WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolved finite state

  1. Evolved finite state controller for hybrid system in reduced search space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Jean-Francois; Fan, Zhun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary methodology to automatically generate finite state automata (FSA) controllers to control hybrid systems. The proposed approach reduces the search space using an invariant analysis of the system. FSA controllers for a case study of two-tank system have been...

  2. Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, Natesh; Anderson, Neal G.

    2013-01-01

    Irreversibility and dissipation in finite-state automata (FSA) are considered from a physical-information-theoretic perspective. A quantitative measure for the computational irreversibility of finite automata is introduced, and a fundamental lower bound on the average energy dissipated per state transition is obtained and expressed in terms of FSA irreversibility. The irreversibility measure and energy bound are germane to any realization of a deterministic automaton that faithfully registers abstract FSA states in distinguishable states of a physical system coupled to a thermal environment, and that evolves via a sequence of interactions with an external system holding a physical instantiation of a random input string. The central result, which is shown to follow from quantum dynamics and entropic inequalities alone, can be regarded as a generalization of Landauer's Principle applicable to FSAs and tailorable to specified automata. Application to a simple FSA is illustrated.

  3. Use of the parameterised finite element method to robustly and efficiently evolve the edge of a moving cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Matthew P; Mackenzie, John A; Webb, Steven D; Insall, Robert H

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present a computational tool that enables the simulation of mathematical models of cell migration and chemotaxis on an evolving cell membrane. Recent models require the numerical solution of systems of reaction-diffusion equations on the evolving cell membrane and then the solution state is used to drive the evolution of the cell edge. Previous work involved moving the cell edge using a level set method (LSM). However, the LSM is computationally very expensive, which severely limits the practical usefulness of the algorithm. To address this issue, we have employed the parameterised finite element method (PFEM) as an alternative method for evolving a cell boundary. We show that the PFEM is far more efficient and robust than the LSM. We therefore suggest that the PFEM potentially has an essential role to play in computational modelling efforts towards the understanding of many of the complex issues related to chemotaxis.

  4. Collaborative Systems – Finite State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the finite state machines are defined and formalized. There are presented the collaborative banking systems and their correspondence is done with finite state machines. It highlights the role of finite state machines in the complexity analysis and performs operations on very large virtual databases as finite state machines. It builds the state diagram and presents the commands and documents transition between the collaborative systems states. The paper analyzes the data sets from Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk application and performs a combined analysis in order to determine certain statistics. Indicators are obtained, such as the number of requests by category and the load degree of an agent in the collaborative system.

  5. On Algebraic Study of Type-2 Fuzzy Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam K. Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Theories of fuzzy sets and type-2 fuzzy sets are powerful mathematical tools for modeling various types of uncertainty. In this paper we introduce the concept of type-2 fuzzy finite state automata and discuss the algebraic study of type-2 fuzzy finite state automata, i.e., to introduce the concept of homomorphisms between two type-2 fuzzy finite state automata, to associate a type-2 fuzzy transformation semigroup with a type-2 fuzzy finite state automata. Finally, we discuss several product of type-2 fuzzy finite state automata and shown that these product is a categorical product.

  6. Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Calude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

  7. Removing the Restrictions Imposed on Finite State Machines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determines an effective method of removing the fixed and finite state amount of memory that restricts finite state machines from carrying out compilation jobs that require larger amount of memory. The study is ... The conclusion reviewed the various steps followed and made projections for further reading. Keyword: ...

  8. Finite-State Methodology in Natural Language Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Korzycki

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent mathematical and algorithmic results in the field of finite-state technology, as well the increase in computing power, have constructed the base for a new approach in natural language processing. However the task of creating an appropriate model that would describe the phenomena of the natural language is still to be achieved. ln this paper I'm presenting some notions related to the finite-state modelling of syntax and morphology.

  9. Rough Finite State Automata and Rough Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulprakasam, R.; Perumal, R.; Radhakrishnan, M.; Dare, V. R.

    2018-04-01

    Sumita Basu [1, 2] recently introduced the concept of a rough finite state (semi)automaton, rough grammar and rough languages. Motivated by the work of [1, 2], in this paper, we investigate some closure properties of rough regular languages and establish the equivalence between the classes of rough languages generated by rough grammar and the classes of rough regular languages accepted by rough finite automaton.

  10. Comprehensive bidding strategies with genetic programming/finite state automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, C.W. Jr.; Sheble, G.B.; Ashlock, D.

    1999-01-01

    This research is an extension of the authors' previous work in double auctions aimed at developing bidding strategies for electric utilities which trade electricity competitively. The improvements detailed in this paper come from using data structures which combine genetic programming and finite state automata termed GP-Automata. The strategies developed by the method described here are adaptive--reacting to inputs--whereas the previously developed strategies were only suitable in the particular scenario for which they had been designed. The strategies encoded in the GP-Automata are tested in an auction simulator. The simulator pits them against other distribution companies (distcos) and generation companies (gencos), buying and selling power via double auctions implemented in regional commodity exchanges. The GP-Automata are evolved with a genetic algorithm so that they possess certain characteristics. In addition to designing successful bidding strategies (whose usage would result in higher profits) the resulting strategies can also be designed to imitate certain types of trading behaviors. The resulting strategies can be implemented directly in on-line trading, or can be used as realistic competitors in an off-line trading simulator

  11. Socio-economic applications of finite state mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Machado Velho, Roberto; Wolfram, Marie Therese

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present different applications of finite state mean field games to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community or consumer choice behaviour in the free market. The corresponding finite

  12. Dynamic and quantitative method of analyzing service consistency evolution based on extended hierarchical finite state automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linjun; Tang, Jun; Ling, Yunxiang; Li, Benxian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA). Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service's evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA) is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA), which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs) based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average) is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12%) is the second biggest one, and the service version's confusion (1.2%) is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  13. Dynamic and Quantitative Method of Analyzing Service Consistency Evolution Based on Extended Hierarchical Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA. Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service’s evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA, which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12% is the second biggest one, and the service version’s confusion (1.2% is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  14. Artificial emotional model based on finite state machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-mei; WU Wei-guo

    2008-01-01

    According to the basic emotional theory, the artificial emotional model based on the finite state machine(FSM) was presented. In finite state machine model of emotion, the emotional space included the basic emotional space and the multiple emotional spaces. The emotion-switching diagram was defined and transition function was developed using Markov chain and linear interpolation algorithm. The simulation model was built using Stateflow toolbox and Simulink toolbox based on the Matlab platform.And the model included three subsystems: the input one, the emotion one and the behavior one. In the emotional subsystem, the responses of different personalities to the external stimuli were described by defining personal space. This model takes states from an emotional space and updates its state depending on its current state and a state of its input (also a state-emotion). The simulation model realizes the process of switching the emotion from the neutral state to other basic emotions. The simulation result is proved to correspond to emotion-switching law of human beings.

  15. Fokker-Planck equation associated with the Wigner function of a quantum system with a finite number of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohendet, O.

    1989-01-01

    We consider a quantum system with a finite number N of states and we show that a Markov process evolving in an 'extended' discrete phase can be associated with the discrete Wigner function of the system. This Wigner function is built using the Weyl quantization procedure on the group Z N xZ N . Moreover we can use this process to compute the quantum mean values as probabilistic expectations of functions of this process. This probabilistic formulation can be seen as a stochastic mechanics in phase space. (orig.)

  16. A programmable finite state module for use with the Fermilab Tevatron Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beechy, D.

    1987-10-01

    A VME module has been designed which implements several programmable finite state machines that use the Tevatron Clock signal as inputs. In addition to normal finite state machine type outputs, the module, called the VME Finite State Machine, or VFSM, records a history of changes of state so that the exact path through the state diagram can be determined. There is also provision for triggering and recording from an external digitizer so that samples can be taken and recorded under very precisely defined circumstances

  17. Socio-economic applications of finite state mean field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, we present different applications of finite state mean field games to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community or consumer choice behaviour in the free market. The corresponding finite state mean field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we present and validate different numerical methods. We illustrate the behaviour of solutions with various numerical experiments,which show interesting phenomena such as shock formation. Hence, we conclude with an investigation of the shock structure in the case of two-state problems.

  18. Quantum entanglement of localized excited states at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caputa, Paweł [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Simón, Joan; Štikonas, Andrius [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences,University of Edinburgh,King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Takayanagi, Tadashi [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU),University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    In this work we study the time evolutions of (Renyi) entanglement entropy of locally excited states in two dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) at finite temperature. We consider excited states created by acting with local operators on thermal states and give both field theoretic and holographic calculations. In free field CFTs, we find that the growth of Renyi entanglement entropy at finite temperature is reduced compared to the zero temperature result by a small quantity proportional to the width of the localized excitations. On the other hand, in finite temperature CFTs with classical gravity duals, we find that the entanglement entropy approaches a characteristic value at late time. This behaviour does not occur at zero temperature. We also study the mutual information between the two CFTs in the thermofield double (TFD) formulation and give physical interpretations of our results.

  19. Recurrent Artificial Neural Networks and Finite State Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisl, Hermann

    It is argued that pessimistic assessments of the adequacy of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for natural language processing (NLP) on the grounds that they have a finite state architecture are unjustified, and that their adequacy in this regard is an empirical issue. First, arguments that counter standard objections to finite state NLP on the…

  20. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, MA

    2013-01-01

    This second volume in the Progress in Electromagnetic Research series examines recent advances in computational electromagnetics, with emphasis on scattering, as brought about by new formulations and algorithms which use finite element or finite difference techniques. Containing contributions by some of the world's leading experts, the papers thoroughly review and analyze this rapidly evolving area of computational electromagnetics. Covering topics ranging from the new finite-element based formulation for representing time-harmonic vector fields in 3-D inhomogeneous media using two coupled sca

  1. Nuclear collective states at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milian, A.; Barranco, M.; Mas, D.; Lombard, R.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Energy Density Method (EDM) has been used to study low-lying nuclear collective states as well as isoscalar giant resonances at finite temperature (T). Giant states have been studied by computing the corresponding strength function moments (sum rules) in the Random-Phase Approximation (RPA). For the description of the low lying states we have resorted to a variety of models from the rather sophisticated RPA method to liquid drop and schematic models. It has been found that low lying states are most affected by thermal effects, giant resonances being little affected in the range of temperatures here studied

  2. Progress in evolving the state-level concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency has launched an important and ambitious project to further develop and implement the State-level concept. It means the development of State-level approaches that are customized for an individual State, meeting State-specific objectives. Further development of the State-level concept requires: 1) expanded use of State-specific factors and implementation of a structured acquisition path analysis to establish State-specific technical objectives and then prioritize them; 2) development of State-level approaches that specify and provide options for safeguards measures, both at Headquarters and in the field, for meeting these technical objectives; 3) identification of activities to be conducted over the course of a year in an annual implementation plan (AIP); and 4) ensuring the linkage between the State-evaluation process and the development and implementation of State-level approaches and AIPs. This project for evolving the State-level concept will result in safeguards implementation that is more objectives-based and information-driven. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  3. Finite size effects and symmetry breaking in the evolution of networks of competing Boolean nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M; Bassler, K E

    2011-01-01

    Finite size effects on the evolutionary dynamics of Boolean networks are analyzed. In the model considered, Boolean networks evolve via a competition between nodes that punishes those in the majority. Previous studies have found that large networks evolve to a statistical steady state that is both critical and highly canalized, and that the evolution of canalization, which is a form of robustness found in genetic regulatory networks, is associated with a particular symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics. Here, it is found that finite size networks evolve in a fundamentally different way than infinitely large networks do. The symmetry of the evolutionary dynamics of infinitely large networks that selects for canalizing Boolean functions is broken in the evolutionary dynamics of finite size networks. In finite size networks, there is an additional selection for input-inverting Boolean functions that output a value opposite to the majority of input values. The reason for the symmetry breaking in the evolutionary dynamics is found to be due to the need for nodes in finite size networks to behave differently in order to cooperate so that the system collectively performs as efficiently as possible. The results suggest that both finite size effects and symmetry are fundamental for understanding the evolution of real-world complex networks, including genetic regulatory networks.

  4. A General Finite Element Scheme for Limit State Analysis and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Limit State analysis which is based on a perfect material behaviour is used in many different applications primarily within Structural Engineering and Geotechnics. The calculation methods have not reached the same level of automation such as Finite Element Analysis for elastic structures....... The computer based systems are more ad hoc based and are typically not well-integrated with pre- and postprocessors well-known from commercial Finite Element codes.A finite element based formulation of limit state analysis is presented which allows an easy integration with standard Finite Element codes...... for elastic analysis. In this way the user is able to perform a limit state analysis on the same model used for elastic analysis only adding data for the yield surface.The method is based on the lower-bound theorem and uses stress-based elements with a linearized yield surface. The mathematical problem...

  5. Socio-economic applications of finite state mean field games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Diogo; Velho, Roberto M; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2014-11-13

    In this paper, we present different applications of finite state mean field games to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community or consumer choice behaviour in the free market. The corresponding finite state mean field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we present and validate different numerical methods. We illustrate the behaviour of solutions with various numerical experiments, which show interesting phenomena such as shock formation. Hence, we conclude with an investigation of the shock structure in the case of two-state problems. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Complete permutation Gray code implemented by finite state machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Peng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An enumerating method of complete permutation array is proposed. The list of n! permutations based on Gray code defined over finite symbol set Z(n = {1, 2, …, n} is implemented by finite state machine, named as n-RPGCF. An RPGCF can be used to search permutation code and provide improved lower bounds on the maximum cardinality of a permutation code in some cases.

  7. Finite temperature grand canonical ensemble study of the minimum electrophilicity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Chattaraj, Pratim K; Ayers, Paul W

    2017-09-28

    We analyze the minimum electrophilicity principle of conceptual density functional theory using the framework of the finite temperature grand canonical ensemble. We provide support for this principle, both for the cases of systems evolving from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state and for the change from one equilibrium state to another. In doing so, we clearly delineate the cases where this principle can, or cannot, be used.

  8. Real-Time Simulation of Coaxial Rotor Configurations with Combined Finite State Dynamic Wake and VPM

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jinggen; He, Chengjian

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a first-principle based finite state dynamic rotor wake model that addresses the complex aerodynamic interference inherent to coaxial rotor configurations in support of advanced vertical lift aircraft simulation, design, and analysis. The high fidelity rotor dynamic wake solution combines an enhanced real-time finite state dynamic wake model (DYW) with a first-principle based viscous Vortex Particle Method (VPM). The finite state dynamic wake model provides a state-spa...

  9. Finite-element analysis of elastic sound-proof coupling thermal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyss, V. G.; Strokov, I. M.; Sergaeva, M. Yu

    2018-01-01

    The aim is in calculated determining of the elastic rubber-metal element thermal state of soundproof coupling ship shafting under variable influence during loads in time. Thermal coupling calculation is performed with finite element method using NX Simens software with Nastran solver. As a result of studies, the following results were obtained: - a volumetric picture of the temperature distribution over the array of the deformed coupling body is obtained; - time to reach steady-state thermal coupling mode has been determined; - dependences of maximum temperature and time to reach state on the established operation mode on rotation frequency and ambient temperature are determined. The findings prove the conclusion that usage of finite element analysis modern software can significantly speed up problem solving.

  10. Finite element modelling of creep process - steady state stresses and strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedmak Aleksandar S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element modelling of steady state creep process has been described. Using an analogy of visco-plastic problem with a described procedure, the finite element method has been used to calculate steady state stresses and strains in 2D problems. An example of application of such a procedure have been presented, using real life problem - cylindrical pipe with longitudinal crack at high temperature, under internal pressure, and estimating its residual life, based on the C*integral evaluation.

  11. Reverse Engineering Integrated Circuits Using Finite State Machine Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oler, Kiri J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Carl H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-12

    In this paper, we present a methodology for reverse engineering integrated circuits, including a mathematical verification of a scalable algorithm used to generate minimal finite state machine representations of integrated circuits.

  12. Faithful remote state preparation using finite classical bits and a nonmaximally entangled state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Mingyong; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2004-01-01

    We present many ensembles of states that can be remotely prepared by using minimum classical bits from Alice to Bob and their previously shared entangled state and prove that we have found all the ensembles in two-dimensional case. Furthermore we show that any pure quantum state can be remotely and faithfully prepared by using finite classical bits from Alice to Bob and their previously shared nonmaximally entangled state though no faithful quantum teleportation protocols can be achieved by using a nonmaximally entangled state

  13. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Zhou Bin

    2016-01-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin–orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. (paper)

  14. Tracking an open quantum system using a finite state machine: Stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasik, R. I.; Wiseman, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    A finite-dimensional Markovian open quantum system will undergo quantum jumps between pure states, if we can monitor the bath to which it is coupled with sufficient precision. In general these jumps, plus the between-jump evolution, create a trajectory which passes through infinitely many different pure states, even for ergodic systems. However, as shown recently by us [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 020406 (2011)], it is possible to construct adaptive monitorings which restrict the system to jumping between a finite number of states. That is, it is possible to track the system using a finite state machine as the apparatus. In this paper we consider the question of the stability of these monitoring schemes. Restricting to cyclic jumps for a qubit, we give a strong analytical argument that these schemes are always stable and supporting analytical and numerical evidence for the example of resonance fluorescence. This example also enables us to explore a range of behaviors in the evolution of individual trajectories, for several different monitoring schemes.

  15. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  16. Finite-time stabilisation of a class of switched nonlinear systems with state constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shipei; Xiang, Zhengrong

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigates the finite-time stabilisation for a class of switched nonlinear systems with state constraints. Some power orders of the system are allowed to be ratios of positive even integers over odd integers. A Barrier Lyapunov function is introduced to guarantee that the state constraint is not violated at any time. Using the convex combination method and a recursive design approach, a state-dependent switching law and state feedback controllers of individual subsystems are constructed such that the closed-loop system is finite-time stable without violation of the state constraint. Two examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. On the convergence of finite state mean-field games through Γ-convergence

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita C.; Gomes, Diogo A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we consider the long-term convergence (trend toward an equilibrium) of finite state mean-field games using Γ-convergence. Our techniques are based on the observation that an important class of mean-field games can be viewed as the Euler-Lagrange equation of a suitable functional. Therefore, using a scaling argument, one can convert a long-term convergence problem into a Γ-convergence problem. Our results generalize previous results related to long-term convergence for finite state problems. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  18. On the convergence of finite state mean-field games through Γ-convergence

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Rita C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we consider the long-term convergence (trend toward an equilibrium) of finite state mean-field games using Γ-convergence. Our techniques are based on the observation that an important class of mean-field games can be viewed as the Euler-Lagrange equation of a suitable functional. Therefore, using a scaling argument, one can convert a long-term convergence problem into a Γ-convergence problem. Our results generalize previous results related to long-term convergence for finite state problems. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Fidelity estimation between two finite ensembles of unknown pure equatorial qubit states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siomau, Michael, E-mail: siomau@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg Universitaet, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Theoretical Physics, Belarussian State University, 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2011-09-05

    Suppose, we are given two finite ensembles of pure qubit states, so that the qubits in each ensemble are prepared in identical (but unknown for us) states lying on the equator of the Bloch sphere. What is the best strategy to estimate fidelity between these two finite ensembles of qubit states? We discuss three possible strategies for the fidelity estimation. We show that the best strategy includes two stages: a specific unitary transformation on two ensembles and state estimation of the output states of this transformation. -- Highlights: → We search for the best strategy for the fidelity estimation. → A measurement-based, a cloning-based and a unified strategies are considered. → The last strategy includes a specific unitary transformation and state estimation. → The unified strategy is shown to be the best among the three.

  20. Guessing lexicon entries using finite-state methods

    OpenAIRE

    Koskenniemi, Kimmo Matti

    2018-01-01

    A practical method for interactive guessing of LEXC lexicon entries is presented. The method is based on describing groups of similarly inflected words using regular expressions. The patterns are compiled into a finite-state transducer (FST) which maps any word form into the possible LEXC lexicon entries which could generate it. The same FST can be used (1) for converting conventional headword lists into LEXC entries, (2) for interactive guessing of entries, (3) for corpus-assisted interactiv...

  1. Parallel Representation of Value-Based and Finite State-Based Strategies in the Ventral and Dorsal Striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous theoretical studies of animal and human behavioral learning have focused on the dichotomy of the value-based strategy using action value functions to predict rewards and the model-based strategy using internal models to predict environmental states. However, animals and humans often take simple procedural behaviors, such as the "win-stay, lose-switch" strategy without explicit prediction of rewards or states. Here we consider another strategy, the finite state-based strategy, in which a subject selects an action depending on its discrete internal state and updates the state depending on the action chosen and the reward outcome. By analyzing choice behavior of rats in a free-choice task, we found that the finite state-based strategy fitted their behavioral choices more accurately than value-based and model-based strategies did. When fitted models were run autonomously with the same task, only the finite state-based strategy could reproduce the key feature of choice sequences. Analyses of neural activity recorded from the dorsolateral striatum (DLS, the dorsomedial striatum (DMS, and the ventral striatum (VS identified significant fractions of neurons in all three subareas for which activities were correlated with individual states of the finite state-based strategy. The signal of internal states at the time of choice was found in DMS, and for clusters of states was found in VS. In addition, action values and state values of the value-based strategy were encoded in DMS and VS, respectively. These results suggest that both the value-based strategy and the finite state-based strategy are implemented in the striatum.

  2. Parallel Representation of Value-Based and Finite State-Based Strategies in the Ventral and Dorsal Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Makoto; Doya, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    Previous theoretical studies of animal and human behavioral learning have focused on the dichotomy of the value-based strategy using action value functions to predict rewards and the model-based strategy using internal models to predict environmental states. However, animals and humans often take simple procedural behaviors, such as the "win-stay, lose-switch" strategy without explicit prediction of rewards or states. Here we consider another strategy, the finite state-based strategy, in which a subject selects an action depending on its discrete internal state and updates the state depending on the action chosen and the reward outcome. By analyzing choice behavior of rats in a free-choice task, we found that the finite state-based strategy fitted their behavioral choices more accurately than value-based and model-based strategies did. When fitted models were run autonomously with the same task, only the finite state-based strategy could reproduce the key feature of choice sequences. Analyses of neural activity recorded from the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), and the ventral striatum (VS) identified significant fractions of neurons in all three subareas for which activities were correlated with individual states of the finite state-based strategy. The signal of internal states at the time of choice was found in DMS, and for clusters of states was found in VS. In addition, action values and state values of the value-based strategy were encoded in DMS and VS, respectively. These results suggest that both the value-based strategy and the finite state-based strategy are implemented in the striatum.

  3. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  4. Decoding spatiotemporal spike sequences via the finite state automata dynamics of spiking neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Dezhe Z

    2008-01-01

    Temporally complex stimuli are encoded into spatiotemporal spike sequences of neurons in many sensory areas. Here, we describe how downstream neurons with dendritic bistable plateau potentials can be connected to decode such spike sequences. Driven by feedforward inputs from the sensory neurons and controlled by feedforward inhibition and lateral excitation, the neurons transit between UP and DOWN states of the membrane potentials. The neurons spike only in the UP states. A decoding neuron spikes at the end of an input to signal the recognition of specific spike sequences. The transition dynamics is equivalent to that of a finite state automaton. A connection rule for the networks guarantees that any finite state automaton can be mapped into the transition dynamics, demonstrating the equivalence in computational power between the networks and finite state automata. The decoding mechanism is capable of recognizing an arbitrary number of spatiotemporal spike sequences, and is insensitive to the variations of the spike timings in the sequences

  5. Finite-size effects in the three-state quantum asymmetric clock model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehlen, G. v.; Rittenberg, V.

    1983-04-01

    The one-dimensional quantum Hamiltonian of the asymmetric three-state clock model is studied using finite-size scaling. Various boundary conditions are considered on chains containing up to eight sites. We calculate the boundary of the commensurate phase and the mass gap index. The model shows an interesting finite-size dependence in connexion with the presence of the incommensurate phase indicating that for the infinite system there is no Lifshitz point. (orig.)

  6. Evolving cellular automata for diversity generation and pattern recognition: deterministic versus random strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Menezes, Marcio Argollo; Brigatti, Edgardo; Schwämmle, Veit

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological systems evolve to fulfil their tasks with maximal efficiency. The immune system is a remarkable example, where the distinction between self and non-self is made by means of molecular interaction between self-proteins and antigens, triggering affinity-dependent systemic actions. Specificity of this binding and the infinitude of potential antigenic patterns call for novel mechanisms to generate antibody diversity. Inspired by this problem, we develop a genetic algorithm where agents evolve their strings in the presence of random antigenic strings and reproduce with affinity-dependent rates. We ask what is the best strategy to generate diversity if agents can rearrange their strings a finite number of times. We find that endowing each agent with an inheritable cellular automaton rule for performing rearrangements makes the system more efficient in pattern-matching than if transformations are totally random. In the former implementation, the population evolves to a stationary state where agents with different automata rules coexist. (paper)

  7. Exact ground state of finite Bose-Einstein condensates on a ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakmann, Kaspar; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Alon, Ofir E.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2005-01-01

    The exact ground state of the many-body Schroedinger equation for N bosons on a one-dimensional ring interacting via a pairwise δ-function interaction is presented for up to 50 particles. The solutions are obtained by solving Lieb and Liniger's system of coupled transcendental equations numerically for finite N. The ground-state energies for repulsive and attractive interactions are shown to be smoothly connected at the point of zero interaction strength, implying that the Bethe ansatz can be used also for attractive interactions for all cases studied. For repulsive interactions the exact energies are compared to (i) Lieb and Liniger's thermodynamic limit solution and (ii) the Tonks-Girardeau gas limit. It is found that the energy of the thermodynamic limit solution can differ substantially from that of the exact solution for finite N when the interaction is weak or when N is small. A simple relation between the Tonks-Girardeau gas limit and the solution for finite interaction strength is revealed. For attractive interactions we find that the true ground-state energy is given to a good approximation by the energy of the system of N attractive bosons on an infinite line, provided the interaction is stronger than the critical interaction strength of mean-field theory

  8. Electronic states in crystals of finite size quantum confinement of bloch waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Shang Yuan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an analytical theory of the electronic states in ideal low dimensional systems and finite crystals based on a differential equation theory approach. It provides precise and fundamental understandings on the electronic states in ideal low-dimensional systems and finite crystals, and offers new insights into some of the basic problems in low-dimensional systems, such as the surface states and quantum confinement effects, etc., some of which are quite different from what is traditionally believed in the solid state physics community. Many previous predictions have been confirmed in subsequent investigations by other authors on various relevant problems. In this new edition, the theory is further extended to one-dimensional photonic crystals and phononic crystals, and a general theoretical formalism for investigating the existence and properties of surface states/modes in semi-infinite one-dimensional crystals is developed. In addition, there are various revisions and improvements, including us...

  9. First Passage Moments of Finite-State Semi-Markov Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warr, Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cordeiro, James [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In this paper, we discuss the computation of first-passage moments of a regular time-homogeneous semi-Markov process (SMP) with a finite state space to certain of its states that possess the property of universal accessibility (UA). A UA state is one which is accessible from any other state of the SMP, but which may or may not connect back to one or more other states. An important characteristic of UA is that it is the state-level version of the oft-invoked process-level property of irreducibility. We adapt existing results for irreducible SMPs to the derivation of an analytical matrix expression for the first passage moments to a single UA state of the SMP. In addition, consistent point estimators for these first passage moments, together with relevant R code, are provided.

  10. Distribution of quantum states in enclosures of finite size I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, J.H.; Chaba, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    The expression for the density of states of a particle in a three-dimensional rectangular box of finite size can be obtained directly by Poissons's Summation formula. The expression for the case of an enclosure in the form of an infinite rectangular slab is derived. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  11. Finite-time quantum-to-classical transition for a Schroedinger-cat state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paavola, Janika; Hall, Michael J. W.; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    The transition from quantum to classical, in the case of a quantum harmonic oscillator, is typically identified with the transition from a quantum superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states, such as the Schroedinger-cat state, into the corresponding statistical mixture. This transition is commonly characterized by the asymptotic loss of the interference term in the Wigner representation of the cat state. In this paper we show that the quantum-to-classical transition has different dynamical features depending on the measure for nonclassicality used. Measures based on an operatorial definition have well-defined physical meaning and allow a deeper understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition. Our analysis shows that, for most nonclassicality measures, the Schroedinger-cat state becomes classical after a finite time. Moreover, our results challenge the prevailing idea that more macroscopic states are more susceptible to decoherence in the sense that the transition from quantum to classical occurs faster. Since nonclassicality is a prerequisite for entanglement generation our results also bridge the gap between decoherence, which is lost only asymptotically, and entanglement, which may show a ''sudden death''. In fact, whereas the loss of coherences still remains asymptotic, we emphasize that the transition from quantum to classical can indeed occur at a finite time.

  12. Employing finite-state machines in data integrity problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the issue of group integrity of tuple subsets regarding corporate integrity constraints in relational databases. A solution may be found by applying the finite-state machine theory to guarantee group integrity of data. We present a practical guide to coding such an automaton. After creating SQL queries to manipulate data and control its integrity for real data domains, we study the issue of query performance, determine the level of transaction isolation, and generate query plans.

  13. Underlying finite state machine for the social engineering attack detection model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, Francois

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available one to have a clearer overview of the mental processing performed within the model. While the current model provides a general procedural template for implementing detection mechanisms for social engineering attacks, the finite state machine provides a...

  14. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: II. Finite-size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stránský, Pavel [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Macek, Michal [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Leviatan, Amiram [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Cejnar, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.cejnar@mff.cuni.cz [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    This article extends our previous analysis Stránský et al. (2014) of Excited-State Quantum Phase Transitions (ESQPTs) in systems of dimension two. We focus on the oscillatory component of the quantum state density in connection with ESQPT structures accompanying a first-order ground-state transition. It is shown that a separable (integrable) system can develop rather strong finite-size precursors of ESQPT expressed as singularities in the oscillatory component of the state density. The singularities originate in effectively 1-dimensional dynamics and in some cases appear in multiple replicas with increasing excitation energy. Using a specific model example, we demonstrate that these precursors are rather resistant to proliferation of chaotic dynamics. - Highlights: • Oscillatory components of state density and spectral flow studied near ESQPTs. • Enhanced finite-size precursors of ESQPT caused by fully/partly separable dynamics. • These precursors appear due to criticality of a subsystem with lower dimension. • Separability-induced finite-size effects disappear in case of fully chaotic dynamics.

  15. Geometrically Unfitted Finite Element Methods and Applications : Proceedings of the UCL Workshop 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Burman, Erik; Larson, Mats; Olshanskii, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the state of the art of the rapidly evolving field of integration of geometric data in finite element computations. The contributions to this volume, based on research presented at the UCL workshop on the topic in January 2016, include three review papers on core topics such as fictitious domain methods for elasticity, trace finite element methods for partial differential equations defined on surfaces, and Nitsche’s method for contact problems. Five chapters present original research articles on related theoretical topics, including Lagrange multiplier methods, interface problems, bulk-surface coupling, and approximation of partial differential equations on moving domains. Finally, two chapters discuss advanced applications such as crack propagation or flow in fractured poroelastic media. This is the first volume that provides a comprehensive overview of the field of unfitted finite element methods, including recent techniques such as cutFEM, traceFEM, ghost penalty, and aug...

  16. QCD bound states at finite temperature and baryon number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinovsky, Yu.L.; Muenchow, L.

    1991-04-01

    Quark-antiquark bound states are described within the Bethe-Salpeter equation for a class of quark models with instantaneous 4-quark interaction at finite temperature. Thereby decompositions of the Bethe-Salpeter vertex and wave functions according to their Lorentz structures and the particles content are used. As an application of general scheme, we determine the mass spectrum of low-lying mesons for a special Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model inspired by QCD for hadrons. (orig.)

  17. Separable states improve protocols with finite randomness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobby, Tan Kok Chuan; Paterek, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    It is known from Bell's theorem that quantum predictions for some entangled states cannot be mimicked using local hidden variable (LHV) models. From a computer science perspective, LHV models may be interpreted as classical computers operating on a potentially infinite number of correlated bits originating from a common source. As such, Bell inequality violations achieved through entangled states are able to characterize the quantum advantage of certain tasks, so long as the task itself imposes no restriction on the availability of correlated bits. However, if the number of shared bits is limited, additional constraints are placed on the possible LHV models, and separable, i.e. disentangled states may become a useful resource. Bell violations are therefore no longer necessary to achieve a quantum advantage. Here we show that, in particular, separable states improve the so-called random access codes, which is a class of communication problem wherein one party tries to read a portion of the data held by another distant party in the presence of finite shared randomness and limited classical communication. We also show how the bias of classical bits can be used to avoid wrong answers in order to achieve the optimal classical protocol and how the advantage of quantum protocols is linked to quantum discord. (paper)

  18. Finite-State Mean-Field Games, Crowd Motion Problems, and its Numerical Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Machado Velho, Roberto

    2017-09-10

    In this dissertation, we present two research projects, namely finite-state mean-field games and the Hughes model for the motion of crowds. In the first part, we describe finite-state mean-field games and some applications to socio-economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community and the consumer choice behavior in a free market. The corresponding finite-state mean-field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we propose and validate a new numerical method. Next, we consider the dual formulation to two-state mean-field games, and we discuss numerical methods for these problems. We then depict different computational experiments, exhibiting a variety of behaviors, including shock formation, lack of invertibility, and monotonicity loss. We conclude the first part of this dissertation with an investigation of the shock structure for two-state problems. In the second part, we consider a model for the movement of crowds proposed by R. Hughes in [56] and describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an Eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. We first establish a priori estimates for the solutions. Next, we consider radial solutions, and we identify a shock formation mechanism. Subsequently, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. We also propose a new numerical method for the solution of Fokker-Planck equations and then to systems of PDEs composed by a Fokker-Planck equation and a potential type equation. Finally, we illustrate the use of the numerical method both to the Hughes model and mean-field games. We also depict cases such as the evacuation of a room and the movement of persons around Kaaba (Saudi Arabia).

  19. Finite-State Mean-Field Games, Crowd Motion Problems, and its Numerical Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Machado Velho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    -economic sciences. Examples include paradigm shifts in the scientific community and the consumer choice behavior in a free market. The corresponding finite-state mean-field game models are hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, for which we propose

  20. Verus: A Tool for Quantitative Analysis of Finite-State Real-Time Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-08-12

    Symbolic model checking is a technique for verifying finite-state concurrent systems that has been extended to handle real - time systems . Models with...up to 10(exp 30) states can often be verified in minutes. In this paper, we present a new tool to analyze real - time systems , based on this technique...We have designed a language, called Verus, for the description of real - time systems . Such a description is compiled into a state-transition graph and

  1. Simplicity of state and overlap structure in finite-volume realistic spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, C.M.; Stein, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We present a combination of heuristic and rigorous arguments indicating that both the pure state structure and the overlap structure of realistic spin glasses should be relatively simple: in a large finite volume with coupling-independent boundary conditions, such as periodic, at most a pair of flip-related (or the appropriate number of symmetry-related in the non-Ising case) states appear, and the Parisi overlap distribution correspondingly exhibits at most a pair of δ functions at ±q EA . This rules out the nonstandard mean-field picture introduced by us earlier, and when combined with our previous elimination of more standard versions of the mean-field picture, argues against the possibility of even limited versions of mean-field ordering in realistic spin glasses. If broken spin-flip symmetry should occur, this leaves open two main possibilities for ordering in the spin glass phase: the droplet-scaling two-state picture, and the chaotic pairs many-state picture introduced by us earlier. We present scaling arguments which provide a possible physical basis for the latter picture, and discuss possible reasons behind numerical observations of more complicated overlap structures in finite volumes. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  2. Putting Encyclopaedia Knowledge into Structural Form: Finite State Transducers Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajić Vesna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In biology and functional genomics in particular, understanding the dependence and interplay between different genome and ecological characteristics of organisms is a very challenging problem. There are some public databases which combine this kind of information, but there is still much more information about microbes and other organisms that reside in unstructured and semi-structured documents, such as encyclopaedias. In this paper we present a method for extracting information from semi-structured resources, such as encyclopaedias, based on finite state transducers, consisting of two clearly distinguished phases. The first phase strongly relies on the analysis of the document structure and it is used for locating records of data in the text. The second phase is based on the finite state transducers created for extracting the data, which can be modified so as to achieve the preferred efficiency and it is used for extracting the particular characteristic from the text. We show how the two phase method is applied to the text of the encyclopaedia “Systematic Bacteriology”. A fully structured database with genotype and phenotype characteristics of organisms has been created from the encyclopaedia unstructured descriptions.

  3. A finite state, finite memory minimum principle, part 2. [a discussion of game theory, signaling, stochastic processes, and control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the theory of the finite - state, finite - memory (FSFM) stochastic control problem is discussed. The sufficiency of the FSFM minimum principle (which is in general only a necessary condition) was investigated. By introducing the notion of a signaling strategy as defined in the literature on games, conditions under which the FSFM minimum principle is sufficient were determined. This result explicitly interconnects the information structure of the FSFM problem with its optimality conditions. The min-H algorithm for the FSFM problem was studied. It is demonstrated that a version of the algorithm always converges to a particular type of local minimum termed a person - by - person extremal.

  4. The Design of Finite State Machine for Asynchronous Replication Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlong; Li, Zhanhuai; Lin, Wei; Hei, Minglei; Hao, Jianhua

    Data replication is a key way to design a disaster tolerance system and to achieve reliability and availability. It is difficult for a replication protocol to deal with the diverse and complex environment. This means that data is less well replicated than it ought to be. To reduce data loss and to optimize replication protocols, we (1) present a finite state machine, (2) run it to manage an asynchronous replication protocol and (3) report a simple evaluation of the asynchronous replication protocol based on our state machine. It's proved that our state machine is applicable to guarantee the asynchronous replication protocol running in the proper state to the largest extent in the event of various possible events. It also can helpful to build up replication-based disaster tolerance systems to ensure the business continuity.

  5. Monotone numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Saude, Joao

    2017-01-01

    Here, we develop numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games (MFGs) that satisfy a monotonicity condition. MFGs are determined by a system of differential equations with initial and terminal boundary conditions. These non-standard conditions are the main difficulty in the numerical approximation of solutions. Using the monotonicity condition, we build a flow that is a contraction and whose fixed points solve the MFG, both for stationary and time-dependent problems. We illustrate our methods in a MFG modeling the paradigm-shift problem.

  6. Monotone numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-04-29

    Here, we develop numerical methods for finite-state mean-field games (MFGs) that satisfy a monotonicity condition. MFGs are determined by a system of differential equations with initial and terminal boundary conditions. These non-standard conditions are the main difficulty in the numerical approximation of solutions. Using the monotonicity condition, we build a flow that is a contraction and whose fixed points solve the MFG, both for stationary and time-dependent problems. We illustrate our methods in a MFG modeling the paradigm-shift problem.

  7. Implementing finite state machines in a computer-based teaching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Charles H.; Sitte, Renate

    1999-09-01

    Finite State Machines (FSM) are models for functions commonly implemented in digital circuits such as timers, remote controls, and vending machines. Teaching FSM is core in the curriculum of many university digital electronic or discrete mathematics subjects. Students often have difficulties grasping the theoretical concepts in the design and analysis of FSM. This has prompted the author to develop an MS-WindowsTM compatible software, WinState, that provides a tutorial style teaching aid for understanding the mechanisms of FSM. The animated computer screen is ideal for visually conveying the required design and analysis procedures. WinState complements other software for combinatorial logic previously developed by the author, and enhances the existing teaching package by adding sequential logic circuits. WinState enables the construction of a students own FSM, which can be simulated, to test the design for functionality and possible errors.

  8. Logic synthesis for FPGA-based finite state machines

    CERN Document Server

    Barkalov, Alexander; Kolopienczyk, Malgorzata; Mielcarek, Kamil; Bazydlo, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses control units represented by the model of a finite state machine (FSM). It contains various original methods and takes into account the peculiarities of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) chips and a FSM model. It shows that one of the peculiarities of FPGA chips is the existence of embedded memory blocks (EMB). The book is devoted to the solution of problems of logic synthesis and reduction of hardware amount in control units. The book will be interesting and useful for researchers and PhD students in the area of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, as well as for designers of modern digital systems.

  9. A finite state projection algorithm for the stationary solution of the chemical master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Mikelson, Jan; Khammash, Mustafa

    2017-10-01

    The chemical master equation (CME) is frequently used in systems biology to quantify the effects of stochastic fluctuations that arise due to biomolecular species with low copy numbers. The CME is a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the evolution of probability density for each population vector in the state-space of the stochastic reaction dynamics. For many examples of interest, this state-space is infinite, making it difficult to obtain exact solutions of the CME. To deal with this problem, the Finite State Projection (FSP) algorithm was developed by Munsky and Khammash [J. Chem. Phys. 124(4), 044104 (2006)], to provide approximate solutions to the CME by truncating the state-space. The FSP works well for finite time-periods but it cannot be used for estimating the stationary solutions of CMEs, which are often of interest in systems biology. The aim of this paper is to develop a version of FSP which we refer to as the stationary FSP (sFSP) that allows one to obtain accurate approximations of the stationary solutions of a CME by solving a finite linear-algebraic system that yields the stationary distribution of a continuous-time Markov chain over the truncated state-space. We derive bounds for the approximation error incurred by sFSP and we establish that under certain stability conditions, these errors can be made arbitrarily small by appropriately expanding the truncated state-space. We provide several examples to illustrate our sFSP method and demonstrate its efficiency in estimating the stationary distributions. In particular, we show that using a quantized tensor-train implementation of our sFSP method, problems admitting more than 100 × 106 states can be efficiently solved.

