heller, Shlosman, and Athanassoula.

  1. Disk Operating System User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-05-01

    This document serves the purpose of bringing together in one place most of the information a user needs to use the DDP-516 Disk Operating System, (DOS). DOS is a core resident, one user, console-oriented operating system which allows the user to cont...

  2. Three types of galaxy disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohlen, M.; Erwin, P.; Trujillo, I.; Beckman, J. E.; Knapen, JH; Mahoney, TJ; Vazdekis, A

    2008-01-01

    We present our new scheme for the classification of radial stellar surface brightness profiles for disk galaxies. We summarize the current theoretical attempts to understand their origin and give an example of an application by comparing local galaxies with their counterparts at high redshift (z

  3. Testing giant planet formation in the transitional disk of SAO 206462 using deep VLT/SPHERE imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, A.-L.; Stolker, T.; Messina, S.; Müller, A.; Biller, B. A.; Currie, T.; Dominik, C.; Grady, C. A.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Galicher, R.; Millward, M.; Pohl, A.; Brandner, W.; Henning, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Quanz, S. P.; Vigan, A.; Zurlo, A.; van Boekel, R.; Buenzli, E.; Buey, T.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Ginski, C.; Giro, E.; Gratton, R.; Hubin, N.; Lannier, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Mesa, D.; Peretti, S.; Perrot, C.; Ramos, J. R.; Salter, G.; Samland, M.; Sissa, E.; Stadler, E.; Thalmann, C.; Udry, S.; Weber, L.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) disk is one of the few known transitional disks showing asymmetric features in scattered light and thermal emission. Near-infrared scattered-light images revealed two bright outer spiral arms and an inner cavity depleted in dust. Giant protoplanets have been proposed to account for the disk morphology. Aims: We aim to search for giant planets responsible for the disk features and, in the case of non-detection, to constrain recent planet predictions using the data detection limits. Methods: We obtained new high-contrast and high-resolution total intensity images of the target spanning the Y to the K bands (0.95-2.3 μm) using the VLT/SPHERE near-infrared camera and integral field spectrometer. Results: The spiral arms and the outer cavity edge are revealed at high resolutions and sensitivities without the need for aggressive image post-processing techniques, which introduce photometric biases. We do not detect any close-in companions. For the derivation of the detection limits on putative giant planets embedded in the disk, we show that the knowledge of the disk aspect ratio and viscosity is critical for the estimation of the attenuation of a planet signal by the protoplanetary dust because of the gaps that these putative planets may open. Given assumptions on these parameters, the mass limits can vary from 2-5 to 4-7 Jupiter masses at separations beyond the disk spiral arms. The SPHERE detection limits are more stringent than those derived from archival NaCo/L' data and provide new constraints on a few recent predictions of massive planets (4-15 MJ) based on the spiral density wave theory. The SPHERE and ALMA data do not favor the hypotheses on massive giant planets in the outer disk (beyond 0.6''). There could still be low-mass planets in the outer disk and/or planets inside the cavity. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 095.C

  4. Magnesium and 54Cr isotope compositions of carbonaceous chondrite chondrules – Insights into early disk processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    typically observed for bulk carbonaceous chondrites. Collectively, these observations suggest that the CV chondrules formed from precursors that originated in various regions of the protoplanetary disk and were then transported to the accretion region of the CV parent asteroid whereas CR chondrule...... establishes that these objects formed from a thermally unprocessed and 26Al-poor source reservoir distinct from most inner Solar System asteroids and planetary bodies, possibly located beyond the orbits of the gas giants. In contrast, a large fraction of the CV chondrules plot on the inner Solar System...... correlation line, indicating that these objects predominantly formed from thermally-processed, 26Al-bearing precursor material akin to that of inner Solar System solids, asteroids and planets....

  5. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Buick

    2008-01-01

    ...2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event...

  6. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  7. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  8. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  9. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harvey, James [NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  10. What Shaped Elias 2-27's Disk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    The young star Elias 2-27 is surrounded by a massive disk with spectacular spiral arms. A team of scientists from University of Cambridges Institute of Astronomy has now examined what might cause this disks appearance.Top: ALMA 1.3-mm observations of Elias 2-27s spiral arms, processed with an unsharp masking filter. Two symmetric spiral arms, a bright inner ellipse, and two dark crescents are clearly visible. Bottom: a deprojection of the top image (i.e., what the system would look like face-on). [Meru et al. 2017]ALMA-Imaged Spiral ArmsWith the dawn of new telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, were now able to study the birth of young stars and their newly forming planetary systems in more detail than ever before. But these new images require new models and interpretations!Case in point: Elias 2-27 is a low-mass star thats only a million years old and is surrounded by an unusually massive disk of gas and dust. Recent spatially-resolved ALMA observations of Elias 2-27 have revealed the stunning structure of the stars disk: it contains two enormous, symmetric spiral arms, as well as additional features interior to the spirals.What caused the disk to develop this structure? Led by Farzana Meru, a group of Institute of Astronomy researchers has run a series of simulations that explore different ways that Elias 2-27s disk might have evolved into the shape we see today.Modeling a DiskMeru and collaborators performed a total of 72 three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations tracking 250,000 gas particles in a model disk around a star like Elias 2-27. They then modeled the transfer of energy through these simulated disks and produced synthetic ALMA observations based on the outcomes.Left: Synthetic ALMA observations of disks shaped by an internal companion (top), an external companion (middle), and gravitational instability within the disk (bottom). Right: Deprojections of the images on the left. Scales are the same as in

  11. Growing and moving planets in disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2006-01-01

    Planets form in disks that are commonly found around young stars. The intimate relationship that exists between planet and disk can account for a lot of the exotic extrasolar planetary systems known today. In this thesis we explore disk-planet interaction using numerical hydrodynamical simulations.

  12. Basics of Videodisc and Optical Disk Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Judith

    1983-01-01

    Outlines basic videodisc and optical disk technology describing both optical and capacitance videodisc technology. Optical disk technology is defined as a mass digital image and data storage device and briefly compared with other information storage media including magnetic tape and microforms. The future of videodisc and optical disk is…

  13. Microporous Carbon Disks For Sorption Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munukutla, Lakshmi V.; Moore, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Slow, carefully controlled pyrolysis found to turn polyvinylidene chloride disks into carbon disks having small pores and large surface areas. Disks exhibit high adsorptivities making them useful in krypton-sorption refrigerators. Carbons made from polyvinylidene chloride have greater adsorptive capacities. Thermal instability controlled and variability of product reduced by careful control of rates of heating, heating times, and rate of final cooling.

  14. Efficiency of thermal relaxation by radiative processes in protoplanetary discs: constraints on hydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malygin, M. G.; Klahr, H.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Hydrodynamic, non-magnetic instabilities can provide turbulent stress in the regions of protoplanetary discs, where the magneto-rotational instability can not develop. The induced motions influence the grain growth, from which formation of planetesimals begins. Thermal relaxation of the gas constrains origins of the identified hydrodynamic sources of turbulence in discs. Aims: We aim to estimate the radiative relaxation timescale of temperature perturbations in protoplanetary discs. We study the dependence of the thermal relaxation on the perturbation wavelength, the location within the disc, the disc mass, and the dust-to-gas mass ratio. We then apply thermal relaxation criteria to localise modes of the convective overstability, the vertical shear instability, and the zombie vortex instability. Methods: For a given temperature perturbation, we estimated two timescales: the radiative diffusion timescale tthick and the optically thin emission timescale tthin. The longest of these timescales governs the relaxation: trelax = max (tthick, tthin). We additionally accounted for the collisional coupling to the emitting species. Our calculations employed the latest tabulated dust and gas mean opacities. Results: The relaxation criterion defines the bulk of a typical T Tauri disc as unstable to the development of linear hydrodynamic instabilities. The midplane is unstable to the convective overstability from at most 2au and up to 40au, as well as beyond 140au. The vertical shear instability can develop between 15au and 180au. The successive generation of (zombie) vortices from a seeded noise can work within the inner 0.8au. Conclusions: A map of relaxation timescale constrains the origins of the identified hydrodynamic turbulence-driving mechanisms in protoplanetary discs. Dynamic disc modelling with the evolution of dust and gas opacities is required to clearly localise the hydrodynamic turbulence, and especially its non-linear phase.

  15. Characterising face-on accretion onto and the subsequent contraction of protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pols, O. R.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Observations indicate that stars generally lose their protoplanetary discs on a timescale of about 5 Myr. Which mechanisms are responsible for the disc dissipation is still debated. Aims: Here we investigate the movement through an ambient medium as a possible cause of disc dispersal. The ram pressure exerted by the flow can truncate the disc and the accretion of material with no azimuthal angular momentum leads to further disc contraction. Methods: We derive a theoretical model from accretion disc theory that describes the evolution of the disc radius, mass, and surface density profile as a function of the density and velocity of the ambient medium. We test our model by performing hydrodynamical simulations of a protoplanetary disc embedded in a flow with different velocities and densities. Results: We find that our model gives an adequate description of the evolution of the disc radius and accretion rate onto the disc. The total disc mass in the simulations follows the theoretically expected trend, except at the lowest density where our simulated discs lose mass owing to continuous stripping. This stripping may be a numerical rather than a physical effect. Some quantitative differences exist between the model predictions and the simulations. These are at least partly caused by numerical viscous effects in the disc and depend on the resolution of the simulation. Conclusions: Our model can be used as a conservative estimate for the process of face-on accretion onto protoplanetary discs, as long as viscous processes in the disc can be neglected. The model predicts that in dense gaseous environments, discs can shrink substantially in size and can, in theory, sweep up an amount of gas of the order of their initial mass. This process could be relevant for planet formation in dense environments.

  16. First results from the Herschel Open time Large Program GaS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, W.-F.

    2011-11-01

    We summarize the first results from the Herschel Open time Key Program GaS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS, P.I.W. Dent). GASPS aims to determine the gas and dust content of ~240 planet-forming discs with ages 1-30 Myrs in a systematic fashion. Photometry in the far-IR and low-resolution spectroscopy of the fine-structure emissions of OI and CII are obtained with the PACS instrument on board the European space telescope Herschel. Initial modelling of the Herschel and complementary observations of the classical T Tauri star TW Hya and of the Herbig Ae star HD 169142 are presented.

  17. Gas in the protoplanetary disc of HD169142: Herschel’s view

    OpenAIRE

    Meeus, G.; Ciardi, D. R.; Morales-Calderon, M.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to simultaneously study the gas and dust components of the disc surrounding the young Herbig Ae star HD169142, we present far-IR observations obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. This work is part of the open time key program GASPS, which is aimed at studying the evolution of protoplanetary discs. To constrain the gas properties in the outer disc, we observed the star at several key gas-lines, including [OI] 63.2 and 145.5 μm, [CII] 157.7 μ...

  18. Turbulent thermal diffusion: a way to concentrate dust in protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence acting on mixes of gas and particles generally diffuses the latter evenly through the former. However, in the presence of background gas temperature gradients, a phenomenon known as turbulent thermal diffusion appears as a particle drift velocity (rather than a diffusive term). This process moves particles from hot regions to cold ones. We re-derive turbulent thermal diffusion using astrophysical language and demonstrate that it could play a major role in protoplanetary discs by concentrating particles by factors of tens. Such a concentration would set the stage for collective behaviour such as the streaming instability and hence planetesimal formation.

