WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolved finite state

  1. Evolved Finite State Controller For Hybrid System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Jean-Francois; Fan, Zhun; Goodman, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary methodology to automatically generate nite state automata (FSA) controllers to control hybrid systems. FSA controllers for a case study of two-tank system have been successfully obtained using the proposed evolutionary approach. Experimental results show...

  2. Comparing an evolved finite state controller for hybrid system to a lookahead design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Jean-Francois; Fan, Zhun

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of an evolutionary methodology for evolving finite state controller to the lookahead controller for hybrid system. To illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of both controllers two case studies, namely a two-tanks system and a single-input double-output DC...

  3. Evolved finite state controller for hybrid system in reduced search space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Jean-Francois; Fan, Zhun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary methodology to automatically generate finite state automata (FSA) controllers to control hybrid systems. The proposed approach reduces the search space using an invariant analysis of the system. FSA controllers for a case study of two-tank system have been...

  4. Finite Virtual State Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Senhadji Navarro, Raouf; García Vargas, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    This letter proposes a new model of state machine called Finite Virtual State Machine (FVSM). A memory-based architecture and a procedure for generating FVSM implementations from Finite State Machines (FSMs) are presented. FVSM implementations provide advantages in speed over conventional RAM-based FSM implementations. The results of experiments prove the feasibility of this approach.

  5. High-order evolving surface finite element method for parabolic problems on evolving surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kovács, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    High-order spatial discretisations and full discretisations of parabolic partial differential equations on evolving surfaces are studied. We prove convergence of the high-order evolving surface finite element method, by showing high-order versions of geometric approximation errors and perturbation error estimates and by the careful error analysis of a modified Ritz map. Furthermore, convergence of full discretisations using backward difference formulae and implicit Runge-Kutta methods are als...

  6. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  7. Expansion and contraction of finite states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, Allard

    2004-01-01

    We present a theory that copes with the dynamics of inconsistent information. A method is set forth to represent possibly inconsistent information by a *finite state*. Next, finite operations for expansion and contraction of finite states are given. No extra-logical element -- a choice function or

  8. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  9. Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, Natesh; Anderson, Neal G., E-mail: anderson@ecs.umass.edu

    2013-12-17

    Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata (FSA) are considered from a physical-information-theoretic perspective. A quantitative measure for the computational irreversibility of finite automata is introduced, and a fundamental lower bound on the average energy dissipated per state transition is obtained and expressed in terms of FSA irreversibility. The irreversibility measure and energy bound are germane to any realization of a deterministic automaton that faithfully registers abstract FSA states in distinguishable states of a physical system coupled to a thermal environment, and that evolves via a sequence of interactions with an external system holding a physical instantiation of a random input string. The central result, which is shown to follow from quantum dynamics and entropic inequalities alone, can be regarded as a generalization of Landauer's Principle applicable to FSAs and tailorable to specified automata. Application to a simple FSA is illustrated.

  10. Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Natesh; Anderson, Neal G.

    2013-12-01

    Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata (FSA) are considered from a physical-information-theoretic perspective. A quantitative measure for the computational irreversibility of finite automata is introduced, and a fundamental lower bound on the average energy dissipated per state transition is obtained and expressed in terms of FSA irreversibility. The irreversibility measure and energy bound are germane to any realization of a deterministic automaton that faithfully registers abstract FSA states in distinguishable states of a physical system coupled to a thermal environment, and that evolves via a sequence of interactions with an external system holding a physical instantiation of a random input string. The central result, which is shown to follow from quantum dynamics and entropic inequalities alone, can be regarded as a generalization of Landauer's Principle applicable to FSAs and tailorable to specified automata. Application to a simple FSA is illustrated.

  11. Quantitative coherence witness for finite dimensional states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huizhong; Lin, Anni; He, Siying; Hu, Xueyuan

    2017-12-01

    We define the stringent coherence witness as an observable whose mean value vanishes for all incoherent states but nonzero for some coherent states. Such witnesses are proved to exist for any finite-dimension states. Not only is the witness efficient in testing whether a state is coherent, but also its mean value can quantitatively reveal the amount of coherence. For an unknown state, the modulus of the mean value of a normalized witness provides a tight lower bound to the l1-norm of coherence. When we have some previous knowledge of a state, the optimal witness which has the maximal mean value is derived. It is proved that for any finite dimension state, the mean value of the optimal witness, which we call the witnessed coherence, equals the l1-norm of coherence. In the case that the witness is fixed and the incoherent operations are allowed, the maximal mean value can reach the witnessed coherence if and only if certain relations between the fixed witness and the initial state are satisfied. Our results provide a way to directly measure the coherence in arbitrary finite dimension states and an operational interpretation of the l1-norm of coherence.

  12. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  13. Finite state models of constrained 2d data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a class of discrete finite alphabet 2D fields that can be characterized using tools front finite state machines and Markov chains. These fields have several properties that greatly simplify the analysis of 2D coding methods.......This paper considers a class of discrete finite alphabet 2D fields that can be characterized using tools front finite state machines and Markov chains. These fields have several properties that greatly simplify the analysis of 2D coding methods....

  14. Modeling software with finite state machines a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Ferdinand; Wagner, Thomas; Wolstenholme, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Modeling Software with Finite State Machines: A Practical Approach explains how to apply finite state machines to software development. It provides a critical analysis of using finite state machines as a foundation for executable specifications to reduce software development effort and improve quality. This book discusses the design of a state machine and of a system of state machines. It also presents a detailed analysis of development issues relating to behavior modeling with design examples and design rules for using finite state machines. This volume describes a coherent and well-tested fr

  15. Squeezing the infinite into the finite : Handling the OT candidate set with Finite State technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biro, Tamas; YliJyra, A; Karttunen, L; Karhumaki, J

    2006-01-01

    Finite State approaches to Optimality Theory have had two goals. The earlier and less ambitious one was to compute the optimal output by compiling a finite state automaton for each underlying representation. Newer approaches aimed at realizing the OT-systems as FS transducers mapping any underlying

  16. Organization Design: The Evolving State-of-the-Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak; Burton, Richard M.; Eriksen, Bo

    undertaken to address the problem. Organization Design: The Evolving State-of-the-Art will be organized in four sections: (1) Theoretical and Practical Issues, (2) Fit, Contingency and Configuration, (3) Design and Performance, and (4) The Dynamics of Adaptation and Change. The book will be a broad...... theory, principles and concepts, and on the basis of this benchmark publication, the editors will encourage researchers and students to further develop the field. The recent development in organization design has been sporadic; hence this book will be an important step in creating better theoretical...

  17. Active Learning of Nondeterministic Finite State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warawoot Pacharoen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of learning nondeterministic finite state machines (NFSMs from systems where their internal structures are implicit and nondeterministic. Recently, an algorithm for inferring observable NFSMs (ONFSMs, which are the potentially learnable subclass of NFSMs, has been proposed based on the hypothesis that the complete testing assumption is satisfied. According to this assumption, with an input sequence (query, the complete set of all possible output sequences is given by the so-called Teacher, so the number of times for asking the same query is not taken into account in the algorithm. In this paper, we propose LNM*, a refined ONFSM learning algorithm that considers the amount for repeating the same query as one parameter. Unlike the previous work, our approach does not require all possible output sequences in one answer. Instead, it tries to observe the possible output sequences by asking the same query many times to the Teacher. We have proved that LNM* can infer the corresponding ONFSMs of the unknown systems when the number of tries for the same query is adequate to guarantee the complete testing assumption. Moreover, the proof shows that our algorithm will eventually terminate no matter whether the assumption is fulfilled or not. We also present the theoretical time complexity analysis of LNM*. In addition, experimental results demonstrate the practical efficiency of our approach.

  18. Recurrent Artificial Neural Networks and Finite State Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisl, Hermann

    It is argued that pessimistic assessments of the adequacy of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for natural language processing (NLP) on the grounds that they have a finite state architecture are unjustified, and that their adequacy in this regard is an empirical issue. First, arguments that counter standard objections to finite state NLP on the…

  19. Geotechnical Ultimate Limit State Design Using Finite Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkgreve, R.B.J.; Post, M.

    2015-01-01

    Displacement-based finite element calculations are primarily used for serviceability limit state (SLS) analysis, but the finite element method also offers possibilities for ultimate limit state (ULS) design in geotechnical engineering. The combined use of SLS and ULS calculations with partial safety

  20. Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Calude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

  1. Reverse Engineering Integrated Circuits Using Finite State Machine Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oler, Kiri J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Carl H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-12

    In this paper, we present a methodology for reverse engineering integrated circuits, including a mathematical verification of a scalable algorithm used to generate minimal finite state machine representations of integrated circuits.

  2. Finite state automata: Dynamic task environments in problem solving research.

    OpenAIRE

    Buchner, Axel; Funke, Joachim

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a new research paradigm for analysing human learning in dynamic task environments based on the theory of finite-state automata. Some of the advantages of the approach are outlined. (1) It is possible to design classes of formally well-described dynamic task environments instead of idiosyncratic microworlds that are difficult if not impossible to compare. (2) The approach suggests assumptions about the mental representation of a discrete dynamic system. (3) The finite-state...

  3. The dynamics of discrete-time computation, with application to recurrent neural networks and finite state machine extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M

    1996-08-15

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) can learn to perform finite state computations. It is shown that an RNN performing a finite state computation must organize its state space to mimic the states in the minimal deterministic finite state machine that can perform that computation, and a precise description of the attractor structure of such systems is given. This knowledge effectively predicts activation space dynamics, which allows one to understand RNN computation dynamics in spite of complexity in activation dynamics. This theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding finite state machine (FSM) extraction techniques and can be used to improve training methods for RNNs performing FSM computations. This provides an example of a successful approach to understanding a general class of complex systems that has not been explicitly designed, e.g., systems that have evolved or learned their internal structure.

  4. The Effect of Evolving Damage on the Finite Strain Response of Inelastic and Viscoelastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Aboudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A finite strain micromechanical model is generalized in order to incorporate the effect of evolving damage in the metallic and polymeric phases of unidirectional compostes. As a result, it is possible to predict the response of composites with ductile and brittle phases undergoing large coupled inelastic-damage and viscoelastic-damage deformations, respectively. For inelastic composites, both finite strain elastoplastic (time-independent and viscoplastic (time-dependent behaviors are considered. The ductile phase exhibits initially a hyperelastic behavior which is followed by an inelastic one, and its analysis is based on the multiplicative split of its deformation gradient into elastic and inelastic parts. The embedded damage mechanisms and their evolutions are based on Gurson’s (which is suitable for the modeling of porous materials and Lemaitre’s finite strain models. Similarly, the polymeric phase exhibits large viscoelastic deformations in which the damage evolves according to a suitable evolution law that depends on the amount of accumulated deformation. Evolving damage in hyperelastic materials can be analyzed as a special case by neglecting the viscous effects. The micromechanical analysis is based on the homogenization technique for periodic multiphase materials, which establishes the strong form of the Lagrangian equilibrium equations. These equations are implemented together with the interfacial and periodic boundary conditions, in conjunction with the current tangent tensor of the phase. As a result, the instantaneous strain concentration tensor that relates the local deformation gradient of the phase to the externally applied deformation gradient is established. This provides also the instantaneous effective stiffness tangent tensor of the composite as well as its current response. Results are given that exhibit the effect of damage on the initial yield surfaces, response and possible failure of the composite.

  5. Removing the Restrictions Imposed on Finite State Machines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explained in details the technology of pushdown automata, though a sophisticated type of finite state machine but has enhanced memory capabilities. The method adopted in the design involved the use of transition states called stack, state and input operations. In addition, the method specified a pushdown ...

  6. Complete permutation Gray code implemented by finite state machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Peng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An enumerating method of complete permutation array is proposed. The list of n! permutations based on Gray code defined over finite symbol set Z(n = {1, 2, …, n} is implemented by finite state machine, named as n-RPGCF. An RPGCF can be used to search permutation code and provide improved lower bounds on the maximum cardinality of a permutation code in some cases.

  7. General finite state machine reasoning method for digital forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Wang, Guoyin

    2008-04-01

    Digital forensics investigator faces the challenge of reliability of forensic conclusions. Formal automatic analysis method is helpful to deal with the challenge. The finite state machine analysis method tries to determine all possible sequences of events that could have happened in a digital system during an incident. Its basic idea is to model the target system using a finite state machine and then explore its all possible states on the condition of available evidence. Timed mealy finite state machine is introduced to model the target system, and the formalization of system running process and evidence is presented to match the system running with possible source evidence automatically. Based on Gladyshev's basic reasoning method, general reasoning algorithms with multi strategies are developed to find the possible real scenarios. Case study and experimental results show that our method is feasible and adaptable to possible cases and takes a further step to practical formal reasoning for digital forensics.

  8. Socio-economic applications of finite state mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, we present different applications of finite state mean field games to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community or consumer choice behaviour in the free market. The corresponding finite state mean field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we present and validate different numerical methods. We illustrate the behaviour of solutions with various numerical experiments,which show interesting phenomena such as shock formation. Hence, we conclude with an investigation of the shock structure in the case of two-state problems.

  9. Exact stabilization of entangled states in finite time by dissipative quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peter D.; Ticozzi, Francesco; Viola, Lorenza

    2017-07-01

    Open quantum systems evolving according to discrete-time dynamics are capable, unlike continuous-time counterparts, to converge to a stable equilibrium in finite time with zero error. We consider dissipative quantum circuits consisting of sequences of quantum channels subject to specified quasi-locality constraints, and determine conditions under which stabilization of a pure multipartite entangled state of interest may be exactly achieved in finite time. Special emphasis is devoted to characterizing scenarios where finite-time stabilization may be achieved robustly with respect to the order of the applied quantum maps, as suitable for unsupervised control architectures. We show that if a decomposition of the physical Hilbert space into virtual subsystems is found, which is compatible with the locality constraint and relative to which the target state factorizes, then robust stabilization may be achieved by independently cooling each component. We further show that if the same condition holds for a scalable class of pure states, a continuous-time quasi-local Markov semigroup ensuring rapid mixing can be obtained. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the commutativity of the canonical parent Hamiltonian one may associate to the target state does not directly relate to its finite-time stabilizability properties, although in all cases where we can guarantee robust stabilization, a (possibly noncanonical) commuting parent Hamiltonian may be found. Aside from graph states, quantum states amenable to finite-time robust stabilization include a class of universal resource states displaying two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological order, along with tensor network states obtained by generalizing a construction due to Bravyi and Vyalyi [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 187 (2005)]. Extensions to representative classes of mixed graph-product and thermal states are also discussed.

  10. State-of-the-Art in Weighted Finite-State Spell-Checking

    OpenAIRE

    Pirinen, Tommi; Linden, Krister

    2014-01-01

    The following claims can be made about finite-state methods for spell-checking: 1) Finite-state language models provide support for morphologically complex languages that word lists, affix stripping and similar approaches do not provide; 2) Weighted finite-state models have expressive power equal to other, state-of-the-art string algorithms used by contemporary spell-checkers; and 3) Finite-state models are at least as fast as other string algorithms for lookup and error correction. In this a...

  11. Hardness of deriving invertible sequences from finite state machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hierons, Robert M.; Mousavi, Mohammad Reza; Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2017-01-01

    Many test generation algorithms use unique input/output sequences (UIOs) that identify states of the finite state machine specification M. However, it is known that UIO checking the existence of UIO sequences is PSPACE-complete. As a result, some UIO generation algorithms utilise what are called ...

  12. Finite-State Approximation of Phrase-Structure Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, F C N; Pereira, Fernando C. N.; Wright, Rebecca N.

    1996-01-01

    Phrase-structure grammars are effective models for important syntactic and semantic aspects of natural languages, but can be computationally too demanding for use as language models in real-time speech recognition. Therefore, finite-state models are used instead, even though they lack expressive power. To reconcile those two alternatives, we designed an algorithm to compute finite-state approximations of context-free grammars and context-free-equivalent augmented phrase-structure grammars. The approximation is exact for certain context-free grammars generating regular languages, including all left-linear and right-linear context-free grammars. The algorithm has been used to build finite-state language models for limited-domain speech recognition tasks.

  13. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  14. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiaxing; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-12-01

    The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  15. The Evolving Role of Emergency Departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, Kristy Gonzalez; Bauhoff, Sebastian; Blanchard, Janice C; Abir, Mahshid; Iyer, Neema; Smith, Alexandria; Vesely, Joseph V; Okeke, Edward N; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this article was performed to develop a more complete picture of how hospital emergency departments (EDs) contribute to the U.S. health care system, which is currently evolving in response to economic, clinical, and political pressures. Using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods, it explores the evolving role that EDs and the personnel who staff them play in evaluating and managing complex and high-acuity patients, serving as the key decisionmaker for roughly half of all inpatient hospital admissions, and serving as "the safety net of the safety net" for patients who cannot get care elsewhere. The report also examines the role that EDs may soon play in either contributing to or helping to control the rising costs of health care.

  16. Continuous time finite state mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2013-04-23

    In this paper we consider symmetric games where a large number of players can be in any one of d states. We derive a limiting mean field model and characterize its main properties. This mean field limit is a system of coupled ordinary differential equations with initial-terminal data. For this mean field problem we prove a trend to equilibrium theorem, that is convergence, in an appropriate limit, to stationary solutions. Then we study an N+1-player problem, which the mean field model attempts to approximate. Our main result is the convergence as N→∞ of the mean field model and an estimate of the rate of convergence. We end the paper with some further examples for potential mean field games. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  17. Keeping current with evolving makeup of New York State population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry; Cannella, Dolores

    2009-11-01

    The changing residential population of New York State requires continued monitoring if health practitioners are to maintain an awareness of the individuals in their community. A review of federal agency reports provides a general overview of state and national demographic and health factor characteristics.

  18. Design methods for fault-tolerant finite state machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Shailesh; Frenzel, James F.

    1993-01-01

    VLSI electronic circuits are increasingly being used in space-borne applications where high levels of radiation may induce faults, known as single event upsets. In this paper we review the classical methods of designing fault tolerant digital systems, with an emphasis on those methods which are particularly suitable for VLSI-implementation of finite state machines. Four methods are presented and will be compared in terms of design complexity, circuit size, and estimated circuit delay.

  19. Employing finite-state machines in data integrity problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the issue of group integrity of tuple subsets regarding corporate integrity constraints in relational databases. A solution may be found by applying the finite-state machine theory to guarantee group integrity of data. We present a practical guide to coding such an automaton. After creating SQL queries to manipulate data and control its integrity for real data domains, we study the issue of query performance, determine the level of transaction isolation, and generate query plans.

  20. Kalman Based Finite State Controller for Partially Observable Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Sardag

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A real world environment is often partially observable by the agents either because of noisy sensors or incomplete perception. Moreover, it has continuous state space in nature, and agents must decide on an action for each point in internal continuous belief space. Consequently, it is convenient to model this type of decision-making problems as Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs with continuous observation and state space. Most of the POMDP methods whether approximate or exact assume that the underlying world dynamics or POMDP parameters such as transition and observation probabilities are known. However, for many real world environments it is very difficult if not impossible to obtain such information. We assume that only the internal dynamics of the agent, such as the actuator noise, interpretation of the sensor suite, are known. Using these internal dynamics, our algorithm, namely Kalman Based Finite State Controller (KBFSC, constructs an internal world model over the continuous belief space, represented by a finite state automaton. Constructed automaton nodes are points of the continuous belief space sharing a common best action and a common uncertainty level. KBFSC deals with continuous Gaussian-based POMDPs. It makes use of Kalman Filter for belief state estimation, which also is an efficient method to prune unvisited segments of the belief space and can foresee the reachable belief points approximately calculating the horizon N policy. KBFSC does not use an “explore and update” approach in the value calculation as TD-learning. Therefore KBFSC does not have an extensive exploration-exploitation phase. Using the MDP case reward and the internal dynamics of the agent, KBFSC can automatically construct the finite state automaton (FSA representing the approximate optimal policy without the need for discretization of the state and observation space. Moreover, the policy always converges for POMDP problems.

  1. Kalman Based Finite State Controller for Partially Observable Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Levent Akin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A real world environment is often partially observable by the agents either because of noisy sensors or incomplete perception. Moreover, it has continuous state space in nature, and agents must decide on an action for each point in internal continuous belief space. Consequently, it is convenient to model this type of decisionmaking problems as Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDPs with continuous observation and state space. Most of the POMDP methods whether approximate or exact assume that the underlying world dynamics or POMDP parameters such as transition and observation probabilities are known. However, for many real world environments it is very difficult if not impossible to obtain such information. We assume that only the internal dynamics of the agent, such as the actuator noise, interpretation of the sensor suite, are known. Using these internal dynamics, our algorithm, namely Kalman Based Finite State Controller (KBFSC, constructs an internal world model over the continuous belief space, represented by a finite state automaton. Constructed automaton nodes are points of the continuous belief space sharing a common best action and a common uncertainty level. KBFSC deals with continuous Gaussian-based POMDPs. It makes use of Kalman Filter for belief state estimation, which also is an efficient method to prune unvisited segments of the belief space and can foresee the reachable belief points approximately calculating the horizon N policy. KBFSC does not use an "explore and update" approach in the value calculation as TD-learning. Therefore KBFSC does not have an extensive exploration-exploitation phase. Using the MDP case reward and the internal dynamics of the agent, KBFSC can automatically construct the finite state automaton (FSA representing the approximate optimal policy without the need for discretization of the state and observation space. Moreover, the policy always converges for POMDP problems.

  2. Finite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W.R. Azzam

    2015-01-01

    .... This technique is investigated numerically using finite element analysis. A four story reinforced concrete building that rests on a raft foundation is idealized as a two-dimensional model with and without skirts...

  3. Speech recognition algorithms based on weighted finite-state transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces the theory, algorithms, and implementation techniques for efficient decoding in speech recognition mainly focusing on the Weighted Finite-State Transducer (WFST) approach. The decoding process for speech recognition is viewed as a search problem whose goal is to find a sequence of words that best matches an input speech signal. Since this process becomes computationally more expensive as the system vocabulary size increases, research has long been devoted to reducing the computational cost. Recently, the WFST approach has become an important state-of-the-art speech recogni

  4. Vi-XFST : a visual interface for xerox finite-state toolkit

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Yasin; Yilmaz, Yasin

    2003-01-01

    This thesis presents a management model and integrated development environment software for finite-state network projects using Xerox Finite-State Toolkit (XFST). XFST is a popular command line tool to construct finite-states networks, used in natural language processing research. However, XFST lacks various sophisticated management features to help the development phase of large projects where there are hundreds of finite-state definitions. In this thesis, we introduce a new approach to XFST...

  5. Reachability for Finite-state Process Algebras Using Horn Clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrypnyuk, Nataliya; Nielson, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an algorithm for solving the reachability problem in finite systems that are modelled with process algebras. Our method is based on Static Analysis, in particular, Data Flow Analysis, of the syntax of a process algebraic system with multi-way synchronisation. The results...... of the Data Flow Analysis are used in order to build a set of Horn clauses whose least model corresponds to an overapproximation of the reachable states. The computed model can be refined after each transition, and the algorithm runs until either a state whose reachability should be checked is encountered...... or it is not in the least model for all constructed states and thus is definitely unreachable. The advantages of the algorithm are that in many cases only a part of the Labelled Transition System will be built which leads to lower time and memory consumption. Also, it is not necessary to save all the encountered states...

  6. Logic synthesis for FPGA-based finite state machines

    CERN Document Server

    Barkalov, Alexander; Kolopienczyk, Malgorzata; Mielcarek, Kamil; Bazydlo, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses control units represented by the model of a finite state machine (FSM). It contains various original methods and takes into account the peculiarities of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) chips and a FSM model. It shows that one of the peculiarities of FPGA chips is the existence of embedded memory blocks (EMB). The book is devoted to the solution of problems of logic synthesis and reduction of hardware amount in control units. The book will be interesting and useful for researchers and PhD students in the area of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, as well as for designers of modern digital systems.

  7. Dynamic and Quantitative Method of Analyzing Service Consistency Evolution Based on Extended Hierarchical Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA. Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service’s evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA, which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12% is the second biggest one, and the service version’s confusion (1.2% is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  8. Dynamic and quantitative method of analyzing service consistency evolution based on extended hierarchical finite state automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linjun; Tang, Jun; Ling, Yunxiang; Li, Benxian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA). Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service's evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA) is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA), which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs) based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average) is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12%) is the second biggest one, and the service version's confusion (1.2%) is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  9. Finite state machine logic synthesis for complex programmable logic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Czerwinski, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This book is a monograph devoted to logic synthesis and optimization for CPLDs. CPLDs' macrocell can also be interpreted as programmable AND-fixed OR structure, well known as PAL-based structure. The question is: what should be done when the number of implicants representing function exceeds the number of product terms available in a logic block. The answer is ... in the book. Logic synthesis and optimization methods dedicated for PAL-based structures are proposed. The methods strive to find the optimum fit for the combinational logic and finite state machines to the structure of the logic device and aim at area and speed optimization. The theoretical background and complete strategies are richly illustrated with examples and figures.

  10. The intersection of Finite State Automata and Definite Clause Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Van Noord, G

    1995-01-01

    Bernard Lang defines parsing as the calculation of the intersection of a FSA (the input) and a CFG. Viewing the input for parsing as a FSA rather than as a string combines well with some approaches in speech understanding systems, in which parsing takes a word lattice as input (rather than a word string). Furthermore, certain techniques for robust parsing can be modelled as finite state transducers. In this paper we investigate how we can generalize this approach for unification grammars. In particular we will concentrate on how we might the calculation of the intersection of a FSA and a DCG. It is shown that existing parsing algorithms can be easily extended for FSA inputs. However, we also show that the termination properties change drastically: we show that it is undecidable whether the intersection of a FSA and a DCG is empty (even if the DCG is off-line parsable). Furthermore we discuss approaches to cope with the problem.

  11. Language Model Combination and Adaptation Using Weighted Finite State Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Gales, M. J. F.; Hieronymus, J. L.; Woodland, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In speech recognition systems language model (LMs) are often constructed by training and combining multiple n-gram models. They can be either used to represent different genres or tasks found in diverse text sources, or capture stochastic properties of different linguistic symbol sequences, for example, syllables and words. Unsupervised LM adaption may also be used to further improve robustness to varying styles or tasks. When using these techniques, extensive software changes are often required. In this paper an alternative and more general approach based on weighted finite state transducers (WFSTs) is investigated for LM combination and adaptation. As it is entirely based on well-defined WFST operations, minimum change to decoding tools is needed. A wide range of LM combination configurations can be flexibly supported. An efficient on-the-fly WFST decoding algorithm is also proposed. Significant error rate gains of 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art broadcast audio recognition task using a history dependently adapted multi-level LM modelling both syllable and word sequences

  12. A finite state, finite memory minimum principle, part 2. [a discussion of game theory, signaling, stochastic processes, and control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the theory of the finite - state, finite - memory (FSFM) stochastic control problem is discussed. The sufficiency of the FSFM minimum principle (which is in general only a necessary condition) was investigated. By introducing the notion of a signaling strategy as defined in the literature on games, conditions under which the FSFM minimum principle is sufficient were determined. This result explicitly interconnects the information structure of the FSFM problem with its optimality conditions. The min-H algorithm for the FSFM problem was studied. It is demonstrated that a version of the algorithm always converges to a particular type of local minimum termed a person - by - person extremal.

  13. A Compact Representation of Pronunciation Lexicons Using Finite-state Super Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Golob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer models based on finite-state transducers are well suited for compact representations of pronunciation lexicons that are used both in speech synthesis as well as in speech recognition. In this paper, we present a finite-state super transducer, which is a new type of finite state transducer that allows the representation of a pronunciation lexicon with fewer states and transitions than using a conventional minimized and determinized finite-state transducer. A finite-state super transducer is a deterministic transducer that can, in addition to the words comprised in the pronunciation lexicon, accept some other, out-of-dictionary words as well. The resulting allophone transcription for these words can be erroneous, but we demonstrate that such errors are comparable to the performance of state-of-the-art methods for grapheme-to-phoneme conversion. The procedure for building finite-state super transducers and a validation of their performance is demonstrated on the SI-PRON pronunciation lexicon. In addition, we also analyze several properties of finite-state transducers with respect to their minimum size obtained by their determinization and minimization. We show that for highly inflected languages their minimum size begins to decrease when the number of words in the represented pronunciation dictionary reaches a certain threshold.

  14. A two-step iterative method for evolving nonlinear acoustic systems to a steady-state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1990-01-01

    A new approach for evolving two-dimensional nonlinear acoustic systems with flow to a steady state is presented. The approach is a two-step iterative method which is tested on a benchmark acoustic problem for which an exact analytical solution is available. Results are also calculated for a nonlinear acoustic problem for which an exact analytical solution is not known. Results indicate that the two-step method represents a powerful, efficient, and stable method for evolving two-dimensional acoustic systems to a steady state, and that the method is applicable to any number of spatial dimensions and to other hyperbolic systems. It is noted that for the benchmark problem only a single iteration on the method is required when the transient and steady-state field are of the same order of magnitude; however, four iterations are required when the steady-state field is several orders of magnitude smaller than the transient field. This method requires six iterations before achieving a steady state for the nonlinear test problem.

  15. Discrete coherent states and probability distributions in finite-dimensional spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galetti, D.; Marchiolli, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    Operator bases are discussed in connection with the construction of phase space representatives of operators in finite-dimensional spaces and their properties are presented. It is also shown how these operator bases allow for the construction of a finite harmonic oscillator-like coherent state. Creation and annihilation operators for the Fock finite-dimensional space are discussed and their expressions in terms of the operator bases are explicitly written. The relevant finite-dimensional probability distributions are obtained and their limiting behavior for an infinite-dimensional space are calculated which agree with the well know results. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs.

  16. Using a satisfiability solver to identify deterministic finite state automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heule, M.J.H.; Verwer, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present an exact algorithm for identification of deterministic finite automata (DFA) which is based on satisfiability (SAT) solvers. Despite the size of the low level SAT representation, our approach seems to be competitive with alternative techniques. Our contributions are threefold: First, we

  17. An analytical description of balanced steady-state free precession with finite radio-frequency excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Oliver

    2011-02-01

    Conceptually, the only flaw in the standard steady-state free precession theory is the assumption of quasi-instantaneous radio-frequency pulses, and 10-20% signal deviations from theory are observed for common balanced steady-state free precession protocols. This discrepancy in the steady-state signal can be resolved by a simple T(2) substitution taking into account reduced transverse relaxation effects during finite radio-frequency excitation. However, finite radio-frequency effects may also affect the transient phase of balanced steady-state free precession, its contrast or its spin-echo nature and thereby have an adverse effect on common steady-state free precession magnetization preparation methods. As a result, an in-depth understanding of finite radio-frequency effects is not only of fundamental theoretical interest but also has direct practical implications. In this article, an analytical solution for balanced steady-state free precession with finite radio-frequency pulses is derived for the transient phase (under ideal conditions) and in the steady state demonstrating that balanced steady-state free precession key features are preserved but revealing an unexpected dependency of finite radio-frequency effects on relaxation times for the transient decay. Finally, the mathematical framework reveals that finite radio-frequency theory can be understood as a generalization of alternating repetition time and fluctuating equilibrium steady-state free precession sequence schemes. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  19. Underlying finite state machine for the social engineering attack detection model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, Francois

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available definitions, attack frameworks, examples of attacks and detection models. In order to formally address social engineering in a broad context, this paper proposes the underlying finite state machine of the Social Engineering Attack Detection Model (SEADM...

  20. Comparison of construction algorithms for minimal, acyclic, deterministic, finite-state automata from sets of strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J; Champarnaud, JM; Maurel, D

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares various methods for constructing minimal, deterministic, acyclic, finite-state automata (recognizers) from sets of words. Incremental, semi-incremental, and non-incremental methods have been implemented and evaluated.

  1. Finite element modelling of creep process - steady state stresses and strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element modelling of steady state creep process has been described. Using an analogy of visco-plastic problem with a described procedure, the finite element method has been used to calculate steady state stresses and strains in 2D problems. An example of application of such a procedure have been presented, using real life problem - cylindrical pipe with longitudinal crack at high temperature, under internal pressure, and estimating its residual life, based on the C*integral evaluation.

  2. Application of steady state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable area duct: A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound propagation without flow in a rectangular duct with a converging-diverging area variation was studied experimentally and theoretically. The area variation was of sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections and induce modal scattering. The rms (root-mean-squared) pressure and phase angle on both the flat and curved surface were measured and tabulated. The steady state finite element theory and the transient finite difference theory are in good agreement with the data. It is concluded that numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large area variations.

  3. Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Stability of Finite State Markov Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Stachurski, John

    2006-01-01

    This note considers finite state Markov chains which overlap supports. While the overlapping supports condition is known to be necessary and sufficient for stability of these chains, the result is typically presented in a more general context. As such, one objective of the note is to provide an exposition, along with simple proofs corresponding to the finite case. Second, the note provides an additional equivalent condition which should be useful in applications.

  4. Extreme fluctuations and the finite lifetime of the turbulent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Gioia, Gustavo

    2010-03-01

    We argue that the transition to turbulence is controlled by large amplitude events that follow extreme distribution theory. The theory suggests an explanation for recent observations of the turbulent state lifetime which exhibit superexponential scaling behavior with Reynolds number.

  5. Approximating Context-Free Grammars with a Finite-State Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Grimley-Evans, E

    1997-01-01

    Although adequate models of human language for syntactic analysis and semantic interpretation are of at least context-free complexity, for applications such as speech processing in which speed is important finite-state models are often preferred. These requirements may be reconciled by using the more complex grammar to automatically derive a finite-state approximation which can then be used as a filter to guide speech recognition or to reject many hypotheses at an early stage of processing. A method is presented here for calculating such finite-state approximations from context-free grammars. It is essentially different from the algorithm introduced by Pereira and Wright (1991; 1996), is faster in some cases, and has the advantage of being open-ended and adaptable.

  6. Reachability for Finite-State Process Algebras Using Static Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrypnyuk, Nataliya; Nielson, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    of the Data Flow Analysis are used in order to “cut off” some of the branches in the reachability analysis that are not important for determining, whether or not a state is reachable. In this way, it is possible for our reachability algorithm to avoid building large parts of the system altogether and still...

  7. On the convergence of finite state mean-field games through Γ-convergence

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we consider the long-term convergence (trend toward an equilibrium) of finite state mean-field games using Γ-convergence. Our techniques are based on the observation that an important class of mean-field games can be viewed as the Euler-Lagrange equation of a suitable functional. Therefore, using a scaling argument, one can convert a long-term convergence problem into a Γ-convergence problem. Our results generalize previous results related to long-term convergence for finite state problems. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Natural language processing and the Mohawk language:creating a finite state morphological parser of Mohawk formal nouns

    OpenAIRE

    Assini, Alicia Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Presented in this thesis is the design, implementation and evaluation of a finite state morphological parser for Mohawk formal nouns. Utilizing the finite state morphology software designed by Beesely and Karttunen (2003) along with three of the most comprehensive grammars for Mohawk, one from each of the major dialectal regions, a lexicon for a finite state system was created that incorporated a structure I created from cross-referencing the three sources. Since there wa...

  9. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-28

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  10. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-01

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  11. Electronic states in crystals of finite size quantum confinement of bloch waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Shang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an analytical theory of the electronic states in ideal low dimensional systems and finite crystals based on a differential equation theory approach. It provides precise and fundamental understandings on the electronic states in ideal low-dimensional systems and finite crystals, and offers new insights into some of the basic problems in low-dimensional systems, such as the surface states and quantum confinement effects, etc., some of which are quite different from what is traditionally believed in the solid state physics community. Many previous predictions have been confirmed in subsequent investigations by other authors on various relevant problems. In this new edition, the theory is further extended to one-dimensional photonic crystals and phononic crystals, and a general theoretical formalism for investigating the existence and properties of surface states/modes in semi-infinite one-dimensional crystals is developed. In addition, there are various revisions and improvements, including us...

  12. Density of states in d-wave superconductors of finite size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fominov, Ya. V.; Fominov, I.V.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2004-01-01

    We consider the effect of the finite size in the ab plane on the surface density of states (DOS) in clean d-wave superconductors. We demonstrate that the angle-resolved DOS consists of energy bands that are formed similarly to the Kronig-Penney model. In contrast to the gapless DOS on a surface of a

  13. Finite temperature quantum correlations in su(2)(c) quark states and quantum spin models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamieh, S; Tawfik, A

    The entanglement at finite temperatures is analyzed by using thermal models for colored quarks making tip the hadron physical states. We have found that these quantum correlations entirely vanish at T-c >= m(q)/ln(1.5). For temperatures larger than T-c the correlations are classical. We have also

  14. A finite state and data-oriented method for grapheme to phoneme conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, G.

    2000-01-01

    A finite-state method, based on leftmost longest-match replacement, is presented for segmenting words into graphemes, and for converting graphemes into phonemes. A small set of hand-crafted conversion rules for Dutch achieves a phoneme accuracy of over 93%. The accuracy of the system is further

  15. The Boundary between Finite and Infinite States through the Concept of Limits of Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahmand, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this article, attempts were made to examine students' thinking about the concepts of infinity and their ideas about transiting from finite to infinite states through the concept of limits of sequences. The participants included 78 senior high-school students ranging in age between 17 and 19 years old. The data were collected through a…

  16. Metastable States, Relaxation Times and Free-energy Barriers in Finite Dimensional Glassy Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Silvio

    2005-01-01

    In this note we discuss metastability in a long-but-finite range disordered model for the glass transition. We show that relaxation is dominated by configuration belonging to metastable states and associate an in principle computable free-energy barrier to the equilibrium relaxation time. Adam-Gibbs like relaxation times appear naturally in this approach.

  17. Equation of State at Finite Density from Imaginary Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Takaishi, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    We perform two flavor QCD simulations with an imaginary chemical potential and measure derivatives of the pressure up to 4th order as a function of the imaginary chemical potential and the temperature $T \\in [0.83 T_c, 2 T_c]$. For temperatures $T \\geq T_c$, these derivatives are fitted by a Taylor series in $\\mu/T$ about $\\mu=0$. A fit limited to 4th order describes the data poorly at all temperatures, showing that we are sensitive to 6th order contributions. Similarly, a 6th order fit fails for temperatures $T_c \\leq T \\leq 1.05 T_c$, showing the need for 8th order terms. Thus, our method may offer a computational advantage over the direct measurement of Taylor coefficients at $\\mu=0$. At temperatures $T \\leq T_c$, we fit our data with a hadron resonance gas ansatz. The fit starts to fail at $T \\gtrsim 0.95 T_c$. Using our fits, we also reconstruct the equation of state as a function of real quark and isospin chemical potentials.

  18. Finding the Minimal DFA of Very Large Finite State Automata with an Application to Token Passing Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Slavici, Vlad; Kunkle, Daniel; Cooperman, Gene; Linton, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Finite state automata (FSA) are ubiquitous in computer science. Two of the most important algorithms for FSA processing are the conversion of a non-deterministic finite automaton (NFA) to a deterministic finite automaton (DFA), and then the production of the unique minimal DFA for the original NFA. We exhibit a parallel disk-based algorithm that uses a cluster of 29 commodity computers to produce an intermediate DFA with almost two billion states and then continues by producing the correspond...