  10. A finite state projection algorithm for the stationary solution of the chemical master equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Mikelson, Jan; Khammash, Mustafa

    2017-10-21

    The chemical master equation (CME) is frequently used in systems biology to quantify the effects of stochastic fluctuations that arise due to biomolecular species with low copy numbers. The CME is a system of ordinary differential equations that describes the evolution of probability density for each population vector in the state-space of the stochastic reaction dynamics. For many examples of interest, this state-space is infinite, making it difficult to obtain exact solutions of the CME. To deal with this problem, the Finite State Projection (FSP) algorithm was developed by Munsky and Khammash [J. Chem. Phys. 124(4), 044104 (2006)], to provide approximate solutions to the CME by truncating the state-space. The FSP works well for finite time-periods but it cannot be used for estimating the stationary solutions of CMEs, which are often of interest in systems biology. The aim of this paper is to develop a version of FSP which we refer to as the stationary FSP (sFSP) that allows one to obtain accurate approximations of the stationary solutions of a CME by solving a finite linear-algebraic system that yields the stationary distribution of a continuous-time Markov chain over the truncated state-space. We derive bounds for the approximation error incurred by sFSP and we establish that under certain stability conditions, these errors can be made arbitrarily small by appropriately expanding the truncated state-space. We provide several examples to illustrate our sFSP method and demonstrate its efficiency in estimating the stationary distributions. In particular, we show that using a quantized tensor-train implementation of our sFSP method, problems admitting more than 100 × 10 6 states can be efficiently solved.

  11. Parallel algorithms for testing finite state machines:Generating UIO sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Hierons, RM; Turker, UC

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient parallel algorithm that uses many-core GPUs for automatically deriving Unique Input Output sequences (UIOs) from Finite State Machines. The proposed algorithm uses the global scope of the GPU's global memory through coalesced memory access and minimises the transfer between CPU and GPU memory. The results of experiments indicate that the proposed method yields considerably better results compared to a single core UIO construction algorithm. Our algorithm is s...

  12. FSM-F: Finite State Machine Based Framework for Denial of Service and Intrusion Detection in MANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Ahmed, Malik; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Kaiwartya, Omprakash

    2016-01-01

    Due to the continuous advancements in wireless communication in terms of quality of communication and affordability of the technology, the application area of Mobile Adhoc Networks (MANETs) significantly growing particularly in military and disaster management. Considering the sensitivity of the application areas, security in terms of detection of Denial of Service (DoS) and intrusion has become prime concern in research and development in the area. The security systems suggested in the past has state recognition problem where the system is not able to accurately identify the actual state of the network nodes due to the absence of clear definition of states of the nodes. In this context, this paper proposes a framework based on Finite State Machine (FSM) for denial of service and intrusion detection in MANETs. In particular, an Interruption Detection system for Adhoc On-demand Distance Vector (ID-AODV) protocol is presented based on finite state machine. The packet dropping and sequence number attacks are closely investigated and detection systems for both types of attacks are designed. The major functional modules of ID-AODV includes network monitoring system, finite state machine and attack detection model. Simulations are carried out in network simulator NS-2 to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework. A comparative evaluation of the performance is also performed with the state-of-the-art techniques: RIDAN and AODV. The performance evaluations attest the benefits of proposed framework in terms of providing better security for denial of service and intrusion detection attacks.

  13. A Finite State Machine Approach to Algorithmic Lateral Inhibition for Real-Time Motion Detection †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María T. López

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have explored the relationship between recurrent neural networks and finite state machines. Finite state machines constitute the best-characterized computational model, whereas artificial neural networks have become a very successful tool for modeling and problem solving. The neurally-inspired lateral inhibition method, and its application to motion detection tasks, have been successfully implemented in recent years. In this paper, control knowledge of the algorithmic lateral inhibition (ALI method is described and applied by means of finite state machines, in which the state space is constituted from the set of distinguishable cases of accumulated charge in a local memory. The article describes an ALI implementation for a motion detection task. For the implementation, we have chosen to use one of the members of the 16-nm Kintex UltraScale+ family of Xilinx FPGAs. FPGAs provide the necessary accuracy, resolution, and precision to run neural algorithms alongside current sensor technologies. The results offered in this paper demonstrate that this implementation provides accurate object tracking performance on several datasets, obtaining a high F-score value (0.86 for the most complex sequence used. Moreover, it outperforms implementations of a complete ALI algorithm and a simplified version of the ALI algorithm—named “accumulative computation”—which was run about ten years ago, now reaching real-time processing times that were simply not achievable at that time for ALI.

  14. The Determining Finite Automata Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Vinogradova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of formal languages widely uses finite state automata both in implementation of automata-based approach to programming, and in synthesis of logical control algorithms.To ensure unambiguous operation of the algorithms, the synthesized finite state automata must be deterministic. Within the approach to the synthesis of the mobile robot controls, for example, based on the theory of formal languages, there are problems concerning the construction of various finite automata, but such finite automata, as a rule, will not be deterministic. The algorithm of determinization can be applied to the finite automata, as specified, in various ways. The basic ideas of the algorithm of determinization can be most simply explained using the representations of a finite automaton in the form of a weighted directed graph.The paper deals with finite automata represented as weighted directed graphs, and discusses in detail the procedure for determining the finite automata represented in this way. Gives a detailed description of the algorithm for determining finite automata. A large number of examples illustrate a capability of the determinization algorithm.

  15. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  16. Introduction to the Explicit Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Transient Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Shen R

    2012-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the theories and formulations of the explicit finite element method As numerical technology continues to grow and evolve with industrial applications, understanding the explicit finite element method has become increasingly important, particularly in the areas of crashworthiness, metal forming, and impact engineering. Introduction to the Explicit FiniteElement Method for Nonlinear Transient Dynamics is the first book to address specifically what is now accepted as the most successful numerical tool for nonlinear transient dynamics. The book aids readers in master

  17. FSM-F: Finite State Machine Based Framework for Denial of Service and Intrusion Detection in MANET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik N Ahmed

    Full Text Available Due to the continuous advancements in wireless communication in terms of quality of communication and affordability of the technology, the application area of Mobile Adhoc Networks (MANETs significantly growing particularly in military and disaster management. Considering the sensitivity of the application areas, security in terms of detection of Denial of Service (DoS and intrusion has become prime concern in research and development in the area. The security systems suggested in the past has state recognition problem where the system is not able to accurately identify the actual state of the network nodes due to the absence of clear definition of states of the nodes. In this context, this paper proposes a framework based on Finite State Machine (FSM for denial of service and intrusion detection in MANETs. In particular, an Interruption Detection system for Adhoc On-demand Distance Vector (ID-AODV protocol is presented based on finite state machine. The packet dropping and sequence number attacks are closely investigated and detection systems for both types of attacks are designed. The major functional modules of ID-AODV includes network monitoring system, finite state machine and attack detection model. Simulations are carried out in network simulator NS-2 to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework. A comparative evaluation of the performance is also performed with the state-of-the-art techniques: RIDAN and AODV. The performance evaluations attest the benefits of proposed framework in terms of providing better security for denial of service and intrusion detection attacks.

  18. Finite Correlation Length Implies Efficient Preparation of Quantum Thermal States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Kastoryano, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    Preparing quantum thermal states on a quantum computer is in general a difficult task. We provide a procedure to prepare a thermal state on a quantum computer with a logarithmic depth circuit of local quantum channels assuming that the thermal state correlations satisfy the following two properties: (i) the correlations between two regions are exponentially decaying in the distance between the regions, and (ii) the thermal state is an approximate Markov state for shielded regions. We require both properties to hold for the thermal state of the Hamiltonian on any induced subgraph of the original lattice. Assumption (ii) is satisfied for all commuting Gibbs states, while assumption (i) is satisfied for every model above a critical temperature. Both assumptions are satisfied in one spatial dimension. Moreover, both assumptions are expected to hold above the thermal phase transition for models without any topological order at finite temperature. As a building block, we show that exponential decay of correlation (for thermal states of Hamiltonians on all induced subgraphs) is sufficient to efficiently estimate the expectation value of a local observable. Our proof uses quantum belief propagation, a recent strengthening of strong sub-additivity, and naturally breaks down for states with topological order.

  19. Data Structure Analysis to Represent Basic Models of Finite State Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gurenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex system engineering based on the automaton models requires a reasoned data structure selection to implement them. The problem of automaton representation and data structure selection to be used in it has been understudied. Arbitrary data structure selection for automaton model software implementation leads to unnecessary computational burden and reduces the developed system efficiency. This article proposes an approach to the reasoned selection of data structures to represent finite algoristic automaton basic models and gives practical considerations based on it.Static and dynamic data structures are proposed for three main ways to assign Mealy and Moore automatons: a transition table, a matrix of coupling and a transition graph. A thirddimensional array, a rectangular matrix and a matrix of lists are the static structures. Dynamic structures are list-oriented structures: two-level and three-level Ayliff vectors and a multi-linked list. These structures allow us to store all required information about finite state automaton model components - characteristic set cardinalities and data of transition and output functions.A criterion system is proposed for data structure comparative evaluation in virtue of algorithmic features of automata theory problems. The criteria focused on capacitive and time computational complexity of operations performed in tasks such as equivalent automaton conversions, proving of automaton equivalence and isomorphism, and automaton minimization.A data structure comparative analysis based on the criterion system has done for both static and dynamic type. The analysis showed advantages of the third-dimensional array, matrix and two-level Ayliff vector. These are structures that assign automaton by transition table. For these structures an experiment was done to measure the execution time of automation operations included in criterion system.The analysis of experiment results showed that a dynamic structure - two

  20. Computational thermo-hydro-mechanics for freezing and thawing multiphase geological media in the finite deformation range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Na, S.

    2017-12-01

    A stabilized thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) finite element model is introduced to investigate the freeze-thaw action of frozen porous media in the finite deformation range. By applying the mixture theory, frozen soil is idealized as a composite consisting of three phases, i.e., solid grain, unfrozen water and ice crystal. A generalized hardening rule at finite strain is adopted to replicate how the elasto-plastic responses and critical state evolve under the influence of phase transitions and heat transfer. The enhanced particle interlocking and ice strengthening during the freezing processes and the thawing-induced consolidation at the geometrical nonlinear regimes are both replicated in numerical examples. The numerical issues due to lack of two-fold inf-sup condition and ill-conditioning of the system of equations are addressed. Numerical examples for engineering applications at cold region are analyzed via the proposed model to predict the impacts of changing climate on infrastructure at cold regions.

  1. Automatic Test Pattern Generator for Fuzzing Based on Finite State Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hung Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the Internet, several emerging technologies are adopted to construct fancy, interactive, and user-friendly websites. Among these technologies, HTML5 is a popular one and is widely used in establishing modern sites. However, the security issues in the new web technologies are also raised and are worthy of investigation. For vulnerability investigation, many previous studies used fuzzing and focused on generation-based approaches to produce test cases for fuzzing; however, these methods require a significant amount of knowledge and mental efforts to develop test patterns for generating test cases. To decrease the entry barrier of conducting fuzzing, in this study, we propose a test pattern generation algorithm based on the concept of finite state machines. We apply graph analysis techniques to extract paths from finite state machines and use these paths to construct test patterns automatically. According to the proposal, fuzzing can be completed through inputting a regular expression corresponding to the test target. To evaluate the performance of our proposal, we conduct an experiment in identifying vulnerabilities of the input attributes in HTML5. According to the results, our approach is not only efficient but also effective for identifying weak validators in HTML5.

  2. Comparison of construction algorithms for minimal, acyclic, deterministic, finite-state automata from sets of strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J; Champarnaud, JM; Maurel, D

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares various methods for constructing minimal, deterministic, acyclic, finite-state automata (recognizers) from sets of words. Incremental, semi-incremental, and non-incremental methods have been implemented and evaluated.

  3. Particle-Resolved Modeling of Aerosol Mixing State in an Evolving Ship Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, N. S.; Tian, J.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Schlager, H.; Petzold, A.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol mixing state is important since it impacts the particles' optical and CCN properties and thereby their climate impact. It evolves continuously during the particles' residence time in the atmosphere as a result of coagulation with other particles and condensation of secondary aerosol species. This evolution is challenging to represent in traditional aerosol models since they require the representation of a multi-dimensional particle distribution. While modal or sectional aerosol representations cannot practically resolve the aerosol mixing state for more than a few species, particle-resolved models store the composition of many individual aerosol particles directly. They thus sample the high-dimensional composition state space very efficiently and so can deal with tens of species, fully resolving the mixing state. Here we use the capabilities of the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC to simulate the evolution of particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engines and compare the results to aircraft measurements made in the English Channel in 2007 as part of the European campaign QUANTIFY. The model was initialized with values of gas concentrations and particle size distributions and compositions representing fresh ship emissions. These values were obtained from a test rig study in the European project HERCULES in 2006 using a serial four-stroke marine diesel engine operating on high-sulfur heavy fuel oil. The freshly emitted particles consisted of sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon and ash. We then tracked the particle population for several hours as it evolved undergoing coagulation, dilution with the background air, and chemical transformations in the aerosol and gas phase. This simulation was used to compute the evolution of CCN properties and optical properties of the plume on a per-particle basis. We compared our results to size-resolved data of aged ship plumes from the QUANTIFY Study in 2007 and showed that the model was able to reproduce

  4. State switching kinetics for quasi-one-dimensional nanosystems: Effects of Finite length and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, B. V., E-mail: petukhov@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The state switching in an extended quasi-one-dimensional material is modeled by the stochastic formation of local new-state nuclei and their subsequent growth along the system axis. An analytical approach is developed to describe the influence of defects, dividing a sample into an ensemble of finite-length segments, on its state switching kinetics. As applied to magnetic systems, the method makes it possible to calculate magnetization curves for different defect concentrations and parameters of material.

  5. Finite-dimensional global attractors for parabolic nonlinear equations with state-dependent delay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chueshov, I.; Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2015), s. 1685-1704 ISSN 1534-0392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Parabolic evolution equations * state-dependent delay * global attractor * finite-dimension * exponential attractor Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.926, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/rezunenko-0444705.pdf

  6. Reachability for Finite-State Process Algebras Using Static Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrypnyuk, Nataliya; Nielson, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    of the Data Flow Analysis are used in order to “cut off” some of the branches in the reachability analysis that are not important for determining, whether or not a state is reachable. In this way, it is possible for our reachability algorithm to avoid building large parts of the system altogether and still......In this work we present an algorithm for solving the reachability problem in finite systems that are modelled with process algebras. Our method uses Static Analysis, in particular, Data Flow Analysis, of the syntax of a process algebraic system with multi-way synchronisation. The results...... solve the reachability problem in a precise way....

  7. Finite nuclear size and Lamb shift of p-wave atomic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milstein, A.I.; Sushkov, O.P.; Terekhov, I.S.

    2003-01-01

    We consider corrections to the Lamb shift of the p-wave atomic states due to the finite nuclear size (FNS). In other words, these are radiative corrections to the atomic isotope shift related to the FNS. It is shown that the structure of the corrections is qualitatively different to that for the s-wave states. The perturbation theory expansion for the relative correction for a p 1/2 state starts with a α ln(1/Zα) term, while for the s 1/2 states it starts with a Zα 2 term. Here, α is the fine-structure constant and Z is the nuclear charge. In the present work, we calculate the α terms for that 2p states, the result for the 2p 1/2 state reads (8α/9π){ln[1/(Zα) 2 ]+0.710}. Even more interesting are the p 3/2 states. In this case the 'correction' is several orders of magnitude larger than the 'leading' FNS shift. However, absolute values of energy shifts related to these corrections are very small

  8. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L; Brunton, Bingni W; Proctor, Joshua L; Kutz, J Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this wIn this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control.ork, we explore finite

  9. Quantum limits to information about states for finite dimensional Hilbert space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A refined bound for the correlation information of an N-trial apparatus is developed via an heuristic argument for Hilbert spaces of arbitrary finite dimensionality. Conditional upon the proof of an easily motivated inequality it was possible to find the optimal apparatus for large ensemble quantum Inference, thereby solving the asymptotic optimal state determination problem. In this way an alternative inferential uncertainty principle, is defined which is then contrasted with the usual Heisenberg uncertainty principle. 6 refs

  10. Implementing a finite-state off-normal and fault response system for disruption avoidance in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Choi, W.; Hahn, S. H.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B. S.; Walker, M. L.

    2018-05-01

    A finite-state off-normal and fault response (ONFR) system is presented that provides the supervisory logic for comprehensive disruption avoidance and machine protection in tokamaks. Robust event handling is critical for ITER and future large tokamaks, where plasma parameters will necessarily approach stability limits and many systems will operate near their engineering limits. Events can be classified as off-normal plasmas events, e.g. neoclassical tearing modes or vertical displacements events, or faults, e.g. coil power supply failures. The ONFR system presented provides four critical features of a robust event handling system: sequential responses to cascading events, event recovery, simultaneous handling of multiple events and actuator prioritization. The finite-state logic is implemented in Matlab®/Stateflow® to allow rapid development and testing in an easily understood graphical format before automated export to the real-time plasma control system code. Experimental demonstrations of the ONFR algorithm on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks are presented. In the most complex demonstration, the ONFR algorithm asynchronously applies ‘catch and subdue’ electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) injection scheme to suppress a virulent 2/1 neoclassical tearing mode, subsequently shuts down ECCD for machine protection when the plasma becomes over-dense, and enables rotating 3D field entrainment of the ensuing locked mode to allow a safe rampdown, all in the same discharge without user intervention. When multiple ONFR states are active simultaneously and requesting the same actuator (e.g. neutral beam injection or gyrotrons), actuator prioritization is accomplished by sorting the pre-assigned priority values of each active ONFR state and giving complete control of the actuator to the state with highest priority. This early experience makes evident that additional research is required to develop an improved actuator sharing protocol, as well as a methodology to

  11. New rational extensions of solvable potentials with finite bound state spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandati, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Using the disconjugacy properties of the Schrödinger equation, we develop a new type of generalized SUSY QM partnership which allows generating new solvable rational extensions for translationally shape invariant potentials having a finite bound state spectrum. For this we prolong the dispersion relation relating the energy to the quantum number out of the physical domain until a disconjugacy sector. By Darboux–Bäcklund Transformations built on these prolonged states we obtain new regular isospectral extensions of the initial potential. We give the spectra of these extensions in terms of new orthogonal polynomials and study their shape invariance properties. -- Highlights: ► New solvable quantum potentials. ► SUSY quantum partnership generalized to excited states. ► Based on disconjugacy theorems and asymptotic behaviour. ► Exact spectrum in terms of new orthogonal polynomials. ► Enlarged shape invariance property.

  12. Koopman Invariant Subspaces and Finite Linear Representations of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems for Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L.; Brunton, Bingni W.; Proctor, Joshua L.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore finite-dimensional linear representations of nonlinear dynamical systems by restricting the Koopman operator to an invariant subspace spanned by specially chosen observable functions. The Koopman operator is an infinite-dimensional linear operator that evolves functions of the state of a dynamical system. Dominant terms in the Koopman expansion are typically computed using dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). DMD uses linear measurements of the state variables, and it has recently been shown that this may be too restrictive for nonlinear systems. Choosing the right nonlinear observable functions to form an invariant subspace where it is possible to obtain linear reduced-order models, especially those that are useful for control, is an open challenge. Here, we investigate the choice of observable functions for Koopman analysis that enable the use of optimal linear control techniques on nonlinear problems. First, to include a cost on the state of the system, as in linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control, it is helpful to include these states in the observable subspace, as in DMD. However, we find that this is only possible when there is a single isolated fixed point, as systems with multiple fixed points or more complicated attractors are not globally topologically conjugate to a finite-dimensional linear system, and cannot be represented by a finite-dimensional linear Koopman subspace that includes the state. We then present a data-driven strategy to identify relevant observable functions for Koopman analysis by leveraging a new algorithm to determine relevant terms in a dynamical system by ℓ1-regularized regression of the data in a nonlinear function space; we also show how this algorithm is related to DMD. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of nonlinear observable subspaces in the design of Koopman operator optimal control laws for fully nonlinear systems using techniques from linear optimal control. PMID:26919740

  13. STABLE STATIONARY STATES OF NON-LOCAL INTERACTION EQUATIONS

    KAUST Repository

    FELLNER, KLEMENS

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the large-time behaviour of a solution to a non-local interaction equation, where a density of particles/individuals evolves subject to an interaction potential and an external potential. It is known that for regular interaction potentials, stable stationary states of these equations are generically finite sums of Dirac masses. For a finite sum of Dirac masses, we give (i) a condition to be a stationary state, (ii) two necessary conditions of linear stability w.r.t. shifts and reallocations of individual Dirac masses, and (iii) show that these linear stability conditions imply local non-linear stability. Finally, we show that for regular repulsive interaction potential Wε converging to a singular repulsive interaction potential W, the Dirac-type stationary states ρ̄ ε approximate weakly a unique stationary state ρ̄ ∈ L∞. We illustrate our results with numerical examples. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  14. Finite temperature instability for compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accetta, F.S.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We consider finite temperature effects upon theories with extra dimensions compactified via vacuum stress energy (Casimir) effects. For sufficiently high temperature, a static configuration for the internal space is impossible. At somewhat lower temperatures, there is an instability due to thermal fluctuations of radius of the compact dimensions. For both cases, the Universe can evolve to a de Sitter-like expansion of all dimensions. Stability to late times constrains the initial entropy of the universe. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. The Evolving Contingency Contracting Market: Private Sector Self regulation and United States Government Monitoring of Procurement of Stability Operations Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    statements of work would be useful in ensuring ethical govern- ment procurement practices. Conclusions The United States conducts diplomatic, defense...THE EVOLVING CONTINGENCY CONTRACTING MARKET: PRIVATE SECTOR SELF-REGULATION AND UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT MONITORING OF PROCUREMENT OF STABILITY...MARKET: PRIVATE SECTOR SELF-REGULATION AND UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT MONITORING OF PROCUREMENT OF STABILITY OPERATIONS SERVICES Whitney Grespin January

  16. Introduction to finite temperature and finite density QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2014-01-01

    It has been pointed out that QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics) in the circumstances of medium at finite temperature and density shows numbers of phenomena similar to the characteristics of solid state physics, e.g. phase transitions. In the past ten years, the very high temperature and density matter came to be observed experimentally at the heavy ion collisions. At the same time, the numerical QCD analysis at finite temperature and density attained quantitative level analysis possible owing to the remarkable progress of computers. In this summer school lecture, it has been set out to give not only the recent results, but also the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry, the fundamental theory of finite temperature and further expositions as in the following four sections. The first section is titled as 'Introduction to Finite Temperature and Density QCD' with subsections of 1.1 standard model and QCD, 1.2 phase transition and phase structure of QCD, 1.3 lattice QCD and thermodynamic quantity, 1.4 heavy ion collision experiments, and 1.5 neutron stars. The second one is 'Equilibrium State' with subsections of 2.1 chiral symmetry, 2.2 vacuum state: BCS theory, 2.3 NJL (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio) model, and 2.4 color superconductivity. The third one is 'Static fluctuations' with subsections of 3.1 fluctuations, 3.2 moment and cumulant, 3.3 increase of fluctuations at critical points, 3.4 analysis of fluctuations by lattice QCD and Taylor expansion, and 3.5 experimental exploration of QCD phase structure. The fourth one is 'Dynamical Structure' with 4.1 linear response theory, 4.2 spectral functions, 4.3 Matsubara function, and 4.4 analyses of dynamical structure by lattice QCD. (S. Funahashi)

  17. Gauge-invariant, nonperturbative approach to the infrared-finite bound-state problem in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogokhia, V.Sh.

    1989-09-01

    Gauge invariant, nonperturbative approach to the bound state problem within the infrared finite Bethe-Salpeter equation is presented. Condition of cancellation of the nonperturbative infrared divergences is derived. Solutions for the quark propagator and corresponding quark gluon vertex function are written down which can be directly applied to the Bethe-Salpeter equation, in particular to the 'generalized ladder' approximation of this equation. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Exact finite volume expectation values of local operators in excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozsgay, B. [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Szécsényi, I.M. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Eötvös Loránd University,Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, 1117 Budapest (Hungary); Takács, G. [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics,Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-04-07

    We present a conjecture for the exact expression of finite volume expectation values in excited states in integrable quantum field theories, which is an extension of an earlier conjecture to the case of general diagonal factorized scattering with bound states and a nontrivial bootstrap structure. The conjectured expression is a spectral expansion which uses the exact form factors and the excited state thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz as building blocks. The conjecture is proven for the case of the trace of the energy-moment tensor. Concerning its validity for more general operators, we provide numerical evidence using the truncated conformal space approach. It is found that the expansion fails to be well-defined for small values of the volume in cases when the singularity structure of the TBA equations undergoes a non-trivial rearrangement under some critical value of the volume. Despite these shortcomings, the conjectured expression is expected to be valid for all volumes for most of the excited states, and as an expansion above the critical volume for the rest.

  19. Exact finite volume expectation values of local operators in excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozsgay, B.; Szécsényi, I.M.; Takács, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a conjecture for the exact expression of finite volume expectation values in excited states in integrable quantum field theories, which is an extension of an earlier conjecture to the case of general diagonal factorized scattering with bound states and a nontrivial bootstrap structure. The conjectured expression is a spectral expansion which uses the exact form factors and the excited state thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz as building blocks. The conjecture is proven for the case of the trace of the energy-moment tensor. Concerning its validity for more general operators, we provide numerical evidence using the truncated conformal space approach. It is found that the expansion fails to be well-defined for small values of the volume in cases when the singularity structure of the TBA equations undergoes a non-trivial rearrangement under some critical value of the volume. Despite these shortcomings, the conjectured expression is expected to be valid for all volumes for most of the excited states, and as an expansion above the critical volume for the rest.

  20. Asymptotic stabilization of nonlinear systems using state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Attellis, Carlos

    1990-01-01

    This paper studies the design of state-feedback controllers for the stabilization of single-input single-output nonlinear systems x = f(x) + g(x)u, y = h(x). Two approaches for the stabilization problem are given; the asymptotic stability is achieved by means of: a) nonlinear state feedback: two nonlinear feedbacks are used; the first separates the system in a controllable linear part and in the zeros-dynamic part. The second feedback generates an asymptotically stable equilibrium on the manifold where this dynamics evolves; b) nonlinear dynamic feedback: conditions are established under which the system can follow the output of a completely controllable bilinear system which uses bounded controls. This fact enables the system to reach, using bounded controls too, a desired output value in finite time. As this value corresponds to a state that lays in the attraction basin of a stable equilibrium with the same output, the system evolves to that point. The two methods are illustrated by examples. (Author) [es

  1. Finite element evaluation of elasto-plastic accommodation energies during solid state transformations: Coherent, spherical precipitate in finite matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Sethuraman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The molar volume difference between the matrix and the precipitate phases in the case of solid state phase transformations results in the creation of stain energy in the system due to the misfit strains. A finite element model based on the initial strain approach is proposed to evaluate elasto-plastic accommodation energies during solid state transformation. The three-dimensional axisymmetric model has been used to evaluate energies as a function of transformation for α-β hydrogen transformations in the Nb-H system. The transformation has been analyzed for the cases of transformation progressing both from the center to surface and from the surface to center of the system. The effect of plastic deformation has been introduced to make the model realistic, specifically to the Nb-NbH phase transformation which involves a 4% linear misfit strain. It has been observed that plastic deformation reduces the strain energies compared to the linear elastic analysis

  2. Necessary and sufficient condition for distillability with unit fidelity from finite copies of a mixed state: The most efficient purification protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Pingxing; Liang Linmei; Li Chengzu; Huang Mingqiu

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that any entangled mixed state in 2x2 systems can be purified via infinite copies of the mixed state. But, can one distill a pure maximally entangled state from finite copies of a mixed state in any bipartite system by local operation and classical communication? This is more meaningful in practical application. We give a necessary and sufficient condition for this distillability. This condition requires that there exist distillable subspaces. According to this condition, one can judge easily whether a mixed state is distillable or not. We also analyze some properties of distillable subspaces, and discuss the most efficient purification protocol. Finally, we discuss the distillable enanglement of a two-qubit system for the case of finite copies

  3. Applications of mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods to transient and steady state creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreiro, J.N.C.; Loula, A.F.D.

    1988-12-01

    The mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation is applied to transiente and steady state creep problems. Numerical analysis has shown additional stability of this method compared to classical Galerkin formulations. The accuracy of the new formulation is confirmed in some representative examples of two dimensional and axisymmetric problems. (author) [pt

  4. Finite size scaling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenberg, V.

    1983-01-01

    Fischer's finite-size scaling describes the cross over from the singular behaviour of thermodynamic quantities at the critical point to the analytic behaviour of the finite system. Recent extensions of the method--transfer matrix technique, and the Hamiltonian formalism--are discussed in this paper. The method is presented, with equations deriving scaling function, critical temperature, and exponent v. As an application of the method, a 3-states Hamiltonian with Z 3 global symmetry is studied. Diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for finite chains allows one to estimate the critical exponents, and also to discover new phase transitions at lower temperatures. The critical points lambda, and indices v estimated for finite-scaling are given

  5. On the application of finite element method in the solution of steady state diffusion equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution of the steady state neutron diffusion equation is obtained by using the finite element method. Specifically the variational approach is used for one dimensional problems and the weighted residual method (Galerkin) for one and two dimensional problems. The spatial domain is divided into retangular elements and the neutron flux is approximated by linear (one dimensional case), and bilinear (two-dimensional case) functions. Numerical results are obtained with a FORTRAN IV computer program and compared with those obtained by the finite difference CITATION code. The results show that linear or bilinear functions, do not satisfactorily describe the differential parameters in highly heterogeneous reactor cases, but provide good results for integral parameters such as multiplication factor. (Author) [pt

  6. An Elgamal Encryption Scheme of Fibonacci Q-Matrix and Finite State Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravi Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptography is the science of writing messages in unknown form using mathematical models. In Cryptography, several ciphers were introduced for the encryption schemes. Recent research focusing on designing various mathematical models in such a way that tracing the inverse of the designed mathematical models is infeasible for the eve droppers. In the present work, the ELGamal encryption scheme is executed using the generator of a cyclic group formed by the points on choosing elliptic curve, finite state machines and key matrices obtained from the Fibonacci sequences.

  7. Equation of state at finite net-baryon density using Taylor coefficients up to sixth order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huovinen, Pasi; Petreczky, Péter; Schmidt, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We employ the lattice QCD data on Taylor expansion coefficients up to sixth order to construct an equation of state at finite net-baryon density. When we take into account how hadron masses depend on lattice spacing and quark mass, the coefficients evaluated using the p4 action are equal to those of hadron resonance gas at low temperature. Thus the parametrised equation of state can be smoothly connected to the hadron resonance gas equation of state. We see that the equation of state using Taylor coefficients up to second order is realistic only at low densities, and that at densities corresponding to s/n B ≳40, the expansion converges by the sixth order term

  8. Language Model Combination and Adaptation Using Weighted Finite State Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Gales, M. J. F.; Hieronymus, J. L.; Woodland, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    In speech recognition systems language model (LMs) are often constructed by training and combining multiple n-gram models. They can be either used to represent different genres or tasks found in diverse text sources, or capture stochastic properties of different linguistic symbol sequences, for example, syllables and words. Unsupervised LM adaption may also be used to further improve robustness to varying styles or tasks. When using these techniques, extensive software changes are often required. In this paper an alternative and more general approach based on weighted finite state transducers (WFSTs) is investigated for LM combination and adaptation. As it is entirely based on well-defined WFST operations, minimum change to decoding tools is needed. A wide range of LM combination configurations can be flexibly supported. An efficient on-the-fly WFST decoding algorithm is also proposed. Significant error rate gains of 7.3% relative were obtained on a state-of-the-art broadcast audio recognition task using a history dependently adapted multi-level LM modelling both syllable and word sequences

  9. Suppression of bottomonia states in finite size quark gluon plasma in PbPb collisions at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Kumar, Vineet

    2012-01-01

    The paper estimated the suppression of bottomonium states in an expanding QGP of finite lifetime and size with the conditions relevant for PbPb collisions at LHC. The recent results on the properties of ϒ states have been used as ingredient in the study. The nuclear modification factor and the ratios of yields of ϒ states are then obtained as a function of transverse momentum and centrality. The study has compared the calculations with the bottomonia yields measured in Pb+Pb collisions at √S NN = 2.76 TeV

  10. Transparency and other State-specific factors: exploration of Ideas for evolving the system of State-evaluations and safeguards implementation of IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everton, C.; Leslie, R.; Bayer, S.; East, M. [Craig Everton, Russell Leslie, Stephan Bayer, Michael East, Australia (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    In November 2010 the IAEA Department of Safeguards launched its Long Term Strategic Plan at the IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards: 'Preparing for Future Verification Challenges'. A key element of the Long Term Strategic Plan is the further evolution of the State-level approach for safeguards implementation away from criteria driven safeguards approaches focussed at the facility level, to a safeguards system that is objectives-based and fully information-driven. The State-level approach is a holistic approach to safeguards implementation, applicable to all States, incorporating comprehensive State evaluations and safeguards implementation approaches that make use of all information available to the IAEA. In further evolving the State-level concept State-specific factors and acquisition path analysis will become increasingly important in State evaluations and in the determination of safeguards approaches for each State. It will be important to determine objective modalities for incorporating these factors. Consideration of State-specific factors in determining safeguards approaches is not new - in fact, paragraph 81 of INFCIRC/153 (concluded June 1972) enumerates several such factors that can be considered. This paper will explore some ideas for State-specific factors that could be used in State-evaluations, and how these factors could be used for determining State-by-State safeguards approaches. Ideas for State-specific factors will include effectiveness of State Systems of Accountancy and Control (SSAC), transparency of States in their dealings with the IAEA, and characteristics of a nuclear fuel cycle of a State.

  11. Transparency and other State-specific factors: exploration of Ideas for evolving the system of State-evaluations and safeguards implementation of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everton, C.; Leslie, R.; Bayer, S.; East, M.

    2011-01-01

    In November 2010 the IAEA Department of Safeguards launched its Long Term Strategic Plan at the IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards: 'Preparing for Future Verification Challenges'. A key element of the Long Term Strategic Plan is the further evolution of the State-level approach for safeguards implementation away from criteria driven safeguards approaches focussed at the facility level, to a safeguards system that is objectives-based and fully information-driven. The State-level approach is a holistic approach to safeguards implementation, applicable to all States, incorporating comprehensive State evaluations and safeguards implementation approaches that make use of all information available to the IAEA. In further evolving the State-level concept State-specific factors and acquisition path analysis will become increasingly important in State evaluations and in the determination of safeguards approaches for each State. It will be important to determine objective modalities for incorporating these factors. Consideration of State-specific factors in determining safeguards approaches is not new - in fact, paragraph 81 of INFCIRC/153 (concluded June 1972) enumerates several such factors that can be considered. This paper will explore some ideas for State-specific factors that could be used in State-evaluations, and how these factors could be used for determining State-by-State safeguards approaches. Ideas for State-specific factors will include effectiveness of State Systems of Accountancy and Control (SSAC), transparency of States in their dealings with the IAEA, and characteristics of a nuclear fuel cycle of a State.

  12. A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Moosavi

    Full Text Available The initial theoretical connections between Leontief input-output models and Markov chains were established back in 1950s. However, considering the wide variety of mathematical properties of Markov chains, so far there has not been a full investigation of evolving world economic networks with Markov chain formalism. In this work, using the recently available world input-output database, we investigated the evolution of the world economic network from 1995 to 2011 through analysis of a time series of finite Markov chains. We assessed different aspects of this evolving system via different known properties of the Markov chains such as mixing time, Kemeny constant, steady state probabilities and perturbation analysis of the transition matrices. First, we showed how the time series of mixing times and Kemeny constants could be used as an aggregate index of globalization. Next, we focused on the steady state probabilities as a measure of structural power of the economies that are comparable to GDP shares of economies as the traditional index of economies welfare. Further, we introduced two measures of systemic risk, called systemic influence and systemic fragility, where the former is the ratio of number of influenced nodes to the total number of nodes, caused by a shock in the activity of a node, and the latter is based on the number of times a specific economic node is affected by a shock in the activity of any of the other nodes. Finally, focusing on Kemeny constant as a global indicator of monetary flow across the network, we showed that there is a paradoxical effect of a change in activity levels of economic nodes on the overall flow of the world economic network. While the economic slowdown of the majority of nodes with high structural power results to a slower average monetary flow over the network, there are some nodes, where their slowdowns improve the overall quality of the network in terms of connectivity and the average flow of the money.

  13. A Markovian model of evolving world input-output network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Vahid; Isacchini, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The initial theoretical connections between Leontief input-output models and Markov chains were established back in 1950s. However, considering the wide variety of mathematical properties of Markov chains, so far there has not been a full investigation of evolving world economic networks with Markov chain formalism. In this work, using the recently available world input-output database, we investigated the evolution of the world economic network from 1995 to 2011 through analysis of a time series of finite Markov chains. We assessed different aspects of this evolving system via different known properties of the Markov chains such as mixing time, Kemeny constant, steady state probabilities and perturbation analysis of the transition matrices. First, we showed how the time series of mixing times and Kemeny constants could be used as an aggregate index of globalization. Next, we focused on the steady state probabilities as a measure of structural power of the economies that are comparable to GDP shares of economies as the traditional index of economies welfare. Further, we introduced two measures of systemic risk, called systemic influence and systemic fragility, where the former is the ratio of number of influenced nodes to the total number of nodes, caused by a shock in the activity of a node, and the latter is based on the number of times a specific economic node is affected by a shock in the activity of any of the other nodes. Finally, focusing on Kemeny constant as a global indicator of monetary flow across the network, we showed that there is a paradoxical effect of a change in activity levels of economic nodes on the overall flow of the world economic network. While the economic slowdown of the majority of nodes with high structural power results to a slower average monetary flow over the network, there are some nodes, where their slowdowns improve the overall quality of the network in terms of connectivity and the average flow of the money.

  14. (N+1)-dimensional Lorentzian evolving wormholes supported by polytropic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Universidad del Bio-Bio, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Concepcion (Chile); Arostica, Fernanda; Bahamonde, Sebastian [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Fisica, Concepcion (Chile)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we study (N+1)-dimensional evolving wormholes supported by energy satisfying a polytropic equation of state. The considered evolving wormhole models are described by a constant redshift function and generalizes the standard flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The polytropic equation of state allows us to consider in (3+1)-dimensions generalizations of the phantom energy and the generalized Chaplygin gas sources. (orig.)

  15. Quantum channels with a finite memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Garry; Mancini, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study quantum communication channels with correlated noise effects, i.e., quantum channels with memory. We derive a model for correlated noise channels that includes a channel memory state. We examine the case where the memory is finite, and derive bounds on the classical and quantum capacities. For the entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities it is shown that these bounds are attainable for certain classes of channel. Also, we show that the structure of any finite-memory state is unimportant in the asymptotic limit, and specifically, for a perfect finite-memory channel where no information is lost to the environment, achieving the upper bound implies that the channel is asymptotically noiseless

  16. Local density of optical states in the band gap of a finite one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeganegi Dastgerdi, Elahe; Lagendijk, Aart; Mosk, Allard; Vos, Willem L.

    2014-01-01

    We study the local density of states (LDOS) in a finite photonic crystal, in particular in the frequency range of the band gap. We propose an original point of view on the band gap, which we consider to be the result of vacuum fluctuations in free space that tunnel in the forbidden range in the

  17. Sampled-data-based vibration control for structural systems with finite-time state constraint and sensor outage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Falu; Liu, Mingxin; Mao, Weijie; Ding, Yuanchun; Liu, Feifei

    2018-05-10

    The problem of sampled-data-based vibration control for structural systems with finite-time state constraint and sensor outage is investigated in this paper. The objective of designing controllers is to guarantee the stability and anti-disturbance performance of the closed-loop systems while some sensor outages happen. Firstly, based on matrix transformation, the state-space model of structural systems with sensor outages and uncertainties appearing in the mass, damping and stiffness matrices is established. Secondly, by considering most of those earthquakes or strong winds happen in a very short time, and it is often the peak values make the structures damaged, the finite-time stability analysis method is introduced to constrain the state responses in a given time interval, and the H-infinity stability is adopted in the controller design to make sure that the closed-loop system has a prescribed level of disturbance attenuation performance during the whole control process. Furthermore, all stabilization conditions are expressed in the forms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), whose feasibility can be easily checked by using the LMI Toolbox. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed theorems. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Social networks: Evolving graphs with memory dependent edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The plethora of digital communication technologies, and their mass take up, has resulted in a wealth of interest in social network data collection and analysis in recent years. Within many such networks the interactions are transient: thus those networks evolve over time. In this paper we introduce a class of models for such networks using evolving graphs with memory dependent edges, which may appear and disappear according to their recent history. We consider time discrete and time continuous variants of the model. We consider the long term asymptotic behaviour as a function of parameters controlling the memory dependence. In particular we show that such networks may continue evolving forever, or else may quench and become static (containing immortal and/or extinct edges). This depends on the existence or otherwise of certain infinite products and series involving age dependent model parameters. We show how to differentiate between the alternatives based on a finite set of observations. To test these ideas we show how model parameters may be calibrated based on limited samples of time dependent data, and we apply these concepts to three real networks: summary data on mobile phone use from a developing region; online social-business network data from China; and disaggregated mobile phone communications data from a reality mining experiment in the US. In each case we show that there is evidence for memory dependent dynamics, such as that embodied within the class of models proposed here.

  19. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  20. Generating feasible transition paths for testing from an extended finite state machine (EFSM) with the counter problem

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaji, AS; Hierons, RM; Swift, S

    2009-01-01

    The extended finite state machine (EFSM) is a powerful approach for modeling state-based systems. However, testing from EFSMs is complicated by the existence of infeasible paths. One important problem is the existence of a transition with a guard that references a counter variable whose value depends on previous transitions. The presence of such transitions in paths often leads to infeasible paths. This paper proposes a novel approach to bypass the counter problem. The proposed approach is ev...

  1. Static Object Detection Based on a Dual Background Model and a Finite-State Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heras Evangelio Rubén

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting static objects in video sequences has a high relevance in many surveillance applications, such as the detection of abandoned objects in public areas. In this paper, we present a system for the detection of static objects in crowded scenes. Based on the detection of two background models learning at different rates, pixels are classified with the help of a finite-state machine. The background is modelled by two mixtures of Gaussians with identical parameters except for the learning rate. The state machine provides the meaning for the interpretation of the results obtained from background subtraction; it can be implemented as a look-up table with negligible computational cost and it can be easily extended. Due to the definition of the states in the state machine, the system can be used either full automatically or interactively, making it extremely suitable for real-life surveillance applications. The system was successfully validated with several public datasets.