  19. Cosmic evolution of stellar disk truncations: from z = 1 to the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Azzollini, Ruyman; Bakos, Judit; Beckman, John; Pohlen, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We present our recent results on the cosmic evolution of the outskirts of disk galaxies. In particular we focus on disk-like galaxies with stellar disk truncations. Using UDF, GOODS and SDSS data we show how the position of the break (i.e. a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z~1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshifts we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constraint several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  20. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  1. Increased H2CO production in the outer disk around HD 163296

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, M. T.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Loomis, R. A.; Salinas, V. N.; Öberg, K. I.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The gas and dust in circumstellar disks provide the raw materials to form planets. The study of organic molecules and their building blocks in such disks offers insight into the origin of the prebiotic environment of terrestrial planets. Aims: We aim to determine the distribution of formaldehyde, H2CO, in the disk around HD 163296 to assess the contribution of gas- and solid-phase formation routes of this simple organic. Methods: Three formaldehyde lines were observed (H2CO 303-202, H2CO 322-221, and H2CO 321-220) in the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 with ALMA at 0.5″ (60 AU) spatial resolution. Different parameterizations of the H2CO abundance were compared to the observed visibilities, using either a characteristic temperature, a characteristic radius or a radial power law index to describe the H2CO chemistry. Similar models were applied to ALMA Science Verification data of C18O. In each scenario, χ2 minimization on the visibilities was used to determine the best-fit model in each scenario. Results: H2CO 303-202 was readily detected via imaging, while the weaker H2CO 322-221 and H2CO 321-220 lines required matched filter analysis to detect. H2CO is present throughout most of the gaseous disk, extending out to 550 AU. An apparent 50 AU inner radius of the H2CO emission is likely caused by an optically thick dust continuum. The H2CO radial intensity profile shows a peak at 100 AU and a secondary bump at 300 AU, suggesting increased production in the outer disk. In all modeling scenarios, fits to the H2CO data show an increased abundance in the outer disk. The overall best-fit H2CO model shows a factor of two enhancement beyond a radius of 270 ± 20 AU, with an inner abundance (relative to H2) of 2 - 5 × 10-12. The H2CO emitting region has a lower limit on the kinetic temperature of T> 20 K. The C18O modeling suggests an order of magnitude depletion of C18O in the outer disk and an abundance of 4 - 12 × 10-8 in the inner disk

  2. Pd-Ag chronometry of IVA iron meteorites and the crystallization and cooling of a protoplanetary core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, M.; Fischer-Gödde, M.; Kruijer, T. S.; Kleine, T.

    2018-01-01

    To constrain the timescales and processes involved in the crystallization and cooling of protoplanetary cores, we examined the Pd-Ag isotope systematics of the IVA iron meteorites Muonionalusta and Gibeon. A Pd-Ag isochron for Muonionalusta provides an initial 107Pd/108Pd = (2.57 ± 0.07) × 10-5. The three metal samples analyzed from Gibeon plot below the Muonionalusta isochron, but these samples also show significant effects of cosmic ray-induced neutron capture reactions, as is evident from 196Pt excesses in the Gibeon samples. After correction for neutron capture effects on Ag isotopes, the Gibeon samples plot on the Muonionalusta isochron, indicating that these two IVA irons have indistinguishable initial 107Pd/108Pd. Collectively, the Pd-Ag data indicate cooling of the IVA core below Pd-Ag closure between 2.9 ± 0.4 Ma and 8.9 ± 0.6 Ma after CAI formation, where this age range reflects uncertainties in the initial 107Pd/108Pd ratios of the solar system, which in turn result from uncertainties in the Pb-Pb age of Muonionalusta. The Ag isotopic data indicate that the IVA core initially evolved with a modestly elevated Pd/Ag, but the low Ag concentrations measured for some metal samples indicate derivation from a source with much lower Ag contents and, hence, higher Pd/Ag. These contrasting observations can be reconciled if the IVA irons crystallized from an initially more Ag-rich core, followed by extraction of Fe-S melts during compaction of the nearly solidified core. Owing to its strong tendency to partition into Fe-S melts, Ag was removed from the IVA core during compaction, leading to the very low Ag concentration observed in metal samples of IVA irons. Alternatively, Ag was lost by evaporation from a still molten metallic body just prior to the onset of crystallization. The Pd-Ag isotopic data indicate that Muonionalusta cooled at >500 K/Ma through the Pd-Ag closure temperature of ∼900 K, consistent with the rapid cooling inferred from metallographic

  3. Size and density sorting of dust grains in SPH simulations of protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Cuello, Nicolas; Bourdon, Bernard; Fitoussi, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    The size and density of dust grains determine their response to gas drag in protoplanetary discs. Aerodynamical (size × density) sorting is one of the proposed mechanisms to explain the grain properties and chemical fractionation of chondrites. However, the efficiency of aerodynamical sorting and the location in the disc in which it could occur are still unknown. Although the effects of grain sizes and growth in discs have been widely studied, a simultaneous analysis including dust composition is missing. In this work, we present the dynamical evolution and growth of multicomponent dust in a protoplanetary disc using a 3D, two-fluid (gas+dust) smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the dust vertical settling is characterized by two phases: a density-driven phase that leads to a vertical chemical sorting of dust and a size-driven phase that enhances the amount of lighter material in the mid-plane. We also see an efficient radial chemical sorting of the dust at large scales. We find that dust particles are aerodynamically sorted in the inner disc. The disc becomes sub-solar in its Fe/Si ratio on the surface since the early stage of evolution but sub-solar Fe/Si can be also found in the outer disc-mid-plane at late stages. Aggregates in the disc mimic the physical and chemical properties of chondrites, suggesting that aerodynamical sorting played an important role in determining their final structure.

  4. THE STELLAR SPHEROID, THE DISK, AND THE DYNAMICS OF THE COSMIC WEB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Obreja, A.; Brook, C. B. [Dept. de Física Teórica, Univ. Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Cantoblanco Madrid (Spain); Martínez-Serrano, F. J.; Serna, A. [Dept. de Física y A.C., Universidad Miguel Hernández, E-03202 Elche (Spain); Stinson, G., E-mail: rosa.dominguez@uam.es [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-02-20

    Models of the advanced stages of gravitational instability predict that baryons that form the stellar populations of current galaxies at z = 0 displayed a web-like structure at high z, as part of the cosmic web (CW). We explore details of these predictions using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. When the stellar populations of the spheroid and disk components of simulated late-type galaxies are traced back separately to high zs we found CW-like structures where spheroid progenitors are more evolved than disk progenitors. The distinction between the corresponding stellar populations, as driven by their specific angular momentum content j, can be explained in terms of the CW evolution, extended to two processes occurring at lower z. First, the spheroid progenitors strongly lose j at collapse, which contrasts with the insignificant j loss of the disk progenitors. The second is related to the lack of alignment, at assembly, between the spheroid-to-be material and the already settled proto-disk, in contrast to the alignment of disk-to-be material, in some cases resulting from circumgalactic, disk-induced gravitational torques. The different final outcomes of these low-z processes have their origins in the different initial conditions driven by the CW dynamics.

  5. A photometric study of the structure of pure disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Pure disk galaxies are galaxies that form and evolve without a central bulge region. This morphology of galaxy is relatively unexplained and has yet to be successfully simulated using Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model parameters. The ΛCDM model is the standard framework from which astronomers and physicists understand and predict the Universe due to confirmed predictions such as the cosmic microwave background and the large scale structure of galaxy clusters. However, ΛCDM has yet to have a benchmark, observationally confirmed prediction on the galactic scale. This thesis is a study of eleven pure disk galaxies. Understanding this type of galaxy is very important in rectifying the incompatibility with the ΛCDM model. The method of analysis includes obtaining, cleaning and sky subtracting images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, deprojecting the images for a face on perspective, using g- and i-bands to construct color-index maps, using Fourier decompositions to create mode-dependent intensity ratio plots, surface density maps, mass-to-light ratio maps and surface brightness profiles, from which the radial scale length is derived. The future of this area of study is vital to understand a common feature of our Universe. Future studies can include looking for early supernova remnants or evidence of recent active galactic nuclei activity in young pure disk galaxies. Surveys and photometric analysis of edge-on pure disk galaxies may also reveal vital information to the origin and evolution of this class of galaxy.

  6. Characterizing Debris Disks in the Late Stages of Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The planet formation process shapes the morphology and grain size distribution of circumstellar disks, encoding the formation history of a given system. Remnants of planet formation, such as comets and asteroids, collisionally evolve and can replenish the dust and small solids that would otherwise be cleared on short timescales. These grains are observed through reprocessed starlight at submm to cm wavelengths.The spectrum of the mm/cm emission reveals details of the grain population. However, one confounding parameter in studying these grains around stars is the stars themselves. The emission from stars in the mm/cm is nontrivial and generally not well-constrained. I will present examples of debris systems (HD 141569 and Fomalhaut) studied by ALMA and the VLA, in which unconstrained stellar emission may be contributing to the observed flux densities. Such contamination in turn biases the inferred emission from the disk and the corresponding dust properties. In some cases, the behavior of the observed A/B stars can exhibit an emission profile that has similarities to that of the Sun's mm/cm emission, although the same processes are not thought to necessarily occur in the atmospheres of massive stars.To address the uncertainty in stellar emission at mm/cm wavelengths, we present ongoing radio observations (JCMT, SMA, VLA) of Sirius A, which is a bright, nearby star with no known debris. We seek to use this system to set an observationally determined standard for stellar atmosphere modeling and debris disk studies around A stars, as well as to take the first step toward characterizing potential intrinsic uncertainty in stellar emission at these wavelengths. This talk will highlight the effort to characterize stellar atmospheres through a project known as MESAS (Measuring the Emission of Stellar Atmospheres at Submillimeter/millimeter wavelengths) which is imperative to the success of current and future debris disk studies.

  7. Characterizing Debris Disks and the Late Stages of Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jacob

    2017-10-01

    The planet formation process shapes the morphology and grain size distribution of circumstellar disks, encoding the formation history of a given system. Remnants of planet formation, such as comets and asteroids, collisionally evolve and can replenish the dust and small solids that would otherwise be cleared on short timescales. These grains are observed through reprocessed starlight at submm to cm wavelengths.The spectrum of the mm/cm emission reveals details of the grain population. However, one confounding parameter in studying these grains around stars is the stars themselves. The emission from stars in the mm/cm is nontrivial and generally not well-constrained. I will present examples of debris systems (HD 141569 and Fomalhaut) studied by ALMA and the VLA, in which unconstrained stellar emission may be contributing to the observed flux densities. Such contamination in turn biases the inferred emission from the disk and the corresponding dust properties. In some cases, the behavior of the observed A/B stars can exhibit an emission profile that has similarities to that of the Sun's mm/cm emission, although the same processes are not thought to necessarily occur in the atmospheres of massive stars.To address the uncertainty in stellar emission at mm/cm wavelengths, we present ongoing radio observations (JCMT, SMA, VLA) of Sirius A, which is a bright, nearby star with no known debris. We seek to use this system to set an observationally determined standard for stellar atmosphere modeling and debris disk studies around A stars, as well as to take the first step toward characterizing potential intrinsic uncertainty in stellar emission at these wavelengths. This talk will highlight the effort to characterize stellar atmospheres through a project known as MESAS (Measuring the Emission of Stellar Atmospheres at Submillimeter/millimeter wavelengths) which is imperative to the success of current and future debris disk studies.

  8. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Marek A; Fragile, P Chris

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  9. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek A. Abramowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks, Shakura-Sunyaev (thin disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs. After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs.

  10. The Herschel view of GAS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) : First comparisons with a large grid of models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinte, C.; Woitke, P.; Menard, F.; Duchene, G.; Kamp, I.; Meeus, G.; Mathews, G.; Howard, C. D.; Grady, C. A.; Thi, W. -F.; Tilling, I.; Augereau, J. -C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Alacid, J. M.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D. R.; Aresu, G.; Barrado, D.; Brittain, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Danchi, W.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Heras, A.; Huelamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Mendigutia, I.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Nomura, H.; Pantin, E.; Pascucci, I.; Phillips, N.; Podio, L.; Poelman, D. R.; Ramsay, S.; Riaz, B.; Rice, K.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Roberge, A.; Sandell, G.; Solano, E.; Vandenbussche, B.; Williams, J. P.; White, G. J.; Wright, G.; Walker, H.