  19. Some properties of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks with finite time of transition between states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimenov, Ibragim; Mun, Grigoriy; Panchenko, Sergey; Pak, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    There were implemented samples of asymmetric Hopfield neural networks which have finite time of transition from one state to another. It was shown that in such systems, various oscillation modes could occur. It was revealed that the oscillation of the output signal of certain neuron could be treated as extra logical variable, which describes the state of the neuron. Asymmetric Hopfield neural networks are described in terms of ternary logic. Such logic may be employed in image recognition procedure.

  20. Application of 'steady' state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable duct - A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for sound propagation in a simulated infinite hard wall duct with a large change in duct cross sectional area. The data are conveniently tabulated for further use. The 'steady' state finite element theory of Astley and Eversman (1981) and the transient finite difference theory of White (1981) are in good agreement with the data for both the axial and transverse pressure profiles and the axial phase angle. Therefore, numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear to be ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large axial gradients in acoustic parameters. The measured energy reflection coefficient agrees with the values from the Astley-Eversman modal coupling model.

  1. Finite number of states, de Sitter space and quantum groups at roots of unity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouliot, Philippe [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-07

    This paper explores the use of a deformation by a root of unity as a tool to build models with a finite number of states for applications to quantum gravity. The initial motivation for this work was cosmological breaking of supersymmetry. We explain why the project was unsuccessful. What is left are some observations on supersymmetry for q-bosons, an analogy between black holes in de Sitter and properties of quantum groups, and an observation on a noncommutative quantum mechanics model with two degrees of freedom, depending on one parameter. When this parameter is positive, the spectrum has a finite number of states; when it is negative or zero, the spectrum has an infinite number of states. This exhibits a desirable feature of quantum physics in de Sitter space, albeit in a very simple, non-gravitational context.

  2. Finite-element analysis of elastic sound-proof coupling thermal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyss, V. G.; Strokov, I. M.; Sergaeva, M. Yu

    2018-01-01

    The aim is in calculated determining of the elastic rubber-metal element thermal state of soundproof coupling ship shafting under variable influence during loads in time. Thermal coupling calculation is performed with finite element method using NX Simens software with Nastran solver. As a result of studies, the following results were obtained: - a volumetric picture of the temperature distribution over the array of the deformed coupling body is obtained; - time to reach steady-state thermal coupling mode has been determined; - dependences of maximum temperature and time to reach state on the established operation mode on rotation frequency and ambient temperature are determined. The findings prove the conclusion that usage of finite element analysis modern software can significantly speed up problem solving.

  3. First Passage Moments of Finite-State Semi-Markov Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warr, Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cordeiro, James [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In this paper, we discuss the computation of first-passage moments of a regular time-homogeneous semi-Markov process (SMP) with a finite state space to certain of its states that possess the property of universal accessibility (UA). A UA state is one which is accessible from any other state of the SMP, but which may or may not connect back to one or more other states. An important characteristic of UA is that it is the state-level version of the oft-invoked process-level property of irreducibility. We adapt existing results for irreducible SMPs to the derivation of an analytical matrix expression for the first passage moments to a single UA state of the SMP. In addition, consistent point estimators for these first passage moments, together with relevant R code, are provided.

  4. Shannon information entropy in position space for doubly excited states of helium with finite confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jen-Hao; Ho, Yew Kam

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying electron localization in quantum confined systems remains challenging, especially for excited states. A quantum dot (QD) is represented by a helium atom in a finite oscillator potential. The effect of dot width variation on the electron localization in QD is systematically examined via Shannon entropy for low-lying doubly excited states (2s21Se, 2p21Se, 2s3s 1Se) obtained using highly correlated Hylleraas functions. In particular, the most effective dot width where the electron density is the most localized is determined successfully and justified by the electron density plot for all three states.

  5. Error-tolerant Finite State Recognition with Applications to Morphological Analysis and Spelling Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Oflazer, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Error-tolerant recognition enables the recognition of strings that deviate mildly from any string in the regular set recognized by the underlying finite state recognizer. Such recognition has applications in error-tolerant morphological processing, spelling correction, and approximate string matching in information retrieval. After a description of the concepts and algorithms involved, we give examples from two applications: In the context of morphological analysis, error-tolerant recognition...

  6. An analysis of the temperature distribution in finite solid-state laser rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrukh, U.O. (Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA 23668 (US)); Buoncristiani, A.M.; Byvik, C.E. (NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23665 (US))

    1988-11-01

    An expression for the time-dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid-state laser rod, for an arbitrary distribution of pump energy, has been derived. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beams is included. This formulation was employed to predict the time evolution of temperature in Ti:sapphire laser rods and in Nd:YAG rods of specific dimensions.

  7. An analysis of the temperature distribution in finite solid-state laser rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An expression for the time-dependent temperature distribution in a finite solid-state laser rod, for an arbitrary distribution of pump energy, has been derived. The specific case of end pumping by circular (constant) or Gaussian beams is included. This formulation was used to predict the time evolution of temperature in Ti:sapphire laser rods and in Nd:YAG rods of specific dimensions.

  8. Designing stable finite state machine behaviors using phase plane analysis and variable structure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1998-03-10

    This paper discusses how phase plane analysis can be used to describe the overall behavior of single and multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that one can begin to design provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with decentralized variable structure control. The ability to prove asymptotically stable group behavior is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  9. Improving Finite-State Spell-Checker Suggestions with Part of Speech N-Grams

    OpenAIRE

    Pirinen, Tommi; Silfverberg, Miikka; Linden, Krister

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a finite-state implementation of context-aware spell checking utilizing an N-gram based part of speech (POS) tagger to rerank the suggestions from a simple edit-distance based spell-checker. We demonstrate the benefits of context-aware spell-checking for English and Finnish and introduce modifications that are necessary to make traditional N-gram models work for morphologically more complex languages, such as Finnish.

  10. DESIGNING A FINITE STATE MACHINE SIMULATOR TO DETECT LOOPS FOR ALICE DETECTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Yogatama, Bobbi Winema

    2017-01-01

    This paper present the design and implementation of a Finite State Machine simulator to provoke loops in ALICE Detector Control System (DCS). Loops in a Finite State Machine can be very harmful for the control system and need to be prevented. One way to prevent loops is to simulate the designed Finite State Machine using a simulator that can detect all of the possible conditions that can provoke loops. Further correction can then be made after the loops are detected in the control system. The proposed simulator is able to get the structure of any unknown FSM, get every datapoint elements that are associated with the FSM, and find every possible datapoint combinations that can provoke loops in the FSM. At the end of the project, we tested the simulator on a sample FSM with loops and a real FSM that belongs to the ALICE PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS). The testing results indicate that the simulator is able to detect every possible condition that can cause loops in the FSM.

  11. A finite state projection algorithm for the stationary solution of the chemical master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Mikelson, Jan; Khammash, Mustafa

    2017-10-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) is frequently used in systems biology to quantify the effects of stochastic fluctuations that arise due to biomolecular species with low copy numbers. The CME is a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the evolution of probability density for each population vector in the state-space of the stochastic reaction dynamics. For many examples of interest, this state-space is infinite, making it difficult to obtain exact solutions of the CME. To deal with this problem, the Finite State Projection (FSP) algorithm was developed by Munsky and Khammash [J. Chem. Phys. 124(4), 044104 (2006)], to provide approximate solutions to the CME by truncating the state-space. The FSP works well for finite time-periods but it cannot be used for estimating the stationary solutions of CMEs, which are often of interest in systems biology. The aim of this paper is to develop a version of FSP which we refer to as the stationary FSP (sFSP) that allows one to obtain accurate approximations of the stationary solutions of a CME by solving a finite linear-algebraic system that yields the stationary distribution of a continuous-time Markov chain over the truncated state-space. We derive bounds for the approximation error incurred by sFSP and we establish that under certain stability conditions, these errors can be made arbitrarily small by appropriately expanding the truncated state-space. We provide several examples to illustrate our sFSP method and demonstrate its efficiency in estimating the stationary distributions. In particular, we show that using a quantized tensor-train implementation of our sFSP method, problems admitting more than 100 × 106 states can be efficiently solved.

  12. Finite Divergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Edberg; Pandya, P. K.; Chaochen, Zhou

    1995-01-01

    Real-time and hybrid systems have been studied so far under the assumption of finite variability. In this paper, we consider models in which systems exhibiting finite divergence can also be analysed. In such systems, the state of the system can change infinitely often in a finite time. This kind...... of behaviour arises in many representations of hybrid systems, and also in theories of nonlinear systems. The aim is to provide a theory where pathological behaviour such as finite divergence can be analysed-if only to prove that it does not occur in systems of interest. Finite divergence is studied using...

  13. State and urban area homeland security strategy v3.0 : evolving strategic planning

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Darren

    2006-01-01

    CHDS State/Local This thesis proposes to overhaul the state and urban area homeland security strategy program by improving the strategic planning process, guidance and assistance, and strategy review in collaboration with state and local stakeholders. Federal, state, and local reviewers regard the current state and urban homeland security strategies as generally inadequate and indicative of limited strategic planning processes. Comprehensive, enterprise-wide homeland security strategie...

  14. On controlling the electronic states of shallow donors using a finite-size metal gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchuk, E. A., E-mail: liauchuk@bsu.by; Makarenko, L. F. [Belarusian State University (Belarus)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of an external electric field on the states of a shallow donor near a semiconductor surface is numerically simulated. A disk-shaped metal gate is considered as an electric-field source. The wavefunctions and energies of bound states are determined by the finite-element method. The critical characteristics of electron relocation between the donor and gate are determined for various gate diameters and boundary conditions, taking into account dielectric mismatch. The empirical dependences of these characteristics on the geometrical parameters and semiconductor properties are obtained. A simple trial function is proposed, which can be used to calculate the critical parameters using the Ritz variational method.

  15. Relations between work and entropy production for general information-driven, finite-state engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhav, Neri

    2017-02-01

    We consider a system model of a general finite-state machine (ratchet) that simultaneously interacts with three kinds of reservoirs: a heat reservoir, a work reservoir, and an information reservoir, the latter being taken to be a running digital tape whose symbols interact sequentially with the machine. As has been shown in earlier work, this finite-state machine can act as a demon (with memory), which creates a net flow of energy from the heat reservoir into the work reservoir (thus extracting useful work) at the price of increasing the entropy of the information reservoir. Under very few assumptions, we propose a simple derivation of a family of inequalities that relate the work extraction with the entropy production. These inequalities can be seen as either upper bounds on the extractable work or as lower bounds on the entropy production, depending on the point of view. Many of these bounds are relatively easy to calculate and they are tight in the sense that equality can be approached arbitrarily closely. In their basic forms, these inequalities are applicable to any finite number of cycles (and not only asymptotically), and for a general input information sequence (possibly correlated), which is not necessarily assumed even stationary. Several known results are obtained as special cases.

  16. Finite-State Mean-Field Games, Crowd Motion Problems, and its Numerical Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Machado Velho, Roberto

    2017-09-10

    In this dissertation, we present two research projects, namely finite-state mean-field games and the Hughes model for the motion of crowds. In the first part, we describe finite-state mean-field games and some applications to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community and the consumer choice behavior in a free market. The corresponding finite-state mean-field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we propose and validate a new numerical method. Next, we consider the dual formulation to two-state mean-field games, and we discuss numerical methods for these problems. We then depict different computational experiments, exhibiting a variety of behaviors, including shock formation, lack of invertibility, and monotonicity loss. We conclude the first part of this dissertation with an investigation of the shock structure for two-state problems. In the second part, we consider a model for the movement of crowds proposed by R. Hughes in [56] and describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an Eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. We first establish a priori estimates for the solutions. Next, we consider radial solutions, and we identify a shock formation mechanism. Subsequently, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. We also propose a new numerical method for the solution of Fokker-Planck equations and then to systems of PDEs composed by a Fokker-Planck equation and a potential type equation. Finally, we illustrate the use of the numerical method both to the Hughes model and mean-field games. We also depict cases such as the evacuation of a room and the movement of persons around Kaaba (Saudi Arabia).

  17. Finite-time quantum-to-classical transition for a Schrödinger-cat state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Janika; Hall, Michael J. W.; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2011-07-01

    The transition from quantum to classical, in the case of a quantum harmonic oscillator, is typically identified with the transition from a quantum superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states, such as the Schrödinger-cat state, into the corresponding statistical mixture. This transition is commonly characterized by the asymptotic loss of the interference term in the Wigner representation of the cat state. In this paper we show that the quantum-to-classical transition has different dynamical features depending on the measure for nonclassicality used. Measures based on an operatorial definition have well-defined physical meaning and allow a deeper understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition. Our analysis shows that, for most nonclassicality measures, the Schrödinger-cat state becomes classical after a finite time. Moreover, our results challenge the prevailing idea that more macroscopic states are more susceptible to decoherence in the sense that the transition from quantum to classical occurs faster. Since nonclassicality is a prerequisite for entanglement generation our results also bridge the gap between decoherence, which is lost only asymptotically, and entanglement, which may show a “sudden death.” In fact, whereas the loss of coherences still remains asymptotic, we emphasize that the transition from quantum to classical can indeed occur at a finite time.

  18. Properties of ground states of atomic nuclei in self-consistent theory of finite fermi-system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapershtejn, Eh.E.; Khodel' , V.A. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1983-05-01

    Ground states of atomic nuclei are described within the framework of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems. The developed approach is compared with the Hartree-Fock method with effective forces.

  19. State and Urban Area Homeland Security Strategy v3.0: Evolving Strategic Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Darren

    2006-01-01

    This thesis proposes to overhaul the state and urban area homeland security strategy program by improving the strategic planning process guidance and assistance and strategy review in collaboration...

  20. An Elgamal Encryption Scheme of Fibonacci Q-Matrix and Finite State Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravi Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is the science of writing messages in unknown form using mathematical models. In Cryptography, several ciphers were introduced for the encryption schemes. Recent research focusing on designing various mathematical models in such a way that tracing the inverse of the designed mathematical models is infeasible for the eve droppers. In the present work, the ELGamal encryption scheme is executed using the generator of a cyclic group formed by the points on choosing elliptic curve, finite state machines and key matrices obtained from the Fibonacci sequences.

  1. The Capacity of Finite-State Channels in the High-Noise Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Pfister, Henry D

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the derivative of the entropy rate of a hidden Markov process with respect to the observation probabilities. The main result is a compact formula for the derivative that can be evaluated easily using Monte Carlo methods. It is applied to the problem of computing the capacity of a finite-state channel (FSC) and, in the high-noise regime, the formula has a simple closed-form expression that enables series expansion of the capacity of a FSC. This expansion is evaluated for a binary-symmetric channel under a (0,1) run-length limited constraint and an intersymbol-interference channel with Gaussian noise.

  2. Monotone numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-04-29

    Here, we develop numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games (MFGs) that satisfy a monotonicity condition. MFGs are determined by a system of differential equations with initial and terminal boundary conditions. These non-standard conditions are the main difficulty in the numerical approximation of solutions. Using the monotonicity condition, we build a flow that is a contraction and whose fixed points solve the MFG, both for stationary and time-dependent problems. We illustrate our methods in a MFG modeling the paradigm-shift problem.

  3. Ket-Bra entangled state method for solving master equation of finite-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi-Chong; Wang, Shu; Fan, Hong-Yi; Chen, Feng

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we first introduce Ket-Bra entangled state method to solve master equation of finite-level system, which can convert master equation into Schrödinger-like equation and solve it with the mature methodology of Schrödinger equation. Then, several physical models include a radioactivity damped 2-level atom driven by classical field, a J- C model with cavity damping, a V-type qutrit under amplitude damping and N-qubits open Heisenberg chain have been solved with KBES method. Furthermore, the dynamic evolution and decoherence process of these models are investigated.

  4. The application of finite state machine in modeling and control of gene mutation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Hu, Wensong; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2013-12-01

    This paper extends our previous study on discrete events system formulations of DNA hybridization, and focuses discussions on metabolism and gene mutation in molecular biology. Finite state machine (FSM) theory is extensively applied to represent key concepts and analyzes the processes related to the biological phenomena mentioned above. The goal is to mathematically represent and interpret the process of gene mutation and the effects on structures of protein macro molecule caused by gene mutation. We hope the proposed model will provide a foothold for introducing the information science and the control theory tools in molecular biology.

  5. A General Finite Element Scheme for Limit State Analysis and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Limit State analysis which is based on a perfect material behaviour is used in many different applications primarily within Structural Engineering and Geotechnics. The calculation methods have not reached the same level of automation such as Finite Element Analysis for elastic structures. The com......Limit State analysis which is based on a perfect material behaviour is used in many different applications primarily within Structural Engineering and Geotechnics. The calculation methods have not reached the same level of automation such as Finite Element Analysis for elastic structures...... for elastic analysis. In this way the user is able to perform a limit state analysis on the same model used for elastic analysis only adding data for the yield surface.The method is based on the lower-bound theorem and uses stress-based elements with a linearized yield surface. The mathematical problem...... is an optimization problem a so-called Linear Programming problem. The optimization gives the optimal stress distribution and through the primal-dual concept a collapse mode can be determined. The formulation can also be used for material optimization which can be used in connection with reinforcement of plates...

  6. Macroscopic description of complex adaptive networks co-evolving with dynamic node states

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedermann, Marc; Heitzig, Jobst; Lucht, Wolfgang; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    In many real-world complex systems, the time-evolution of the network's structure and the dynamic state of its nodes are closely entangled. Here, we study opinion formation and imitation on an adaptive complex network which is dependent on the individual dynamic state of each node and vice versa to model the co-evolution of renewable resources with the dynamics of harvesting agents on a social network. The adaptive voter model is coupled to a set of identical logistic growth models and we show that in such systems, the rate of interactions between nodes as well as the adaptive rewiring probability play a crucial role for the sustainability of the system's equilibrium state. We derive a macroscopic description of the system which provides a general framework to model and quantify the influence of single node dynamics on the macroscopic state of the network and is applicable to many fields of study, such as epidemic spreading or social modeling.

  7. Oxidation states of the manganese cluster during the flash-induced S-state cycle of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Roelofs, T A; Liang, W.; M. J. Latimer; Cinco, R M; Rompel, A; Andrews, J. C.; Sauer, K.; Yachandra, V. K.; Klein, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Mn K-edge x-ray absorption spectra for the pure S states of the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II during flash-induced S-state cycling have been determined. The relative S-state populations in samples given 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 flashes were determined from fitting the flash-induced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) multiline signal oscillation pattern to the Kok model. The edge spectra of samples given 0, 1, 2, or 3 flashes were combined with EPR ...

  8. Data Structure Analysis to Represent Basic Models of Finite State Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gurenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex system engineering based on the automaton models requires a reasoned data structure selection to implement them. The problem of automaton representation and data structure selection to be used in it has been understudied. Arbitrary data structure selection for automaton model software implementation leads to unnecessary computational burden and reduces the developed system efficiency. This article proposes an approach to the reasoned selection of data structures to represent finite algoristic automaton basic models and gives practical considerations based on it.Static and dynamic data structures are proposed for three main ways to assign Mealy and Moore automatons: a transition table, a matrix of coupling and a transition graph. A thirddimensional array, a rectangular matrix and a matrix of lists are the static structures. Dynamic structures are list-oriented structures: two-level and three-level Ayliff vectors and a multi-linked list. These structures allow us to store all required information about finite state automaton model components - characteristic set cardinalities and data of transition and output functions.A criterion system is proposed for data structure comparative evaluation in virtue of algorithmic features of automata theory problems. The criteria focused on capacitive and time computational complexity of operations performed in tasks such as equivalent automaton conversions, proving of automaton equivalence and isomorphism, and automaton minimization.A data structure comparative analysis based on the criterion system has done for both static and dynamic type. The analysis showed advantages of the third-dimensional array, matrix and two-level Ayliff vector. These are structures that assign automaton by transition table. For these structures an experiment was done to measure the execution time of automation operations included in criterion system.The analysis of experiment results showed that a dynamic structure - two

  9. Characteristic distribution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents for chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, André E.

    2016-01-01

    Our fascination with chimera states stems partially from the somewhat paradoxical, yet fundamental trait of identical, and identically coupled, oscillators to split into spatially separated, coherently and incoherently oscillating groups. While the list of systems for which various types of chimeras have already been detected continues to grow, there is a corresponding increase in the number of mathematical analyses aimed at elucidating the fundamental reasons for this surprising behaviour. Based on the model systems, there are strong indications that chimera states may generally be ubiquitous in naturally occurring systems containing large numbers of coupled oscillators – certain biological systems and high-Tc superconducting materials, for example. In this work we suggest a new way of detecting and characterising chimera states. Specifically, it is shown that the probability densities of finite-time Lyapunov exponents, corresponding to chimera states, have a definite characteristic shape. Such distributions could be used as signatures of chimera states, particularly in systems for which the phases of all the oscillators cannot be measured directly. For such cases, we suggest that chimera states could perhaps be detected by reconstructing the characteristic distribution via standard embedding techniques, thus making it possible to detect chimera states in systems where they could otherwise exist unnoticed. PMID:27374473

  10. An Autonomous Connectivity Restoration Algorithm Based on Finite State Machine for Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Hao, Guan

    2018-01-08

    With the development of autonomous unmanned intelligent systems, such as the unmanned boats, unmanned planes and autonomous underwater vehicles, studies on Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks (WSANs) have attracted more attention. Network connectivity algorithms play an important role in data exchange, collaborative detection and information fusion. Due to the harsh application environment, abnormal nodes often appear, and the network connectivity will be prone to be lost. Network self-healing mechanisms have become critical for these systems. In order to decrease the movement overhead of the sensor-actor nodes, an autonomous connectivity restoration algorithm based on finite state machine is proposed. The idea is to identify whether a node is a critical node by using a finite state machine, and update the connected dominating set in a timely way. If an abnormal node is a critical node, the nearest non-critical node will be relocated to replace the abnormal node. In the case of multiple node abnormality, a regional network restoration algorithm is introduced. It is designed to reduce the overhead of node movements while restoration happens. Simulation results indicate the proposed algorithm has better performance on the total moving distance and the number of total relocated nodes compared with some other representative restoration algorithms.

  11. Automatic Test Pattern Generator for Fuzzing Based on Finite State Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hung Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the Internet, several emerging technologies are adopted to construct fancy, interactive, and user-friendly websites. Among these technologies, HTML5 is a popular one and is widely used in establishing modern sites. However, the security issues in the new web technologies are also raised and are worthy of investigation. For vulnerability investigation, many previous studies used fuzzing and focused on generation-based approaches to produce test cases for fuzzing; however, these methods require a significant amount of knowledge and mental efforts to develop test patterns for generating test cases. To decrease the entry barrier of conducting fuzzing, in this study, we propose a test pattern generation algorithm based on the concept of finite state machines. We apply graph analysis techniques to extract paths from finite state machines and use these paths to construct test patterns automatically. According to the proposal, fuzzing can be completed through inputting a regular expression corresponding to the test target. To evaluate the performance of our proposal, we conduct an experiment in identifying vulnerabilities of the input attributes in HTML5. According to the results, our approach is not only efficient but also effective for identifying weak validators in HTML5.

  12. Finite-time state-dependent Riccati equation for time-varying nonaffine systems: rigid and flexible joint manipulator control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korayem, M H; Nekoo, S R

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates finite-time optimal and suboptimal controls for time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities. The state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) controller was the main framework. A finite-time constraint imposed on the equation changes it to a differential equation, known as the state-dependent differential Riccati equation (SDDRE) and this equation was applied to the problem reported in this study that provides general formulation and stability analysis. The following four solution methods were developed for solving the SDDRE; backward integration, state transition matrix (STM) and the Lyapunov based method. In the Lyapunov approach, both positive and negative definite solutions to related SDRE were used to provide suboptimal gain for the SDDRE. Finite-time suboptimal control is applied for robotic manipulator, as finite-time constraint strongly decreases state error and operation time. General state-dependent coefficient (SDC) parameterizations for rigid and flexible joint arms (prismatic or revolute joints) are introduced. By including nonlinear control inputs in the formulation, the actuator׳s limits can be inserted directly to the state-space equation of a manipulator. A finite-time SDRE was implemented on a 6R manipulator both in theory and experimentally. And a reduced 3R arm was modeled and tested as a flexible joint robot (FJR). Evaluations of load carrying capacity and operation time were investigated to assess the capability of this approach, both of which showed significant improvement. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How Hybridity has Evolved in the Governance of State-owned Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup Christensen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the evolution of the governance of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in passenger rail services. Two opposite cases are presented: one from Sweden and the other from Denmark. Using institutional change theory, the paper shows how the SOEs' hybrid character changed over time. Th....... The political responsibility for the Danish SOE expanded, while the Swedish SOE's political role was gradually reduced. The research approach is new and the results have lessons for those managing and researching SOEs....

  14. Collective phenomena and non-finite state computation in a human social system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDeo, Simon

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the computational structure of a paradigmatic example of distributed social interaction: that of the open-source Wikipedia community. We examine the statistical properties of its cooperative behavior, and perform model selection to determine whether this aspect of the system can be described by a finite-state process, or whether reference to an effectively unbounded resource allows for a more parsimonious description. We find strong evidence, in a majority of the most-edited pages, in favor of a collective-state model, where the probability of a "revert" action declines as the square root of the number of non-revert actions seen since the last revert. We provide evidence that the emergence of this social counter is driven by collective interaction effects, rather than properties of individual users.

  15. A heuristic finite-state model of the human driver in a car-following situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, G. O.; Bekey, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    An approach to modeling human driver behavior in single-lane car following which is based on a finite-state decision structure is considered. The specific strategy at each point in the decision tree was obtained from observations of typical driver behavior. The synthesis of the decision logic is based on position and velocity thresholds and four states defined by regions in the phase plane. The performance of the resulting assumed intuitively logical model was compared with actual freeway data. The match of the model to the data was optimized by adapting the model parameters using a modified PARTAN algorithm. The results indicate that the heuristic model behavior matches actual car-following performance better during deceleration and constant velocity phases than during acceleration periods.

  16. Evolving Distributed Generation Support Mechanisms: Case Studies from United States, Germany, United Kingdom, and Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowder, Travis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Ella [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tian, Tian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-14

    This report expands on a previous National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) technical report (Lowder et al. 2015) that focused on the United States' unique approach to distributed generation photovoltaics (DGPV) support policies and business models. While the focus of that report was largely historical (i.e., detailing the policies and market developments that led to the growth of DGPV in the United States), this report looks forward, narrating recent changes to laws and regulations as well as the ongoing dialogues over how to incorporate distributed generation (DG) resources onto the electric grid. This report also broadens the scope of Lowder et al. (2015) to include additional countries and technologies. DGPV and storage are the principal technologies under consideration (owing to market readiness and deployment volumes), but the report also contemplates any generation resource that is (1) on the customer side of the meter, (2) used to, at least partly, offset a host's energy consumption, and/or (3) potentially available to provide grid support (e.g., through peak shaving and load shifting, ancillary services, and other means).

  17. Parallel Representation of Value-Based and Finite State-Based Strategies in the Ventral and Dorsal Striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous theoretical studies of animal and human behavioral learning have focused on the dichotomy of the value-based strategy using action value functions to predict rewards and the model-based strategy using internal models to predict environmental states. However, animals and humans often take simple procedural behaviors, such as the "win-stay, lose-switch" strategy without explicit prediction of rewards or states. Here we consider another strategy, the finite state-based strategy, in which a subject selects an action depending on its discrete internal state and updates the state depending on the action chosen and the reward outcome. By analyzing choice behavior of rats in a free-choice task, we found that the finite state-based strategy fitted their behavioral choices more accurately than value-based and model-based strategies did. When fitted models were run autonomously with the same task, only the finite state-based strategy could reproduce the key feature of choice sequences. Analyses of neural activity recorded from the dorsolateral striatum (DLS, the dorsomedial striatum (DMS, and the ventral striatum (VS identified significant fractions of neurons in all three subareas for which activities were correlated with individual states of the finite state-based strategy. The signal of internal states at the time of choice was found in DMS, and for clusters of states was found in VS. In addition, action values and state values of the value-based strategy were encoded in DMS and VS, respectively. These results suggest that both the value-based strategy and the finite state-based strategy are implemented in the striatum.

  18. Finite Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Rogač, Luka Viktor

    2004-01-01

    In this diploma work the concept of formal language is presented, introducing the ideas related to the concept of formal language and operations over languages. Informal and formal recognition of the concept of the finite state automata is given together with the similarities and differences between deterministic and nondeterministic finite state automata. The concept of regular expression and regular language is described, enabling a transparent and shorter form at writing of the language...

  19. A Probabilistic Finite State Logic Machine Realized Experimentally on a Single Dopant Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresch, Barbara; Bocquel, Juanita; Rogge, Sven; Levine, R D; Remacle, F

    2017-03-08

    Exploiting the potential of nanoscale devices for logic processing requires the implementation of computing functionalities departing from the conventional switching paradigm. We report on the design and the experimental realization of a probabilistic finite state machine in a single phosphorus donor atom placed in a silicon matrix electrically addressed and probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The single atom logic unit simulates the flow of visitors in a maze whose topology is determined by the dynamics of the electronic transport through the states of the dopant. By considering the simplest case of a unique charge state for which three electronic states can be resolved, we demonstrate an efficient solution of the following problem: in a maze of four connected rooms, what is the optimal combination of door opening rates in order to maximize the time that visitors spend in one specific chamber? The implementation takes advantage of the stochastic nature of electron tunneling, while the output remains the macroscopic current whose reading can be realized with standard techniques and does not require single electron sensitivity.

  20. A generic finite state machine framework for the ACNET control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, L.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    A significant level of automation and flexibility has been added to the ACNET control system through the development of a Java-based Finite State Machine (FSM) infrastructure. These FSMs are integrated into ACNET and allow users to easily build, test and execute scripts that have full access to ACNET's functionality. In this paper, a description will be given of the FSM design and its ties to the Java-based Data Acquisition Engine (DAE) framework. Each FSM is part of a client-server model with FSM display clients using Remote Method Invocation (RMI) to communicate with DAE servers heavily coupled to ACNET. A web-based monitoring system that allows users to utilize browsers to observe persistent FSMs will also be discussed. Finally, some key implementations such as the crash recovery FSM developed for the Electron Cooling machine protection system will be presented.

  1. Quantum correlation properties in Matrix Product States of finite-number spin rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; He, Qi-Kai

    2018-02-01

    The organization and structure of quantum correlation (QC) of quantum spin-chains are very rich and complex. Hence the depiction and measures about the QC of finite-number spin rings deserved to be investigated intensively by using Matrix Product States(MPSs) in addition to the case with infinite-number. Here the dependencies of the geometric quantum discord(GQD) of two spin blocks on the total spin number, the spacing spin number and the environment parameter are presented in detail. We also compare the GQD with the total correlation(TC) and the classical correlation(CC) and illustrate its characteristics. Predictably, our findings may provide the potential of designing the optimal QC experimental detection proposals and pave the way for the designation of optimal quantum information processing schemes.

  2. Hidden semi-Markov Model based earthquake classification system using Weighted Finite-State Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Beyreuther

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic earthquake detection and classification is required for efficient analysis of large seismic datasets. Such techniques are particularly important now because access to measures of ground motion is nearly unlimited and the target waveforms (earthquakes are often hard to detect and classify. Here, we propose to use models from speech synthesis which extend the double stochastic models from speech recognition by integrating a more realistic duration of the target waveforms. The method, which has general applicability, is applied to earthquake detection and classification. First, we generate characteristic functions from the time-series. The Hidden semi-Markov Models are estimated from the characteristic functions and Weighted Finite-State Transducers are constructed for the classification. We test our scheme on one month of continuous seismic data, which corresponds to 370 151 classifications, showing that incorporating the time dependency explicitly in the models significantly improves the results compared to Hidden Markov Models.

  3. Hidden semi-Markov Model based earthquake classification system using Weighted Finite-State Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, M.; Wassermann, J.

    2011-02-01

    Automatic earthquake detection and classification is required for efficient analysis of large seismic datasets. Such techniques are particularly important now because access to measures of ground motion is nearly unlimited and the target waveforms (earthquakes) are often hard to detect and classify. Here, we propose to use models from speech synthesis which extend the double stochastic models from speech recognition by integrating a more realistic duration of the target waveforms. The method, which has general applicability, is applied to earthquake detection and classification. First, we generate characteristic functions from the time-series. The Hidden semi-Markov Models are estimated from the characteristic functions and Weighted Finite-State Transducers are constructed for the classification. We test our scheme on one month of continuous seismic data, which corresponds to 370 151 classifications, showing that incorporating the time dependency explicitly in the models significantly improves the results compared to Hidden Markov Models.

  4. Adaptive disturbance compensation finite control set optimal control for PMSM systems based on sliding mode extended state observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-jie; Li, Guo-fei

    2018-01-01

    Based on sliding mode extended state observer (SMESO) technique, an adaptive disturbance compensation finite control set optimal control (FCS-OC) strategy is proposed for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system driven by voltage source inverter (VSI). So as to improve robustness of finite control set optimal control strategy, a SMESO is proposed to estimate the output-effect disturbance. The estimated value is fed back to finite control set optimal controller for implementing disturbance compensation. It is indicated through theoretical analysis that the designed SMESO could converge in finite time. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed adaptive disturbance compensation FCS-OC possesses better dynamical response behavior in the presence of disturbance.

  5. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  6. The finite state projection approach to analyze dynamics of heterogeneous populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rob; Munsky, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Population modeling aims to capture and predict the dynamics of cell populations in constant or fluctuating environments. At the elementary level, population growth proceeds through sequential divisions of individual cells. Due to stochastic effects, populations of cells are inherently heterogeneous in phenotype, and some phenotypic variables have an effect on division or survival rates, as can be seen in partial drug resistance. Therefore, when modeling population dynamics where the control of growth and division is phenotype dependent, the corresponding model must take account of the underlying cellular heterogeneity. The finite state projection (FSP) approach has often been used to analyze the statistics of independent cells. Here, we extend the FSP analysis to explore the coupling of cell dynamics and biomolecule dynamics within a population. This extension allows a general framework with which to model the state occupations of a heterogeneous, isogenic population of dividing and expiring cells. The method is demonstrated with a simple model of cell-cycle progression, which we use to explore possible dynamics of drug resistance phenotypes in dividing cells. We use this method to show how stochastic single-cell behaviors affect population level efficacy of drug treatments, and we illustrate how slight modifications to treatment regimens may have dramatic effects on drug efficacy.

  7. Euler-Maclaurin Closed Form Finite State Space Model for a String Applied to Broadband Plate Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Panza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Euler-Maclaurin sun formula is applied to the infinite series Green's function solution in the space-time Laplace transform domain for the one dimensional wave equation for a string fixed at each end. The resulting approximate closed form solution is used to derive a single third order input-output ordinary differential equation to model the string dynamics. The average modal density of a plate is shown to be comparable to a string. A finite three state-space model is developed for the string and applied to the vibrations of a plate subjected to broadband random and impulse inputs. The applications include the direct problem of determining the response to a disturbance input and the inverse problem of identifying the disturbance input with a finite state observer based on the finite string model. Numerical simulations using many plate modes are obtained in the time and frequency domains and are used to compare the multimodal plate model to the finite string based model and to demonstrate how the finite string based model can be used to represent the multimodal vibrations of the plate.

  8. State-Space Modeling of Dynamic Psychological Processes via the Kalman Smoother Algorithm: Rationale, Finite Sample Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hairong; Ferrer, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a state-space modeling (SSM) technique for fitting process factor analysis models directly to raw data. The Kalman smoother via the expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood parameter estimates is used. To examine the finite sample properties of the estimates in SSM when common factors are involved, a…

  9. FSM-F: Finite State Machine Based Framework for Denial of Service and Intrusion Detection in MANET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik N Ahmed

    Full Text Available Due to the continuous advancements in wireless communication in terms of quality of communication and affordability of the technology, the application area of Mobile Adhoc Networks (MANETs significantly growing particularly in military and disaster management. Considering the sensitivity of the application areas, security in terms of detection of Denial of Service (DoS and intrusion has become prime concern in research and development in the area. The security systems suggested in the past has state recognition problem where the system is not able to accurately identify the actual state of the network nodes due to the absence of clear definition of states of the nodes. In this context, this paper proposes a framework based on Finite State Machine (FSM for denial of service and intrusion detection in MANETs. In particular, an Interruption Detection system for Adhoc On-demand Distance Vector (ID-AODV protocol is presented based on finite state machine. The packet dropping and sequence number attacks are closely investigated and detection systems for both types of attacks are designed. The major functional modules of ID-AODV includes network monitoring system, finite state machine and attack detection model. Simulations are carried out in network simulator NS-2 to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework. A comparative evaluation of the performance is also performed with the state-of-the-art techniques: RIDAN and AODV. The performance evaluations attest the benefits of proposed framework in terms of providing better security for denial of service and intrusion detection attacks.

  10. FSM-F: Finite State Machine Based Framework for Denial of Service and Intrusion Detection in MANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Ahmed, Malik; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Kaiwartya, Omprakash

    2016-01-01

    Due to the continuous advancements in wireless communication in terms of quality of communication and affordability of the technology, the application area of Mobile Adhoc Networks (MANETs) significantly growing particularly in military and disaster management. Considering the sensitivity of the application areas, security in terms of detection of Denial of Service (DoS) and intrusion has become prime concern in research and development in the area. The security systems suggested in the past has state recognition problem where the system is not able to accurately identify the actual state of the network nodes due to the absence of clear definition of states of the nodes. In this context, this paper proposes a framework based on Finite State Machine (FSM) for denial of service and intrusion detection in MANETs. In particular, an Interruption Detection system for Adhoc On-demand Distance Vector (ID-AODV) protocol is presented based on finite state machine. The packet dropping and sequence number attacks are closely investigated and detection systems for both types of attacks are designed. The major functional modules of ID-AODV includes network monitoring system, finite state machine and attack detection model. Simulations are carried out in network simulator NS-2 to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework. A comparative evaluation of the performance is also performed with the state-of-the-art techniques: RIDAN and AODV. The performance evaluations attest the benefits of proposed framework in terms of providing better security for denial of service and intrusion detection attacks.

  11. Finite-temperature time-dependent variation with multiple Davydov states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Zhao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    The Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational approach with Davydov Ansätze is a sophisticated, yet efficient technique to obtain an accurate solution to many-body Schrödinger equations for energy and charge transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates and light-harvesting complexes. We extend this variational approach to finite temperature dynamics of the spin-boson model by adopting a Monte Carlo importance sampling method. In order to demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we compare calculated real-time quantum dynamics of the spin-boson model with that from numerically exact iterative quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) technique. The comparison shows that our variational approach with the single Davydov Ansätze is in excellent agreement with the QUAPI method at high temperatures, while the two differ at low temperatures. Accuracy in dynamics calculations employing a multitude of Davydov trial states is found to improve substantially over the single Davydov Ansatz, especially at low temperatures. At a moderate computational cost, our variational approach with the multiple Davydov Ansatz is shown to provide accurate spin-boson dynamics over a wide range of temperatures and bath spectral densities.