  2. An Autonomous Connectivity Restoration Algorithm Based on Finite State Machine for Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of autonomous unmanned intelligent systems, such as the unmanned boats, unmanned planes and autonomous underwater vehicles, studies on Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks (WSANs have attracted more attention. Network connectivity algorithms play an important role in data exchange, collaborative detection and information fusion. Due to the harsh application environment, abnormal nodes often appear, and the network connectivity will be prone to be lost. Network self-healing mechanisms have become critical for these systems. In order to decrease the movement overhead of the sensor-actor nodes, an autonomous connectivity restoration algorithm based on finite state machine is proposed. The idea is to identify whether a node is a critical node by using a finite state machine, and update the connected dominating set in a timely way. If an abnormal node is a critical node, the nearest non-critical node will be relocated to replace the abnormal node. In the case of multiple node abnormality, a regional network restoration algorithm is introduced. It is designed to reduce the overhead of node movements while restoration happens. Simulation results indicate the proposed algorithm has better performance on the total moving distance and the number of total relocated nodes compared with some other representative restoration algorithms.

  3. An Autonomous Connectivity Restoration Algorithm Based on Finite State Machine for Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Hao, Guan

    2018-01-08

    With the development of autonomous unmanned intelligent systems, such as the unmanned boats, unmanned planes and autonomous underwater vehicles, studies on Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks (WSANs) have attracted more attention. Network connectivity algorithms play an important role in data exchange, collaborative detection and information fusion. Due to the harsh application environment, abnormal nodes often appear, and the network connectivity will be prone to be lost. Network self-healing mechanisms have become critical for these systems. In order to decrease the movement overhead of the sensor-actor nodes, an autonomous connectivity restoration algorithm based on finite state machine is proposed. The idea is to identify whether a node is a critical node by using a finite state machine, and update the connected dominating set in a timely way. If an abnormal node is a critical node, the nearest non-critical node will be relocated to replace the abnormal node. In the case of multiple node abnormality, a regional network restoration algorithm is introduced. It is designed to reduce the overhead of node movements while restoration happens. Simulation results indicate the proposed algorithm has better performance on the total moving distance and the number of total relocated nodes compared with some other representative restoration algorithms.

  4. An Autonomous Connectivity Restoration Algorithm Based on Finite State Machine for Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Hao, Guan

    2018-01-01

    With the development of autonomous unmanned intelligent systems, such as the unmanned boats, unmanned planes and autonomous underwater vehicles, studies on Wireless Sensor-Actor Networks (WSANs) have attracted more attention. Network connectivity algorithms play an important role in data exchange, collaborative detection and information fusion. Due to the harsh application environment, abnormal nodes often appear, and the network connectivity will be prone to be lost. Network self-healing mechanisms have become critical for these systems. In order to decrease the movement overhead of the sensor-actor nodes, an autonomous connectivity restoration algorithm based on finite state machine is proposed. The idea is to identify whether a node is a critical node by using a finite state machine, and update the connected dominating set in a timely way. If an abnormal node is a critical node, the nearest non-critical node will be relocated to replace the abnormal node. In the case of multiple node abnormality, a regional network restoration algorithm is introduced. It is designed to reduce the overhead of node movements while restoration happens. Simulation results indicate the proposed algorithm has better performance on the total moving distance and the number of total relocated nodes compared with some other representative restoration algorithms. PMID:29316702

  5. Quantum-enhanced reinforcement learning for finite-episode games with discrete state spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukart, Florian; Von Dollen, David; Seidel, Christian; Compostella, Gabriele

    2017-12-01

    Quantum annealing algorithms belong to the class of metaheuristic tools, applicable for solving binary optimization problems. Hardware implementations of quantum annealing, such as the quantum annealing machines produced by D-Wave Systems, have been subject to multiple analyses in research, with the aim of characterizing the technology's usefulness for optimization and sampling tasks. Here, we present a way to partially embed both Monte Carlo policy iteration for finding an optimal policy on random observations, as well as how to embed n sub-optimal state-value functions for approximating an improved state-value function given a policy for finite horizon games with discrete state spaces on a D-Wave 2000Q quantum processing unit (QPU). We explain how both problems can be expressed as a quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problem, and show that quantum-enhanced Monte Carlo policy evaluation allows for finding equivalent or better state-value functions for a given policy with the same number episodes compared to a purely classical Monte Carlo algorithm. Additionally, we describe a quantum-classical policy learning algorithm. Our first and foremost aim is to explain how to represent and solve parts of these problems with the help of the QPU, and not to prove supremacy over every existing classical policy evaluation algorithm.

  6. Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemilentsau, A; Ya Slepyan, G; Maksimenko, S A

    2009-01-01

    Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated theoretically in this paper. The analysis is based on the fluctuation-dissipative theorem in the Callen-Welton form. The Dyson equation for the Green dyadic of the electromagnetic field in the presence of CNT is formulated and a method for its numerical solution is elaborated. We show that the photonic density of states spectrum has a nontrivial resonant structure in the terahertz range in the vicinity of the metallic single-wall CNT. The origin of these resonances is the surface plasmon resonances on the CNT's edges.

  7. Self-similarly evolving and minimally dissipated stable states of plasmas realized after relaxation and self-organization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Hakoiwa, Toru; Okada, Akihito; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2006-01-01

    A novel set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations having dissipative terms are derived to find self-similarly evolving and minimally dissipated stable states of plasmas realized after relaxation and self-organization processes. By numerically solving the set of eigenvalue equations in a cylindrical model, typical spatial profiles of plasma parameters, electric and magnetic fields and diffusion factors are presented, all of which determine self-consistently with each other by physical laws and mutual relations among them, just as in experimental plasmas. (author)

  8. Inflection points of microcanonical entropy: Monte Carlo simulation of q state Potts model on a finite square lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen, E., E-mail: svmstaya@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: svmstaya@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Traditional definition of phase transition involves an infinitely large system in thermodynamic limit. Finite systems such as biological proteins exhibit cooperative behavior similar to phase transitions. We employ recently discovered analysis of inflection points of microcanonical entropy to estimate the transition temperature of the phase transition in q state Potts model on a finite two dimensional square lattice for q=3 (second order) and q=8 (first order). The difference of energy density of states (DOS) Δ ln g(E) = ln g(E+ ΔE) −ln g(E) exhibits a point of inflexion at a value corresponding to inverse transition temperature. This feature is common to systems exhibiting both first as well as second order transitions. While the difference of DOS registers a monotonic variation around the point of inflexion for systems exhibiting second order transition, it has an S-shape with a minimum and maximum around the point of inflexion for the case of first order transition.

  9. Inflection points of microcanonical entropy: Monte Carlo simulation of q state Potts model on a finite square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen, E.; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional definition of phase transition involves an infinitely large system in thermodynamic limit. Finite systems such as biological proteins exhibit cooperative behavior similar to phase transitions. We employ recently discovered analysis of inflection points of microcanonical entropy to estimate the transition temperature of the phase transition in q state Potts model on a finite two dimensional square lattice for q=3 (second order) and q=8 (first order). The difference of energy density of states (DOS) Δ ln g(E) = ln g(E+ ΔE) −ln g(E) exhibits a point of inflexion at a value corresponding to inverse transition temperature. This feature is common to systems exhibiting both first as well as second order transitions. While the difference of DOS registers a monotonic variation around the point of inflexion for systems exhibiting second order transition, it has an S-shape with a minimum and maximum around the point of inflexion for the case of first order transition

  10. Faithful state transfer between two-level systems via an actively cooled finite-temperature cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárkány, Lőrinc; Fortágh, József; Petrosyan, David

    2018-03-01

    We consider state transfer between two qubits—effective two-level systems represented by Rydberg atoms—via a common mode of a microwave cavity at finite temperature. We find that when both qubits have the same coupling strength to the cavity field, at large enough detuning from the cavity mode frequency, quantum interference between the transition paths makes the swap of the excitation between the qubits largely insensitive to the number of thermal photons in the cavity. When, however, the coupling strengths are different, the photon-number-dependent differential Stark shift of the transition frequencies precludes efficient transfer. Nevertheless, using an auxiliary cooling system to continuously extract the cavity photons, we can still achieve a high-fidelity state transfer between the qubits.

  11. A hybrid finite-volume and finite difference scheme for depth-integrated non-hydrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Sun, Jia-wen; Wang, Xing-gang; Yu, Yong-hai; Sun, Zhao-chen

    2017-06-01

    A depth-integrated, non-hydrostatic model with hybrid finite difference and finite volume numerical algorithm is proposed in this paper. By utilizing a fraction step method, the governing equations are decomposed into hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic parts. The first part is solved by using the finite volume conservative discretization method, whilst the latter is considered by solving discretized Poisson-type equations with the finite difference method. The second-order accuracy, both in time and space, of the finite volume scheme is achieved by using an explicit predictor-correction step and linear construction of variable state in cells. The fluxes across the cell faces are computed in a Godunov-based manner by using MUSTA scheme. Slope and flux limiting technique is used to equip the algorithm with total variation dimensioning property for shock capturing purpose. Wave breaking is treated as a shock by switching off the non-hydrostatic pressure in the steep wave front locally. The model deals with moving wet/dry front in a simple way. Numerical experiments are conducted to verify the proposed model.

  12. Navier--Stokes relaxation to sinh--Poisson states at finite Reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.; Shan, X.; Matthaeus, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical framework is proposed in which it seems possible to justify the computationally-observed relaxation of a two-dimensional Navier--Stokes fluid to a ''most probable,'' or maximum entropy, state. The relaxation occurs at large but finite Reynolds numbers, and involves substantial decay of higher-order ideal invariants such as enstrophy. A two-fluid formulation, involving interpenetrating positive and negative vorticity fluxes (continuous and square integrable) is developed, and is shown to be intimately related to the passive scalar decay problem. Increasing interpenetration of the two fluids corresponds to the decay of vorticity flux due to viscosity. It is demonstrated numerically that, in two dimensions, passive scalars decay rapidly, relative to mean-square vorticity (enstrophy). This observation provides a basis for assigning initial data to the two-fluid field variables

  13. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Troyer, Matthias; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model. (paper)

  14. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model.

  15. Generic finite size scaling for discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions into absorbing states

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M. M.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Fiore, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Based on quasistationary distribution ideas, a general finite size scaling theory is proposed for discontinuous nonequilibrium phase transitions into absorbing states. Analogously to the equilibrium case, we show that quantities such as response functions, cumulants, and equal area probability distributions all scale with the volume, thus allowing proper estimates for the thermodynamic limit. To illustrate these results, five very distinct lattice models displaying nonequilibrium transitions—to single and infinitely many absorbing states—are investigated. The innate difficulties in analyzing absorbing phase transitions are circumvented through quasistationary simulation methods. Our findings (allied to numerical studies in the literature) strongly point to a unifying discontinuous phase transition scaling behavior for equilibrium and this important class of nonequilibrium systems.

  16. Automated Finite State Workflow for Distributed Data Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdu, L.; Didenko, L.; Lauret, J.; Amol, J.; Betts, W.; Jang, H. J.; Noh, S. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In statistically hungry science domains, data deluges can be both a blessing and a curse. They allow the narrowing of statistical errors from known measurements, and open the door to new scientific opportunities as research programs mature. They are also a testament to the efficiency of experimental operations. However, growing data samples may need to be processed with little or no opportunity for huge increases in computing capacity. A standard strategy has thus been to share resources across multiple experiments at a given facility. Another has been to use middleware that “glues” resources across the world so they are able to locally run the experimental software stack (either natively or virtually). We describe a framework STAR has successfully used to reconstruct a ~400 TB dataset consisting of over 100,000 jobs submitted to a remote site in Korea from STAR's Tier 0 facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The framework automates the full workflow, taking raw data files from tape and writing Physics-ready output back to tape without operator or remote site intervention. Through hardening we have demonstrated 97(±2)% efficiency, over a period of 7 months of operation. The high efficiency is attributed to finite state checking with retries to encourage resilience in the system over capricious and fallible infrastructure.

  17. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  18. Finite lattice extrapolation algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, M.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-08-01

    Two algorithms for sequence extrapolation, due to von den Broeck and Schwartz and Bulirsch and Stoer are reviewed and critically compared. Applications to three states and six states quantum chains and to the (2+1)D Ising model show that the algorithm of Bulirsch and Stoer is superior, in particular if only very few finite lattice data are available. (orig.)

  19. Relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, which has been proposed recently in an astrophysical context. Assuming a constant distribution of protons inside the nucleus of finite size avoids severe divergence of the electron density with respect to a point-like nucleus. A formula for the nuclear radius is chosen to treat any element. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model matches the two asymptotic regimes, i.e., the non-relativistic and the ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models. The equation of state is considered in detail. For each version of the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model, the pressure, the kinetic energy, and the entropy are calculated. The internal energy and free energy are also considered. The thermodynamic consistency of the three models is considered by working from the free energy. The virial question is also studied in the three cases as well as the relationship with the density functional theory. The relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model is far more involved than the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi models that are very close to each other from a mathematical point of view.

  20. A generic finite state machine framework for the ACNET control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, L.; Warner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A significant level of automation and flexibility has been added to the ACNET control system through the development of a Java-based Finite State Machine (FSM) infrastructure. These FSMs are integrated into ACNET and allow users to easily build, test and execute scripts that have full access to ACNET's functionality. In this paper, a description will be given of the FSM design and its ties to the Java-based Data Acquisition Engine (DAE) framework. Each FSM is part of a client-server model with FSM display clients using Remote Method Invocation (RMI) to communicate with DAE servers heavily coupled to ACNET. A web-based monitoring system that allows users to utilize browsers to observe persistent FSMs will also be discussed. Finally, some key implementations such as the crash recovery FSM developed for the Electron Cooling machine protection system will be presented.

  1. The Dirac Equation in the algebraic approximation. VII. A comparison of molecular finite difference and finite basis set calculations using distributed Gaussian basis sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quiney, H. M.; Glushkov, V. N.; Wilson, S.; Sabin,; Brandas, E

    2001-01-01

    A comparison is made of the accuracy achieved in finite difference and finite basis set approximations to the Dirac equation for the ground state of the hydrogen molecular ion. The finite basis set calculations are carried out using a distributed basis set of Gaussian functions the exponents and

  2. Evolvability Search: Directly Selecting for Evolvability in order to Study and Produce It

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengistu, Henok; Lehman, Joel Anthony; Clune, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    of evolvable digital phenotypes. Although some types of selection in evolutionary computation indirectly encourage evolvability, one unexplored possibility is to directly select for evolvability. To do so, we estimate an individual's future potential for diversity by calculating the behavioral diversity of its...... immediate offspring, and select organisms with increased offspring variation. While the technique is computationally expensive, we hypothesized that direct selection would better encourage evolvability than indirect methods. Experiments in two evolutionary robotics domains confirm this hypothesis: in both...... domains, such Evolvability Search produces solutions with higher evolvability than those produced with Novelty Search or traditional objective-based search algorithms. Further experiments demonstrate that the higher evolvability produced by Evolvability Search in a training environment also generalizes...

  3. A Generalized Dynamic Composition Algorithm of Weighted Finite State Transducers for Large Vocabulary Speech Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Octavian; Dines, John; Magimai.-Doss, Mathew

    2006-01-01

    We propose a generalized dynamic composition algorithm of weighted finite state transducers (WFST), which avoids the creation of non-coaccessible paths, performs weight look-ahead and does not impose any constraints to the topology of the WFSTs. Experimental results on Wall Street Journal (WSJ1) 20k-word trigram task show that at 17\\% WER (moderately-wide beam width), the decoding time of the proposed approach is about 48\\% and 65\\% of the other two dynamic composition approaches. In comparis...

  4. Quantum correlation properties in Matrix Product States of finite-number spin rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; He, Qi-Kai

    2018-02-01

    The organization and structure of quantum correlation (QC) of quantum spin-chains are very rich and complex. Hence the depiction and measures about the QC of finite-number spin rings deserved to be investigated intensively by using Matrix Product States(MPSs) in addition to the case with infinite-number. Here the dependencies of the geometric quantum discord(GQD) of two spin blocks on the total spin number, the spacing spin number and the environment parameter are presented in detail. We also compare the GQD with the total correlation(TC) and the classical correlation(CC) and illustrate its characteristics. Predictably, our findings may provide the potential of designing the optimal QC experimental detection proposals and pave the way for the designation of optimal quantum information processing schemes.

  5. Finite element approximation of a sharp interface approach for gradient flow dynamics of two-phase biomembranes

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2017-01-01

    A finite element method for the evolution of a two-phase membrane in a sharp interface formulation is introduced. The evolution equations are given as an $L^2$--gradient flow of an energy involving an elastic bending energy and a line energy. In the two phases Helfrich-type evolution equations are prescribed, and on the interface, an evolving curve on an evolving surface, highly nonlinear boundary conditions have to hold. Here we consider both $C^0$-- and $C^1$--matching conditions for the su...

  6. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  7. Automated Finite State Workflow for Distributed Data Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, L; Didenko, L; Lauret, J; Betts, W; Amol, J; Jang, H J; Noh, S Y

    2016-01-01

    In statistically hungry science domains, data deluges can be both a blessing and a curse. They allow the narrowing of statistical errors from known measurements, and open the door to new scientific opportunities as research programs mature. They are also a testament to the efficiency of experimental operations. However, growing data samples may need to be processed with little or no opportunity for huge increases in computing capacity. A standard strategy has thus been to share resources across multiple experiments at a given facility. Another has been to use middleware that “glues” resources across the world so they are able to locally run the experimental software stack (either natively or virtually). We describe a framework STAR has successfully used to reconstruct a ∼400 TB dataset consisting of over 100,000 jobs submitted to a remote site in Korea from STAR's Tier 0 facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The framework automates the full workflow, taking raw data files from tape and writing Physics-ready output back to tape without operator or remote site intervention. Through hardening we have demonstrated 97(±2)% efficiency, over a period of 7 months of operation. The high efficiency is attributed to finite state checking with retries to encourage resilience in the system over capricious and fallible infrastructure. (paper)

  8. Finite element modeling of micromachined MEMS photon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Boyd M., III; Schonberger, D. W.; Datskos, Panos G.

    1999-09-01

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-01-01

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness

  10. Multilayer Finite-Element Model Application to Define the Bearing Structure Element Stress State of Launch Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article objective is to justify the rationale for selecting the multilayer finite element model parameters of the bearing structure of a general-purpose launch complex unit.A typical design element of the launch complex unit, i.e. a mount of the hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, block, etc. is under consideration. The mount represents a set of the cantilevered axis and external structural cage. The most loaded element of the cage is disk to which a moment is transferred from the cantilevered axis due to actuator effort acting on it.To calculate the stress-strain state of disk was used a finite element method. Five models of disk mount were created. The only difference in models was the number of layers of the finite elements through the thickness of disk. There were models, which had one, three, five, eight, and fourteen layers of finite elements through the thickness of disk. For each model, we calculated the equivalent stresses arising from the action of the test load. Disk models were formed and calculated using the MSC Nastran complex software.The article presents results in the table to show data of equivalent stresses in each of the multi-layered models and graphically to illustrate the changing equivalent stresses through the thickness of disk.Based on these results we have given advice on selecting the proper number of layers in the model allowing a desirable accuracy of results with the lowest run time. In addition, it is concluded that there is a need to use the multi-layer models in assessing the performance of structural elements in case the stress exceeds the allowable one in their surface layers.

  11. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.

  12. Evolving Random Forest for Preference Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou-Zleikha, Mohamed; Shaker, Noor

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for pairwise preference learning through a combination of an evolutionary method and random forest. Grammatical evolution is used to describe the structure of the trees in the Random Forest (RF) and to handle the process of evolution. Evolved random forests ...... obtained for predicting pairwise self-reports of users for the three emotional states engagement, frustration and challenge show very promising results that are comparable and in some cases superior to those obtained from state-of-the-art methods....

  13. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  14. The finite state projection approach to analyze dynamics of heterogeneous populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rob; Munsky, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Population modeling aims to capture and predict the dynamics of cell populations in constant or fluctuating environments. At the elementary level, population growth proceeds through sequential divisions of individual cells. Due to stochastic effects, populations of cells are inherently heterogeneous in phenotype, and some phenotypic variables have an effect on division or survival rates, as can be seen in partial drug resistance. Therefore, when modeling population dynamics where the control of growth and division is phenotype dependent, the corresponding model must take account of the underlying cellular heterogeneity. The finite state projection (FSP) approach has often been used to analyze the statistics of independent cells. Here, we extend the FSP analysis to explore the coupling of cell dynamics and biomolecule dynamics within a population. This extension allows a general framework with which to model the state occupations of a heterogeneous, isogenic population of dividing and expiring cells. The method is demonstrated with a simple model of cell-cycle progression, which we use to explore possible dynamics of drug resistance phenotypes in dividing cells. We use this method to show how stochastic single-cell behaviors affect population level efficacy of drug treatments, and we illustrate how slight modifications to treatment regimens may have dramatic effects on drug efficacy.

  15. A System of Poisson Equations for a Nonconstant Varadhan Functional on a Finite State Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavazos-Cadena, Rolando; Hernandez-Hernandez, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Given a discrete-time Markov chain with finite state space and a stationary transition matrix, a system of 'local' Poisson equations characterizing the (exponential) Varadhan's functional J(.) is given. The main results, which are derived for an arbitrary transition structure so that J(.) may be nonconstant, are as follows: (i) Any solution to the local Poisson equations immediately renders Varadhan's functional, and (ii) a solution of the system always exist. The proof of this latter result is constructive and suggests a method to solve the local Poisson equations

  16. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  17. Finite approximations in discrete-time stochastic control quantized models and asymptotic optimality

    CERN Document Server

    Saldi, Naci; Yüksel, Serdar

    2018-01-01

    In a unified form, this monograph presents fundamental results on the approximation of centralized and decentralized stochastic control problems, with uncountable state, measurement, and action spaces. It demonstrates how quantization provides a system-independent and constructive method for the reduction of a system with Borel spaces to one with finite state, measurement, and action spaces. In addition to this constructive view, the book considers both the information transmission approach for discretization of actions, and the computational approach for discretization of states and actions. Part I of the text discusses Markov decision processes and their finite-state or finite-action approximations, while Part II builds from there to finite approximations in decentralized stochastic control problems. This volume is perfect for researchers and graduate students interested in stochastic controls. With the tools presented, readers will be able to establish the convergence of approximation models to original mo...

  18. Modelling robot's behaviour using finite automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janošek, Michal; Žáček, Jaroslav

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a model of a robot's behaviour described by finite automata. We split robot's knowledge into several knowledge bases which are used by the inference mechanism of the robot's expert system to make a logic deduction. Each knowledgebase is dedicated to the particular behaviour domain and the finite automaton helps us switching among these knowledge bases with the respect of actual situation. Our goal is to simplify and reduce complexity of one big knowledgebase splitting it into several pieces. The advantage of this model is that we can easily add new behaviour by adding new knowledgebase and add this behaviour into the finite automaton and define necessary states and transitions.

  19. Critical state and magnetization loss in multifilamentary superconducting wire solved through the commercial finite element code ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinon, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Gömöry, F.

    2010-11-01

    The commercially available finite element code ANSYS has been adapted to solve the critical state of single strips and multifilamentary tapes. We studied a special algorithm which approaches the critical state by an iterative adjustment of the material resistivity. Then, we proved its validity by comparing the results obtained for a thin strip to the Brand theory for the transport current and magnetization cases. Also, the challenging calculation of the magnetization loss of a real multifilamentary BSCCO tape showed the usefulness of our method. Finally, we developed several methods to enhance the speed of convergence, making the proposed process quite competitive in the existing survey of ac losses simulations.

  20. Complex finite element sensitivity method for creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Farias, Armando; Montoya, Arturo; Millwater, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The complex finite element method (ZFEM) has been extended to perform sensitivity analysis for mechanical and structural systems undergoing creep deformation. ZFEM uses a complex finite element formulation to provide shape, material, and loading derivatives of the system response, providing an insight into the essential factors which control the behavior of the system as a function of time. A complex variable-based quadrilateral user element (UEL) subroutine implementing the power law creep constitutive formulation was incorporated within the Abaqus commercial finite element software. The results of the complex finite element computations were verified by comparing them to the reference solution for the steady-state creep problem of a thick-walled cylinder in the power law creep range. A practical application of the ZFEM implementation to creep deformation analysis is the calculation of the skeletal point of a notched bar test from a single ZFEM run. In contrast, the standard finite element procedure requires multiple runs. The value of the skeletal point is that it identifies the location where the stress state is accurate, regardless of the certainty of the creep material properties. - Highlights: • A novel finite element sensitivity method (ZFEM) for creep was introduced. • ZFEM has the capability to calculate accurate partial derivatives. • ZFEM can be used for identification of the skeletal point of creep structures. • ZFEM can be easily implemented in a commercial software, e.g. Abaqus. • ZFEM results were shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical solutions

  1. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  2. A collocation--Galerkin finite element model of cardiac action potential propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J M; McCulloch, A D

    1994-08-01

    A new computational method was developed for modeling the effects of the geometric complexity, nonuniform muscle fiber orientation, and material inhomogeneity of the ventricular wall on cardiac impulse propagation. The method was used to solve a modification to the FitzHugh-Nagumo system of equations. The geometry, local muscle fiber orientation, and material parameters of the domain were defined using linear Lagrange or cubic Hermite finite element interpolation. Spatial variations of time-dependent excitation and recovery variables were approximated using cubic Hermite finite element interpolation, and the governing finite element equations were assembled using the collocation method. To overcome the deficiencies of conventional collocation methods on irregular domains, Galerkin equations for the no-flux boundary conditions were used instead of collocation equations for the boundary degrees-of-freedom. The resulting system was evolved using an adaptive Runge-Kutta method. Converged two-dimensional simulations of normal propagation showed that this method requires less CPU time than a traditional finite difference discretization. The model also reproduced several other physiologic phenomena known to be important in arrhythmogenesis including: Wenckebach periodicity, slowed propagation and unidirectional block due to wavefront curvature, reentry around a fixed obstacle, and spiral wave reentry. In a new result, we observed wavespeed variations and block due to nonuniform muscle fiber orientation. The findings suggest that the finite element method is suitable for studying normal and pathological cardiac activation and has significant advantages over existing techniques.

  3. NCEL: two dimensional finite element code for steady-state temperature distribution in seven rod-bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrehor, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an application of the finite element method to the heat transfer study in seven-pin models of LMFBR fuel subassembly. The developed code NCEL solves two-dimensional steady state heat conduction equation in the whole subassembly model cross-section and enebles to perform the analysis of thermal behaviour in both normal and accidental operational conditions as eccentricity of the central rod or full or partial (porous) blockage of some part of the cross-flow area. The heat removal is simulated by heat sinks in coolant under conditions of subchannels slug flow approximation

  4. Finite density lattice gauge theories with positive fermion determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, D.K.; Kogut, J.B.; Toublan, D.

    2004-01-01

    We perform simulations of (3-colour) QCD with 2 quark flavours at a finite chemical potential μ I for isospin (I 3 ), and of 2-colour QCD at a finite chemical potential μ for quark number. At zero temperature, QCD at finite μ I has a mean-field phase transition at μ I = m π to a superfluid state with a charged pion condensate which spontaneously breaks I 3 . We study the finite temperature transition as a function of μ I . For μ I π , where this is closely related to the transition at finite μ, this appears to be a crossover independent of quark mass, with no sign of the proposed critical endpoint. For μ I > m π this becomes a true phase transition where the pion condensate evaporates. For μ I just above m π the transition seems to be second order, while for larger μ I it appears to become first order. At zero temperature, 2-colour QCD also possesses a superfluid state with a diquark condensate. We study its spectrum of Goldstone and pseudo-Goldstone bosons associated with chiral and quark-number symmetry breaking. (author)

  5. GPP Webinar: The Solar Roadmap—Navigating the Evolving Solar Energy Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    GPP and State & Local Climate and Energy Branch webinar on the Solar Roadmap and the evolving solar energy market. This webinar discussed local and state government’s success stories and opportunities for progress in renewable energy goals using the Solar

  6. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klymenko, M. V.; Klein, M.; Levine, R. D.; Remacle, F.

    2016-01-01

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  7. Operation of a quantum dot in the finite-state machine mode: Single-electron dynamic memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, M. V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); Klein, M. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levine, R. D. [The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Remacle, F., E-mail: fremacle@ulg.ac.be [Department of Chemistry, University of Liège, B4000 Liège (Belgium); The Fritz Haber Center for Molecular Dynamics and the Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-07-14

    A single electron dynamic memory is designed based on the non-equilibrium dynamics of charge states in electrostatically defined metallic quantum dots. Using the orthodox theory for computing the transfer rates and a master equation, we model the dynamical response of devices consisting of a charge sensor coupled to either a single and or a double quantum dot subjected to a pulsed gate voltage. We show that transition rates between charge states in metallic quantum dots are characterized by an asymmetry that can be controlled by the gate voltage. This effect is more pronounced when the switching between charge states corresponds to a Markovian process involving electron transport through a chain of several quantum dots. By simulating the dynamics of electron transport we demonstrate that the quantum box operates as a finite-state machine that can be addressed by choosing suitable shapes and switching rates of the gate pulses. We further show that writing times in the ns range and retention memory times six orders of magnitude longer, in the ms range, can be achieved on the double quantum dot system using experimentally feasible parameters, thereby demonstrating that the device can operate as a dynamic single electron memory.

  8. Chiral crossover transition in a finite volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Jia, Wenbao; Sun, An; Zhang, Liping; Zong, Hongshi

    2018-02-01

    Finite volume effects on the chiral crossover transition of strong interactions at finite temperature are studied by solving the quark gap equation within a cubic volume of finite size L. With the anti-periodic boundary condition, our calculation shows the chiral quark condensate, which characterizes the strength of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, decreases as L decreases below 2.5 fm. We further study the finite volume effects on the pseudo-transition temperature {T}{{c}} of the crossover, showing a significant decrease in {T}{{c}} as L decreases below 3 fm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475085, 11535005, 11690030, 51405027), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (020414380074), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591808) and Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment & Technology in Huazhong University of Science & Technology (DMETKF2015015)

  9. Finite-Time Adaptive Synchronization of a New Hyperchaotic System with Uncertain Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a finite-time adaptive synchronization strategy for a class of new hyperchaotic systems with unknown slave system’s parameters. Based on the finite-time stability theory, an adaptive control law is derived to make the states of the new hyperchaotic systems synchronized in finite-time. Numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed finite time synchronization scheme.

  10. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalewicz, Vladimír

    1991-04-01

    We show that there are no non-Boolean block-finite orthomodular posets possessing a unital set of Jauch-Piron states. Thus, an orthomodular poset representing a quantum physical system must have infinitely many blocks.

  11. Method and system employing finite state machine modeling to identify one of a plurality of different electric load types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Yang, Yi; Harley, Ronald Gordon; Habetler, Thomas G.; He, Dawei

    2016-08-09

    A system is for a plurality of different electric load types. The system includes a plurality of sensors structured to sense a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; and a processor. The processor acquires a voltage and current waveform from the sensors for a corresponding one of the different electric load types; calculates a power or current RMS profile of the waveform; quantizes the power or current RMS profile into a set of quantized state-values; evaluates a state-duration for each of the quantized state-values; evaluates a plurality of state-types based on the power or current RMS profile and the quantized state-values; generates a state-sequence that describes a corresponding finite state machine model of a generalized load start-up or transient profile for the corresponding electric load type; and identifies the corresponding electric load type.

  12. Finite-Temperature Variational Monte Carlo Method for Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Kensaku; Ido, Kota; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    A new computational method for finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated electrons is proposed by extending the variational Monte Carlo method originally developed for the ground state. The method is based on the path integral in the imaginary-time formulation, starting from the infinite-temperature state that is well approximated by a small number of certain random initial states. Lower temperatures are progressively reached by the imaginary-time evolution. The algorithm follows the framework of the quantum transfer matrix and finite-temperature Lanczos methods, but we extend them to treat much larger system sizes without the negative sign problem by optimizing the truncated Hilbert space on the basis of the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). This optimization algorithm is equivalent to the stochastic reconfiguration (SR) method that has been frequently used for the ground state to optimally truncate the Hilbert space. The obtained finite-temperature states allow an interpretation based on the thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state instead of the conventional canonical-ensemble average. Our method is tested for the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models and its accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated.

  13. When Darwin meets Lorenz: Evolving new chaotic attractors through genetic programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Indranil; Das, Saptarshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •New 3D continuous time chaotic systems with analytical expressions are obtained. •The multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP) paradigm is employed to achieve this. •Extends earlier works for evolving generalised family of Lorenz attractors. •Over one hundred of new chaotic attractors along with their parameters are reported. •The MGGP method have the potential for finding other similar chaotic attractors. -- Abstract: In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatically finding new chaotic attractors through a computational intelligence technique known as multi-gene genetic programming (MGGP). We apply this technique to the case of the Lorenz attractor and evolve several new chaotic attractors based on the basic Lorenz template. The MGGP algorithm automatically finds new nonlinear expressions for the different state variables starting from the original Lorenz system. The Lyapunov exponents of each of the attractors are calculated numerically based on the time series of the state variables using time delay embedding techniques. The MGGP algorithm tries to search the functional space of the attractors by aiming to maximise the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of the evolved attractors. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology, we report over one hundred new chaotic attractor structures along with their parameters, which are evolved from just the Lorenz system alone

  14. Robust filtering and prediction for systems with embedded finite-state Markov-Chain dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    This research developed new methodologies for the design of robust near-optimal filters/predictors for a class of system models that exhibit embedded finite-state Markov-chain dynamics. These methodologies are developed through the concepts and methods of stochastic model building (including time-series analysis), game theory, decision theory, and filtering/prediction for linear dynamic systems. The methodology is based on the relationship between the robustness of a class of time-series models and quantization which is applied to the time series as part of the model identification process. This relationship is exploited by utilizing the concept of an equivalence, through invariance of spectra, between the class of Markov-chain models and the class of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models. This spectral equivalence permits a straightforward implementation of the desirable robust properties of the Markov-chain approximation in a class of models which may be applied in linear-recursive form in a linear Kalman filter/predictor structure. The linear filter/predictor structure is shown to provide asymptotically optimal estimates of states which represent one or more integrations of the Markov-chain state. The development of a new saddle-point theorem for a game based on the Markov-chain model structure gives rise to a technique for determining a worst case Markov-chain process, upon which a robust filter/predictor design if based

  15. Using a satisfiability solver to identify deterministic finite state automata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heule, M.J.H.; Verwer, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present an exact algorithm for identification of deterministic finite automata (DFA) which is based on satisfiability (SAT) solvers. Despite the size of the low level SAT representation, our approach seems to be competitive with alternative techniques. Our contributions are threefold: First, we

  16. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B

    2004-01-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates

  17. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huanmei [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Sharp, Gregory C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Salzberg, Betty [College of Computer and Information Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kaeli, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2004-12-07

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  18. Electronic states of on- and off-center donors in quantum rings of finite width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R.P.A.; Amado, M.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic states of a hydrogenic donor in two-dimensional quantum rings are calculated by taking into account the finite width of the potential well in the ring. In addition, a strong magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the quantum ring. Using the effective-mass approximation at the Γ valley, the radial Hamiltonian for the envelope-function is exactly diagonalized in the case of on-center donors. The corresponding energy levels for different angular momenta are studied as a function of the applied magnetic field. In the case of off-center donors, a perturbation approach is considered and its limitations are discussed. Finally, we calculate the absorption spectra and oscillator strength for different intraband transitions, specifically for on-center donors

  19. Evolvement simulation of the probability of neutron-initiating persistent fission chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhe; Hong Zhenying

    2014-01-01

    Background: Probability of neutron-initiating persistent fission chain, which has to be calculated in analysis of critical safety, start-up of reactor, burst waiting time on pulse reactor, bursting time on pulse reactor, etc., is an inherent parameter in a multiplying assembly. Purpose: We aim to derive time-dependent integro-differential equation for such probability in relative velocity space according to the probability conservation, and develop the deterministic code Dynamic Segment Number Probability (DSNP) based on the multi-group S N method. Methods: The reliable convergence of dynamic calculation was analyzed and numerical simulation of the evolvement process of dynamic probability for varying concentration was performed under different initial conditions. Results: On Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Bare Spheres, when the time is long enough, the results of dynamic calculation approach to those of static calculation. The most difference of such results between DSNP and Partisn code is less than 2%. On Baker model, over the range of about 1 μs after the first criticality, the most difference between the dynamic and static calculation is about 300%. As for a super critical system, the finite fission chains decrease and the persistent fission chains increase as the reactivity aggrandizes, the dynamic evolvement curve of initiation probability is close to the static curve within the difference of 5% when the K eff is more than 1.2. The cumulative probability curve also indicates that the difference of integral results between the dynamic calculation and the static calculation decreases from 35% to 5% as the K eff increases. This demonstrated that the ability of initiating a self-sustaining fission chain reaction approaches stabilization, while the former difference (35%) showed the important difference of the dynamic results near the first criticality with the static ones. The DSNP code agrees well with Partisn code. Conclusions: There are large numbers of

  20. The discretized Schroedinger equation for the finite square well and its relationship to solid-state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boykin, Timothy B; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The discretized Schroedinger equation is most often used to solve one-dimensional quantum mechanics problems numerically. While it has been recognized for some time that this equation is equivalent to a simple tight-binding model and that the discretization imposes an underlying bandstructure unlike free-space quantum mechanics on the problem, the physical implications of this equivalence largely have been unappreciated and the pedagogical advantages accruing from presenting the problem as one of solid-state physics (and not numerics) remain generally unexplored. This is especially true for the analytically solvable discretized finite square well presented here. There are profound differences in the physics of this model and its continuous-space counterpart which are direct consequences of the imposed bandstructure. For example, in the discrete model the number of bound states plus transmission resonances equals the number of atoms in the quantum well

  1. From Finite Time to Finite Physical Dimensions Thermodynamics: The Carnot Engine and Onsager's Relations Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feidt, Michel; Costea, Monica

    2018-04-01

    Many works have been devoted to finite time thermodynamics since the Curzon and Ahlborn [1] contribution, which is generally considered as its origin. Nevertheless, previous works in this domain have been revealed [2], [3], and recently, results of the attempt to correlate Finite Time Thermodynamics with Linear Irreversible Thermodynamics according to Onsager's theory were reported [4]. The aim of the present paper is to extend and improve the approach relative to thermodynamic optimization of generic objective functions of a Carnot engine with linear response regime presented in [4]. The case study of the Carnot engine is revisited within the steady state hypothesis, when non-adiabaticity of the system is considered, and heat loss is accounted for by an overall heat leak between the engine heat reservoirs. The optimization is focused on the main objective functions connected to engineering conditions, namely maximum efficiency or power output, except the one relative to entropy that is more fundamental. Results given in reference [4] relative to the maximum power output and minimum entropy production as objective function are reconsidered and clarified, and the change from finite time to finite physical dimension was shown to be done by the heat flow rate at the source. Our modeling has led to new results of the Carnot engine optimization and proved that the primary interest for an engineer is mainly connected to what we called Finite Physical Dimensions Optimal Thermodynamics.

  2. OBSERVATION OF UNIVERSALITY IN THE GENERALIZED SIMILARITY OF EVOLVING SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE AS SEEN BY ULYSSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.; Leonardis, E.; Kiyani, K.; Carbone, V.

    2009-01-01

    We perform statistical analysis of the fluctuating magnetic field observed in-situ by the Ulysses spacecraft, from the perspective of quantitative characterization of the evolving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We focus on two successive polar passes around solar minimum which provide extended intervals of quiet, fast solar wind at a range of radial distances and latitudes: the south polar pass of 1994 and the north polar pass of 1995. Fully developed inertial range turbulence has a characteristic statistical similarity property of quantities that characterize the flow, such as the magnetic field components B k (t), so that the pth moment of fluctuations has power-law dependence on scale τ such that k (t + τ) - B k (t)| p > ∼ τ ζ(p) . We instead find a generalized similarity k (t + τ) - B k (t)| p > ∼ g(τ/τ 0 ) ζ(p) consistent with extended self-similarity; and in particular all of these Ulysses observations, from both polar passes, share the same single function g(τ/τ 0 ). If these observations are indeed characteristic of MHD turbulence evolving in-situ, then this quantifies for the first time a key aspect of the universal nature of evolving MHD turbulence in a system of finite size, with implications both for theoretical development, and for our understanding of the evolving solar wind.

  3. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapliyal, Kishore, E-mail: tkishore36@yahoo.com [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida, UP-201307 (India); Banerjee, Subhashish, E-mail: subhashish@iitj.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, Jodhpur 342011 (India); Pathak, Anirban, E-mail: anirban.pathak@gmail.com [Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, A-10, Sector-62, Noida, UP-201307 (India)

    2016-03-15

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them. -- Highlights: •Tomograms are constructed for open quantum systems. •Finite and infinite dimensional quantum systems are studied. •Finite dimensional systems (phase states, single & two qubit spin states) are studied. •A dissipative harmonic oscillator is considered as an infinite dimensional system. •Both pure dephasing as well as dissipation effects are studied.

  4. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them. -- Highlights: •Tomograms are constructed for open quantum systems. •Finite and infinite dimensional quantum systems are studied. •Finite dimensional systems (phase states, single & two qubit spin states) are studied. •A dissipative harmonic oscillator is considered as an infinite dimensional system. •Both pure dephasing as well as dissipation effects are studied.

  5. Review of Tomographic Imaging using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fua’ad RAHMAT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many types of techniques for process tomography were proposed and developed during the past 20 years. This paper review the techniques and the current state of knowledge and experience on the subject, aimed at highlighting the problems associated with the non finite element methods, such as the ill posed, ill conditioned which relates to the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements. In this paper, considerations for choice of sensors and its applications were outlined and descriptions of non finite element tomography systems were presented. The finite element method tomography system as obtained from recent works, suitable for process control and measurement were also presented.

  6. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed.

  7. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Nicola; Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults.