    The Herschel GASPS key program is a survey of the gas phase of protoplanetary discs, targeting 240 objects which cover a large range of ages, spectral types, and disc properties. To interpret this large quantity of data and initiate self-consistent analyses of the gas and dust properties of

  11. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espaillat, C.; Muzerolle, J.; Najita, J.; Andrews, S.; Zhu, Z.; Calvet, N.; Kraus, S.; Hashimoto, J.; Kraus, A.; D'Alessio, P.

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)millimeter and infrared. We note the limitations of these techniques, particularly with respect to the sizes of the clearings currently detectable, and highlight the need for pairing broadband SEDs with multi-wavelength images to paint a more detailed picture of transitional disk structure. We review the gas in transitional disks, keeping in mind that future observations with ALMA will give us unprecedented access to gas in disks, and also observed infrared variability pointing to variable transitional disk structure, which may have implications for disks in general. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk-clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and

  12. Why Do Disks Form Jets?

    OpenAIRE

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    2002-01-01

    It is argued that jet modelers have given insufficient study to the natural magneto-static configurations of field wound up in the presence of a confining general pressure. Such fields form towers whose height grows with each twist at a velocity comparable to the circular velocity of the accretion disk that turns them. A discussion of the generation of such towers is preceded by a brief history of the idea that quasars, active galaxies, and galactic nuclei contain giant black holes with accre...

  13. Astrophysical disks Collective and Stochastic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexei M; Kovalenko, Ilya G

    2006-01-01

    The book deals with collective and stochastic processes in astrophysical discs involving theory, observations, and the results of modelling. Among others, it examines the spiral-vortex structure in galactic and accretion disks , stochastic and ordered structures in the developed turbulence. It also describes sources of turbulence in the accretion disks, internal structure of disk in the vicinity of a black hole, numerical modelling of Be envelopes in binaries, gaseous disks in spiral galaxies with shock waves formation, observation of accretion disks in a binary system and mass distribution of luminous matter in disk galaxies. The editors adaptly brought together collective and stochastic phenomena in the modern field of astrophysical discs, their formation, structure, and evolution involving the methodology to deal with, the results of observation and modelling, thereby advancing the study in this important branch of astrophysics and benefiting Professional Researchers, Lecturers, and Graduate Students.

  14. Erasing Data and Recycling of Optical Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Fujita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical disks, DVDs and CDs, are convenient recording media on which to safely store data for a long period of time. However, the complete data erasure from recorded media is also important for the security of the data. After erasure of data from optical disks, recycling the material is needed in order to recover the valuable components of the optical disks. Here, data erasure methods for optical disks are discussed in the view of material recycling. The main finding of the study is that the explosion of optical disks in water is a very suitable method for complete erasure of data on the disks as well as recycling of their materials.

  15. Structure of the Kuiper Belt Dust Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Kaufmann, D. E.

    An overview of the Kuiper belt dust disk is provided in this chapter. Mutual collisions among Kuiper belt objects should produce a dust disk in the outer solar system similar to the observed circumstellar dust disks. As the Kuiper belt dust particles migrate toward the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag, they are perturbed by the giant planets. Mean-motion resonances with Neptune and gravitational scattering by Saturn and Jupiter alter their orbital evolution dramatically. Asa result, large-scale structures are created in the disk. Descriptions of the dynamics involved, and the numerical simulations required to unveil the disk features, are included. Implications for extrasolar planet detection from circumstellar dust disk modeling are also discussed.

  16. Thermal continua of AGN accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, G. A.; Coleman, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    We have computed the thermal continuum energy distribution of thermal radiation from the atmospheres of supermassive accretion disks around supermassive black holes. Non-LTE radiative transfer is combined with a model of the vertical structure at each radius appropriate to the low effective gravities of these disks. Locally, the Lyman edge of H can be in emission or absorption. When the emission is summed over the disk with Doppler and gravitational redshifts taken into account, the observed continuum typically shows little sign of a discontinuity near the Lyman edge. For relatively cool disks, the Lyman edge is in absorption, but it appears as a slope change extending over several hundred angstroms, rather than an abrupt discontinuity. Disks around Kerr black holes can explain the observed range of soft X-ray luminosities of AGN, but disks around Schwarzschild holes are much too faint in soft X-rays.

  17. Probing the Cold Dust Emission in the AB Aur Disk: A Dust Trap in a Decaying Vortex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, Asunción; Baruteau, Clément; Neri, Roberto; Carmona, Andrés; Agúndez, Marcelino; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Bachiller, Rafael; Cernicharo, José; Berné, Olivier

    2017-09-01

    One serious challenge for planet formation is the rapid inward drift of pebble-sized dust particles in protoplanetary disks. Dust trapping at local maxima in the disk gas pressure has received much theoretical attention but still lacks observational support. The cold dust emission in the AB Aur disk forms an asymmetric ring at a radius of about 120 au, which is suggestive of dust trapping in a gas vortex. We present high spatial resolution (0.″58 × 0.″78 ≈ 80 × 110 au) NOEMA observations of the 1.12 mm and 2.22 mm dust continuum emission from the AB Aur disk. Significant azimuthal variations of the flux ratio at both wavelengths indicate a size segregation of the large dust particles along the ring. Our continuum images also show that the intensity variations along the ring are smaller at 2.22 mm than at 1.12 mm, contrary to what dust trapping models with a gas vortex have predicted. Our two-fluid (gas+dust) hydrodynamical simulations demonstrate that this feature is well explained if the gas vortex has started to decay due to turbulent diffusion, and dust particles are thus losing the azimuthal trapping on different timescales depending on their size. The comparison between our observations and simulations allows us to constrain the size distribution and the total mass of solid particles in the ring, which we find to be of the order of 30 Earth masses, enough to form future rocky planets. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Northern Extended millimeter Array (NOEMA). IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  18. HD 76582's Circumstellar Debris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The debris disk host star HD 76582 was observed at 450 μm and 850 μm as part of the JCMT/SCUBA-2 debris disk legacy survey `Sub-millimetre Observations of Nearby Stars' (SONS). The sub-millimetre data are inconsistent with a disk undergoing a steady-state collisional cascade. Combining the sub-millimetre (sub-mm) measurements with mid- and far-infrared measurements from Spitzer and Herschel, we simultaneously model the disk's thermal emission and radial extent in a self-consistent manner.

  19. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  20. The Evolving Resource Metadata Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    The search and discovery mechanisms that will facilitate and simplify systematic research on the Internet depend on systematic classifications of resources, as well as on standardized access to such metadata. The principles and technologies that will make this possible are evolving in the work of the Internet Engineering Task Force and the digital library initiatives, among others. The desired outcome is a set of standards, tools, and practices that permits both cataloging and retrieval to be comprehensive and efficient.

  1. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  2. Hard disks with SCSI interface

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, O Yu

    1999-01-01

    The testing of 20 models of hard SCSI-disks is carried out: the Fujitsu MAE3091LP; the IBM DDRS-39130, DGHS-318220, DNES-318350, DRHS-36V and DRVS-18V; the Quantum Atlas VI 18.2; the Viking 11 9.1; the Seagate ST118202LW, ST118273LW, ST118273W, ST318203LW, ST318275LW, ST34520W, ST39140LW and ST39173W; and the Western Digital WDE9100-0007, WDE9100-AV0016, WDE9100-AV0030 and WDE9180-0048. All tests ran under the Windows NT 4.0 workstation operating system with Service Pack 4, under video mode with 1024*768 pixel resolution, 32- bit colour depth and V-frequency equal to 85 Hz. The detailed description and characteristics of SCSI stores are presented. Test results (ZD Winstone 99 and ZD WinBench 99 tests) are given in both table and diagram (disk transfer rate) forms. (0 refs).

  3. Kinematics in the Circumnuclear Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth; Casey-Clyde, J. Andrew; Rodriguez, Julio; Kruijssen, Diederik; Martin, Sergio; Moser, Lydia; Riquelme, Denise; Harada, Nanase; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Lu, Hauyu

    2018-01-01

    The Circumnuclear Disk (CND) extends from 1.5-5pc in radius around our Galaxy's central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. New ALMA observations reveal that the CND is a more complex system than previously thought, containing multiple streams, filaments and other structures inconsistent with the uniform circular rotation that is typically assumed for this source. We will present position-position-velocity maps of this region using the HNC 3-2 and HCN 3-2 transitions, which reveal line of sight velocities that are highly discontinuous in several regions, suggesting the CND consists of several overlapping and possibly interacting clouds, rather than one continuous and circularized disk. In particular, we single out a uniquely linear stream on the eastern side of this region, which is continuous in both position and velocity, with a size of 3 x 0.1 pc and velocities ranging from -50 to 100 km/s. For this stream, we will also present the results of recently performed orbital fitting, establishing its 3 dimensional position in the central potential around Sagittarius A*.

  4. Production of methanol from heat-stressed pepper and corn leaf disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.A. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture)

    1994-05-01

    Early Calwonder'' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and Jubilee'' corn (Zea mays L.) leaf disks exposed to high temperature stress produced ethylene, ethane, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol based on comparison of retention times during gas chromatography to authentic standards. Methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde were also identified by mass spectroscopy. Corn leaf disks produced lower levels of ethylene, ethane, and methanol, but more acetaldehyde and ethanol than pepper. Production of ethane, a by-product of lipid peroxidation, coincided with an increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) in pepper but not in corn. Compared with controls, pepper leaf disks infiltrated with linolenic acid evolved significantly greater amounts of ethane, acetaldehyde, and methanol and similar levels of ethanol. EL and volatile hydrocarbon production were not affected by fatty acid infiltration in corn. Infiltration of pepper leaves with buffers increasing in pH from 5.5 to 9.5 increased methanol production.

  5. High Dynamics Infrared Imaging of Evolved Stars with FLUOR/IOTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, G.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Ridgway, S. T.; Mariotti, J.-M.; Traub, W. A.; Carleton, N. P.; Lacasse, M. G.

    The high precision FLUOR beam combiner set on the IOTA interferometer allows a very accurate calibration of visibilities. As a consequence, it is very well suited to study surface structures and variations of evolved stars in the K band. We present data obtained on several stars showing departure from uniform and limb-darkened disk models and variations with time. Among them, surface features on the supergiant alpha Orionis and diameter variations of the Mira type star R Leonis.

  6. Improving the thin-disk models of circumstellar disk evolution. The 2+1-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav N.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks of gas and dust are naturally formed from contracting pre-stellar molecular cores during the star formation process. To study various dynamical and chemical processes that take place in circumstellar disks prior to their dissipation and transition to debris disks, the appropriate numerical models capable of studying the long-term disk chemodynamical evolution are required. Aims: We improve the frequently used 2D hydrodynamical model for disk evolution in the thin-disk limit by employing a better calculation of the disk thermal balance and adding a reconstruction of the disk vertical structure. Together with the hydrodynamical processes, the thermal evolution is of great importance since it influences the strength of gravitational instability and the chemical evolution of the disk. Methods: We present a new 2+1-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics model of circumstellar disk evolution, where the thin-disk model is complemented with the procedure for calculating the vertical distributions of gas volume density and temperature in the disk. The reconstruction of the disk vertical structure is performed at every time step via the solution of the time-dependent radiative transfer equations coupled to the equation of the vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. Results: We perform a detailed comparison between circumstellar disks produced with our previous 2D model and with the improved 2+1D approach. The structure and evolution of resulting disks, including the differences in temperatures, densities, disk masses, and protostellar accretion rates, are discussed in detail. Conclusions: The new 2+1D model yields systematically colder disks, while the in-falling parental clouds are warmer. Both effects act to increase the strength of disk gravitational instability and, as a result, the number of gravitationally bound fragments that form in the disk via gravitational fragmentation as compared to the purely 2D thin-disk simulations with a simplified

  7. Periodic Light Variability in Twelve Carbon-rich Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Maupin, Richard E.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.