  12. FAULT TOLERANCE FOR TWO WHEEL MOBILE ROBOT USING FSM (FINITE STATE MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Shi Jing

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fault Tolerance (FT enables system to continue operating despite in the event of failures. Therefore, FT serves as a backup component or procedure that can immediately play its role to minimize any service lost. FT exists in many forms, where it can either be in the software form or hardware form or both hardware and software form. Fault Tolerance is an umbrella term for fault detection, fault isolation, fault identification and fault solving. To better visualize the fault detection and isolation process, a two wheel robot is used in this study to represent the complex system. The aim of this research is to construct and design a Fault Tolerance algorithm considered to speed up the fault isolation procedure and it might identify multiple fault with the same static fault signature. The Finite State Machine (FSM model, a wide library of reusable model for the fault tolerant is used in this study to solve the fault in actuator or in the sensor by resetting and adjusting it to the correct position. Using the system sensors or actuators, the technique used is able to recognize the fault from its data. This FSM method is capable to avoid, replace, reset and recover any possible faults occurred in the system, offering an innovative solution to identify and solve a fault immediately.

  13. Finite Element Method Study on Stress State in Soil Induced by Agricultural Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Molnar-Irimie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In general, when a tyre is running on a deformable soil, the soil compaction will occur not only on surface layers, but also on soil profile, in deeper layers. This leads to a series of negative effects not only on physical and mechanical properties of soil, but also influences the crops growth and the crop yield. For these reasons, currently are needed solutions to reduce soil compaction, caused mainly by agricultural implements passing on the soil surface in order to aply the specific crop production technologies. From our simulation we can draw the following conclusions: the soil stresses decreased with depth; the soil displacements magnitude increased with soil water content due to lower friction forces between soil particles (water acts like a lubricant between soil particles; decreasing rate for soil displacement is influenced by load magnitude and tyre inflation pressure; the soil particles moved in vertical plain from the top to the bottom, but also in horizontal direction, from the center to the edge in cross section and in longitudinal direction; the dimensions of the geometric shape of the mentioned soil volume is influenced by load and tyre inflation pressure. In this paper the agricultural traffic and its influence on stress state in soil, it was used a software application based on Finite Element Method, that has been proved to be a useful tool for soil compaction assessment in order to find the right decisions for a proper field traffic management.

  14. Steady-state solution of the PTC thermistor problem using a quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir A. R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  15. Evolving wormhole geometries within nonlinear electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, Aaron V B [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, El Cerrillo, Piedras Blancas, CP 50200, Toluca (Mexico); Lobo, Francisco S N [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed C8 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-10-21

    In this work, we explore the possibility of evolving (2 + 1) and (3 + 1)-dimensional wormhole spacetimes, conformally related to the respective static geometries, within the context of nonlinear electrodynamics. For (3 + 1)-dimensional spacetime, it is found that the Einstein field equation imposes a contracting wormhole solution and the obedience of the weak energy condition. Nevertheless, in the presence of an electric field, the latter presents a singularity at the throat; however, for a pure magnetic field the solution is regular. For (2 + 1)-dimensional case, it is also found that the physical fields are singular at the throat. Thus, taking into account the principle of finiteness, which states that a satisfactory theory should avoid physical quantities becoming infinite, one may rule out evolving (3 + 1)-dimensional wormhole solutions, in the presence of an electric field, and (2 + 1)-dimensional case coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics.

  16. Quantum mechanical evolution operator in the presence of a scalar linear potential: discussion on the evolved state, phase shift generator and tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, F.; Safari, L.

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the form of the wave-function of a state subjected to a scalar linear potential, focusing on quantum tunneling. We analyze the phases acquired by the evolved state and show that some are of a pure quantum mechanical origin. We propose a simple experimental scenario to measure one of these phases. We apply the evolution equations to re-analyze the Stern and Gerlach experiment and to demonstrate how to manipulate spin by employing constant electric fields.

  17. Newton's method applied to finite-difference approximations for the steady-state compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Harry E.; Beam, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    Finite-difference approximations for steady-state compressible Navier-Stokes equations, whose two spatial dimensions are written in generalized curvilinear coordinates and strong conservation-law form, are presently solved by means of Newton's method in order to obtain a lifting-airfoil flow field under subsonic and transonnic conditions. In addition to ascertaining the computational requirements of an initial guess ensuring convergence and the degree of computational efficiency obtainable via the approximate Newton method's freezing of the Jacobian matrices, attention is given to the need for auxiliary methods assessing the temporal stability of steady-state solutions. It is demonstrated that nonunique solutions of the finite-difference equations are obtainable by Newton's method in conjunction with a continuation method.

  18. Estimation of State of Charge for Lithium-Ion Battery Based on Finite Difference Extended Kalman Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Ze Cheng; Jikao Lv; Yanli Liu; Zhihao Yan

    2014-01-01

    An accurate estimation of the state of charge (SOC) of the battery is of great significance for safe and efficient energy utilization of electric vehicles. Given the nonlinear dynamic system of the lithium-ion battery, the parameters of the second-order RC equivalent circuit model were calibrated and optimized using a nonlinear least squares algorithm in the Simulink parameter estimation toolbox. A comparison was made between this finite difference extended Kalman filter (FDEKF) and the stand...

  19. Non-Fermi liquids at finite temperature: Normal-state and infrared singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huajia; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2017-10-01

    We analyze quantum criticality at finite temperature for a class of non-Fermi liquids with massless bosons. Finite temperature gives rise to new infrared singularities that invalidate standard perturbative treatments. We show how such divergences are resolved at a nonperturbative level, and obtain the resulting fermion self-energy. This leads to a new "thermal" non-Fermi liquid regime that extends over a wide range of frequencies, and which violates finite temperature scaling laws near quantum critical points. We analyze the resulting quantum critical region and properties of the retarded Green's function. More generally, such effects dominate in the nearly static limit and are expected to have a nontrivial impact on superconductivity and transport.

  20. Development of a finite state machine for the automates operation of the LLRF control at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A.

    2007-07-15

    The entry of digital signal processors in modern control systems not only allows for extended diagnostics compared to analog systems but also for sophisticated and tricky extensions of the control algorithms. With modern DSP- and FPGA-technology, the processing speed of digital systems is no longer inferior to analog systems in many applications. A higher degree of digitalization leads to an increased complexity of the systems and hence to higher requirements on their operators. The focus of research and development in the field of high frequency control has changed in the last few years and moved towards the direction of software development and complexity management. In the presented thesis, a frame for an automation concept of modern high frequency control systems is developed. The developed automation is based on the concept of finite state machines (FSM), which is established in industry for years. A flexible framework was developed, in which procedures communicate using standardized interfaces and can be exchanged easily. With that, the developer of high frequency control components as well as the operator on shift shall be empowered to improve and adapt the automation to changed conditions without special programming skills required. Along the automation concept a number of algorithms addressing various problems were developed which satisfy the needs of modern high frequency control systems. Among the developed and successfully tested algorithms are the calibration of incident and reflected wave of resonators without antennas, the fast adaptive compensation of repetitive errors, the robust estimation of the phase advance in the control loop and the latency adjustment for the rejection of instabilities caused by passband modes. During the development of the resonator theory, high value was set on the usability of the equation in algorithms for high frequency control. The usage of the common nomenclature of control theory emphasizes the underlying mathematical

  1. PERANCANGAN FUNGSI RANGKAIAN LOGIKA MELALUI FINITE STATE MACHINE DENGAN MEKANISME BELAJAR DARI CONTOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudhi Purwananto

    2003-01-01

    dalam bentuk finite state machine, yang kemudian diterjemahkan menjadi fungsi logika dalam bentuk sum of product. Dari hasil uji coba yang telah dilakukan, untuk setiap contoh yang diberikan, perangkat lunak yang dikembangkan terbukti mampu membentuk minimal sebuah model dan menerjemahkannya menjadi fungsi logika. Namun demikian, tingkat kesesuaian antara model yang dihasilkan dengan yang diharapkan masih tergantung pada kelengkapan contoh yang diberikan. Selain itu, perangkat lunak ini juga mampu membedakan jenis rangkaian logika yang dihasilkan, mampu melakukan modifikasi pada model yang dihasilkan serta mampu menangani contoh-contoh yang inkonsisten.

  2. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  3. Ultimate limit state design of sheet pile walls by finite elements and nonlinear programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe....

  4. Ultimate Limit State Design Of Sheet Pile Walls By Finite Elements And Nonlinear Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe...

  5. A Pipelined Non-Deterministic Finite Automaton-Based String Matching Scheme Using Merged State Transitions in an FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyunJin; Choi, Kang-Il

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a pipelined non-deterministic finite automaton (NFA)-based string matching scheme using field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation. The characteristics of the NFA such as shared common prefixes and no failure transitions are considered in the proposed scheme. In the implementation of the automaton-based string matching using an FPGA, each state transition is implemented with a look-up table (LUT) for the combinational logic circuit between registers. In addition, multiple state transitions between stages can be performed in a pipelined fashion. In this paper, it is proposed that multiple one-to-one state transitions, called merged state transitions, can be performed with an LUT. By cutting down the number of used LUTs for implementing state transitions, the hardware overhead of combinational logic circuits is greatly reduced in the proposed pipelined NFA-based string matching scheme.

  6. A Pipelined Non-Deterministic Finite Automaton-Based String Matching Scheme Using Merged State Transitions in an FPGA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyunJin Kim

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a pipelined non-deterministic finite automaton (NFA-based string matching scheme using field programmable gate array (FPGA implementation. The characteristics of the NFA such as shared common prefixes and no failure transitions are considered in the proposed scheme. In the implementation of the automaton-based string matching using an FPGA, each state transition is implemented with a look-up table (LUT for the combinational logic circuit between registers. In addition, multiple state transitions between stages can be performed in a pipelined fashion. In this paper, it is proposed that multiple one-to-one state transitions, called merged state transitions, can be performed with an LUT. By cutting down the number of used LUTs for implementing state transitions, the hardware overhead of combinational logic circuits is greatly reduced in the proposed pipelined NFA-based string matching scheme.

  7. Asymmetric evolving random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulomb, S.; Bauer, M.

    2003-10-01

    We generalize the Poissonian evolving random graph model of M. Bauer and D. Bernard (2003), to deal with arbitrary degree distributions. The motivation comes from biological networks, which are well-known to exhibit non Poissonian degree distributions. A node is added at each time step and is connected to the rest of the graph by oriented edges emerging from older nodes. This leads to a statistical asymmetry between incoming and outgoing edges. The law for the number of new edges at each time step is fixed but arbitrary. Thermodynamical behavior is expected when this law has a large time limit. Although (by construction) the incoming degree distributions depend on this law, this is not the case for most qualitative features concerning the size distribution of connected components, as long as the law has a finite variance. As the variance grows above 1/4, the average being < 1/2, a giant component emerges, which connects a finite fraction of the vertices. Below this threshold, the distribution of component sizes decreases algebraically with a continuously varying exponent. The transition is of infinite order, in sharp contrast with the case of static graphs. The local-in-time profiles for the components of finite size allow to give a refined description of the system.

  8. Quark-hadron phase structure and QCD equations of state in vanishing and finite magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Hussein, M T

    2016-01-01

    In characterizing the quark-hadron phase structure, determining various thermodynamic quantities and investigating their temperature dependencies on vanishing and finite magnetic field, SU(3) Polyakov linear-sigma model (PLSM) is utilized. The dependence of the chiral order-parameter on vanishing and finite magnetic field is calculated in mean-field approximation. In a wide range of temperatures and magnetic field strengths, the thermodynamic observables including trace anomaly, speed of sound squared, entropy density, specific heat and magnetization are presented. An excellent agreement is found when these are confronted to recent lattice QCD calculations. The temperature dependence of these quantities confirms our previous result that the transition temperature is reduced with magnetic field. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of magnetization verifies the conclusion that the QCD matter has paramagnetic properties near and far above the critical temperature. The excellent agreement with recent lattice ...

  9. Spin-polarized quasi-one-dimensional state with finite band gap on the Bi/InSb(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, J.; Ohtsubo, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Yaji, K.; Harasawa, A.; Komori, F.; Shin, S.; Rault, J. E.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Nurmamat, M.; Yamane, H.; Ideta, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kimura, S.

    2017-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) electronic states were discovered on the 1D surface atomic structure of Bi fabricated on semiconductor InSb(001) substrates by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The 1D state showed steep, Dirac-cone-like dispersion along the 1D atomic structure with a finite direct band gap opening as large as 150 meV. Moreover, spin-resolved ARPES revealed the spin polarization of the 1D unoccupied states as well as that of the occupied states, the orientation of which inverted depending on the wave-vector direction parallel to the 1D array on the surface. These results reveal that a spin-polarized quasi-1D carrier was realized on the surface of 1D Bi with highly efficient backscattering suppression, showing promise for use in future spintronics and energy-saving devices.

  10. Inference for finite-sample trajectories in dynamic multi-state site-occupancy models using hidden Markov model smoothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Ian J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Gross, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists and wildlife biologists increasingly use latent variable models to study patterns of species occurrence when detection is imperfect. These models have recently been generalized to accommodate both a more expansive description of state than simple presence or absence, and Markovian dynamics in the latent state over successive sampling seasons. In this paper, we write these multi-season, multi-state models as hidden Markov models to find both maximum likelihood estimates of model parameters and finite-sample estimators of the trajectory of the latent state over time. These estimators are especially useful for characterizing population trends in species of conservation concern. We also develop parametric bootstrap procedures that allow formal inference about latent trend. We examine model behavior through simulation, and we apply the model to data from the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program.

  11. Multilayer Finite-Element Model Application to Define the Bearing Structure Element Stress State of Launch Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article objective is to justify the rationale for selecting the multilayer finite element model parameters of the bearing structure of a general-purpose launch complex unit.A typical design element of the launch complex unit, i.e. a mount of the hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, block, etc. is under consideration. The mount represents a set of the cantilevered axis and external structural cage. The most loaded element of the cage is disk to which a moment is transferred from the cantilevered axis due to actuator effort acting on it.To calculate the stress-strain state of disk was used a finite element method. Five models of disk mount were created. The only difference in models was the number of layers of the finite elements through the thickness of disk. There were models, which had one, three, five, eight, and fourteen layers of finite elements through the thickness of disk. For each model, we calculated the equivalent stresses arising from the action of the test load. Disk models were formed and calculated using the MSC Nastran complex software.The article presents results in the table to show data of equivalent stresses in each of the multi-layered models and graphically to illustrate the changing equivalent stresses through the thickness of disk.Based on these results we have given advice on selecting the proper number of layers in the model allowing a desirable accuracy of results with the lowest run time. In addition, it is concluded that there is a need to use the multi-layer models in assessing the performance of structural elements in case the stress exceeds the allowable one in their surface layers.

  12. A sixth-order finite volume scheme for the steady-state incompressible Stokes equations on staggered unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ricardo; Clain, Stéphane; Machado, Gaspar J.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a new sixth-order finite volume scheme to solve the bidimensional linear steady-state Stokes problem on staggered unstructured meshes and complex geometries. The method is based on several classes of polynomial reconstructions to accurately evaluate the diffusive fluxes, the pressure gradient, and the velocity divergence. The main difficulty is to handle the div-grad duality to avoid numerical locking and oscillations. A new preconditioning technique based on the construction of a pseudo-inverse matrix is also proposed to dramatically reduce the computational effort. Several numerical simulations are carried out to highlight the performance of the new method.

  13. On the Stability of Jump-Linear Systems Driven by Finite-State Machines with Markovian Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patilkulkarni, Sudarshan; Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Gray, W. Steven; Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents two mean-square stability tests for a jump-linear system driven by a finite-state machine with a first-order Markovian input process. The first test is based on conventional Markov jump-linear theory and avoids the use of any higher-order statistics. The second test is developed directly using the higher-order statistics of the machine s output process. The two approaches are illustrated with a simple model for a recoverable computer control system.

  14. Finite element simulation of steady state and transient forced convection in superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    1999-01-01

    The solution of transient mass, momentum and energy balances in superfluid helium are discussed by means of a finite element algorithm. A simple linearization procedure is used for the non- linear pseudo-diffusion term in the energy balance arising because of the unique counterflow heat transport mechanism in superfluid helium. The linearization algorithm is analyzed for accuracy order and stability. The reliability of the algorithm devised is shown in practical tests, comparing the numerical solutions with experimental data available in the literature. (18 refs).

  15. Density of States FFA analysis of SU(3) lattice gauge theory at a finite density of color sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Mario; Gattringer, Christof

    2017-10-01

    We present a Density of States calculation with the Functional Fit Approach (DoS FFA) in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with a finite density of static color sources. The DoS FFA uses a parameterized density of states and determines the parameters of the density by fitting data from restricted Monte Carlo simulations with an analytically known function. We discuss the implementation of DoS FFA and the results for a qualitative picture of the phase diagram in a model which is a further step towards implementing DoS FFA in full QCD. We determine the curvature κ in the μ-T phase diagram and find a value close to the results published for full QCD.

  16. Finite Element Modeling with Embed Rebar Elements and Steady State Rolling Analysis for Rolling Resistance Test of Pneumatic Tire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvanjumrat Chakrit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element model of tire rolling resistance test on the drum was developed using 3D steady state rolling analysis coupling with pre-inflation of 2D axisymmetric tire analysis. The complex components of the radial tires composing tread, sidewall, ply layers, steel belts, and lead wires were modeled using rebar elements which were embed into the rubber element using the tying equation. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic constitutive model was employed to describe the large deformation behavior of tread and sidewall, while other components such as plies, steel belts and bead wires were assigned the linear isotropic material. The tire rolling resistance system was modeled by inflation of slick tire and compression on the drum for the footprint analysis regarding the rolling resistance test. The tire’s steady state characteristics such as footprint contact pressure, rolling resistance force, and time response characteristic of tires were predicted instead the experiment of the prototype.

  17. Direct evaluation of boson dynamics via finite-temperature time-dependent variation with multiple Davydov states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Wang, Lu; Zhao, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in quantum optics allow for exploration of boson dynamics in dissipative many-body systems. However, the traditional descriptions of quantum dissipation using reduced density matrices are unable to capture explicit information of bath dynamics. In this work, efficient evaluation of boson dynamics is demonstrated by combining the multiple Davydov Ansatz with finite-temperature time-dependent variation, going beyond what state-of-the-art density matrix approaches are capable to offer for coupled electron-boson systems. To this end, applications are made to excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems, singlet fission in organic thin films, and circuit quantum electrodynamics in superconducting devices. Thanks to the multiple Davydov Ansatz, our analysis of boson dynamics leads to clear revelation of boson modes strongly coupled to electronic states, as well as in-depth description of polaron creation and destruction in the presence of thermal fluctuations.

  18. Density of States FFA analysis of SU(3 lattice gauge theory at a finite density of color sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Giuliani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a Density of States calculation with the Functional Fit Approach (DoS FFA in SU(3 lattice gauge theory with a finite density of static color sources. The DoS FFA uses a parameterized density of states and determines the parameters of the density by fitting data from restricted Monte Carlo simulations with an analytically known function. We discuss the implementation of DoS FFA and the results for a qualitative picture of the phase diagram in a model which is a further step towards implementing DoS FFA in full QCD. We determine the curvature κ in the μ–T phase diagram and find a value close to the results published for full QCD.

  19. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the S0 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II and of dinuclear manganese model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, L V; Lubitz, W; Messinger, J

    2005-07-05

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 was measured for the S0 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II and for two dinuclear manganese model complexes by pulse EPR using the inversion-recovery method. For [Mn(III)Mn(IV)(mu-O)2 bipy4]ClO4, the Raman relaxation process dominates at temperatures below 50 K. In contrast, Orbach type relaxation was found for [Mn(II)Mn(III)(mu-OH)(mu-piv)2(Me3 tacn)2](ClO4)2 between 4.3 and 9 K. For the latter complex, an energy separation of 24.7-28.0 cm(-1) between the ground and the first excited electronic state was determined. In the S0 state of photosystem II, the T1 relaxation times were measured in the range of 4.3-6.5 K. A comparison with the relaxation data (rate and pre-exponential factor) of the two model complexes and of the S2 state of photosystem II indicates that the Orbach relaxation process is dominant for the S0 state and that its first excited state lies 21.7 +/- 0.4 cm(-1) above its ground state. The results are discussed with respect to the structure of the OEC in photosystem II.

  20. Finite element analysis of ion transport in solid state nuclear waste form materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, F.; Brinkman, K.; Amoroso, J.; Reifsnider, K.

    2017-09-01

    Release of nuclear species from spent fuel ceramic waste form storage depends on the individual constituent properties as well as their internal morphology, heterogeneity and boundary conditions. Predicting the release rate is essential for designing a ceramic waste form, which is capable of effectively storing the spent fuel without contaminating the surrounding environment for a longer period of time. To predict the release rate, in the present work a conformal finite element model is developed based on the Nernst Planck Equation. The equation describes charged species transport through different media by convection, diffusion, or migration. And the transport can be driven by chemical/electrical potentials or velocity fields. The model calculates species flux in the waste form with different diffusion coefficient for each species in each constituent phase. In the work reported, a 2D approach is taken to investigate the contributions of different basic parameters in a waste form design, i.e., volume fraction, phase dispersion, phase surface area variation, phase diffusion co-efficient, boundary concentration etc. The analytical approach with preliminary results is discussed. The method is postulated to be a foundation for conformal analysis based design of heterogeneous waste form materials.

  1. SIMULATION FROM ENDPOINT-CONDITIONED, CONTINUOUS-TIME MARKOV CHAINS ON A FINITE STATE SPACE, WITH APPLICATIONS TO MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobolth, Asger; Stone, Eric A

    2009-09-01

    Analyses of serially-sampled data often begin with the assumption that the observations represent discrete samples from a latent continuous-time stochastic process. The continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) is one such generative model whose popularity extends to a variety of disciplines ranging from computational finance to human genetics and genomics. A common theme among these diverse applications is the need to simulate sample paths of a CTMC conditional on realized data that is discretely observed. Here we present a general solution to this sampling problem when the CTMC is defined on a discrete and finite state space. Specifically, we consider the generation of sample paths, including intermediate states and times of transition, from a CTMC whose beginning and ending states are known across a time interval of length T. We first unify the literature through a discussion of the three predominant approaches: (1) modified rejection sampling, (2) direct sampling, and (3) uniformization. We then give analytical results for the complexity and efficiency of each method in terms of the instantaneous transition rate matrix Q of the CTMC, its beginning and ending states, and the length of sampling time T. In doing so, we show that no method dominates the others across all model specifications, and we give explicit proof of which method prevails for any given Q, T, and endpoints. Finally, we introduce and compare three applications of CTMCs to demonstrate the pitfalls of choosing an inefficient sampler.

  2. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, M. V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); Klein, M. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levine, R. D. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Remacle, F., E-mail: fremacle@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-14

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  3. Specific and Evolving Resting-State Network Alterations in Post-Concussion Syndrome Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud Messé; Sophie Caplain; Mélanie Pélégrini-Issac; Sophie Blancho; Richard Lévy; Nozar Aghakhani; Michèle Montreuil; Habib Benali; Stéphane Lehéricy

    2013-01-01

    Post-concussion syndrome has been related to axonal damage in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, but little is known about the consequences of injury on brain networks. In the present study, our aim was to characterize changes in functional brain networks following mild traumatic brain injury in patients with post-concussion syndrome using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We investigated 17 injured patients with persistent post-concussion syndrome (under the D...

  4. Finite Temperature Green's Function Approach for Excited State and Thermodynamic Properties of Cool to Warm Dense Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, J J; Rehr, J J

    2017-10-27

    We present a finite-temperature extension of the retarded cumulant Green's function for calculations of exited-state, correlation, and thermodynamic properties of electronic systems. The method incorporates a cumulant to leading order in the screened Coulomb interaction W, and improves on the GW approximation of many-body perturbation theory. Results for the homogeneous electron gas are presented for a wide range of densities and temperatures, from cool to warm dense matter regimes, which reveal several hitherto unexpected properties. For example, correlation effects remain strong at high T while the exchange-correlation energy becomes small; also the spectral function broadens and damping increases with temperature, blurring the usual quasiparticle picture. These effects are evident, e.g., in Compton scattering which exhibits many-body corrections that persist at normal densities and intermediate T. The approach also yields exchange-correlation energies and potentials in good agreement with existing methods.

  5. Estimation of State of Charge for Lithium-Ion Battery Based on Finite Difference Extended Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of the state of charge (SOC of the battery is of great significance for safe and efficient energy utilization of electric vehicles. Given the nonlinear dynamic system of the lithium-ion battery, the parameters of the second-order RC equivalent circuit model were calibrated and optimized using a nonlinear least squares algorithm in the Simulink parameter estimation toolbox. A comparison was made between this finite difference extended Kalman filter (FDEKF and the standard extended Kalman filter in the SOC estimation. The results show that the model can essentially predict the dynamic voltage behavior of the lithium-ion battery, and the FDEKF algorithm can maintain good accuracy in the estimation process and has strong robustness against modeling error.

  6. Geometries and Electronic States of Divacancy Defect in Finite-Size Hexagonal Graphene Flakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometries and electronic properties of divacancies with two kinds of structures were investigated by the first-principles (U B3LYP/STO-3G and self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB method. Different from the reported understanding of these properties of divacancy in graphene and carbon nanotubes, it was found that the ground state of the divacancy with 585 configurations is closed shell singlet state and much more stable than the 555777 configurations in the smaller graphene flakes, which is preferred to triplet state. But when the sizes of the graphene become larger, the 555777 defects will be more stable. In addition, the spin density properties of the both configurations are studied in this paper.

  7. Maximizing the Hilbert space for a finite number of distinguishable quantum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greentree, Andrew D; Schirmer, S G; Green, F; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Hamilton, A R; Clark, R G

    2004-03-05

    Given a particular quantum computing architecture, how might one optimize its resources to maximize its computing power? We consider quantum computers with a number of distinguishable quantum states, and entangled particles shared between those states. Hilbert-space dimensionality is linked to nonclassicality and, hence, quantum computing power. We find that qutrit-based quantum computers optimize the Hilbert-space dimensionality and so are expected to be more powerful than other qudit implementations. In going beyond qudits, we identify structures with much higher Hilbert-space dimensionalities.

  8. Phase cycling schemes for finite-pulse-RFDR MAS solid state NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-03-01

    The finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used in 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS). A recent study demonstrated the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle, XY4(1)4, for the fp-RFDR pulse sequence employed in 2D (1)H/(1)H single-quantum/single-quantum correlation experiments under ultrafast MAS conditions. In this study, we report a comprehensive analysis on the dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY4(1)2, XY4(1)3, XY4(1)4, and XY8(1)4 phase cycles under different spinning speeds ranging from 10 to 100 kHz. The theoretical calculations reveal the presence of second-order terms (T(10)T(2,±2), T(1,±1)T(2,±1), etc.) in the recoupled homonuclear dipolar coupling Hamiltonian only when the basic XY4 phase cycle is utilized, making it advantageous for proton-proton magnetization transfer under ultrafast MAS conditions. It is also found that the recoupling efficiency of fp-RFDR is quite dependent on the duty factor (τ180/τR) as well as on the strength of homonuclear dipolar couplings. The rate of longitudinal magnetization transfer increases linearly with the duty factor of fp-RFDR for all the XY-based phase cycles investigated in this study. Examination of the performances of different phase cycles against chemical shift offset and RF field inhomogeneity effects revealed that XY4(1)4 is the most tolerant phase cycle, while the shortest phase cycle XY4 suppressed the RF field inhomogeneity effects most efficiently under slow spinning speeds. Our results suggest that the difference in the fp-RFDR recoupling efficiencies decreases with the increasing MAS speed, while ultrafast (>60 kHz) spinning speed is advantageous as it recouples a large amount of homonuclear dipolar couplings and therefore enable fast magnetization exchange. The effects of higher-order terms and cross terms between various interactions in the effective Hamiltonian of fp

  9. Societal response to chronic environmental change: The role of evolving scientific and technical information in state coastal erosion management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Mark; James, Thomas E.; Deyle, Robert E.

    1992-06-01

    Natural hazards, such as acute storm events, often exacerbate chronic change processes and heighten public awareness of overt and latent risks to society. This paper reports the results of a study of the development of coastal erosion management policies from 1960 to 1990 in Florida, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, all of which have been subject to marked chronic and acute environmental changes. The case studies were guided by a conceptual framework that links acute and chronic environmental changes with state and federal policity initiatives as well as the scientific community. We traced the evolution of policies and programs and the policy innovation process in these states that were designed to mitigate the risks associated with coastal erosion, and documented the role that scientific and technical information played. From information drawn from published and unpublished literature as well as personal interviews, the case studies reveal a wide variation in policy responses to coastal erosion phenomena and exhibit differing degrees of program success. Although the case studies preclude broad generalizations, they illustrate clearly the importance of institution to enable policy enterpreneurs and other key individuals a base for acquiring and using scientific and technical information for policy development and implementation.

  10. Dynamic Raman Line Shapes on an Evolving Excited-State Landscape: Insights from Tunable Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Weimin; Zhu, Liangdong; Fang, Chong

    2017-07-27

    Tracking molecular motions in real time remains a formidable challenge in science and engineering fields because the experimental methodology requires simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Building on early successes and future potential of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) as a structural dynamics technique, we present a comprehensive study of stimulated Raman line shapes of a photosensitive molecule in solution with tunable Raman pump and probe pulses. Following femtosecond 400 nm electronic excitation, the model photoacid pyranine exhibits dynamic and mode-dependent Raman line shapes when the Raman pump is tuned from the red side toward and across the excited-state absorption (ESA) band (e.g., from S1) with varying resonance conditions. On the anti-Stokes FSRS side, low-frequency modes below ∼1000 cm-1 exhibit a line shape change from gain to dispersive to loss, whereas the dispersive intermediate is much less notable for high-frequency modes. The characteristic mode frequency blue shift involving vibrationally hot states in S1 with time constants of ∼9.6 and 58.6 ps reveals the sensitivity of anti-Stokes FSRS to vibrational cooling and solvation. This work lays the foundation for expanding tunable FSRS technology on both the Stokes and anti-Stokes sides to investigate a variety of photoinduced processes in solution with sufficient resolution to expose functional motions and increased sensitivity to monitor vibrational cooling.

  11. Evolving Distributed Generation Support Mechanisms: Case Studies from United States, Germany, United Kingdom, and Australia (Chinese translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengru [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lowder, Travis R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tian, Tian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This is the Chinese translation of NREL/TP-6A20-67613. This report expands on a previous National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) technical report (Lowder et al. 2015) that focused on the United States' unique approach to distributed generation photovoltaics (DGPV) support policies and business models. While the focus of that report was largely historical (i.e., detailing the policies and market developments that led to the growth of DGPV in the United States), this report looks forward, narrating recent changes to laws and regulations as well as the ongoing dialogues over how to incorporate distributed generation (DG) resources onto the electric grid. This report also broadens the scope of Lowder et al. (2015) to include additional countries and technologies. DGPV and storage are the principal technologies under consideration (owing to market readiness and deployment volumes), but the report also contemplates any generation resource that is (1) on the customer side of the meter, (2) used to, at least partly, offset a host's energy consumption, and/or (3) potentially available to provide grid support (e.g., through peak shaving and load shifting, ancillary services, and other means).

  12. Specific and evolving resting-state network alterations in post-concussion syndrome following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Messé

    Full Text Available Post-concussion syndrome has been related to axonal damage in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, but little is known about the consequences of injury on brain networks. In the present study, our aim was to characterize changes in functional brain networks following mild traumatic brain injury in patients with post-concussion syndrome using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We investigated 17 injured patients with persistent post-concussion syndrome (under the DSM-IV criteria at 6 months post-injury compared with 38 mild traumatic brain injury patients with no post-concussion syndrome and 34 healthy controls. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations at the subacute (1-3 weeks and late (6 months phases after injury. Group-wise differences in functional brain networks were analyzed using graph theory measures. Patterns of long-range functional networks alterations were found in all mild traumatic brain injury patients. Mild traumatic brain injury patients with post-concussion syndrome had greater alterations than patients without post-concussion syndrome. In patients with post-concussion syndrome, changes specifically affected temporal and thalamic regions predominantly at the subacute stage and frontal regions at the late phase. Our results suggest that the post-concussion syndrome is associated with specific abnormalities in functional brain network that may contribute to explain deficits typically observed in PCS patients.

  13. Spatio-temporal learning with the online finite and infinite echo-state Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Harold; Demiris, Yiannis

    2015-03-01

    Successful biological systems adapt to change. In this paper, we are principally concerned with adaptive systems that operate in environments where data arrives sequentially and is multivariate in nature, for example, sensory streams in robotic systems. We contribute two reservoir inspired methods: 1) the online echostate Gaussian process (OESGP) and 2) its infinite variant, the online infinite echostate Gaussian process (OIESGP) Both algorithms are iterative fixed-budget methods that learn from noisy time series. In particular, the OESGP combines the echo-state network with Bayesian online learning for Gaussian processes. Extending this to infinite reservoirs yields the OIESGP, which uses a novel recursive kernel with automatic relevance determination that enables spatial and temporal feature weighting. When fused with stochastic natural gradient descent, the kernel hyperparameters are iteratively adapted to better model the target system. Furthermore, insights into the underlying system can be gleamed from inspection of the resulting hyperparameters. Experiments on noisy benchmark problems (one-step prediction and system identification) demonstrate that our methods yield high accuracies relative to state-of-the-art methods, and standard kernels with sliding windows, particularly on problems with irrelevant dimensions. In addition, we describe two case studies in robotic learning-by-demonstration involving the Nao humanoid robot and the Assistive Robot Transport for Youngsters (ARTY) smart wheelchair.

  14. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  15. Finite element code FENIA verification and application for 3D modelling of thermal state of radioactive waste deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    The verification of the FENIA finite element code on some problems and an example of its application are presented in the paper. The code is being developing for 3D modelling of thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamical (THM) problems related to the functioning of deep geological repositories. Verification of the code for two analytical problems has been performed. The first one is point heat source with exponential heat decrease, the second one - linear heat source with similar behavior. Analytical solutions have been obtained by the authors. The problems have been chosen because they reflect the processes influencing the thermal state of deep geological repository of radioactive waste. Verification was performed for several meshes with different resolution. Good convergence between analytical and numerical solutions was achieved. The application of the FENIA code is illustrated by 3D modelling of thermal state of a prototypic deep geological repository of radioactive waste. The repository is designed for disposal of radioactive waste in a rock at depth of several hundred meters with no intention of later retrieval. Vitrified radioactive waste is placed in the containers, which are placed in vertical boreholes. The residual decay heat of radioactive waste leads to containers, engineered safety barriers and host rock heating. Maximum temperatures and corresponding times of their establishment have been determined.

  16. Ground state structure and conductivity of quantum wires of infinite length and finite width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, F.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.; Lipparini, E.

    2005-11-01

    We have studied the ground state structure of quantum strips within the local spin-density approximation, for a range of electronic densities between ˜5×104 and 2×106cm-1 and several strengths of the lateral confining potential. The results have been used to address the conductance G of quantum strips. At low density, when only one subband is occupied, the system is fully polarized and G takes a value close to 0.7(2e2/h) , decreasing with increasing electron density in agreement with experiments. At higher densities the system becomes paramagnetic and G takes a value near (2e2/h) , showing a similar decreasing behavior with increasing electron density. In both cases, the physical parameter that determines the value of the conductance is the ratio K/K0 of the compressibility of the system to the free one.

  17. Steady State Structural Analysis of High Pressure Gas Turbine Blade using Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarbhuiya, Hussain Mahamed Sahed Mostafa; Murari Pandey, Krishna

    2017-08-01

    In gas turbines the major portion of performance dependency lies upon turbine blade design. Turbine blades experience very high centrifugal, axial and tangential force during power generation. While withstanding these forces blades undergo elongation. Different methods have proposed for better enhancement of the mechanical properties of blade to withstand in extreme condition. Present paper describes the stress and elongation for blades having properties of different materials. Steady state structural analysis have performed in the present work for different materials (In 625, In 718, In 738, In 738 LC, MAR M246, Ni-Cr, Ti-alloy, Ti-Al, Ti-T6, U500). Remarkable finding is that the root of the blade is subjected to maximum stress for all blade materials and the blade made of MAR M246 has less stress and deformation among all other blade materials which can be selected as a suitable material for gas turbine blade.

  18. Development of Multi-Disciplinary Finite Element Method Analysis Courses at California State University, Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, John; Wu, Chivey

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Partnership Awards Grant to California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA) has two primary goals that help to achieve NASA objectives. The overall objectives of the NASA Partnership Awards are to create opportunities for joint University NASA/Government sponsored research and related activities. One of the goals of the grant is to have university faculty researchers participate and contribute to the development of NASA technology that supports NASA goals for research and development (R&D) in Aeronautics and Astronautics. The other goal is technology transfer in the other direction, where NASA developed technology is made available to the general public and more specifically, targeted to industries that can profit from utilization of government developed technology. This years NASA Dryden Partnership Awards grant to CSULA entitled, "Computer Simulation of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering Systems", has two major tasks that satisfy overall NASA objectives. The first task conducts basic and applied research that contributes to technology development at the Dryden Flight Research Center. The second part of the grant provides for dissemination of NASA developed technology, by using the teaching environment created in the CSULA classroom. The second task and how this is accomplished is the topic of this paper. The NASA STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) computer simulation program is used at the Dryden center to support flight testing of high-performance experimental aircraft and to conduct research and development of new and advanced Aerospace technology.

  19. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  20. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  1. The electronic structures of the S(2) states of the oxygen-evolving complexes of photosystem II in plants and cyanobacteria in the presence and absence of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Hu; Cox, Nicholas; Ames, William; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Lohmiller, Thomas; Kulik, Leonid V; Dorlet, Pierre; Rutherford, A William; Neese, Frank; Boussac, Alain; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Messinger, Johannes

    2011-07-01

    The electronic properties of the Mn(4)O(x)Ca cluster in the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) were studied using X- and Q-band EPR and Q-band (55)Mn-ENDOR using photosystem II preparations isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium T. elongatus and higher plants (spinach). The data presented here show that there is very little difference between the two species. Specifically it is shown that: (i) only small changes are seen in the fitted isotropic hyperfine values, suggesting that there is no significant difference in the overall spin distribution (electronic coupling scheme) between the two species; (ii) the inferred fine-structure tensor of the only Mn(III) ion in the cluster is of the same magnitude and geometry for both species types, suggesting that the Mn(III) ion has the same coordination sphere in both sample preparations; and (iii) the data from both species are consistent with only one structural model available in the literature, namely the Siegbahn structure [Siegbahn, P. E. M. Accounts Chem. Res.2009, 42, 1871-1880, Pantazis, D. A. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2009, 11, 6788-6798]. These measurements were made in the presence of methanol because it confers favorable magnetic relaxation properties to the cluster that facilitate pulse-EPR techniques. In the absence of methanol the separation of the ground state and the first excited state of the spin system is smaller. For cyanobacteria this effect is minor but in plant PS II it leads to a break-down of the S(T)=½ spin model of the S(2) state. This suggests that the methanol-OEC interaction is species dependent. It is proposed that the effect of small organic solvents on the electronic structure of the cluster is to change the coupling between the outer Mn (Mn(A)) and the other three Mn ions that form the trimeric part of the cluster (Mn(B), Mn(C), Mn(D)), by perturbing the linking bis-μ-oxo bridge. The flexibility of this bridging unit is discussed with regard to the mechanism of O

  2. Simplifying Nondeterministic Finite Cover Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar Câmpeanu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Deterministic Finite Cover Automata (DFCA was introduced at WIA '98, as a more compact representation than Deterministic Finite Automata (DFA for finite languages. In some cases representing a finite language, Nondeterministic Finite Automata (NFA may significantly reduce the number of states used. The combined power of the succinctness of the representation of finite languages using both cover languages and non-determinism has been suggested, but never systematically studied. In the present paper, for nondeterministic finite cover automata (NFCA and l-nondeterministic finite cover automaton (l-NFCA, we show that minimization can be as hard as minimizing NFAs for regular languages, even in the case of NFCAs using unary alphabets. Moreover, we show how we can adapt the methods used to reduce, or minimize the size of NFAs/DFCAs/l-DFCAs, for simplifying NFCAs/l-NFCAs.