  8. Risk factors which cause senile cataract evolvement: outline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Bragin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of natural ageing processes including those caused by multiple external factors has been attracting re-searchers' attention over the last years. Senile cataract is a multi-factor disease. Expenditure on cataract surgery remain one of the greatest expenses items in public health care. Age is a basic factor which causes senile cataract. Morbidity with cataract doubles each 10 years of life. This outline considers some literature sources which describe research results on influence exerted on cataract evolvement by such risk factors as age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol intake, pancreatic diabetes, intake of certain medications, a number of environmental factors including ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. mane of these factors are shown to increase or reduce senile cataract risk; there are conflicting data on certain factors. The outline also contains quantitative characteristics of cataract risks which are given via odds relation and evolve due to age parameters impacts, alcohol intake, ionizing radiation, etc. The authors also state that still there is no answer to the question whether dose-effect relationship for cataract evolvement is a threshold or non-threshold.

  9. Preface: evolving rotifers, evolving science: Proceedings of the XIV International Rotifer Symposium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Devetter, Miloslav; Fontaneto, D.; Jersabek, Ch.D.; Welch, D.B.M.; May, L.; Walsh, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 796, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-6 ISSN 0018-8158 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : evolving rotifers * 14th International Rotifer Symposium * evolving science Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  10. Finite-Time Stabilization and Adaptive Control of Memristor-Based Delayed Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Guodong

    Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.

  11. Modelling and finite-time stability analysis of psoriasis pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Harshal B.; Pandey, Rakesh; Roper, Daniel; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Spurgeon, Sarah K.; Goodfellow, Marc

    2017-08-01

    A new systems model of psoriasis is presented and analysed from the perspective of control theory. Cytokines are treated as actuators to the plant model that govern the cell population under the reasonable assumption that cytokine dynamics are faster than the cell population dynamics. The analysis of various equilibria is undertaken based on singular perturbation theory. Finite-time stability and stabilisation have been studied in various engineering applications where the principal paradigm uses non-Lipschitz functions of the states. A comprehensive study of the finite-time stability properties of the proposed psoriasis dynamics is carried out. It is demonstrated that the dynamics are finite-time convergent to certain equilibrium points rather than asymptotically or exponentially convergent. This feature of finite-time convergence motivates the development of a modified version of the Michaelis-Menten function, frequently used in biology. This framework is used to model cytokines as fast finite-time actuators.

  12. Clustering impact regime with shocks in freely evolving granular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2017-06-01

    A freely cooling granular gas without any external force evolves from the initial homogeneous state to the inhomogeneous clustering state, at which the energy decay deviates from the Haff's law. The asymptotic behavior of energy in the inelastic hard sphere model have been predicted by several theories, which are based on the mode coupling theory or extension of inelastic hard rods gas. In this study, we revisited the clustering regime of freely evolving granular gas via large-scale molecular dynamics simulation with up to 16.7 million inelastic hard disks. We found novel regime regarding on collisions between "clusters" spontaneously appearing after clustering regime, which can only be identified more than a few million particles system. The volumetric dilatation pattern of semicircular shape originated from density shock propagation are well characterized on the appearing of "cluster impact" during the aggregation process of clusters.

  13. Three nonlinear performance relationships in the start-up state of IPMC strips based on finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Han Min; Ding, Qing Jun; Hui, Yao; Li, Hua Feng; Zhao, Chun Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMC) are a class of electroactive polymers (EAP), and they currently attract numerous researchers to study their performance characteristics and applications. However, research on its start-up characteristics still requires more attention. In the IPMC start-up state (the moment of applying an actuation voltage at the very beginning), its mechanical performance is different in the stable working state (working for at least 10 min). Therefore, this paper focuses on three performance relationships of an IPMC strip between its maximal tip deformation and voltage, its maximal stress and voltage, as well as its maximal strain and voltage, both in the two states. Different from other reports, we found that they present nonlinear tendencies in the start-up state rather than linear ones. Therefore, based on the equivalent bimorph beam model, a finite element electromechanical coupling calculation module in the ANSYS software was utilized to simulate these characteristics. Furthermore, a test system is introduced to validate the phenomena. As a whole, these three relationships and the FEA method may be beneficial for providing control strategies effectively to IPMC actuators, especially in their start-up states

  14. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-01

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of ℎ. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  15. Finite element analysis of metallurgical phase transformations in AA 6056-T4 and their effects upon the residual stress and distortion states of a laser welded T-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad; Nelias, Daniel; Jullien, Jean-Francois; Boitout, Frederic; Dischert, Luc; Noe, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft industry makes extensive use of aluminium alloy AA 6056-T4 in the fabrication of fuselage panels using laser beam welding technique. Since high temperatures are involved in the manufacturing process, the precipitation/dissolution occurrences are expected as solid state phase transformations. These transformations are likely to affect the residual distortion and stress states of the component. The present work investigates the effect of metallurgical phase transformations upon the residual stresses and distortions induced by laser beam welding in a T-joint configuration using the finite element method. Two separate models were studied using different finite element codes, where the first one describes a thermo-mechanical analysis using Abaqus; while the second one discusses a thermo-metallo-mechanical analysis using Sysweld. A comparative analysis of experimentally validated finite element models has been performed and the residual stress states with and without the metallurgical phase transformations are predicted. The results show that the inclusion of phase transformations has a negligible effect on predicted distortions, which are in agreement with the experimental data, but an effect on predicted residual stresses, although the experimentally measured residual stresses are not available to support the analyses.

  16. Clifford algebra in finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-12-01

    We consider the most general power counting renormalizable and gauge invariant Lagrangean density L invariant with respect to some non-Abelian, compact, and semisimple gauge group G. The particle content of this quantum field theory consists of gauge vector bosons, real scalar bosons, fermions, and ghost fields. We assume that the ultimate grand unified theory needs no cutoff. This yields so-called finiteness conditions, resulting from the demand for finite physical quantities calculated by the bare Lagrangean. In lower loop order, necessary conditions for finiteness are thus vanishing beta functions for dimensionless couplings. The complexity of the finiteness conditions for a general quantum field theory makes the discussion of non-supersymmetric theories rather cumbersome. Recently, the F = 1 class of finite quantum field theories has been proposed embracing all supersymmetric theories. A special type of F = 1 theories proposed turns out to have Yukawa couplings which are equivalent to generators of a Clifford algebra representation. These algebraic structures are remarkable all the more than in the context of a well-known conjecture which states that finiteness is maybe related to global symmetries (such as supersymmetry) of the Lagrangean density. We can prove that supersymmetric theories can never be of this Clifford-type. It turns out that these Clifford algebra representations found recently are a consequence of certain invariances of the finiteness conditions resulting from a vanishing of the renormalization group β-function for the Yukawa couplings. We are able to exclude almost all such Clifford-like theories. (author)

  17. Dynamic properties of epidemic spreading on finite size complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Yang; Shan, Xiu-Ming; Ren, Yong; Jiao, Jian; Qiu, Ben

    2005-11-01

    The Internet presents a complex topological structure, on which computer viruses can easily spread. By using theoretical analysis and computer simulation methods, the dynamic process of disease spreading on finite size networks with complex topological structure is investigated. On the finite size networks, the spreading process of SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) model is a finite Markov chain with an absorbing state. Two parameters, the survival probability and the conditional infecting probability, are introduced to describe the dynamic properties of disease spreading on finite size networks. Our results can help understanding computer virus epidemics and other spreading phenomena on communication and social networks. Also, knowledge about the dynamic character of virus spreading is helpful for adopting immunity policy.

  18. Symmetry Reduction in Infinite Games with Finite Branching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Nicolas; Vester, Steen

    2014-01-01

    infinite-state games on graphs with finite branching where the objectives of the players can be very general. As particular applications, it is shown that the technique can be applied to reduce the state space in parity games as well as when doing modelchecking of the Alternating-time temporal logic ATL....

  19. Finite dipolar hexagonal columns on piled layers of triangular lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Katsuyoshi; Sugano, Ryoko; Kuroda, Akiyoshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Takayama, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated, by the Monte Carlo simulation, spin systems which represent moments of arrayed magnetic nanoparticles interacting with each other only by the dipole-dipole interaction. In the present paper we aim the understanding of finite size effects on the magnetic nanoparticles arrayed in hexagonal columns cut out from the close-packing structures or from those with uniaxial compression. In columns with the genuine close-packing structures, we observe a single vortex state which is also observed previously in finite two-dimensional systems. On the other hand in the system with the inter-layer distance set 1/2 times of the close-packing one, we found ground states which depend on the number of layers. The dependence is induced by a finite size effect and is related to a orientation transition in the corresponding bulk system

  20. Cook-Levin Theorem Algorithmic-Reducibility/Completeness = Wilson Renormalization-(Semi)-Group Fixed-Points; ``Noise''-Induced Phase-Transitions (NITs) to Accelerate Algorithmics (``NIT-Picking'') REPLACING CRUTCHES!!!: Models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Frederic; Siegel, Edward

    Cook-Levin theorem theorem algorithmic computational-complexity(C-C) algorithmic-equivalence reducibility/completeness equivalence to renormalization-(semi)-group phase-transitions critical-phenomena statistical-physics universality-classes fixed-points, is exploited via Siegel FUZZYICS =CATEGORYICS = ANALOGYICS =PRAGMATYICS/CATEGORY-SEMANTICS ONTOLOGY COGNITION ANALYTICS-Aristotle ``square-of-opposition'' tabular list-format truth-table matrix analytics predicts and implements ''noise''-induced phase-transitions (NITs) to accelerate versus to decelerate Harel [Algorithmics (1987)]-Sipser[Intro.Thy. Computation(`97)] algorithmic C-C: ''NIT-picking''(!!!), to optimize optimization-problems optimally(OOPO). Versus iso-''noise'' power-spectrum quantitative-only amplitude/magnitude-only variation stochastic-resonance, ''NIT-picking'' is ''noise'' power-spectrum QUALitative-type variation via quantitative critical-exponents variation. Computer-''science''/SEANCE algorithmic C-C models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models, finite-automata,..., discrete-maths graph-theory equivalence to physics Feynman-diagrams are identified as early-days once-workable valid but limiting IMPEDING CRUTCHES(!!!), ONLY IMPEDE latter-days new-insights!!!

  1. Finite Element Method in Machining Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Markopoulos, Angelos P

    2013-01-01

    Finite Element Method in Machining Processes provides a concise study on the way the Finite Element Method (FEM) is used in the case of manufacturing processes, primarily in machining. The basics of this kind of modeling are detailed to create a reference that will provide guidelines for those who start to study this method now, but also for scientists already involved in FEM and want to expand their research. A discussion on FEM, formulations and techniques currently in use is followed up by machining case studies. Orthogonal cutting, oblique cutting, 3D simulations for turning and milling, grinding, and state-of-the-art topics such as high speed machining and micromachining are explained with relevant examples. This is all supported by a literature review and a reference list for further study. As FEM is a key method for researchers in the manufacturing and especially in the machining sector, Finite Element Method in Machining Processes is a key reference for students studying manufacturing processes but al...

  2. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  3. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  4. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element's gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element's performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element's behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties

  5. Topological Design for Acoustic-Structure Interaction Problems with a Mixed Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    to subdomain interfaces evolving during the optimization process. In this paper, we propose to use a mixed finite element formulation with displacements and pressure as primary variables (u/p formulation) which eliminates the need for explicit boundary representation. In order to describe the Helmholtz...... equation and the linear elasticity equation, the mass density as well as the shear and bulk moduli are interpolated with the design variables. In this formulation, the coupled interface boundary conditions are automatically satisfied without having to compute surface coupling integrals. Two dimensional...

  6. Solving the Einstein constraint equations on multi-block triangulations using finite element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, Oleg; Pazos, Enrique [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Aksoylu, Burak [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Holst, Michael [Department of Mathematics, University of California at San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093-0112 (United States); Tiglio, Manuel [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2009-07-21

    In order to generate initial data for nonlinear relativistic simulations, one needs to solve the Einstein constraints, which can be cast into a coupled set of nonlinear elliptic equations. Here we present an approach for solving these equations on three-dimensional multi-block domains using finite element methods. We illustrate our approach on a simple example of Brill wave initial data, with the constraints reducing to a single linear elliptic equation for the conformal factor psi. We use quadratic Lagrange elements on semi-structured simplicial meshes, obtained by triangulation of multi-block grids. In the case of uniform refinement the scheme is superconvergent at most mesh vertices, due to local symmetry of the finite element basis with respect to local spatial inversions. We show that in the superconvergent case subsequent unstructured mesh refinements do not improve the quality of our initial data. As proof of concept that this approach is feasible for generating multi-block initial data in three dimensions, after constructing the initial data we evolve them in time using a high-order finite-differencing multi-block approach and extract the gravitational waves from the numerical solution.

  7. Solving the Einstein constraint equations on multi-block triangulations using finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, Oleg; Pazos, Enrique; Aksoylu, Burak; Holst, Michael; Tiglio, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    In order to generate initial data for nonlinear relativistic simulations, one needs to solve the Einstein constraints, which can be cast into a coupled set of nonlinear elliptic equations. Here we present an approach for solving these equations on three-dimensional multi-block domains using finite element methods. We illustrate our approach on a simple example of Brill wave initial data, with the constraints reducing to a single linear elliptic equation for the conformal factor ψ. We use quadratic Lagrange elements on semi-structured simplicial meshes, obtained by triangulation of multi-block grids. In the case of uniform refinement the scheme is superconvergent at most mesh vertices, due to local symmetry of the finite element basis with respect to local spatial inversions. We show that in the superconvergent case subsequent unstructured mesh refinements do not improve the quality of our initial data. As proof of concept that this approach is feasible for generating multi-block initial data in three dimensions, after constructing the initial data we evolve them in time using a high-order finite-differencing multi-block approach and extract the gravitational waves from the numerical solution.

  8. A stochastic-field description of finite-size spiking neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Grégory; Payeur, Alexandre; Longtin, André

    2017-08-01

    Neural network dynamics are governed by the interaction of spiking neurons. Stochastic aspects of single-neuron dynamics propagate up to the network level and shape the dynamical and informational properties of the population. Mean-field models of population activity disregard the finite-size stochastic fluctuations of network dynamics and thus offer a deterministic description of the system. Here, we derive a stochastic partial differential equation (SPDE) describing the temporal evolution of the finite-size refractory density, which represents the proportion of neurons in a given refractory state at any given time. The population activity-the density of active neurons per unit time-is easily extracted from this refractory density. The SPDE includes finite-size effects through a two-dimensional Gaussian white noise that acts both in time and along the refractory dimension. For an infinite number of neurons the standard mean-field theory is recovered. A discretization of the SPDE along its characteristic curves allows direct simulations of the activity of large but finite spiking networks; this constitutes the main advantage of our approach. Linearizing the SPDE with respect to the deterministic asynchronous state allows the theoretical investigation of finite-size activity fluctuations. In particular, analytical expressions for the power spectrum and autocorrelation of activity fluctuations are obtained. Moreover, our approach can be adapted to incorporate multiple interacting populations and quasi-renewal single-neuron dynamics.

  9. Analytical realization of finite-size scaling for Anderson localization. Does the band of critical states exist for d > 2?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslov, I. M.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical realization is suggested for the finite-size scaling algorithm based on the consideration of auxiliary quasi-1D systems. Comparison of the obtained analytical results with the results of numerical calculations indicates that the Anderson transition point splits into the band of critical states. This conclusion is supported by direct numerical evidence (Edwards, Thouless, 1972; Last, Thouless, 1974; Schreiber, 1985). The possibility of restoring the conventional picture still exists but requires a radical reinterpretation of the raw numerical data

  10. Leading relativistic corrections for atomic P states calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Bralin, Amir; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2018-01-01

    In this work we report progress in the development and implementation of quantum-mechanical methods for calculating bound ground and excited states of small atomic systems. The work concerns singlet states with the L =1 total orbital angular momentum (P states). The method is based on the finite-nuclear-mass (non-Born-Oppenheimer; non-BO) approach and the use of all-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian functions for expanding the nonrelativistic wave function of the system. The development presented here includes derivation and implementation of algorithms for calculating the leading relativistic corrections for singlet states. The corrections are determined in the framework of the perturbation theory as expectation values of the corresponding effective operators using the non-BO wave functions. The method is tested in the calculations of the ten lowest 1P states of the helium atom and the four lowest 1P states of the beryllium atom.

  11. Fragmentation of giant dipole resonance at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that the main part of a width of a collective giant resonance built on the ground state in heavy nuclei is due to coupling of one-phonon vibrational states with more complex ones like two phonon or two-particle - two-hole. So it seems natural that the same idea was also explored in studying of the formation and dependence on temperature of a width of giant resonances built on a compound nuclear state. The first microscopic calculations of a giant dipole resonance width at finite temperature have demonstrated its weak dependence on T whereas the experimental width Γ exp strongly increases up to T≤3 MeV. The observed thermal behaviour of Γ exp was attributed mainly to thermal fluctuations of a nuclear shape at finite T . However, further theoretical studies of the problem have shown a strengthening of the GDR spreading with T. We calculate a fragmentation of the giant dipole resonance in hot spherical nuclei within the approach based on the quasiparticle-phonon model extended to finite temperature in with the formalism of thermofield dynamics. The fragmentation of collective giant dipole vibrations at finite T is due to the coupling with 'two-thermal phonon' configurations. The energies and structures of thermal phonon states are calculated from the thermal RPA temperature dependence of the variance σ th of a theoretical E1 strength function and the experimental GDR width Γ exp in 120 Sn. The coupling of thermal phonons is determined by their fermionic structure. The variance σ th of the E1 strength function is found continuously increasing with temperature. The main reason of this behavior is the coupling of the dipole phonons with very low-lying particle-particle (hole-hole) thermal phonons. These phonons are noncollective ones and they appear only at T≠0. The calculated T dependence of σ th is quite similar to that of the experimental width Γ exp in 120 Sn and 208 Pb

  12. State and regional systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials cooperation between international, regional and states safeguards organizations: An evolving issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández Moreno, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Cooperation between the IAEA, States and regional organizations is increasingly important to ensure effective accountancy and control of nuclear material in peaceful uses. The IAEA, SAGSI2 and institutions such INMM3 and ESARDA4 have recognized the relevance and the evolving role that SSAC5 and regional organizations play to this aim. In this context, it is important to take steps to ensure the effectiveness of the system and the optimal level of relationship between these organizations so as to maximize the benefits for each party, particularly in those cases where well developed systems exist. Moreover, expansion of nuclear energy requires concerted efforts towards building competence in safeguards in all relevant States. This is also important with respect to other aspects of nonproliferation. In this scenario there is agreement on the need to have effective state organizations that fulfill international safeguards and other security obligations. However, the roles and duties of SSAC and the possible scope of cooperation between the IAEA and SSAC are still under evolution. This paper discusses possible ways and means to build competence in safeguards and how the international community could be more proactive in establishing a framework including the various dimensions of the cooperation in safeguards and other security matters between all parties concerned. The establishment of a forum and a network of interested parties under the auspice of interested organizations could be one mechanism to exchange best practices and experiences. (authors)

  13. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  14. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Graves

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish

  15. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  16. Finite-Dimensional Representations for Controlled Diffusions with Delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, Salvatore, E-mail: salvatore.federico@unimi.it [Università di Milano, Dipartimento di Economia, Management e Metodi Quantitativi (Italy); Tankov, Peter, E-mail: tankov@math.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Université Paris Diderot, Laboratoire de Probabilités et Modèles Aléatoires (France)

    2015-02-15

    We study stochastic delay differential equations (SDDE) where the coefficients depend on the moving averages of the state process. As a first contribution, we provide sufficient conditions under which the solution of the SDDE and a linear path functional of it admit a finite-dimensional Markovian representation. As a second contribution, we show how approximate finite-dimensional Markovian representations may be constructed when these conditions are not satisfied, and provide an estimate of the error corresponding to these approximations. These results are applied to optimal control and optimal stopping problems for stochastic systems with delay.

  17. 8th conference on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This first volume of the proceedings of the 8th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Lille, June 2017) covers various topics including convergence and stability analysis, as well as investigations of these methods from the point of view of compatibility with physical principles. It collects together the focused invited papers comparing advanced numerical methods for Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations on a benchmark, as well as reviewed contributions from internationally leading researchers in the field of analysis of finite volume and related methods, offering a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation, and recent decades have brought significant advances in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including m...

  18. Advances in dynamic relaxation techniques for nonlinear finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, R.G.; Metzger, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Traditionally, the finite element technique has been applied to static and steady-state problems using implicit methods. When nonlinearities exist, equilibrium iterations must be performed using Newton-Raphson or quasi-Newton techniques at each load level. In the presence of complex geometry, nonlinear material behavior, and large relative sliding of material interfaces, solutions using implicit methods often become intractable. A dynamic relaxation algorithm is developed for inclusion in finite element codes. The explicit nature of the method avoids large computer memory requirements and makes possible the solution of large-scale problems. The method described approaches the steady-state solution with no overshoot, a problem which has plagued researchers in the past. The method is included in a general nonlinear finite element code. A description of the method along with a number of new applications involving geometric and material nonlinearities are presented. They include: (1) nonlinear geometric cantilever plate; (2) moment-loaded nonlinear beam; and (3) creep of nuclear fuel channel assemblies

  19. Finite-volume effects due to spatially non-local operators arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Monahan, Christopher J.

    Spatially non-local matrix elements are useful lattice-QCD observables in a variety of contexts, for example in determining hadron structure. To quote credible estimates of the systematic uncertainties in these calculations, one must understand, among other things, the size of the finite-volume effects when such matrix elements are extracted from numerical lattice calculations. In this work, we estimate finite-volume effects for matrix elements of non-local operators, composed of two currents displaced in a spatial direction by a distance $\\xi$. We find that the finite-volume corrections depend on the details of the matrix element. If the external state is the lightest degree of freedom in the theory, e.g.~the pion in QCD, then the volume corrections scale as $ e^{-m_\\pi (L- \\xi)} $, where $m_\\pi$ is the mass of the light state. For heavier external states the usual $e^{- m_\\pi L}$ form is recovered, but with a polynomial prefactor of the form $L^m/|L - \\xi|^n$ that can lead to enhanced volume effects. These ...

  20. Thermo field dynamics: a quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, F.; Marinaro, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of the theory of thermo field dynamics (TFD) is presented. TFD is introduced and developed by Umezawa and his coworkers at finite temperature. The most significant concept in TFD is that of a thermal vacuum which satisfies some conditions denoted as thermal state conditions. The TFD permits to reformulate theories at finite temperature. There is no need in an additional principle to determine particle distributions at T ≠ 0. Temperature and other macroscopic parameters are introduced in the definition of the vacuum state. All operator formalisms used in quantum field theory at T=0 are preserved, although the field degrees of freedom are doubled. 8 refs

  1. Theory of finite-entanglement scaling at one-dimensional quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Frank; Mukerjee, Subroto; Turner, Ari M; Moore, Joel E

    2009-06-26

    Studies of entanglement in many-particle systems suggest that most quantum critical ground states have infinitely more entanglement than noncritical states. Standard algorithms for one-dimensional systems construct model states with limited entanglement, which are a worse approximation to quantum critical states than to others. We give a quantitative theory of previously observed scaling behavior resulting from finite entanglement at quantum criticality. Finite-entanglement scaling in one-dimensional systems is governed not by the scaling dimension of an operator but by the "central charge" of the critical point. An important ingredient is the universal distribution of density-matrix eigenvalues at a critical point [P. Calabrese and A. Lefevre, Phys. Rev. A 78, 032329 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevA.78.032329]. The parameter-free theory is checked against numerical scaling at several quantum critical points.

  2. Quantum control of finite-time disentanglement in qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Mazhar

    2009-07-13

    This thesis is a theoretical study of entanglement dynamics and its control of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems. In particular, we focus on the decay of entanglement of quantum states interacting with dissipative environments. Qubit-qubit entanglement may vanish suddenly while interacting with statistically independent vacuum reservoirs. Such finite- time disentanglement is called sudden death of entanglement (ESD). We investigate entanglement sudden death of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems interacting with statistically independent reservoirs at zero- and finite-temperature. It is shown that for zero-temperature reservoirs, some entangled states exhibit sudden death while others lose their entanglement only after infinite time. Thus, there are two possible routes of entanglement decay, namely sudden death and asymptotic decay. We demonstrate that starting with an initial condition which leads to finite-time disentanglement, we can alter the future course of entanglement by local unitary actions. In other words, it is possible to put the quantum states on other track of decay once they are on a particular route of decay. We show that one can accelerate or delay sudden death. However, there is a critical time such that if local actions are taken before that critical time then sudden death can be delayed to infinity. Any local unitary action taken after that critical time can only accelerate or delay sudden death. In finite-temperature reservoirs, we demonstrate that a whole class of entangled states exhibit sudden death. This conclusion is valid if at least one of the reservoirs is at finite-temperature. However, we show that we can still hasten or delay sudden death by local unitary transformations up to some finite time. We also study sudden death for qubit-qutrit systems. Similar to qubit-qubit systems, some states exhibit sudden death while others do not. However, the process of disentanglement can be effected due to existence of quantum interference

  3. Quantum control of finite-time disentanglement in qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Mazhar

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of entanglement dynamics and its control of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems. In particular, we focus on the decay of entanglement of quantum states interacting with dissipative environments. Qubit-qubit entanglement may vanish suddenly while interacting with statistically independent vacuum reservoirs. Such finite- time disentanglement is called sudden death of entanglement (ESD). We investigate entanglement sudden death of qubit-qubit and qubit-qutrit systems interacting with statistically independent reservoirs at zero- and finite-temperature. It is shown that for zero-temperature reservoirs, some entangled states exhibit sudden death while others lose their entanglement only after infinite time. Thus, there are two possible routes of entanglement decay, namely sudden death and asymptotic decay. We demonstrate that starting with an initial condition which leads to finite-time disentanglement, we can alter the future course of entanglement by local unitary actions. In other words, it is possible to put the quantum states on other track of decay once they are on a particular route of decay. We show that one can accelerate or delay sudden death. However, there is a critical time such that if local actions are taken before that critical time then sudden death can be delayed to infinity. Any local unitary action taken after that critical time can only accelerate or delay sudden death. In finite-temperature reservoirs, we demonstrate that a whole class of entangled states exhibit sudden death. This conclusion is valid if at least one of the reservoirs is at finite-temperature. However, we show that we can still hasten or delay sudden death by local unitary transformations up to some finite time. We also study sudden death for qubit-qutrit systems. Similar to qubit-qubit systems, some states exhibit sudden death while others do not. However, the process of disentanglement can be effected due to existence of quantum interference

  4. Reexamination of optimal quantum state estimation of pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Horibe, M.

    2005-01-01

    A direct derivation is given for the optimal mean fidelity of quantum state estimation of a d-dimensional unknown pure state with its N copies given as input, which was first obtained by Hayashi in terms of an infinite set of covariant positive operator valued measures (POVM's) and by Bruss and Macchiavello establishing a connection to optimal quantum cloning. An explicit condition for POVM measurement operators for optimal estimators is obtained, by which we construct optimal estimators with finite POVMs using exact quadratures on a hypersphere. These finite optimal estimators are not generally universal, where universality means the fidelity is independent of input states. However, any optimal estimator with finite POVM for M(>N) copies is universal if it is used for N copies as input

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of evolved objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.K.; Roche, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    In this review, the authors are concerned with spectroscopic observations of evolved objects made in the wavelength range 1-300μm. Spectroscopic observations can conveniently be divided into studies of narrow lines, bands and broader continua. The vibrational frequencies of molecular groups fall mainly in this spectral region and appear as vibration-rotation bands from the gas phase, and as less structured, but often broader, features from the solid state. Many ionic lines, including recombination lines of abundant species and fine structure lines of astrophysically important ions also appear in this region. The continuum can arise from a number of mechanisms - photospheric emission, radiation from dust, free-free transitions in ionized gas and non-thermal processes. (Auth.)

  6. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  7. Investigation of faulted tunnel models by combined photoelasticity and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping

    1994-01-01

    Models of square and circular tunnels with short faults cutting through their surfaces are investigated by photoelasticity. These models, when duplicated by finite element analysis can predict the stress states of square or circular faulted tunnels adequately. Finite element analysis, using gap elements, may be used to investigate full size faulted tunnel system

  8. Finite-time stabilization for a class of nonholonomic feedforward systems subject to inputs saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fangzheng; Yuan, Ye; Wu, Yuqiang

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the problem of finite-time stabilization by state feedback for a class of uncertain nonholonomic systems in feedforward-like form subject to inputs saturation. Under the weaker homogeneous condition on systems growth, a saturated finite-time control scheme is developed by exploiting the adding a power integrator method, the homogeneous domination approach and the nested saturation technique. Together with a novel switching control strategy, the designed saturated controller guarantees that the states of closed-loop system are regulated to zero in a finite time without violation of the constraint. As an application of the proposed theoretical results, the problem of saturated finite-time control for vertical wheel on rotating table is solved. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PLANS; a finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 2: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifko, A.; Armen, H., Jr.; Levy, A.; Levine, H.

    1977-01-01

    The PLANS system, rather than being one comprehensive computer program, is a collection of finite element programs used for the nonlinear analysis of structures. This collection of programs evolved and is based on the organizational philosophy in which classes of analyses are treated individually based on the physical problem class to be analyzed. Each of the independent finite element computer programs of PLANS, with an associated element library, can be individually loaded and used to solve the problem class of interest. A number of programs have been developed for material nonlinear behavior alone and for combined geometric and material nonlinear behavior. The usage, capabilities, and element libraries of the current programs include: (1) plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant, (2) three dimensional elastic-plastic analysis, (3) plastic analysis of bodies of revolution, and (4) material and geometric nonlinear analysis of built-up structures.

  10. A Riemann-Hilbert formulation for the finite temperature Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaglià, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Università di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Cornagliotto, Martina [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Università di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); DESY Hamburg, Theory Group,Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Mattelliano, Massimo; Tateo, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Università di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-03

    Inspired by recent results in the context of AdS/CFT integrability, we reconsider the Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations describing the 1D fermionic Hubbard model at finite temperature. We prove that the infinite set of TBA equations are equivalent to a simple nonlinear Riemann-Hilbert problem for a finite number of unknown functions. The latter can be transformed into a set of three coupled nonlinear integral equations defined over a finite support, which can be easily solved numerically. We discuss the emergence of an exact Bethe Ansatz and the link between the TBA approach and the results by Jüttner, Klümper and Suzuki based on the Quantum Transfer Matrix method. We also comment on the analytic continuation mechanism leading to excited states and on the mirror equations describing the finite-size Hubbard model with twisted boundary conditions.

  11. Distributed finite-time containment control for double-integrator multiagent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Li, Shihua; Shi, Peng

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the distributed finite-time containment control problem for double-integrator multiagent systems with multiple leaders and external disturbances is discussed. In the presence of multiple dynamic leaders, by utilizing the homogeneous control technique, a distributed finite-time observer is developed for the followers to estimate the weighted average of the leaders' velocities at first. Then, based on the estimates and the generalized adding a power integrator approach, distributed finite-time containment control algorithms are designed to guarantee that the states of the followers converge to the dynamic convex hull spanned by those of the leaders in finite time. Moreover, as a special case of multiple dynamic leaders with zero velocities, the proposed containment control algorithms also work for the case of multiple stationary leaders without using the distributed observer. Simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithms.

  12. Global finite-time attitude stabilization for rigid spacecraft in the exponential coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Di

    2018-06-01

    This paper addresses the global finite-time attitude stabilisation problem on the special orthogonal group (SO(3)) for a rigid spacecraft via homogeneous feedback approach. Considering the topological and geometric properties of SO(3), the logarithm map is utilised to transform the stabilisation problem on SO(3) into the one on its associated Lie algebra (?). A model-independent discontinuous state feedback plus dynamics compensation scheme is constructed to achieve the global finite-time attitude stabilisation in a coordinate-invariant way. In addition, to address the absence of angular velocity measurements, a sliding mode observer is proposed to reconstruct the unknown angular velocity information within finite time. Then, an observer-based finite-time output feedback control strategy is obtained. Numerical simulations are finally performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed finite-time controllers.

  13. Changing State Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  14. The Evolving Ethics of Dialysis in the United States: A Principlist Bioethics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Catherine R; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Tonelli, Mark R; Lam, Daniel Y

    2016-04-07

    Throughout the history of dialysis, four bioethical principles - beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy and justice - have been weighted differently based upon changing forces of technologic innovation, resource limitation, and societal values. In the 1960s, a committee of lay people in Seattle attempted to fairly distribute a limited number of maintenance hemodialysis stations guided by considerations of justice. As technology advanced and dialysis was funded under an amendment to the Social Security Act in 1972, focus shifted to providing dialysis for all in need while balancing the burdens of treatment and quality of life, supported by the concepts of beneficence and nonmaleficence. At the end of the last century, the importance of patient preferences and personal values became paramount in medical decisions, reflecting a focus on the principle of autonomy. More recently, greater recognition that health care financial resources are limited makes fair allocation more pressing, again highlighting the importance of distributive justice. The varying application and prioritization of these four principles to both policy and clinical decisions in the United States over the last 50 years makes the history of hemodialysis an instructive platform for understanding principlist bioethics. As medical technology evolves in a landscape of changing personal and societal values, a comprehensive understanding of an ethical framework for evaluating appropriate use of medical interventions enables the clinician to systematically negotiate and optimize difficult ethical situations. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. A short summary on finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Konjengbam Darunkumar [Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati (India); Parry, Matthew Roger [Airbus Operations Ltd, Bristol(United Kingdom); Sinclair, Ian [University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents a short summary pertaining to the finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure. Several key issues related to finite element modelling of fatigue crack closure are highlighted: element type, mesh refinement, stabilization of crack closure, crack-tip node release scheme, constitutive model, specimen geometry, stress-states (i.e., plane stress, plane strain), crack closure monitoring. Reviews are presented for both straight and deflected cracks.

  16. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  17. Composite Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we extend the previous results of Chap. 2 to the more general case of composite finite sums. We describe what composite finite sums are and how their analysis can be reduced to the analysis of simple finite sums using the chain rule. We apply these techniques, next, on numerical integration and on some identities of Ramanujan.

  18. Guaranteed Cost Finite-Time Control of Discrete-Time Positive Impulsive Switched Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leipo Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the guaranteed cost finite-time boundedness of discrete-time positive impulsive switched systems. Firstly, the definition of guaranteed cost finite-time boundedness is introduced. By using the multiple linear copositive Lyapunov function (MLCLF and average dwell time (ADT approach, a state feedback controller is designed and sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee that the corresponding closed-loop system is guaranteed cost finite-time boundedness (GCFTB. Such conditions can be solved by linear programming. Finally, a numerical example is provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Evolvability Is an Evolved Ability: The Coding Concept as the Arch-Unit of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Srdja; Ćirković, Milan M

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes that characterize living matter are qualitatively distinct in that they involve encoding and transfer of specific types of information. Such information plays an active part in the control of events that are ultimately linked to the capacity of the system to persist and multiply. This algorithmicity of life is a key prerequisite for its Darwinian evolution, driven by natural selection acting upon stochastically arising variations of the encoded information. The concept of evolvability attempts to define the total capacity of a system to evolve new encoded traits under appropriate conditions, i.e., the accessible section of total morphological space. Since this is dependent on previously evolved regulatory networks that govern information flow in the system, evolvability itself may be regarded as an evolved ability. The way information is physically written, read and modified in living cells (the "coding concept") has not changed substantially during the whole history of the Earth's biosphere. This biosphere, be it alone or one of many, is, accordingly, itself a product of natural selection, since the overall evolvability conferred by its coding concept (nucleic acids as information carriers with the "rulebook of meanings" provided by codons, as well as all the subsystems that regulate various conditional information-reading modes) certainly played a key role in enabling this biosphere to survive up to the present, through alterations of planetary conditions, including at least five catastrophic events linked to major mass extinctions. We submit that, whatever the actual prebiotic physical and chemical processes may have been on our home planet, or may, in principle, occur at some time and place in the Universe, a particular coding concept, with its respective potential to give rise to a biosphere, or class of biospheres, of a certain evolvability, may itself be regarded as a unit (indeed the arch-unit) of natural selection.

  20. Consideration of time-evolving capacity distributions and improved degradation models for seismic fragility assessment of aging highway bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Jayadipta; Sood, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to develop seismic fragility curves for deteriorating highway bridges by uniquely accounting for realistic pitting corrosion deterioration and time-dependent capacity distributions for reinforced concrete columns under chloride attacks. The proposed framework offers distinct improvements over state-of-the-art procedures for fragility assessment of degrading bridges which typically assume simplified uniform corrosion deterioration model and pristine limit state capacities. Depending on the time in service life and deterioration mechanism, this study finds that capacity limit states for deteriorating bridge columns follow either lognormal distribution or generalized extreme value distributions (particularly for pitting corrosion). Impact of column degradation mechanism on seismic response and fragility of bridge components and system is assessed using nonlinear time history analysis of three-dimensional finite element bridge models reflecting the uncertainties across structural modeling parameters, deterioration parameters and ground motion. Comparisons are drawn between the proposed methodology and traditional approaches to develop aging bridge fragility curves. Results indicate considerable underestimations of system level fragility across different damage states using the traditional approach compared to the proposed realistic pitting model for chloride induced corrosion. Time-dependent predictive functions are provided to interpolate logistic regression coefficients for continuous seismic reliability evaluation along the service life with reasonable accuracy. - Highlights: • Realistic modeling of chloride induced corrosion deterioration in the form of pitting. • Time-evolving capacity distribution for aging bridge columns under chloride attacks. • Time-dependent seismic fragility estimation of highway bridges at component and system level. • Mathematical functions for continuous tracking of seismic fragility along service

  1. Axial anomaly at finite temperature and finite density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Zhixin; Su Rukeng; Yu, P.K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The U(1) axial anomaly in a hot fermion medium is investigated by using the real time Green's function method. After calculating the lowest order triangle diagrams, we find that finite temperature as well as finite fermion density does not affect the axial anomaly. The higher order corrections for the axial anomaly are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Finite volume form factors in the presence of integrable defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajnok, Z.; Buccheri, F.; Hollo, L.; Konczer, J.; Takacs, G.

    2014-01-01

    We developed the theory of finite volume form factors in the presence of integrable defects. These finite volume form factors are expressed in terms of the infinite volume form factors and the finite volume density of states and incorporate all polynomial corrections in the inverse of the volume. We tested our results, in the defect Lee–Yang model, against numerical data obtained by truncated conformal space approach (TCSA), which we improved by renormalization group methods adopted to the defect case. To perform these checks we determined the infinite volume defect form factors in the Lee–Yang model exactly, including their vacuum expectation values. We used these data to calculate the two point functions, which we compared, at short distance, to defect CFT. We also derived explicit expressions for the exact finite volume one point functions, which we checked numerically. In all of these comparisons excellent agreement was found

  3. On the spectral properties of random finite difference operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Souillard, B.

    1980-01-01

    We study a class of random finite difference operators, a typical example of which is the finite difference Schroedinger operator with a random potential which arises in solid state physics in the tight binding approximation. We obtain with probability one, in various situations, the exact location of the spectrum, and criterions for a given part in the spectrum to be pure point or purely continuous, or for the static electric conductivity to vanish. A general formalism is developped which transforms the study of these random operators into that of the asymptotics of a multiple integral constructed from a given recipe. Finally we apply our criterions and formalism to prove that, with probability one, the one-dimensional finite difference Schroedinger operator with a random potential has pure point spectrum and developps no static conductivity. (orig.)

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  5. Locally Finite Root Supersystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the notion of locally finite root supersystems as a generalization of both locally finite root systems and generalized root systems. We classify irreducible locally finite root supersystems.

  6. Multidimensional Schrödinger Equation and Spectral Properties of Heavy-Quarkonium Mesons at Finite Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu-Shady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-radial Schrödinger equation is analytically solved at finite temperature. The analytic exact iteration method (AEIM is employed to obtain the energy eigenvalues and wave functions for all states n and l. The application of present results to the calculation of charmonium and bottomonium masses at finite temperature is also presented. The behavior of the charmonium and bottomonium masses is in qualitative agreement with other theoretical methods. We conclude that the solution of the Schrödinger equation plays an important role at finite temperature that the analysis of the quarkonium states gives a key input to quark-gluon plasma diagnostics.

  7. Real-space local polynomial basis for solid-state electronic-structure calculations: A finite-element approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pask, J.E.; Klein, B.M.; Fong, C.Y.; Sterne, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach to solid-state electronic-structure calculations based on the finite-element method. In this method, the basis functions are strictly local, piecewise polynomials. Because the basis is composed of polynomials, the method is completely general and its convergence can be controlled systematically. Because the basis functions are strictly local in real space, the method allows for variable resolution in real space; produces sparse, structured matrices, enabling the effective use of iterative solution methods; and is well suited to parallel implementation. The method thus combines the significant advantages of both real-space-grid and basis-oriented approaches and so promises to be particularly well suited for large, accurate ab initio calculations. We develop the theory of our approach in detail, discuss advantages and disadvantages, and report initial results, including electronic band structures and details of the convergence of the method. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. Exactly solvable models: the way towards a rigorous treatment of phase transitions in finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugaev, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    The exact analytical solutions of a variety of statistical models recently obtained for finite systems are thoroughly discussed. Among them are a constrained version of the statistical multifragmentation model, the Bag Model of Gases and the Hills and Dales Model of surface partition. The finite volume analytical solutions of these models were obtained by a novel powerful mathematical method - the Laplace-Fourier transform. The Laplace-Fourier transform allows one to study the nuclear matter equation of state, the equation of state of hadronic and quark-gluon plasma and the surface entropy of large clusters on the same footing. A complete analysis of the isobaric partition singularities of these models is done for finite systems. The developed formalism allows one to exactly define the finite volume analogs of gaseous, liquid and mixed phases of these models from the first principles of statistical mechanics [ru

  9. Efficiently computing exact geodesic loops within finite steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shi-Qing; He, Ying; Fu, Chi-Wing

    2012-06-01

    Closed geodesics, or geodesic loops, are crucial to the study of differential topology and differential geometry. Although the existence and properties of closed geodesics on smooth surfaces have been widely studied in mathematics community, relatively little progress has been made on how to compute them on polygonal surfaces. Most existing algorithms simply consider the mesh as a graph and so the resultant loops are restricted only on mesh edges, which are far from the actual geodesics. This paper is the first to prove the existence and uniqueness of geodesic loop restricted on a closed face sequence; it contributes also with an efficient algorithm to iteratively evolve an initial closed path on a given mesh into an exact geodesic loop within finite steps. Our proposed algorithm takes only an O(k) space complexity and an O(mk) time complexity (experimentally), where m is the number of vertices in the region bounded by the initial loop and the resultant geodesic loop, and k is the average number of edges in the edge sequences that the evolving loop passes through. In contrast to the existing geodesic curvature flow methods which compute an approximate geodesic loop within a predefined threshold, our method is exact and can apply directly to triangular meshes without needing to solve any differential equation with a numerical solver; it can run at interactive speed, e.g., in the order of milliseconds, for a mesh with around 50K vertices, and hence, significantly outperforms existing algorithms. Actually, our algorithm could run at interactive speed even for larger meshes. Besides the complexity of the input mesh, the geometric shape could also affect the number of evolving steps, i.e., the performance. We motivate our algorithm with an interactive shape segmentation example shown later in the paper.