    2009-09-01

    We present the results of a long-term (14 year) photometric monitoring program of 12 carbon-rich proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs). PPNs are objects in the evolutionary transition between the AGB and planetary nebula phases. These 12 have bright central stars (V = 8-14 mag) with F-G spectral types and faint nebulae (as seen with the HST). All of the objects show a periodicity in their light variations, although there is also evidence for multiple periods or small period changes. The pulsation periods range from 35 to 153 days, with the longer periods correlated with later spectral types. In fact, a tight correlation is seen between the period and effective temperature. The light variations range from 0.15 to 0.7 mag and are larger for the cooler objects.

  8. Thermodynamic model of MHD turbulence and some of its applications to accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2008-06-01

    Within the framework of the main problem of cosmogony related to the reconstruction of the evolution of the protoplanetary gas-dust cloud that surrounded the proto-Sun at an early stage of its existence, we have derived a closed system of magnetohydrodynamic equations for the scale of mean motion in the approximation of single-fluid magnetohydrodynamics designed to model the shear and convective turbulent flows of electrically conducting media in the presence of a magnetic field. These equations are designed for schematized formulations and the numerical solution of special problems to interconsistently model intense turbulent flows of cosmic plasma in accretion disks and associated coronas, in which the magnetic field noticeably affects the dynamics of astrophysical processes. In developing the model of a conducting turbulized medium, apart from the conventional probability-theoretical averaging of the MHD equations, we systematically use the weighted Favre averaging. The latter allows us to considerably simplify the writing of the averaged equations of motion for a compressible fluid and the analysis of the mechanisms of macroscopic field amplification by turbulent flows. To clearly interpret the individual components of the plasma and field-energy balance, we derive various energy equations that allow us to trace the possible energy conversions from one form into another, in particular, to understand the transfer mechanisms of the gravitational and kinetic energies of the mean motion into magnetic energy. Special emphasis is placed on the method for obtaining the closure relations for the total (with allowance made for the magnetic field) kinetic turbulent stress tensor in an electrically conducting medium and the turbulent electromotive force (or the so-called magnetic Reynolds tensor). This method also makes it possible to analyze the constraints imposed on the turbulent transport coefficients by the entropy growth condition. As applied to the problem of

  9. Changes in orientation and shape of protoplanetary discs moving through an ambient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Pols, O. R.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2017-08-01

    Misalignments between the orbital planes of planets and the equatorial planes of their host stars have been observed in our solar system, in transiting exoplanets, and for the orbital planes of debris discs. We present a mechanism that causes such a spin-orbit misalignment for a protoplanetary disc due to its movement through an ambient medium. Our physical explanation of the mechanism is based on the theoretical solutions to the Stark problem. We test this idea by performing self-consistent hydrodynamical simulations and simplified gravitational N-body simulations. The N-body model reduces the mechanism to the relevant physical processes. The hydrodynamical simulations show the mechanism in its full extent, including gas-dynamical and viscous processes in the disc which are not included in the theoretical framework. We find that a protoplanetary disc embedded in a flow changes its orientation as its angular momentum vector tends to align parallel to the relative velocity vector. Due to the force exerted by the flow, orbits in the disc become eccentric, which produces a net torque and consequentially changes the orbital inclination. The tilting of the disc causes it to contract. Apart from becoming lopsided, the gaseous disc also forms a spiral arm even if the inclination does not change substantially. The process is most effective at high velocities and observational signatures are therefore mostly expected in massive star-forming regions and around winds or supernova ejecta. Our N-body model indicates that the interaction with supernova ejecta is a viable explanation for the observed spin-orbit misalignment in our solar system.

  10. Thanatology in protoplanetary discs. The combined influence of Ohmic, Hall, and ambipolar diffusion on dead zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Fromang, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Protoplanetary discs are poorly ionised due to their low temperatures and high column densities and are therefore subject to three "non-ideal" magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects: Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. The existence of magnetically driven turbulence in these discs has been a central question since the discovery of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Early models considered Ohmic diffusion only and led to a scenario of layered accretion, in which a magnetically "dead" zone in the disc midplane is embedded within magnetically "active" surface layers at distances of about 1-10 au from the central protostellar object. Recent work has suggested that a combination of Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion can render both the midplane and surface layers of the disc inactive and that torques due to magnetically driven outflows are required to explain the observed accretion rates. We reassess this picture by performing three-dimensional numerical simulations that include all three non-ideal MHD effects for the first time. We find that the Hall effect can generically "revive" dead zones by producing a dominant azimuthal magnetic field and a large-scale Maxwell stress throughout the midplane, provided that the angular velocity and magnetic field satisfy Ω·B > 0. The attendant large magnetic pressure modifies the vertical density profile and substantially increases the disc scale height beyond its hydrostatic value. Outflows are produced but are not necessary to explain accretion rates ≲ 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The flow in the disc midplane is essentially laminar, suggesting that dust sedimentation may be efficient. These results demonstrate that if the MRI is relevant for driving mass accretion in protoplanetary discs, one must include the Hall effect to obtain even qualitatively correct results. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Coronagraphic imaging of circumstellar material around evolved massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Levesque, Emily; Wisniewski, John

    2018-01-01

    While many astronomical subfields (e.g. the solar, exoplanet, and disk communities) have been using coronagraphy to combat contrast ratio problems for years, the use of coronagraphic imaging techniques to probe the circumstellar environments of massive stars has been surprisingly underutilized. While current extreme adaptive optics coronagraphic imaging systems (e.g. GPI on Gemini South, SPHERE at the VLT, and SCExAO at Subaru) were built for the sole purpose of detecting exoplanets, their ability to provide large contrast ratios and small inner working angles means they can detect gas, dust, and companions that are closer to the central star than ever before. In this poster we present pilot studies of evolved massive stars using several coronagraphic imaging systems and summarize potential science gains this technique might provide.

  12. BREEDING SUPER-EARTHS AND BIRTHING SUPER-PUFFS IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: evelee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1–4R{sub ⊕}, 2–20M{sub ⊕}) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ∼0.1–1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4–10R{sub ⊕}, 2–6M{sub ⊕}). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ∼1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  13. The evolvability of programmable hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In biological systems, individual phenotypes are typically adopted by multiple genotypes. Examples include protein structure phenotypes, where each structure can be adopted by a myriad individual amino acid sequence genotypes. These genotypes form vast connected ‘neutral networks’ in genotype space. The size of such neutral networks endows biological systems not only with robustness to genetic change, but also with the ability to evolve a vast number of novel phenotypes that occur near any one neutral network. Whether technological systems can be designed to have similar properties is poorly understood. Here we ask this question for a class of programmable electronic circuits that compute digital logic functions. The functional flexibility of such circuits is important in many applications, including applications of evolutionary principles to circuit design. The functions they compute are at the heart of all digital computation. We explore a vast space of 1045 logic circuits (‘genotypes’) and 1019 logic functions (‘phenotypes’). We demonstrate that circuits that compute the same logic function are connected in large neutral networks that span circuit space. Their robustness or fault-tolerance varies very widely. The vicinity of each neutral network contains circuits with a broad range of novel functions. Two circuits computing different functions can usually be converted into one another via few changes in their architecture. These observations show that properties important for the evolvability of biological systems exist in a commercially important class of electronic circuitry. They also point to generic ways to generate fault-tolerant, adaptable and evolvable electronic circuitry. PMID:20534598

  14. Observational constraints on Acrretion disk formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsono, Daniel; Jørgensen, Jes; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Bruderer, Simon; Persson, Magnus; Mottram, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Stable rotationally supported disks (RSDs) are important for the star and planet formation process. The structure and stability of the RSDs are linked to the accretion process onto the star and the evolution of the protostellar system. Additionally, these disks are composed of infalling material that encounter a wide range of physical conditions. The history of these changes affect the chemical structure and evolution of the accretion disk and, thus, the material out of which planets are formed. The formation of RSDs is not well understood and it is unclear from the existing data at which stage the young disks are rotationally supported. Here, we present new PdBI observations of 13CO and C18O toward 4 Class I YSOs with higher spatial resolution and significantly higher sensitivity than previously possible. The high quality data allow us to constrain the physical structure of the young embedded disks which are rotationally supported within the inner 100 AU radius. Furthermore, the extent of the RSD is smaller than that of the dust disk. The observed physical structure of embedded disks are compared to semi-analytical disk formation models which suggests that the formation process is consistent with inside-out formation. ALMA is needed to confirm the extent of the rotationally supported structure.

  15. Scaling Ratios and Triangles in Siegel Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buff, Xavier; Henriksen, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Let f(z)=e^{2i\\pi \\theta} + z^2, where \\theta is a quadratic irrational. McMullen proved that the Siegel disk for f is self-similar about the critical point, and we show that if \\theta = (\\sqrt{5}-1)/2 is the golden mean, then there exists a triangle contained in the Siegel disk, and with one...

  16. 10 MB disk platter from CDC 7638

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This magnetic disk was one of three which interfaced with various Control Data machines. This single platter came from a Control Data 7638 Disk Storage Subsystem and could contain up to 10MB - about the size of a few MP4's on your iPod.

  17. The Transitional Disks Associated With Herbig Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Lomax, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Currie, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru YSO survey, we have surveyed a number of Herbig B-F stars mainly at H-band using Polarimetric Differential Imaging + Angular differential imaging. Historically, Herbig stars have been sorted by the shape of the IR SEDs into those which can be fit by power laws over 1-200 micrometers (Meeus et al. 2001, group II), and those which can be interpreted as a power law + a blackbody component (Meeus group I) or as transitional or pre-transitional disks (Maaskant et al. 2013). Meeus group II disks, when imaged with HiCIAO show featureless disks with depolarization along the projection of the disk semi-minor axis (Kusakabe et al. 2012). This is what we had expected to see for the Meeus group I disks, except for the addition of wide gaps or central cavities. Instead we find wild diversity, suggesting that transitional disks are highly perturbed compared to Meeus group II disks. To date, similar structure continues to be observed as higher Strehl ratio imagery becomes available.

  18. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Pessah, Martin; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    if the resolution were set equal to the natural dissipation scale in astrophysical disks. We conclude that, in order for MRI-driven turbulent angular momentum transport to be able to account for the large value of the effective alpha viscosity inferred observationally, the disk must be threaded by a significant...

  19. The Kinematics of Galactic Stellar Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrifield, M. R.; Kuijken, K.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract: The disks of galaxies are primarily stellar systems, and fundamentally dynamical entities. Thus, to fully understand galactic disks, we must study their stellar kinematics as well as their morphologies. Observational techniques have now advanced to a point where quite detailed

  20. Dissecting disks around B-type protostars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Beltran, Maite; Kumar, M. S. Nanda; Stanke, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans; Etoka, Sandra; Galli, Daniele; Hummel, Christian A.; Moscadelli, Luca; Preibisch, Thomas; Ratzka, Thorsten; van der Tak, Floris; Vig, Sarita; Walmsley, C. Malcolm; Wang, Kuo-Song

    Recent theoretical models indicate that OB-type stars could form through disk-mediated accretion, like their low mass counterparts. However, on the observational side, circumstellar disks appear still elusive, especially around the most massive (proto)stars. As for early B-type (proto)stars, an ever

  1. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akeson, R. L. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, IPAC/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jensen, E. L. N. [Swarthmore College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  2. Planetesimal Formation in the Warm, Inner Disk: Experiments with Tempered Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beule, Caroline; Landers, Joachim; Salamon, Soma; Wende, Heiko; Wurm, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    It is an open question how elevated temperatures in the inner parts of protoplanetary disks influence the formation of planetesimals. We approach this problem here by studying the tensile strength of granular beds with dust samples tempered at different temperatures. We find via laboratory experiments that tempering at increasing temperatures is correlated with an increase in cohesive forces. We studied dust samples of palagonite (JSC Mars-1a) which were tempered for up to 200 hr at temperatures between 600 and 1200 K, and measured the relative tensile strengths of highly porous dust layers once the samples cooled to room temperature. Tempering increases the tensile strength from 800 K upwards. This change is accompanied by mineral transformations, the formation of iron oxide crystallites as analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, changes in the number size distribution, and the morphology of the surface visible as cracks in larger grains. These results suggest a difference in the collisional evolution toward larger bodies with increasing temperature as collisional growth is fundamentally based on cohesion. While high temperatures might also increase sticking (not studied here), compositional evolution will already enhance the cohesion and the possibility of growing larger aggregates on the way toward planetesimals. This might lead to a preferred in situ formation of inner planets and explain the observed presence of dense inner planetary systems.