  3. Compositional Approach to Distributed System Behavior Modeling and Formal Validation of Infrastructure Operations with Finite State Automata: Application to Viewpoint-Driven Verification of Functionality in Waterways

    OpenAIRE

    Mark A. Austin; John Johnson

    2018-01-01

    Now that modern infrastructure systems are moving toward an increased use of automation in their day-to-day operations, there is an emerging need for new approaches to the formal analysis and validation of system functionality with respect to correctness of operations. This paper describes a compositional approach to the multi-level behavior modeling and formal validation of large-scale distributed system operations with hierarchies and networks of finite state automata. To avoid the well-kno...

  4. Finite temperature grand canonical ensemble study of the minimum electrophilicity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Chattaraj, Pratim K; Ayers, Paul W

    2017-09-28

    We analyze the minimum electrophilicity principle of conceptual density functional theory using the framework of the finite temperature grand canonical ensemble. We provide support for this principle, both for the cases of systems evolving from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state and for the change from one equilibrium state to another. In doing so, we clearly delineate the cases where this principle can, or cannot, be used.

  5. High-order finite-volume solutions of the steady-state advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear Robin boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhi; Zhang, Qinghai

    2017-09-01

    We propose high-order finite-volume schemes for numerically solving the steady-state advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear Robin boundary conditions. Although the original motivation comes from a mathematical model of blood clotting, the nonlinear boundary conditions may also apply to other scientific problems. The main contribution of this work is a generic algorithm for generating third-order, fourth-order, and even higher-order explicit ghost-filling formulas to enforce nonlinear Robin boundary conditions in multiple dimensions. Under the framework of finite volume methods, this appears to be the first algorithm of its kind. Numerical experiments on boundary value problems show that the proposed fourth-order formula can be much more accurate and efficient than a simple second-order formula. Furthermore, the proposed ghost-filling formulas may also be useful for solving other partial differential equations.

  6. Advanced finite element technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Wriggers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The book presents an overview of the state of research of advanced finite element technologies. Besides the mathematical analysis, the finite element development and their engineering applications are shown to the reader. The authors give a survey of the methods and technologies concerning efficiency, robustness and performance aspects. The book covers the topics of mathematical foundations for variational approaches and the mathematical understanding of the analytical requirements of modern finite element methods. Special attention is paid to finite deformations, adaptive strategies, incompressible, isotropic or anisotropic material behavior and the mathematical and numerical treatment of the well-known locking phenomenon. Beyond that new results for the introduced approaches are presented especially for challenging nonlinear problems.

  7. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  8. Correlation of finite element free vibration predictions using random vibration test data. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element analysis is regularly used during the engineering cycle of mechanical systems to predict the response to static, thermal, and dynamic loads. The finite element model (FEM) used to represent the system is often correlated with physical test results to determine the validity of analytical results provided. Results from dynamic testing provide one means for performing this correlation. One of the most common methods of measuring accuracy is by classical modal testing, whereby vibratory mode shapes are compared to mode shapes provided by finite element analysis. The degree of correlation between the test and analytical mode shapes can be shown mathematically using the cross orthogonality check. A great deal of time and effort can be exhausted in generating the set of test acquired mode shapes needed for the cross orthogonality check. In most situations response data from vibration tests are digitally processed to generate the mode shapes from a combination of modal parameters, forcing functions, and recorded response data. An alternate method is proposed in which the same correlation of analytical and test acquired mode shapes can be achieved without conducting the modal survey. Instead a procedure is detailed in which a minimum of test information, specifically the acceleration response data from a random vibration test, is used to generate a set of equivalent local accelerations to be applied to the reduced analytical model at discrete points corresponding to the test measurement locations. The static solution of the analytical model then produces a set of deformations that once normalized can be used to represent the test acquired mode shapes in the cross orthogonality relation. The method proposed has been shown to provide accurate results for both a simple analytical model as well as a complex space flight structure.

  9. Finite superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Restuccia, A; Taylor, J G

    1992-01-01

    This is the first complete account of the construction and finiteness analysis of multi-loop scattering amplitudes for superstrings, and of the guarantee that for certain superstrings (in particular the heterotic one), the symmetries of the theory in the embedding space-time are those of the super-poincaré group SP10 and that the multi-loop amplitudes are each finite. The book attempts to be self-contained in its analysis, although it draws on the works of many researchers. It also presents the first complete field theory for such superstrings. As such it demonstrates that gravity can be quant

  10. Excitonic states and their wave functions in anisotropic materials: A computation using the finite-element method and its application to AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Bernard; Felbacq, Didier; Guizal, Brahim [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR CNRS 5221, Universite Montpellier 2, case courrier 074-34095 Montpellier (France); Bouchitte, Guy [Institut de Mathematiques de Toulon, Universite de Toulon et du Var, 83957 La Garde Cedex (France)

    2012-03-15

    We have computed the excitonic states in the case of cylindrical symmetry as a function of the anisotropy using the finite-element method. The wave functions are also obtained and are presented for m=0, the states coupled with the electromagnetic fields. We illustrate for instance that the state dominantly built from the 3d{sub 0} hydrogenic level has a non-vanishing oscillator strength when the anisotropy increases. As an illustration we conclude our message by the application of that calculation to the interpretation of the 1s-2s splitting in the specific case of aluminum nitride using the predictions of very recent band-structure calculations. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Evolving digital ecological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    Full Text Available "It is hard to realize that the living world as we know it is just one among many possibilities" [1]. Evolving digital ecological networks are webs of interacting, self-replicating, and evolving computer programs (i.e., digital organisms that experience the same major ecological interactions as biological organisms (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism. Despite being computational, these programs evolve quickly in an open-ended way, and starting from only one or two ancestral organisms, the formation of ecological networks can be observed in real-time by tracking interactions between the constantly evolving organism phenotypes. These phenotypes may be defined by combinations of logical computations (hereafter tasks that digital organisms perform and by expressed behaviors that have evolved. The types and outcomes of interactions between phenotypes are determined by task overlap for logic-defined phenotypes and by responses to encounters in the case of behavioral phenotypes. Biologists use these evolving networks to study active and fundamental topics within evolutionary ecology (e.g., the extent to which the architecture of multispecies networks shape coevolutionary outcomes, and the processes involved.

  12. Numerical solution of the state-delayed optimal control problems by a fast and accurate finite difference θ-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Mojtaba; Jajarmi, Amin

    2018-02-01

    Using the Pontryagin's maximum principle for a time-delayed optimal control problem results in a system of coupled two-point boundary-value problems (BVPs) involving both time-advance and time-delay arguments. The analytical solution of this advance-delay two-point BVP is extremely difficult, if not impossible. This paper provides a discrete general form of the numerical solution for the derived advance-delay system by applying a finite difference θ-method. This method is also implemented for the infinite-time horizon time-delayed optimal control problems by using a piecewise version of the θ-method. A matrix formulation and the error analysis of the suggested technique are provided. The new scheme is accurate, fast and very effective for the optimal control of linear and nonlinear time-delay systems. Various types of finite- and infinite-time horizon problems are included to demonstrate the accuracy, validity and applicability of the new technique.

  13. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  14. Compositional Approach to Distributed System Behavior Modeling and Formal Validation of Infrastructure Operations with Finite State Automata: Application to Viewpoint-Driven Verification of Functionality in Waterways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Austin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Now that modern infrastructure systems are moving toward an increased use of automation in their day-to-day operations, there is an emerging need for new approaches to the formal analysis and validation of system functionality with respect to correctness of operations. This paper describes a compositional approach to the multi-level behavior modeling and formal validation of large-scale distributed system operations with hierarchies and networks of finite state automata. To avoid the well-known state explosion problem, we develop a new procedure for viewpoint-action-process traceability, thereby allowing parts of a behavior model not relevant to a specific decision to be removed from consideration. Key features of the methodology are illustrated through the development of behavior models and validation procedures for polite conversation between two individuals, and lockset- and system-level concerns for ships traversing a large-scale waterway system.

  15. Graph-associated entanglement cost of a multipartite state in exact and finite-block-length approximate constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Hayata; Soeda, Akihito; Murao, Mio

    2017-09-01

    We introduce and analyze graph-associated entanglement cost, a generalization of the entanglement cost of quantum states to multipartite settings. We identify a necessary and sufficient condition for any multipartite entangled state to be constructible when quantum communication between the multiple parties is restricted to a quantum network represented by a tree. The condition for exact state construction is expressed in terms of the Schmidt ranks of the state defined with respect to edges of the tree. We also study approximate state construction and provide a second-order asymptotic analysis.

  16. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  17. Measurably evolving populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drummond, Alexei James; Pybus, Oliver George; Rambaut, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    processes through time. Populations for which such studies are possible � measurably evolving populations (MEPs) � are characterized by sufficiently long or numerous sampled sequences and a fast mutation rate relative to the available range of sequence sampling times. The impact of sequences sampled through...... understanding of evolutionary processes in diverse organisms, from viruses to vertebrates....

  18. A time stepping coupled finite element-state space modeling environment for synchronous machine performance and design analysis in the ABC frame of reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fang

    This dissertation centers on the development of a modeling environment to predict the performance and operating characteristics of salient-pole synchronous generators. The model basically consists of an algorithm consisting of two sections, a time stepping two-dimensional (2D) magnetostatic field finite element (FE) computation algorithm coupled to a state-space (SS) time-domain model of the winding circuits. Hence the term time stepping Coupled Finite Element-State Space (CFE-SS) modeling environment is adopted for this approach. In the FE section, magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and computation of two-dimensional (2D) magnetostatic fields are used to get the magnetic field solutions throughout a machine's cross-section at a sequence (samplings) of rotor positions covering a complete (360 deg e) ac cycle. These field solutions yield the winding inductances by means of an energy and current perturbation method. The output of the FE section is the magnetic field solutions and the entire set of phase, field, damper, and sleeve winding inductance profiles versus rotor position, including all space harmonics due to rotor saliency, damper bar slotting, sleeve segmentation, stator slotting, and magnetic saturation. These inductance profiles are decomposed into their harmonic components by Fourier analysis. The magnetic field solutions and resulting winding inductances represent the key input data to the SS portion of the CFE-SS modeling environment. Laminated machine iron core loss calculations, which include the losses in the stator and rotor as well as pole face are subsequently performed using the magnetic field solution data. Conversely, the output of the SS portion is the entire set of phase, field, damper winding (circuit), and sleeve segment currents, which also include all the resulting time harmonics. These winding current results form in turn the key input data to the FE portion of the modeling environment which is

  19. Study of microwave-induced phase switches from the finite voltage state in Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Haruhisa; Yamaguchi, Ayami; Takahashi, Yusaku; Kakehi, Daiki; Ayukawa, Shin-ya

    2017-07-01

    We study the microwave-induced phase switches from the finite voltage state for the underdamped intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) made of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy (Bi2212). We observe the resonant double-peak structure in the switching current distribution at low temperatures. This feature is successfully explained by a quantum mechanical model where the strong microwave field effectively suppresses the potential barrier for the phase escape from a potential well and the macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) is resonantly enhanced. The detailed analyses considering the effects of multiple phase retrapping processes after the phase escape strongly suggest that the intense microwave field suppresses the energy-level spacing in the potential well, by effectively decreasing the fluctuation-free critical current and the Josephson plasma frequency. This effect also reduces the number of photons required for the multiphoton transition between the ground and the first excited states, making it possible to observe the energy level quantization in the MQT state. The temperature dependence of the resonance peak emerging in the switching rate clearly demonstrates that the quantized energy state can be survived up to ~10 K, which is much higher than a crossover temperature predicted by the conventional Caldeira-Leggett theory.

  20. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  1. Cyberspace Operations: Influence Upon Evolving War Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    St ra te gy R es ea rc h Pr oj ec t CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS: INFLUENCE UPON EVOLVING WAR THEORY BY COLONEL KRISTIN BAKER United States...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cyberspace Operations: Influence Upon Evolving War Theory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Leadership 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S

  2. Finite-time stability and finite-time stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sanjay Purushottam

    While non-Lipschitzian effects such as Coulomb friction abound in nature, most of the available techniques for feedback stabilization yield closed-loop systems with Lipschitzian dynamics. The convergence in such systems is at best exponential with infinite settling time. In this dissertation, we are interested in finite-settling-time behavior, that is, finite-time stability. The object of this dissertation is to provide a rigorous foundation for the theory of finite-time stability of continuous autonomous systems and motivate a closer examination of finite-time stability as a possible objective in control design. Accordingly, the notion of finite-time stability is precisely formulated and properties of the settling-time function are studied. Lyapunov and converse Lyapunov results involving scalar differential inequalities are obtained. It is shown that, under certain conditions, finite-time-stable systems possess better disturbance rejection and robustness properties. As an application of these ideas, we consider the finite-time stabilization of the translational and rotational double integrators. In the case of the rotational double integrator, the topology of the cylindrical state space renders continuous global stabilization impossible and hence the closed-loop system possesses saddle points. Because of the non-Lipschitzian character of the feedback law, these saddle points are, in fact, finite-time repellers--equilibria from which solutions can spontaneously and unpredictably depart. It is generally believed that models obtained from classical dynamics are completely deterministic. We present a counterexample to this widely held notion. The counterexample consists of a particle moving along a nonsmooth (once, but not twice, differentiable) constraint in a uniform gravitational field. The equation of motion obtained by applying classical Lagrangian dynamics contains non-Lipschitzian terms and, consequently, the dynamics of the system exhibit a finite-time saddle

  3. Three dimensional finite element modeling and characterization of intermediate states in single active layer phase change memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, I.; Aslan, O. B.; Gokce, A.; Dincer, O.; Karakas, V.; Stipe, B.; Katine, J. A.; Aktas, G.; Ozatay, O.

    2015-06-01

    The high contrast in the electrical resistivity between amorphous and crystalline states of a phase change material can potentially enable multiple memory levels for efficient use of a data storage medium. We report on our investigation of the role of the current injection site geometry (circular and square) in stabilizing such intermediate states within a nanoscale single-phase change material system (Ge2Sb2Te5). We have developed a three dimensional multiphysics model, which includes phase change kinetics, electrical, thermal, thermoelectric, and percolation effects, all as a function of temperature, using an iterative approach with coupled differential equations. Our model suggests that the physical origin of the formation of stable intermediate states in square top contact devices is mainly due to anisotropic heating during the application of a programming current pulse. Furthermore, the threshold current requirement and the width of the programming window are determined by crystallite nucleation and growth rates such that a higher crystallization rate leads to a narrower range of current pulses for switching to intermediate resistance level(s). The experimentally determined resistance maps, those that are indicative of the crystallinity, show good agreement with the simulated phase change behavior confirming the existence of stable intermediate states. Our model successfully predicts the required programming conditions for such mixed-phase levels, which can be used to optimize memory cells for future ultra-high density data storage applications.

  4. Isotope shifts of the three lowest 1S states of the B+ ion calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Komasa, Jacek; Stanke, Monika; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2010-03-01

    We present very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the three lowest S-states [1s22s2(S10), 1s22p2(S10), and 1s22s3s(S10)] of the two stable isotopes of the boron ion, B10+ and B11+. At the nonrelativistic level the calculations have been performed with the Hamiltonian that explicitly includes the finite mass of the nucleus as it was obtained by a rigorous separation of the center-of-mass motion from the laboratory frame Hamiltonian. The spatial part of the nonrelativistic wave function for each state was expanded in terms of 10 000 all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The nonlinear parameters of the Gaussians were variationally optimized using a procedure involving the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to the nonlinear parameters. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the three states were subsequently used to calculate the leading α2 relativistic corrections (α is the fine structure constant; α =1/c, where c is the speed of light) and the α3 quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the α4 QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement. The discrepancy is smaller than 0.4 cm-1.

  5. Spin-exchange interactions in the S 2-state manganese tetramer in photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex deduced from g=2 multiline EPR signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koji; Ono, Taka-aki; Inoue, Yorinao; Kusunoki, Masami

    1999-01-01

    Possible spin-exchange structures of the Mn(III,IV,IV,IV) cluster in an S 2 state of plant photosystem II were computer-searched, within the range compatible with X-ray absorption data, by diagonalizing each Heisenberg spin-exchange Hamiltonian and then by checking whether it can take the S=1/2 ground state capable of explaining the effective 55Mn hyperfine constants determined from oriented multiline spectra and the first excited state with excitation energy around 20-50 cm -1, or not. The possible spin-exchange structures were found to be distributed in those that contain only one strong-antiferromagnetic coupling and at most two intermediate coupling(s). The most probable structures are discussed in detail.

  6. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  7. A Multiple Time-Step Finite State Projection Algorithm for the Solution to the Chemical Master Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-30

    begins in state k, the initial probability distribution for the CME was written, pi(0) = δik, where δik is the Kronecker delta . Suppose now that the...initial distribution is given not by the Kronecker delta but by a vector with many non-zero elements. For example, suppose that the initial distribution is...pap-pili epigenetic switch,” Proc. FOSBE , pp. 145–148, August 2005. [16] B. Munsky and M. Khammash, “A reduced model solution for the chemical master

  8. Steady-state time-periodic finite element analysis of a brushless DC motor drive considering motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagieła Mariusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing a framework for comprehensive steady-state time-domain analysis of rotating machines considering motion. The steady-state waveforms of electromagnetic and circuit quantities are computed via iterative solution of the nonlinear field-circuit-and-motion problem with constraints of time periodicity. The cases with forced speed and forced load torque are considered. A comparison of execution times with a conventional time-stepping transient model is carried out for two different machines. The numerical stability of a time-periodic model with forced speed is shown to be worse than that of traditional transient time-stepping one, although the model converges within a reasonable number of iterations. This is not the case if forced load via equation of mechanical balance is accounted for. To ensure convergence of the iterative process the physical equation of motion is replaced by the fixed-point equation. In this way the model delivers time-periodic solutions regarding not only the electromagnetic quantities but also the rotational speed.

  9. A method for predicting errors when interacting with finite state systems. How implicit learning shapes the user's knowledge of a system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaux, Denis

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes a method for predicting the errors that may appear when human operators or users interact with systems behaving as finite state systems. The method is a generalization of a method used for predicting errors when interacting with autopilot modes on modern, highly computerized airliners [Proc 17th Digital Avionics Sys Conf (DASC) (1998); Proc 10th Int Symp Aviat Psychol (1999)]. A cognitive model based on spreading activation networks is used for predicting the user's model of the system and its impact on the production of errors. The model strongly posits the importance of implicit learning in user-system interaction and its possible detrimental influence on users' knowledge of the system. An experiment conducted with Airbus Industrie and a major European airline on pilots' knowledge of autopilot behavior on the A340-200/300 confirms the model predictions, and in particular the impact of the frequencies with which specific state transitions and contexts are experienced.

  10. States of stress and slip partitioning in a continental scale strike-slip duplex: Tectonic and magmatic implications by means of finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrieta, Pablo Cristián; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Cembrano, José; Stanton-Yonge, Ashley

    2017-09-01

    Orogenic belts at oblique convergent subduction margins accommodate deformation in several trench-parallel domains, one of which is the magmatic arc, commonly regarded as taking up the margin-parallel, strike-slip component. However, the stress state and kinematics of volcanic arcs is more complex than usually recognized, involving first- and second-order faults with distinctive slip senses and mutual interaction. These are usually organized into regional scale strike-slip duplexes, associated with both long-term and short-term heterogeneous deformation and magmatic activity. This is the case of the 1100 km-long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System in the Southern Andes, made up of two overlapping margin-parallel master faults joined by several NE-striking second-order faults. We present a finite element model addressing the nature and spatial distribution of stress across and along the volcanic arc in the Southern Andes to understand slip partitioning and the connection between tectonics and magmatism, particularly during the interseismic phase of the subduction earthquake cycle. We correlate the dynamics of the strike-slip duplex with geological, seismic and magma transport evidence documented by previous work, showing consistency between the model and the inferred fault system behavior. Our results show that maximum principal stress orientations are heterogeneously distributed within the continental margin, ranging from 15° to 25° counter-clockwise (with respect to the convergence vector) in the master faults and 10-19° clockwise in the forearc and backarc domains. We calculate the stress tensor ellipticity, indicating simple shearing in the eastern master fault and transpressional stress in the western master fault. Subsidiary faults undergo transtensional-to-extensional stress states. The eastern master fault displays slip rates of 5 to 10 mm/yr, whereas the western and subsidiary faults show slips rates of 1 to 5 mm/yr. Our results endorse that favorably oriented

  11. A Finite Difference, Semi-implicit, Equation-of-State Efficient Algorithm for the Compositional Flow Modeling in the Subsurface: Numerical Examples

    KAUST Repository

    Saavedra, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    The mathematical model that has been recognized to have the more accurate approximation to the physical laws govern subsurface hydrocarbon flow in reservoirs is the Compositional Model. The features of this model are adequate to describe not only the performance of a multiphase system but also to represent the transport of chemical species in a porous medium. Its importance relies not only on its current relevance to simulate petroleum extraction processes, such as, Primary, Secondary, and Enhanced Oil Recovery Process (EOR) processes but also, in the recent years, carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the subsurface compositional flow under isothermal conditions for several oil well cases. While simultaneously addressing computational implementation finesses to contribute to the efficiency of the algorithm. This study provides the theoretical framework and computational implementation subtleties of an IMplicit Pressure Explicit Composition (IMPEC)-Volume-balance (VB), two-phase, equation-of-state, approach to model isothermal compositional flow based on the finite difference scheme. The developed model neglects capillary effects and diffusion. From the phase equilibrium premise, the model accounts for volumetric performances of the phases, compressibility of the phases, and composition-dependent viscosities. The Equation of State (EoS) employed to approximate the hydrocarbons behaviour is the Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR-EOS). Various numerical examples were simulated. The numerical results captured the complex physics involved, i.e., compositional, gravitational, phase-splitting, viscosity and relative permeability effects. Regarding the numerical scheme, a phase-volumetric-flux estimation eases the calculation of phase velocities by naturally fitting to phase-upstream-upwinding. And contributes to a faster computation and an efficient programming development.

  12. A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Vahid; Isacchini, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The initial theoretical connections between Leontief input-output models and Markov chains were established back in 1950s. However, considering the wide variety of mathematical properties of Markov chains, so far there has not been a full investigation of evolving world economic networks with Markov chain formalism. In this work, using the recently available world input-output database, we investigated the evolution of the world economic network from 1995 to 2011 through analysis of a time series of finite Markov chains. We assessed different aspects of this evolving system via different known properties of the Markov chains such as mixing time, Kemeny constant, steady state probabilities and perturbation analysis of the transition matrices. First, we showed how the time series of mixing times and Kemeny constants could be used as an aggregate index of globalization. Next, we focused on the steady state probabilities as a measure of structural power of the economies that are comparable to GDP shares of economies as the traditional index of economies welfare. Further, we introduced two measures of systemic risk, called systemic influence and systemic fragility, where the former is the ratio of number of influenced nodes to the total number of nodes, caused by a shock in the activity of a node, and the latter is based on the number of times a specific economic node is affected by a shock in the activity of any of the other nodes. Finally, focusing on Kemeny constant as a global indicator of monetary flow across the network, we showed that there is a paradoxical effect of a change in activity levels of economic nodes on the overall flow of the world economic network. While the economic slowdown of the majority of nodes with high structural power results to a slower average monetary flow over the network, there are some nodes, where their slowdowns improve the overall quality of the network in terms of connectivity and the average flow of the money.

  13. Modelling of the steady state thermal behaviour of a permanent magnet direct current motor with commutator. 3D finite elements study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, R.; Cuchet, D. [ECIA Lab. Electricite-Electronique, Audincourt (France); Glises, R.; Chamagne, D.; Kauffmann, J.M.

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this work concerns the development and the validation of a thermal steady state model applied to a permanent magnet direct current motor with commutator. The rated power of the machine is 120 W. Design has been realized thanks to the thermal modulus of the computation software with the finite element method Flux3D. It is shown in this work how it is possible to use only the heat equation to simulate the thermal behaviour of the motor. It implies calculating of new fluid conductivities (considering also all thermal modes) by comparison of calculated and experimental temperatures. To realize these 3D modelizations, it is necessary to know and to locate all the losses of the motor which are considered as thermal sources. The experimental temperatures are given by 40 chromel-alumel thermocouples of 100 {mu}m diameter located in the rotor and the stator of the machine. Numerical computations use Dirichlet boundary layer conditions given by an IR camera. (orig.)

  14. Ground state degeneracy, energy barriers, and molecular dynamics evidence for two-dimensional disorder in black phosphorus and monochalcogenide monolayers at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehboudi, Mehrshad; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Dorio, Alex M.; Zhu, Wenjuan; van der Zande, Arend; Churchill, Hugh O. H.; Pacheco-Sanjuan, Alejandro A.; Harriss, Edmund O.; Kumar, Pradeep

    Mono-layers of black phosphorus and other two dimensional materials such as mono-layers of SiSe, GeS, GeSe, GeTe, Sns, SnSe, and SnTe with a similar crystalline structure have a four-fold degenerate ground state that leads to two-dimensional disorder at finite temperature. Disorder happens when neighboring atoms gently re-accommodate bonds beyond a critical temperature. In this talk, the effect of atomic numbers on the transition temperature will be discussed. In addition Car-Parinello molecular dynamics calculations at temperatures 30, 300 and 1000 K were performed on supercells containing more than five hundred atoms and the results from these calculations confirm the transition onto a two-dimensional disordered structure past the critical temperature, which is close to room temperature for many of these compounds. References: M. Mehboudi, A.M. Dorio, W. Zhu, A. van der Zande, H.O.H. Churchill, A.A. Pacheco Sanjuan, E.O.H. Harris, P. Kumar, and S. Barraza-Lopez. arXiv:1510.09153.

  15. Fat: an evolving issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2012-09-01

    Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65% of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come.

  16. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  17. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Effect of the crown design and interface lute parameters on the stress-state of a machined crown-tooth system: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrbaf, Shirin; vanNoort, Richard; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Martin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The effect of preparation design and the physical properties of the interface lute on the restored machined ceramic crown-tooth complex are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to determine, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) the effect of the tooth preparation design and the elastic modulus of the cement on the stress state of the cemented machined ceramic crown-tooth complex. The three-dimensional structure of human premolar teeth, restored with adhesively cemented machined ceramic crowns, was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of a restored tooth was created. Two preparation designs, with different occlusal morphologies, were modeled with cements of 3 different elastic moduli. Interactive medical image processing software (mimics and professional CAD modeling software) was used to create sophisticated digital models that included the supporting structures; periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The generated models were imported into an FEA software program (hypermesh version 10.0, Altair Engineering Inc.) with all degrees of freedom constrained at the outer surface of the supporting cortical bone of the crown-tooth complex. Five different elastic moduli values were given to the adhesive cement interface 1.8GPa, 4GPa, 8GPa, 18.3GPa and 40GPa; the four lower values are representative of currently used cementing lutes and 40GPa is set as an extreme high value. The stress distribution under simulated applied loads was determined. The preparation design demonstrated an effect on the stress state of the restored tooth system. The cement elastic modulus affected the stress state in the cement and dentin structures but not in the crown, the pulp, the periodontal ligament or the cancellous and cortical bone. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of the preparation design and the cement elastic modulus can affect the stress state within the restored crown

  19. Abductive learning of quantized stochastic processes with probabilistic finite automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Ishanu; Lipson, Hod

    2013-02-13

    We present an unsupervised learning algorithm (GenESeSS) to infer the causal structure of quantized stochastic processes, defined as stochastic dynamical systems evolving over discrete time, and producing quantized observations. Assuming ergodicity and stationarity, GenESeSS infers probabilistic finite state automata models from a sufficiently long observed trace. Our approach is abductive; attempting to infer a simple hypothesis, consistent with observations and modelling framework that essentially fixes the hypothesis class. The probabilistic automata we infer have no initial and terminal states, have no structural restrictions and are shown to be probably approximately correct-learnable. Additionally, we establish rigorous performance guarantees and data requirements, and show that GenESeSS correctly infers long-range dependencies. Modelling and prediction examples on simulated and real data establish relevance to automated inference of causal stochastic structures underlying complex physical phenomena.

  20. Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(μ-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2010-12-01

    Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

  1. Finiteness and Computation in Toposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hermann Haeusler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Some notions in mathematics can be considered relative. Relative is a term used to denote when the variation in the position of an observer implies variation in properties or measures on the observed object. We know, from Skolem theorem, that there are first-order models where the set of real numbers is countable and some where it is not. This fact depends on the position of the observer and on the instrument/language the obserevr uses as well, i.e., it depends on whether he/she is inside the model or not and in this particular case the use of first-order logic. In this article, we assume that computation is based on finiteness rather than natural numbers and discuss Turing machines computable morphisms defined on top of the sole notion finiteness. We explore the relativity of finiteness in models provided by toposes where the Axiom of Choice (AC does not hold, since Tarski proved that if AC holds then all finiteness notions are equivalent. Our toposes do not have natural numbers object (NNO either, since in a topos with a NNO these finiteness notions are equivalent to Peano finiteness going back to computation on top of Natural Numbers. The main contribution of this article is to show that although from inside every topos, with the properties previously stated, the computation model is standard, from outside some of these toposes, unexpected properties on the computation arise, e.g., infinitely long programs, finite computations containing infinitely long ones, infinitely branching computations. We mainly consider Dedekind and Kuratowski notions of finiteness in this article.

  2. Evolved atmospheric entry corridor with safety factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zixuan; Ren, Zhang; Li, Qingdong

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric entry corridors are established in previous research based on the equilibrium glide condition which assumes the flight-path angle to be zero. To get a better understanding of the highly constrained entry flight, an evolved entry corridor that considers the exact flight-path angle is developed in this study. Firstly, the conventional corridor in the altitude vs. velocity plane is extended into a three-dimensional one in the space of altitude, velocity, and flight-path angle. The three-dimensional corridor is generated by a series of constraint boxes. Then, based on a simple mapping method, an evolved two-dimensional entry corridor with safety factor is obtained. The safety factor is defined to describe the flexibility of the flight-path angle for a state within the corridor. Finally, the evolved entry corridor is simulated for the Space Shuttle and the Common Aero Vehicle (CAV) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the corridor generation approach. Compared with the conventional corridor, the evolved corridor is much wider and provides additional information. Therefore, the evolved corridor would benefit more to the entry trajectory design and analysis.

  3. Electronic structure of the Mn4OxCa cluster in the S0 and S2 states of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II based on pulse 55Mn-ENDOR and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Leonid V; Epel, Boris; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Messinger, Johannes

    2007-11-07

    The heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II is a Mn4OxCa cluster that cycles through five different oxidation states (S0 to S4) during the light-driven water-splitting reaction cycle. In this study we interpret the recently obtained 55Mn hyperfine coupling constants of the S0 and S2 states of the OEC [Kulik et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2392-2393] on the basis of Y-shaped spin-coupling schemes with up to four nonzero exchange coupling constants, J. This analysis rules out the presence of one or more Mn(II) ions in S0 in methanol (3%) containing samples and thereby establishes that the oxidation states of the manganese ions in S0 and S2 are, at 4 K, Mn4(III, III, III, IV) and Mn4(III, IV, IV, IV), respectively. By applying a "structure filter" that is based on the recently reported single-crystal EXAFS data on the Mn4OxCa cluster [Yano et al. Science 2006, 314, 821-825] we (i) show that this new structural model is fully consistent with EPR and 55Mn-ENDOR data, (ii) assign the Mn oxidation states to the individual Mn ions, and (iii) propose that the known shortening of one 2.85 A Mn-Mn distance in S0 to 2.75 A in S1 [Robblee et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 7459-7471] corresponds to a deprotonation of a mu-hydroxo bridge between MnA and MnB, i.e., between the outer Mn and its neighboring Mn of the mu3-oxo bridged moiety of the cluster. We summarize our results in a molecular model for the S0 --> S1 and S1 --> S2 transitions.

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  5. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  6. FTIR spectra and normal-mode analysis of a tetranuclear Manganese adamantane-like complex in two electrochemically prepared oxidation states: Relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Hendrik; Dube, Christopher E.; Armstrong, William H.; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-03-19

    The IR spectra and normal-mode analysis of the adamantane-like compound [Mn4O6(bpea)4]n+ in two oxidation states, MnIV4 and MnIIIMnIV3, that are relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II are presented. Mn-O vibrational modes are identified with isotopic exchange, 16O->18O, of the mono-(mu)-oxo bridging atoms in the complex. IR spectra of the MnIIIMnIV3 species are obtained by electrochemical reduction of the MnIV4 species using a spectroelectrochemical cell, based on attenuated total reflection [Visser et al. Anal Chem 2001, 73, 4374-4378]. A novel method of subtraction is used to reduce background contributions from solvent and ligand modes, and the difference and double-difference spectra are used in identifying Mn-O bridging modes that are sensitive to oxidation state change. Two strong IR bands are observed for the MnIV4 species at 745 and 707 cm-1 and a weaker band at 510 cm-1. Upon reduction, the MnIIIMnIV3 species exhibits two strong IR bands at 745 and 680 cm-1, and several weaker bands are observed in the 510 - 425 cm-1 range. A normal mode analysis is performed to assign all the relevant bridging modes in the oxidized MnIV4 and reduced MnIIIMnIV3 species. The calculated force constants for the MnIV4 species are = 3.15 mdynAngstrom, = 0.55 mdyn/Angstrom, and = 0.20 mdyn/Angstrom. The force constants for the MnIIIMnIV3 species are = 3.10 mdyn/Angstrom, = 2.45 mdyn/Angstrom, = 0.40, and = 0.15 mdyn/Angstrom. This study provides insights for the identification of Mn-O modes in the IR spectra of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex during its catalytic cycle.

  7. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile.

  8. Finite element analysis of metallurgical phase transformations in AA 6056-T4 and their effects upon the residual stress and distortion states of a laser welded T-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Nelias, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.nelias@insa-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Jullien, Jean-Francois [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Boitout, Frederic; Dischert, Luc; Noe, Xavier [ESI Group Le Recamier 70, rue Robert 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

    2011-01-15

    Aircraft industry makes extensive use of aluminium alloy AA 6056-T4 in the fabrication of fuselage panels using laser beam welding technique. Since high temperatures are involved in the manufacturing process, the precipitation/dissolution occurrences are expected as solid state phase transformations. These transformations are likely to affect the residual distortion and stress states of the component. The present work investigates the effect of metallurgical phase transformations upon the residual stresses and distortions induced by laser beam welding in a T-joint configuration using the finite element method. Two separate models were studied using different finite element codes, where the first one describes a thermo-mechanical analysis using Abaqus; while the second one discusses a thermo-metallo-mechanical analysis using Sysweld. A comparative analysis of experimentally validated finite element models has been performed and the residual stress states with and without the metallurgical phase transformations are predicted. The results show that the inclusion of phase transformations has a negligible effect on predicted distortions, which are in agreement with the experimental data, but an effect on predicted residual stresses, although the experimentally measured residual stresses are not available to support the analyses.

  9. Frontiers of finite temperature lattice QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsányi Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available I review a selection of recent finite temperature lattice results of the past years. First I discuss the extension of the equation of state towards high temperatures and finite densities, then I show recent results on the QCD topological susceptibility at high temperatures and highlight its relevance for dark matter search.

  10. Evolution of evolvability in gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crombach

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks are perhaps the most important organizational level in the cell where signals from the cell state and the outside environment are integrated in terms of activation and inhibition of genes. For the last decade, the study of such networks has been fueled by large-scale experiments and renewed attention from the theoretical field. Different models have been proposed to, for instance, investigate expression dynamics, explain the network topology we observe in bacteria and yeast, and for the analysis of evolvability and robustness of such networks. Yet how these gene regulatory networks evolve and become evolvable remains an open question. An individual-oriented evolutionary model is used to shed light on this matter. Each individual has a genome from which its gene regulatory network is derived. Mutations, such as gene duplications and deletions, alter the genome, while the resulting network determines the gene expression pattern and hence fitness. With this protocol we let a population of individuals evolve under Darwinian selection in an environment that changes through time. Our work demonstrates that long-term evolution of complex gene regulatory networks in a changing environment can lead to a striking increase in the efficiency of generating beneficial mutations. We show that the population evolves towards genotype-phenotype mappings that allow for an orchestrated network-wide change in the gene expression pattern, requiring only a few specific gene indels. The genes involved are hubs of the networks, or directly influencing the hubs. Moreover, throughout the evolutionary trajectory the networks maintain their mutational robustness. In other words, evolution in an alternating environment leads to a network that is sensitive to a small class of beneficial mutations, while the majority of mutations remain neutral: an example of evolution of evolvability.

  11. Approximate equations of state for a finite lattice system with two-, three-, and four-body potentials: Models for the binding of oxygen to hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jeffrey P.

    1992-06-01

    result is a one-parameter equation of state that does not exhibit a phase transition for a finite system, but may exhibit a phase transition in the limit of infinite system size (depending on the magnitude of the cooperativeness parameter).

  12. Evolving adrenal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajitesh Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis is the most common cause of Addison′s disease in India. The exact status of adrenal reserve in tuberculosis is still an enigma and recovery of adrenal function is unpredictable. Objective: We report a case with a pre-Addisonian state and unchanged adrenal size after 1 year treatment. Materials and Methods: A 31-year patient with adrenal tuberculosis was diagnosed and treated with anti tubercular drugs (ATDs and steroid. Results: A 31-year male, presented with fever and weight loss for 3½ months with anorexia, nausea, hyperpigmentation of skin, and buccal mucosa and weakness with past h/o adequately treated pulmonary tuberculosis at 3 years of age. On examination, the patient was anemic. A non-tender, firm right (Rt. submandibular lymphnode was palpable. Investigations revealed: High erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, negative HIV, and sputum for acid fast bacilli (AFB. Initial cortisol was high but subsequently became low with negative short synacthin test (SST. Computed tomography showed bilateral (B/L enlarged hypodense adrenal mass with inconclusive fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and negative AFB culture. Rt. submandibular lymph node FNAC showed caseating granuloma. ATDs and steroids were started, the lymphadenopathy regressed and symptoms subsided. However, after 1 year of treatment steroid withdrawal failed and adrenal size remained the same. Conclusion: The adrenal has considerable capacity to regenerate during active infection and ultimately become normal or smaller in size. However, in the case reported here, they failed to regress. Reversal of adrenal function following ATD is a controversial issue. Some studies have shown normalization following therapy, while others have contradicted it similar to the finding in our case.