  10. Multi-rate sensor fusion-based adaptive discrete finite-time synergetic control for flexible-joint mechanical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Guang-Yue; Ren Xue-Mei; Xia Yuan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive discrete finite-time synergetic control (ADFTSC) scheme based on a multi-rate sensor fusion estimator for flexible-joint mechanical systems in the presence of unmeasured states and dynamic uncertainties. Multi-rate sensors are employed to observe the system states which cannot be directly obtained by encoders due to the existence of joint flexibilities. By using an extended Kalman filter (EKF), the finite-time synergetic controller is designed based on a sensor fusion estimator which estimates states and parameters of the mechanical system with multi-rate measurements. The proposed controller can guarantee the finite-time convergence of tracking errors by the theoretical derivation. Simulation and experimental studies are included to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (general)

  11. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-01-01

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  12. Simple Finite Sums

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim M.

    2018-03-07

    We will begin our treatment of summability calculus by analyzing what will be referred to, throughout this book, as simple finite sums. Even though the results of this chapter are particular cases of the more general results presented in later chapters, they are important to start with for a few reasons. First, this chapter serves as an excellent introduction to what summability calculus can markedly accomplish. Second, simple finite sums are encountered more often and, hence, they deserve special treatment. Third, the results presented in this chapter for simple finite sums will, themselves, be used as building blocks for deriving the most general results in subsequent chapters. Among others, we establish that fractional finite sums are well-defined mathematical objects and show how various identities related to the Euler constant as well as the Riemann zeta function can actually be derived in an elementary manner using fractional finite sums.

  13. On Stochastic Finite-Time Control of Discrete-Time Fuzzy Systems with Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the stochastic finite-time stability and stochastic finite-time boundedness problems for one family of fuzzy discrete-time systems over networks with packet dropout, parametric uncertainties, and time-varying norm-bounded disturbance. Firstly, we present the dynamic model description studied, in which the discrete-time fuzzy T-S systems with packet loss can be described by one class of fuzzy Markovian jump systems. Then, the concepts of stochastic finite-time stability and stochastic finite-time boundedness and problem formulation are given. Based on Lyapunov function approach, sufficient conditions on stochastic finite-time stability and stochastic finite-time boundedness are established for the resulting closed-loop fuzzy discrete-time system with Markovian jumps, and state-feedback controllers are designed to ensure stochastic finite-time stability and stochastic finite-time boundedness of the class of fuzzy systems. The stochastic finite-time stability and stochastic finite-time boundedness criteria can be tackled in the form of linear matrix inequalities with a fixed parameter. As an auxiliary result, we also give sufficient conditions on the stochastic stability of the class of fuzzy T-S systems with packet loss. Finally, two illustrative examples are presented to show the validity of the developed methodology.

  14. Disgust: Evolved function and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tybur, J.M.; Lieberman, D.; Kurzban, R.; DeScioli, P.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and

  15. Geometric measures of multipartite entanglement in finite-size spin chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, M; Dell' Anno, F; De Siena, S; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F, E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the behaviour of multipartite entanglement in finite-size quantum spin systems, resorting to a hierarchy of geometric measures of multipartite entanglement recently introduced in the literature. In particular, we investigate the ground-state entanglement in the XY model defined on finite chains of N sites with periodic boundary conditions. We analyse the behaviour of the geometric measures of (N- 1)-partite and (N/2)-partite entanglement and compare them with the Wei-Goldbart geometric measure of global entanglement.

  16. Geometric measures of multipartite entanglement in finite-size spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasone, M; Dell'Anno, F; De Siena, S; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of multipartite entanglement in finite-size quantum spin systems, resorting to a hierarchy of geometric measures of multipartite entanglement recently introduced in the literature. In particular, we investigate the ground-state entanglement in the XY model defined on finite chains of N sites with periodic boundary conditions. We analyse the behaviour of the geometric measures of (N- 1)-partite and (N/2)-partite entanglement and compare them with the Wei-Goldbart geometric measure of global entanglement.

  17. On the modification of the Efimov spectrum in a finite cubic box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzer, S.; Hammer, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Three particles with large scattering length display a universal spectrum of three-body bound states called ''Efimov trimers''. We calculate the modification of the Efimov trimers of three identical bosons in a finite cubic box and compute the dependence of their energies on the box size using effective field theory. Previous calculations for positive scattering length that were perturbative in the finite-volume energy shift are extended to arbitrarily large shifts and negative scattering lengths. The renormalization of the effective field theory in the finite volume is explicitly verified. We investigate the effects of partial-wave mixing and study the behavior of shallow trimers near the dimer energy. Moreover, we provide numerical evidence for universal scaling of the finite-volume corrections. (orig.)

  18. Radiative nonrecoil nuclear finite size corrections of order α(Zα)5 to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faustov, R.N.; Martynenko, A.P.; Martynenko, G.A.; Sorokin, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we calculate nuclear finite size radiative corrections of order α(Zα) 5 to the hyperfine structure of S-wave energy levels in muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium. For the construction of the particle interaction operator we employ the projection operators on the particle bound states with definite spins. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried–Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and deuteron are used.

  19. Magnon localization and Bloch oscillations in finite Heisenberg spin chains in an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yuriy A; Gann, Vladimir V

    2013-06-19

    We study the localization of magnon states in finite defect-free Heisenberg spin-1/2 ferromagnetic chains placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with a constant spatial gradient. Continuous transformation from the extended magnon states to the localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a finite spin chain placed in an inhomogeneous field is described both analytically and numerically. We describe for the first time the non-monotonic dependence of the energy levels of magnons, both long and short wavelength, on the magnetic field gradient, which is a consequence of magnon localization in a finite spin chain. We show that, in contrast to the destruction of the magnon band and the establishment of the Wannier-Stark ladder in a vanishingly small field gradient in an infinite chain, the localization of magnon states at the chain ends preserves the memory of the magnon band. Essentially, the localization at the lower- or higher-field chain end resembles the localization of the positive- or negative-effective-mass band quasiparticles. We also show how the beat dynamics of coherent superposition of extended spin waves in a finite chain in a homogeneous or weakly inhomogeneous field transforms into magnon Bloch oscillations of the superposition of localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a strongly inhomogeneous field. We provide a semiclassical description of the magnon Bloch oscillations and show that the correspondence between the quantum and semiclassical descriptions is most accurate for Bloch oscillations of the magnon coherent states, which are built from a coherent superposition of a large number of the nearest-neighbour Wannier-Zeeman states.

  20. Magnon localization and Bloch oscillations in finite Heisenberg spin chains in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosevich, Yuriy A; Gann, Vladimir V

    2013-01-01

    We study the localization of magnon states in finite defect-free Heisenberg spin-1/2 ferromagnetic chains placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with a constant spatial gradient. Continuous transformation from the extended magnon states to the localized Wannier–Zeeman states in a finite spin chain placed in an inhomogeneous field is described both analytically and numerically. We describe for the first time the non-monotonic dependence of the energy levels of magnons, both long and short wavelength, on the magnetic field gradient, which is a consequence of magnon localization in a finite spin chain. We show that, in contrast to the destruction of the magnon band and the establishment of the Wannier–Stark ladder in a vanishingly small field gradient in an infinite chain, the localization of magnon states at the chain ends preserves the memory of the magnon band. Essentially, the localization at the lower- or higher-field chain end resembles the localization of the positive- or negative-effective-mass band quasiparticles. We also show how the beat dynamics of coherent superposition of extended spin waves in a finite chain in a homogeneous or weakly inhomogeneous field transforms into magnon Bloch oscillations of the superposition of localized Wannier–Zeeman states in a strongly inhomogeneous field. We provide a semiclassical description of the magnon Bloch oscillations and show that the correspondence between the quantum and semiclassical descriptions is most accurate for Bloch oscillations of the magnon coherent states, which are built from a coherent superposition of a large number of the nearest-neighbour Wannier–Zeeman states. (paper)

  1. Finite time exergy analysis and multi-objective ecological optimization of a regenerative Brayton cycle considering the impact of flow rate variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naserian, Mohammad Mahdi; Farahat, Said; Sarhaddi, Faramarz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Defining a dimensionless parameter includes the finite-time and size concepts. • Inserting the concept of exergy of fluid streams into finite-time thermodynamics. • Defining, drawing and modifying of maximum ecological function curve. • Suggesting the appropriate performance zone, according to maximum ecological curve. - Abstract: In this study, the optimal performance of a regenerative Brayton cycle is sought through power and then ecological function maximization using finite-time thermodynamic concept and finite-size components. Multi-objective optimization is used for maximizing the ecological function. Optimizations are performed using genetic algorithm. In order to take into account the finite-time and finite-size concepts in current problem, a dimensionless mass-flow parameter is introduced deploying time variations. The variations of output power, total exergy destruction of the system, and decision variables for the optimum state (maximum ecological function state) are compared to the maximum power state using the dimensionless parameter. The modified ecological function in optimum state is obtained and plotted relating to the dimensionless mass-flow parameter. One can see that the modified ecological function study results in a better performance than that obtained with the maximum power state. Finally, the appropriate performance zone of the heat engine will be obtained

  2. Signal detection without finite-energy limits to quantum resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Aina, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    We show that there are extremely simple signal detection schemes where the finiteness of energy resources places no limit on the resolution. On the contrary, larger resolution can be obtained with lower energy. To this end the generator of the signal-dependent transformation encoding the signal information on the probe state must be different from the energy. We show that the larger the deviation of the probe state from being the minimum-uncertainty state, the better the resolution.

  3. Global Existence Results for Viscoplasticity at Finite Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Alexander; Rossi, Riccarda; Savaré, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    We study a model for rate-dependent gradient plasticity at finite strain based on the multiplicative decomposition of the strain tensor, and investigate the existence of global-in-time solutions to the related PDE system. We reveal its underlying structure as a generalized gradient system, where the driving energy functional is highly nonconvex and features the geometric nonlinearities related to finite-strain elasticity as well as the multiplicative decomposition of finite-strain plasticity. Moreover, the dissipation potential depends on the left-invariant plastic rate, and thus depends on the plastic state variable. The existence theory is developed for a class of abstract, nonsmooth, and nonconvex gradient systems, for which we introduce suitable notions of solutions, namely energy-dissipation-balance and energy-dissipation-inequality solutions. Hence, we resort to the toolbox of the direct method of the calculus of variations to check that the specific energy and dissipation functionals for our viscoplastic models comply with the conditions of the general theory.

  4. Real Time Robot Soccer Game Event Detection Using Finite State Machines with Multiple Fuzzy Logic Probability Evaluators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmer P. Dadios

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new algorithm for real time event detection using Finite State Machines with multiple Fuzzy Logic Probability Evaluators (FLPEs. A machine referee for a robot soccer game is developed and is used as the platform to test the proposed algorithm. A novel technique to detect collisions and other events in microrobot soccer game under inaccurate and insufficient information is presented. The robots' collision is used to determine goalkeeper charging and goal score events which are crucial for the machine referee's decisions. The Main State Machine (MSM handles the schedule of event activation. The FLPE calculates the probabilities of the true occurrence of the events. Final decisions about the occurrences of events are evaluated and compared through threshold crisp probability values. The outputs of FLPEs can be combined to calculate the probability of an event composed of subevents. Using multiple fuzzy logic system, the FLPE utilizes minimal number of rules and can be tuned individually. Experimental results show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Quantum phase space points for Wigner functions in finite-dimensional spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Aina, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    We introduce quantum states associated with single phase space points in the Wigner formalism for finite-dimensional spaces. We consider both continuous and discrete Wigner functions. This analysis provides a procedure for a direct practical observation of the Wigner functions for states and transformations without inversion formulas.

  6. Quantum phase space points for Wigner functions in finite-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    We introduce quantum states associated with single phase space points in the Wigner formalism for finite-dimensional spaces. We consider both continuous and discrete Wigner functions. This analysis provides a procedure for a direct practical observation of the Wigner functions for states and transformations without inversion formulas

  7. Finite temperature effects on anisotropic pressure and equation of state of dense neutron matter in an ultrastrong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayev, A. A.; Yang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spin-polarized states in dense neutron matter with the recently developed Skyrme effective interaction (BSk20 parametrization) are considered in the magnetic fields H up to 10 20 G at finite temperature. In a strong magnetic field, the total pressure in neutron matter is anisotropic, and the difference between the pressures parallel and perpendicular to the field direction becomes significant at H>H th ∼10 18 G. The longitudinal pressure decreases with the magnetic field and vanishes in the critical field 10 18 c 19 G, resulting in the longitudinal instability of neutron matter. With increasing temperature, the threshold H th and critical H c magnetic fields also increase. The appearance of the longitudinal instability prevents the formation of a fully spin-polarized state in neutron matter and only the states with moderate spin polarization are accessible. The anisotropic equation of state is determined at densities and temperatures relevant to the interiors of magnetars. The entropy of strongly magnetized neutron matter turns out to be larger than the entropy of nonpolarized matter. This is caused by some specific details in the dependence of the entropy on the effective masses of neutrons with spin up and spin down in a polarized state.

  8. Groebner Finite Path Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Leamer, Micah J.

    2004-01-01

    Let K be a field and Q a finite directed multi-graph. In this paper I classify all path algebras KQ and admissible orders with the property that all of their finitely generated ideals have finite Groebner bases. MS

  9. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Ivan P., E-mail: ivan.christov@phys.uni-sofia.bg

    2016-08-15

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  10. Criticality is an emergent property of genetic networks that exhibit evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Torres-Sosa

    Full Text Available Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that the gene regulatory networks of living organisms operate in the critical phase, namely, at the transition between ordered and chaotic dynamics. Such critical dynamics of the network permits the coexistence of robustness and flexibility which are necessary to ensure homeostatic stability (of a given phenotype while allowing for switching between multiple phenotypes (network states as occurs in development and in response to environmental change. However, the mechanisms through which genetic networks evolve such critical behavior have remained elusive. Here we present an evolutionary model in which criticality naturally emerges from the need to balance between the two essential components of evolvability: phenotype conservation and phenotype innovation under mutations. We simulated the Darwinian evolution of random Boolean networks that mutate gene regulatory interactions and grow by gene duplication. The mutating networks were subjected to selection for networks that both (i preserve all the already acquired phenotypes (dynamical attractor states and (ii generate new ones. Our results show that this interplay between extending the phenotypic landscape (innovation while conserving the existing phenotypes (conservation suffices to cause the evolution of all the networks in a population towards criticality. Furthermore, the networks produced by this evolutionary process exhibit structures with hubs (global regulators similar to the observed topology of real gene regulatory networks. Thus, dynamical criticality and certain elementary topological properties of gene regulatory networks can emerge as a byproduct of the evolvability of the phenotypic landscape.

  11. Noncommutative solitons: moduli spaces, quantization, finite θ effects and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Rocek, Martin; Lindström, Ulf; von Unge, Rikard

    2001-06-01

    We find the N-soliton solution at infinite θ, as well as the metric on the moduli space corresponding to spatial displacements of the solitons. We use a perturbative expansion to incorporate the leading θ-1 corrections, and find an effective short range attraction between solitons. We study the stability of various solutions. We discuss the finite θ corrections to scattering, and find metastable orbits. Upon quantization of the two-soliton moduli space, for any finite θ, we find an s-wave bound state.

  12. Discrete Wigner formalism for qubits and noncontextuality of Clifford gates on qubit stabilizer states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocia, Lucas; Love, Peter

    2017-12-01

    We show that qubit stabilizer states can be represented by non-negative quasiprobability distributions associated with a Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism where Clifford gates are positive state-independent maps. This is accomplished by generalizing the Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism to three generators instead of two—producing an exterior, or Grassmann, algebra—which results in Clifford group gates for qubits that act as a permutation on the finite Weyl phase space points naturally associated with stabilizer states. As a result, a non-negative probability distribution can be associated with each stabilizer state's three-generator Wigner function, and these distributions evolve deterministically to one another under Clifford gates. This corresponds to a hidden variable theory that is noncontextual and local for qubit Clifford gates while Clifford (Pauli) measurements have a context-dependent representation. Equivalently, we show that qubit Clifford gates can be expressed as propagators within the three-generator Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism whose semiclassical expansion is truncated at order ℏ0 with a finite number of terms. The T gate, which extends the Clifford gate set to one capable of universal quantum computation, requires a semiclassical expansion of the propagator to order ℏ1. We compare this approach to previous quasiprobability descriptions of qubits that relied on the two-generator Wigner-Weyl-Moyal formalism and find that the two-generator Weyl symbols of stabilizer states result in a description of evolution under Clifford gates that is state-dependent, in contrast to the three-generator formalism. We have thus extended Wigner non-negative quasiprobability distributions from the odd d -dimensional case to d =2 qubits, which describe the noncontextuality of Clifford gates and contextuality of Pauli measurements on qubit stabilizer states.

  13. Wilson-Polyakov loops for critical strings and superstrings at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    An open string with end-points fixed at spatial separation L is a string theory analogue of the static quark-antiquark system in quenched QCD. Folowing a review of the quantum mechanics of this system in critical bosonic string theory the partition function at finite β (the inverse temperature) for fixed end-point open strings is discussed. This is related by a conformal transformation ('world-sheet duality') to the correlation function of two closed strings fixed at distinct spatial points (a string theory analogue of two Wilson-Polyakov loops). Temperature duality (β → β' = 4π 2 /β) relates this correlation function, in turn, to the finite-temperature Green function for a closed strong propagating between initial and final states that are at distinct (euclidean) space-time points. In addition, spatial duality relates the fixed end-point open string to the familiar open string with free end-points. A generalization to fixed end-points superstrings is suggested, in which the superalgebra may be viewed as the spatial dual of the usual open-string superalgebra. At zero temperature world-sheet duality relates the partition function of supersymmetric fixed end-point open strings to the correlation function of point-like closed-string states. These couple to combinations of the scalar and pseudoscalar states of a type-2b superstring superfield. At finite temperature supersymmetry is broken and this correlation function involves the propagation of non-supersymmetric states with non-zero winding numbers (which formally include a tachyon at temperatures above the Hagedorn transition). Temperature duality again relates the partition function to the finite-temperature Green function describing the propagator for point-like closed-string states of the dual theory, in which supersymmetry is broken. The singularity that arises in the critical bosonic theory as L is reduced below L = 2 π√α' is absent in the superstring and the static potential is well defined for all

  14. Finite state projection based bounds to compare chemical master equation models using single-cell data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Zachary [School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Neuert, Gregor [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University School of Engineering, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Munsky, Brian [School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Emerging techniques now allow for precise quantification of distributions of biological molecules in single cells. These rapidly advancing experimental methods have created a need for more rigorous and efficient modeling tools. Here, we derive new bounds on the likelihood that observations of single-cell, single-molecule responses come from a discrete stochastic model, posed in the form of the chemical master equation. These strict upper and lower bounds are based on a finite state projection approach, and they converge monotonically to the exact likelihood value. These bounds allow one to discriminate rigorously between models and with a minimum level of computational effort. In practice, these bounds can be incorporated into stochastic model identification and parameter inference routines, which improve the accuracy and efficiency of endeavors to analyze and predict single-cell behavior. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach using simulated data for three example models as well as for experimental measurements of a time-varying stochastic transcriptional response in yeast.

  15. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  16. Finite volume spectrum of 2D field theories from Hirota dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Kazakov, Vladimir; Vieira, Pedro; Univ. do Porto

    2008-12-01

    We propose, using the example of the O(4) sigma model, a general method for solving integrable two dimensional relativistic sigma models in a finite size periodic box. Our starting point is the so-called Y-system, which is equivalent to the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations of Yang and Yang. It is derived from the Zamolodchikov scattering theory in the cross channel, for virtual particles along the non-compact direction of the space-time cylinder. The method is based on the integrable Hirota dynamics that follows from the Y-system. The outcome is a nonlinear integral equation for a single complex function, valid for an arbitrary quantum state and accompanied by the finite size analogue of Bethe equations. It is close in spirit to the Destri-deVega (DdV) equation. We present the numerical data for the energy of various states as a function of the size, and derive the general Luescher-type formulas for the finite size corrections. We also re-derive by our method the DdV equation for the SU(2) chiral Gross-Neveu model. (orig.)

  17. Sanity check for NN bound states in lattice QCD with Lüscher’s finite volume formula – Disclosing Symptoms of Fake Plateaux –

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Sinya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The sanity check is to rule out certain classes of obviously false results, not to catch every possible error. After reviewing such a sanity check for NN bound states with the Lüscher’s finite volume formula [1–3], we give further evidences for the operator dependence of plateaux, a symptom of the fake plateau problem, against the claim [4]. We then present our critical comments on [5] by NPLQCD: (i Operator dependences of plateaux in NPL2013 [6, 7] exist with the P value of 4–5%. (ii The volume independence of plateaux in NPL2013 does not prove their correctness. (iii Effective range expansions (EREs in NPL2013 violate the physical pole condition. (iv Their comment is partly based on new data and analysis different from the original ones. (v Their new ERE does not satisfy the Lüscher’s finite volume formula.

  18. Finite element concept to derive isostatic residual maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new space-domain operator based on the shape function concept of finite element analysis has been developed to derive the residual maps of the Gorda Plate of western United States. The technique does not require explicit assumptions on isostatic models. Besides delineating the Gorda Plate boundary, the residual ...

  19. Instability modes on a solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjuan; Liu, Feng; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2017-09-01

    Numerical solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained to study the time evolution of both axisymmetric and three-dimensional perturbations to a base solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe with non-periodic boundary conditions imposed at the pipe inlet and outlet. It is found that for a given Reynolds number there exists a critical swirl number beyond which the initial perturbations grow, in contrast to the solid-body rotation flow in an infinitely-long pipe or a finite-length pipe with periodic inlet and exit boundary conditions for which the classical Kelvin analysis and Rayleigh stability criterion affirm neutrally stable for all levels of swirl. This paper uncovers for the first time the detailed evolution of the perturbations in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional situations. The computations reveal a linear growth stage of the perturbations with a constant growth rate after a brief initial period of decay of the imposed initial perturbations. The fastest growing axisymmetric and three-dimensional instability modes and the associated growth rates are identified numerically for the first time. The computations show that the critical swirl number increases and the growth rate of instability decreases at the same swirl number with decreasing Reynolds number. The growth rate of the axisymmetric mode at high Reynolds number agrees well with previous stability theory for inviscid flow. More importantly, three-dimensional simulations uncover that the most unstable mode is the spiral type m = 1 mode, which appears at a lower critical swirl number than that for the onset of the axisymmetric mode. This spiral mode grows faster than the unstable axisymmetric mode at the same swirl. Moreover, the computations reveal that after the linear growing stage of the perturbation the flow continues to evolve nonlinearly to a saturated axisymmetric vortex breakdown state.

  20. Instability modes on a solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjuan Feng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained to study the time evolution of both axisymmetric and three-dimensional perturbations to a base solid-body-rotation flow in a finite-length pipe with non-periodic boundary conditions imposed at the pipe inlet and outlet. It is found that for a given Reynolds number there exists a critical swirl number beyond which the initial perturbations grow, in contrast to the solid-body rotation flow in an infinitely-long pipe or a finite-length pipe with periodic inlet and exit boundary conditions for which the classical Kelvin analysis and Rayleigh stability criterion affirm neutrally stable for all levels of swirl. This paper uncovers for the first time the detailed evolution of the perturbations in both the axisymmetric and three-dimensional situations. The computations reveal a linear growth stage of the perturbations with a constant growth rate after a brief initial period of decay of the imposed initial perturbations. The fastest growing axisymmetric and three-dimensional instability modes and the associated growth rates are identified numerically for the first time. The computations show that the critical swirl number increases and the growth rate of instability decreases at the same swirl number with decreasing Reynolds number. The growth rate of the axisymmetric mode at high Reynolds number agrees well with previous stability theory for inviscid flow. More importantly, three-dimensional simulations uncover that the most unstable mode is the spiral type m = 1 mode, which appears at a lower critical swirl number than that for the onset of the axisymmetric mode. This spiral mode grows faster than the unstable axisymmetric mode at the same swirl. Moreover, the computations reveal that after the linear growing stage of the perturbation the flow continues to evolve nonlinearly to a saturated axisymmetric vortex breakdown state.

  1. A Kohn–Sham equation solver based on hexahedral finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jun; Gao Xingyu; Zhou Aihui

    2012-01-01

    We design a Kohn–Sham equation solver based on hexahedral finite element discretizations. The solver integrates three schemes proposed in this paper. The first scheme arranges one a priori locally-refined hexahedral mesh with appropriate multiresolution. The second one is a modified mass-lumping procedure which accelerates the diagonalization in the self-consistent field iteration. The third one is a finite element recovery method which enhances the eigenpair approximations with small extra work. We carry out numerical tests on each scheme to investigate the validity and efficiency, and then apply them to calculate the ground state total energies of nanosystems C 60 , C 120 , and C 275 H 172 . It is shown that our solver appears to be computationally attractive for finite element applications in electronic structure study.

  2. Three-point correlation functions of giant magnons with finite size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Changrim; Bozhilov, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    We compute holographic three-point correlation functions or structure constants of a zero-momentum dilaton operator and two (dyonic) giant magnon string states with a finite-size length in the semiclassical approximation. We show that the semiclassical structure constants match exactly with the three-point functions between two su(2) magnon single trace operators with finite size and the Lagrangian in the large 't Hooft coupling constant limit. A special limit J>>√(λ) of our result is compared with the relevant result based on the Luescher corrections.

  3. Finite element solution of two dimensional time dependent heat equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaz

    1999-01-01

    A Microsoft Windows based computer code, named FHEAT, has been developed for solving two dimensional heat problems in Cartesian and Cylindrical geometries. The programming language is Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0. The code makes use of Finite element formulation for spatial domain and Finite difference formulation for time domain. Presently the code is capable of solving two dimensional steady state and transient problems in xy- and rz-geometries. The code is capable excepting both triangular and rectangular elements. Validation and benchmarking was done against hand calculations and published results. (author)

  4. Exact vacuum polarization in 1 + 1 dimensional finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferree, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the use of renormalizable quantum field theories to describe nuclear structure. In particular, theories which employ hadronic degrees of freedom are used widely and lead to efficient models which allow self-consistent solutions of the many-body problem. An interesting feature inherent to relativistic field theories (like QHD) is the presence of an infinite sea of negative energy fermion (nucleon) states, which interact dynamically with positive energy fermions via other fields. Such interactions give rise to, for example, vacuum polarization effects, in which virtual particle-antiparticle pairs interact with positive energy valence nucleons as well as with each other, and can significantly influence the ground and excited states of nuclear systems. Several authors have addressed this question in various approximations for finite nuclei, mostly based on extensions of results derived for a uniform system of nucleons. Some attempts have also been made to include vacuum effects in finite systems exactly, but the presence of a vector potential can be problematic when working in a spectral representation. In this paper, the author presents a computational method by which vacuum polarization effects in finite nuclei can be calculated exactly in the RHA by employing matrix diagonalization methods in a discrete Fourier representation of the Dirac equation, and an approximate method for including deep negative energy states based on a derivative expansion of the effective action. This efficient approach is shown to provide well-behaved vacuum polarization densities which remain so even in the presence of strong vector potential

  5. A finite landscape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, B.S.; Douglas, M.R.

    2006-06-01

    We present evidence that the number of string/M theory vacua consistent with experiments is finite. We do this both by explicit analysis of infinite sequences of vacua and by applying various mathematical finiteness theorems. (author)

  6. A neighbourhood evolving network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.J.; Wang, G.Z.; Jiang, Q.Y.; Han, Z.X.

    2006-01-01

    Many social, technological, biological and economical systems are best described by evolved network models. In this short Letter, we propose and study a new evolving network model. The model is based on the new concept of neighbourhood connectivity, which exists in many physical complex networks. The statistical properties and dynamics of the proposed model is analytically studied and compared with those of Barabasi-Albert scale-free model. Numerical simulations indicate that this network model yields a transition between power-law and exponential scaling, while the Barabasi-Albert scale-free model is only one of its special (limiting) cases. Particularly, this model can be used to enhance the evolving mechanism of complex networks in the real world, such as some social networks development

  7. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  8. The finite-difference and finite-element modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moszo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Pazak, P.; Balazovijech, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion is an irreplaceable tool in investigation of the Earth's structure, processes in the Earth, and particularly earthquake phenomena. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is the dominant method in the modeling of earthquake motion. Moreover, it is becoming more important in the seismic exploration and structural modeling. At the same time we are convinced that the best time of the finite-difference method in seismology is in the future. This monograph provides tutorial and detailed introduction to the application of the finite-difference, finite-element, and hybrid finite-difference-finite-element methods to the modeling of seismic wave propagation and earthquake motion. The text does not cover all topics and aspects of the methods. We focus on those to which we have contributed. (Author)

  9. On the Critical Role of Divergent Selection in Evolvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ambitious goal in evolutionary robotics is to evolve increasingly complex robotic behaviors with minimal human design effort. Reaching this goal requires evolutionary algorithms that can unlock from genetic encodings their latent potential for evolvability. One issue clouding this goal is conceptual confusion about evolvability, which often obscures the aspects of evolvability that are important or desirable. The danger from such confusion is that it may establish unrealistic goals for evolvability that prove unproductive in practice. An important issue separate from conceptual confusion is the common misalignment between selection and evolvability in evolutionary robotics. While more expressive encodings can represent higher-level adaptations (e.g. sexual reproduction or developmental systems that increase long-term evolutionary potential (i.e. evolvability, realizing such potential requires gradients of fitness and evolvability to align. In other words, selection is often a critical factor limiting increasing evolvability. Thus, drawing from a series of recent papers, this article seeks to both (1 clarify and focus the ways in which the term evolvability is used within artificial evolution, and (2 argue for the importance of one type of selection, i.e. divergent selection, for enabling evolvability. The main argument is that there is a fundamental connection between divergent selection and evolvability (on both the individual and population level that does not hold for typical goal-oriented selection. The conclusion is that selection pressure plays a critical role in realizing the potential for evolvability, and that divergent selection in particular provides a principled mechanism for encouraging evolvability in artificial evolution.

  10. Finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures - Workshop proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This workshop is related to the finite element analysis of degraded concrete structures. It is composed of three sessions. The first session (which title is: the use of finite element analysis in safety assessments) comprises six papers which titles are: Historical Development of Concrete Finite Element Modeling for Safety Evaluation of Accident-Challenged and Aging Concrete Structures; Experience with Finite Element Methods for Safety Assessments in Switzerland; Stress State Analysis of the Ignalina NPP Confinement System; Prestressed Containment: Behaviour when Concrete Cracking is Modelled; Application of FEA for Design and Support of NPP Containment in Russia; Verification Problems of Nuclear Installations Safety Software of Strength Analysis (NISS SA). The second session (title: concrete containment structures under accident loads) comprises seven papers which titles are: Two Application Examples of Concrete Containment Structures under Accident Load Conditions Using Finite Element Analysis; What Kind of Prediction for Leak rates for Nuclear Power Plant Containments in Accidental Conditions; Influence of Different Hypotheses Used in Numerical Models for Concrete At Elevated Temperatures on the Predicted Behaviour of NPP Core Catchers Under Severe Accident Conditions; Observations on the Constitutive Modeling of Concrete Under Multi-Axial States at Elevated Temperatures; Analyses of a Reinforced Concrete Containment with Liner Corrosion Damage; Program of Containment Concrete Control During Operation for the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant; Static Limit Load of a Deteriorated Hyperbolic Cooling Tower. The third session (concrete structures under extreme environmental load) comprised five papers which titles are: Shear Transfer Mechanism of RC Plates After Cracking; Seismic Back Calculation of an Auxiliary Building of the Nuclear Power Plant Muehleberg, Switzerland; Seismic Behaviour of Slightly Reinforced Shear Wall Structures; FE Analysis of Degraded Concrete

  11. Evolved H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchwell, E.

    1975-01-01

    A probable evolutionary sequence of H II regions based on six distinct types of observed objects is suggested. Two examples which may deviate from this idealized sequence, are discussed. Even though a size-mean density relation of H II regions can be used as a rough indication of whether a nebula is very young or evolved, it is argued that such a relation is not likely to be useful for the quantitative assignment of ages to H II regions. Evolved H II regions appear to fit into one of four structural types: rings, core-halos, smooth structures, and irregular or filamentary structures. Examples of each type are given with their derived physical parameters. The energy balance in these nebulae is considered. The mass of ionized gas in evolved H II regions is in general too large to trace the nebula back to single compact H II regions. Finally, the morphological type of the Galaxy is considered from its H II region content. 2 tables, 2 figs., 29 refs

  12. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  13. Finite rotation shells basic equations and finite elements for Reissner kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, K

    2010-01-01

    This book covers theoretical and computational aspects of non-linear shells. Several advanced topics of shell equations and finite elements - not included in standard textbooks on finite elements - are addressed, and the book includes an extensive bibliography.

  14. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C* boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss's law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C* boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C* boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in this setup in a fully consistent fashion, without relying on gauge fixing. We argue that this class of states covers most of the interesting phenomenological applications in the framework of numerical simulations. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charg...

  15. Distributed Leader-Following Finite-Time Consensus Control for Linear Multiagent Systems under Switching Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaole; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the finite-time consensus problem of leader-following multiagent systems. The dynamical models for all following agents and the leader are assumed the same general form of linear system, and the interconnection topology among the agents is assumed to be switching and undirected. We mostly consider the continuous-time case. By assuming that the states of neighbouring agents are known to each agent, a sufficient condition is established for finite-time consensus via a neighbor-based state feedback protocol. While the states of neighbouring agents cannot be available and only the outputs of neighbouring agents can be accessed, the distributed observer-based consensus protocol is proposed for each following agent. A sufficient condition is provided in terms of linear matrix inequalities to design the observer-based consensus protocol, which makes the multiagent systems achieve finite-time consensus under switching topologies. Then, we discuss the counterparts for discrete-time case. Finally, we provide an illustrative example to show the effectiveness of the design approach. PMID:24883367

  16. Finite element analysis of nonlinear creeping flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loula, A.F.D.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state creep problems with monotone constitutive laws are studied. Finite element approximations are constructed based on mixed Petrov-Galerkin formulations for constrained problems. Stability, convergence and a priori error estimates are proved for equal-order discontinuous stress and continuous velocity interpolations. Numerical results are presented confirming the rates of convergence predicted in the analysis and the good performance of this formulation. (author) [pt

  17. Stability of the nonequilibrium states of a superconductor with a finite difference between the populations of the electron- and hole-like spectral branches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal'perin, Y.M.; Kozub, V.I.; Spivak, B.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The stability of the nonequilibrium states of a superconductor with a finite difference between the populations of the electron- and hole-like spectral branches is investigated. It is shown that an instability similar to the Cooper instability of a normal metal arises at a sufficiently large value of the imbalance. This eliminates the imbalance within quantum-mechanical (nonkinetic) time periods. The consistency of the allowance for the imbalance in the nonequilibrium Ginzburg-Landau equations is discussed

  18. Measurement Uncertainty for Finite Quantum Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Schwonnek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement uncertainty relations are lower bounds on the errors of any approximate joint measurement of two or more quantum observables. The aim of this paper is to provide methods to compute optimal bounds of this type. The basic method is semidefinite programming, which we apply to arbitrary finite collections of projective observables on a finite dimensional Hilbert space. The quantification of errors is based on an arbitrary cost function, which assigns a penalty to getting result x rather than y, for any pair ( x , y . This induces a notion of optimal transport cost for a pair of probability distributions, and we include an Appendix with a short summary of optimal transport theory as needed in our context. There are then different ways to form an overall figure of merit from the comparison of distributions. We consider three, which are related to different physical testing scenarios. The most thorough test compares the transport distances between the marginals of a joint measurement and the reference observables for every input state. Less demanding is a test just on the states for which a “true value” is known in the sense that the reference observable yields a definite outcome. Finally, we can measure a deviation as a single expectation value by comparing the two observables on the two parts of a maximally-entangled state. All three error quantities have the property that they vanish if and only if the tested observable is equal to the reference. The theory is illustrated with some characteristic examples.

  19. A fast finite-difference algorithm for topology optimization of permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abert, Claas; Huber, Christian; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Wautischer, Gregor; Suess, Dieter

    2017-09-01

    We present a finite-difference method for the topology optimization of permanent magnets that is based on the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) accelerated computation of the stray-field. The presented method employs the density approach for topology optimization and uses an adjoint method for the gradient computation. Comparison to various state-of-the-art finite-element implementations shows a superior performance and accuracy. Moreover, the presented method is very flexible and easy to implement due to various preexisting FFT stray-field implementations that can be used.

  20. Radiative nonrecoil nuclear finite size corrections of order α(Zα){sup 5} to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustov, R.N. [Dorodnicyn Computing Centre, Russian Academy of Science, Vavilov Str. 40, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, A.P. [Samara State University, Pavlov Str. 1, 443011 Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State Aerospace University named after S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086 Samara (Russian Federation); Martynenko, G.A.; Sorokin, V.V. [Samara State University, Pavlov Str. 1, 443011 Samara (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-02

    On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we calculate nuclear finite size radiative corrections of order α(Zα){sup 5} to the hyperfine structure of S-wave energy levels in muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium. For the construction of the particle interaction operator we employ the projection operators on the particle bound states with definite spins. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried–Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and deuteron are used.

  1. Finite amplitude, horizontal motion of a load symmetrically supported between isotropic hyperelastic springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Millard F; Young, Todd R

    2012-03-01

    The undamped, finite amplitude horizontal motion of a load supported symmetrically between identical incompressible, isotropic hyperelastic springs, each subjected to an initial finite uniaxial static stretch, is formulated in general terms. The small amplitude motion of the load about the deformed static state is discussed; and the periodicity of the arbitrary finite amplitude motion is established for all such elastic materials for which certain conditions on the engineering stress and the strain energy function hold. The exact solution for the finite vibration of the load is then derived for the classical neo-Hookean model. The vibrational period is obtained in terms of the complete Heuman lambda-function whose properties are well-known. Dependence of the period and hence the frequency on the physical parameters of the system is investigated and the results are displayed graphically.

  2. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  3. Development of a partitioned finite volume-finite element fluid-structure interaction scheme for strongly-coupled problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available -linear deformations are accounted for. As will be demonstrated, the finite volume approach exhibits similar disad- vantages to the linear Q4 finite element formulation when undergoing bending. An enhanced finite volume approach is discussed and compared with finite...

  4. Current Issues in Finite-T Density-Functional Theory and Warm-Correlated Matter †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. C. Dharma-wardana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Finite-temperature density functional theory (DFT has become of topical interest, partly due to the increasing ability to create novel states of warm-correlated matter (WCM.Warm-dense matter (WDM, ultra-fast matter (UFM, and high-energy density matter (HEDM may all be regarded as subclasses of WCM. Strong electron-electron, ion-ion and electron-ion correlation effects and partial degeneracies are found in these systems where the electron temperature Te is comparable to the electron Fermi energy EF. Thus, many electrons are in continuum states which are partially occupied. The ion subsystem may be solid, liquid or plasma, with many states of ionization with ionic charge Zj. Quasi-equilibria with the ion temperature Ti ≠ Te are common. The ion subsystem in WCM can no longer be treated as a passive “external potential”, as is customary in T = 0 DFT dominated by solid-state theory or quantum chemistry. Many basic questions arise in trying to implement DFT for WCM. Hohenberg-Kohn-Mermin theory can be adapted for treating these systems if suitable finite-T exchange-correlation (XC functionals can be constructed. They are functionals of both the one-body electron density ne and the one-body ion densities ρj. Here, j counts many species of nuclei or charge states. A method of approximately but accurately mapping the quantum electrons to a classical Coulomb gas enables one to treat electron-ion systems entirely classically at any temperature and arbitrary spin polarization, using exchange-correlation effects calculated in situ, directly from the pair-distribution functions. This eliminates the need for any XC-functionals. This classical map has been used to calculate the equation of state of WDM systems, and construct a finite-T XC functional that is found to be in close agreement with recent quantum path-integral simulation data. In this review, current developments and concerns in finite-T DFT, especially in the context of non-relativistic warm

  5. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.J.; Kogut, J.B.; Morrison, S.E.; Sinclair, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) 'colour' at finite chemical potential, μ for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for μ large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  6. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S. J.; Kogut, J. B.; Morrison, S. E.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) colour at finite chemical potential, p for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for p large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  7. Dynamic steady-state analysis of crack propagation in rubber-like solids using an extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a computational framework for studying high-speed crack growth in rubber-like solids under conditions of plane stress and steady-state is proposed. Effects of inertia, viscoelasticity and finite strains are included. The main purpose of the study is to examine the contribution of viscoelastic dissipation to the total work of fracture required to propagate a crack in a rubber-like solid. The computational framework builds upon a previous work by the present author (Kroon in Int J Fract 169:49-60, 2011). The model was fully able to predict experimental results in terms of the local surface energy at the crack tip and the total energy release rate at different crack speeds. The predicted distributions of stress and dissipation around the propagating crack tip are presented. The predicted crack tip profiles also agree qualitatively with experimental findings.