  3. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  4. Disk accretion onto a magnetized star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istomin Ya. N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of interaction of the rotating magnetic field, frozen to a star, with a thin well conducting accretion disk is solved exactly. It is shown that a disk pushes the magnetic field lines towards a star, compressing the stellar dipole magnetic field. At the point of corotation, where the Keplerian rotation frequency coincides with the frequency of the stellar rotation, the loop of the electric current appears. The electric currents flow in the magnetosphere only along two particular magnetic surfaces, which connect the corotation region and the inner edge of a disk with the stellar surface. It is shown that the closed current surface encloses the magnetosphere. Rotation of a disk is stopped at some distance from the stellar surface, which is 0.55 of the corotation radius. Accretion from a disk spins up the stellar rotation. The angular momentum transferred to the star is determined.

  5. Reverberation Mapping of AGN Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausnaugh, Michael; AGN STORM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    I will discuss new reverberation mapping results that allow us to investigate the temperature structure of AGN accretion disks. By measuring time-delays between broad-band continuum light curves, we can determine the size of the disk as a function of wavelength. I will discuss the detection of continuum lags in NGC 5548 reported by the AGN STORM project and implications for the accretion disk. I will also present evidence for continuum lags in two other AGN for which we recently measured black hole masses from continuum-Hbeta reverberations. The mass measurements allow us to compare the continuum lags to predictions from standard thin disk theory, and our results indicate that the accretion disks are larger than the simplest expectations.

  6. Continuum Reverberation Mapping of AGN Accretion Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Fausnaugh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We show recent detections of inter-band continuum lags in three AGN (NGC 5548, NGC 2617, and MCG+08-11-011, which provide new constraints on the temperature profiles and absolute sizes of the accretion disks. We find lags larger than would be predicted for standard geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disks by factors of 2.3–3.3. For NGC 5548, the data span UV through optical/near-IR wavelengths, and we are able to discern a steeper temperature profile than the T ~ R−3/4 expected for a standard thin disk. Using a physical model, we are also able to estimate the inclinations of the disks for two objects. These results are similar to those found from gravitational microlensing of strongly lensed quasars, and provide a complementary approach for investigating the accretion disk structure in local, low luminosity AGN.

  7. Development of Powered Disk Type Sugar Cane Stubble Saver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radite P.A.S.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design, fabricate and test a prototype of sugar cane stubble saver based on powered disk mechanism. In this research, a heavy duty disk plow or disk harrow was used as a rotating knife to cut the sugarcane stubble. The parabolic disk was chosen because it is proven reliable as soil working tools and it is available in the market as spare part of disk plow or disk harrow unit. The prototype was mounted on the four wheel tractor’s three point hitch, and powered by PTO of the tractor. Two kinds of disks were used in these experiments, those were disk with regular edge or plain disk and disk with scalloped edge or scalloped disk. Both disks had diameter of 28 inch. Results of field test showed that powered disk mechanism could satisfy cut sugar cane’s stubble. However, scalloped disk type gave smoother stubble cuts compared to that of plain disk. Plain disk type gave broken stubble cut. Higher rotation (1000 rpm resulted better cuts as compared to lower rotation (500 rpm both either on plain disk and scalloped disk. The developed prototype could work below the soil surface at depth of 5 to 10 cm. With tilt angle setting 20O and disk angle 45O the width of cut was about 25 cm.

  8. Outbursts and Disk Variability in Be Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Whelan, David G.; Pepper, Joshua; McSwain, M. Virginia; Borges Fernandes, Marcelo; Wisniewski, John P.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Carciofi, Alex C.; Siverd, Robert J.; Glazier, Amy L.; Anderson, Sophie G.; Caravello, Anthoni J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Lund, Michael B.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; James, David J.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.

    2018-02-01

    In order to study the growth and evolution of circumstellar disks around classical Be stars, we analyze optical time-series photometry from the KELT survey with simultaneous infrared and visible spectroscopy from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey and Be Star Spectra database for a sample of 160 Galactic classical Be stars. The systems studied here show variability including transitions from a diskless to a disk-possessing state (and vice versa), and persistent disks that vary in strength, being replenished at either regularly or irregularly occurring intervals. We detect disk-building events (outbursts) in the light curves of 28% of our sample. Outbursts are more commonly observed in early- (57%), compared to mid- (27%) and late-type (8%) systems. A given system may show anywhere between 0 and 40 individual outbursts in its light curve, with amplitudes ranging up to ∼0.5 mag and event durations between ∼2 and 1000 days. We study how both the photometry and spectroscopy change together during active episodes of disk growth or dissipation, revealing details about the evolution of the circumstellar environment. We demonstrate that photometric activity is linked to changes in the inner disk, and show that, at least in some cases, the disk growth process is asymmetrical. Observational evidence of Be star disks both growing and clearing from the inside out is presented. The duration of disk buildup and dissipation phases are measured for 70 outbursts, and we find that the average outburst takes about twice as long to dissipate as it does to build up in optical photometry. Our analysis hints that dissipation of the inner disk occurs relatively slowly for late-type Be stars.

  9. Accretion Disks Around Binary Black Holes of Unequal Mass: GRMHD Simulations Near Decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Pfeiffer, Harald, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simulations in general relativity of magnetized disks onto black hole binaries. We vary the binary mass ratio from 1:1 to 1:10 and evolve the systems when they orbit near the binary disk decoupling radius. We compare (surface) density profiles, accretion rates (relative to a single, non-spinning black hole), variability, effective alpha-stress levels and luminosities as functions of the mass ratio. We treat the disks in two limiting regimes: rapid radiative cooling and no radiative cooling. The magnetic field lines clearly reveal jets emerging from both black hole horizons and merging into one common jet at large distances. The magnetic fields give rise to much stronger shock heating than the pure hydrodynamic flows, completely alter the disk structure, and boost accretion rates and luminosities. Accretion streams near the horizons are among the densest structures; in fact, the 1:10 no-cooling evolution results in a refilling of the cavity. The typical effective temperature in the bulk of the disk is approx. 10(exp5) (M / 10(exp 8)M solar mass (exp -1/4(L/L(sub edd) (exp 1/4K) yielding characteristic thermal frequencies approx. 10 (exp 15) (M /10(exp 8)M solar mass) (exp -1/4(L/L (sub edd) (1+z) (exp -1)Hz. These systems are thus promising targets for many extragalactic optical surveys, such as LSST, WFIRST, and PanSTARRS.

  10. Disk-Planet Torques from Radiation-Hydrodynamics Calculations with Spatially-Resolved Planetary Envelopes Undergoing Solids' Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, G.

    2016-12-01

    D'Angelo & Bodenheimer (2013, ApJ, 778, 77) performed global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics disk-planet simulations aimed at studying envelope formation around planetary cores, during the phase of sustained planetesimal accretion. The calculations modeled cores of 5, 10, and 15 Earth masses orbiting a sun-like star in a protoplanetary disk extending from ap/2 to 2ap in radius, ap=5 or 10 AU being the core's orbital radius. The gas equation of state - for a solar mixture of H2, H, He - accounted for translational, rotational, and vibrational states, for molecular dissociation and atomic ionization, and for radiation energy. Dust opacity calculations applied the Mie theory to multiple grain species whose size distributions ranged from 5e-6 to 1 mm. Mesh refinement via grid nesting allowed the planets' envelopes to be resolved at the core-radius length scale. Passive tracers were used to determine the volume of gas bound to a core, defining the envelope, and resulting in planet radii comparable to the Bondi radius. The energy budjet included contributions from the accretion of solids on the cores, whose rates were self-consistently computed with a 1D planet formation code. At this stage of the planet's growth, gravitational energy released in the envelope by solids' accretion far exceeds that released by gas accretion. These models are used to determine the gravitational torques exerted by the disk's gas on the planet and the resulting orbital migration rates. Since the envelope radius is a direct product of the models, they allow for a non-ambiguous assessment of the torques exerted by gas not bound to the planet. Additionally, since planets' envelopes are fully resolved, thermal and dynamical effects on the surrounding disk's gas are accurately taken into account. The computed migration rates are compared to those obtained from existing semi-analytical formulations for planets orbiting in isothermal and adiabatic disks. Because these formulations do not account for

  11. Extragalactic Thick Disks: Implications for Early Galaxy Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Seth, Anil; Yoachim, Peter

    2005-01-01

    I briefly review the growing evidence that thick stellar disks surround most edge-on disk galaxies. Recent studies show that these extragalactic thick disks have old ages, low metallicities, long scale lengths, and moderately flattened axial ratios, much like the thick disk of the Milky Way. However, the properties of thick disks change systematically with the mass of the galaxy. The thick disks of low mass galaxies are more prominent and somewhat more metal-poor than those surrounding massiv...

  12. Debris Disk Structure and Morphology as Revealed by Aggressive STIS Multi-Roll Coronagraphy: A New Look at Some Old Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Carol A; Kuchner, Marc; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    We present new imaging results from a well-selected sample of II circumstellar debris disks, all with HST pedigree, using STIS visible-light 6-roll PSF-template subtracted coronagraphy (PSFTSC). These new observations, pushing HST to its highest levels of coronagraphic performance, simultaneously probe both the interior regions of these debris systems, with inner working distances morphologies strongly suggestive of ISM wind interactions), HD 181327 & HDI07146 (close to face-on with respectively narrow and broad debris rings), and MP Mus (a "mature" proto-planetary disk hosted by a cTTS). All of our objects were previously observed in the near-IR with inferior spatial resolution and imaging efficacy, but with NICMOS r = 0.3" inner working angle (IWA) comparable to STIS multi-roll coronagraphy. The combination of new optical and existing near-IR imaging can strongly constrain the dust properties, thus enabling an assessment of grain processing and planetesimal populations. These results will directly inform upon the posited planet formation mechanisms that occur after the approximately 10 My epoch of gas depletion, a time in our solar system when giant planets were migrating and terrestrial planets were forming, and directly test theoretical models of these processes. These observations lmiquely probe both into the interior regions of these systems and are sensitive to and spatially resolve low surface-brightness (SB) material at large stellocentric distances with spatial resolution comparable to ACS and with augmenting NICMOS near-IR disk photometry in hand.