  13. Finite Coverings by Cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijs, S.H.; Reijnierse, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers analogues of statements concerning compactness and finite coverings, in which the roles of spheres are replaced by cones. Furthermore, one of the finite covering results provides an application in Multi-Objective Programming; infinite sets of alternatives are reduced to finite

  14. Density functional calculations of (55)Mn, (14)N and (13)C electron paramagnetic resonance parameters support an energetically feasible model system for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, Sandra; Schraut, Johannes; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Siegbahn, Per E M; Kaupp, Martin

    2010-09-10

    Metal and ligand hyperfine couplings of a previously suggested, energetically feasible Mn(4)Ca model cluster (SG2009(-1)) for the S(2) state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) have been studied by broken-symmetry density functional methods and compared with other suggested structural and spectroscopic models. This was carried out explicitly for different spin-coupling patterns of the S=1/2 ground state of the Mn(III)(Mn(IV))(3) cluster. By applying spin-projection techniques and a scaling of the manganese hyperfine couplings, computation of the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters allows a direct evaluation of the proposed models in comparison with data obtained from the simulation of EPR, ENDOR, and ESEEM spectra. The computation of (55)Mn hyperfine couplings (HFCs) for SG2009(-1) gives excellent agreement with experiment. However, at the current level of spin projection, the (55)Mn HFCs do not appear sufficiently accurate to distinguish between different structural models. Yet, of all the models studied, SG2009(-1) is the only one with the Mn(III) site at the Mn(C) center, which is coordinated by histidine (D1-His332). The computed histidine (14)N HFC anisotropy for SG2009(-1) gives much better agreement with ESEEM data than the other models, in which Mn(C) is an Mn(IV) site, thus supporting the validity of the model. The (13)C HFCs of various carboxylates have been compared with (13)C ENDOR data for PSII preparations with (13)C-labelled alanine.

  15. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Glueballs at finite temperature from AdS/QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Alex S., E-mail: astmiranda@if.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Astrofisica Teorica e Observacional, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, 45650-000, Ilheus, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Ballon Bayona, C.A., E-mail: ballon@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Boschi-Filho, Henrique, E-mail: boschi@if.ufrj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Braga, Nelson R.F., E-mail: braga@if.ufrj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    Inspired in the AdS/CFT correspondence, a variety of holographic phenomenological models have been proposed in the last years to describe non-perturbative aspects of strong interactions. These models are denominated as AdS/QCD. In this work we review the use of the AdS/QCD soft-wall model to investigate the spectrum of scalar glueballs at finite temperature. The scalar glueball states are identified as the poles of the retarded correlation function of the glueball operator. In the gauge/gravity duality, these poles are determined by the quasinormal spectrum of a massless scalar field propagating in the bulk geometry that consists on an AdS5 black hole with a background dilaton field. We discuss some results for masses and decay widths of scalar glueballs in the plasma phase and analyze how these quantities evolve with temperature and momentum.

  17. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Buick

    2008-01-01

    ...2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event...

  18. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  19. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  20. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  1. Orientation of the tetranuclear manganese cluster and tyrosine Z in the O(2)-evolving complex of photosystem II: An EPR study of the S(2)Y(Z)(*) state in oriented acetate-inhibited photosystem II membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, K V; Eaton, S S; Eaton, G R; Brudvig, G W

    1999-09-28

    Inhibitory treatment by acetate, followed by illumination and rapid freezing, is known to trap the S(2)Y(Z)(*) state of the O(2)-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PS II). An EPR spectrum of this state exhibits broad split signals due to the interaction of the tyrosyl radical, Y(Z)(*), with the S = 1/2 S(2) state of the Mn(4) cluster. We present a novel approach to analyze S(2)Y(Z)(*) spectra of one-dimensionally (1-D) oriented acetate-inhibited PS II membranes to determine the magnitude and relative orientation of the S(2)Y(Z)(*) dipolar vector within the membrane. Although there exists a vast body of EPR data on isolated spins in oriented membrane sheets, the present study is the first of its kind on dipolar-coupled electron spin pairs in such systems. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique and establish a rigorous treatment to account for the disorder present in partially oriented 1-D membrane preparations. We find that (i) the point-dipole distance between Y(Z)(*) and the Mn(4) cluster is 7.9 +/- 0.2 A, (ii) the angle between the interspin vector and the thylakoid membrane normal is 75 degrees, (iii) the g(z)()-axis of the Mn(4) cluster is 70 degrees away from the membrane normal and 35 degrees away from the interspin vector, and (iv) the exchange interaction between the two spins is -275 x 10(-)(4) cm(-)(1), which is antiferromagnetic. Due to the sensitivity of EPR line shapes of oriented spin-coupled pairs to the interspin distance, the present study imposes a tighter constraint on the Y(Z)-Mn(4) point-dipole distance than obtained from randomly oriented samples. The geometric constraints obtained from the 1-D oriented sample are combined with published models of the structure of Mn-depleted PS II to propose a location of the Mn(4) cluster. A structure in which Y(Z) is hydrogen bonded to a manganese-bound hydroxide ligand is consistent with available data and favors maximal orbital overlap between the two redox center that would facilitate

  2. Effect of Ca2+/Sr2+ substitution on the electronic structure of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: a combined multifrequency EPR, 55Mn-ENDOR, and DFT study of the S2 state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Su, Ji-Hu; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Sugiura, Miwa; Kulik, Leonid; Dorlet, Pierre; Rutherford, A William; Neese, Frank; Boussac, Alain; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Messinger, Johannes

    2011-03-16

    The electronic structures of the native Mn(4)O(x)Ca cluster and the biosynthetically substituted Mn(4)O(x)Sr cluster of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus, poised in the S(2) state, were studied by X- and Q-band CW-EPR and by pulsed Q-band (55)Mn-ENDOR spectroscopy. Both wild type and tyrosine D less mutants grown photoautotrophically in either CaCl(2) or SrCl(2) containing media were measured. The obtained CW-EPR spectra of the S(2) state displayed the characteristic, clearly noticeable differences in the hyperfine pattern of the multiline EPR signal [Boussac et al. J. Biol. Chem.2004, 279, 22809-22819]. In sharp contrast, the manganese ((55)Mn) ENDOR spectra of the Ca and Sr forms of the OEC were remarkably similar. Multifrequency simulations of the X- and Q-band CW-EPR and (55)Mn-pulsed ENDOR spectra using the Spin Hamiltonian formalism were performed to investigate this surprising result. It is shown that (i) all four manganese ions contribute to the (55)Mn-ENDOR spectra; (ii) only small changes are seen in the fitted isotropic hyperfine values for the Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) containing OEC, suggesting that there is no change in the overall spin distribution (electronic coupling scheme) upon Ca(2+)/Sr(2+) substitution; (iii) the changes in the CW-EPR hyperfine pattern can be explained by a small decrease in the anisotropy of at least two hyperfine tensors. It is proposed that modifications at the Ca(2+) site may modulate the fine structure tensor of the Mn(III) ion. DFT calculations support the above conclusions. Our data analysis also provides strong support for the notion that in the S(2) state the coordination of the Mn(III) ion is square-pyramidal (5-coordinate) or octahedral (6-coordinate) with tetragonal elongation. In addition, it is shown that only one of the currently published OEC models, the Siegbahn structure [Siegbahn, P. E. M. Acc. Chem. Res.2009, 42, 1871-1880, Pantazis

  3. Evolving Random Forest for Preference Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Noor

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for pairwise preference learning through a combination of an evolutionary method and random forest. Grammatical evolution is used to describe the structure of the trees in the Random Forest (RF) and to handle the process of evolution. Evolved random forests ...... obtained for predicting pairwise self-reports of users for the three emotional states engagement, frustration and challenge show very promising results that are comparable and in some cases superior to those obtained from state-of-the-art methods....

  4. The dirac equation in the algebraic approximation : VIII. Comparison of finite basis set and finite element molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations for the H-2, LiH, and BH ground states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiney, HM; Glushkov, VN; Wilson, S

    2002-01-01

    Using basis sets of distributed s-type Gaussian functions with positions and exponents optimized so as to support Hartree-Fock total energies with an accuracy approaching the sub-muHartree level, Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Coulomb calculations are reported for the ground states of the H-2, LiH, and BH

  5. (N+1)-dimensional Lorentzian evolving wormholes supported by polytropic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Universidad del Bio-Bio, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Concepcion (Chile); Arostica, Fernanda; Bahamonde, Sebastian [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we study (N+1)-dimensional evolving wormholes supported by energy satisfying a polytropic equation of state. The considered evolving wormhole models are described by a constant redshift function and generalizes the standard flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The polytropic equation of state allows us to consider in (3+1)-dimensions generalizations of the phantom energy and the generalized Chaplygin gas sources. (orig.)

  6. ACCURATE CHEMICAL MASTER EQUATION SOLUTION USING MULTI-FINITE BUFFERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Youfang; Terebus, Anna; Liang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The discrete chemical master equation (dCME) provides a fundamental framework for studying stochasticity in mesoscopic networks. Because of the multi-scale nature of many networks where reaction rates have large disparity, directly solving dCMEs is intractable due to the exploding size of the state space. It is important to truncate the state space effectively with quantified errors, so accurate solutions can be computed. It is also important to know if all major probabilistic peaks have been computed. Here we introduce the Accurate CME (ACME) algorithm for obtaining direct solutions to dCMEs. With multi-finite buffers for reducing the state space by O(n!), exact steady-state and time-evolving network probability landscapes can be computed. We further describe a theoretical framework of aggregating microstates into a smaller number of macrostates by decomposing a network into independent aggregated birth and death processes, and give an a priori method for rapidly determining steady-state truncation errors. The maximal sizes of the finite buffers for a given error tolerance can also be pre-computed without costly trial solutions of dCMEs. We show exactly computed probability landscapes of three multi-scale networks, namely, a 6-node toggle switch, 11-node phage-lambda epigenetic circuit, and 16-node MAPK cascade network, the latter two with no known solutions. We also show how probabilities of rare events can be computed from first-passage times, another class of unsolved problems challenging for simulation-based techniques due to large separations in time scales. Overall, the ACME method enables accurate and efficient solutions of the dCME for a large class of networks. PMID:27761104

  7. Finite time analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Vaudrey, Alexandre; Baucour, Philippe; Lanzetta, François; Glises, Raynal

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper consists in a new thermodynamical description of the fuel cell, using the finite time thermodynamics. Starting from the comparison beetween a reversible fuel cell and a Carnot heat engine driven by a perfect chemical reaction, we remind that – contrary to a common opinion – both systems have the same thermodynamical performances. Thereby, we evolve the comparison beetween these two systems to the area of finite time thermodynamics. The main result...

  8. Finite Automata Implementations Considering CPU Cache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Holub

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The finite automata are mathematical models for finite state systems. More general finite automaton is the nondeterministic finite automaton (NFA that cannot be directly used. It is usually transformed to the deterministic finite automaton (DFA that then runs in time O(n, where n is the size of the input text. We present two main approaches to practical implementation of DFA considering CPU cache. The first approach (represented by Table Driven and Hard Coded implementations is suitable forautomata being run very frequently, typically having cycles. The other approach is suitable for a collection of automata from which various automata are retrieved and then run. This second kind of automata are expected to be cycle-free. 

  9. Determination of excited states of quantum systems by finite difference time domain method (FDTD) with supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudiarta, I. Wayan; Angraini, Lily Maysari, E-mail: lilyangraini@unram.ac.id [Physics Study Program, University of Mataram, Jln. Majapahit 62 Mataram, NTB (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    We have applied the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with the supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY-QM) procedure to determine excited energies of one dimensional quantum systems. The theoretical basis of FDTD, SUSY-QM, a numerical algorithm and an illustrative example for a particle in a one dimensional square-well potential were given in this paper. It was shown that the numerical results were in excellent agreement with theoretical results. Numerical errors produced by the SUSY-QM procedure was due to errors in estimations of superpotentials and supersymmetric partner potentials.

  10. Finite element procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Finite element procedures are now an important and frequently indispensable part of engineering analyses and scientific investigations. This book focuses on finite element procedures that are very useful and are widely employed. Formulations for the linear and nonlinear analyses of solids and structures, fluids, and multiphysics problems are presented, appropriate finite elements are discussed, and solution techniques for the governing finite element equations are given. The book presents general, reliable, and effective procedures that are fundamental and can be expected to be in use for a long time. The given procedures form also the foundations of recent developments in the field.

  11. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  12. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  13. Finite Control in Korean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kum Young

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores finite control in Korean. An overview of the previous studies of control shows that the mainstream literature on control has consistently argued that referential dependence between an overt matrix argument and an embedded null subject is characteristic of non-finite clauses which contain a PRO subject. Moreover, although some…

  14. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  15. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  16. Cook-Levin Theorem Algorithmic-Reducibility/Completeness = Wilson Renormalization-(Semi)-Group Fixed-Points; ``Noise''-Induced Phase-Transitions (NITs) to Accelerate Algorithmics (``NIT-Picking'') REPLACING CRUTCHES!!!: Models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Frederic; Siegel, Edward

    Cook-Levin theorem theorem algorithmic computational-complexity(C-C) algorithmic-equivalence reducibility/completeness equivalence to renormalization-(semi)-group phase-transitions critical-phenomena statistical-physics universality-classes fixed-points, is exploited via Siegel FUZZYICS =CATEGORYICS = ANALOGYICS =PRAGMATYICS/CATEGORY-SEMANTICS ONTOLOGY COGNITION ANALYTICS-Aristotle ``square-of-opposition'' tabular list-format truth-table matrix analytics predicts and implements ''noise''-induced phase-transitions (NITs) to accelerate versus to decelerate Harel [Algorithmics (1987)]-Sipser[Intro.Thy. Computation(`97)] algorithmic C-C: ''NIT-picking''(!!!), to optimize optimization-problems optimally(OOPO). Versus iso-''noise'' power-spectrum quantitative-only amplitude/magnitude-only variation stochastic-resonance, ''NIT-picking'' is ''noise'' power-spectrum QUALitative-type variation via quantitative critical-exponents variation. Computer-''science''/SEANCE algorithmic C-C models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata,..., discrete-maths graph-theory equivalence to physics Feynman-diagrams are identified as early-days once-workable valid but limiting IMPEDING CRUTCHES(!!!), ONLY IMPEDE latter-days new-insights!!!

  17. On Constructing Finite, Finitely Subadditive Outer Measures, and Submodularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Traina

    2008-01-01

    functions on the lattice generated by . Lastly, we describe a construction of a finite, finitely subadditive outer measure given an arbitrary family of subsets, ℬ, of and a nonnegative, finite set function defined on ℬ.

  18. The Evolving Resource Metadata Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    The search and discovery mechanisms that will facilitate and simplify systematic research on the Internet depend on systematic classifications of resources, as well as on standardized access to such metadata. The principles and technologies that will make this possible are evolving in the work of the Internet Engineering Task Force and the digital library initiatives, among others. The desired outcome is a set of standards, tools, and practices that permits both cataloging and retrieval to be comprehensive and efficient.

  19. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  20. Relativistic mean field theory with the pion for finite nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, S.; Toki, H.; Ikeda, K.; Minkov, N

    2003-07-14

    We study the possible occurrence of finite pion mean field in finite nuclei in the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. We calculate explicitly various N = Z closed-shell nuclei with finite pion mean field in the RMF theory with the standard parameter set and the pion-nucleon coupling in free space. The finite pion mean field is introduced by breaking the parity symmetry of intrinsic single-particle states. We demonstrate the actual occurrence and the property of the finite pion mean field.

  1. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  2. Envisioning the Infinite by Projecting Finite Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We analyze interviews with 24 post-secondary students as they reason about infinite processes in the context of the tricky Tennis Ball Problem. By metaphorically projecting various properties from the finite states such as counting and indexing, participants envisioned widely varying final states for the infinite process. Depending on which…

  3. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saeedian, M; Jafari, G R; Kertesz, J

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences peoples willingness to contact others: A friendly contact may be turned to unfriendly to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected (SI) disease spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heiders theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte-Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find loc...

  4. Verifying continuous-variable entanglement in finite spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2009-05-01

    Starting from arbitrary Hilbert spaces, we reduce the problem to verify entanglement of any bipartite quantum state to finite-dimensional subspaces. Entanglement can be fully characterized as a finite-dimensional property, even though in general the truncation of the Hilbert space may cause fake nonclassicality. A generalization for multipartite quantum states is also given.

  5. QUARKONIUM AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETRECZKY,P.

    2003-07-21

    The author discusses quarkonium spectral functions at finite temperature reconstructed using the Maximum Entropy Method. The author shows in particular that the J/{psi} survives in the deconfined phase up to 1.5T{sub c}.

  6. Finite BMS transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnich, Glenn [Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Université Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Troessaert, Cédric [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs),Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

    2016-03-24

    The action of finite BMS and Weyl transformations on the gravitational data at null infinity is worked out in three and four dimensions in the case of an arbitrary conformal factor for the boundary metric induced on Scri.

  7. The evolvability of programmable hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In biological systems, individual phenotypes are typically adopted by multiple genotypes. Examples include protein structure phenotypes, where each structure can be adopted by a myriad individual amino acid sequence genotypes. These genotypes form vast connected ‘neutral networks’ in genotype space. The size of such neutral networks endows biological systems not only with robustness to genetic change, but also with the ability to evolve a vast number of novel phenotypes that occur near any one neutral network. Whether technological systems can be designed to have similar properties is poorly understood. Here we ask this question for a class of programmable electronic circuits that compute digital logic functions. The functional flexibility of such circuits is important in many applications, including applications of evolutionary principles to circuit design. The functions they compute are at the heart of all digital computation. We explore a vast space of 1045 logic circuits (‘genotypes’) and 1019 logic functions (‘phenotypes’). We demonstrate that circuits that compute the same logic function are connected in large neutral networks that span circuit space. Their robustness or fault-tolerance varies very widely. The vicinity of each neutral network contains circuits with a broad range of novel functions. Two circuits computing different functions can usually be converted into one another via few changes in their architecture. These observations show that properties important for the evolvability of biological systems exist in a commercially important class of electronic circuitry. They also point to generic ways to generate fault-tolerant, adaptable and evolvable electronic circuitry. PMID:20534598

  8. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  9. Epidemic spreading on evolving signed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedian, M.; Azimi-Tafreshi, N.; Jafari, G. R.; Kertesz, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies of disease spreading consider the underlying social network as obtained without the contagion, though epidemic influences people's willingness to contact others: A "friendly" contact may be turned to "unfriendly" to avoid infection. We study the susceptible-infected disease-spreading model on signed networks, in which each edge is associated with a positive or negative sign representing the friendly or unfriendly relation between its end nodes. In a signed network, according to Heider's theory, edge signs evolve such that finally a state of structural balance is achieved, corresponding to no frustration in physics terms. However, the danger of infection affects the evolution of its edge signs. To describe the coupled problem of the sign evolution and disease spreading, we generalize the notion of structural balance by taking into account the state of the nodes. We introduce an energy function and carry out Monte Carlo simulations on complete networks to test the energy landscape, where we find local minima corresponding to the so-called jammed states. We study the effect of the ratio of initial friendly to unfriendly connections on the propagation of disease. The steady state can be balanced or a jammed state such that a coexistence occurs between susceptible and infected nodes in the system.

  10. Damage Detection and Identification of Finite Element Models Using State-Space Based Signal Processing a Summation of Work Completed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 1999 to April 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, G.C.

    2000-04-28

    Until recently, attempts to update Finite Element Models (FEM) of large structures based upon recording structural motions were mostly ad hoc, requiring a large amount of engineering experience and skill. Studies have been undertaken at LLNL to use state-space based signal processing techniques to locate the existence and type of model mismatches common in FEM. Two different methods (Gauss-Newton gradient search and extended Kalman filter) have been explored, and the progress made in each type of algorithm as well as the results from several simulated and one actual building model will be discussed. The algorithms will be examined in detail, and the computer programs written to implement the algorithms will be documented.

  11. Quantum mechanics in an evolving Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; O'Regan, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Many basis sets for electronic structure calculations evolve with varying external parameters, such as moving atoms in dynamic simulations, giving rise to extra derivative terms in the dynamical equations. Here we revisit these derivatives in the context of differential geometry, thereby obtaining a more transparent formalization, and a geometrical perspective for better understanding the resulting equations. The effect of the evolution of the basis set within the spanned Hilbert space separates explicitly from the effect of the turning of the space itself when moving in parameter space, as the tangent space turns when moving in a curved space. New insights are obtained using familiar concepts in that context such as the Riemann curvature. The differential geometry is not strictly that for curved spaces as in general relativity, a more adequate mathematical framework being provided by fiber bundles. The language used here, however, will be restricted to tensors and basic quantum mechanics. The local gauge implied by a smoothly varying basis set readily connects with Berry's formalism for geometric phases. Generalized expressions for the Berry connection and curvature are obtained for a parameter-dependent occupied Hilbert space spanned by nonorthogonal Wannier functions. The formalism is applicable to basis sets made of atomic-like orbitals and also more adaptative moving basis functions (such as in methods using Wannier functions as intermediate or support bases), but should also apply to other situations in which nonorthogonal functions or related projectors should arise. The formalism is applied to the time-dependent quantum evolution of electrons for moving atoms. The geometric insights provided here allow us to propose new finite-difference time integrators, and also better understand those already proposed.

  12. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Brunton

    Full Text Available In this wIn this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD. DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control.ork, we

  13. Combinatorics of Finite Words and Suffix Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fici, Gabriele

    The suffix automaton of a finite word is the minimal deterministic automaton accepting the language of its suffixes. The states of the suffix automaton are the classes of an equivalence relation defined on the set of factors. We explore the relationship between the combinatorial properties of a finite word and the structural properties of its suffix automaton. We give formulas for expressing the total number of states and the total number of edges of the suffix automaton in terms of special factors of the word.

  14. Primordial evolvability: Impasses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasas, Vera; Fernando, Chrisantha; Szilágyi, András; Zachár, István; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    While it is generally agreed that some kind of replicating non-living compounds were the precursors of life, there is much debate over their possible chemical nature. Metabolism-first approaches propose that mutually catalytic sets of simple organic molecules could be capable of self-replication and rudimentary chemical evolution. In particular, the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, depicting assemblies of amphiphilic molecules, has received considerable interest. The system propagates compositional information across generations and is suggested to be a target of natural selection. However, evolutionary simulations indicate that the system lacks selectability (i.e. selection has negligible effect on the equilibrium concentrations). We elaborate on the lessons learnt from the example of the GARD model and, more widely, on the issue of evolvability, and discuss the implications for similar metabolism-first scenarios. We found that simple incorporation-type chemistry based on non-covalent bonds, as assumed in GARD, is unlikely to result in alternative autocatalytic cycles when catalytic interactions are randomly distributed. An even more serious problem stems from the lognormal distribution of catalytic factors, causing inherent kinetic instability of such loops, due to the dominance of efficiently catalyzed components that fail to return catalytic aid. Accordingly, the dynamics of the GARD model is dominated by strongly catalytic, but not auto-catalytic, molecules. Without effective autocatalysis, stable hereditary propagation is not possible. Many repetitions and different scaling of the model come to no rescue. Despite all attempts to show the contrary, the GARD model is not evolvable, in contrast to reflexively autocatalytic networks, complemented by rare uncatalyzed reactions and compartmentation. The latter networks, resting on the creation and breakage of chemical bonds, can generate novel ('mutant') autocatalytic loops from a given set of

  15. Peripartum hysterectomy: an evolving picture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Turner, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Peripartum hysterectomy (PH) is one of the obstetric catastrophes. Evidence is emerging that the role of PH in modern obstetrics is evolving. Improving management of postpartum hemorrhage and newer surgical techniques should decrease PH for uterine atony. Rising levels of repeat elective cesarean deliveries should decrease PH following uterine scar rupture in labor. Increasing cesarean rates, however, have led to an increase in the number of PHs for morbidly adherent placenta. In the case of uterine atony or rupture where PH is required, a subtotal PH is often sufficient. In the case of pathological placental localization involving the cervix, however, a total hysterectomy is required. Furthermore, the involvement of other pelvic structures may prospectively make the diagnosis difficult and the surgery challenging. If resources permit, PH for pathological placental localization merits a multidisciplinary approach. Despite advances in clinical practice, it is likely that peripartum hysterectomy will be more challenging for obstetricians in the future.

  16. Extreme evolved solar systems (EESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2017-08-01

    In just 20 years, we went from not knowing if the solar system is a fluke of Nature to realising that it is totally normal for stars to have planets. More remarkably, it is now clear that planet formation is a robust process, as rich multi-planet systems are found around stars more massive and less massive than the Sun. More recently, planetary systems have been identified in increasingly complex architectures, including circumbinary planets, wide binaries with planets orbiting one or both stellar components, and planets in triple stellar systems.We have also learned that many planetary systems will survive the evolution of their host stars into the white dwarf phase. Small bodies are scattered by unseen planets into the gravitational field of the white dwarfs, tidally disrupt, form dust discs, and eventually accrete onto the white dwarf, where they can be spectroscopically detected. HST/COS has played a critical role in the study these evolved planetary systems, demonstrating that overall the bulk composition of the debris is rocky and resembles in composition the inner the solar system, including evidence for water-rich planetesimals. Past observations of planetary systems at white dwarfs have focused on single stars with main-sequence progenitors of 1.5 to 2.5Msun. Here we propose to take the study of evolved planetary systems into the extremes of parameter ranges to answer questions such as: * How efficient is planet formation around 4-10Msun stars? * What are the metallicities of the progenitors of debris-accreting white dwarfs?* What is the fate of circumbinary planets?* Can star-planet interactions generate magnetic fields in the white dwarf host?

  17. Bound-state energy of the three-dimensional Ising model in the broken-symmetry phase: suppressed finite-size corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2008-05-01

    The low-lying spectrum of the three-dimensional Ising model is investigated numerically; we made use of an equivalence between the excitation gap and the reciprocal correlation length. In the broken-symmetry phase, the magnetic excitations are attractive, forming a bound state with an excitation gap m_{2} (mass-gap ratio as m_{2}/m_{1}=1.84(3) .

  18. Evidence for a Finite-Temperature Insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, M; Kalok, D; Tamir, I; Mitra, S; Sacépé, B; Shahar, D

    2015-08-27

    In superconductors the zero-resistance current-flow is protected from dissipation at finite temperatures (T) by virtue of the short-circuit condition maintained by the electrons that remain in the condensed state. The recently suggested finite-T insulator and the "superinsulating" phase are different because any residual mechanism of conduction will eventually become dominant as the finite-T insulator sets-in. If the residual conduction is small it may be possible to observe the transition to these intriguing states. We show that the conductivity of the high magnetic-field insulator terminating superconductivity in amorphous indium-oxide exhibits an abrupt drop, and seem to approach a zero conductance at T insulator.

  19. Five lowest S1 states of the Be atom calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and QED corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Komasa, Jacek; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-08-01

    We have performed very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the five lowest S states of the beryllium atom. In the nonrelativistic part of the calculations we used the variational method and we explicitly included the nuclear motion in the Schrödinger equation. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the five states were expanded in terms of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. These wave functions were used to calculate the leading α2 relativistic correction ( α is the fine structure constant) and the α3 quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the α4 QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement.

  20. Finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Finite element analysis is an engineering method for the numerical analysis of complex structures. This book provides a bird's eye view on this very broad matter through 27 original and innovative research studies exhibiting various investigation directions. Through its chapters the reader will have access to works related to Biomedical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Process Analysis and Civil Engineering. The text is addressed not only to researchers, but also to professional engineers, engineering lecturers and students seeking to gain a better understanding of where Finite Element Analysis stands today.

  1. A weighted network evolving model with capacity constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XiaoHuan; Zhu, JinFu; Wu, WeiWei; Ge, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Most of existing works on complex network assumed that the nodes and edges were uncapacitated during the evolving process, and displayed "rich club" phenomenon. Here we will show that the "rich club" could be changed to "common rich" if we consider the node capacity. In this paper, we define the node and edge attractive index with node capacity, and propose a new evolving model on the base of BBV model, with evolving simulations of the networks. In the new model, an entering node is linked with an existing node according to the preferential attachment mechanism defined with the attractive index of the existing node. We give the theoretical approximation and simulation solutions. If node capacity is finite, the rich node may not be richer further when the node strength approaches or gets to the node capacity. This is confirmed by analyzing the passenger traffic and routes of Chinese main airports. Due to node strength being function of time t, we can use the theoretical approximation solution to forecast how node strength changes and the time when node strength reaches its maximum value.

  2. Social networks: Evolving graphs with memory dependent edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The plethora of digital communication technologies, and their mass take up, has resulted in a wealth of interest in social network data collection and analysis in recent years. Within many such networks the interactions are transient: thus those networks evolve over time. In this paper we introduce a class of models for such networks using evolving graphs with memory dependent edges, which may appear and disappear according to their recent history. We consider time discrete and time continuous variants of the model. We consider the long term asymptotic behaviour as a function of parameters controlling the memory dependence. In particular we show that such networks may continue evolving forever, or else may quench and become static (containing immortal and/or extinct edges). This depends on the existence or otherwise of certain infinite products and series involving age dependent model parameters. We show how to differentiate between the alternatives based on a finite set of observations. To test these ideas we show how model parameters may be calibrated based on limited samples of time dependent data, and we apply these concepts to three real networks: summary data on mobile phone use from a developing region; online social-business network data from China; and disaggregated mobile phone communications data from a reality mining experiment in the US. In each case we show that there is evidence for memory dependent dynamics, such as that embodied within the class of models proposed here.

  3. Survival of time-evolved quantum correlations depending on whether quenching is across a critical point in an X Y spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.

    2016-04-01

    The time dynamics of quantum correlations in the quantum transverse anisotropic X Y spin chain of infinite length is studied at zero and finite temperatures. The evolution occurs due to the instantaneous quenching of the coupling constant between the nearest-neighbor spins of the model, which is performed either within the same phase or across the quantum phase-transition point connecting the order-disorder phases of the model. We characterize the time-evolved quantum correlations, viz., entanglement and quantum discord, which exhibit varying behavior depending on the initial state and the quenching scheme. We show that the system is endowed with enhanced nearest-neighbor bipartite quantum correlations compared to that of the initial state, when quenched from the ordered to the deep disordered phase. However, nearest-neighbor quantum correlations are almost washed out when the system is quenched from the disordered to the ordered phase with the initial state being at the zero temperature. We also identify the condition for the occurrence of enhanced bipartite correlations when the system is quenched within the same phase. Moreover, we investigate the bipartite quantum correlations when the initial state is a thermal equilibrium state with finite temperature, which reveals the effects of thermal fluctuation on the phenomena observed at zero temperature. Finally, an analogous analysis is carried out for zero-temperature next-nearest-neighbor quantum correlations.

  4. Algorithms for finite rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciocanea Teodorescu I.,

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we are interested in describing algorithms that answer questions arising in ring and module theory. Our focus is on deterministic polynomial-time algorithms and rings and modules that are finite. The first main result of this thesis is a solution to the module isomorphism problem in

  5. Inside finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    All relevant implementation aspects of finite element methods are discussed in this book. The focus is on algorithms and data structures as well as on their concrete implementation. Theory is covered as far as it gives insight into the construction of algorithms. Throughout the exercises a complete FE-solver for scalar 2D problems will be implemented in Matlab/Octave.

  6. CERN internal communication is evolving

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN news will now be regularly updated on the CERN People page (see here).      Dear readers, All over the world, communication is becoming increasingly instantaneous, with news published in real time on websites and social networks. In order to keep pace with these changes, CERN's internal communication is evolving too. From now on, you will be informed of what’s happening at CERN more often via the “CERN people” page, which will frequently be updated with news. The Bulletin is following this trend too: twice a month, we will compile the most important articles published on the CERN site, with a brand-new layout. You will receive an e-mail every two weeks as soon as this new form of the Bulletin is available. If you have interesting news or stories to share, tell us about them through the form at: https://communications.web.cern.ch/got-story-cern-website​. You can also find out about news from CERN in real time...

  7. Finite approximate controllability for semilinear heat equations in noncylindrical domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Silvano B. de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate finite approximate controllability for semilinear heat equation in noncylindrical domains. First we study the linearized problem and then by an application of the fixed point result of Leray-Schauder we obtain the finite approximate controllability for the semilinear state equation.

  8. The Socle and finite dimensionality of some Banach algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of this note is to describe some algebraic conditions on a Banach algebra which force it to be finite dimensional. One of the main results in Theorem 2 which states that for a locally compact group , is compact if there exists a measure in S o c ( L 1 ( G ) ) such that () ≠ 0. We also prove that is finite if S ...

  9. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  10. STABLE STATIONARY STATES OF NON-LOCAL INTERACTION EQUATIONS

    KAUST Repository

    FELLNER, KLEMENS

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the large-time behaviour of a solution to a non-local interaction equation, where a density of particles/individuals evolves subject to an interaction potential and an external potential. It is known that for regular interaction potentials, stable stationary states of these equations are generically finite sums of Dirac masses. For a finite sum of Dirac masses, we give (i) a condition to be a stationary state, (ii) two necessary conditions of linear stability w.r.t. shifts and reallocations of individual Dirac masses, and (iii) show that these linear stability conditions imply local non-linear stability. Finally, we show that for regular repulsive interaction potential Wε converging to a singular repulsive interaction potential W, the Dirac-type stationary states ρ̄ ε approximate weakly a unique stationary state ρ̄ ∈ L∞. We illustrate our results with numerical examples. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  11. Quasispecies theory for finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Man; Muñoz, Enrique; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    We present stochastic, finite-population formulations of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of quasispecies theory, for fitness functions that depend in an arbitrary way on the number of mutations from the wild type. We include back mutations in our description. We show that the fluctuation of the population numbers about the average values is exceedingly large in these physical models of evolution. We further show that horizontal gene transfer reduces by orders of magnitude the fluctuations in the population numbers and reduces the accumulation of deleterious mutations in the finite population due to Muller’s ratchet. Indeed, the population sizes needed to converge to the infinite population limit are often larger than those found in nature for smooth fitness functions in the absence of horizontal gene transfer. These analytical results are derived for the steady state by means of a field-theoretic representation. Numerical results are presented that indicate horizontal gene transfer speeds up the dynamics of evolution as well.

  12. Wigner distribution function for finite signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kurt B.; Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Chumakov, Sergey M.

    1997-07-01

    We construct a bilinear form with the properties of the Wigner distribution function for a model of finite optics: the multimodal linear waveguide. This is a guide that can carry a finite number of oscillator modes, and sends/reads the data by an equal number of sensors. The Wigner distribution function is a function of the classical observables of position and momentum, as well as the mode content; it provides a visual image corresponding to the (`musical') score of the signal. The dynamical group for this model is SU(2) and the wavefunctions span the space of a finite-dimensional irreducible representation of this group. Phase space is a sphere and the linear optical transformations are: translations along the waveguide, refractive wedges and inclined slabs, which correspond to rotations around the 3-, 1-, and 2-axes, respectively. Coherent and Schrodinger cat states are readily identified.

  13. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  14. Finiteness in Hinuq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Forker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hinuq (Nakh-Daghestanian language family, Caucasus, Russia has a rich system of verbal forms. In independent/main clauses there are seven synthetic TAM forms, 20 periphrastic TAM forms, and two heterogeneous TAM forms that cannot be attributed clearly to one of these two groups. In dependent clauses there are about twenty forms that serve adverbial function, attributive function (i.e. headed and headless relative clauses or complement function. To these forms belong suffixed forms that are traditionally called participles, adverbial participles, Infinitive and Masdar. In this paper I analyze Hinuq verb forms and clause types with respect to categories and phenomena that have been associated with finiteness. I will explore which of the criteria actually apply to Hinuq and whether they form a cluster that could be subsumed under the notion of finiteness.

  15. Finite-time stability and control

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, Francesco; Ariola, Marco; Cosentino, Carlo; De Tommasi, Gianmaria

    2014-01-01

    Finite-time stability (FTS) is a more practical concept than classical Lyapunov stability, useful for checking whether the state trajectories of a system remain within pre-specified bounds over a finite time interval. In a linear systems framework, FTS problems can be cast as convex optimization problems and solved by the use of effective off-the-shelf computational tools such as LMI solvers. Finite-time Stability and Control exploits this benefit to present the practical applications of FTS and finite-time control-theoretical results to various engineering fields. The text is divided into two parts: ·         linear systems; and ·         hybrid systems. The building of practical motivating examples helps the reader to understand the methods presented. Finite-time Stability and Control is addressed to academic researchers and to engineers working in the field of robust process control. Instructors teaching graduate courses in advanced control will also find parts of this book useful for the...

  16. Confinement at Finite Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro; Cardoso, Marco

    2017-05-01

    We show the flux tubes produced by static quark-antiquark, quark-quark and quark-gluon charges at finite temperature. The sources are placed on the lattice with fundamental and adjoint Polyakov loops. We compute the squared strengths of the chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields above and below the critical temperature. Our results are for pure gauge SU(3) gauge theory, they are invariant and all computations are done with GPUs using CUDA.

  17. Mn K-edge XANES and Kbeta XES studies of two Mn-oxo binuclear complexes: investigation of three different oxidation states relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, H; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, E; Bergmann, U; Glatzel, P; Robblee, J H; Cramer, S P; Girerd, J J; Sauer, K; Klein, M P; Yachandra, V K

    2001-07-25

    Two structurally homologous Mn compounds in different oxidation states were studied to investigate the relative influence of oxidation state and ligand environment on Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and Mn Kbeta X-ray emission spectroscopy (Kbeta XES). The two manganese compounds are the di-mu-oxo compound [L'2Mn(III)O2Mn(IV)L'2](ClO4)3, where L' is 1,10-phenanthroline (Cooper, S. R.; Calvin, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1977, 99, 6623-6630) and the linear mono-mu-oxo compound [LMn(III)OMn(III)L](ClO4)2, where L- is the monoanionic N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N'-salicylidene-1,2-diaminoethane ligand (Horner, O.; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, E.; Charlot, M. F.; Tchertanov, L.; Guilhem, J.; Mattioli, T. A.; Boussac, A.; Girerd, J.-J. Inorg. Chem. 1999, 38, 1222-1232). Preparative bulk electrolysis in acetonitrile was used to obtain higher oxidation states of the compounds: the Mn(IV)Mn(IV) species for the di-mu-oxo compound and the Mn(III)Mn(IV) and Mn(IV)Mn(IV) species for the mono-mu-oxo compound. IR, UV/vis, EPR, and EXAFS spectra were used to determine the purity and integrity of the various sample solutions. The Mn K-edge XANES spectra shift to higher energy upon oxidation when the ligand environment remains similar. However, shifts in energy are also observed when only the ligand environment is altered. This is achieved by comparing the di-mu-oxo and linear mono-mu-oxo Mn-Mn moieties in equivalent oxidation states, which represent major structural changes. The magnitude of an energy shift due to major changes in ligand environment can be as large as that of an oxidation-state change. Therefore, care must be exercised when correlating the Mn K-edge energies to manganese oxidation states without taking into account the nature of the ligand environment and the overall structure of the compound. In contrast to Mn K-edge XANES, Kbeta XES spectra show less dependence on ligand environment. The Kbeta1,3 peak energies are comparable for the di-mu-oxo and mono

  18. Multigame effect in finite populations induces strategy linkage between two games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koh

    2014-03-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics with two 2-strategy games in a finite population has been investigated in this study. Traditionally, frequency-dependent evolutionary dynamics are modeled by deterministic replicator dynamics under the assumption that the population size is infinite. However, in reality, population sizes are finite. Recently, stochastic processes in finite populations have been introduced into evolutionary games in order to study finite size effects in evolutionary game dynamics. However, most of these studies focus on populations playing only single games. In this study, we investigate a finite population with two games and show that a finite population playing two games tends to evolve toward a specific direction to form particular linkages between the strategies of the two games. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Bromide does not bind to the Mn4Ca complex in its S1 state in Cl(-)-depleted and Br(-)-reconstituted oxygen-evolving photosystem II: evidence from X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Br K-edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, Michael; Barra, Marcos; Loja, Paola; Löscher, Simone; Krivanek, Roland; Grundmeier, Alexander; Andreasson, Lars-Erik; Dau, Holger

    2006-10-31

    Chloride is an important cofactor in photosynthetic water oxidation. It can be replaced by bromide with retention of the oxygen-evolving activity of photosystem II (PSII). Binding of bromide to the Mn(4)Ca complex of PSII in its dark-stable S(1) state was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Br K-edge in Cl(-)-depleted and Br(-)-substituted PSII membrane particles from spinach. The XAS spectra exclude the presence of metal ions in the first and second coordination spheres of Br(-). EXAFS analysis provided tentative evidence of at least one metal ion, which may be manganese or calcium, at a distance of approximately 5 A to Br(-). The native Cl(-) ion may bind at a similar distance. Accordingly, water oxidation may not require binding of a halide directly to the metal ions of the Mn complex in its S(1) state.