  8. The second RPA description for the decay of the one-phonon nuclear collective states at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannouleas, C.; Jang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The zero-temperature second RPA is generalized to finite temperatures through the use of the method of linearization of the equations of motion. After elimination of the quadruples, for low enough temperatures and within the subspace spanned by the doubles, a proper symmetrization yields an eigenvalue equation which exhibits formal properties like the simple RPA. From this second RPA eigenvalue equation, a closed formula for the spreading width of an isolated collective state is extracted. The second RPA can be recast in the form of a generalized collision term and be compared with the method of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-body Green function. However, the second RPA method (and results) contrasts with the approach (and corresponding results) of the Boltzmann collision term, which is usually viewed as the appropriate agent for nuclear dissipation. (orig.)

  9. Reversed-field pinch configuration with minimum energy and finite beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1989-01-01

    The reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration has been studied for the case of finite beta. Suydam's condition and the sufficient criterion have been used to examine this configuration. Results of numerical calculations show that the critical value of the pinch parameter Θ for the appearance of the reverse toroidal field increases as the β-value increases. The critical value of Θ for the helical state increases with β as well. Suydam's and Robinson's stability regions increase and shift towards higher values of Θ with increasing β. Theoretical results for finite β coincide with recent RFP experimental results

  10. Biobanks in the United States: how to identify an undefined and rapidly evolving population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Gregory J; Whipple, Warren; Cadigan, R Jean; Henderson, Gail E

    2012-12-01

    As part of a larger organizational study, we sought to survey biobanks in the United States. However, we encountered two problems with this population. First, no common definition of biobanks exists. Second, no census is available of these facilities from which to sample in order to implement a survey. In light of these problems, we employed a multifaceted approach using electronic searches of PubMed, RePORTER, and Google. In addition, we systematically searched for biobanks housed within universities that have NIH-designated Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). We expanded this part of the search by looking for biobanks among all members of the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). Finally, we added banks to our database found previously by other researchers and banks found via correspondence with our colleagues. Our search strategy produced a database of 624 biobanks for which we were able to confirm contact information in order to conduct our online survey. Another 140 biobanks were identified but did not respond to our requests to confirm their existence or contact information. In order to maximize both the uniqueness of banks found and the greatest return on effort for each search, we suggest targeting resources that are already organized. In our work, these included the CTSA, AAMC, and part of the Google searches. We contend that our search provides a model for analysis of new fields of research and/or rapidly evolving industries. Furthermore, our approach demonstrates that with the appropriate tools it is possible to develop a systematic and comprehensive database to investigate undefined populations.

  11. Computations of finite temperature QCD with the pseudofermion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucito, F.; Solomon, S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss the phase diagram of finite temperature QCD as it is obtained including the effects of dynamical quarks by the pseudofermion method. They compare their results with the results obtained by other groups and comment on the actual state of the art for these kind of computations

  12. Finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the relation between finiteness of a four-dimensional quantum field theory and global supersymmetry. To this end we consider the most general quantum field theory and analyse the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of the absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of the theory. In addition to the gauge bosons, both fermions and scalar bosons turn out to be a necessary ingredient in a non-trivial finite gauge theory. In all cases discussed, the supersymmetric theory restricted by two well-known constraints on the dimensionless couplings proves to be the unique solution of the finiteness conditions. (Author)

  13. Determination of Fracture Parameters for Multiple Cracks of Laminated Composite Finite Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Arora, P. K.; Srivastava, Sharad Chandra; Kumar, Harish; Lohumi, M. K.

    2018-04-01

    A predictive method for estimation of stress state at zone of crack tip and assessment of remaining component lifetime depend on the stress intensity factor (SIF). This paper discusses the numerical approach for prediction of first ply failure load (FL), progressive failure load, SIF and critical SIF for multiple cracks configurations of laminated composite finite plate using finite element method (FEM). The Hashin and Chang failure criterion are incorporated in ABAQUS using subroutine approach user defined field variables (USDFLD) for prediction of progressive fracture response of laminated composite finite plate, which is not directly available in the software. A tensile experiment on laminated composite finite plate with stress concentration is performed to validate the numerically predicted subroutine results, shows excellent agreement. The typical results are presented to examine effect of changing the crack tip distance (S), crack offset distance (H), and stacking fiber angle (θ) on FL, and SIF .

  14. Comparisons of Particle Tracking Techniques and Galerkin Finite Element Methods in Flow Simulations on Watershed Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.; Yeh, G.

    2009-12-01

    This paper applies two numerical approximations, the particle tracking technique and Galerkin finite element method, to solve the diffusive wave equation in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow simulations. The finite element method is one of most commonly approaches in numerical problems. It can obtain accurate solutions, but calculation times may be rather extensive. The particle tracking technique, using either single-velocity or average-velocity tracks to efficiently perform advective transport, could use larger time-step sizes than the finite element method to significantly save computational time. Comparisons of the alternative approximations are examined in this poster. We adapt the model WASH123D to examine the work. WASH123D is an integrated multimedia, multi-processes, physics-based computational model suitable for various spatial-temporal scales, was first developed by Yeh et al., at 1998. The model has evolved in design capability and flexibility, and has been used for model calibrations and validations over the course of many years. In order to deliver a locally hydrological model in Taiwan, the Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) is working with Prof. Yeh to develop next version of WASH123D. So, the work of our preliminary cooperationx is also sketched in this poster.

  15. Influence of the nuclear matter equation of state on the r-mode instability using the finite-range simple effective interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, S. P.; Routray, T. R.; Viñas, X.; Basu, D. N.; Centelles, M.; Madhuri, K.; Behera, B.

    2018-05-01

    The characteristic physical properties of rotating neutron stars under the r-mode oscillation are evaluated using the finite-range simple effective interaction. Emphasis is given on examining the influence of the stiffness of both the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the nuclear equation of state on these properties. The amplitude of the r-mode at saturation is calculated using the data of particular neutron stars from the considerations of ‘spin equilibrium’ and ‘thermal equilibrium’. The upper limit of the r-mode saturation amplitude is found to lie in the range 10‑8–10‑6, in agreement with the predictions of earlier work.

  16. Evolving Technologies: A View to Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin, Molly; Rodrigo, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    Technology leaders must participate in strategy creation as well as operational delivery within higher education institutions. The future of higher education--the view to tomorrow--is irrevocably integrated and intertwined with evolving technologies. This article focuses on two specific evolving technologies: (1) alternative IT sourcing; and (2)…

  17. 3-D thermal analysis using finite difference technique with finite element model for improved design of components of rocket engine turbomachines for Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kiho D.; Ip, Shek-Se P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite element models were generated and transferred into three-dimensional finite difference models to perform transient thermal analyses for the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump's first stage nozzles and rotor blades. STANCOOL was chosen to calculate the heat transfer characteristics (HTCs) around the airfoils, and endwall effects were included at the intersections of the airfoils and platforms for the steady-state boundary conditions. Free and forced convection due to rotation effects were also considered in hollow cores. Transient HTCs were calculated by taking ratios of the steady-state values based on the flow rates and fluid properties calculated at each time slice. Results are presented for both transient plots and three-dimensional color contour isotherm plots; they were also converted into universal files to be used for FEM stress analyses.

  18. Finite-Time H∞ Filtering for Linear Continuous Time-Varying Systems with Uncertain Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihong Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the finite-time H∞ filtering problem for linear continuous time-varying systems with uncertain observations and ℒ2-norm bounded noise. The design of finite-time H∞ filter is equivalent to the problem that a certain indefinite quadratic form has a minimum and the filter is such that the minimum is positive. The quadratic form is related to a Krein state-space model according to the Krein space linear estimation theory. By using the projection theory in Krein space, the finite-time H∞ filtering problem is solved. A numerical example is given to illustrate the performance of the H∞ filter.

  19. Instability of flat space at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.J.; Perry, M.J.; Yaffe, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The instabilities of quantum gravity are investigated using the path-integral formulation of Einstein's theory. A brief review is given of the classical gravitational instabilities, as well as the stability of flat space. The Euclidean path-integral representation of the partition function is employed to discuss the instability of flat space at finite temperature. Semiclassical, or saddle-point, approximations are utilized. We show how the Jeans instability arises as a tachyon in the graviton propagator when small perturbations about hot flat space are considered. The effect due to the Schwarzschild instanton is studied. The small fluctuations about this instanton are analyzed and a negative mode is discovered. This produces, in the semiclassical approximation, an imaginary part of the free energy. This is interpreted as being due to the metastability of hot flat space to nucleate black holes. These then evolve by evaporation or by accretion of thermal gravitons, leading to the instability of hot flat space. The nucleation rate of black holes is calculated as a function of temperature

  20. Finite fields and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mullen, Gary L

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a brief and accessible introduction to the theory of finite fields and to some of their many fascinating and practical applications. The first chapter is devoted to the theory of finite fields. After covering their construction and elementary properties, the authors discuss the trace and norm functions, bases for finite fields, and properties of polynomials over finite fields. Each of the remaining chapters details applications. Chapter 2 deals with combinatorial topics such as the construction of sets of orthogonal latin squares, affine and projective planes, block designs, and Hadamard matrices. Chapters 3 and 4 provide a number of constructions and basic properties of error-correcting codes and cryptographic systems using finite fields. Each chapter includes a set of exercises of varying levels of difficulty which help to further explain and motivate the material. Appendix A provides a brief review of the basic number theory and abstract algebra used in the text, as well as exercises rel...

  1. On finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties that make massless versions of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory and a class of N = 2 supersymmetric theories finite are: (I) a universal coupling for the gauge and matter interactions, (II) anomaly-free representations to which the bosonic and fermionic matter belong, and (III) no charge renormalisation, i.e. β(g) = 0. It was conjectured that field theories constructed out of N = 1 matter multiplets are also finite if they too share the above properties. Explicit calculations have verified these theories to be finite up to two loops. The implications of the finiteness conditions for N = 1 finite field theories with SU(M) gauge symmetry are discussed. (orig.)

  2. SIMULATION FROM ENDPOINT-CONDITIONED, CONTINUOUS-TIME MARKOV CHAINS ON A FINITE STATE SPACE, WITH APPLICATIONS TO MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobolth, Asger; Stone, Eric A

    2009-09-01

    Analyses of serially-sampled data often begin with the assumption that the observations represent discrete samples from a latent continuous-time stochastic process. The continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) is one such generative model whose popularity extends to a variety of disciplines ranging from computational finance to human genetics and genomics. A common theme among these diverse applications is the need to simulate sample paths of a CTMC conditional on realized data that is discretely observed. Here we present a general solution to this sampling problem when the CTMC is defined on a discrete and finite state space. Specifically, we consider the generation of sample paths, including intermediate states and times of transition, from a CTMC whose beginning and ending states are known across a time interval of length T. We first unify the literature through a discussion of the three predominant approaches: (1) modified rejection sampling, (2) direct sampling, and (3) uniformization. We then give analytical results for the complexity and efficiency of each method in terms of the instantaneous transition rate matrix Q of the CTMC, its beginning and ending states, and the length of sampling time T. In doing so, we show that no method dominates the others across all model specifications, and we give explicit proof of which method prevails for any given Q, T, and endpoints. Finally, we introduce and compare three applications of CTMCs to demonstrate the pitfalls of choosing an inefficient sampler.

  3. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes

  4. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  5. $\\delta$-Expansion at Finite Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Rudnei O.

    1996-01-01

    We apply the $\\delta$-expansion perturbation scheme to the $\\lambda \\phi^{4}$ self-interacting scalar field theory in 3+1 D at finite temperature. In the $\\delta$-expansion the interaction term is written as $\\lambda (\\phi^{2})^{ 1 + \\delta}$ and $\\delta$ is considered as the perturbation parameter. We compute within this perturbative approach the renormalized mass at finite temperature at a finite order in $\\delta$. The results are compared with the usual loop-expansion at finite temperature.

  6. Finite spatial volume approach to finite temperature field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Nathan

    1981-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory at finite temperature T=β -1 is equivalent to the same field theory at zero temperature but with one spatial dimension of finite length β. This equivalence is discussed for scalars, for fermions, and for gauge theories. The relationship is checked for free field theory. The translation of correlation functions between the two formulations is described with special emphasis on the nonlocal order parameters of gauge theories. Possible applications are mentioned. (auth)

  7. Dual and primal mixed Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods in heat transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loula, A.F.D.; Toledo, E.M.

    1988-12-01

    New mixed finite element formulations for the steady state heat transfer problem are presented with no limitation in the choice of conforming finite element spaces. Adding least square residual forms of the governing equations of the classical Galerkin formulation the original saddle point problem is transformed into a minimization problem. Stability analysis, error estimates and numerical results are presented, confirming the error estimates and the good performance of this new formulation. (author) [pt

  8. Partial Finite-Time Synchronization of Switched Stochastic Chua's Circuits via Sliding-Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Lin Wan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of partial finite-time synchronization between switched stochastic Chua's circuits accompanied by a time-driven switching law. Based on the Ito formula and Lyapunov stability theory, a sliding-mode controller is developed to guarantee the synchronization of switched stochastic master-slave Chua's circuits and for the mean of error states to obtain the partial finite-time stability. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  9. General renormalized statistical approach with finite cross-field correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakulenko, M.O.

    1992-01-01

    The renormalized statistical approach is proposed, accounting for finite correlations of potential and magnetic fluctuations. It may be used for analysis of a wide class of nonlinear model equations describing the cross-correlated plasma states. The influence of a cross spectrum on stationary potential and magnetic ones is investigated. 10 refs. (author)

  10. Equations of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with effective finite-rank separable interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Basic equations are derived for the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model for the finite-rank separable isoscalar and isovector multipole and spin-multipole and isovector tensor particle-hole and particle-particle interactions between quasiparticles. For even-even spherical nuclei it is shown that in the calculation of single-phonon states in the random phase approximation a significant complication arises due to the finite rank n max >1 of separable interactions. Taking into account separable interactions with n max >1 does not lead to significant difficulties in the calculation of fragmentation of quasiparticle and collective states. It is asserted that the model can be used as a basis for calculations of many characteristics of complex nuclei

  11. Transition to Pulse-Like Rupture, With and Without Inclusion of Evolving Temperature and Pore Pressure, When Accounting for Extreme Weakening at High Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Dunham, E. M.; Rice, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted rupture propagation simulations incorporating the combined effects of thermal pressurization of pore fluid by distributed heating within a finite width shear zone, and flash heating of microscopic contacts. These are probably the primary weakening mechanisms at high coseismic slip rates. For flash heating, we use a rate- and state-dependent friction law in the slip law formulation, accounting for extreme velocity weakening above a weakening slip rate Vw ~ 0.1 m/s that depends on the background temperature, and a very short state evolution distance, L, of ~ 10 μm, which is comparable to the asperity length. We have also conducted a series of calculations with neglecting evolving change in macroscopic temperature, T, and pore pressure, p, and compared the results. Slip rate, V, at a point on a fault increases when a rupture front approaches, and decreases behind it. In the pulse-like solutions, V decreases below Vw, and the point is eventually locked. On the other hand, in the crack-like solutions, V increases again only if we allow evolving change in T and p. In the cases when we neglect changes in T and p, V continues to decrease behind the rupture front as long as we simulate. Here, a question emerges; is the solution crack-like because of the short calculation time? Zheng and Rice [1998] proposed an intuitive criterion between crack-like and pulse-like solutions as follows: If and only if the background shear stress, τb, is larger than a critical value, τpulse, there are roots of τss(V) = τb - μ V/2 cs, where τss is steady-state strength, μ is shear modulus and cs is shear speed. If TZR = - (μ/2cs)/(dτss/dV) at the largest root is near unity, the solution is pulse-like. Our calculations without T and p changes show that the pulse-like solution regime extends above τpulse, at least up to the point where TZR = 0.176, if a rupture is initiated by a perturbation in shear stress in a certain manner. The transition time to pulse

  12. Finite-dimensional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinsilver, Philip; Schott, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We discuss topics related to finite-dimensional calculus in the context of finite-dimensional quantum mechanics. The truncated Heisenberg-Weyl algebra is called a TAA algebra after Tekin, Aydin and Arik who formulated it in terms of orthofermions. It is shown how to use a matrix approach to implement analytic representations of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra in univariate and multivariate settings. We provide examples for the univariate case. Krawtchouk polynomials are presented in detail, including a review of Krawtchouk polynomials that illustrates some curious properties of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, as well as presenting an approach to computing Krawtchouk expansions. From a mathematical perspective, we are providing indications as to how to implement infinite terms Rota's 'finite operator calculus'.

  13. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  14. Evolving phenotypic networks in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Evolved gene networks are constrained by natural selection. Their structures and functions are consequently far from being random, as exemplified by the multiple instances of parallel/convergent evolution. One can thus ask if features of actual gene networks can be recovered from evolutionary first principles. I review a method for in silico evolution of small models of gene networks aiming at performing predefined biological functions. I summarize the current implementation of the algorithm, insisting on the construction of a proper "fitness" function. I illustrate the approach on three examples: biochemical adaptation, ligand discrimination and vertebrate segmentation (somitogenesis). While the structure of the evolved networks is variable, dynamics of our evolved networks are usually constrained and present many similar features to actual gene networks, including properties that were not explicitly selected for. In silico evolution can thus be used to predict biological behaviours without a detailed knowledge of the mapping between genotype and phenotype. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. canEvolve: a web portal for integrative oncogenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kemal Samur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Genome-wide profiles of tumors obtained using functional genomics platforms are being deposited to the public repositories at an astronomical scale, as a result of focused efforts by individual laboratories and large projects such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA and the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Consequently, there is an urgent need for reliable tools that integrate and interpret these data in light of current knowledge and disseminate results to biomedical researchers in a user-friendly manner. We have built the canEvolve web portal to meet this need. RESULTS: canEvolve query functionalities are designed to fulfill most frequent analysis needs of cancer researchers with a view to generate novel hypotheses. canEvolve stores gene, microRNA (miRNA and protein expression profiles, copy number alterations for multiple cancer types, and protein-protein interaction information. canEvolve allows querying of results of primary analysis, integrative analysis and network analysis of oncogenomics data. The querying for primary analysis includes differential gene and miRNA expression as well as changes in gene copy number measured with SNP microarrays. canEvolve provides results of integrative analysis of gene expression profiles with copy number alterations and with miRNA profiles as well as generalized integrative analysis using gene set enrichment analysis. The network analysis capability includes storage and visualization of gene co-expression, inferred gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interaction information. Finally, canEvolve provides correlations between gene expression and clinical outcomes in terms of univariate survival analysis. CONCLUSION: At present canEvolve provides different types of information extracted from 90 cancer genomics studies comprising of more than 10,000 patients. The presence of multiple data types, novel integrative analysis for identifying regulators of oncogenesis, network

  16. The detection and stabilisation of limit cycle for deterministic finite automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zengqiang; Liu, Zhongxin; Zhang, Qing

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the topological structure properties of deterministic finite automata (DFA), under the framework of the semi-tensor product of matrices, are investigated. First, the dynamics of DFA are converted into a new algebraic form as a discrete-time linear system by means of Boolean algebra. Using this algebraic description, the approach of calculating the limit cycles of different lengths is given. Second, we present two fundamental concepts, namely, domain of attraction of limit cycle and prereachability set. Based on the prereachability set, an explicit solution of calculating domain of attraction of a limit cycle is completely characterised. Third, we define the globally attractive limit cycle, and then the necessary and sufficient condition for verifying whether all state trajectories of a DFA enter a given limit cycle in a finite number of transitions is given. Fourth, the problem of whether a DFA can be stabilised to a limit cycle by the state feedback controller is discussed. Criteria for limit cycle-stabilisation are established. All state feedback controllers which implement the minimal length trajectories from each state to the limit cycle are obtained by using the proposed algorithm. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the theoretical results.

  17. Mesh-size errors in diffusion-theory calculations using finite-difference and finite-element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.R.

    1982-07-01

    A study has been performed of mesh-size errors in diffusion-theory calculations using finite-difference and finite-element methods. As the objective was to illuminate the issues, the study was performed for a 1D slab model of a reactor with one neutron-energy group for which analytical solutions were possible. A computer code SLAB was specially written to perform the finite-difference and finite-element calculations and also to obtain the analytical solutions. The standard finite-difference equations were obtained by starting with an expansion of the neutron current in powers of the mesh size, h, and keeping terms as far as h 2 . It was confirmed that these equations led to the well-known result that the criticality parameter varied with the square of the mesh size. An improved form of the finite-difference equations was obtained by continuing the expansion for the neutron current as far as the term in h 4 . In this case, the critical parameter varied as the fourth power of the mesh size. The finite-element solutions for 2 and 3 nodes per element revealed that the criticality parameter varied as the square and fourth power of the mesh size, respectively. Numerical results are presented for a bare reactive core of uniform composition with 2 zones of different uniform mesh and for a reactive core with an absorptive reflector. (author)

  18. A review on application of finite element modelling in bone biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Parashar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades the finite element modelling has been developed as an effective tool for modelling and simulation of the biomedical engineering system. Finite element modelling (FEM is a computational technique which can be used to solve the biomedical engineering problems based on the theories of continuum mechanics. This paper presents the state of art review on finite element modelling application in the four areas of bone biomechanics, i.e., analysis of stress and strain, determination of mechanical properties, fracture fixation design (implants, and fracture load prediction. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive detail about the development in the area of application of FEM in bone biomechanics during the last decades. It will help the researchers and the clinicians alike for the better treatment of patients and future development of new fixation designs.

  19. Infinite coherence time of edge spins in finite-length chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceira, Ivo A.; Mila, Frédéric

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the recent observation that exponentially long coherence times can be achieved for edge spins in models with strong zero modes, we study the impact of level crossings in finite-length spin chains on the dynamics of the edge spins. Focusing on the X Y spin-1 /2 chain with a transverse or longitudinal magnetic field, two models relevant to understanding recent experimental results on cobalt adatoms, we show that the edge spins can remain coherent for an infinite time even for a finite-length chain if the magnetic field is tuned to a value at which there is a level crossing. Furthermore, we show that the edge spins remain coherent for any initial state for the integrable case of a transverse field because all states have level crossings at the same value of the field, while the coherence time is increasingly large for lower temperatures in the case of a longitudinal field, which is nonintegrable.

  20. Structure of the vertex function in finite quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1975-01-01

    We study the structure of the renormalized electromagnetic current vertes, GAMMA-tilde/sub μ/(p,p+q,q), in finite quantum electrodynamics. Using conformal invariance we find that GAMMA-tilde/sub μ/(p,p,0) takes the simple form of Z 1 γ/sub μ/ when the external fermions are far off the mass shell. We interpret this result as an old theorem on the structure of the vertex function due to Gell--Mann and Zachariasen. We give the general structure of the vertex for arbitrary momentum transfer parametrically, and discuss how the Bethe--Salpeter equation and the Federbush--Johnson theorem are satisfied. We contrast the meaning of pointlike in a finite field theory with the meaning understood in the parton model. We discuss to what extent the condition Z 1 = 0, which may hold in conformal theories other than finite quantum electrodynamics, may be interpreted as a bootstrap condition. We show that the vanishing of Z 1 prevents their being bound states in the Migdal--Polyakov bootstrap

  1. Comparison of 3-D finite elements for incompressible fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaud, M.; Tanguy, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, the finite element method applied to the solution of incompressible fluid flow has been in constant evolution. In the present state-of-the-art, 2-D problems are solved routinely and reliable results are obtained at a reasonable cost. In 3-D the finite element method is still undergoing active research and many methods have been proposed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at 'low cost'. These methods have in common the choice of the element which has a trilinear velocity and a discontinuous constant pressure (Q1-PO). The prohibitive cost of 3-D finite element method in fluid flow is the reason for this choice: the Q1-PO is the simplest and the cheapest 3-D element. However, as mentioned in (5) and (6), it generates 'spurious' pressure modes phenomenon called checkerboarding. On regular mesh these spurious modes can be filtered but on distorted mesh the pressure solution is meaningless. (author)

  2. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  3. Efimov states near a Feshbach resonance and the limits of van der Waals universality at finite background scattering length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Schmidt, Richard; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the spectrum of three-body Efimov bound states near a Feshbach resonance within a model which accounts both for the finite range of interactions and the presence of background scattering. The latter may be due to direct interactions in an open channel or a second overlapping Feshbach resonance. It is found that background scattering gives rise to substantial changes in the trimer spectrum as a function of the detuning away from a Feshbach resonance, in particular in the regime where the background channel supports Efimov states on its own. Compared to the situation with negligible background scattering, the regime where van der Waals universality applies is shifted to larger values of the resonance strength if the background scattering length is positive. For negative background scattering lengths, in turn, van der Waals universality extends to even small values of the resonance strength parameter, consistent with experimental results on Efimov states in 39K. Within a simple model, we show that short-range three-body forces do not affect van der Waals universality significantly. Repulsive three-body forces may, however, explain the observed variation between around -8 and -10 of the ratio between the scattering length where the first Efimov trimer appears and the van der Waals length.

  4. Relativistic Random-Phase Approximation with Density-dependent Meson-nucleon Couplings at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Y.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-01-01

    The fully self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA) framework based on effective interactions with a phenomenological density dependence is extended to finite temperatures. The RRPA configuration space is built from the spectrum of single-nucleon states at finite temperature obtained by the temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) theory based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon vertex functions. As an illustration, the dependence of binding energy, radius, entropy and single particle levels on temperature for spherical nucleus 2 08P b is investigated in RMF-T theory. The finite temperature RRPA has been employed in studies of giant monopole and dipole resonances, and the evolution of resonance properties has been studied as a function of temperature. In addition, exotic modes of excitation have been systematically explored at finite temperatures, with an emphasis on the case of pygmy dipole resonances.(author)

  5. Heat transfer model and finite element formulation for simulation of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Souvik; Juha, Mario; Shephard, Mark S.; Maniatty, Antoinette M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach and finite element formulation for modeling the melting, consolidation, and re-solidification process that occurs in selective laser melting additive manufacturing is presented. Two state variables are introduced to track the phase (melt/solid) and the degree of consolidation (powder/fully dense). The effect of the consolidation on the absorption of the laser energy into the material as it transforms from a porous powder to a dense melt is considered. A Lagrangian finite element formulation, which solves the governing equations on the unconsolidated reference configuration is derived, which naturally considers the effect of the changing geometry as the powder melts without needing to update the simulation domain. The finite element model is implemented into a general-purpose parallel finite element solver. Results are presented comparing to experimental results in the literature for a single laser track with good agreement. Predictions for a spiral laser pattern are also shown.

  6. Multichannel 1 → 2 transition amplitudes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, Raul A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Hansen, Maxwell T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Walker-Loud, Andre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-02-03

    We perform a model-independent, non-perturbative investigation of two-point and three-point finite-volume correlation functions in the energy regime where two-particle states can go on-shell. We study three-point functions involving a single incoming particle and an outgoing two-particle state, relevant, for example, for studies of meson decays (e.g., B⁰ → K*l⁺l⁻) or meson photo production (e.g., πγ* → ππ). We observe that, while the spectrum solely depends upon the on-shell scattering amplitude, the correlation functions also depend upon off-shell amplitudes. The main result of this work is a non-perturbative generalization of the Lellouch-Luscher formula relating matrix elements of currents in finite and infinite spatial volumes. We extend that work by considering a theory with multiple, strongly-coupled channels and by accommodating external currents which inject arbitrary four-momentum as well as arbitrary angular-momentum. The result is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections governed by the pion mass times the box size. We also apply our master equation to various examples, including two processes mentioned above as well as examples where the final state is an admixture of two open channels.

  7. Guaranteed Cost Finite-Time Control of Fractional-Order Positive Switched Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leipo Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of guaranteed cost finite-time control of fractional-order positive switched systems (FOPSS is considered in this paper. Firstly, a new cost function is defined. Then, by constructing linear copositive Lyapunov functions and using the average dwell time (ADT approach, a state feedback controller and a static output feedback controller are constructed, respectively, and sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee that the corresponding closed-loop systems are guaranteed cost finite-time stable (GCFTS. Such conditions can be easily solved by linear programming. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Finite flavour groups of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimus, Walter; Ludl, Patrick Otto

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the theory of finite groups, with regard to their application as flavour symmetries in particle physics. In a general part, we discuss useful theorems concerning group structure, conjugacy classes, representations and character tables. In a specialized part, we attempt to give a fairly comprehensive review of finite subgroups of SO(3) and SU(3), in which we apply and illustrate the general theory. Moreover, we also provide a concise description of the symmetric and alternating groups and comment on the relationship between finite subgroups of U(3) and finite subgroups of SU(3). Although in this review we give a detailed description of a wide range of finite groups, the main focus is on the methods which allow the exploration of their different aspects. (topical review)

  9. Finite elements and approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, O C

    2006-01-01

    A powerful tool for the approximate solution of differential equations, the finite element is extensively used in industry and research. This book offers students of engineering and physics a comprehensive view of the principles involved, with numerous illustrative examples and exercises.Starting with continuum boundary value problems and the need for numerical discretization, the text examines finite difference methods, weighted residual methods in the context of continuous trial functions, and piecewise defined trial functions and the finite element method. Additional topics include higher o

  10. On the Benefits of Divergent Search for Evolved Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Risi, Sebastian; Stanley, Kenneth O

    2012-01-01

    Evolved representations in evolutionary computation are often fragile, which can impede representation-dependent mechanisms such as self-adaptation. In contrast, evolved representations in nature are robust, evolvable, and creatively exploit available representational features. This paper provide...

  11. Navier-Stokes equations by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portella, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by using the Finite Element Method is implemented. The solutions variables investigated are stream-function/vorticity in the steady case and velocity/pressure in the steady state and transient cases. For steady state flow the equations are solved simultaneously by the Newton-Raphson method. For the time dependent formulation, a fractional step method is employed to discretize in time and artificial viscosity is used to preclude spurious oscilations in the solution. The element used is the three node triangle. Some numerical examples are presented and comparisons are made with applications already existent. (Author) [pt

  12. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  13. Finite Discrete Gabor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel

    2007-01-01

    frequency bands at certain times. Gabor theory can be formulated for both functions on the real line and for discrete signals of finite length. The two theories are largely the same because many aspects come from the same underlying theory of locally compact Abelian groups. The two types of Gabor systems...... can also be related by sampling and periodization. This thesis extends on this theory by showing new results for window construction. It also provides a discussion of the problems associated to discrete Gabor bases. The sampling and periodization connection is handy because it allows Gabor systems...... on the real line to be well approximated by finite and discrete Gabor frames. This method of approximation is especially attractive because efficient numerical methods exists for doing computations with finite, discrete Gabor systems. This thesis presents new algorithms for the efficient computation of finite...

  14. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc 2 /k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10 11 0 K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light

  15. Finite temperature system of strongly interacting baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.; Wheeler, J.W.

    1976-07-01

    A fully relativistic finite temperature many body theory is constructed and used to examine the bulk properties of a system of strongly interacting baryons. The strong interactions are described by a two parameter phenomenological model fit to a simple description of nuclear matter at T = 0. The zero temperature equation of state for such a system which has already been discussed in the literature was developed to give a realistic description of nuclear matter. The model presented here is the exact finite temperature extension of that model. The effect of the inclusion of baryon pairs for T greater than or equal to 2mc/sup 2//k is discussed in detail. The phase transition identified with nuclear matter vanishes for system temperatures in excess of T/sub C/ = 1.034 x 10/sup 11/ /sup 0/K. All values of epsilon (P,T) correspond to systems that are causal in the sense that the locally determined speed of sound never exceeds the speed of light.

  16. A finite range coupled channel Born approximation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, P.; Koshel, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The computer code OUKID calculates differential cross sections for direct transfer nuclear reactions in which multistep processes, arising from strongly coupled inelastic states in both the target and residual nuclei, are possible. The code is designed for heavy ion reactions where full finite range and recoil effects are important. Distorted wave functions for the elastic and inelastic scattering are calculated by solving sets of coupled differential equations using a Matrix Numerov integration procedure. These wave functions are then expanded into bases of spherical Bessel functions by the plane-wave expansion method. This approach allows the six-dimensional integrals for the transition amplitude to be reduced to products of two one-dimensional integrals. Thus, the inelastic scattering is treated in a coupled channel formalism while the transfer process is treated in a finite range born approximation formalism. (Auth.)

  17. Quantum phase crossovers with finite atom number in the Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J G; Castaños, O; Nahmad-Achar, E; López-Peña, R

    2013-01-01

    Two-level atoms interacting with a one-mode cavity field at zero temperature have order parameters which reflect the presence of a quantum phase transition at a critical value of the atom–cavity coupling strength. Two popular examples are the number of photons inside the cavity and the number of excited atoms. Coherent states provide a mean field description, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. Employing symmetry-adapted (SA) SU(2) coherent states the quantum crossover, precursor of the critical behavior, can be described for a finite number of atoms. A variation after projection treatment, involving a numerical minimization of the SA energy surface, associates the quantum crossover with a discontinuity in the order parameters, which originates from competition between two local minima in the SA energy surface. Although this discontinuity is not present in finite systems, it provides a good description of 1/N effects in the observables. (paper)

  18. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo; Kronbichler, Martin; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Today's large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Massively Parallel Finite Element Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Heister, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Today\\'s large finite element simulations require parallel algorithms to scale on clusters with thousands or tens of thousands of processor cores. We present data structures and algorithms to take advantage of the power of high performance computers in generic finite element codes. Existing generic finite element libraries often restrict the parallelization to parallel linear algebra routines. This is a limiting factor when solving on more than a few hundreds of cores. We describe routines for distributed storage of all major components coupled with efficient, scalable algorithms. We give an overview of our effort to enable the modern and generic finite element library deal.II to take advantage of the power of large clusters. In particular, we describe the construction of a distributed mesh and develop algorithms to fully parallelize the finite element calculation. Numerical results demonstrate good scalability. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  20. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms fr...

  1. Finite temperature effects in Bose-Einstein condensed dark matter halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Madarassy, Enikö J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Once the critical temperature of a cosmological boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Zero temperature condensed dark matter can be described as a non-relativistic, Newtonian gravitational condensate, whose density and pressure are related by a barotropic equation of state, with barotropic index equal to one. In the present paper we analyze the effects of the finite dark matter temperature on the properties of the dark matter halos. We formulate the basic equations describing the finite temperature condensate, representing a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation that takes into account the presence of the thermal cloud. The static condensate and thermal cloud in thermodynamic equilibrium is analyzed in detail, by using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and Thomas-Fermi approximations. The condensed dark matter and thermal cloud density and mass profiles at finite temperatures are explicitly obtained. Our results show that when the temperature of the condensate and of the thermal cloud are much smaller than the critical Bose-Einstein transition temperature, the zero temperature density and mass profiles give an excellent description of the dark matter halos. However, finite temperature effects may play an important role in the early stages of the cosmological evolution of the dark matter condensates

  2. Finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  3. EVOLVE

    CERN Document Server

    Deutz, André; Schütze, Oliver; Legrand, Pierrick; Tantar, Emilia; Tantar, Alexandru-Adrian

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises nine selected works on numerical and computational methods for solving multiobjective optimization, game theory, and machine learning problems. It provides extended versions of selected papers from various fields of science such as computer science, mathematics and engineering that were presented at EVOLVE 2013 held in July 2013 at Leiden University in the Netherlands. The internationally peer-reviewed papers include original work on important topics in both theory and applications, such as the role of diversity in optimization, statistical approaches to combinatorial optimization, computational game theory, and cell mapping techniques for numerical landscape exploration. Applications focus on aspects including robustness, handling multiple objectives, and complex search spaces in engineering design and computational biology.

  4. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  5. Jauch-Piron logics with finiteness conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogalewicz, V.

    1991-01-01

    An event structure (so-called quantum logic) of a quantum mechanical system is commonly assumed to be an orthomodular poset L. A state of such a system is then interpreted as a probability measure on L. It turns out that the orthomodular posets which may potentially serve as logics must have reasonably rich spaces of states. Moreover, the following condition on the state space appears among the axioms of a quantum system: if Φ is a state on a logic L, and Φ(a) = Φ(b) = 1 for some a, b element-of L, then there is a c element-of L such that c ≤ a, c ≤ b, and Φ(c) = 1. Such a state is said to be a Jauch-Piron state. If all states on L fulfill this condition, then L is called a Jauch-Piron logic. The condition was originally introduced by Jauch (1968) and Piron (1976). The author investigates unital Jauch-Piron logics with finitely many blocks (maximal Boolean subalgebras). He shows that such a logic is always Boolean, i.e., it represents a purely classical system. In other words, and orthomodular poset must have infinitely many blocks in order to describe a (nonclassical) quantum system

  6. Multigrid Finite Element Method in Calculation of 3D Homogeneous and Composite Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Matveev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a method of multigrid finite elements to calculate elastic three-dimensional homogeneous and composite solids under static loading has been suggested. The method has been developed based on the finite element method algorithms using homogeneous and composite three-dimensional multigrid finite elements (MFE. The procedures for construction of MFE of both rectangular parallelepiped and complex shapes have been shown. The advantages of MFE are that they take into account, following the rules of the microapproach, heterogeneous and microhomogeneous structures of the bodies, describe the three-dimensional stress-strain state (without any simplifying hypotheses in homogeneous and composite solids, as well as generate small dimensional discrete models and numerical solutions with a high accuracy.

  7. Super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick quantum gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a class of multidimensional higher derivative theories of gravity without extra real degrees of freedom besides the graviton field. The propagator shows up the usual real graviton pole in k2=0 and extra complex conjugates poles that do not contribute to the absorptive part of the physical scattering amplitudes. Indeed, they may consistently be excluded from the asymptotic observable states of the theory making use of the Lee–Wick and Cutkosky, Landshoff, Olive and Polkinghorne prescription for the construction of a unitary S-matrix. Therefore, the spectrum consists of the graviton and short lived elementary unstable particles that we named “anti-gravitons” because of their repulsive contribution to the gravitational potential at short distance. However, another interpretation of the complex conjugate pairs is proposed based on the Calmet's suggestion, i.e. they could be understood as black hole precursors long established in the classical theory. Since the theory is CPT invariant, the conjugate complex of the micro black hole precursor can be interpreted as a white hole precursor consistently with the 't Hooft complementarity principle. It is proved that the quantum theory is super-renormalizable in even dimension, i.e. only a finite number of divergent diagrams survive, and finite in odd dimension. Furthermore, turning on a local potential of the Riemann tensor we can make the theory finite in any dimension. The singularity-free Newtonian gravitational potential is explicitly computed for a range of higher derivative theories. Finally, we propose a new super-renormalizable or finite Lee–Wick standard model of particle physics.

  8. Revisiting Robustness and Evolvability: Evolution in Weighted Genotype Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, Raghavendran; Raman, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Robustness and evolvability are highly intertwined properties of biological systems. The relationship between these properties determines how biological systems are able to withstand mutations and show variation in response to them. Computational studies have explored the relationship between these two properties using neutral networks of RNA sequences (genotype) and their secondary structures (phenotype) as a model system. However, these studies have assumed every mutation to a sequence to be equally likely; the differences in the likelihood of the occurrence of various mutations, and the consequence of probabilistic nature of the mutations in such a system have previously been ignored. Associating probabilities to mutations essentially results in the weighting of genotype space. We here perform a comparative analysis of weighted and unweighted neutral networks of RNA sequences, and subsequently explore the relationship between robustness and evolvability. We show that assuming an equal likelihood for all mutations (as in an unweighted network), underestimates robustness and overestimates evolvability of a system. In spite of discarding this assumption, we observe that a negative correlation between sequence (genotype) robustness and sequence evolvability persists, and also that structure (phenotype) robustness promotes structure evolvability, as observed in earlier studies using unweighted networks. We also study the effects of base composition bias on robustness and evolvability. Particularly, we explore the association between robustness and evolvability in a sequence space that is AU-rich – sequences with an AU content of 80% or higher, compared to a normal (unbiased) sequence space. We find that evolvability of both sequences and structures in an AU-rich space is lesser compared to the normal space, and robustness higher. We also observe that AU-rich populations evolving on neutral networks of phenotypes, can access less phenotypic variation compared to

  9. Finite Element Method Study on Stress State in Soil Induced by Agricultural Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Molnar-Irimie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In general, when a tyre is running on a deformable soil, the soil compaction will occur not only on surface layers, but also on soil profile, in deeper layers. This leads to a series of negative effects not only on physical and mechanical properties of soil, but also influences the crops growth and the crop yield. For these reasons, currently are needed solutions to reduce soil compaction, caused mainly by agricultural implements passing on the soil surface in order to aply the specific crop production technologies. From our simulation we can draw the following conclusions: the soil stresses decreased with depth; the soil displacements magnitude increased with soil water content due to lower friction forces between soil particles (water acts like a lubricant between soil particles; decreasing rate for soil displacement is influenced by load magnitude and tyre inflation pressure; the soil particles moved in vertical plain from the top to the bottom, but also in horizontal direction, from the center to the edge in cross section and in longitudinal direction; the dimensions of the geometric shape of the mentioned soil volume is influenced by load and tyre inflation pressure. In this paper the agricultural traffic and its influence on stress state in soil, it was used a software application based on Finite Element Method, that has been proved to be a useful tool for soil compaction assessment in order to find the right decisions for a proper field traffic management.