  13. Primordial evolvability: Impasses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, Vera; Fernando, Chrisantha; Szilágyi, András; Zachár, István; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    While it is generally agreed that some kind of replicating non-living compounds were the precursors of life, there is much debate over their possible chemical nature. Metabolism-first approaches propose that mutually catalytic sets of simple organic molecules could be capable of self-replication and rudimentary chemical evolution. In particular, the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, depicting assemblies of amphiphilic molecules, has received considerable interest. The system propagates compositional information across generations and is suggested to be a target of natural selection. However, evolutionary simulations indicate that the system lacks selectability (i.e. selection has negligible effect on the equilibrium concentrations). We elaborate on the lessons learnt from the example of the GARD model and, more widely, on the issue of evolvability, and discuss the implications for similar metabolism-first scenarios. We found that simple incorporation-type chemistry based on non-covalent bonds, as assumed in GARD, is unlikely to result in alternative autocatalytic cycles when catalytic interactions are randomly distributed. An even more serious problem stems from the lognormal distribution of catalytic factors, causing inherent kinetic instability of such loops, due to the dominance of efficiently catalyzed components that fail to return catalytic aid. Accordingly, the dynamics of the GARD model is dominated by strongly catalytic, but not auto-catalytic, molecules. Without effective autocatalysis, stable hereditary propagation is not possible. Many repetitions and different scaling of the model come to no rescue. Despite all attempts to show the contrary, the GARD model is not evolvable, in contrast to reflexively autocatalytic networks, complemented by rare uncatalyzed reactions and compartmentation. The latter networks, resting on the creation and breakage of chemical bonds, can generate novel ('mutant') autocatalytic loops from a given set of

  14. A massive, dead disk galaxy in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Sune; Zabl, Johannes; Richard, Johan; Gallazzi, Anna; Zibetti, Stefano; Prescott, Moire; Grillo, Claudio; Man, Allison W. S.; Lee, Nicholas Y.; Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Stockmann, Mikkel; Magdis, Georgios; Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2017-06-01

    At redshift z = 2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation. It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most massive local elliptical galaxies seen today, through mergers with minor companions, but validating this picture requires higher-resolution observations of their centres than is currently possible. Magnification from gravitational lensing offers an opportunity to resolve the inner regions of galaxies. Here we report an analysis of the stellar populations and kinematics of a lensed z = 2.1478 compact galaxy, which—surprisingly—turns out to be a fast-spinning, rotationally supported disk galaxy. Its stars must have formed in a disk, rather than in a merger-driven nuclear starburst. The galaxy was probably fed by streams of cold gas, which were able to penetrate the hot halo gas until they were cut off by shock heating from the dark matter halo. This result confirms previous indirect indications that the first galaxies to cease star formation must have gone through major changes not just in their structure, but also in their kinematics, to evolve into present-day elliptical galaxies.

  15. A massive, dead disk galaxy in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Sune; Zabl, Johannes; Richard, Johan; Gallazzi, Anna; Zibetti, Stefano; Prescott, Moire; Grillo, Claudio; Man, Allison W S; Lee, Nicholas Y; Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Stockmann, Mikkel; Magdis, Georgios; Steinhardt, Charles L

    2017-06-21

    At redshift z = 2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation. It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most massive local elliptical galaxies seen today, through mergers with minor companions, but validating this picture requires higher-resolution observations of their centres than is currently possible. Magnification from gravitational lensing offers an opportunity to resolve the inner regions of galaxies. Here we report an analysis of the stellar populations and kinematics of a lensed z = 2.1478 compact galaxy, which-surprisingly-turns out to be a fast-spinning, rotationally supported disk galaxy. Its stars must have formed in a disk, rather than in a merger-driven nuclear starburst. The galaxy was probably fed by streams of cold gas, which were able to penetrate the hot halo gas until they were cut off by shock heating from the dark matter halo. This result confirms previous indirect indications that the first galaxies to cease star formation must have gone through major changes not just in their structure, but also in their kinematics, to evolve into present-day elliptical galaxies.

  16. Identification of an 84Sr-depleted carrier in primitive meteorites and implications for thermal processing in the solar protoplanetary disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Bizzarro, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The existence of correlated nucleosynthetic heterogeneities in solar system reservoirs is now well demonstrated for numerous nuclides. However, it has proven difficult to discriminate between the two disparate processes that can explain such correlated variability: incomplete mixing of presolar m...

  17. Herschel/PACS Survey of Protoplanetary Disks in Taurus/Auriga-Observations of [O I] and [C II], and Far-infrared Continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barrado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe similar to 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 mu m, [O I] 145 mu m, [C II

  18. Numerical simulations of dissipationless disk accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Tronin, I. V.

    2017-09-01

    Our goal is to study the regime of disk accretion in which almost all of the angular momentum and energy is carried away by the wind outflowing from the disk in numerical experiments. For this type of accretion the kinetic energy flux in the outflowing wind can exceed considerably the bolometric luminosity of the accretion disk, what is observed in the plasma flow from galactic nuclei in a number of cases. In this paper we consider the nonrelativistic case of an outflow from a cold Keplerian disk. All of the conclusions derived previously for such a system in the self-similar approximation are shown to be correct. The numerical results agree well with the analytical predictions. The inclination angle of the magnetic field lines in the disk is less than 60°, which ensures a free wind outflow from the disk, while the energy flux per wind particle is greater than the particle rotation energy in its Keplerian orbit by several orders of magnitude, provided that the ratio r A/ r ≫ 1, where r A is the Alfvénic radius and r is the radius of the Keplerian orbit. In this case, the particle kinetic energy reaches half the maximum possible energy in the simulation region. The magnetic field collimates the outflowing wind near the rotation axis and decollimates appreciably the wind outflowing from the outer disk periphery.

  19. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Allen, J.; Kascak, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core and regolith samples, from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected from a US cooperative effort among NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution that funds expeditions to Antarctica. The meteorites that are collected include rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. The sample disks for educational use include these different samples. Active relevant learning has always been important to teachers and the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program provides this active style of learning for students and the general public. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks permit students to conduct investigations comparable to actual scientists. The Lunar Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Basalt, Breccia, Highland Regolith, Anorthosite, Mare Regolith and Orange Soil. The Meteorite Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Chondrite L3, Chondrite H5, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Basaltic Achondrite, Iron and Stony-Iron. Teachers are given different activities that adhere to their standards with the disks. During a Sample Disk Certification Workshop, teachers participate in the activities as students gain insight into the history, formation and geologic processes of the moon, asteroids and meteorites.

  20. Peripartum hysterectomy: an evolving picture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Peripartum hysterectomy (PH) is one of the obstetric catastrophes. Evidence is emerging that the role of PH in modern obstetrics is evolving. Improving management of postpartum hemorrhage and newer surgical techniques should decrease PH for uterine atony. Rising levels of repeat elective cesarean deliveries should decrease PH following uterine scar rupture in labor. Increasing cesarean rates, however, have led to an increase in the number of PHs for morbidly adherent placenta. In the case of uterine atony or rupture where PH is required, a subtotal PH is often sufficient. In the case of pathological placental localization involving the cervix, however, a total hysterectomy is required. Furthermore, the involvement of other pelvic structures may prospectively make the diagnosis difficult and the surgery challenging. If resources permit, PH for pathological placental localization merits a multidisciplinary approach. Despite advances in clinical practice, it is likely that peripartum hysterectomy will be more challenging for obstetricians in the future.

  1. Extreme evolved solar systems (EESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2017-08-01

    In just 20 years, we went from not knowing if the solar system is a fluke of Nature to realising that it is totally normal for stars to have planets. More remarkably, it is now clear that planet formation is a robust process, as rich multi-planet systems are found around stars more massive and less massive than the Sun. More recently, planetary systems have been identified in increasingly complex architectures, including circumbinary planets, wide binaries with planets orbiting one or both stellar components, and planets in triple stellar systems.We have also learned that many planetary systems will survive the evolution of their host stars into the white dwarf phase. Small bodies are scattered by unseen planets into the gravitational field of the white dwarfs, tidally disrupt, form dust discs, and eventually accrete onto the white dwarf, where they can be spectroscopically detected. HST/COS has played a critical role in the study these evolved planetary systems, demonstrating that overall the bulk composition of the debris is rocky and resembles in composition the inner the solar system, including evidence for water-rich planetesimals. Past observations of planetary systems at white dwarfs have focused on single stars with main-sequence progenitors of 1.5 to 2.5Msun. Here we propose to take the study of evolved planetary systems into the extremes of parameter ranges to answer questions such as: * How efficient is planet formation around 4-10Msun stars? * What are the metallicities of the progenitors of debris-accreting white dwarfs?* What is the fate of circumbinary planets?* Can star-planet interactions generate magnetic fields in the white dwarf host?

  2. Latest advances in high brightness disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Vincent; Gottwald, Tina; Stolzenburg, Christian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Killi, Alexander; Ryba, Tracey

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade diode pumped solid state lasers have become an important tool for many industrial materials processing applications. They combine ease of operation with efficiency, robustness and low cost. This paper will give insight in latest progress in disk laser technology ranging from kW-class CW-Lasers over frequency converted lasers to ultra-short pulsed lasers. The disk laser enables high beam quality at high average power and at high peak power at the same time. The power from a single disk was scaled from 1 kW around the year 2000 up to more than 10 kW nowadays. Recently was demonstrated more than 4 kW of average power from a single disk close to fundamental mode beam quality (M²=1.38). Coupling of multiple disks in a common resonator results in even higher power. As an example we show 20 kW extracted from two disks of a common resonator. The disk also reduces optical nonlinearities making it ideally suited for short and ultrashort pulsed lasers. In a joint project between TRUMPF and IFSW Stuttgart more than 1.3 kW of average power at ps pulse duration and exceptionally good beam quality was recently demonstrated. The extremely low saturated gain makes the disk laser ideal for internal frequency conversion. We show >1 kW average power and >6 kW peak power in multi ms pulsed regime from an internally frequency doubled disk laser emitting at 515 nm (green). Also external frequency conversion can be done efficiently with ns pulses. >500 W of average UV power was demonstrated.

  3. Equilibrium large vortex state in ferromagnetic disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlov, Konstantin L.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic vortices in soft ferromagnetic nano-disks have been extensively studied for at least several decades both for their applied (non-volatile information storage) as well as fundamental value. Here, it is shown that there is another vortex ground state with large radius-dependent core profile in nano-scale ferromagnetic disks of several exchange lengths in size. Its energy is computed numerically and its stability is studied analytically, which allows to plot it on magnetic phase diagram. Large vortices may exist on par with the classical ones, while being separated by an energy barrier, controllable by tuning the geometry and material of ferromagnetic disk.

  4. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopic examination of CM carbonaceous chondrites meteorites Migey, Murchison, Staroe Boriskino aged more than 4.56 billion years (about 50 million years from the beginning of the formation of the Solar system). Our study confirmed the conclusion of Rozanov, Hoover and other researchers about the presence of microfossils of bacterial origin in the matrix of all these meteorites. Since the time of the Solar system formation is 60 - 100 million years, the primary biocenosis emerged in the protoplanetary disc of the Solar system before meteorites or simultaneously with them. It means that prebiological processes and RNA world appeared even earlier in the circumsolar protoplanetary disc. Most likely, this appearance of prebiotic chemistry takes place nowday in massive and medium-massive discs of the observed young stellar objects (YSO) class 0 and I. The timescale of the transition from chemical to biological evolution took less than 50 million years for the Solar system. Further evolution of individual biocenosis in a protoplanetary disc associated with varying physico-chemical conditions during the formation of the Solar system bodies. Biocenosis on these bodies could remove or develop under the influence of many cosmic factors and geological processes in the case of Earth. To complete the primary biosphere formation in short evolution time - millions of years - requires highly efficient chemical syntheses. In industrial chemistry for the efficient synthesis of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, methanol and other organic species, that are the precursors to obtain prebiotic compounds, catalytic reactors of high pressure are used. Thus (1) necessary amount of the proper catalyst in (2) high pressure areas of the disc can trigger these intense syntheses. The disc contains the solids with the size from nanoparticle to pebble. Iron and magnesium is catalytically active ingredient for such solids. The puzzle is a way to provide hydrogen

  5. The Earliest Stages of Star and Planet Formation: Core Collapse, and the Formation of Disks and Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.-Y.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Shang, H.; Krasnopolsky, R.; Maury, A.