  20. DNA evolved to minimize frameshift mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Agoni, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Point mutations can surely be dangerous but what is worst than to lose the reading frame?! Does DNA evolved a strategy to try to limit frameshift mutations?! Here we investigate if DNA sequences effectively evolved a system to minimize frameshift mutations analyzing the transcripts of proteins with high molecular weights.

  1. The evolving environmental marketplace, using green to make green[An introduction to the U.S. Green Building Council, Performance Rating Systems, LEED as a benchmarking tool in the United States and green economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andereck, K.J. [Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Using an economic perspective, it is possible to make a case for green buildings and green development practices by placing emphasis on Energy Efficiency and Environmental Design. Several case studies have demonstrated that green buildings save money through reduced consumption of natural resources, electricity and gas both at the building site and at the source of energy. Sound environmental practices and energy efficiency measures improve the environmental conditions throughout the state by reducing power plant emissions and reducing operations and maintenance budgets in the state. The author presented a case study where a green development project was guided and monitored using the Environmental Performance Rating System called Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), version 2.0. The work was registered to achieve LEED certification. A brief study on current construction related costs was also included. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  2. How does cognition evolve? Phylogenetic comparative psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Luke J.; Hare, Brian A.; Nunn, Charles L.; Anderson, Rindy C.; Aureli, Filippo; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Call, Josep; Drea, Christine M.; Emery, Nathan J.; Haun, Daniel B. M.; Herrmann, Esther; Jacobs, Lucia F.; Platt, Michael L.; Rosati, Alexandra G.; Sandel, Aaron A.; Schroepfer, Kara K.; Seed, Amanda M.; Tan, Jingzhi; van Schaik, Carel P.; Wobber, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Now more than ever animal studies have the potential to test hypotheses regarding how cognition evolves. Comparative psychologists have developed new techniques to probe the cognitive mechanisms underlying animal behavior, and they have become increasingly skillful at adapting methodologies to test multiple species. Meanwhile, evolutionary biologists have generated quantitative approaches to investigate the phylogenetic distribution and function of phenotypic traits, including cognition. In particular, phylogenetic methods can quantitatively (1) test whether specific cognitive abilities are correlated with life history (e.g., lifespan), morphology (e.g., brain size), or socio-ecological variables (e.g., social system), (2) measure how strongly phylogenetic relatedness predicts the distribution of cognitive skills across species, and (3) estimate the ancestral state of a given cognitive trait using measures of cognitive performance from extant species. Phylogenetic methods can also be used to guide the selection of species comparisons that offer the strongest tests of a priori predictions of cognitive evolutionary hypotheses (i.e., phylogenetic targeting). Here, we explain how an integration of comparative psychology and evolutionary biology will answer a host of questions regarding the phylogenetic distribution and history of cognitive traits, as well as the evolutionary processes that drove their evolution. PMID:21927850

  3. How does cognition evolve? Phylogenetic comparative psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Evan L; Matthews, Luke J; Hare, Brian A; Nunn, Charles L; Anderson, Rindy C; Aureli, Filippo; Brannon, Elizabeth M; Call, Josep; Drea, Christine M; Emery, Nathan J; Haun, Daniel B M; Herrmann, Esther; Jacobs, Lucia F; Platt, Michael L; Rosati, Alexandra G; Sandel, Aaron A; Schroepfer, Kara K; Seed, Amanda M; Tan, Jingzhi; van Schaik, Carel P; Wobber, Victoria

    2012-03-01

    Now more than ever animal studies have the potential to test hypotheses regarding how cognition evolves. Comparative psychologists have developed new techniques to probe the cognitive mechanisms underlying animal behavior, and they have become increasingly skillful at adapting methodologies to test multiple species. Meanwhile, evolutionary biologists have generated quantitative approaches to investigate the phylogenetic distribution and function of phenotypic traits, including cognition. In particular, phylogenetic methods can quantitatively (1) test whether specific cognitive abilities are correlated with life history (e.g., lifespan), morphology (e.g., brain size), or socio-ecological variables (e.g., social system), (2) measure how strongly phylogenetic relatedness predicts the distribution of cognitive skills across species, and (3) estimate the ancestral state of a given cognitive trait using measures of cognitive performance from extant species. Phylogenetic methods can also be used to guide the selection of species comparisons that offer the strongest tests of a priori predictions of cognitive evolutionary hypotheses (i.e., phylogenetic targeting). Here, we explain how an integration of comparative psychology and evolutionary biology will answer a host of questions regarding the phylogenetic distribution and history of cognitive traits, as well as the evolutionary processes that drove their evolution.

  4. On the Discovery of Evolving Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaliang; Li, Qi; Gao, Jing; Su, Lu; Zhao, Bo; Fan, Wei; Han, Jiawei

    2015-08-01

    In the era of big data, information regarding the same objects can be collected from increasingly more sources. Unfortunately, there usually exist conflicts among the information coming from different sources. To tackle this challenge, truth discovery, i.e., to integrate multi-source noisy information by estimating the reliability of each source, has emerged as a hot topic. In many real world applications, however, the information may come sequentially, and as a consequence, the truth of objects as well as the reliability of sources may be dynamically evolving. Existing truth discovery methods, unfortunately, cannot handle such scenarios. To address this problem, we investigate the temporal relations among both object truths and source reliability, and propose an incremental truth discovery framework that can dynamically update object truths and source weights upon the arrival of new data. Theoretical analysis is provided to show that the proposed method is guaranteed to converge at a fast rate. The experiments on three real world applications and a set of synthetic data demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method over state-of-the-art truth discovery methods.

  5. Combinatorics of finite sets

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Coherent treatment provides comprehensive view of basic methods and results of the combinatorial study of finite set systems. The Clements-Lindstrom extension of the Kruskal-Katona theorem to multisets is explored, as is the Greene-Kleitman result concerning k-saturated chain partitions of general partially ordered sets. Connections with Dilworth's theorem, the marriage problem, and probability are also discussed. Each chapter ends with a helpful series of exercises and outline solutions appear at the end. ""An excellent text for a topics course in discrete mathematics."" - Bulletin of the Ame

  6. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  7. Finite quantum gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  8. Finite-Time Adaptive Synchronization of a New Hyperchaotic System with Uncertain Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a finite-time adaptive synchronization strategy for a class of new hyperchaotic systems with unknown slave system’s parameters. Based on the finite-time stability theory, an adaptive control law is derived to make the states of the new hyperchaotic systems synchronized in finite-time. Numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed finite time synchronization scheme.

  9. A Finite Element Projection Method for the Solution of Particle Transport Problems with Anisotropic Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Ackroyd , R. T. "A Finite Element Technique for the Even Parity Neutron Transport Equation," The Mathematics of Finite Elements and...state transport equation. In 1972 a more detailed examination of the use of finite elements to solve neutron diffusion problems was provided by Kaper...79, 269-277 (1981). Ukai, S., "Solution of the Multi-dimensional Neutron Transport Equation by Finite Element Methods,"

  10. Évolution des relations entre État et cinéma au Royaume-Uni (1979-2005 The State and the Cinema in the United Kingdom: Evolving Relationships (1979-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Tirtaine

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A government can adopt two different stances regarding its domestic film industry. It may choose to support and protect it because of its cultural remit – or it may treat it like any other industry and adopt a laissez-faire attitude and let market forces determine its fate. The latter stance was adopted by the Thatcher government, which abolished the support system and protectionist measures from which British film had benefited for decades and granted it only few subsidies. The government severed almost all the existing links between the film industry and the State. These non-interventionist policies undoubtedly contributed to the dramatic drop in the number of British films produced and the chronic difficulties which the film industry experienced in the 1980s. The relationships between the government and the film industry have since changed considerably. The creation of the Film Council and the existence of a Film Minister within the government have definitely contributed to reinstating a dialogue between the industry and the government. State support in favour of film has increased dramatically in the past decade, with the introduction of tax incentives and new subsidies, which mostly derive from National Lottery revenues. The State’s investment in film is thus mainly indirect and it is clear that the government, by supporting British cinema, has in mind not only its contribution to the country’s culture but also to its economy. By changing the legal definition of a British film in order to entice into the UK foreign investors who want to benefit from attractive tax incentives, the government triggered an increase in the number of co-productions and foreign films shot in the UK – at the risk of undermining the identity of British cinema, and thus, the country’s culture.

  11. Resistive MHD modelling of the quasi-single helicity state in the KTX regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bing; Zhu, Ping; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong; KTX Team

    2018-01-01

    The potential formation of a quasi-single-helicity (QSH) state in the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) is investigated in resistive MHD simulations using the NIMROD code. We focus on the effects of finite resistivity on the mode structure and characteristics of the dominant linear and nonlinear resistive tearing-mode in a finite β, cylindrical configuration of a reversed field pinch model for KTX. In the typical resistive regimes of KTX where the Lundquist number S=5 × 104 , the plasma transitions to a steady QSH state after evolving through an initial transient phase with multiple helicities. The dominant mode of the QSH state develops from the dominant linear tearing mode instability. In the lower β regime, the QSH state is intermittent and short in duration; in the higher β regime, the QSH state persists for a longer time and should be more easily observed in experiments.

  12. A weak energy stationary action principle for quantum state evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, A. D.

    2003-06-01

    It is shown that the actual paths in Hilbert space followed by a finite set of n geq 2 quantum states evolving between initial and final end point configurations are such that an associated weak energy functional defined by Pancharatnam phases and state separation distances in projective Hilbert space determined by the generalized Fubini-Study metric is stationary for all variations of these phases, separations and time which vanish at the end points. Noether's theorem is used to identify two weak energy conservation laws which are shown to be the analogues of the momentum and energy conservation laws of Langrangian mechanics.

  13. A weak energy stationary action principle for quantum state evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, A D [Quantum Processing Group, Systems Research and Technology Department, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, VA 22448 (United States)

    2003-06-27

    It is shown that the actual paths in Hilbert space followed by a finite set of n {>=} 2 quantum states evolving between initial and final end point configurations are such that an associated weak energy functional defined by Pancharatnam phases and state separation distances in projective Hilbert space determined by the generalized Fubini-Study metric is stationary for all variations of these phases, separations and time which vanish at the end points. Noether's theorem is used to identify two weak energy conservation laws which are shown to be the analogues of the momentum and energy conservation laws of Langrangian mechanics.

  14. Evolving Complexity, Cognition, and Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenström, H.

    2012-12-01

    All through the history of the universe there is an apparent tendency for increasing complexity, with the organization of matter in evermore elaborate and interactive systems. The living world in general, and the human brain in particular, provides the highest complexity known. It seems obvious that all of this complexity must be the result of physical, chemical and biological evolution, but it was only with Darwin that we began to get a scientific understanding of biological evolution. Darwinian principles are guiding in our understanding of such complex systems as the nervous system, but also for the evolution of human society and technology. Living organisms have to survive in a complex and changing environment. This implies response and adaption to environmental events and changes at several time scales. The interaction with the environment depends on the present state of the organism, as well as on previous experiences stored in its molecular and cellular structures. At a longer time scale, organisms can adapt to slow environmental changes, by storing information in the genetic material carried over from generation to generation. This phylogenetic learning is complemented by ontogenetic learning, which is adaptation at a shorter time scale, occuring in non-genetic structures. The evolution of a nervous system is a major transition in biological evolution and allows for an increasing capacity for information storage and processing, increasing chances of survival. Such neural knowledge processing, cognition, shows the same principal features as nonneural adaptive processes. Similarly, consciousness might appear, to different degrees, at different stages in evolution. Both cognition and consciousness depends critically on the organization and complexity of the organism. In this presentation, I will briefly discuss general principles for evolution of complexity, focussing on the evolution of the nervous system, which provides organisms with ever increasing

  15. Evolving Pacing Strategies for Team Pursuit Track Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Markus; Day, Jareth; Jordan, Diora; Kroeger, Trent; Neumann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Team pursuit track cycling is a bicycle racing sport held on velodromes and is part of the Summer Olympics. It involves the use of strategies to minimize the overall time that a team of cyclists needs to complete a race. We present an optimisation framework for team pursuit track cycling and show how to evolve strategies using metaheuristics for this interesting real-world problem. Our experimental results show that these heuristics lead to significantly better strategies than state-of-art st...

  16. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  17. Edge Effects in Finite Elongated Graphene Nanoribbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the relevance of finite-size effects to the electronic structure of long graphene nanoribbons using a divide and conquer density functional approach. We find that for hydrogen terminated graphene nanoribbons most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite graphene nanoribbon are recovered at a length of 40 nm. Nevertheless, even for the longest systems considered (72 nm long) pronounced edge effects appear in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. The wei...

  18. WSC-07: Evolving the Web Services Challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, M. Brian; Cheung, William K.W.; Jaeger, Michael C.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is an evolving architectural paradigm where businesses can expose their capabilities as modular, network-accessible software services. By decomposing capabilities into modular services, organizations can share their offerings at multiple levels of granularity

  19. Satcom access in the evolved packet core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, M.D.; Norp, A.H.J.; Popova, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications (Satcom) networks are increasingly integrating with terrestrial communications networks, namely Next Generation Networks (NGN). In the area of NGN the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a new network architecture that can support multiple access technologies. When Satcom is

  20. Acquisition: Acquisition of the Evolved SEASPARROW Missile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... The Evolved SEASPARROW Missile, a Navy Acquisition Category II program, is an improved version of the RIM-7P SEASPARROW missile that will intercept high-speed maneuvering, anti-ship cruise missiles...

  1. Evolving effective incremental SAT solvers with GP

    OpenAIRE

    Bader, Mohamed; Poli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Hyper-Heuristics could simply be defined as heuristics to choose other heuristics, and it is a way of combining existing heuristics to generate new ones. In a Hyper-Heuristic framework, the framework is used for evolving effective incremental (Inc*) solvers for SAT. We test the evolved heuristics (IncHH) against other known local search heuristics on a variety of benchmark SAT problems.

  2. The Military Intelligence Officer Corps: Evolving Into the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Torrisi, Annette L

    2007-01-01

    For the past two decades the Military Intelligence (MI) Officer Corps of the United States Army, has evolved in response to legislative requirements, organizational culture and the changing security environment of the nation...

  3. NASA's Space Launch System: An Evolving Capability for Exploration An Evolving Capability for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Crumbly, Christopher M.; Robinson, Kimerly F.

    2016-01-01

    A foundational capability for international human deep-space exploration, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle represents a new spaceflight infrastructure asset, creating opportunities for mission profiles and space systems that cannot currently be executed. While the primary purpose of SLS, which is making rapid progress towards initial launch readiness in two years, will be to support NASA's Journey to Mars, discussions are already well underway regarding other potential utilization of the vehicle's unique capabilities. In its initial Block 1 configuration, capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) to low Earth orbit (LEO), SLS is capable of propelling the Orion crew vehicle to cislunar space, while also delivering small CubeSat-class spacecraft to deep-space destinations. With the addition of a more powerful upper stage, the Block 1B configuration of SLS will be able to deliver 105 t to LEO and enable more ambitious human missions into the proving ground of space. This configuration offers opportunities for launching co-manifested payloads with the Orion crew vehicle, and a class of secondary payloads, larger than today's CubeSats. Further upgrades to the vehicle, including advanced boosters, will evolve its performance to 130 t in its Block 2 configuration. Both Block 1B and Block 2 also offer the capability to carry 8.4- or 10-m payload fairings, larger than any contemporary launch vehicle. With unmatched mass-lift capability, payload volume, and C3, SLS not only enables spacecraft or mission designs currently impossible with contemporary EELVs, it also offers enhancing benefits, such as reduced risk, operational costs and/or complexity, shorter transit time to destination or launching large systems either monolithically or in fewer components. This paper will discuss both the performance and capabilities of Space Launch System as it evolves, and the current state of SLS utilization planning.

  4. Introduction to the Explicit Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Transient Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Shen R

    2012-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the theories and formulations of the explicit finite element method As numerical technology continues to grow and evolve with industrial applications, understanding the explicit finite element method has become increasingly important, particularly in the areas of crashworthiness, metal forming, and impact engineering. Introduction to the Explicit FiniteElement Method for Nonlinear Transient Dynamics is the first book to address specifically what is now accepted as the most successful numerical tool for nonlinear transient dynamics. The book aids readers in master

  5. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...

  6. Evolvability Search: Directly Selecting for Evolvability in order to Study and Produce It

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengistu, Henok; Lehman, Joel Anthony; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of natural organisms is their significant evolvability, i.e.,their increased potential for further evolution. However, reproducing such evolvability in artificial evolution remains a challenge, which both reduces the performance of evolutionary algorithms and inhibits the study...... of evolvable digital phenotypes. Although some types of selection in evolutionary computation indirectly encourage evolvability, one unexplored possibility is to directly select for evolvability. To do so, we estimate an individual's future potential for diversity by calculating the behavioral diversity of its...... immediate offspring, and select organisms with increased offspring variation. While the technique is computationally expensive, we hypothesized that direct selection would better encourage evolvability than indirect methods. Experiments in two evolutionary robotics domains confirm this hypothesis: in both...

  7. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Bottomonium dissociation in a finite density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a holographic description of the thermal behavior of bb¯ heavy vector mesons inside a plasma at finite temperature and density. The meson dissociation in the medium is represented by the decrease in the height of the spectral function peaks. In order to find a description for the evolution of the quasi-states with temperature and chemical potential it is crucial to use a model that is consistent with the decay constant behavior. The reason is that the height of a spectral function peak is related to the value of the zero temperature decay constant of the corresponding particle. AdS/QCD holographic models are in general not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with radial excitation level. However, it was recently shown that using a soft wall background and calculating the correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, it is possible to describe the observed behavior. Here we extend this proposal to the case of finite temperature T and chemical potential μ. A clear picture of the dissociation of bottomonium states as a function of μ and T emerges from the spectral function. The energy scales where the change in chemical potential leads to changes in the thermal properties of the mesons is consistent with QCD expectations.

  9. Bottomonium dissociation in a finite density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Nelson R. F.; Ferreira, Luiz F.

    2017-10-01

    We present a holographic description of the thermal behavior of b b bar heavy vector mesons inside a plasma at finite temperature and density. The meson dissociation in the medium is represented by the decrease in the height of the spectral function peaks. In order to find a description for the evolution of the quasi-states with temperature and chemical potential it is crucial to use a model that is consistent with the decay constant behavior. The reason is that the height of a spectral function peak is related to the value of the zero temperature decay constant of the corresponding particle. AdS/QCD holographic models are in general not consistent with the observation that decay constants of heavy vector mesons decrease with radial excitation level. However, it was recently shown that using a soft wall background and calculating the correlation functions at a finite position of anti-de Sitter space, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, it is possible to describe the observed behavior. Here we extend this proposal to the case of finite temperature T and chemical potential μ. A clear picture of the dissociation of bottomonium states as a function of μ and T emerges from the spectral function. The energy scales where the change in chemical potential leads to changes in the thermal properties of the mesons is consistent with QCD expectations.

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Cracks and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čížik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method to the analysis of discontinuous structural systems has received a considerable interest in recent years. Examples of problems in which discontinuities play a prominent role in the physical behaviour of a system are numerous and include various types of contact problems and layered or jointed systems. This paper gives a state-of-the-art report on the different methods developed to date for the finite element modelling of cracks and joints in discontinuous systems. Particular attention, however, has been given to the use of joint/interface elements, since their application is considered to be most appropriate for modelling of all kinds of discontinuities that may present in a structural system. A chronology of development of the main types of joint elements, including their pertinent characteristics, is also given. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual methods and types of joint elements presented are briefly discussed, together with various applications of interest.

  11. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    While the success of electronic music often relies on the uniqueness and quality of selected timbres, many musicians struggle with complicated and expensive equipment and techniques to create their desired sounds. Instead, this paper presents a technique for producing novel timbres that are evolved......, CPPNs can theoretically compute any function and can build on those present in traditional synthesizers (e.g. square, sawtooth, triangle, and sine waves functions) to produce completely novel timbres. Evolved with NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (NEAT), the aim of this paper is to explore...... the space of potential sounds that can be generated through such compositional sound synthesis networks (CSSNs). To study the effect of evolution on subjective appreciation, participants in a listener study ranked evolved timbres by personal preference, resulting in preferences skewed toward the first...

  12. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mugler, Andrew [COLUMBIA UNIV; Ziv, Etay [COLUMBIA UNIV; Wiggins, Chris H [COLUMBIA UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  13. Evolving national cultural policies for modern African states ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Second, is to show that such policies serve as veritable intellectual sources for generation, documentation and dissemination of new ideas, concepts and models needed to enrich our general knowledge about our arts and cultures. Third, is to show the nature, structure, value and significance of the Nigerian model of the ...

  14. Stochastic delocalization of finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyrhofer, Lukas; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The localization of populations of replicating bacteria, viruses or autocatalytic chemicals arises in various contexts, such as ecology, evolution, medicine or chemistry. Several deterministic mathematical models have been used to characterize the conditions under which localized states can form, and how they break down due to convective driving forces. It has been repeatedly found that populations remain localized unless the bias exceeds a critical threshold value, and that close to the transition the population is characterized by a diverging length scale. These results, however, have been obtained upon ignoring number fluctuations (‘genetic drift’), which are inevitable given the discreteness of the replicating entities. Here, we study the localization/delocalization of a finite population in the presence of genetic drift. The population is modeled by a linear chain of subpopulations, or demes, which exchange migrants at a constant rate. Individuals in one particular deme, called ‘oasis’, receive a growth rate benefit, and the total population is regulated to have constant size N. In this ecological setting, we find that any finite population delocalizes on sufficiently long time scales. Depending on parameters, however, populations may remain localized for a very long time. The typical waiting time to delocalization increases exponentially with both population size and distance to the critical wind speed of the deterministic approximation. We augment these simulation results by a mathematical analysis that treats the reproduction and migration of individuals as branching random walks subject to global constraints. For a particular constraint, different from a fixed population size constraint, this model yields a solvable first moment equation. We find that this solvable model approximates very well the fixed population size model for large populations, but starts to deviate as population sizes are small. Nevertheless, the qualitative behavior of the

  15. Distributed Finite-Time Cooperative Control of Multiple High-Order Nonholonomic Mobile Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haibo; Wen, Guanghui; Cheng, Yingying; He, Yigang; Jia, Ruting

    2017-12-01

    The consensus problem of multiple nonholonomic mobile robots in the form of high-order chained structure is considered in this paper. Based on the model features and the finite-time control technique, a finite-time cooperative controller is explicitly constructed which guarantees that the states consensus is achieved in a finite time. As an application of the proposed results, finite-time formation control of multiple wheeled mobile robots is studied and a finite-time formation control algorithm is proposed. To show effectiveness of the proposed approach, a simulation example is given.

  16. How the first biopolymers could have evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkevich, V I; Gutin, A M; Shakhnovich, E I

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we discuss a possible origin of the first biopolymers with stable unique structures. We suggest that at the prebiotic stage of evolution, long organic polymers had to be compact to avoid hydrolysis and had to be soluble and thus must not be exceedingly hydrophobic. We present an algorithm that generates such sequences for model proteins. The evolved sequences turn out to have a stable unique structure, into which they quickly fold. This result illustrates the idea that the unique three-dimensional native structures of first biopolymers could have evolved as a side effect of nonspecific physicochemical factors acting at the prebiotic stage of evolution. PMID:8570645

  17. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  18. Extending Finite Memory Determinacy to Multiplayer Games

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Roux, Stéphane; Pauly, Arno

    2016-01-01

    We show that under some general conditions the finite memory determinacy of a class of two-player win/lose games played on finite graphs implies the existence of a Nash equilibrium built from finite...

  19. Topological Design for Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems with a Mixed Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    to subdomain interfaces evolving during the optimization process. In this paper, we propose to use a mixed finite element formulation with displacements and pressure as primary variables (u/p formulation) which eliminates the need for explicit boundary representation. In order to describe the Helmholtz...... acoustic-structure interaction problems are optimized to show the validity of the proposed method....

  20. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  1. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  2. Symmetry Reduction in Infinite Games with Finite Branching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Nicolas; Vester, Steen

    2014-01-01

    infinite-state games on graphs with finite branching where the objectives of the players can be very general. As particular applications, it is shown that the technique can be applied to reduce the state space in parity games as well as when doing modelchecking of the Alternating-time temporal logic ATL....

  3. Relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, which has been proposed recently in an astrophysical context. Assuming a constant distribution of protons inside the nucleus of finite size avoids severe divergence of the electron density with respect to a point-like nucleus. A formula for the nuclear radius is chosen to treat any element. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model matches the two asymptotic regimes, i.e., the non-relativistic and the ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models. The equation of state is considered in detail. For each version of the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, the pressure, the kinetic energy, and the entropy are calculated. The internal energy and free energy are also considered. The thermodynamic consistency of the three models is considered by working from the free energy. The virial question is also studied in the three cases as well as the relationship with the density functional theory. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model is far more involved than the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models that are very close to each other from a mathematical point of view.

  4. Preface: evolving rotifers, evolving science: Proceedings of the XIV International Rotifer Symposium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Devetter, Miloslav; Fontaneto, D.; Jersabek, Ch.D.; Welch, D.B.M.; May, L.; Walsh, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 796, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-6 ISSN 0018-8158 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : evolving rotifers * 14th International Rotifer Symposium * evolving science Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  5. Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is a computer-aided drawing of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Apollo 16 Evolved Lithology Sodic Ferrogabbro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Evolved lunar igneous lithologies, often referred to as the alkali suite, are a minor but important component of the lunar crust. These evolved samples are incompatible-element rich samples, and are, not surprisingly, most common in the Apollo sites in (or near) the incompatible-element rich region of the Moon known as the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT). The most commonly occurring lithologies are granites (A12, A14, A15, A17), monzogabbro (A14, A15), alkali anorthosites (A12, A14), and KREEP basalts (A15, A17). The Feldspathic Highlands Terrane is not entirely devoid of evolved lithologies, and rare clasts of alkali gabbronorite and sodic ferrogabbro (SFG) have been identified in Apollo 16 station 11 breccias 67915 and 67016. Curiously, nearly all pristine evolved lithologies have been found as small clasts or soil particles, exceptions being KREEP basalts 15382/6 and granitic sample 12013 (which is itself a breccia). Here we reexamine the petrography and geochemistry of two SFG-like particles found in a survey of Apollo 16 2-4 mm particles from the Cayley Plains 62283,7-15 and 62243,10-3 (hereafter 7-15 and 10-3 respectively). We will compare these to previously reported SFG samples, including recent analyses on the type specimen of SFG from lunar breccia 67915.

  7. Green's Functions and Finite Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Friedel

    2013-01-01

    This book elucidates how Finite Element methods look like from the perspective of Green’s functions, and shows new insights into the mathematical theory of Finite Elements. Practically, this new view on Finite Elements enables the reader to better assess solutions of standard programs and to find better model of a given problem. The book systematically introduces the basic concepts how Finite Elements fulfill the strategy of Green’s functions  and how approximating of Green’s functions. It discusses in detail the discretization error and shows that are coherent with the strategy of “goal oriented refinement”. The book also gives much attention to the dependencies of FE solutions from the parameter set of the model.

  8. Language dynamics in finite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Nowak, Martin A

    2003-04-07

    Any mechanism of language acquisition can only learn a restricted set of grammars. The human brain contains a mechanism for language acquisition which can learn a restricted set of grammars. The theory of this restricted set is universal grammar (UG). UG has to be sufficiently specific to induce linguistic coherence in a population. This phenomenon is known as "coherence threshold". Previously, we have calculated the coherence threshold for deterministic dynamics and infinitely large populations. Here, we extend the framework to stochastic processes and finite populations. If there is selection for communicative function (selective language dynamics), then the analytic results for infinite populations are excellent approximations for finite populations; as expected, finite populations need a slightly higher accuracy of language acquisition to maintain coherence. If there is no selection for communicative function (neutral language dynamics), then linguistic coherence is only possible for finite populations. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Vibrationally excited water emission at 658 GHz from evolved stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, A.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Herpin, F.; Torstensson, K.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Richards, A. M. S.; Gray, M. D.; De Breuck, C.; Olberg, M.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Several rotational transitions of ortho- and para-water have been identified toward evolved stars in the ground vibrational state as well as in the first excited state of the bending mode (v2 = 1 in (0, 1, 0) state). In the latter vibrational state of water, the 658 GHz J = 11,0-10,1 rotational transition is often strong and seems to be widespread in late-type stars. Aims: Our main goals are to better characterize the nature of the 658 GHz emission, compare the velocity extent of the 658 GHz emission with SiO maser emission to help locate the water layers and, more generally, investigate the physical conditions prevailing in the excited water layers of evolved stars. Another goal is to identify new 658 GHz emission sources and contribute in showing that this emission is widespread in evolved stars. Methods: We have used the J = 11,0-10,1 rotational transition of water in the (0, 1, 0) vibrational state nearly 2400 K above the ground-state to trace some of the physical conditions of evolved stars. Eleven evolved stars were extracted from our mini-catalog of existing and potential 658 GHz sources for observations with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope equipped with the SEPIA Band 9 receiver. The 13CO J = 6-5 line at 661 GHz was placed in the same receiver sideband for simultaneous observation with the 658 GHz line of water. We have compared the ratio of these two lines to the same ratio derived from HIFI earlier observations to check for potential time variability in the 658 GHz line. We have compared the 658 GHz line properties with our H2O radiative transfer models in stars and we have compared the velocity ranges of the 658 GHz and SiO J = 2-1, v = 1 maser lines. Results: Eleven stars have been extracted from our catalog of known or potential 658 GHz evolved stars. All of them show 658 GHz emission with a peak flux density in the range ≈50-70 Jy (RU Hya and RT Eri) to ≈2000-3000 Jy (VY CMa and W Hya). Five Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB

  10. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  11. 8th conference on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This first volume of the proceedings of the 8th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Lille, June 2017) covers various topics including convergence and stability analysis, as well as investigations of these methods from the point of view of compatibility with physical principles. It collects together the focused invited papers comparing advanced numerical methods for Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations on a benchmark, as well as reviewed contributions from internationally leading researchers in the field of analysis of finite volume and related methods, offering a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation, and recent decades have brought significant advances in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including m...

  12. A finite difference Taylor series method applied to thermal problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R. L.

    1988-06-01

    A new technique has been developed for solving finite difference equations that approximate parabolic (transient) and elliptic (steady) partial differential equations for heat transfer problems. The approach utilizes a Taylor series method and a variable-weighted implicit finite difference approximation. The weighting function for each difference equation is determined from the power-law suggested by S. Patankar and B. Baliga. An automatic-time-step selection process has been incorporated to enhance the transient solution scheme. Both the transient and steady-state equation sets are solved iteratively. The Aitken extrapolation process is used to accelerate convergence to steady state. Although this solution process was developed for the SINDA thermal analyzer, application to other finite difference thermal analysis codes should be fairly straightforward. The potential of this new scheme is demonstrated by solving three transient and two steady-state heat transfer problems that involve conduction and radiation.

  13. Finite-time resilient decentralized control for interconnected impulsive switched systems with neutral delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hangli; Zong, Guangdeng; Hou, Linlin; Yang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of finite-time control for a class of interconnected impulsive switched systems with neutral delay in which the time-varying delay appears in both the state and the state derivative. The concepts of finite-time boundedness and finite-time stability are respectively extended to interconnected impulsive switched systems with neutral delay for the first time. By applying the average dwell time method, sufficient conditions are first derived to cope with the problem of finite-time boundedness and finite-time stability for interconnected impulsive switched systems with neutral delay. In addition, the purpose of finite-time resilient decentralized control is to construct a resilient decentralized state-feedback controller such that the closed-loop system is finite-time bounded and finite-time stable. All the conditions are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities to ensure finite-time boundedness and finite-time stability of the given system. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regenerative technologies to bed side: Evolving the regulatory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sakai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There are high expectations for the clinical application of regenerative medicine technologies to treat musculoskeletal disorders. However, there are still big hurdles in bringing cell-based products to the market, mainly due to strict regulatory frameworks to approve these. Recently, the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency adopted new regulations under legislature. The translational potential of this article is to inform on the regulations to bring experimental phase regenerative concepts to market approval in the United States and Europe, and highlight the opportunities granted by Japanese regulatory framework. Furthermore, we discuss the perspectives on the quickly evolving regulatory environment.

  15. On thin-shell wormholes evolving in flat FRW spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    La Camera, M

    2011-01-01

    We analize the stability of a class of thin-shell wormholes with spherical symmetry evolving in flat FRW spacetimes. The wormholes considered here are supported at the throat by a perfect fluid with equation of state $\\mathcal{P}=w\\sigma$ and have a physical radius equal to $aR$, where $a$ is a time-dependent function describing the dynamics of the throat and $R$ is the background scale factor. The study of wormhole stability is done by means of the stability analysis of dynamic systems.

  16. Do metaphors evolve? The case of the social organism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.

    2013-01-01

    A long line of philosophers and social scientists have defended and extended the curious idea that collective entities – states and societies, cities and corporations – are biological organisms. In this article, I study a few short but spectacular episodes from the history of that metaphor......, juxtapose mappings made in one era with correspondences conjured in other epochs, and reflect upon the reasons why they differ. By adopting a historical perspective on the process whereby the notion of a “social organism” evolved from its relatively simple beginnings in ancient philosophy to its rather...

  17. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part II: Finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the second and final part of this study is to simulate fatigue crack growth in the tested Sandwich Tear Test specimens, described in Part I, using the finite element method. To accelerate the simulation, a cycle jump method is utilized and implemented in the finite element routine....... The proposed method is based on conducting finite element analysis for a set of cycles to establish a trend line, extrapolating the trend line spanning many cycles, and use the extrapolated state as initial state for additional finite element simulations. The measured da/dN relations of the face/core interface...

  18. Finite-Time Stability Analysis for a Class of Continuous Switched Descriptor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Tinglong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite-time stability has more practical application values than the classical Lyapunov asymptotic stability over a fixed finite-time interval. The problems of finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness for a class of continuous switched descriptor systems are considered in this paper. Based on the average dwell time approach and the multiple Lyapunov functions technique, the concepts of finite-time stability and boundedness are extended to continuous switched descriptor systems. In addition, sufficient conditions for the existence of state feedback controllers in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs are obtained with arbitrary switching rules, which guarantee that the switched descriptor system is finite-time stable and finite-time bounded, respectively. Finally, two numerical examples are presented to illustrate the reasonableness and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  19. Finite element methodology for transient conduction/forced-convection thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.; Wieting, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Finite element methodology for steady state thermal analysis of convectively cooled structures has been extended for transient analysis. The finite elements are based on representing the fluid passages by fluid bulk-temperature nodes and fluid-solid interface nodes. The formulation of the finite element equations for a typical flow passage is based on the weighted residual method with upwind weighting functions. Computer implementation of the convective finite element methodology using explicit and implicit time integration algorithms is described. Accuracy and efficiency of the methodology is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and finite-difference lumped-parameter analyses. The comparative analyses demonstrate that finite element conduction/conduction methodology may be used to predict transient temperatures with an accuracy equal or superior to the lumped-parameter finite-difference method.

  20. Mixed finite elements for global tide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Colin J; Kirby, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We study mixed finite element methods for the linearized rotating shallow water equations with linear drag and forcing terms. By means of a strong energy estimate for an equivalent second-order formulation for the linearized momentum, we prove long-time stability of the system without energy accumulation-the geotryptic state. A priori error estimates for the linearized momentum and free surface elevation are given in [Formula: see text] as well as for the time derivative and divergence of the linearized momentum. Numerical results confirm the theoretical results regarding both energy damping and convergence rates.

  1. Static phantom wormholes of finite size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Orellana, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we derive new static phantom traversable wormholes by assuming a shape function with a quadratic dependence on the radial coordinate r . We mainly focus our study on wormholes sustained by exotic matter with positive energy density (as seen by any static observer) and a variable equation of state pr/ρ wormhole spacetimes extending to infinity, we show that a quadratic shape function allows us to construct static spacetimes of finite size, composed of a phantom wormhole connected to an anisotropic spherically symmetric distribution of dark energy. The wormhole part of the full spacetime does not fulfill the dominant energy condition, while the dark energy part does.

  2. Edge effects in finite elongated carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of finite-size effects for the electronic structure of long zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes is studied. We analyze the electronic structure of capped (6,6), (8,0), and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes as a function of their length up to 60 nm, using a divide and conquer density functional theory approach. For the metallic nanotubes studied, most of the physical features appearing in the density of states of an infinite carbon nanotube are recovered at a length of 40 nm...

  3. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Wen-Cong, E-mail: ganwencong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shu, Fu-Wen, E-mail: shufuwen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wu, Meng-He, E-mail: menghewu.physik@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-09-10

    We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  4. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cong Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  5. Measuring Communication in Parallel Communicating Finite Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bordihn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systems of deterministic finite automata communicating by sending their states upon request are investigated, when the amount of communication is restricted. The computational power and decidability properties are studied for the case of returning centralized systems, when the number of necessary communications during the computations of the system is bounded by a function depending on the length of the input. It is proved that an infinite hierarchy of language families exists, depending on the number of messages sent during their most economical recognitions. Moreover, several properties are shown to be not semi-decidable for the systems under consideration.

  6. A discrete, finite multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    McKenzie, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The Many Worlds Interpretation (MWI) famously avoids the issue of wave function collapse. Different MWI trees representing the same quantum events can have different topologies, depending upon the observer. However, they are all isomorphic to the group of block universes containing all of the outcomes of all of the events, and so, in that sense, the group of block universes is a more fundamental representation. Different branches of the MWI tree, representing different universes in MWI, ultimately share the same quantum state in a common ancestor branch. This branching topology is incompatible with that of the Minkowski block universe; the resolution is to replace the branches with discrete, parallel block universes, each of which extends from the trunk to the outermost twigs. The number of universes in a branch is proportional to its thickness which, in turn, depends upon the absolute square of the probability amplitude for the state in that branch. Every quantum event may be represented by a kernel of unive...

  7. Parallel computing for the finite element method in MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Šimkus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, parallel computing capabilities of MATLAB and the capabilities for the finite element method were analyzed. A program for solving a heat transfer problem by the finite element method was implemented. Three different parallel algorithms using CPU and GPU for solving steady state and transient heat transfer problems were proposed and implemented. A maximal speedup of around 2.3 times for steady state and 2 times for transient problem solving time was achieved by using a quad-core CPU.