  10. Evolving impact of environmental laws on cross-border power between Mexico and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron, J.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing concern among some United States (US) residents that the increasing number of merchant power plants planned for the Mexican side of the US/Mexican border could contribute to increased air pollution and the misuse of finite water resources in the border region. The case of Border Power Plant Working Group v. DOE, et al. is examined in this paper, providing a focus for a discussion of the border region's future as US merchant power producers continue to position themselves to provide electricity in California. One of the factors in the push to develop power generation on the Mexican side of the border was California's electricity crisis of 2000-2001, and plans have been drawn up to build 22 plants between Mexicali and Ciudad Juarez. A history of the Border Power Plant Working Group (BPPWG) was presented, along with details of the government's granting of permits for the power plants after environmental assessments. By suing the government BPPWG hoped to set a standard for future power plant development in the area. The lawsuit addressed the following 4 primary concerns: air emissions; emission offsets; water cooling; and wastewater discharge. BPPWG aimed to achieve the 3 following results: protective legislation in the 4 U.S. border states that would preclude the use of massive amounts of water in border power plant cooling systems; a critical area designation with pollution limits set low enough to require catalytic control systems; and an overarching annex to the La Paz Agreement that would create a formal bi-national agreement governing the above actions for both countries. A review of environmental law in both countries was presented, along with a description of the proposed plants. A complete review of the lawsuit was provided, along with eventual rulings against the BPPWG. It was concluded that the case showed that power developers had proved that although the plants would contribute to the environmental degradation of the region, the

  11. Fluid boundary of a viscoplastic Bingham flow for finite solid deformations

    OpenAIRE

    Thual , Olivier; Lacaze , Laurent

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The modelling of viscoplastic Bingham fluids often relies on a rheological constitutive law based on a "plastic rule function" often identical to the yield criterion of the solid state. It is also often assumed that this plastic rule function vanishes at the boundary between the solid and fluid states, based on the fact that it is true in the limit of small deformations of the solid state or for simple yield criteria. We show that this is not the case for finite deform...

  12. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  13. A method for predicting errors when interacting with finite state systems. How implicit learning shapes the user's knowledge of a system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaux, Denis

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a method for predicting the errors that may appear when human operators or users interact with systems behaving as finite state systems. The method is a generalization of a method used for predicting errors when interacting with autopilot modes on modern, highly computerized airliners [Proc 17th Digital Avionics Sys Conf (DASC) (1998); Proc 10th Int Symp Aviat Psychol (1999)]. A cognitive model based on spreading activation networks is used for predicting the user's model of the system and its impact on the production of errors. The model strongly posits the importance of implicit learning in user-system interaction and its possible detrimental influence on users' knowledge of the system. An experiment conducted with Airbus Industrie and a major European airline on pilots' knowledge of autopilot behavior on the A340-200/300 confirms the model predictions, and in particular the impact of the frequencies with which specific state transitions and contexts are experienced

  14. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  15. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-15

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  16. Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Falk

    2013-08-01

    We present the algebraic approach to perturbative quantum field theory for the real scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. In this work we put a special emphasis on the inherent state-independence of the framework and provide a detailed analysis of the state space. The dynamics of the interacting system is constructed in a novel way by virtue of the time-slice axiom in causal perturbation theory. This method sheds new light in the connection between quantum statistical dynamics and perturbative quantum field theory. In particular it allows the explicit construction of the KMS and vacuum state for the interacting, massive Klein-Gordon field which implies the absence of infrared divergences of the interacting theory at finite temperature, in particular for the interacting Wightman and time-ordered functions.

  17. Nonequilibrium Equation of State in Suspensions of Active Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Ginot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active colloids constitute a novel class of materials composed of colloidal-scale particles locally converting chemical energy into motility, mimicking micro-organisms. Evolving far from equilibrium, these systems display structural organizations and dynamical properties distinct from thermalized colloidal assemblies. Harvesting the potential of this new class of systems requires the development of a conceptual framework to describe these intrinsically nonequilibrium systems. We use sedimentation experiments to probe the nonequilibrium equation of state of a bidimensional assembly of active Janus microspheres and conduct computer simulations of a model of self-propelled hard disks. Self-propulsion profoundly affects the equation of state, but these changes can be rationalized using equilibrium concepts. We show that active colloids behave, in the dilute limit, as an ideal gas with an activity-dependent effective temperature. At finite density, increasing the activity is similar to increasing adhesion between equilibrium particles. We quantify this effective adhesion and obtain a unique scaling law relating activity and effective adhesion in both experiments and simulations. Our results provide a new and efficient way to understand the emergence of novel phases of matter in active colloidal suspensions.

  18. Relativistic equations of state at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.S.; Menezes, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    In this work we study the effects of temperature on the equations of state obtained within a relativistic model with and without β equilibrium, over a wide range of densities. We integrate the TOV equations. We also compare the results of the equation of state, effective mass and strangeness fraction from the TM1, NL3 and GL sets of parameters, as well as investigating the importance of antiparticles in the treatment. The have checked that TM1 and NL3 are not appropriate for the description of neutron and protoneutron stars. (author)

  19. Probabilistic finite element modeling of waste rollover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, M.A.; Cofer, W.F.; Al-fouqaha, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    Stratification of the wastes in many Hanford storage tanks has resulted in sludge layers which are capable of retaining gases formed by chemical and/or radiolytic reactions. As the gas is produced, the mechanisms of gas storage evolve until the resulting buoyancy in the sludge leads to instability, at which point the sludge ''rolls over'' and a significant volume of gas is suddenly released. Because the releases may contain flammable gases, these episodes of release are potentially hazardous. Mitigation techniques are desirable for more controlled releases at more frequent intervals. To aid the mitigation efforts, a methodology for predicting of sludge rollover at specific times is desired. This methodology would then provide a rational basis for the development of a schedule for the mitigation procedures. In addition, a knowledge of the sensitivity of the sludge rollovers to various physical and chemical properties within the tanks would provide direction for efforts to reduce the frequency and severity of these events. In this report, the use of probabilistic finite element analyses for computing the probability of rollover and the sensitivity of rollover probability to various parameters is described

  20. Modeling and simulation of liquid diffusion through a porous finitely elastic solid

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Qiangsheng; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    state variable. A finite element implementation is employed to assess the predictive capacity of the proposed theory, with particular emphasis on the mechanical response of Nafion® membranes to the flow of water. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation for the baryon-quark phase transition at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimura, Y.; Maruyama, T.; Chiba, S.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2005-01-01

    We study the baryon-quark phase transition in the molecular dynamics (MD) of the quark degrees of freedom at finite baryon density. The baryon state at low baryon density, and the deconfined quark state at high baryon density are reproduced. We investigate the equations of state of matters with different u-d-s compositions. It is found that the baryon-quark transition is sensitive to the quark width. (orig.)

  3. The Analysis of Quadrupole Magnetic Focusing Effect by Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utaja

    2003-01-01

    Quadrupole magnets will introduce focusing effect to a beam of the charge particle passing parallel to the magnet faces. The focusing effect is need to control the particle beam, so that it is in accordance with necessity requirement stated. This paper describes the analysis of focusing effect on the quadrupole magnetic by the finite element method. The finite element method in this paper is used for solve the potential distribution of magnetic field. If the potential magnetic field distribution in every node have known, a charge particle trajectory can be traced. This charge particle trajectory will secure the focusing effect of the quadrupole magnets. (author)

  4. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cong Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  5. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Wen-Cong, E-mail: ganwencong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shu, Fu-Wen, E-mail: shufuwen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wu, Meng-He, E-mail: menghewu.physik@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-09-10

    We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  6. Ground state metamorphosis for Yang-Mills fields on a finite periodic lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Arroyo, A.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Korthals-Altes, C.P.

    1983-01-01

    The authors study the weak coupling behaviour of the partition function of non-abelian gauge fields on a finite lattice. Periodic boundary conditions are imposed. Two different power laws in the coupling BETA -1 arise for the partition function, when the dimension d of space time is larger or smaller than a critical dimension d /SUB c/ . For SU(2) d /SUB c/ = 4 and they find at this dimension power behaviour corrected by log BETA. The phenomenon is of practical importance in Monte Carlo simulations of the twisted action

  7. The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Marc D; Chomsky, Noam; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2002-11-22

    We argue that an understanding of the faculty of language requires substantial interdisciplinary cooperation. We suggest how current developments in linguistics can be profitably wedded to work in evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, and neuroscience. We submit that a distinction should be made between the faculty of language in the broad sense (FLB) and in the narrow sense (FLN). FLB includes a sensory-motor system, a conceptual-intentional system, and the computational mechanisms for recursion, providing the capacity to generate an infinite range of expressions from a finite set of elements. We hypothesize that FLN only includes recursion and is the only uniquely human component of the faculty of language. We further argue that FLN may have evolved for reasons other than language, hence comparative studies might look for evidence of such computations outside of the domain of communication (for example, number, navigation, and social relations).

  8. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrev, Veselin A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kolev, Tzanio V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rieben, Robert N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  9. The finite temperature QCD phase transition and the thermodynamic equation of state. An investigation employing lattice QCD with Nf=2 twisted mass quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we report about an investigation of the finite temperature crossover/phase transition of quantum chromodynamics and the evaluation of the thermodynamic equation of state. To this end the lattice method and the Wilson twisted mass discretisation of the quark action are used. This formulation is known to have an automatic improvement of lattice artifacts and thus an improved continuum limit behaviour. This work presents first robust results using this action for the non-vanishing temperature case. We investigate the chiral limit of the two flavour phase transition with several small values of the pion mass in order to address the open question of the order of the transition in the limit of vanishing quark mass. For the currently simulated pion masses in the range of 300 to 700 MeV we present evidence that the finite temperature transition is a crossover transition rather than a genuine phase transition. The chiral limit is investigated by comparing the scaling of the observed crossover temperature with the mass including several possible scenarios. Complementary to this approach the chiral condensate as the order parameter for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is analysed in comparison with the O(4) universal scaling function which characterises a second order transition. With respect to thermodynamics the equation of state is obtained from the trace anomaly employing the temperature integral method which provides the pressure and energy density in the crossover region. The continuum limit of the trace anomaly is studied by considering several values of N τ and the tree-level correction technique.

  10. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Bulge Forming of Laser Welding Dimple Jacket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisi ZHONG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The stress-strain states of the model of laser welded dimple jacket is analyzed using ANSYS/LS-DYNA in order to determine the relation between bulging height and pressure and to achieve the controllability of pressure distension of the jacket. It is shown that in the same conditions, the bulging height increases with the increasing of the bulging pressure and the space of honeycomb. And it will decrease when the thickness of jacket plate changing larger. A table showing the relation between bulging height and pressure is obtained. An experiment using a test panel is conducted to certify the reliability of finite element analysis. It turns out that the data of finite element analysis is coincident with experimental data, which support finite element method based ANSYS/LS-DYNA can be an efficient way to research the laser welded dimple jacket. The relation table is useful as guidance for the fabrication process.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9704

  12. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences, which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  13. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences), which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  14. Neural Network Based Finite-Time Stabilization for Discrete-Time Markov Jump Nonlinear Systems with Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization problem for discrete-time Markov jump nonlinear systems with time delays and norm-bounded exogenous disturbance. The nonlinearities in different jump modes are parameterized by neural networks. Subsequently, a linear difference inclusion state space representation for a class of neural networks is established. Based on this, sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities to guarantee stochastic finite-time boundedness and stochastic finite-time stabilization of the closed-loop system. A numerical example is illustrated to verify the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  15. Momentum distribution functions in ensembles: the inequivalence of microcannonical and canonical ensembles in a finite ultracold system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Xianlong, Gao; Li, Haibin

    2013-08-01

    It is demonstrated in many thermodynamic textbooks that the equivalence of the different ensembles is achieved in the thermodynamic limit. In this present work we discuss the inequivalence of microcanonical and canonical ensembles in a finite ultracold system at low energies. We calculate the microcanonical momentum distribution function (MDF) in a system of identical fermions (bosons). We find that the microcanonical MDF deviates from the canonical one, which is the Fermi-Dirac (Bose-Einstein) function, in a finite system at low energies where the single-particle density of states and its inverse are finite.

  16. Magnetic flux periodicities and finite momentum pairing in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loder, Florian

    2009-12-22

    This work contains a thorough study of the magnetic flux periodicity of loops of conventional and unconventional, especially d-wave, superconductors. Although already in 1961, several independent works showed that the flux period of a conventional superconducting loop is the superconducting flux quantum hc/2e, this question has never been investigated deeply for unconventional superconductors. And indeed, we show here that d-wave superconducting loops show a basic flux period of the normal flux quantum hc/e, a property originating from the nodal quasi-particle states. This doubling of the flux periodicity is best visible in the persistent current circulating in the loop, and it affects other properties of the superconductor such as the periodicity of d-wave Josephson junctions. In the second part of this work, the theory of electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum, necessary for the description of superconducting loops, is extended to systems in zero magnetic field. We show that even in the field free case, an unconventional pairing symmetry can lead to a superconducting ground state with finite-momentum electron pairs. Such a state has an inhomogeneous charge density and therefore is a basis for the description of coexistence of superconductivity and stripe order. (orig.)

  17. Evolvability as a Quality Attribute of Software Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Duchien, Laurence; D'Hondt, Maja; Mens, Tom

    We review the definition of evolvability as it appears on the literature. In particular, the concept of software evolvability is compared with other system quality attributes, such as adaptability, maintainability and modifiability.

  18. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  19. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J-N.G.; Kurita, Gen-ichi.

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  20. Another way to approach zero entropy for a finite system of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.S.; Vala, J.; Myrgren, S.; Whaley, K.B.; Thapliyal, A.V.; Vazirani, U.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a way to manifestly reduce the entropy of a finite system of atoms to arbitrarily small values. First, the locations of vacancies of laser-cooled atoms in a deep optical lattice are measured. Then, the distribution is efficiently compacted using a combination of site-specific atomic state flips and state-sensitive lattice site translations. In the final state, the central region of the lattice has exactly one atom per site in its vibrational ground state. This is a good initial state for a quantum computer. The process can be understood to be an experimentally viable Maxwell demon with a memory

  1. Finite size effects in the evaporation rate of 3He clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guirao, A.; Pi, M.; Barranco, M.

    1991-01-01

    We have computed the density of states and the evaporation rate of 3 He clusters, paying special attention to finite size effects which modify the 3 He level density parameter and chemical potential from their bulk values. Ready-to-use liquid-drop expansions of these quantities are given. (orig.)

  2. QCD at finite isospin chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Endrődi, Gergely; Schmalzbauer, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the properties of QCD at finite isospin chemical potential at zero and non-zero temperatures. This theory is not affected by the sign problem and can be simulated using Monte-Carlo techniques. With increasing isospin chemical potential and temperatures below the deconfinement transition the system changes into a phase where charged pions condense, accompanied by an accumulation of low modes of the Dirac operator. The simulations are enabled by the introduction of a pionic source into the action, acting as an infrared regulator for the theory, and physical results are obtained by removing the regulator via an extrapolation. We present an update of our study concerning the associated phase diagram using 2+1 flavours of staggered fermions with physical quark masses and the comparison to Taylor expansion. We also present first results for our determination of the equation of state at finite isospin chemical potential and give an example for a cosmological application. The results can also be used to gain information about QCD at small baryon chemical potentials using reweighting with respect to the pionic source parameter and the chemical potential and we present first steps in this direction.

  3. A new evolutionary system for evolving artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X; Liu, Y

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new evolutionary system, i.e., EPNet, for evolving artificial neural networks (ANNs). The evolutionary algorithm used in EPNet is based on Fogel's evolutionary programming (EP). Unlike most previous studies on evolving ANN's, this paper puts its emphasis on evolving ANN's behaviors. Five mutation operators proposed in EPNet reflect such an emphasis on evolving behaviors. Close behavioral links between parents and their offspring are maintained by various mutations, such as partial training and node splitting. EPNet evolves ANN's architectures and connection weights (including biases) simultaneously in order to reduce the noise in fitness evaluation. The parsimony of evolved ANN's is encouraged by preferring node/connection deletion to addition. EPNet has been tested on a number of benchmark problems in machine learning and ANNs, such as the parity problem, the medical diagnosis problems, the Australian credit card assessment problem, and the Mackey-Glass time series prediction problem. The experimental results show that EPNet can produce very compact ANNs with good generalization ability in comparison with other algorithms.

  4. Supersymmetric theories and finiteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helayel-Neto, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We attempt here to present a short survey of the all-order finite Lagrangian field theories known at present in four-and two-dimensional space-times. The question of the possible relevance of these ultraviolet finite models in the formulation of consistent unified frameworks for the fundamental forces is also addressed to. (author)

  5. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  6. An induction-based magnetohydrodynamic 3D code for finite magnetic Reynolds number liquid-metal flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawczynski, Charlie; Smolentsev, Sergey, E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu; Abdou, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A new induction-based magnetohydrodynamic code was developed using a finite difference method. • The code was benchmarked against purely hydrodynamic and MHD flows for low and finite magnetic Reynolds number. • Possible applications of the new code include liquid-metal MHD flows in the breeder blanket during unsteady events in the plasma. - Abstract: Most numerical analysis performed in the past for MHD flows in liquid-metal blankets were based on the assumption of low magnetic Reynolds number and involved numerical codes that utilized electric potential as the main electromagnetic variable. One limitation of this approach is that such codes cannot be applied to truly unsteady processes, for example, MHD flows of liquid-metal breeder/coolant during unsteady events in plasma, such as major plasma disruptions, edge-localized modes and vertical displacements, when changes in plasmas occur at millisecond timescales. Our newly developed code MOONS (Magnetohydrodynamic Object-Oriented Numerical Solver) uses the magnetic field as the main electromagnetic variable to relax the limitations of the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation for more realistic fusion reactor environments. The new code, written in Fortran, implements a 3D finite-difference method and is capable of simulating multi-material domains. The constrained transport method was implemented to evolve the magnetic field in time and assure that the magnetic field remains solenoidal within machine accuracy at every time step. Various verification tests have been performed including purely hydrodynamic flows and MHD flows at low and finite magnetic Reynolds numbers. Test results have demonstrated very good accuracy against known analytic solutions and other numerical data.

  7. Lattice QCD at finite density. An introductory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroya, Shin; Nakamura, Atushi; Nonaka, Chiho; Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2003-01-01

    This is a pedagogical review of the lattice study of finite density QCD. It is intended to provide the minimum necessary content, so that it may be used as an introduction for newcomers to the field and also for those working in nonlattice areas. After a brief introduction in which we discuss the reasons that finite density QCD is an active and important subject, we present the fundamental formulae that are necessary for the treatment given in the following sections. Next, we survey lattice QCD simulational studies of system with small chemical potentials, of which there have been several prominent works reported recently. Then, two-color QCD calculations are discussed, where we are free from the notorious phase problem and have a chance to consider many new features of finite density QCD. Of special note is the result of recent simulations indicating quark pair condensation and the in-medium effect. Tables of SU(3) and SU(2) lattice simulations at finite baryon density are given. In the next section, we survey several related works that may represent a starting point of future development, although some of these works have not attracted much attention yet. This material is described in a pedagogical manner. Starting from a simple 2-d model, we briefly discuss a lattice analysis of the NJL model. We describe a non-perturbative analytic approach, i.e., the strong coupling approximation method and some results. The canonical ensemble approach, instead of the usual canonical ensemble may be another route to reach high density. We examine the density of state method and show that this old idea includes the recently proposed factorization method. An alternative method, the complex Langevin equation, and an interesting model, the finite isospin model, are also discussed. We give brief comments on a partial sum with respect to Z 3 symmetry and the meron-cluster algorithm, which might solve the sign problem partially or completely. In the Appendix, we discuss several

  8. A first course in finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Fish, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Developed from the authors, combined total of 50 years undergraduate and graduate teaching experience, this book presents the finite element method formulated as a general-purpose numerical procedure for solving engineering problems governed by partial differential equations.  Focusing on the formulation and application of the finite element method through the integration of finite element theory, code development, and software application, the book is both introductory and self-contained, as well as being a hands-on experience for any student. This authoritative text on Finite Elements:Adopts

  9. Features of finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Denner, A.

    1987-01-01

    We analyse general features of finite quantum field theories. A quantum field theory is considered to be finite, if the corresponding renormalization constants evaluated in the dimensional regularization scheme are free from divergences in all orders of perturbation theory. We conclude that every finite renormalizable quantum field theory with fields of spin one or less must contain both scalar fields and fermion fields and nonabelian gauge fields. Some secific nonsupersymmetric models are found to be finite at the one- and two-loop level. (orig.)

  10. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  11. A Multiple Time-Step Finite State Projection Algorithm for the Solution to the Chemical Master Equation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    At the mesoscopic scale, chemical processes have probability distributions that evolve according to an infinite set of linear ordinary differential equations known as the chemical master equation (CME...

  12. A Generalized Time-Dependent Harmonic Oscillator at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, H.; Suzuki, A.

    2006-01-01

    We show how a generalized time-dependent harmonic oscillator (GTHO) is extended to a finite temperature case by using thermo field dynamics (TFD). We derive the general time-dependent annihilation and creation operators for the system, and obtain the time-dependent quasiparticle annihilation and creation operators for the GTHO by using the temperature-dependent Bogoliubov transformation of TFD. We also obtain the thermal state as a two-mode squeezed vacuum state in the time-dependent case as well as in the time-independent case. The general formula is derived to calculate the thermal expectation value of operators

  13. Numerical solution of critical state in superconductivity by finite element software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    A numerical method is proposed to analyse the electromagnetic behaviour of systems including high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in time-varying external fields and superconducting cables carrying AC transport current. The E-J constitutive law together with an H-formulation is used to calculate the current distribution and electromagnetic fields in HTSCs, and the magnetization of HTSCs; then the forces in the interaction between the electromagnet and the superconductor and the AC loss of the superconducting cable can be obtained. This numerical method is based on solving the partial differential equations time dependently and is adapted to the commercial finite element software Comsol Multiphysics 3.2. The advantage of this method is to make the modelling of the superconductivity simple, flexible and extendable.

  14. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum chromodynamics; finite temperature; chiral perturbation theory; QCD sum rules. PACS Nos 11.10. ..... at finite temperature. The self-energy diagrams of figure 2 modify it to ..... method of determination at present. Acknowledgement.

  15. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  16. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  17. The effect of multiaxial stress state on creep behavior and fracture mechanism of P92 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yuan; Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong@ncepu.edu.cn; Ni, Yongzhong; Lan, Xiang; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-06-11

    The creep experiments on plain and double U-typed notched specimens were conducted on P92 steel at 650 °C. The notch strengthening effect was found in the notched specimens. Fracture appearance observed by scanning electron microscopy revealed that dimpled fracture for relatively blunt notched specimen, and dimpled fracture doubled with intergranular brittle fracture for relatively sharp notched specimen, which meant that fracture mechanism of P92 steel altered due to the presence of the notch. Meanwhile, based on Norton–Bailey and Kachanov–Robotnov constitutive models, a modified model was proposed. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of multiaxial stress state on the creep behavior, fracture mechanism and damage evolvement of P92 steel. The simulation results agreed well with the fracture behaviors observed experimentally.

  18. Mentoring: An Evolving Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Michelle; Florczak, Kristine L

    2017-04-01

    The column concerns itself with mentoring as an evolving relationship between mentor and mentee. The collegiate mentoring model, the transformational transcendence model, and the humanbecoming mentoring model are considered in light of a dialogue with mentors at a Midwest university and conclusions are drawn.

  19. Nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka is a relatively consistent parameter for defining fast-evolving and slow-evolving protein-coding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian genome sequence data are being acquired in large quantities and at enormous speeds. We now have a tremendous opportunity to better understand which genes are the most variable or conserved, and what their particular functions and evolutionary dynamics are, through comparative genomics. Results We chose human and eleven other high-coverage mammalian genome data–as well as an avian genome as an outgroup–to analyze orthologous protein-coding genes using nonsynonymous (Ka and synonymous (Ks substitution rates. After evaluating eight commonly-used methods of Ka and Ks calculation, we observed that these methods yielded a nearly uniform result when estimating Ka, but not Ks (or Ka/Ks. When sorting genes based on Ka, we noticed that fast-evolving and slow-evolving genes often belonged to different functional classes, with respect to species-specificity and lineage-specificity. In particular, we identified two functional classes of genes in the acquired immune system. Fast-evolving genes coded for signal-transducing proteins, such as receptors, ligands, cytokines, and CDs (cluster of differentiation, mostly surface proteins, whereas the slow-evolving genes were for function-modulating proteins, such as kinases and adaptor proteins. In addition, among slow-evolving genes that had functions related to the central nervous system, neurodegenerative disease-related pathways were enriched significantly in most mammalian species. We also confirmed that gene expression was negatively correlated with evolution rate, i.e. slow-evolving genes were expressed at higher levels than fast-evolving genes. Our results indicated that the functional specializations of the three major mammalian clades were: sensory perception and oncogenesis in primates, reproduction and hormone regulation in large mammals, and immunity and angiotensin in rodents. Conclusion Our study suggests that Ka calculation, which is less biased compared to Ks and Ka

  20. Interactively Evolving Compositional Sound Synthesis Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Björn Þór; Hoover, Amy K.; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    the space of potential sounds that can be generated through such compositional sound synthesis networks (CSSNs). To study the effect of evolution on subjective appreciation, participants in a listener study ranked evolved timbres by personal preference, resulting in preferences skewed toward the first......While the success of electronic music often relies on the uniqueness and quality of selected timbres, many musicians struggle with complicated and expensive equipment and techniques to create their desired sounds. Instead, this paper presents a technique for producing novel timbres that are evolved...

  1. Evolving effective incremental SAT solvers with GP

    OpenAIRE

    Bader, Mohamed; Poli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Hyper-Heuristics could simply be defined as heuristics to choose other heuristics, and it is a way of combining existing heuristics to generate new ones. In a Hyper-Heuristic framework, the framework is used for evolving effective incremental (Inc*) solvers for SAT. We test the evolved heuristics (IncHH) against other known local search heuristics on a variety of benchmark SAT problems.

  2. Finite Word-Length Effects in Digital State-Space Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Psenicka

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The state-space description of digital filters involves except the relationship between input and output signals an additional set of state variables. The state-space structures of digital filters have many positive properties compared with direct canonical structures. The main advantage of digital filter structures developed using state-space technique is a smaller sensitivity to quantization effects by fixed-point implementation. In our presentation, the emphasis is on the analysis of coefficient quantization and on existence of zero-input limit cycles in state-space digital filters. The comparison with direct form II structure is presented.

  3. Time evolution of some quantum-mechanical systems. Wavefunction cloning in evolving rotating systems. Finite range boundary conditions for time dependent Schroedinger Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvieu, R.; Carbonell, J.; Gignoux, C.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Rozmej, P.

    1997-01-01

    The time evolution of coherent rotational wave packets associated to a diatomic molecule or to a deformed nucleus has been studied. Assuming a rigid body dynamics the J(J+1) law leads to a mechanism of cloning: the way function is divided into wave packets identical to the initial one at specific time. Applications are studied for a nuclear wave packed formed by Coulomb excitation. Exact boundary conditions at finite distance for the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation are derived. A numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicholson method is proposed to illustrate its applicability in several examples. (authors)

  4. Exact solution for the inhomogeneous Dicke model in the canonical ensemble: Thermodynamical limit and finite-size corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogosov, W.V., E-mail: walter.pogosov@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bork, L.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Onishchenko, A.I. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    We consider an exactly solvable inhomogeneous Dicke model which describes an interaction between a disordered ensemble of two-level systems with single mode boson field. The existing method for evaluation of Richardson–Gaudin equations in the thermodynamical limit is extended to the case of Bethe equations in Dicke model. Using this extension, we present expressions both for the ground state and lowest excited states energies as well as leading-order finite-size corrections to these quantities for an arbitrary distribution of individual spin energies. We then evaluate these quantities for an equally-spaced distribution (constant density of states). In particular, we study evolution of the spectral gap and other related quantities. We also reveal regions on the phase diagram, where finite-size corrections are of particular importance.

  5. Finiteness of quantum field theories and supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1986-01-01

    We study the consequences of finiteness for a general renormalizable quantum field theory by analysing the finiteness conditions resulting from the requirement of absence of divergent contributions to the renormalizations of the parameters of an arbitrary gauge theory. In all cases considered, the well-known two-loop finite supersymmetric theories prove to be the unique solution of the finiteness criterion. (Author)

  6. Finite Element Analysis for Bending Process of U-Bending Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Dong; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    ASTM G30 suggests that the applied strain can be calculated by dividing thickness by a bend radius. It should be noted, however, that the formula is reliable under an assumption that the ratio of thickness to bend radius is less than 0.2. Typically, to increase the applied stress/strain, the ratio of thickness to bend radius becomes larger than 0.2. This suggests that the estimated strain values by ASTM G30 are not reliable to predict the actual residual strain state of the highly deformed U-bend specimen. For this reason, finite element analysis (FEA) for the bending process of Ubend specimens was conducted by using a commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. ver.6.14- 2;2014. From the results of FEA, PWSCC initiation time and U-bend specimen size can be determined exactly. Since local stress and strain have a significant effect on the initiation of PWSCC, it was inappropriate to apply results of ASTM G30 to the PWSCC test directly. According to results of finite element analysis (FEA), elastic relaxation can cause inaccuracy in intended final residual stress. To modify this inaccuracy, additional process reducing the spring back is required. However this additional process also may cause uncertainty of stress/strain state. Therefore, the U-bending specimen size which is not creating uncertainty should be optimized and selected. With the bending radius of 8.3 mm, the thickness of 3 mm and the roller distance of 32.6 mm, calculated maximum stress and strain were 670 MPa and 0.21, respectively.

  7. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter; Jü ngel, Ansgar; Aoki, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  8. Observations on finite quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Itzykson, C.

    1986-01-01

    We study the canonical transformations of the quantum mechanics on a finite phase space. For simplicity we assume that the configuration variable takes an odd prime number 4 K±1 of distinct values. We show that the canonical group is unitarily implemented. It admits a maximal abelian subgroup of order 4 K, commuting with the finite Fourier transform F, a finite analogue of the harmonic oscillator group. This provides a natural construction of F 1/K and of an orthogonal basis of eigenstates of F [fr

  9. Automatic Construction of Finite Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with model generation for equational theories,i.e.,automatically generating (finite)models of a given set of (logical) equations.Our method of finite model generation and a tool for automatic construction of finite algebras is described.Some examples are given to show the applications of our program.We argue that,the combination of model generators and theorem provers enables us to get a better understanding of logical theories.A brief comparison betwween our tool and other similar tools is also presented.

  10. Concurrent approach for evolving compact decision rule sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelstein, Robert E.; Hammack, Lonnie P.; Lamont, Gary B.

    1999-02-01

    The induction of decision rules from data is important to many disciplines, including artificial intelligence and pattern recognition. To improve the state of the art in this area, we introduced the genetic rule and classifier construction environment (GRaCCE). It was previously shown that GRaCCE consistently evolved decision rule sets from data, which were significantly more compact than those produced by other methods (such as decision tree algorithms). The primary disadvantage of GRaCCe, however, is its relatively poor run-time execution performance. In this paper, a concurrent version of the GRaCCE architecture is introduced, which improves the efficiency of the original algorithm. A prototype of the algorithm is tested on an in- house parallel processor configuration and the results are discussed.

  11. Quantum mechanics in an evolving Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, Emilio; O'Regan, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Many basis sets for electronic structure calculations evolve with varying external parameters, such as moving atoms in dynamic simulations, giving rise to extra derivative terms in the dynamical equations. Here we revisit these derivatives in the context of differential geometry, thereby obtaining a more transparent formalization, and a geometrical perspective for better understanding the resulting equations. The effect of the evolution of the basis set within the spanned Hilbert space separates explicitly from the effect of the turning of the space itself when moving in parameter space, as the tangent space turns when moving in a curved space. New insights are obtained using familiar concepts in that context such as the Riemann curvature. The differential geometry is not strictly that for curved spaces as in general relativity, a more adequate mathematical framework being provided by fiber bundles. The language used here, however, will be restricted to tensors and basic quantum mechanics. The local gauge implied by a smoothly varying basis set readily connects with Berry's formalism for geometric phases. Generalized expressions for the Berry connection and curvature are obtained for a parameter-dependent occupied Hilbert space spanned by nonorthogonal Wannier functions. The formalism is applicable to basis sets made of atomic-like orbitals and also more adaptative moving basis functions (such as in methods using Wannier functions as intermediate or support bases), but should also apply to other situations in which nonorthogonal functions or related projectors should arise. The formalism is applied to the time-dependent quantum evolution of electrons for moving atoms. The geometric insights provided here allow us to propose new finite-difference time integrators, and also better understand those already proposed.

  12. Finite-momentum condensation in a pumped microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, R. T.; Eastham, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the absorption spectra of a semiconductor microcavity into which a nonequilibrium exciton population has been pumped. We predict strong peaks in the spectrum corresponding to collective modes analogous to the Cooper modes in superconductors and fermionic atomic gases. These modes can become unstable, leading to the formation of off-equilibrium quantum condensates. We calculate a phase diagram for condensation and show that the dominant instabilities can be at a finite momentum. Thus we predict the formation of inhomogeneous condensates, similar to Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinnikov states.

  13. Finite size effects on hydrogen bonds in confined water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, R.; Renault, J.P.; Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Candelaresi, M.; Palmer, D.J.; Righini, R.

    2008-01-01

    Femtosecond IR spectroscopy was used to study water confined in 1-50 nm pores. The results show that even large pores induce significant changes (for example excited-state lifetimes) to the hydrogen-bond network, which are independent of pore diameter between 1 and 50 nm. Thus, the changes are not surface-induced but rather finite size effects, and suggest a confinement-induced enhancement of the acidic character of water. (authors)

  14. Evolving Intelligent Systems Methodology and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelov, Plamen; Kasabov, Nik

    2010-01-01

    From theory to techniques, the first all-in-one resource for EIS. There is a clear demand in advanced process industries, defense, and Internet and communication (VoIP) applications for intelligent yet adaptive/evolving systems. Evolving Intelligent Systems is the first self- contained volume that covers this newly established concept in its entirety, from a systematic methodology to case studies to industrial applications. Featuring chapters written by leading world experts, it addresses the progress, trends, and major achievements in this emerging research field, with a strong emphasis on th

  15. Spin Multiphoton Antiresonance at Finite Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, Christian; Dykman, Mark

    2007-03-01

    Weakly anisotropic S>1 spin systems display multiphoton antiresonance. It occurs when an Nth overtone of the radiation frequency coincides with the distance between the ground and the Nth excited energy level (divided by ). The coherent response of the spin displays a sharp minimum or maximum as a function of frequency, depending on which state was initially occupied. We find the spectral shape of the response dips/peaks. We also study the stationary response for zero and finite temperatures. The response changes dramatically with increasing temperature, when excited states become occupied even in the absence of radiation. The change is due primarily to the increasing role of single-photon resonances between excited states, which occur at the same frequencies as multiphoton resonances. Single-photon resonances are broad, because the single-photon Rabi frequencies largely exceed the multi-photon ones. This allows us to separate different resonances and to study their spectral shape. We also study the change of the spectrum due to relaxational broadening of the peaks, with account taken of both decay and phase modulation.

  16. Toward finite quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajpoot, S.; Taylor, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The properties that make the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory free from ultraviolet divergences are (i) a universal coupling for gauge and matter interactions, (ii) anomaly-free representations, (iii) no charge renormalization, and (iv) if masses are explicitly introduced into the theory, then these are required to satisfy the mass-squared supertrace sum rule Σsub(s=0.1/2)(-1)sup(2s+1)(2s+1)M 2 sub(s)=O. Finite N=2 theories are found to satisfy the above criteria. The missing member in this class of field theories are finite field theories consisting of N=1 superfields. These theories are discussed in the light of the above finiteness properties. In particular, the representations of all simple classical groups satisfying the anomaly-free and no-charge renormalization conditions for finite N=1 field theories are discussed. A consequence of these restrictions on the allowed representations is that an N=1 finite SU(5)-based model of strong and electroweak interactions can contain at most five conventional families of quarks and leptons, a constraint almost compatible with the one deduced from cosmological arguments. (author)

  17. Exact solution of two interacting run-and-tumble random walkers with finite tumble duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowman, A B; Evans, M R; Blythe, R A

    2017-01-01

    We study a model of interacting run-and-tumble random walkers operating under mutual hardcore exclusion on a one-dimensional lattice with periodic boundary conditions. We incorporate a finite, poisson-distributed, tumble duration so that a particle remains stationary whilst tumbling, thus generalising the persistent random walker model. We present the exact solution for the nonequilibrium stationary state of this system in the case of two random walkers. We find this to be characterised by two lengthscales, one arising from the jamming of approaching particles, and the other from one particle moving when the other is tumbling. The first of these lengthscales vanishes in a scaling limit where the continuous-space dynamics is recovered whilst the second remains finite. Thus the nonequilibrium stationary state reveals a rich structure of attractive, jammed and extended pieces. (paper)

  18. Strategy Complexity of Finite-Horizon Markov Decision Processes and Simple Stochastic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Chatterjee, Krishnendu

    2012-01-01

    Markov decision processes (MDPs) and simple stochastic games (SSGs) provide a rich mathematical framework to study many important problems related to probabilistic systems. MDPs and SSGs with finite-horizon objectives, where the goal is to maximize the probability to reach a target state in a given...

  19. Theoretical formulation of finite-dimensional discrete phase spaces: I. Algebraic structures and uncertainty principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiolli, M.A.; Ruzzi, M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a self-consistent theoretical framework for a wide class of physical systems characterized by a finite space of states which allows us, within several mathematical virtues, to construct a discrete version of the Weyl–Wigner–Moyal (WWM) formalism for finite-dimensional discrete phase spaces with toroidal topology. As a first and important application from this ab initio approach, we initially investigate the Robertson–Schrödinger (RS) uncertainty principle related to the discrete coordinate and momentum operators, as well as its implications for physical systems with periodic boundary conditions. The second interesting application is associated with a particular uncertainty principle inherent to the unitary operators, which is based on the Wiener–Khinchin theorem for signal processing. Furthermore, we also establish a modified discrete version for the well-known Heisenberg–Kennard–Robertson (HKR) uncertainty principle, which exhibits additional terms (or corrections) that resemble the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) into the context of quantum gravity. The results obtained from this new algebraic approach touch on some fundamental questions inherent to quantum mechanics and certainly represent an object of future investigations in physics. - Highlights: ► We construct a discrete version of the Weyl–Wigner–Moyal formalism. ► Coherent states for finite-dimensional discrete phase spaces are established. ► Discrete coordinate and momentum operators are properly defined. ► Uncertainty principles depend on the topology of finite physical systems. ► Corrections for the discrete Heisenberg uncertainty relation are also obtained.

  20. Generalized finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachspress, E.

    2009-01-01

    Triangles and rectangles are the ubiquitous elements in finite element studies. Only these elements admit polynomial basis functions. Rational functions provide a basis for elements having any number of straight and curved sides. Numerical complexities initially associated with rational bases precluded extensive use. Recent analysis has reduced these difficulties and programs have been written to illustrate effectiveness. Although incorporation in major finite element software requires considerable effort, there are advantages in some applications which warrant implementation. An outline of the basic theory and of recent innovations is presented here. (authors)

  1. Characterization of resonances using finite size effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozsgay, B.; Takacs, G.

    2006-01-01

    We develop methods to extract resonance widths from finite volume spectra of (1+1)-dimensional quantum field theories. Our two methods are based on Luscher's description of finite size corrections, and are dubbed the Breit-Wigner and the improved ''mini-Hamiltonian'' method, respectively. We establish a consistent framework for the finite volume description of sufficiently narrow resonances that takes into account the finite size corrections and mass shifts properly. Using predictions from form factor perturbation theory, we test the two methods against finite size data from truncated conformal space approach, and find excellent agreement which confirms both the theoretical framework and the numerical validity of the methods. Although our investigation is carried out in 1+1 dimensions, the extension to physical 3+1 space-time dimensions appears straightforward, given sufficiently accurate finite volume spectra

  2. Methods Evolved by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  3. Link Prediction in Evolving Networks Based on Popularity of Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; He, Xing-Sheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang; Fu, Zhong-Qian

    2017-08-02

    Link prediction aims to uncover the underlying relationship behind networks, which could be utilized to predict missing edges or identify the spurious edges. The key issue of link prediction is to estimate the likelihood of potential links in networks. Most classical static-structure based methods ignore the temporal aspects of networks, limited by the time-varying features, such approaches perform poorly in evolving networks. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that the ability of each node to attract links depends not only on its structural importance, but also on its current popularity (activeness), since active nodes have much more probability to attract future links. Then a novel approach named popularity based structural perturbation method (PBSPM) and its fast algorithm are proposed to characterize the likelihood of an edge from both existing connectivity structure and current popularity of its two endpoints. Experiments on six evolving networks show that the proposed methods outperform state-of-the-art methods in accuracy and robustness. Besides, visual results and statistical analysis reveal that the proposed methods are inclined to predict future edges between active nodes, rather than edges between inactive nodes.

  4. Discrete phase space based on finite fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, Kathleen S.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Wootters, William K.

    2004-01-01

    The original Wigner function provides a way of representing in phase space the quantum states of systems with continuous degrees of freedom. Wigner functions have also been developed for discrete quantum systems, one popular version being defined on a 2Nx2N discrete phase space for a system with N orthogonal states. Here we investigate an alternative class of discrete Wigner functions, in which the field of real numbers that labels the axes of continuous phase space is replaced by a finite field having N elements. There exists such a field if and only if N is a power of a prime; so our formulation can be applied directly only to systems for which the state-space dimension takes such a value. Though this condition may seem limiting, we note that any quantum computer based on qubits meets the condition and can thus be accommodated within our scheme. The geometry of our NxN phase space also leads naturally to a method of constructing a complete set of N+1 mutually unbiased bases for the state space

  5. Lattice study of finite volume effect in HVP for muon g-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izubuchi Taku

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the finite volume effect of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to muon g-2, aμhvp,in lattice QCD by comparison with two different volumes, L4 = (5.44 and (8.14 fm4, at physical pion. We perform the lattice computation of highly precise vector-vector current correlator with optimized AMA technique on Nf = 2 + 1 PACS gauge configurations in Wilson-clover fermion and stout smeared gluon action at one lattice cut-off, a−1 = 2.33 GeV. We compare two integrals of aμhvp, momentum integral and time-slice summation, on the lattice and numerically show that the different size of finite volume effect appears between two methods. We also discuss the effect of backward-state propagation into the result of aμhvp with the different boundary condition. Our model-independent study suggest that the lattice computation at physical pion is important for correct estimate of finite volume and other lattice systematics in aμhvp.