    The formation of stars and planets are connected through disks. Our theoretical understanding of disk formation has undergone drastic changes in recent years, and we are on the brink of a revolution in disk observation enabled by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). Large rotationally supported circumstellar disks, although common around more evolved young stellar objects (YSOs), are rarely detected during the earliest, "class 0" phase; however, a few excellent candidates have been discovered recently around both low- and high-mass protostars. In this early phase, prominent outflows are ubiquitously observed; they are expected to be associated with at least small magnetized disks. Whether the paucity of large Keplerian disks is due to observational challenges or intrinsically different properties of the youngest disks is unclear. In this review, we focus on the observations and theory of the formation of early disks and outflows and their connections with the first phases of planet formation. Disk formation — once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during hydrodynamic core collapse — is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in the strict ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) limit for the observed level of core magnetization. We review what is known about this "magnetic braking catastrophe," possible ways to resolve it, and the current status of early disk observations. Possible resolutions include non-ideal MHD effects (ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic dissipation, and the Hall effect), magnetic interchange instability in the inner part of protostellar accretion flow, turbulence, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and depletion of the slowly rotating envelope by outflow stripping or accretion. Outflows are also intimately linked to disk

  6. Disk MHD Conversion System for Nerva Reactor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, W

    1992-01-01

    The principal results of the study have been to: (1) confirm that cesium seeded hydrogen plasma disk MHD generator can meet its expected performance while operating in a stable plasma regime; and (2...

  7. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abramowicz, Marek A; Fragile, P. Chris

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves...

  8. Exact Relativistic Magnetized Haloes around Rotating Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Gutiérrez-Piñeres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamics of magnetic fields in galaxies is one of important problems in formation and evolution of galaxies. In this paper, we present the exact relativistic treatment of a rotating disk surrounded by a magnetized material halo. The features of the halo and disk are described by the distributional energy-momentum tensor of a general fluid in canonical form. All the relevant quantities and the metric and electromagnetic potentials are exactly determined by an arbitrary harmonic function only. For instance, the generalized Kuzmin-disk potential is used. The particular class of solutions obtained is asymptotically flat and satisfies all the energy conditions. Moreover, the motion of a charged particle on the halo is described. As far as we know, this is the first relativistic model describing analytically the magnetized halo of a rotating disk.

  9. Internal and external resonances of dielectric disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dettmann, C. P.; Morozov, G. V.; Sieber, M.; Waalkens, H.

    Circular microresonators (microdisks) are micron size dielectric disks embedded in a material of lower refractive index. They possess modes with complex eigenvalues (resonances) which are solutions of analytically given transcendental equations. The behavior of such eigenvalues in the small opening

  10. ON THE TRANSITIONAL DISK CLASS: LINKING OBSERVATIONS OF T TAURI STARS AND PHYSICAL DISK MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espaillat, C.; Andrews, S.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ingleby, L.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Muzerolle, J., E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: cqi@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dwilner@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: jesush@cida.ve, E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: muzerol@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    Two decades ago 'transitional disks' (TDs) described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk (FD). Here, we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a 'dip' in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects 'transitional disks' and 'pre-transitional disks' (PTDs), respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with FD models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest that the term 'transitional' only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that TDs and PTDs tend to have lower mass accretion rates than FDs and that TDs have lower accretion rates than PTDs. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of TDs and PTDs will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.

  11. Circumplanetary Debris Disks and Consequences of an Eccentric Fomalhaut b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Burns, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Each of the Solar System’s giant planets hosts many small and distant irregular satellites. These moons’ radially overlapping orbits and their unusually shallow size distributions imply a violent collisional history (Bottke et al. 2010). Thus, at early epochs, the giant planets likely displayed prominent circumplanetary debris clouds. For my PhD I numerically studied how such debris in the Saturnian system would evolve inward through radiation forces to coat the striking two-faced moon Iapetus (Tamayo et al. 2011). I also investigated the analogous process at Uranus, where the planet’s extreme obliquity renders infalling dust orbits chaotic. We find that this could explain the color dichotomies observed on the largest four Uranian satellites (Tamayo et al. 2013a, 2013b). Even today, Saturn has such a vast dust disk, sourced by the irregular satellite Phoebe (Verbiscer et al. 2009). This ‘Phoebe Ring’, can be used to observationally study the gravitational effects of moons on the dust; I have successfully probed this ring with Cassini, but was unsuccessful with Herschel observations. By these combined observational and dynamical studies, I hope to inform the field of extrasolar debris disks, where one tries to use dust signatures to infer the existence of planets that are too faint to see. I am now focusing on a related problem involving the exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Kalas et al. 2008). While its optical flux is too large to come directly from a planet, perhaps we are observing a disk supplied by irregular moons (Kennedy & Wyatt 2011). Additional observation epochs imply that Fomalhaut-b’s orbit is very eccentric (Kalas et al. 2013). Yet despite crossing the system’s observed circumstellar debris disk in projection, Fomalhaut b does not appear to have significantly disturbed it. We argue from simulations that if Fomalhaut b is a giant planet, it must have scattered into its present orbit in the past ~10 Myr. If so, the young Fomalhaut system 400

  12. LMC Microlensing and Very Thick Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Gyuk, Geza; Gates, Evalyn

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the implications of a very thick (scale height 1.5 - 3.0 kpc) disk population of MACHOs. Such a population represents a reasonable alternative to standard halo configurations of a lensing population. We find that very thick disk distributions can lower the lens mass estimate derived from the microlensing data toward the LMC, although an average lens mass substantially below $0.3\\Msol$ is unlikely. Constraints from direct searches for such lenses imply very low luminosity object...

  13. Dissecting disks around B-type protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Beltran, Maite; Kumar, M. S. Nanda; Stanke, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans; Etoka, Sandra; Galli, Daniele; Hummel, Christian A.; Moscadelli, Luca; Preibisch, Thomas; Ratzka, Thorsten; van der Tak, Floris F. S.; Vig, Sarita; Walmsley, C. Malcolm; Wang, Kuo-Song

    2013-07-01

    Recent theoretical models indicate that OB-type stars could form through disk-mediated accretion, like their low mass counterparts. However, on the observational side, circumstellar disks appear still elusive, especially around the most massive (proto)stars. As for early B-type (proto)stars, an ever growing number of disk candidates has been proposed, but only very few of these present evidence for Keplerian rotation. The advent of ALMA provides us with the necessary sensitivity and angular resolution to assess the existence of such disks and possibly establish their rotation curves. With this in mind, we have performed ALMA observations with the highest possible resolution (~0.4") at 350 GHz to search for circumstellar disks in a couple of presumably massive young stellar objects with luminosities of ~10000 Lsun and associated with bipolar nebulosities suggestive of the presence of disk/outflow systems. By observing simultaneously core and jet tracers, we could reveal molecular cores with velocity gradients perpendicular to the corresponding jets. In at least one case (G35.20-0.74 N), the core structure appears resolved and the velocity field can be fitted with an almost edge-on Keplerian disk rotating about a central mass of 18 Msun. This finding is consistent with the results of a recent study of the CO first overtone bandhead emission at 2.3mum towards G35.20-0.74 N. The disk radius and mass are >2500 au and 3 Msun. To reconcile the observed bolometric luminosity (3x10^4 Lsun) with the estimated stellar mass of 18 Msun, we propose that the latter is the total mass of a binary system.

  14. CERN internal communication is evolving

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN news will now be regularly updated on the CERN People page (see here).      Dear readers, All over the world, communication is becoming increasingly instantaneous, with news published in real time on websites and social networks. In order to keep pace with these changes, CERN's internal communication is evolving too. From now on, you will be informed of what’s happening at CERN more often via the “CERN people” page, which will frequently be updated with news. The Bulletin is following this trend too: twice a month, we will compile the most important articles published on the CERN site, with a brand-new layout. You will receive an e-mail every two weeks as soon as this new form of the Bulletin is available. If you have interesting news or stories to share, tell us about them through the form at: https://communications.web.cern.ch/got-story-cern-website​. You can also find out about news from CERN in real time...

  15. YottaYotta announces new world record set for TCP disk-to-disk bulk transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Yottabyte NetStorage(TM) Company, today announced a new world record for TCP disk-to-disk data transfer using the company's NetStorager(R) System. The record-breaking demonstration transferred 5 terabytes of data between Chicago, Il. to Vancouver, BC and Ottawa, ON, at a sustained average throughput of 11.1 gigabits per second. Peak throughput exceeded 11.6 gigabits per second, more than 15-times faster than previous records for TCP transfer from disk-to-disk (1 page).

  16. Thermal Test on Target with Pressed Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gromov, Roman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lowden, Rick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-27

    A thorough test of the thermal performance of a target for Mo99 production using solid Mo100 target to produce the Mo99 via a gamma-n reaction has previously been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The results are reported in “Zero Degree Line Mo Target Thermal Test Results and Analysis,” LANL report Number LA-UR-15-23134 dated 3/27/15. This target was comprised of 25 disks 1 mm thick and 12 mm in diameter, separated by helium coolant gaps 0.5 mm wide. The test reported in the above referenced report was conducted with natural Mo disks all cut from commercial rod. The production plant will have Mo100 disks pressed and sintered using a process being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural integrity of press-and-sinter disks is of some concern. The test reported herein included 4 disks made by the ORNL process and placed in the high heat, and therefore high thermal stress, region of the target. The electron beam energy was 23 MeV for these tests. Beam spot size was 3.5 mm horizontal and 3 mm vertical, FWHM. The thermal stress test of pressed-and-sintered disks resulted in no mechanical failures. The induced thermal stresses were below yield stress for natural Mo, indicating that up to that stress state no inherent deficiencies in the mechanical properties of the fabricated disks were evident.

  17. Ultraviolet Echoes of Quasar Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel ultraviolet monitoring campaign with WFC3/UVIS to measure quasar accretion disk structure. The bulk of supermassive black hole growth occurs in luminous quasar phases of rapid accretion, yet the governing physics remains poorly understood. Continuum reverberation mapping (RM) measures the accretion disk size via the time lag between short- and long-wavelength emission: the proposed UV monitoring forms the foundation for simultaneous optical observations (expected to continue for our quasars through 2019). Currently only 4 Seyfert AGNs have UV/optical RM accretion-disk sizes, all low-luminosity and at z<0.02. We propose to monitor 5 new quasars, spanning an order of magnitude higher accretion rate and out to z 1. The 5 quasar targets are drawn from SDSS-RM, a pioneering multi-object spectroscopic RM campaign, and have been monitored with optical photometry and spectroscopy since 2014. The higher luminosity and accurate RM masses of our sample enable the first measurements of accretion-rate effects on accretion-disk size, with UV monitoring directly probing changes in the inner disk suggested by theory and previous indirect observations. Our proposed HST monitoring campaign is unusually efficient, targeting 5 quasars per orbit using the DASH method with UVIS subarray readouts. We use simulations to demonstrate that our 2-day cadence over 32 epochs will accurately measure continuum lags and accretion-disk structure. Ultraviolet monitoring of these 5 quasars will enable critical new measurements of accretion-disk structure during the rapid accretion mode that dominates black hole growth.

  18. Cold disks : Spitzer spectroscopy of disks around young stars with large gaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, G. A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Merin, B.; Augereau, J. C.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Evans, N. J.; Geers, V. C.; Lahuis, F.; Kessler-Silacci, J. E.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Brown, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have identified four circumstellar disks with a deficit of dust emission from their inner 15-50 AU. All four stars have F-G spectral type and were uncovered as part of the Spitzer Space Telescope "Cores to Disks" Legacy Program Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) first-look survey of similar to 100 pre -

  19. Equilibrium configuration of a stratus floating above accretion disks: Full-disk calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itanishi, Yusuke; Fukue, Jun

    2017-06-01

    We examine floating strati above a luminous accretion disk, supported by the radiative force from the entire disk, and calculate the equilibrium locus, which depends on the disk luminosity and the optical depth of the stratus. Due to the radiative transfer effect (albedo effect), the floating height of the stratus with a finite optical depth generally becomes high, compared with the particle case. In contrast to the case of the near-disk approximation, moreover, the floating height becomes yet higher in the present full-disk calculation, since the intense radiation from the inner disk is taken into account. As a result, when the disk luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity is ˜0.3 and the stratus optical depth is around unity, the stable configuration disappears at around r ˜ 50 rg, rg being the Schwarzschild radius, and the stratus would be blown off as a cloudy wind consisting of many strati with appropriate conditions. This luminosity is sufficiently smaller than the Eddington one, and the present results suggest that the radiation-driven cloudy wind can be easily blown off from the sub-Eddington disk, and this can explain various outflows observed in ultra-fast outflow objects as well as in broad-absorption-line quasars.