  8. Changing State Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  9. Continual Learning through Evolvable Neural Turing Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüders, Benno; Schläger, Mikkel; Risi, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Continual learning, i.e. the ability to sequentially learn tasks without catastrophic forgetting of previously learned ones, is an important open challenge in machine learning. In this paper we take a step in this direction by showing that the recently proposed Evolving Neural Turing Machine (ENT......) approach is able to perform one-shot learning in a reinforcement learning task without catastrophic forgetting of previously stored associations.......Continual learning, i.e. the ability to sequentially learn tasks without catastrophic forgetting of previously learned ones, is an important open challenge in machine learning. In this paper we take a step in this direction by showing that the recently proposed Evolving Neural Turing Machine (ENTM...

  10. Designing Garments to Evolve Over Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Grose, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a REDO of the current fashion paradigm by investigating how garments might be designed to evolve over time. The purpose is to discuss ways of expanding the traditional role of the designer to include temporal dimensions of creating, producing and using clothes and to suggest a...... to a REDO of design education, to further research and the future fashion and textile industry.......This paper proposes a REDO of the current fashion paradigm by investigating how garments might be designed to evolve over time. The purpose is to discuss ways of expanding the traditional role of the designer to include temporal dimensions of creating, producing and using clothes and to suggest...... a range of potential fashion futures that decouple from declining resources. In the first part literature on 'Past and Present' historical and current aspects of sustainability in fashion and textiles are presented. In the second part, three exploratory case studies are described: Two projects by students...

  11. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  12. Directional Communication in Evolved Multiagent Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    networks. Artificial Life, 15(2):185– 212, 2009. [23] K. O. Stanley and R. Miikkulainen. Evolving neural networks through augmenting topologies ...paper. 2.2 Neuroevolution of Augmenting Topologies The HyperNEAT approach is itself an extension of the original NEAT (Neu- roevolution of Augmenting ...Gauci and K. O. Stanley. Autonomous evolution of topographic regu- larities in artificial neural networks. Neural Computation, 22(7):1860–1898, 2010

  13. The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2012-01-02

    This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

  14. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving to hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzukowiak, Tina Renae

    2015-04-01

    Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia is most commonly characterized as deep, boring, nonpulsatile, severe, unilateral facial and head pain in the distribution of the V1 area combined with ipsilateral oculosympathetic palsy and autonomic symptoms. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving into hemicrania continua, a rare primary, chronic headache syndrome characterized by unilateral pain and response to indomethacin, has rarely been documented. The purpose of this case report is to contribute to the medical literature a single case of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia presenting as multiple cranial nerve palsies that evolved into hemicrania continua that was successfully treated with onabotulinumtoxinA. A 52-year-old white woman presented to the emergency department with the complaint of severe, aching, constant eye pain radiating to the V1 area for 1 week with associated ptosis and photophobia of the left eye. Ocular examination revealed involvement of cranial nerves II, III, V, and VI. Additional symptoms included ipsilateral lacrimation, eyelid edema, and rhinorrhea. Extensive medical work-up showed normal results. Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia was diagnosed with multiple cranial nerve involvement; the headache component became chronic with periodic exacerbations of autonomic symptoms evolving to a diagnosis of hemicrania continua. The patient was intolerant to traditional indomethacin treatment, and the headache was successfully treated with onabotulinumtoxinA injections. Recognition of ipsilateral signs such as miosis, ptosis, hydrosis, eyelid edema, hyperemia, rhinorrhea, or nasal congestion is useful in the differential diagnosis of painful ophthalmoplegia, particularly in the diagnosis of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia and hemicrania continua. This case study illustrates a rare presentation of Raeder paratrigeminal neuralgia evolving into hemicrania continua presenting as a painful ophthalmoplegia with multiple cranial nerve involvement. The example supports the

  15. Evolvability of Amyloidogenic Proteins in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Ho, Gilbert; Sugama, Shuei; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Shimizu, Yuka; Takenouchi, Takato; Waragai, Masaaki; Masliah, Eliezer

    2018-01-01

     Currently, the physiological roles of amyloidogenic proteins (APs) in human brain, such as amyloid-β and α-synuclein, are elusive. Given that many APs arose by gene duplication and have been resistant against the pressures of natural selection, APs may be associated with some functions that are advantageous for survival of offspring. Nonetheless, evolvability is the sole physiological quality of APs that has been characterized in microorganisms such as yeast. Since yeast and human brain may share similar strategies in coping with diverse range of critical environmental stresses, the objective of this paper was to discuss the potential role of evolvability of APs in aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Given the heterogeneity of APs in terms of structure and cytotoxicity, it is argued that APs might be involved in preconditioning against diverse stresses in human brain. It is further speculated that these stress-related APs, most likely protofibrillar forms, might be transmitted to offspring via the germline, conferring preconditioning against forthcoming stresses. Thus, APs might represent a vehicle for the inheritance of the acquired characteristics against environmental stresses. Curiously, such a characteristic of APs is reminiscent of Charles Darwin’s ‘gemmules’, imagined molecules of heritability described in his pangenesis theory. We propose that evolvability might be a physiological function of APs during the reproductive stage and neurodegenerative diseases could be a by-product effect manifested later in aging. Collectively, our evolvability hypothesis may play a complementary role in the pathophysiology of APs with the conventional amyloid cascade hypothesis. PMID:29439348

  16. A Finite Speed Curzon-Ahlborn Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Curzon and Ahlborn achieved finite power output by introducing the concept of finite rate of heat transfer in a Carnot engine. The finite power can also be achieved through a finite speed of the piston on the four branches of the Carnot cycle. The present paper combines these two approaches to study the behaviour of output power in terms of…

  17. [Application of finite element method in spinal biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Shu-Chun; Wang, Fei

    2017-02-25

    The finite element model is one of the most important methods in study of modern spinal biomechanics, according to the needs to simulate the various states of the spine, calculate the stress force and strain distribution of the different groups in the state, and explore its principle of mechanics, mechanism of injury, and treatment effectiveness. In addition, in the study of the pathological state of the spine, the finite element is mainly used in the understanding the mechanism of lesion location, evaluating the effects of different therapeutic tool, assisting and completing the selection and improvement of therapeutic tool, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the rehabilitation of spinal lesions. Finite element method can be more provide the service for the patients suffering from spinal correction, operation and individual implant design. Among the design and performance evaluation of the implant need to pay attention to the individual difference and perfect the evaluation system. At present, how to establish a model which is more close to the real situation has been the focus and difficulty of the study of human body's finite element.Although finite element method can better simulate complex working condition, it is necessary to improve the authenticity of the model and the sharing of the group by using many kinds of methods, such as image science, statistics, kinematics and so on. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  18. Solid finite elements through three decades

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh, DN; Shrinivasa, U

    1994-01-01

    conventionally, solid finite elements have been looked upon as just generalizations of two-dimensional finite elements. In this article we trace their development starting from the days of their inception. Keeping in tune with our perceptions on developing finite elements, without taking recourse to any extra variational techniques, we discuss a few of the techniques which have been applied to solid finite elements. Finally we critically examine our own work on formulating solid finite elemen...

  19. GPP Webinar: The Solar Roadmap—Navigating the Evolving Solar Energy Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPP and State & Local Climate and Energy Branch webinar on the Solar Roadmap and the evolving solar energy market. This webinar discussed local and state government’s success stories and opportunities for progress in renewable energy goals using the Solar

  20. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; CREUTZ,M.; PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-02-24

    With the operation of the RHIC heavy ion program, the theoretical understanding of QCD at finite temperature and density has become increasingly important. Though QCD at finite temperature has been extensively studied using lattice Monte-Carlo simulations over the past twenty years, most physical questions relevant for RHIC (and future) heavy ion experiments remain open. In lattice QCD at finite temperature and density there have been at least two major advances in recent years. First, for the first time calculations of real time quantities, like meson spectral functions have become available. Second, the lattice study of the QCD phase diagram and equation of state have been extended to finite baryon density by several groups. Both issues were extensively discussed in the course of the workshop. A real highlight was the study of the QCD phase diagram in (T, {mu})-plane by Z. Fodor and S. Katz and the determination of the critical end-point for the physical value of the pion mass. This was the first time such lattice calculations at, the physical pion mass have been performed. Results by Z Fodor and S. Katz were obtained using a multi-parameter re-weighting method. Other determinations of the critical end point were also presented, in particular using a Taylor expansion around {mu} = 0 (Bielefeld group, Ejiri et al.) and using analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential (Ph. de Forcrand and O. Philipsen). The result based on Taylor expansion agrees within errors with the new prediction of Z. Fodor and S. Katz, while methods based on analytic continuation still predict a higher value for the critical baryon density. Most of the thermodynamics studies in full QCD (including those presented at this workshop) have been performed using quite coarse lattices, a = 0.2-0.3 fm. Therefore one may worry about cutoff effects in different thermodynamic quantities, like the transition temperature T{sub tr}. At the workshop U. Heller presented a study of the transition

  1. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  2. Finite and profinite quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vourdas, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    This monograph provides an introduction to finite quantum systems, a field at the interface between quantum information and number theory, with applications in quantum computation and condensed matter physics. The first major part of this monograph studies the so-called `qubits' and `qudits', systems with periodic finite lattice as position space. It also discusses the so-called mutually unbiased bases, which have applications in quantum information and quantum cryptography. Quantum logic and its applications to quantum gates is also studied. The second part studies finite quantum systems, where the position takes values in a Galois field. This combines quantum mechanics with Galois theory. The third part extends the discussion to quantum systems with variables in profinite groups, considering the limit where the dimension of the system becomes very large. It uses the concepts of inverse and direct limit and studies quantum mechanics on p-adic numbers. Applications of the formalism include quantum optics and ...

  3. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...... in the radiation formula directly, and no pre-windowing is needed. Examples are given for the radiation efficiency, and the results are compared with results found in the literature....

  4. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  5. Thermodynamic instabilities of nuclear matter at finite temperature with finite range effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ventura, J.; Polls, A.; Vinas, X.; Pi, M. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia); Hernandez, S. (Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica)

    1992-08-03

    A systematic study of the equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter is performed in the framework of a finite-temperature density dependent Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction. Special attention is devoted to the density and temperature dependence of the single-particle spectrum, the effective mass and the momentum distributions. The liquid-gas phase transition and the spinodal lines are discussed, in connection with the breakup of heated nucleus into small clusters that takes place in medium energy heavy ion reactions. The level density parameter, which has been derived by a low temperature expansion of the internal energy, is also discussed. Comparisons with previous calculations using zero range effective interactions are also made. (orig.).

  6. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PECINGINA OLIMPIA-MIOARA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method is analytical when solutions can not be applied for deeper study analyzes static, dynamic or other types of requirements in different points of the structures .In practice it is necessary to know the behavior of the structure or certain parts components of the machine under the influence of certain factors static and dynamic . The application of finite element in the optimization of components leads to economic growth , to increase reliability and durability organs studied, thus the machine itself.

  7. Finite elements of nonlinear continua

    CERN Document Server

    Oden, John Tinsley

    1972-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate and graduate students, this text extends applications of the finite element method from linear problems in elastic structures to a broad class of practical, nonlinear problems in continuum mechanics. It treats both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view.The text reviews the thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method, and then brings them together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of these models are analyzed, along with the numerical s

  8. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Cervantes, Mayra [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Diag. 113 y 64 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-10-26

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others.

  9. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  10. Survivability is more fundamental than evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Palmer

    Full Text Available For a lineage to survive over long time periods, it must sometimes change. This has given rise to the term evolvability, meaning the tendency to produce adaptive variation. One lineage may be superior to another in terms of its current standing variation, or it may tend to produce more adaptive variation. However, evolutionary outcomes depend on more than standing variation and produced adaptive variation: deleterious variation also matters. Evolvability, as most commonly interpreted, is not predictive of evolutionary outcomes. Here, we define a predictive measure of the evolutionary success of a lineage that we call the k-survivability, defined as the probability that the lineage avoids extinction for k generations. We estimate the k-survivability using multiple experimental replicates. Because we measure evolutionary outcomes, the initial standing variation, the full spectrum of generated variation, and the heritability of that variation are all incorporated. Survivability also accounts for the decreased joint likelihood of extinction of sub-lineages when they 1 disperse in space, or 2 diversify in lifestyle. We illustrate measurement of survivability with in silico models, and suggest that it may also be measured in vivo using multiple longitudinal replicates. The k-survivability is a metric that enables the quantitative study of, for example, the evolution of 1 mutation rates, 2 dispersal mechanisms, 3 the genotype-phenotype map, and 4 sexual reproduction, in temporally and spatially fluctuating environments. Although these disparate phenomena evolve by well-understood microevolutionary rules, they are also subject to the macroevolutionary constraint of long-term survivability.

  11. Present weather and climate: evolving conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerling, Martin P; Dettinger, Michael; Wolter, Klaus; Lukas, Jeff; Eischeid, Jon K.; Nemani, Rama; Liebmann, Brant; Kunkel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter assesses weather and climate variability and trends in the Southwest, using observed climate and paleoclimate records. It analyzes the last 100 years of climate variability in comparison to the last 1,000 years, and links the important features of evolving climate conditions to river flow variability in four of the region’s major drainage basins. The chapter closes with an assessment of the monitoring and scientific research needed to increase confidence in understanding when climate episodes, events, and phenomena are attributable to human-caused climate change.

  12. f( R) gravity solutions for evolving wormholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Subhra; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2017-08-01

    The scalar-tensor f( R) theory of gravity is considered in the framework of a simple inhomogeneous space-time model. In this research we use the reconstruction technique to look for possible evolving wormhole solutions within viable f( R) gravity formalism. These f( R) models are then constrained so that they are consistent with existing experimental data. Energy conditions related to the matter threading the wormhole are analyzed graphically and are in general found to obey the null energy conditions (NEC) in regions around the throat, while in the limit f(R)=R, NEC can be violated at large in regions around the throat.

  13. Information theory, evolutionary innovations and evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas

    2017-12-05

    How difficult is it to 'discover' an evolutionary adaptation or innovation? I here suggest that information theory, in combination with high-throughput DNA sequencing, can help answer this question by quantifying a new phenotype's information content. I apply this framework to compute the phenotypic information associated with novel gene regulation and with the ability to use novel carbon sources. The framework can also help quantify how DNA duplications affect evolvability, estimate the complexity of phenotypes and clarify the meaning of 'progress' in Darwinian evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. The degree of irreversibility in deterministic finite automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Holzer, Markus; Kutrib, Martin

    2016-01-01

    for nondeterministic finite state automata (NFA) is PSPACE-complete. The recent DFA method essentially works by minimizing the DFA and inspecting it for a forbidden pattern. We here study the degree of irreversibility for a regular language, the minimal number of such forbidden patterns necessary in any DFA accepting...

  15. An Orthogonal Residual Procedure for Nonlinear Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.

    A general and robust solution procedure for nonlinear finite element equations with limit points is developed. At each equilibrium iteration the magnitude of the load is adjusted such that the residual force is orthogonal to the current displacement increment from the last equilibrium state...

  16. Finite element concept to derive isostatic residual maps-Application ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new space-domain operator based on the shape function concept of finite element analysis has been developed to derive the residual maps of the Gorda Plate of western United States. The technique does not require explicit assumptions on isostatic models. Besides delineating the Gorda Plate boundary, the residual ...

  17. Block-Fading Channels with Delayed CSIT at Finite Blocklength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillingsgaard, Kasper Fløe; Popovski, Petar

    2014-01-01

    In many wireless systems, the channel state information at the transmitter (CSIT) can not be learned until after a transmission has taken place and is thereby outdated. In this paper, we study the benefits of delayed CSIT on a block-fading channel at finite blocklength. First, the achievable rate...

  18. Gluon propagator at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandula, J.E.; Ogilvie, M.

    1988-01-28

    The Landau gauge gluon propagator at finite temperature above and below the deconfinement transition is measured using lattice Monte Carlo simulation. The color electric and magnetic masses are determined. The most striking result of the calculation is that the time component of the gluon field appears to acquire a vacuum expected value in the deconfined region.

  19. A Typology for Finite Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    This project classifies groups of small order using a group's center as the key feature. Groups of a given order "n" are typed based on the order of each group's center. Students are led through a sequence of exercises that combine proof-writing, independent research, and an analysis of specific classes of finite groups…

  20. Linguistics, Logic, and Finite Trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Meyer-Viol, W.

    1993-01-01

    A modal logic is developed to deal with finite ordered binary trees as they are used in (computational) linguistics. A modal language is introduced with operators for the 'mother of', 'first daughter of' and 'second daughter of' relations together with their transitive reflexive closures.

  1. Netgram: Visualizing Communities in Evolving Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Mall

    Full Text Available Real-world complex networks are dynamic in nature and change over time. The change is usually observed in the interactions within the network over time. Complex networks exhibit community like structures. A key feature of the dynamics of complex networks is the evolution of communities over time. Several methods have been proposed to detect and track the evolution of these groups over time. However, there is no generic tool which visualizes all the aspects of group evolution in dynamic networks including birth, death, splitting, merging, expansion, shrinkage and continuation of groups. In this paper, we propose Netgram: a tool for visualizing evolution of communities in time-evolving graphs. Netgram maintains evolution of communities over 2 consecutive time-stamps in tables which are used to create a query database using the sql outer-join operation. It uses a line-based visualization technique which adheres to certain design principles and aesthetic guidelines. Netgram uses a greedy solution to order the initial community information provided by the evolutionary clustering technique such that we have fewer line cross-overs in the visualization. This makes it easier to track the progress of individual communities in time evolving graphs. Netgram is a generic toolkit which can be used with any evolutionary community detection algorithm as illustrated in our experiments. We use Netgram for visualization of topic evolution in the NIPS conference over a period of 11 years and observe the emergence and merging of several disciplines in the field of information processing systems.

  2. Evolving MEMS Resonator Designs for Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Kraus, William F.; Lohn, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their small size and high reliability, microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices have the potential to revolution many areas of engineering. As with conventionally-sized engineering design, there is likely to be a demand for the automated design of MEMS devices. This paper describes our current status as we progress toward our ultimate goal of using an evolutionary algorithm and a generative representation to produce designs of a MEMS device and successfully demonstrate its transfer to an actual chip. To produce designs that are likely to transfer to reality, we present two ways to modify evaluation of designs. The first is to add location noise, differences between the actual dimensions of the design and the design blueprint, which is a technique we have used for our work in evolving antennas and robots. The second method is to add prestress to model the warping that occurs during the extreme heat of fabrication. In future we expect to fabricate and test some MEMS resonators that are evolved in this way.

  3. Netgram: Visualizing Communities in Evolving Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Raghvendra; Langone, Rocco; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Real-world complex networks are dynamic in nature and change over time. The change is usually observed in the interactions within the network over time. Complex networks exhibit community like structures. A key feature of the dynamics of complex networks is the evolution of communities over time. Several methods have been proposed to detect and track the evolution of these groups over time. However, there is no generic tool which visualizes all the aspects of group evolution in dynamic networks including birth, death, splitting, merging, expansion, shrinkage and continuation of groups. In this paper, we propose Netgram: a tool for visualizing evolution of communities in time-evolving graphs. Netgram maintains evolution of communities over 2 consecutive time-stamps in tables which are used to create a query database using the sql outer-join operation. It uses a line-based visualization technique which adheres to certain design principles and aesthetic guidelines. Netgram uses a greedy solution to order the initial community information provided by the evolutionary clustering technique such that we have fewer line cross-overs in the visualization. This makes it easier to track the progress of individual communities in time evolving graphs. Netgram is a generic toolkit which can be used with any evolutionary community detection algorithm as illustrated in our experiments. We use Netgram for visualization of topic evolution in the NIPS conference over a period of 11 years and observe the emergence and merging of several disciplines in the field of information processing systems. PMID:26356538

  4. BOOK REVIEW: OPENING SCIENCE, THE EVOLVING GUIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The way we get our funding, collaborate, do our research, and get the word out has evolved over hundreds of years but we can imagine a more open science world, largely facilitated by the internet. The movement towards this more open way of doing and presenting science is coming, and it is not taking hundreds of years. If you are interested in these trends, and would like to find out more about where this is all headed and what it means to you, consider downloding Opening Science, edited by Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike, subtitled The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration, and Scholarly Publishing. In 26 chapters by various authors from a range of disciplines the book explores the developing world of open science, starting from the first scientific revolution and bringing us to the next scientific revolution, sometimes referred to as “Science 2.0”. Some of the articles deal with the impact of the changing landscape of how science is done, looking at the impact of open science on Academia, or journal publishing, or medical research. Many of the articles look at the uses, pitfalls, and impact of specific tools, like microblogging (think Twitter), social networking, and reference management. There is lots of discussion and definition of terms you might use or misuse like “altmetrics” and “impact factor”. Science will probably never be completely open, and Twitter will probably never replace the journal article,

  5. Instability modes on a solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjuan; Liu, Feng; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Numerical solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained to study the time evolution of both axisymmetric and three-dimensional perturbations to a base solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe with non-periodic boundary conditions imposed at the pipe inlet and outlet. It is found that for a given Reynolds number there exists a critical swirl number beyond which the initial perturbations grow, in contrast to the solid-body rotation flow in an infinitely-long pipe or a finite-length pipe with periodic inlet and exit boundary conditions for which the classical Kelvin analysis and Rayleigh stability criterion affirm neutrally stable for all levels of swirl. This paper uncovers for the first time the detailed evolution of the perturbations in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional situations. The computations reveal a linear growth stage of the perturbations with a constant growth rate after a brief initial period of decay of the imposed initial perturbations. The fastest growing axisymmetric and three-dimensional instability modes and the associated growth rates are identified numerically for the first time. The computations show that the critical swirl number increases and the growth rate of instability decreases at the same swirl number with decreasing Reynolds number. The growth rate of the axisymmetric mode at high Reynolds number agrees well with previous stability theory for inviscid flow. More importantly, three-dimensional simulations uncover that the most unstable mode is the spiral type m = 1 mode, which appears at a lower critical swirl number than that for the onset of the axisymmetric mode. This spiral mode grows faster than the unstable axisymmetric mode at the same swirl. Moreover, the computations reveal that after the linear growing stage of the perturbation the flow continues to evolve nonlinearly to a saturated axisymmetric vortex breakdown state.

  6. Strategy Complexity of Finite-Horizon Markov Decision Processes and Simple Stochastic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Chatterjee, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    finite time, is a classical and well-studied problem. In this work we consider the strategy complexity of finite-horizon MDPs and SSGs. We show that for all ε > 0, the natural class of counter-based strategies require at most loglog(1 ϵ )+n+1 memory states, and memory of size Ω(loglog(1 ϵ )+n...

  7. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of ...

  8. How could the Gompertz-Makeham law evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, A

    2009-05-07

    In line with the origin of life from the chemical world, biological mortality kinetics is suggested to originate from chemical decomposition kinetics described by the Arrhenius equation k = A*exp(-E/RT). Another chemical legacy of living bodies is that, by using the appropriate properties of their constituent molecules, they incorporate all their potencies, including adverse ones. In early evolution, acquiring an ability to use new molecules to increase disintegration barrier E might be associated with new adverse interactions, yielding products that might accumulate in organisms and compromise their viability. Thus, the main variable of the Arrhenius equation changed from T in chemistry to E in biology; mortality turned to rise exponentially as E declined with increasing age; and survivorship patterns turned to feature slow initial and fast late descent making the bulk of each finite cohort to expire within a short final period of its lifespan. Numerical modelling shows that such acquisition of new functions associated with faster functional decline may increase the efficiency of investing resources into progeny, in line with the antagonistic pleiotropy theory of ageing. Any evolved time trajectories of functional changes were translated into changes in mortality through exponent according to the generalised Gompertz-Makeham law mu = C(t)+Lambda*exp[-E(t)], which is reduced to the conventional form when E(t) = E0-gammat and C is constant. The proposed model explains the origin of the linear mid-age functional decline followed by its deceleration at later ages and the positive correlation between the initial vitality and the rate of ageing.

  9. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability.

  10. Finite-Dimensional Representations for Controlled Diffusions with Delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, Salvatore, E-mail: salvatore.federico@unimi.it [Università di Milano, Dipartimento di Economia, Management e Metodi Quantitativi (Italy); Tankov, Peter, E-mail: tankov@math.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Université Paris Diderot, Laboratoire de Probabilités et Modèles Aléatoires (France)

    2015-02-15

    We study stochastic delay differential equations (SDDE) where the coefficients depend on the moving averages of the state process. As a first contribution, we provide sufficient conditions under which the solution of the SDDE and a linear path functional of it admit a finite-dimensional Markovian representation. As a second contribution, we show how approximate finite-dimensional Markovian representations may be constructed when these conditions are not satisfied, and provide an estimate of the error corresponding to these approximations. These results are applied to optimal control and optimal stopping problems for stochastic systems with delay.

  11. Fast Stiffness Matrix Calculation for Nonlinear Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Gülümser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fast stiffness matrix calculation technique for nonlinear finite element method (FEM. Nonlinear stiffness matrices are constructed using Green-Lagrange strains, which are derived from infinitesimal strains by adding the nonlinear terms discarded from small deformations. We implemented a linear and a nonlinear finite element method with the same material properties to examine the differences between them. We verified our nonlinear formulation with different applications and achieved considerable speedups in solving the system of equations using our nonlinear FEM compared to a state-of-the-art nonlinear FEM.

  12. Finite element solution of two dimensional time dependent heat equation

    CERN Document Server

    Maa

    1999-01-01

    A Microsoft Windows based computer code, named FHEAT, has been developed for solving two dimensional heat problems in Cartesian and Cylindrical geometries. The programming language is Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0. The code makes use of Finite element formulation for spatial domain and Finite difference formulation for time domain. Presently the code is capable of solving two dimensional steady state and transient problems in xy- and rz-geometries. The code is capable excepting both triangular and rectangular elements. Validation and benchmarking was done against hand calculations and published results.

  13. Evolvability as a Quality Attribute of Software Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Duchien, Laurence; D'Hondt, Maja; Mens, Tom

    We review the definition of evolvability as it appears on the literature. In particular, the concept of software evolvability is compared with other system quality attributes, such as adaptability, maintainability and modifiability.

  14. Stabilization of Finite Automata with Application to Hybrid Systems Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Imura, Jun-ichi; Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the state feedback stabilization problem of a deterministic finite automaton (DFA), and its application to stabilizing model predictive control (MPC) of hybrid systems. In the modeling of a DFA, a linear state equation representation recently proposed by the authors is used. First, this representation is briefly explained. Next, after the notion of equilibrium points and stabilizability of the DFA are defined, a necessary and sufficient condition for the DFA to be stabili...

  15. Tracking correlated, simultaneously evolving target populations, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2017-05-01

    This paper is the sixth in a series aimed at weakening the independence assumptions that are typically presumed in multitarget tracking. Earlier papers investigated Bayes …lters that propagate the correlations between two evolving multitarget systems. Last year at this conference we attempted to derive PHD …lter-type approximations that account for both spatial correlation and cardinality correlation (i.e., correlation between the target numbers of the two systems). Unfortunately, this approach required heuristic models of both clutter and target appearance in order to incorporate both spatial and cardinality correlation. This paper describes a fully rigorous approach- provided, however, that spatial correlation between the two populations is ignored and only their cardinality correlations are taken into account. We derive the time-update and measurement-update equations for a CPHD …lter describing the evolution of such correlated multitarget populations.

  16. Resiliently evolving supply-demand networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubido, Nicolás; Grebogi, Celso; Baptista, Murilo S

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design a transport network such that commodities are brought from suppliers to consumers in a steady, optimal, and stable way is of great importance for distribution systems nowadays. In this work, by using the circuit laws of Kirchhoff and Ohm, we provide the exact capacities of the edges that an optimal supply-demand network should have to operate stably under perturbations, i.e., without overloading. The perturbations we consider are the evolution of the connecting topology, the decentralization of hub sources or sinks, and the intermittence of supplier and consumer characteristics. We analyze these conditions and the impact of our results, both on the current United Kingdom power-grid structure and on numerically generated evolving archetypal network topologies.

  17. A local-world evolving hypernetwork model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Yong; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Complex hypernetworks are ubiquitous in the real system. It is very important to investigate the evolution mechanisms. In this paper, we present a local-world evolving hypernetwork model by taking into account the hyperedge growth and local-world hyperedge preferential attachment mechanisms. At each time step, a newly added hyperedge encircles a new coming node and a number of nodes from a randomly selected local world. The number of the selected nodes from the local world obeys the uniform distribution and its mean value is m. The analytical and simulation results show that the hyperdegree approximately obeys the power-law form and the exponent of hyperdegree distribution is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we numerically investigate the node degree, hyperedge degree, clustering coefficient, as well as the average distance, and find that the hypernetwork model shares the scale-free and small-world properties, which shed some light for deeply understanding the evolution mechanism of the real systems.

  18. The Evolving Theory of Evolutionary Radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, M; Breitkreuz, L; Alvarado, M; Baca, S; Cooper, J C; Heins, L; Herzog, K; Lieberman, B S

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary radiations have intrigued biologists for more than 100 years, and our understanding of the patterns and processes associated with these radiations continues to grow and evolve. Recently it has been recognized that there are many different types of evolutionary radiation beyond the well-studied adaptive radiations. We focus here on multifarious types of evolutionary radiations, paying special attention to the abiotic factors that might trigger diversification in clades. We integrate concepts such as exaptation, species selection, coevolution, and the turnover-pulse hypothesis (TPH) into the theoretical framework of evolutionary radiations. We also discuss other phenomena that are related to, but distinct from, evolutionary radiations that have relevance for evolutionary biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Finch: A System for Evolving Java (Bytecode)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Michael; Sipper, Moshe

    The established approach in genetic programming (GP) involves the definition of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem at hand, after which evolution of expressions using these definitions takes place. We have recently developed a system, dubbed FINCH (Fertile Darwinian Bytecode Harvester), to evolutionarily improve actual, extant software, which was not intentionally written for the purpose of serving as a GP representation in particular, nor for evolution in general. This is in contrast to existing work that uses restricted subsets of the Java bytecode instruction set as a representation language for individuals in genetic programming. The ability to evolve Java programs will hopefully lead to a valuable new tool in the software engineer's toolkit.

  20. Finite-Time Stabilization and Adaptive Control of Memristor-Based Delayed Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Guodong

    Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.

  1. Alcohol use and policy formation: an evolving social problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Amir

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the evolutionary course that the social problem of alcohol use has taken in the United States since the Colonial Era. This article utilizes a range of theoretical models to analyze the evolving nature of alcohol use from an unrecognized to a perceived social problem. The models used include critical constructionism (Heiner, 2002), top-down policy model (Dye, 2001) and Mauss'(1975) understanding of social problems and movements. These theoretical constructs exhibit the relative nature of alcohol use as a social problem in regards to a specific time, place, and social context as well as the powerful and influential role that social elites have in defining alcohol asa social problem. Studies regarding the development of alcohol policy formation are discussed to illuminate the different powers, constituents, and factors that play a role in alcohol policy formation.Finally, implications for future study are discussed [corrected].

  2. Concurrent approach for evolving compact decision rule sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelstein, Robert E.; Hammack, Lonnie P.; Lamont, Gary B.

    1999-02-01

    The induction of decision rules from data is important to many disciplines, including artificial intelligence and pattern recognition. To improve the state of the art in this area, we introduced the genetic rule and classifier construction environment (GRaCCE). It was previously shown that GRaCCE consistently evolved decision rule sets from data, which were significantly more compact than those produced by other methods (such as decision tree algorithms). The primary disadvantage of GRaCCe, however, is its relatively poor run-time execution performance. In this paper, a concurrent version of the GRaCCE architecture is introduced, which improves the efficiency of the original algorithm. A prototype of the algorithm is tested on an in- house parallel processor configuration and the results are discussed.

  3. Representation theory of finite monoids

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This first text on the subject provides a comprehensive introduction to the representation theory of finite monoids. Carefully worked examples and exercises provide the bells and whistles for graduate accessibility, bringing a broad range of advanced readers to the forefront of research in the area. Highlights of the text include applications to probability theory, symbolic dynamics, and automata theory. Comfort with module theory, a familiarity with ordinary group representation theory, and the basics of Wedderburn theory, are prerequisites for advanced graduate level study. Researchers in algebra, algebraic combinatorics, automata theory, and probability theory, will find this text enriching with its thorough presentation of applications of the theory to these fields. Prior knowledge of semigroup theory is not expected for the diverse readership that may benefit from this exposition. The approach taken in this book is highly module-theoretic and follows the modern flavor of the theory of finite dimensional ...

  4. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  5. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  6. The Applications of Finite Element Analysis in Proximal Humeral Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yongyu; You, Wei; Zhu, Weimin; Cui, Jiaming; Chen, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are common and most challenging, due to the complexity of the glenohumeral joint, especially in the geriatric population with impacted fractures, that the development of implants continues because currently the problems with their fixation are not solved. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative assessments are crucial in management of those patients. Finite element analysis, as one of the valuable tools, has been implemented as an effective and noninvasive method to analyze proximal humeral fractures, providing solid evidence for management of troublesome patients. However, no review article about the applications and effects of finite element analysis in assessing proximal humeral fractures has been reported yet. This review article summarized the applications, contribution, and clinical significance of finite element analysis in assessing proximal humeral fractures. Furthermore, the limitations of finite element analysis, the difficulties of more realistic simulation, and the validation and also the creation of validated FE models were discussed. We concluded that although some advancements in proximal humeral fractures researches have been made by using finite element analysis, utility of this powerful tool for routine clinical management and adequate simulation requires more state-of-the-art studies to provide evidence and bases. PMID:29081829

  7. The Applications of Finite Element Analysis in Proximal Humeral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyu Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humeral fractures are common and most challenging, due to the complexity of the glenohumeral joint, especially in the geriatric population with impacted fractures, that the development of implants continues because currently the problems with their fixation are not solved. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative assessments are crucial in management of those patients. Finite element analysis, as one of the valuable tools, has been implemented as an effective and noninvasive method to analyze proximal humeral fractures, providing solid evidence for management of troublesome patients. However, no review article about the applications and effects of finite element analysis in assessing proximal humeral fractures has been reported yet. This review article summarized the applications, contribution, and clinical significance of finite element analysis in assessing proximal humeral fractures. Furthermore, the limitations of finite element analysis, the difficulties of more realistic simulation, and the validation and also the creation of validated FE models were discussed. We concluded that although some advancements in proximal humeral fractures researches have been made by using finite element analysis, utility of this powerful tool for routine clinical management and adequate simulation requires more state-of-the-art studies to provide evidence and bases.

  8. Finite element analysis of thrust angle contact ball slewing bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Biao; Guo, Yuan; Zhang, An; Tang, Shengjin

    2017-12-01

    In view of the large heavy slewing bearing no longer follows the rigid ring hupothesis under the load condition, the entity finite element model of thrust angular contact ball bearing was established by using finite element analysis software ANSYS. The boundary conditions of the model were set according to the actual condition of slewing bearing, the internal stress state of the slewing bearing was obtained by solving and calculation, and the calculated results were compared with the numerical results based on the rigid ring assumption. The results show that more balls are loaded in the result of finite element method, and the maximum contact stresses between the ball and raceway have some reductions. This is because the finite element method considers the ferrule as an elastic body. The ring will produce structure deformation in the radial plane when the heavy load slewing bearings are subjected to external loads. The results of the finite element method are more in line with the actual situation of the slewing bearing in the engineering.

  9. A Brownian model for multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wanyang

    2002-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the heavy traffic behavior of a type of multiclass queueing networks with finite buffers. The network consists of d single server stations and is populated by K classes of customers. Each station has a finite capacity waiting buffer and operates under first-in first-out (FIFO) service discipline. The network is assumed to have a feedforward routing structure under a blocking scheme. A server stops working when the downstream buffer is full. The focus of this paper is on the Brownian model formulation. More specifically, the approximating Brownian model for the networks is proposed via the method of showing a pseudo-heavy-traffic limit theorem which states that the limit process is a reflecting Brownian motion (RBM) if the properly normalized d-dimensional workload process converges in distribution to a continuous process. Numerical algorithm with finite element method has been designed to effectively compute the solution of the Brownian model (W. Dai, Ph.D. thesis (1996); X. Shen et al. The finite element method for computing the stationary distribution of an SRBM in a hypercube with applications to finite buffer queueing networks, under revision for Queueing Systems).

  10. Finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    Features step-by-step examples based on actual data and connects fundamental mathematical modeling skills and decision making concepts to everyday applicability Featuring key linear programming, matrix, and probability concepts, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications emphasizes cross-disciplinary applications that relate mathematics to everyday life. The book provides a unique combination of practical mathematical applications to illustrate the wide use of mathematics in fields ranging from business, economics, finance, management, operations research, and the life and social sciences.

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Finite Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    Yang, Matrix displacement solution to elastica problems of beams and frames , Internat. J. Solids Structures 9 (1973) 829-842. [51 W.F. Schmidt...nonlinear finite element analysis of beams, frames . arches and axisymmetric shells. Comput. and Structures 7 (1977) 725-735. 171 1. Fried. The Numerical...extension. Near inexten bility is achieved with a high dostic constant . ,p -P+(.(l-)+Q? (3) Lare axial stilness gives rise to strong oscmations in

  12. Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgopolov M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present article we consider the short description of the “Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials” program for calculating loop integrals at vanishing external momenta and applications for extended Higgs potentials reconstructions. Here we collect the analytic forms of the relevant loop integrals for our work in reconstruction of the effective Higgs potential parameters in extended models (MSSM, NMSSM and etc..

  13. The evolving quality of frictional contact with graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhi; Li, Qunyang; Carpick, Robert W; Gumbsch, Peter; Liu, Xin Z; Ding, Xiangdong; Sun, Jun; Li, Ju

    2016-11-24

    -slip behaviour. While the quantity of atomic-scale contacts (true contact area) evolves, the quality (in this case, the local pinning state of individual atoms and the overall commensurability) also evolves in frictional sliding on graphene. Moreover, the effects can be tuned by pre-wrinkling. The evolving contact quality is critical for explaining the time-dependent friction of configurationally flexible interfaces.

  14. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlick, Conor P., E-mail: conorschlick2015@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Umbanhowar, Paul B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Ottino, Julio M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); The Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Lueptow, Richard M., E-mail: r-lueptow@northwestern.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); The Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A+B→2B and A+C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics.

  15. Feedback stabilization of vortex flows in a finite-length straight pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Gong, R.; Rusak, Z.; Xu, L.; Taylor, S.; Jeng, L.

    2012-11-01

    The properties of a recently proposed feedback stabilization method of swirling flows in a finite-length pipe are studied. In the natural case, when swirl is above a critical level, linearly unstable modes appear in sequence as swirl increases and evolve to a vortex breakdown state. Based on a long-wave approach, the feedback control methodology is shown to enforce decay of perturbation's kinetic energy and to quench all instability modes at above critical swirl. In the case of a solid-body rotation, the effectiveness of this control approach is further analyzed through a mode analysis of the full linearized flow control problem. We first establish the asymptotic decay of all modes with real growth rates. We then compute growth rates of all modes according to the linearized flow control problem for swirl up to 50% above critical level. Flow stabilization in the whole swirl range is demonstrated. However, control effectiveness is sensitive to choice of the control gain. An inadequate gain, either insufficient or excessive, could lead to a failure of control at high swirl levels. Predictions of controlled flow cases agree with numerical simulations using the full unsteady and axisymmetric Euler equations with fluidic actuation along the pipe wall. Rusak et al. JFM 2012.

  16. The new finite temperature Schrödinger equations with strong or weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heling; Yang, Bin; Shen, Hongjun

    2017-07-01

    Implanting the thoughtway of thermostatistics into quantum mechanics, we formulate new Schrödinger equations of multi-particle and single-particle respectively at finite temperature. To get it, the pure-state free energies and the microscopic entropy operators are introduced and meantime the pure-state free energies take the places of mechanical energies at finite temperature. The definition of microscopic entropy introduced by Wu was also revised, and the strong or weak interactions dependent on temperature are considered in multi-particle Schrödinger Equations. Based on the new Schrödinger equation at finite temperature, two simple cases were analyzed. The first one is concerning some identical harmonic oscillators in N lattice points and the other one is about N unrelated particles in three dimensional in finite potential well. From the results gotten, we conclude that the finite temperature Schrödinger equation is particularly important for mesoscopic systems.

  17. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro

    2012-01-16

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  18. Friction welding; Magnesium; Finite element; Shear test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Contri Campanelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction spot welding (FSpW is one of the most recently developed solid state joining technologies. In this work, based on former publications, a computer aided draft and engineering resource is used to model a FSpW joint on AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets and subsequently submit the assembly to a typical shear test loading, using a linear elastic model, in order to conceive mechanical tests results. Finite element analysis shows that the plastic flow is concentrated on the welded zone periphery where yield strength is reached. It is supposed that “through the weld” and “circumferential pull-out” variants should be the main failure behaviors, although mechanical testing may provide other types of fracture due to metallurgical features.

  19. The evolving energy budget of accretionary wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeck, Jessica; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Souloumiac, Pauline

    2017-04-01

    The energy budget of evolving accretionary systems reveals how deformational processes partition energy as faults slip, topography uplifts, and layer-parallel shortening produces distributed off-fault deformation. The energy budget provides a quantitative framework for evaluating the energetic contribution or consumption of diverse deformation mechanisms. We investigate energy partitioning in evolving accretionary prisms by synthesizing data from physical sand accretion experiments and numerical accretion simulations. We incorporate incremental strain fields and cumulative force measurements from two suites of experiments to design numerical simulations that represent accretionary wedges with stronger and weaker detachment faults. One suite of the physical experiments includes a basal glass bead layer and the other does not. Two physical experiments within each suite implement different boundary conditions (stable base versus moving base configuration). Synthesizing observations from the differing base configurations reduces the influence of sidewall friction because the force vector produced by sidewall friction points in opposite directions depending on whether the base is fixed or moving. With the numerical simulations, we calculate the energy budget at two stages of accretion: at the maximum force preceding the development of the first thrust pair, and at the minimum force following the development of the pair. To identify the appropriate combination of material and fault properties to apply in the simulations, we systematically vary the Young's modulus and the fault static and dynamic friction coefficients in numerical accretion simulations, and identify the set of parameters that minimizes the misfit between the normal force measured on the physical backwall and the numerically simulated force. Following this derivation of the appropriate material and fault properties, we calculate the components of the work budget in the numerical simulations and in the

  20. Tutorial: The quantum finite square well and the Lambert W function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valluri, S.R; Roberts, Ken

    .... The technique can also be described using the Lambert W function. One can work in either of the complex domains, thereby obtaining additional insight into the finite square well problem and its bound energy states...

  1. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...... matrix of a finite metric space is both hypermetric and regular, then it is of strictly negative type. We show that the strictly negative type finite subspaces of spheres are precisely those which do not contain two pairs of antipodal points....

  2. Brake rotor design and comparison using finite element analysis : an investigation in topology optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Domond, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Disc brake technology used for mountain bikes, and mountain bike technology in general, has improved significantly as the sport of mountain biking has evolved. Disc brakes on bicycles are relatively new compared to their use on other vehicles. Rotor design is varied for rotors of the same intended use for many companies; some still use the same initial rotor designs that were introduced over a decade ago. Through the finite element analysis and optimization process, understanding the difficul...

  3. On the Critical Role of Divergent Selection in Evolvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ambitious goal in evolutionary robotics is to evolve increasingly complex robotic behaviors with minimal human design effort. Reaching this goal requires evolutionary algorithms that can unlock from genetic encodings their latent potential for evolvability. One issue clouding this goal is conceptual confusion about evolvability, which often obscures the aspects of evolvability that are important or desirable. The danger from such confusion is that it may establish unrealistic goals for evolvability that prove unproductive in practice. An important issue separate from conceptual confusion is the common misalignment between selection and evolvability in evolutionary robotics. While more expressive encodings can represent higher-level adaptations (e.g. sexual reproduction or developmental systems that increase long-term evolutionary potential (i.e. evolvability, realizing such potential requires gradients of fitness and evolvability to align. In other words, selection is often a critical factor limiting increasing evolvability. Thus, drawing from a series of recent papers, this article seeks to both (1 clarify and focus the ways in which the term evolvability is used within artificial evolution, and (2 argue for the importance of one type of selection, i.e. divergent selection, for enabling evolvability. The main argument is that there is a fundamental connection between divergent selection and evolvability (on both the individual and population level that does not hold for typical goal-oriented selection. The conclusion is that selection pressure plays a critical role in realizing the potential for evolvability, and that divergent selection in particular provides a principled mechanism for encouraging evolvability in artificial evolution.

  4. Approximating centrality in evolving graphs: toward sublinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Benjamin W.; Cybenko, George

    2017-05-01

    The identification of important nodes is a ubiquitous problem in the analysis of social networks. Centrality indices (such as degree centrality, closeness centrality, betweenness centrality, PageRank, and others) are used across many domains to accomplish this task. However, the computation of such indices is expensive on large graphs. Moreover, evolving graphs are becoming increasingly important in many applications. It is therefore desirable to develop on-line algorithms that can approximate centrality measures using memory sublinear in the size of the graph. We discuss the challenges facing the semi-streaming computation of many centrality indices. In particular, we apply recent advances in the streaming and sketching literature to provide a preliminary streaming approximation algorithm for degree centrality utilizing CountSketch and a multi-pass semi-streaming approximation algorithm for closeness centrality leveraging a spanner obtained through iteratively sketching the vertex-edge adjacency matrix. We also discuss possible ways forward for approximating betweenness centrality, as well as spectral measures of centrality. We provide a preliminary result using sketched low-rank approximations to approximate the output of the HITS algorithm.

  5. Sexual regret: evidence for evolved sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Andrew; Haselton, Martie G; Frederick, David A; Poore, Joshua; von Hippel, William; Buss, David M; Gonzaga, Gian C

    2013-10-01

    Regret and anticipated regret enhance decision quality by helping people avoid making and repeating mistakes. Some of people's most intense regrets concern sexual decisions. We hypothesized evolved sex differences in women's and men's experiences of sexual regret. Because of women's higher obligatory costs of reproduction throughout evolutionary history, we hypothesized that sexual actions, particularly those involving casual sex, would be regretted more intensely by women than by men. In contrast, because missed sexual opportunities historically carried higher reproductive fitness costs for men than for women, we hypothesized that poorly chosen sexual inactions would be regretted more by men than by women. Across three studies (Ns = 200, 395, and 24,230), we tested these hypotheses using free responses, written scenarios, detailed checklists, and Internet sampling to achieve participant diversity, including diversity in sexual orientation. Across all data sources, results supported predicted psychological sex differences and these differences were localized in casual sex contexts. These findings are consistent with the notion that the psychology of sexual regret was shaped by recurrent sex differences in selection pressures operating over deep time.

  6. Extracting evolving pathologies via spectral clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardis, Elena; Pohl, Kilian M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A bottleneck in the analysis of longitudinal MR scans with white matter brain lesions is the temporally consistent segmentation of the pathology. We identify pathologies in 3D+t(ime) within a spectral graph clustering framework. Our clustering approach simultaneously segments and tracks the evolving lesions by identifying characteristic image patterns at each time-point and voxel correspondences across time-points. For each 3D image, our method constructs a graph where weights between nodes capture the likeliness of two voxels belonging to the same region. Based on these weights, we then establish rough correspondences between graph nodes at different time-points along estimated pathology evolution directions. We combine the graphs by aligning the weights to a reference time-point, thus integrating temporal information across the 3D images, and formulate the 3D+t segmentation problem as a binary partitioning of this graph. The resulting segmentation is very robust to local intensity fluctuations and yields better results than segmentations generated for each time-point.

  7. Functional Topology of Evolving Urban Drainage Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock; McGrath, Gavan S.; Urich, Christian; Krueger, Elisabeth; Kumar, Praveen; Rao, P. Suresh C.

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the scaling and topology of engineered urban drainage networks (UDNs) in two cities, and further examined UDN evolution over decades. UDN scaling was analyzed using two power law scaling characteristics widely employed for river networks: (1) Hack's law of length (L)-area (A) [L∝Ah] and (2) exceedance probability distribution of upstream contributing area (δ) [P>(A≥δ>)˜aδ-ɛ]. For the smallest UDNs ((A≥δ>) plots for river networks are abruptly truncated, those for UDNs display exponential tempering [P>(A≥δ>)=aδ-ɛexp⁡>(-cδ>)]. The tempering parameter c decreases as the UDNs grow, implying that the distribution evolves in time to resemble those for river networks. However, the power law exponent ɛ for large UDNs tends to be greater than the range reported for river networks. Differences in generative processes and engineering design constraints contribute to observed differences in the evolution of UDNs and river networks, including subnet heterogeneity and nonrandom branching.

  8. The Evolving Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshat, Michelle; Boroumand, Nahal

    2017-05-01

    - An explosion of information on pulmonary hypertension has occurred during the past few decades. The perception of this disease has shifted from purely clinical to incorporate new knowledge of the underlying pathology. This transfer has occurred in light of advancements in pathophysiology, histology, and molecular medical diagnostics. - To update readers about the evolving understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and to demonstrate how pathology has shaped the current classification. - Information presented at the 5 World Symposia on pulmonary hypertension held since 1973, with the last meeting occurring in 2013, was used in this review. - Pulmonary hypertension represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that are differentiated based on differences in clinical, hemodynamic, and histopathologic features. Early concepts of pulmonary hypertension were largely influenced by pharmacotherapy, hemodynamic function, and clinical presentation of the disease. The initial nomenclature for pulmonary hypertension segregated the clinical classifications from pathologic subtypes. Major restructuring of this disease classification occurred between the first and second symposia, which was the first to unite clinical and pathologic information in the categorization scheme. Additional changes were introduced in subsequent meetings, particularly between the third and fourth World Symposia meetings, when additional pathophysiologic information was gained. Discoveries in molecular diagnostics significantly progressed the understanding of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Continued advancements in imaging modalities, mechanistic pathogenicity, and molecular biomarkers will enable physicians to define pulmonary hypertension phenotypes based on the pathobiology and allow for treatment customization.

  9. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Roveri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Norberto Roveri, Michele IafiscoLaboratory of Environmental and Biological Structural Chemistry (LEBSC, Dipartimento di Chimica ‘G. Ciamician’, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical–physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical–physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical–physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, nanocrystals, biomimetism, biomaterials, drug delivery, remineralization

  10. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roveri, Norberto; Iafisco, Michele

    2010-11-09

    By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical-physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical-physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical-physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.

  11. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  12. UKAEA'S evolving contract philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, R. D. [UK Atomic Energy Authority, UKAEA, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has gone through fundamental change over the last ten years. At the heart of this change has been UKAEA's relationship with the contracting and supply market. This paper describes the way in which UKAEA actively developed the market to support the decommissioning programme, and how the approach to contracting has evolved as external pressures and demands have changed. UKAEA's pro-active approach to industry has greatly assisted the development of a healthy, competitive market for services supporting decommissioning in the UK. There have been difficult changes and many challenges along the way, and some retrenchment was necessary to meet regulatory requirements. Nevertheless, UKAEA has sustained a high level of competition - now measured in terms of competed spend as a proportion of competable spend - with annual out-turns consistently over 80%. The prime responsibility for market development will pass to the new Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in 2005, as the owner, on behalf of the Government, of the UK's civil nuclear liabilities. The preparatory work for the NDA indicates that the principles established by UKAEA will be carried forward. (author)

  13. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  14. An 8-node tetrahedral finite element suitable for explicit transient dynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Stone, C.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Considerable effort has been expended in perfecting the algorithmic properties of 8-node hexahedral finite elements. Today the element is well understood and performs exceptionally well when used in modeling three-dimensional explicit transient dynamic events. However, the automatic generation of all-hexahedral meshes remains an elusive achievement. The alternative of automatic generation for all-tetrahedral finite element is a notoriously poor performer, and the 10-node quadratic tetrahedral finite element while a better performer numerically is computationally expensive. To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation extant today, the authors have explored the creation of a quality 8-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four midface nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular, they examine the 80node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element only samples constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hourglass modes. In this regard, it bears similarities to the 8-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the 8-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the 8-node hexahedral finite element and handbuilt meshes.

  15. From the Myth of Level Playing Fields to the Reality of a Finite Planet: Comment on "A Global Social Support System: What the International Community Could Learn From the United States' National Basketball Association's Scheme for Redistribution of New Talent".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Ronald

    2015-11-19

    Despite the mythology that the global economy with its trade rules creates a 'level playing field,' international trade has never involved 'level players.' The inequalities in outcomes generated by the more powerful winning more frequently has led to innovative ideas for ex post redistribution to make the matches between the players both fairer, and in the analogy to basketball used by the authors, more interesting and even more competitive. The proposal for a Global Social Protection Fund, financed by a small tax on the winners to enhance social protection spending for the losers, presumably increasing the latter's capabilities to compete more effectively in the global market game, is one such idea. It has much to commend it. Several problems, however, stand in its way, apart from those inherent within nations themselves and to which the authors give some attention. First, much global trade is now intra-firm rather than international, making calculations of which nations win or lose exceedingly difficult. Second, tax havens persist without the transparency and global regulatory oversights that would allow a better rendering of where winnings are stashed. Third, pre-distribution inequalities (those arising from market activities before government tax and transfer measures apply) are still increasing as labour's power to wrestle global capital into some ameliorative social contract diminishes. Fourth, there are finite limits to a planet on the cusp of multiple environmental crises. These problems do not diminish the necessity of alternative policy playbooks such as the proposed Fund, but point to the need to embrace the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a single set, such that economic growth for the bottom half of humanity includes deep structural reforms to both pre-distribution and redistribution, if the targets for environmental survival are to be met. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  16. Thermalization and Return to Equilibrium on Finite Quantum Lattice Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Terry; Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Cramer, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    Thermal states are the bedrock of statistical physics. Nevertheless, when and how they actually arise in closed quantum systems is not fully understood. We consider this question for systems with local Hamiltonians on finite quantum lattices. In a first step, we show that states with exponentially decaying correlations equilibrate after a quantum quench. Then, we show that the equilibrium state is locally equivalent to a thermal state, provided that the free energy of the equilibrium state is sufficiently small and the thermal state has exponentially decaying correlations. As an application, we look at a related important question: When are thermal states stable against noise? In other words, if we locally disturb a closed quantum system in a thermal state, will it return to thermal equilibrium? We rigorously show that this occurs when the correlations in the thermal state are exponentially decaying. All our results come with finite-size bounds, which are crucial for the growing field of quantum thermodynamics and other physical applications.

  17. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  18. Simulating QCD at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    de Forcrand, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In this review, I recall the nature and the inevitability of the "sign problem" which plagues attempts to simulate lattice QCD at finite baryon density. I present the main approaches used to circumvent the sign problem at small chemical potential. I sketch how one can predict analytically the severity of the sign problem, as well as the numerically accessible range of baryon densities. I review progress towards the determination of the pseudo-critical temperature T_c(mu), and towards the identification of a possible QCD critical point. Some promising advances with non-standard approaches are reviewed.

  19. Covariant gauges at finite temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Landshoff, P V; Rebhan, A

    1992-01-01

    A prescription is presented for real-time finite-temperature perturbation theory in covariant gauges, in which only the two physical degrees of freedom of the gauge-field propagator acquire thermal parts. The propagators for the unphysical degrees of freedom of the gauge field, and for the Faddeev-Popov ghost field, are independent of temperature. This prescription is applied to the calculation of the one-loop gluon self-energy and the two-loop interaction pressure, and is found to be simpler...

  20. NASA's Space Launch System: An Evolving Capability for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    A foundational capability for international human deep-space exploration, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle represents a new spaceflight infrastructure asset, creating opportunities for mission profiles and space systems that cannot currently be executed. While the primary purpose of SLS, which is making rapid progress towards initial launch readiness in two years, will be to support NASA's Journey to Mars, discussions are already well underway regarding other potential utilization of the vehicle's unique capabilities. In its initial Block 1 configuration, capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) to low Earth orbit (LEO), SLS will propel the Orion crew vehicle to cislunar space, while also delivering small CubeSat-class spacecraft to deep-space destinations. With the addition of a more powerful upper stage, the Block 1B configuration of SLS will be able to deliver 105 t to LEO and enable more ambitious human missions into the proving ground of space. This configuration offers opportunities for launching co-manifested payloads with the Orion crew vehicle, and a class of secondary payloads, larger than today's CubeSats. Further upgrades to the vehicle, including advanced boosters, will evolve its performance to 130 t in its Block 2 configuration. Both Block 1B and Block 2 also offer the capability to carry 8.4- or 10-m payload fairings, larger than any contemporary launch vehicle. With unmatched mass-lift capability, payload volume, and C3, SLS not only enables spacecraft or mission designs currently impossible with contemporary EELVs, it also offers enhancing benefits, such as reduced risk, operational costs and/or complexity, shorter transit time to destination or launching large systems either monolithically or in fewer components. This paper will discuss both the performance and capabilities of Space Launch System as it evolves, and the current state of SLS utilization planning.

  1. The evolving role of tiotropium in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIvor ER

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Emma R McIvor,1 R Andrew McIvor2 1Queen’s University, Belfast, UK; 2Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Abstract: Tiotropium is a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA that exerts its bronchodilatory effect by blocking endogenous acetylcholine receptors in the airways. Its safety and efficacy are well established for the treatment of COPD, and it is now being recognized for its role in improving lung function and control in asthma. This review discusses the evolving role of tiotropium delivered by the Respimat® in patients across the range of asthma severities and ages, and provides an overview of safety and efficacy data. Tiotropium is the only LAMA currently approved for the treatment of asthma, and evidence from a large-scale clinical trial program, including several Phase III studies in adults, has demonstrated that tiotropium improves lung function and asthma control, with a safety profile comparable with that of placebo. Clinical trials in adolescent patients (aged 12–17 years have also shown improvements in lung function and trends toward improved asthma control. Of note, the efficacy and safety profiles are consistent regardless of baseline characteristics and phenotype. Given the large and growing body of evidence, it is likely that as clinical experience with tiotropium increases, this treatment may possibly emerge as the key choice for add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids/long-acting β2-agonists, and in patients who do not tolerate long-acting bronchodilators or other medications, in the future. Keywords: tiotropium, anticholinergics, asthma, efficacy

  2. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshordi, Niayesh [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan, E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  3. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2014-12-01

    Changing the dimensionality of the space-time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of ;evolving dimensions; in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger-Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3 + 1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3 + 1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  4. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niayesh Afshordi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  5. Unitary equilibration after a quantum quench of a thermal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Zanardi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    In this work we investigate the equilibration dynamics after a sudden Hamiltonian quench of a quantum spin system initially prepared in a thermal state. To characterize the equilibration we evaluate the Loschmidt echo, a global measure for the degree of distinguishability between the initial and time-evolved quenched states. We present general results valid for small quenches and detailed analysis of the quantum XY chain. The result is that quantum criticality manifests, even at small but finite temperatures, in a universal double-peaked form of the echo statistics and poor equilibration for sufficiently relevant perturbations. In addition, for this model we find a tight lower bound on the Loschmidt echo in terms of the purity of the initial state and the more easily evaluated Hilbert-Schmidt inner product between initial and time-evolved quenched states. This bound allows us to relate the time-averaged Loschmidt echo with the purity of the time-averaged state, a quantity that has been shown to provide an upper bound on the variance of observables.

  6. Unitary equilibration after a quantum quench of a thermal state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Venuti, Lorenzo Campos [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale Settimio Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy); Zanardi, Paolo [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States); Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI), Viale Settimio Severo 65, I-10133 Torino (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    In this work we investigate the equilibration dynamics after a sudden Hamiltonian quench of a quantum spin system initially prepared in a thermal state. To characterize the equilibration we evaluate the Loschmidt echo, a global measure for the degree of distinguishability between the initial and time-evolved quenched states. We present general results valid for small quenches and detailed analysis of the quantum XY chain. The result is that quantum criticality manifests, even at small but finite temperatures, in a universal double-peaked form of the echo statistics and poor equilibration for sufficiently relevant perturbations. In addition, for this model we find a tight lower bound on the Loschmidt echo in terms of the purity of the initial state and the more easily evaluated Hilbert-Schmidt inner product between initial and time-evolved quenched states. This bound allows us to relate the time-averaged Loschmidt echo with the purity of the time-averaged state, a quantity that has been shown to provide an upper bound on the variance of observables.

  7. Local Lorentz covariance in finite-dimensional local quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasakka, Matti

    2017-10-01

    We show that local Lorentz covariance arises canonically as the group of transformations between local thermal states in the framework of local quantum physics, given the following three postulates: (i) Local observable algebras are finite-dimensional. (ii) Minimal local observable algebras are isomorphic to M2(C ) , the observable algebra of a single qubit. (iii) The vacuum restricted to any minimal local observable algebra is a nonmaximally mixed thermal state. The derivation reveals a new and surprising relation between spacetime structure and local quantum states. In particular, we show how local restrictions of the vacuum can determine the connection between different local inertial reference frames.

  8. Phase transitions in finite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), DSM-CEA / IN2P3-CNRS, 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    2002-07-01

    In this series of lectures we will first review the general theory of phase transition in the framework of information theory and briefly address some of the well known mean field solutions of three dimensional problems. The theory of phase transitions in finite systems will then be discussed, with a special emphasis to the conceptual problems linked to a thermodynamical description for small, short-lived, open systems as metal clusters and data samples coming from nuclear collisions. The concept of negative heat capacity developed in the early seventies in the context of self-gravitating systems will be reinterpreted in the general framework of convexity anomalies of thermo-statistical potentials. The connection with the distribution of the order parameter will lead us to a definition of first order phase transitions in finite systems based on topology anomalies of the event distribution in the space of observations. Finally a careful study of the thermodynamical limit will provide a bridge with the standard theory of phase transitions and show that in a wide class of physical situations the different statistical ensembles are irreducibly inequivalent. (authors)

  9. Biset functors for finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bouc, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This volume exposes the theory of biset functors for finite groups, which yields a unified framework for operations of induction, restriction, inflation, deflation and transport by isomorphism. The first part recalls the basics on biset categories and biset functors. The second part is concerned with the Burnside functor and the functor of complex characters, together with semisimplicity issues and an overview of Green biset functors. The last part is devoted to biset functors defined over p-groups for a fixed prime number p. This includes the structure of the functor of rational representations and rational p-biset functors. The last two chapters expose three applications of biset functors to long-standing open problems, in particular the structure of the Dade group of an arbitrary finite p-group.This book is intended both to students and researchers, as it gives a didactic exposition of the basics and a rewriting of advanced results in the area, with some new ideas and proofs.

  10. Syntheses, Characterization, and Photo-Hydrogen-Evolving Properties of Tris(2,2'-bipyridineruthenium(II Derivatives Tethered to an H2-Evolving (2-phenylpyridinatoplatinum(II Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sakai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of developing new molecular devices having higher photo-hydrogen-evolving activity, Pt(ppyClX units (ppy = 2-phenylpyridinate, X = Cl- or DMSO; DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide have been employed as an H2-evolving site, as the catalytic activity of [Pt(ppyCl2]- was confirmed to be higher than those of other mononuclear platinum(II complexes. In the present study, two new heterodinuclear Ru(IIPt(II complexes, produced by condensation of [Ru(bpy2(5-amino-phen]2+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline with [Pt(cppyCl2]- and Pt(cppy(DMSOCl (cppy = 9-carboxy-phenylpyridinate, respectively, have been prepared and their photo-hydrogen-evolving activities have been evaluated in detail. The ineffectiveness of these systems as photo-hydrogen-evolving molecular devices are interpreted in terms of their negative driving forces for the photoinduced electron transfer from the triplet MLCT excited state of the Ru chromophore to the p*(ppy orbital of the catalyst moiety.

  11. Orthogonally Evolved AI to Improve Difficulty Adjustment in Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintze, Arend; Olson, Randal; Lehman, Joel Anthony

    2016-01-01

    (i.e. agents subject to fewer generations of evolution) make for easier opponents, while highly-evolved agents are more challenging to overcome. In this publication we test a new approach for difficulty adjustment in games: orthogonally evolved AI, where the player receives support from collaborating...... opponents. Furthermore, human interaction can modulate (and be informed by) the performance and behavior of collaborating agents. In this way, orthogonally evolved AI both facilitates smoother difficulty adjustment and enables new game experiences....

  12. Formation of Majorana fermions in finite-size graphene strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Kaladzhyan, Cristina Bena

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation of Majorana fermions in finite-size graphene strips with open boundary conditions in both directions, in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field and in the proximity of a superconducting substrate. We show that for long enough strips the Majorana states can form in the presence of a Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling, as well as in the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field. We find that, unlike infinite graphene ribbons in which Majorana states arise solely close to the bottom of the band and the Van Hove singularities, for finite-size systems this can happen also at much smaller doping values, close to the Dirac points, and depends strongly on the type of the short edges of the systems (e.g. armchair vs. zigzag, as well as on the width of the ribbons.

  13. Accuracy of topological entanglement entropy on finite cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong-Chen; Singh, Rajiv R P; Balents, Leon

    2013-09-06

    Topological phases are unique states of matter which support nonlocal excitations which behave as particles with fractional statistics. A universal characterization of gapped topological phases is provided by the topological entanglement entropy (TEE). We study the finite size corrections to the TEE by focusing on systems with a Z2 topological ordered state using density-matrix renormalization group and perturbative series expansions. We find that extrapolations of the TEE based on the Renyi entropies with a Renyi index of n≥2 suffer from much larger finite size corrections than do extrapolations based on the von Neumann entropy. In particular, when the circumference of the cylinder is about ten times the correlation length, the TEE obtained using von Neumann entropy has an error of order 10(-3), while for Renyi entropies it can even exceed 40%. We discuss the relevance of these findings to previous and future searches for topological ordered phases, including quantum spin liquids.

  14. Evolving R Coronae Borealis Stars with MESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Lauer, Amber; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Frank, Juhan

    2018-01-01

    being a WD. Solving the mystery of how the RCB stars evolve will lead to a better understanding of other important types of stellar merger events such as Type Ia SNe.

  15. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Relative position finite-time coordinated tracking control of spacecraft formation without velocity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates finite-time relative position coordinated tracking problem by output feedback for spacecraft formation flying without velocity measurement. By employing homogeneous system theory, a finite-time relative position coordinated tracking controller by state feedback is firstly developed, where the desired time-varying trajectory given in advance can be tracked by the formation. Then, to address the problem of lack of velocity measurements, a finite-time output feedback controller is proposed by involving a novel filter to recover unknown velocity information in a finite time. Rigorous proof shows that the proposed control law ensures global stability and guarantees the position of spacecraft formation to track a time-varying reference in finite time. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed controller. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Challenges in Integrating Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Methods for Realistic Structural Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Zagidulin, Dmitri; Rauser, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities and expertise related to the development of links between nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) at Glenn Research Center (GRC) are demonstrated. Current tools to analyze data produced by computed tomography (CT) scans are exercised to help assess the damage state in high temperature structural composite materials. A utility translator was written to convert velocity (an image processing software) STL data file to a suitable CAD-FEA type file. Finite element analyses are carried out with MARC, a commercial nonlinear finite element code, and the analytical results are discussed. Modeling was established by building MSC/Patran (a pre and post processing finite element package) generated model and comparing it to a model generated by Velocity in conjunction with MSC/Patran Graphics. Modeling issues and results are discussed in this paper. The entire process that outlines the tie between the data extracted via NDE and the finite element modeling and analysis is fully described.

  18. How Often Are Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Said to "Evolve" in the News?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Singh

    Full Text Available Media plays an important role in informing the general public about scientific ideas. We examine whether the word "evolve," sometimes considered controversial by the general public, is frequently used in the popular press. Specifically, we ask how often articles discussing antibiotic resistance use the word "evolve" (or its lexemes as opposed to alternative terms such as "emerge" or "develop." We chose the topic of antibiotic resistance because it is a medically important issue; bacterial evolution is a central player in human morbidity and mortality. We focused on the most widely-distributed newspapers written in English in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, India, and Australia. We examined all articles that focused primarily on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, were published in 2014 or earlier, and were accessible in online archives, for a total of 1639 articles. The total years examined per newspaper ranged from 5 to 37 years with a median of 27 years, and the overall range was 1978-2014. We quantified how many articles included the term "evolve" and analyzed how this varied with newspaper, country, and time. We found that an overall rate of 18% of articles used the term "evolve" but with significant variation among countries. Newspapers in the United Kingdom had the highest rate (24%, more than double of those in India (9%, the country with the lowest rate. These frequencies were lower than those found in scientific papers from both evolutionary journals and biomedical journals. There were no statistically significant changes in frequency and no trends when "evolve" usage was compared against variables such as newspaper circulation, liberal/conservative bias, time, and state evolution acceptance in U.S. newspapers. This study highlights the globally low usage of the word "evolve" in the popular press. We suggest this low usage may affect public understanding and acceptance of evolutionary concepts.

  19. Nonconforming tetrahedral mixed finite elements for elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Douglas N.; Awanou, Gerard; Winther, Ragnar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a nonconforming finite element approximation of the space of symmetric tensors with square integrable divergence, on tetrahedral meshes. Used for stress approximation together with the full space of piecewise linear vector fields for displacement, this gives a stable mixed finite element method which is shown to be linearly convergent for both the stress and displacement, and which is significantly simpler than any stable conforming mixed finite element method. The method ...

  20. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  1. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  2. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  3. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  4. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  5. Out of sight, out of mind : is solitary confinement offensive to the evolving standards of the US Constitution's Eighth Amendment?

    OpenAIRE

    Eastaugh, C.

    2016-01-01

    The United States (US) Constitution’s Eighth Amendment includes a restriction on cruel and unusual punishments. Over the past fifty years the punishments clause has been developed by the US Supreme Court through its ‘evolving standards of decency’ (ESD) jurisprudence, restricting the range and application of lawful capital and non-capital penalties. Although the punishments clause has been evolved in the capital sphere such that the American death penalty is reaching a vanishing point, the Co...

  6. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory.

  7. Axisymmetric finite deformation membrane problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, W.W.

    1980-12-12

    Many biomechanic problems involve the analysis of finite deformation axisymmetric membranes. This paper presents the general formulation for solving a class of axisymmetric membrane problems. The material nonlinearity, as well as the geometric nonlinearity, is considered. Two methods are presented to solve these problems. The first method is solving a set of differential equilibrium equations. The governing equations are reduced to three first-order ordinary-differential equations with explicit derivatives. The second method is the Ritz method where a general potential energy functional valid for all axisymmetric deformed positions is presented. The geometric admissible functions that govern the deformed configuration are written in terms of a series with unknown coefficients. These unknown coefficients are determined by the minimum potential energy principle that of all geometric admissible deformed configurations, the equilibrium configuration minimizes the potential energy. Some examples are presented. A comparison between these two methods is mentioned.

  8. Electric fields at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez Manjarres, A. D.; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2017-11-01

    Partial differential equations for the electric potential at finite temperature, taking into account the thermal Euler-Heisenberg contribution to the electromagnetic Lagrangian are derived. This complete temperature dependence introduces quantum corrections to several well known equations such as the Thomas-Fermi and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Our unified approach allows at the same time to derive other similar equations which take into account the effect of the surrounding heat bath on electric fields. We vary our approach by considering a neutral plasma as well as the screening caused by electrons only. The effects of changing the statistics from Fermi-Dirac to the Tsallis statistics and including the presence of a magnetic field are also investigated. Some useful applications of the above formalism are presented.

  9. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  10. Robust control of post-stall pitching maneuver based on finite-time observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dawei; Chen, Mou; Gong, Huajun

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a robust finite-time maneuver control scheme for the longitudinal attitude dynamic of the aircraft with unsteady aerodynamic disturbances and input saturation. To efficiently eliminate the influence of unsteady aerodynamic disturbances, nonlinear finite-time observers are developed. Despite the existence of the nonlinearity and the coupling between aircraft states and unsteady aerodynamic disturbances, the proposed observers can still precisely estimate the unmeasurable unsteady aerodynamic disturbances in finite time. To attenuate the effect caused by input saturation, a finite-time auxiliary system is constructed. With the error between the desired control input and saturation input as the input of the auxiliary system, the additional signals are generated to compensate for the effect of input saturation. Combined with the finite-time observers and the finite-time auxiliary system, a robust finite-time backstepping attitude control design is developed. The finite-time convergence of all closed-loop system signals is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis method under the developed robust attitude control schemes. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed attitude control approaches. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  12. Loops and autonomy promote evolvability of ecosystem networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianxi

    2014-09-29

    The structure of ecological networks, in particular food webs, determines their ability to evolve further, i.e. evolvability. The knowledge about how food web evolvability is determined by the structures of diverse ecological networks can guide human interventions purposefully to either promote or limit evolvability of ecosystems. However, the focus of prior food web studies was on stability and robustness; little is known regarding the impact of ecological network structures on their evolvability. To correlate ecosystem structure and evolvability, we adopt the NK model originally from evolutionary biology to generate and assess the ruggedness of fitness landscapes of a wide spectrum of model food webs with gradual variation in the amount of feeding loops and link density. The variation in network structures is controlled by linkage rewiring. Our results show that more feeding loops and lower trophic link density, i.e. higher autonomy of species, of food webs increase the potential for the ecosystem to generate heritable variations with improved fitness. Our findings allow the prediction of the evolvability of actual food webs according to their network structures, and provide guidance to enhancing or controlling the evolvability of specific ecosystems.

  13. Protein structural modularity and robustness are associated with evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorick, Mary M; Wagner, Günter P

    2011-01-01

    Theory suggests that biological modularity and robustness allow for maintenance of fitness under mutational change, and when this change is adaptive, for evolvability. Empirical demonstrations that these traits promote evolvability in nature remain scant however. This is in part because modularity, robustness, and evolvability are difficult to define and measure in real biological systems. Here, we address whether structural modularity and/or robustness confer evolvability at the level of proteins by looking for associations between indices of protein structural modularity, structural robustness, and evolvability. We propose a novel index for protein structural modularity: the number of regular secondary structure elements (helices and strands) divided by the number of residues in the structure. We index protein evolvability as the proportion of sites with evidence of being under positive selection multiplied by the average rate of adaptive evolution at these sites, and we measure this as an average over a phylogeny of 25 mammalian species. We use contact density as an index of protein designability, and thus, structural robustness. We find that protein evolvability is positively associated with structural modularity as well as structural robustness and that the effect of structural modularity on evolvability is independent of the structural robustness index. We interpret these associations to be the result of reduced constraints on amino acid substitutions in highly modular and robust protein structures, which results in faster adaptation through natural selection.

  14. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to glucose promotes evolvability in lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kelly N; Castillo, Gerardo; Wünsche, Andrea; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-02-01

    The selective history of a population can influence its subsequent evolution, an effect known as historical contingency. We previously observed that five of six replicate populations that were evolved in a glucose-limited environment for 2000 generations, then switched to lactose for 1000 generations, had higher fitness increases in lactose than populations started directly from the ancestor. To test if selection in glucose systematically increased lactose evolvability, we started 12 replay populations--six from a population subsample and six from a single randomly selected clone--from each of the six glucose-evolved founder populations. These replay populations and 18 ancestral populations were evolved for 1000 generations in a lactose-limited environment. We found that replay populations were initially slightly less fit in lactose than the ancestor, but were more evolvable, in that they increased in fitness at a faster rate and to higher levels. This result indicates that evolution in the glucose environment resulted in genetic changes that increased the potential of genotypes to adapt to lactose. Genome sequencing identified four genes--iclR, nadR, spoT, and rbs--that were mutated in most glucose-evolved clones and are candidates for mediating increased evolvability. Our results demonstrate that short-term selective costs during selection in one environment can lead to changes in evolvability that confer longer term benefits. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. K-finite decidable objects and finite cardinals in an arbitrary topos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Acuña Ortega

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In an elemetary topos $\\varepsilo$, we prove that the class of K-finite decidable objects is the same to the class of finite cardinals in E if and only if every K-finite decidable object X such that $X \\longrightarrow 1$ is epic, then $1 \\longrightarrow X $ is split epic.

  16. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  17. Finite time control of uncertain networked switched linear systems with quantizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Zhou, Guopeng; Tian, Fengxia; Liu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the finite-time control problem for uncertain networked switched linear systems with both state and control input quantizations. By employing average well dwell time (ADT) and Lyapunov-like function method, a feedback controller is designed to guarantee that the dynamic augment closed-loop system is finite-time boundedness. Then based on this, some sufficient conditions which ensure the finite-time boundedness of networked switched systems are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  18. General beam cross-section analysis using a 3D finite element slice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couturier, Philippe; Krenk, Steen

    2014-01-01

    A formulation for analysis of general cross-section properties has been developed. This formulation is based on the stress-strain states in the classic six equilibrium modes of a beam by considering a finite thickness slice modelled by a single layer of 3D finite elements. The displacement...... an analytical solution is available. The paper also shows an application to wind turbine blade cross-sections and discusses the effect of the finite element discretization on the cross-section properties such as stiffness parameters and the location of the elastic and shear centers....

  19. Finite-temperature field theory and quantum noise in an electrical network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garavaglia, T.

    1988-10-15

    Finite-temperature (0less than or equal toTfinite second moments that satisfy the uncertainty principle bound are given for a dissipative quantum oscillator. A regularization method, based on the analysis of a semi-infinite low-pass filter, is employed, and it leads to results which differ from those of the Drude model. To illustrate the FTF method, an example is given using an ideal finite-temperature coherent state.

  20. Evolving Structural Diversity and Metallicity in Compressed Lithium Azide

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Dasari L. V. K.

    2013-10-10

    In pursuit of new stable nitrogen-rich phases and of a possible insulator-metal transition, the ground-state electronic structure of lithium azide, LiN3, is investigated from 1 atm to 300 GPa (∼2-fold compression) using evolutionary crystal structure exploration methods coupled with density functional theoretical calculations. Two new LiN3 phases, containing slightly reduced and well-separated N2 units, are found to be enthalpically competitive with the known lithium azide crystal structure at 1 atm. At pressures above 36 GPa nitrogen-rich assemblies begin to evolve. These incorporate NN bond formation beyond that in N2 or N3 -. N6 rings and infinite one-dimensional linear nitrogen chains (structural analogues to polyacetylene) appear. Above 200 GPa quasi-one- and two-dimensional extended puckered hexagonal and decagonal nitrogen layers emerge. The high-pressure phase featuring linear chains may be quenchable to P = 1 atm. With increasing pressure the progression in electrical conductivity is from insulator to metal. © 2013 American Chemical Society.