  20. The Tilt between Acretion Disk and Stellar Disk Shiyin Shen1,2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to a control galaxy sample. Given that the Type 2 AGN fraction is in the range of 70–90 percent for low luminosity AGNs as a priori, we find that the mean tilt between the accretion disk and stellar disk is ∼ 30 degrees. (Shen et al. 2010). Key words. Galaxies: statistics—galaxies: Seyfert—galaxies: nuclei— galaxies: spiral. 1.

  1. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar mass accretion disks around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    A cosmological model for gamma-ray bursts is explored in which the radiation is produced as a broadly beamed pair fireball along the rotation axis of an accreting black hole. The black hole may be a consequence of neutron star merger or neutron star-black hole merger, but for long complex bursts, it is more likely to come from the collapse of a single Wolf-Rayet star endowed with rotation ('failed' Type Ib supernova). The disk is geometrically thick and typically has a mass inside 100 km of several tenths of a solar mass. In the failed supernova case, the disk is fed for a longer period of time by the collapsing star. At its inner edge the disk is thick to its own neutrino emission and evolves on a viscous time scale of several seconds. In a region roughly 30 km across, interior to the accretion disk and along its axis of rotation, a pair fireball is generated by neutrino annihilation and electron-neutrino scattering which deposit approximately 10 exp 50 ergs/s.

  2. Reconfigurable superconducting vortex pinning potential for magnetic disks in hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Estefani; Curran, Peter J; Kim, Jangyong; Satchell, Nathan; Burnell, Gavin; Bending, Simon J

    2017-03-24

    High resolution scanning Hall probe microscopy has been used to directly visualise the superconducting vortex behavior in hybrid structures consisting of a square array of micrometer-sized Py ferromagnetic disks covered by a superconducting Nb thin film. At remanence the disks exist in almost fully flux-closed magnetic vortex states, but the observed cloverleaf-like stray fields indicate the presence of weak in-plane anisotropy. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that the most likely origin is an unintentional shape anisotropy. We have studied the pinning of added free superconducting vortices as a function of the magnetisation state of the disks, and identified a range of different phenomena arising from competing energy contributions. We have also observed clear differences in the pinning landscape when the superconductor and the ferromagnet are electron ically coupled or insulated by a thin dielectric layer, with an indication of non-trivial vortex-vortex interactions. We demonstrate a complete reconfiguration of the vortex pinning potential when the magnetisation of the disks evolves from the vortex-like state to an onion-like one under an in-plane magnetic field. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions and could form the basis of novel superconducting devices based on reconfigurable vortex pinning sites.

  3. Manipulation of magnetic vortex parameters in disk-on-disk nanostructures with various geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebliy, Maxim E; Kolesnikov, Alexander G; Ognev, Alexey V; Samardak, Alexander S; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanostructures in the form of a sandwich consisting of two permalloy (Py) disks with diameters of 600 and 200 nm separated by a nonmagnetic interlayer are studied. Magnetization reversal of the disk-on-disk nanostructures depends on the distance between centers of the small and big disks and on orientation of an external magnetic field applied during measurements. It is found that manipulation of the magnetic vortex chirality and the trajectory of the vortex core in the big disk is only possible in asymmetric nanostructures. Experimentally studied peculiarities of a motion path of the vortex core and vortex parameters by the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometer are supported by the magnetic force microscopy imaging and micromagnetic simulations.

  4. Manipulation of magnetic vortex parameters in disk-on-disk nanostructures with various geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim E. Stebliy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanostructures in the form of a sandwich consisting of two permalloy (Py disks with diameters of 600 and 200 nm separated by a nonmagnetic interlayer are studied. Magnetization reversal of the disk-on-disk nanostructures depends on the distance between centers of the small and big disks and on orientation of an external magnetic field applied during measurements. It is found that manipulation of the magnetic vortex chirality and the trajectory of the vortex core in the big disk is only possible in asymmetric nanostructures. Experimentally studied peculiarities of a motion path of the vortex core and vortex parameters by the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE magnetometer are supported by the magnetic force microscopy imaging and micromagnetic simulations.

  5. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of gas and dust play a crucial role in the formation of stars and planets. Until now, high-resolution images of such disks around young stars within the Orion Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) constituted the most direct proof of their existence. Now, another circumstellar disk has been detected around a star in the Lagoon Nebula - also known as Messier 8 (M8) , a giant complex of interstellar gas and dust with many young stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius and four times more distant than the Orion Nebula. The observations were carried out by an international team of scientists led by Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte, Tautenburg, Germany) [1] who used telescopes located at the ESO La Silla observatory and also observations from the HST archive. These new results are paving the road towards exciting research programmes on star formation which will become possible with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The harsh environment of circumstellar disks The existence of circumstellar disks has been inferred from indirect measurements of young stellar objects, such as the spectral energy distribution, the analysis of the profiles of individual spectral lines and measurements of the polarisation of the emitted light [2]. Impressive images of such disks in the Orion Nebula, known as proplyds (PROto-PLanetarY DiskS), have been obtained by the HST during the recent years. They have confirmed the interpretation of previous ground-based emission-line observations and mapping by radio telescopes. Moreover, they demonstrated that those disks which are located close to hot and massive stars are subject to heating caused by the intense radiation from these stars. Subsequently, the disks evaporate releasing neutral gas which streams off. During this process, shock fronts (regions with increased density) with tails of ionised gas result at a certain distance between the disk and the hot star. These objects appear on

  6. Theory of Disk-to-Vesicle Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Shi, An-Chang

    2009-03-01

    Self-assembled membranes from amphiphilic molecules, such as lipids and block copolymers, can assume a variety of morphologies dictated by energy minimization of system. The membrane energy is characterized by a bending modulus (κ), a Gaussian modulus (κG), and the line tension (γ) of the edge. Two basic morphologies of membranes are flat disks that minimize the bending energy at the cost of the edge energy, and enclosed vesicles that minimize the edge energy at the cost of bending energy. In our work, the transition from disk to vesicle is studied theoretically using the string method, which is designed to find the minimum energy path (MEP) or the most probable transition path between two local minima of an energy landscape. Previous studies of disk-to-vesicle transition usually approximate the transitional states by a series of spherical cups, and found that the spherical cups do not correspond to stable or meta-stable states of the system. Our calculation demonstrates that the intermediate shapes along the MEP are very different from spherical cups. Furthermore, some of these transitional states can be meta-stable. The disk-to-vesicle transition pathways are governed by two scaled parameters, κG/κ and γR0/4κ, where R0 is the radius of the disk. In particular, a meta-stable intermediate state is predicted, which may correspond to the open morphologies observed in experiments and simulations.

  7. Disk-Jet Connection in Active Supermassive Black Holes in the Standard Accretion Disk Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Doi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Grzegorz M.

    2017-05-01

    We study the disk-jet connection in supermassive black holes by investigating the properties of their optical and radio emissions utilizing the SDSS DR7 and the NVSS catalogs. Our sample contains 7017 radio-loud quasars with detection both at 1.4 GHz and SDSS optical spectra. Using this radio-loud quasar sample, we investigate the correlation among the jet power ({P}{jet}), the bolometric disk luminosity ({L}{disk}), and the black hole mass ({M}{BH}) in the standard accretion disk regime. We find that the jet powers correlate with the bolometric disk luminosities as {log}{P}{jet}=(0.96+/- 0.012){log}{L}{disk}+(0.79+/- 0.55). This suggests the jet production efficiency of {η }{jet}≃ {1.1}-0.76+2.6 × {10}-2 assuming the disk radiative efficiency of 0.1, implying low black hole spin parameters and/or low magnetic flux for radio-loud quasars. But it can be also due to the dependence of this efficiency on the geometrical thickness of the accretion flow, which is expected to be small for quasars accreting at the disk Eddington ratios 0.01≲ λ ≲ 0.3. This low jet production efficiency does not significantly increase even if we set the disk radiative efficiency to be 0.3. We also investigate the fundamental plane in our samples among {P}{jet}, {L}{disk}, and {M}{BH}. We could not find a statistically significant fundamental plane for radio-loud quasars in the standard accretion regime.

  8. Random Number Generators in Secure Disk Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hars Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cryptographic random number generators seeded by physical entropy sources are employed in many embedded security systems, including self-encrypting disk drives, being manufactured by the millions every year. Random numbers are used for generating encryption keys and for facilitating secure communication, and they are also provided to users for their applications. We discuss common randomness requirements, techniques for estimating the entropy of physical sources, investigate specific nonrandom physical properties, estimate the autocorrelation, then mix reduce the data until all common randomness tests pass. This method is applied to a randomness source in disk drives: the always changing coefficients of an adaptive filter for the read channel equalization. These coefficients, affected by many kinds of physical noise, are used in the reseeding process of a cryptographic pseudorandom number generator in a family of self encrypting disk drives currently in the market.

  9. Toshiba Optical Disk Stores 15000 CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Haruo; Kita, Kouichi

    1984-08-01

    The Toshiba computed tomography scanner system TCT60A/500X is equipped with an optical disk data storage device for image data archiving. One optical disk stores 3.6 gigabytes of data, or 15000 CT images on both sides. When writing on an optical disk, one spiral of data pits is produced with a semiconductor laser by evaporating the Te-C film coated on the PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) substrate. The pits are read by the same laser at a lower power along with CRC (cyclic redundancy code) error correction. A bit error rate of 1.0E-12 was attained. The IEEE488 interface bus (GPIB) is used to communicate with a host computer. The mean data transfer rate through the bus is 100 kilobytes per second.

  10. DNA evolved to minimize frameshift mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Agoni, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Point mutations can surely be dangerous but what is worst than to lose the reading frame?! Does DNA evolved a strategy to try to limit frameshift mutations?! Here we investigate if DNA sequences effectively evolved a system to minimize frameshift mutations analyzing the transcripts of proteins with high molecular weights.

  11. A POSSIBLE DETECTION OF OCCULTATION BY A PROTO-PLANETARY CLUMP IN GM Cephei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. P.; Hu, S. C.-L.; Guo, J. K.; Hsiao, H. Y.; Lin, H. C.; Lin, C. S. [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Errmann, R.; Adam, Ch.; Baar, S.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Fiedler, S.; Ginski, Ch.; Graefe, C.; Hohle, M. M.; Kitze, M.; Maciejewski, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaets-Sternwarte, FSU Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Bukowiecki, L. [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, PL87-100 Torun (Poland); Dimitrov, D. P. [Institute of Astronomy and NAO, Bulg. Acad. Sc., 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Janulis, R. [Moletai Observatory, Vilnius University (Lithuania); and others

    2012-06-01

    GM Cephei (GM Cep), in the young ({approx}4 Myr) open cluster Trumpler 37, has been known to be an abrupt variable and to have a circumstellar disk with a very active accretion. Our monitoring observations in 2009-2011 revealed that the star showed sporadic flare events, each with a brightening of {approx}< 0.5 mag lasting for days. These brightening events, associated with a color change toward blue, should originate from increased accretion activity. Moreover, the star also underwent a brightness drop of {approx}1 mag lasting for about a month, during which time the star became bluer when fainter. Such brightness drops seem to have a recurrence timescale of a year, as evidenced in our data and the photometric behavior of GM Cep over a century. Between consecutive drops, the star brightened gradually by about 1 mag and became blue at peak luminosity. We propose that the drop is caused by the obscuration of the central star by an orbiting dust concentration. The UX Orionis type of activity in GM Cep therefore exemplifies the disk inhomogeneity process in transition between the grain coagulation and the planetesimal formation in a young circumstellar disk.

  12. On corotation torques, horseshoe drag and the possibility of sustained stalled or outward protoplanetary migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2009-04-