  6. Lattice study of finite volume effect in HVP for muon g-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izubuchi, Taku; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Lehner, Christoph; Shintani, Eigo

    2018-03-01

    We study the finite volume effect of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to muon g-2, aμhvp, in lattice QCD by comparison with two different volumes, L4 = (5.4)4 and (8.1)4 fm4, at physical pion. We perform the lattice computation of highly precise vector-vector current correlator with optimized AMA technique on Nf = 2 + 1 PACS gauge configurations in Wilson-clover fermion and stout smeared gluon action at one lattice cut-off, a-1 = 2.33 GeV. We compare two integrals of aμhvp, momentum integral and time-slice summation, on the lattice and numerically show that the different size of finite volume effect appears between two methods. We also discuss the effect of backward-state propagation into the result of aμhvp with the different boundary condition. Our model-independent study suggest that the lattice computation at physical pion is important for correct estimate of finite volume and other lattice systematics in aμhvp.

  7. Open cup nests evolved from roofed nests in the early passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J Jordan; Griffith, Simon C

    2017-02-08

    The architectural diversity of nests in the passerine birds (order Passeriformes) is thought to have played an important role in the adaptive radiation of this group, which now comprises more than half of avian species and occupies nearly all terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present an extensive survey and ancestral state reconstruction of nest design across the passerines, focusing on early Australian lineages and including members of nearly all passerine families worldwide. Most passerines build open cup-shaped nests, whereas a minority build more elaborate domed structures with roofs. We provide strong evidence that, despite their relative rarity today, domed nests were constructed by the common ancestor of all modern passerines. Open cup nests evolved from enclosed domes at least four times independently during early passerine evolution, at least three of which occurred on the Australian continent, yielding several primarily cup-nesting clades that are now widespread and numerically dominant among passerines. Our results show that the ubiquitous and relatively simple cup-shaped nests of many birds today evolved multiple times convergently, suggesting adaptive benefits over earlier roofed designs. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  9. Excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusch, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental observations of collective excitations of Bose condensed atomic vapours have stimulated interest in the microscopic description of the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an external potential. We present a finite temperature field theory for collective excitations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates and use a finite-temperature linear response formalism, which goes beyond the simple mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The effect of the non-condensed thermal atoms we include using perturbation theory in a quasiparticle basis. This presents a simple scheme to understand the interaction between condensate and non-condensed atoms and enables us to include the effect the condensate has on collision dynamics. At first we limit our treatment to the case of a spatially homogeneous Bose gas. We include the effect of pair and triplet anomalous averages and thus obtain a gapless theory for the excitations of a weakly interacting system, which we can link to well known results for Landau and Beliaev damping rates. A gapless theory for trapped systems with a static thermal component follows straightforwardly. We then investigate finite temperature excitations of a condensate in a spherically symmetric harmonic trap. We avoid approximations to the density of states and thus emphasise finite size aspects of the problem. We show that excitations couple strongly to a restricted number of modes, giving rise to resonance structure in their frequency spectra. Where possible we derive energy shifts and lifetimes of excitations. For one particular mode, the breathing mode, the effects of the discreteness of the system are sufficiently pronounced that the simple picture of an energy shift and width fails. Experiments in spherical traps have recently become feasible and should be able to test our detailed quantitative predictions. (author)

  10. Evolving artificial metalloenzymes via random mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Swartz, Alan M.; Park, Hyun June; Srivastava, Poonam; Ellis-Guardiola, Ken; Upp, David M.; Lee, Gihoon; Belsare, Ketaki; Gu, Yifan; Zhang, Chen; Moellering, Raymond E.; Lewis, Jared C.

    2018-03-01

    Random mutagenesis has the potential to optimize the efficiency and selectivity of protein catalysts without requiring detailed knowledge of protein structure; however, introducing synthetic metal cofactors complicates the expression and screening of enzyme libraries, and activity arising from free cofactor must be eliminated. Here we report an efficient platform to create and screen libraries of artificial metalloenzymes (ArMs) via random mutagenesis, which we use to evolve highly selective dirhodium cyclopropanases. Error-prone PCR and combinatorial codon mutagenesis enabled multiplexed analysis of random mutations, including at sites distal to the putative ArM active site that are difficult to identify using targeted mutagenesis approaches. Variants that exhibited significantly improved selectivity for each of the cyclopropane product enantiomers were identified, and higher activity than previously reported ArM cyclopropanases obtained via targeted mutagenesis was also observed. This improved selectivity carried over to other dirhodium-catalysed transformations, including N-H, S-H and Si-H insertion, demonstrating that ArMs evolved for one reaction can serve as starting points to evolve catalysts for others.

  11. Supersymmetry at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Finite-temperature supersymmetry (SUSY) is characterized by unbroken Ward identities for SUSY variations of ensemble averages of Klein-operator inserted imaginary time-ordered products of fields. Path-integral representations of these products are defined and the Feynman rules in superspace are given. The finite-temperature no-renormalization theorem is derived. Spontaneously broken SUSY at zero temperature is shown not to be restored at high temperature. (orig.)

  12. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  13. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  14. An introduction to finite tight frames

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, Shayne F D

    2018-01-01

    This textbook is an introduction to the theory and applications of finite tight frames, an area that has developed rapidly in the last decade. Stimulating much of this growth are the applications of finite frames to diverse fields such as signal processing, quantum information theory, multivariate orthogonal polynomials, and remote sensing. Key features and topics: * First book entirely devoted to finite frames * Extensive exercises and MATLAB examples for classroom use * Important examples, such as harmonic and Heisenberg frames, are presented in preliminary chapters, encouraging readers to explore and develop an intuitive feeling for tight frames * Later chapters delve into general theory details and recent research results * Many illustrations showing the special aspects of the geometry of finite frames * Provides an overview of the field of finite tight frames * Discusses future research directions in the field Featuring exercises and MATLAB examples in each chapter, the book is well suited as a textbook ...

  15. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  16. The evolution of resource adaptation: how generalist and specialist consumers evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junling; Levin, Simon A

    2006-07-01

    Why and how specialist and generalist strategies evolve are important questions in evolutionary ecology. In this paper, with the method of adaptive dynamics and evolutionary branching, we identify conditions that select for specialist and generalist strategies. Generally, generalist strategies evolve if there is a switching benefit; specialists evolve if there is a switching cost. If the switching cost is large, specialists always evolve. If the switching cost is small, even though the consumer will first evolve toward a generalist strategy, it will eventually branch into two specialists.

  17. Ranking in evolving complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao; Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Yang

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks have emerged as a simple yet powerful framework to represent and analyze a wide range of complex systems. The problem of ranking the nodes and the edges in complex networks is critical for a broad range of real-world problems because it affects how we access online information and products, how success and talent are evaluated in human activities, and how scarce resources are allocated by companies and policymakers, among others. This calls for a deep understanding of how existing ranking algorithms perform, and which are their possible biases that may impair their effectiveness. Many popular ranking algorithms (such as Google's PageRank) are static in nature and, as a consequence, they exhibit important shortcomings when applied to real networks that rapidly evolve in time. At the same time, recent advances in the understanding and modeling of evolving networks have enabled the development of a wide and diverse range of ranking algorithms that take the temporal dimension into account. The aim of this review is to survey the existing ranking algorithms, both static and time-aware, and their applications to evolving networks. We emphasize both the impact of network evolution on well-established static algorithms and the benefits from including the temporal dimension for tasks such as prediction of network traffic, prediction of future links, and identification of significant nodes.

  18. Schroedinger cat states and multilevel atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.; Knight, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that the generalization of the two-level Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) to an N-level atom leads to the creation of up to N macroscopically distinct field states. These field states are Schmidt-orthogonalized superpositions of Fock states. They correspond to macroscopic states of the field, attainable with large mean photon numbers. Unlike the situation with a two-level atom and a coherent-state field, which evolves into a macroscopic coherent superposition state (a Schrodinger cat), we find that when the additional levels participate strongly in the excitation (e.g all transitions are resonant with equal dipole moments) then the system does not evolve into a pure state. We will present some examples of special cases, giving insight into the behavior of three-level atoms and the two-level two-photon JCM

  19. A similarity hypothesis for the two-point correlation tensor in a temporally evolving plane wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, D. W.; George, W. K.; Moser, R. D.; Rogers, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis demonstrated that the governing equations for the two-point velocity correlation tensor in the temporally evolving wake admit similarity solutions, which include the similarity solutions for the single-point moment as a special case. The resulting equations for the similarity solutions include two constants, beta and Re(sub sigma), that are ratios of three characteristic time scales of processes in the flow: a viscous time scale, a time scale characteristic of the spread rate of the flow, and a characteristic time scale of the mean strain rate. The values of these ratios depend on the initial conditions of the flow and are most likely measures of the coherent structures in the initial conditions. The occurrences of these constants in the governing equations for the similarity solutions indicates that these solutions, in general, will only be the same for two flows if these two constants are equal (and hence the coherent structures in the flows are related). The comparisons between the predictions of the similarity hypothesis and the data presented here and elsewhere indicate that the similarity solutions for the two-point correlation tensors provide a good approximation of the measures of those motions that are not significantly affected by the boundary conditions caused by the finite extent of real flows. Thus, the two-point similarity hypothesis provides a useful tool for both numerical and physical experimentalist that can be used to examine how the finite extent of real flows affect the evolution of the different scales of motion in the flow.

  20. Adaptation of Escherichia coli to glucose promotes evolvability in lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kelly N; Castillo, Gerardo; Wünsche, Andrea; Cooper, Tim F

    2016-02-01

    The selective history of a population can influence its subsequent evolution, an effect known as historical contingency. We previously observed that five of six replicate populations that were evolved in a glucose-limited environment for 2000 generations, then switched to lactose for 1000 generations, had higher fitness increases in lactose than populations started directly from the ancestor. To test if selection in glucose systematically increased lactose evolvability, we started 12 replay populations--six from a population subsample and six from a single randomly selected clone--from each of the six glucose-evolved founder populations. These replay populations and 18 ancestral populations were evolved for 1000 generations in a lactose-limited environment. We found that replay populations were initially slightly less fit in lactose than the ancestor, but were more evolvable, in that they increased in fitness at a faster rate and to higher levels. This result indicates that evolution in the glucose environment resulted in genetic changes that increased the potential of genotypes to adapt to lactose. Genome sequencing identified four genes--iclR, nadR, spoT, and rbs--that were mutated in most glucose-evolved clones and are candidates for mediating increased evolvability. Our results demonstrate that short-term selective costs during selection in one environment can lead to changes in evolvability that confer longer term benefits. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. A Non-Perturbative, Finite Particle Number Approach to Relativistic Scattering Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, James V

    2001-05-11

    We present integral equations for the scattering amplitudes of three scalar particles, using the Faddeev channel decomposition, which can be readily extended to any finite number of particles of any helicity. The solution of these equations, which have been demonstrated to be calculable, provide a non-perturbative way of obtaining relativistic scattering amplitudes for any finite number of particles that are Lorentz invariant, unitary, cluster decomposable and reduce unambiguously in the non-relativistic limit to the non-relativistic Faddeev equations. The aim of this program is to develop equations which explicitly depend upon physically observable input variables, and do not require ''renormalization'' or ''dressing'' of these parameters to connect them to the boundary states.

  2. The finite-dimensional Freeman thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Lee

    2008-06-01

    I suggest a modification--and mathematization--of Freeman's thesis on the relations among "perception", "the finite brain", and "the world", based on my recent proposal that the theory of finite topological spaces is both an adequate and a natural mathematical foundation for human psychology.

  3. Evolving fuzzy rules for relaxed-criteria negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong

    2008-12-01

    In the literature on automated negotiation, very few negotiation agents are designed with the flexibility to slightly relax their negotiation criteria to reach a consensus more rapidly and with more certainty. Furthermore, these relaxed-criteria negotiation agents were not equipped with the ability to enhance their performance by learning and evolving their relaxed-criteria negotiation rules. The impetus of this work is designing market-driven negotiation agents (MDAs) that not only have the flexibility of relaxing bargaining criteria using fuzzy rules, but can also evolve their structures by learning new relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules to improve their negotiation outcomes as they participate in negotiations in more e-markets. To this end, an evolutionary algorithm for adapting and evolving relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules was developed. Implementing the idea in a testbed, two kinds of experiments for evaluating and comparing EvEMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are evolved using the evolutionary algorithm) and EMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are manually constructed) were carried out through stochastic simulations. Empirical results show that: 1) EvEMDAs generally outperformed EMDAs in different types of e-markets and 2) the negotiation outcomes of EvEMDAs generally improved as they negotiated in more e-markets.

  4. Three-level system driven by delayed pulses of finite duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishkhanyan, Artur; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2002-01-01

    We find the exact solution to the three-state problem for a class of intuitive and counterintuitive sequences of delayed pulses of finite duration in terms of the Clausen's generalized hypergeometric function, which reduces to simple analytic expressions, involving elementary functions only, for final occupation probabilities. These analytic results show that the sequence of delayed pulses, independently of the pulse order and applied detunings, can completely remove the population from the initially populated state (thus creating a quantum superposition of two other involved states). This conclusion extends the original result of Vitanov and Stenholm [Phys. Rev. A 55, 648 (1997)], to the case of nonzero two-photon detuning and more general pulse shapes

  5. Sound radiation from finite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    A method to account for the effect of finite size in acoustic power radiation problem of planar surfaces using spatial windowing is developed. Cremer and Heckl presents a very useful formula for the power radiating from a structure using the spatially Fourier transformed velocity, which combined...... with spatially windowing of a plane waves can be used to take into account the finite size. In the present paper, this is developed by means of a radiation impedance for finite surfaces, that is used instead of the radiation impedance for infinite surfaces. In this way, the spatial windowing is included...

  6. Photon propagators at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    We have used the real time formalism to compute the one-loop finite temperature corrections to the photon self energies in spinor and scalar QED. We show that, for a real photon, only the transverse components develop the temperature-dependent masses, while, for an external static electromagnetic field applied to the finite temperature system, only the static electric field is screened by thermal fluctuations. After showing how to compute systematically the imaginary parts of the finite temperature Green functions, we have attempted to give a microscopic interpretation of the imaginary parts of the self energies. (author)

  7. DrawCompileEvolve: Sparking interactive evolutionary art with human creations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jinhong; Taarnby, Rasmus; Liapis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DrawCompileEvolve, a web-based drawing tool which allows users to draw simple primitive shapes, group them together or define patterns in their groupings (e.g. symmetry, repetition). The user’s vector drawing is then compiled into an indirectly encoded genetic representation......, which can be evolved interactively, allowing the user to change the image’s colors, patterns and ultimately transform it. The human artist has direct control while drawing the initial seed of an evolutionary run and indirect control while interactively evolving it, thus making DrawCompileEvolve a mixed...

  8. Finite-time tracking control for multiple non-holonomic mobile robots based on visual servoing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Meiying; Li, Shihua; Wang, Chaoli

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates finite-time tracking control problem of multiple non-holonomic mobile robots via visual servoing. It is assumed that the pinhole camera is fixed to the ceiling, and camera parameters are unknown. The desired reference trajectory is represented by a virtual leader whose states are available to only a subset of the followers, and the followers have only interaction. First, the camera-objective visual kinematic model is introduced by utilising the pinhole camera model for each mobile robot. Second, a unified tracking error system between camera-objective visual servoing model and desired reference trajectory is introduced. Third, based on the neighbour rule and by using finite-time control method, continuous distributed cooperative finite-time tracking control laws are designed for each mobile robot with unknown camera parameters, where the communication topology among the multiple mobile robots is assumed to be a directed graph. Rigorous proof shows that the group of mobile robots converges to the desired reference trajectory in finite time. Simulation example illustrates the effectiveness of our method.

  9. FINITE MARKOV CHAINS IN THE MODEL REPRESENTATION OF THE HUMAN OPERATOR ACTIVITY IN QUASI-FUNCTIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Serzhantova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We analyze the problems of finite Markov chains apparatus application for simulating a human operator activity in the quasi-static functional environment. It is shown that the functional environment stochastic nature is generated by a factor of interval character of human operator properties. Method. The problem is solved in the class of regular (recurrent finite Markov chains with three states of the human operator: with a favorable, median and unfavorable combination of the values of mathematical model parameters of the human operator in a quasi-static functional environment. The finite Markov chain is designed taking into account the factors of human operator tiredness and interval character of parameters of the model representation of his properties. The device is based on the usage of mathematical approximation of the standard curve of the human operator activity performance during work shift. The standard curve of the human operator activity performance is based on the extensive research experience of functional activity of the human operator with the help of photos of the day, his action timing and ergonomic generalizations. Main Results. The apparatus of regular finite Markov chains gave the possibility to evaluate correctly the human operator activity performance in a quasi-static functional environment with the use of the main information component of these chains as a vector of final probabilities. In addition, we managed to build an algorithmic basis for estimating the stationary time (time study for transit of human operator from arbitrary initial functional state into a state corresponding to a vector of final probabilities for a used chain after it reaches the final state based on the analysis of the eigenvalues spectrum of the matrix of transition probabilities for a regular (recurrent finite Markov chain. Practical Relevance. Obtained theoretical results are confirmed by illustrative examples, which

  10. High order well-balanced finite volume WENO schemes and discontinuous Galerkin methods for a class of hyperbolic systems with source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yulong; Shu Chiwang

    2006-01-01

    Hyperbolic balance laws have steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are nonzero but are exactly balanced by the source term. In our earlier work [J. Comput. Phys. 208 (2005) 206-227; J. Sci. Comput., accepted], we designed a well-balanced finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, which at the same time maintains genuine high order accuracy for general solutions, to a class of hyperbolic systems with separable source terms including the shallow water equations, the elastic wave equation, the hyperbolic model for a chemosensitive movement, the nozzle flow and a two phase flow model. In this paper, we generalize high order finite volume WENO schemes and Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) finite element methods to the same class of hyperbolic systems to maintain a well-balanced property. Finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin finite element schemes are more flexible than finite difference schemes to treat complicated geometry and adaptivity. However, because of a different computational framework, the maintenance of the well-balanced property requires different technical approaches. After the description of our well-balanced high order finite volume WENO and RKDG schemes, we perform extensive one and two dimensional simulations to verify the properties of these schemes such as the exact preservation of the balance laws for certain steady state solutions, the non-oscillatory property for general solutions with discontinuities, and the genuine high order accuracy in smooth regions

  11. Axial anomaly at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Gupte, Neelima; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    The Jackiw-Bardeen-Adler anomaly for QED 4 and QED 2 are calculated at finite temperature. It is found that the anomaly is independent of temperature. Ishikawa's method [1984, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 53 1615] for calculating the quantised Hall effect is extended to finite temperature. (author)

  12. Stochastic ℋ∞ Finite-Time Control of Discrete-Time Systems with Packet Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stochastic finite-time stabilization and ℋ∞ control problem for one family of linear discrete-time systems over networks with packet loss, parametric uncertainties, and time-varying norm-bounded disturbance. Firstly, the dynamic model description studied is given, which, if the packet dropout is assumed to be a discrete-time homogenous Markov process, the class of discrete-time linear systems with packet loss can be regarded as Markovian jump systems. Based on Lyapunov function approach, sufficient conditions are established for the resulting closed-loop discrete-time system with Markovian jumps to be stochastic ℋ∞ finite-time boundedness and then state feedback controllers are designed to guarantee stochastic ℋ∞ finite-time stabilization of the class of stochastic systems. The stochastic ℋ∞ finite-time boundedness criteria can be tackled in the form of linear matrix inequalities with a fixed parameter. As an auxiliary result, we also give sufficient conditions on the robust stochastic stabilization of the class of linear systems with packet loss. Finally, simulation examples are presented to illustrate the validity of the developed scheme.

  13. Robust mixed finite element methods to deal with incompressibility in finite strain in an industrial framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Akhrass, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Simulations in solid mechanics exhibit several difficulties, as dealing with incompressibility, with nonlinearities due to finite strains, contact laws, or constitutive laws. The basic motivation of our work is to propose efficient finite element methods capable of dealing with incompressibility in finite strain context, and using elements of low order. During the three last decades, many approaches have been proposed in the literature to overcome the incompressibility problem. Among them, mixed formulations offer an interesting theoretical framework. In this work, a three-field mixed formulation (displacement, pressure, volumetric strain) is investigated. In some cases, this formulation can be condensed in a two-field (displacement - pressure) mixed formulation. However, it is well-known that the discrete problem given by the Galerkin finite element technique, does not inherit the 'inf-sup' stability condition from the continuous problem. Hence, the interpolation orders in displacement and pressure have to be chosen in a way to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska stability conditions when using Galerkin approaches. Interpolation orders must be chosen so as to satisfy this condition. Two possibilities are considered: to use stable finite element satisfying this requirement, or to use finite element that does not satisfy this condition, and to add terms stabilizing the FE Galerkin formulation. The latter approach allows the use of equal order interpolation. In this work, stable finite element P2/P1 and P2/P1/P1 are used as reference, and compared to P1/P1 and P1/P1/P1 formulations stabilized with a bubble function or with a VMS method (Variational Multi-Scale) based on a sub-grid-space orthogonal to the FE space. A finite strain model based on logarithmic strain is selected. This approach is extended to three and two field mixed formulations with stable or stabilized elements. These approaches are validated on academic cases and used on industrial cases. (author)

  14. Dynamics and rheology of finitely extensible polymer coils: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Donggang

    2017-05-01

    One contemporary research issue in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is to accurately and effectively model viscoelastic polymer flow of practical relevance. In the past several years, we have been working on the formulation of a finitely extensible coil model for polymer flow, particularly including these elements: (1) decoupled equations for kinematical and dynamical variables, (2) logarithmic relaxation at large deformation, (3) rotational retardation, (4) controllable straining, and (5) finite stretch. In this paper, we provide a constructive overview of this nonlinear coil formulation focusing on integration of these elements in a single, unified constitutive model with a minimal number of model parameters that are linked with corresponding physical processes. We also use this opportunity to share the rationale and thought process in the model development. In one particular implement of the general formulation, three parameters are used to tackle with the principal dynamics of a deforming polymer coil: one for finite stretch dictated by a ceiling stretch of the coil, the second one for rotational recovery/retardation, and the third one for adjusting stretch hardening of the rubbery coil. The new model, even in a single mode, is able to simultaneously predict practical material functions in simple shear and coaxial extension and to fit well to representative experimental data. Particularly in the steady-state (or quasi-steady state) flow case, a nearly closed-form stress to velocity gradient relationship can be derived with which shear thinning and elongational thickening can be simultaneously considered while computational advantages of a classical GNF model is retained. The model also fits reasonably well to representative experimental transient data for both shear and extension.

  15. Finite-time H∞ control for linear continuous system with norm-bounded disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyi; Shen, Yanjun

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the definition of finite-time H∞ control is presented. The system under consideration is subject to time-varying norm-bounded exogenous disturbance. The main aim of this paper is focused on the design a state feedback controller which ensures that the closed-loop system is finite-time bounded (FTB) and reduces the effect of the disturbance input on the controlled output to a prescribed level. A sufficient condition is presented for the solvability of this problem, which can be reduced to a feasibility problem involving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A detailed solving method is proposed for the restricted linear matrix inequalities. Finally, examples are given to show the validity of the methodology.

  16. Finite p′-nilpotent groups. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Srinivasan

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we continue the study of finite p′-nilpotent groups that was started in the first part of this paper. Here we give a complete characterization of all finite groups that are not p′-nilpotent but all of whose proper subgroups are p′-nilpotent.

  17. Electrical machine analysis using finite elements

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    OUTLINE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDSVector AnalysisElectromagnetic FieldsFundamental Equations SummaryReferencesBASIC PRINCIPLES OF FINITE ELEMENT METHODSIntroductionField Problems with Boundary ConditionsClassical Method for the Field Problem SolutionThe Classical Residual Method (Galerkin's Method)The Classical Variational Method (Rayleigh-Ritz's Method)The Finite Element MethodReferencesAPPLICATIONS OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD TO TWO-DIMENSIONAL FIELDSIntroductionLinear Interpolation of the Function fApplication of the Variational MethodSimple Descriptions of Electromagnetic FieldsAppendix: I

  18. An adaptive finite element method for steady and transient problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.E. Jr.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Distributing integral error uniformly over variable subdomains, or finite elements, is an attractive criterion by which to subdivide a domain for the Galerkin/finite element method when localized steep gradients and high curvatures are to be resolved. Examples are fluid interfaces, shock fronts and other internal layers, as well as fluid mechanical and other boundary layers, e.g. thin-film states at solid walls. The uniform distribution criterion is developed into an adaptive technique for one-dimensional problems. Nodal positions can be updated simultaneously with nodal values during Newton iteration, but it is usually better to adopt nearly optimal nodal positions during Newton iteration upon nodal values. Three illustrative problems are solved: steady convection with diffusion, gradient theory of fluid wetting on a solid surface and Buckley-Leverett theory of two phase Darcy flow in porous media

  19. Hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agadjanov, Andria

    2017-11-07

    In the present thesis, we study a number of hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume. Our work is motivated by the ongoing and future lattice simulations of the strong interaction theory called quantum chromodynamics. According to the available computational resources, the numerical calculations are necessarily performed on lattices with a finite spatial extension. The first part of the thesis is based on the finite volume formalism which is a standard method to investigate the processes with the final state interactions, and in particular, the elastic hadron resonances, on the lattice. Throughout the work, we systematically apply the non-relativistic effective field theory. The great merit of this approach is that it encodes the low-energy dynamics directly in terms of the effective range expansion parameters. After a brief introduction into the subject, we formulate a framework for the extraction of the ΔNγ{sup *} as well as the B→K{sup *} transition form factors from lattice data. Both processes are of substantial phenomenological interest, including the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Moreover, we provide a proper field-theoretical definition of the resonance matrix elements, and advocate it in comparison to the one based on the infinitely narrow width approximation. In the second part we consider certain aspects of the doubly virtual nucleon Compton scattering. The main objective of the work is to answer the question whether there is, in the Regge language, a so-called fixed pole in the process. To answer this question, the unknown subtraction function, which enters one of the dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes, has to be determined. The external field method provides a feasible approach to tackle this problem on the lattice. Considering the nucleon in a periodic magnetic field, we derive a simple relation for the ground state energy shift up to a second order in the field strength. The obtained result encodes the

  20. Hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Andria

    2017-01-01

    In the present thesis, we study a number of hadronic electroweak processes in a finite volume. Our work is motivated by the ongoing and future lattice simulations of the strong interaction theory called quantum chromodynamics. According to the available computational resources, the numerical calculations are necessarily performed on lattices with a finite spatial extension. The first part of the thesis is based on the finite volume formalism which is a standard method to investigate the processes with the final state interactions, and in particular, the elastic hadron resonances, on the lattice. Throughout the work, we systematically apply the non-relativistic effective field theory. The great merit of this approach is that it encodes the low-energy dynamics directly in terms of the effective range expansion parameters. After a brief introduction into the subject, we formulate a framework for the extraction of the ΔNγ * as well as the B→K * transition form factors from lattice data. Both processes are of substantial phenomenological interest, including the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Moreover, we provide a proper field-theoretical definition of the resonance matrix elements, and advocate it in comparison to the one based on the infinitely narrow width approximation. In the second part we consider certain aspects of the doubly virtual nucleon Compton scattering. The main objective of the work is to answer the question whether there is, in the Regge language, a so-called fixed pole in the process. To answer this question, the unknown subtraction function, which enters one of the dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes, has to be determined. The external field method provides a feasible approach to tackle this problem on the lattice. Considering the nucleon in a periodic magnetic field, we derive a simple relation for the ground state energy shift up to a second order in the field strength. The obtained result encodes the value of the

  1. What is finiteness? (Abhishek Banerjee) (Indian Institute of Science)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Do finites get enough respect? • Finiteness is easy, no? • Just count whether 1, 2, 3,... • But then we miss out on the true richness of the concept of finitness. • There's more finiteness around. In fact, finiteness is what helps us really understand things. 5 ...

  2. Measuring Communication in Parallel Communicating Finite Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bordihn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systems of deterministic finite automata communicating by sending their states upon request are investigated, when the amount of communication is restricted. The computational power and decidability properties are studied for the case of returning centralized systems, when the number of necessary communications during the computations of the system is bounded by a function depending on the length of the input. It is proved that an infinite hierarchy of language families exists, depending on the number of messages sent during their most economical recognitions. Moreover, several properties are shown to be not semi-decidable for the systems under consideration.

  3. Finite Metric Spaces of Strictly negative Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    If a finite metric space is of strictly negative type then its transfinite diameter is uniquely realized by an infinite extent (“load vector''). Finite metric spaces that have this property include all trees, and all finite subspaces of Euclidean and Hyperbolic spaces. We prove that if the distance...

  4. Competitive autocatalytic reactions in chaotic flows with diffusion: Prediction using finite-time Lyapunov exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate chaotic advection and diffusion in autocatalytic reactions for time-periodic sine flow computationally using a mapping method with operator splitting. We specifically consider three different autocatalytic reaction schemes: a single autocatalytic reaction, competitive autocatalytic reactions, which can provide insight into problems of chiral symmetry breaking and homochirality, and competitive autocatalytic reactions with recycling. In competitive autocatalytic reactions, species B and C both undergo an autocatalytic reaction with species A such that A+B→2B and A+C→2C. Small amounts of initially spatially localized B and C and a large amount of spatially homogeneous A are advected by the velocity field, diffuse, and react until A is completely consumed and only B and C remain. We find that local finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs) can accurately predict the final average concentrations of B and C after the reaction completes. The species that starts in the region with the larger FTLE has, with high probability, the larger average concentration at the end of the reaction. If B and C start in regions with similar FTLEs, their average concentrations at the end of the reaction will also be similar. When a recycling reaction is added, the system evolves towards a single species state, with the FTLE often being useful in predicting which species fills the entire domain and which is depleted. The FTLE approach is also demonstrated for competitive autocatalytic reactions in journal bearing flow, an experimentally realizable flow that generates chaotic dynamics

  5. Evolving Procurement Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Laine, Jari; Mugurusi, Godfrey

    Procurement has to find further levers and advance its contribution to corporate goals continuously. This places pressure on its organization in order to facilitate its performance. Therefore, procurement organizations constantly have to evolve in order to match these demands. A conceptual model...... and external contingency factors and having a more detailed look at the structural dimensions chosen, beyond the well-known characteristics of centralization, formalization, participation, specialization, standardization and size. From a theoretical perspective, it opens up insights that can be leveraged...

  6. Laplacian Estrada and normalized Laplacian Estrada indices of evolving graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale time-evolving networks have been generated by many natural and technological applications, posing challenges for computation and modeling. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to probe mathematical tools tailored for evolving networks. In this paper, on top of the dynamic Estrada index, we study the dynamic Laplacian Estrada index and the dynamic normalized Laplacian Estrada index of evolving graphs. Using linear algebra techniques, we established general upper and lower bounds for these graph-spectrum-based invariants through a couple of intuitive graph-theoretic measures, including the number of vertices or edges. Synthetic random evolving small-world networks are employed to show the relevance of the proposed dynamic Estrada indices. It is found that neither the static snapshot graphs nor the aggregated graph can approximate the evolving graph itself, indicating the fundamental difference between the static and dynamic Estrada indices.

  7. Chiral ward-Takahashi identities at finite temperature and chiral phase transition in (2+1) dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Kun; Qiu Zhongping

    1993-01-01

    Chiral Ward-Takahashi identities at finite temperature are derived in (2+1) dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model. In terms of these identities, fermion mass generation and the mass spectra of bound states are investigate at finite temperature. Taking the fermion mass as an order parameter, the authors discuss the phase structure and chiral phase transition and obtain the critical temperature

  8. Extension of the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory to finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonis, A.; Däne, M.

    2018-05-01

    Based on Mermin's extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to non-zero temperature, the Kohn-Sham formulation of density functional theory (KS-DFT) is generalized to finite temperature. We show that present formulations are inconsistent with Mermin's functional containing expressions, in particular describing the Coulomb energy, that defy derivation and are even in violation of rules of logical inference. More; current methodology is in violation of fundamental laws of both quantum and classical mechanics. Based on this feature, we demonstrate the impossibility of extending the KS formalism to finite temperature through the self-consistent solutions of the single-particle Schrödinger equation of T > 0. Guided by the form of Mermin's functional that depends on the eigenstates of a Hamiltonian, determined at T = 0, we base our extension of KS-DFT on the determination of the excited states of a non-interacting system at the zero of temperature. The resulting formulation is consistent with that of Mermin constructing the free energy at T > 0 in terms of the excited states of a non-interacting Hamiltonian (system) that, within the KS formalism, are described by Slater determinants. To determine the excited states at T = 0 use is made of the extension of the Hohenberg and Kohn theorems to excited states presented in previous work applied here to a non-interacting collection of replicas of a non-interacting N-particle system, whose ground state density is taken to match that of K non-interacting replicas of an interacting N-particle system at T = 0 . The formalism allows for an ever denser population of the excitation spectrum of a Hamiltonian, within the KS approximation. The form of the auxiliary potential, (Kohn-Sham potential), is formally identical to that in the ground state formalism with the contribution of the Coulomb energy provided by the derivative of the Coulomb energy in all excited states taken into account. Once the excited states are determined, the

  9. Global and Local Mechanical Responses for Necking of Rectangular Bars Using Updated and Total Lagrangian Finite Element Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Careglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In simulations of forged and stamping processes using the finite element method, load displacement paths and three-dimensional stress and strains states should be well and reliably represented. The simple tension test is a suitable and economical tool to calibrate constitutive equations with finite strains and plasticity for those simulations. A complex three-dimensional stress and strain states are developed when this test is done on rectangular bars and the necking phenomenon appears. In this work, global and local numerical results of the mechanical response of rectangular bars subjected to simple tension test obtained from two different finite element formulations are compared and discussed. To this end, Updated and Total Lagrangian formulations are used in order to get the three-dimensional stress and strain states. Geometric changes together with strain and stress distributions at the cross section where necking occurs are assessed. In particular, a detailed analysis of the effective plastic strain, stress components in axial and transverse directions and pressure, and deviatoric stress components is presented. Specific numerical results are also validated with experimental measurements comparing, in turn, the performance of the two numerical approaches used in this study.

  10. A Finite-Volume approach for compressible single- and two-phase flows in flexible pipelines with fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daude, F.; Galon, P.

    2018-06-01

    A Finite-Volume scheme for the numerical computations of compressible single- and two-phase flows in flexible pipelines is proposed based on an approximate Godunov-type approach. The spatial discretization is here obtained using the HLLC scheme. In addition, the numerical treatment of abrupt changes in area and network including several pipelines connected at junctions is also considered. The proposed approach is based on the integral form of the governing equations making it possible to tackle general equations of state. A coupled approach for the resolution of fluid-structure interaction of compressible fluid flowing in flexible pipes is considered. The structural problem is solved using Euler-Bernoulli beam finite elements. The present Finite-Volume method is applied to ideal gas and two-phase steam-water based on the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in conjunction with a tabulated equation of state in order to demonstrate its ability to tackle general equations of state. The extensive application of the scheme for both shock tube and other transient flow problems demonstrates its capability to resolve such problems accurately and robustly. Finally, the proposed 1-D fluid-structure interaction model appears to be computationally efficient.

  11. Simulation of 3D parachute fluid–structure interaction based on nonlinear finite element method and preconditioning finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuxin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A fluid–structure interaction method combining a nonlinear finite element algorithm with a preconditioning finite volume method is proposed in this paper to simulate parachute transient dynamics. This method uses a three-dimensional membrane–cable fabric model to represent a parachute system at a highly folded configuration. The large shape change during parachute inflation is computed by the nonlinear Newton–Raphson iteration and the linear system equation is solved by the generalized minimal residual (GMRES method. A membrane wrinkling algorithm is also utilized to evaluate the special uniaxial tension state of membrane elements on the parachute canopy. In order to avoid large time expenses during structural nonlinear iteration, the implicit Hilber–Hughes–Taylor (HHT time integration method is employed. For the fluid dynamic simulations, the Roe and HLLC (Harten–Lax–van Leer contact scheme has been modified and extended to compute flow problems at all speeds. The lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS approximate factorization is applied to accelerate the numerical convergence speed. Finally, the test model of a highly folded C-9 parachute is simulated at a prescribed speed and the results show similar characteristics compared with experimental results and previous literature.

  12. Reachability for Finite-state Process Algebras Using Horn Clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrypnyuk, Nataliya; Nielson, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    of the Data Flow Analysis are used in order to build a set of Horn clauses whose least model corresponds to an overapproximation of the reachable states. The computed model can be refined after each transition, and the algorithm runs until either a state whose reachability should be checked is encountered...... or it is not in the least model for all constructed states and thus is definitely unreachable. The advantages of the algorithm are that in many cases only a part of the Labelled Transition System will be built which leads to lower time and memory consumption. Also, it is not necessary to save all the encountered states...... which leads to further reduction of the memory requirements of the algorithm....

  13. Diverticular Disease: Traditional and Evolving Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Lenore; Moran, Patricia E

    Diverticular disease includes diverticulosis, which are sac protrusions of the intestinal mucosa, and diverticulitis, inflammation of the diverticula. Diverticular disease is listed as one of the top 10 leading physician diagnoses for gastrointestinal disorders in outpatient clinic visits in the United States. There are several classifications of diverticular disease ranging from asymptomatic diverticulosis to diverticulitis with complications. Several theories are linked to the development of diverticula which includes the physiology of the colon itself, collagen cross-linking, and recently challenged, low-fiber intake. The differential diagnoses of lower abdominal pain in addition to diverticular disease have overlapping signs and symptoms, which can make a diagnosis challenging. Identification of the distinct signs and symptoms of each classification will assist the practitioner in making the correct diagnosis and lead to appropriate management. The findings from recent studies have changed the paradigm of diverticular disease. The purpose of this article is to discuss traditional dogma and evolving concepts in the pathophysiology, prevention, and management of diverticular disease. Practitioners must be knowledgeable about diverticular disease for improved outcomes.

  14. Probabilistic finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, Ted; Wing, Kam Liu

    1987-01-01

    In the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), finite element methods have been efficiently combined with second-order perturbation techniques to provide an effective method for informing the designer of the range of response which is likely in a given problem. The designer must provide as input the statistical character of the input variables, such as yield strength, load magnitude, and Young's modulus, by specifying their mean values and their variances. The output then consists of the mean response and the variance in the response. Thus the designer is given a much broader picture of the predicted performance than with simply a single response curve. These methods are applicable to a wide class of problems, provided that the scale of randomness is not too large and the probabilistic density functions possess decaying tails. By incorporating the computational techniques we have developed in the past 3 years for efficiency, the probabilistic finite element methods are capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Sample results for an elastic-plastic ten-bar structure and an elastic-plastic plane continuum with a circular hole subject to cyclic loadings with the yield stress on the random field are given.

  15. Quantization and representation theory of finite W algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J. de; Tjin, T.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the finitely generated algebras underlying W algebras. These so called 'finite W algebras' are constructed as Poisson reductions of Kirillov Poisson structures on simple Lie algebras. The inequivalent reductions are labeled by the inequivalent embeddings of sl 2 into the simple Lie algebra in question. For arbitrary embeddings a coordinate free formula for the reduced Poisson structure is derived. We also prove that any finite W algebra can be embedded into the Kirillov Poisson algebra of a (semi)simple Lie algebra (generalized Miura map). Furthermore it is shown that generalized finite Toda systems are reductions of a system describing a free particle moving on a group manifold and that they have finite W symmetry. In the second part we BRST quantize the finite W algebras. The BRST cohomoloy is calculated using a spectral sequence (which is different from the one used by Feigin and Frenkel). This allows us to quantize all finite W algebras in one stroke. Examples are given. In the last part of the paper we study the representation theory of finite W algebras. It is shown, using a quantum inversion of the generalized Miura transformation, that the representations of finite W algebras can be constructed from the representations of a certain Lie subalgebra of the original simple Lie algebra. As a byproduct of this we are able to construct the Fock realizations of arbitrary finite W algebras. (orig.)

  16. A finite capacity queue with Markovian arrivals and two servers with group services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chakravarthy

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a finite capacity queuing system in which arrivals are governed by a Markovian arrival process. The system is attended by two exponential servers, who offer services in groups of varying sizes. The service rates may depend on the number of customers in service. Using Markov theory, we study this finite capacity queuing model in detail by obtaining numerically stable expressions for (a the steady-state queue length densities at arrivals and at arbitrary time points; (b the Laplace-Stieltjes transform of the stationary waiting time distribution of an admitted customer at points of arrivals. The stationary waiting time distribution is shown to be of phase type when the interarrival times are of phase type. Efficient algorithmic procedures for computing the steady-state queue length densities and other system performance measures are discussed. A conjecture on the nature of the mean waiting time is proposed. Some illustrative numerical examples are presented.

  17. Finite-time generalized function matrix projective lag synchronization of coupled dynamical networks with different dimensions via the double power function nonlinear feedback control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hao; Si, Gangquan; Jia, Lixin; Zhang, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of finite-time generalized function matrix projective lag synchronization between two different coupled dynamical networks with different dimensions of network nodes. The double power function nonlinear feedback control method is proposed in this paper to guarantee that the state trajectories of the response network converge to the state trajectories of the drive network according to a function matrix in a given finite time. Furthermore, in comparison with the traditional nonlinear feedback control method, the new method improves the synchronization efficiency, and shortens the finite synchronization time. Numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method. (papers)

  18. Implicit and fully implicit exponential finite difference methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Burgers' equation; exponential finite difference method; implicit exponential finite difference method; ... This paper describes two new techniques which give improved exponential finite difference solutions of Burgers' equation. ... Current Issue

  19. k– fading channels: a finite state Markov modelling approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Priyanka

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... 1 Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, SRM University, ... probability; level crossing rate; state-transition probability; state-time duration. 1. ... statistics of the mobile radio signals are described by dif-.

  20. Laplacian Estrada and normalized Laplacian Estrada indices of evolving graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    Full Text Available Large-scale time-evolving networks have been generated by many natural and technological applications, posing challenges for computation and modeling. Thus, it is of theoretical and practical significance to probe mathematical tools tailored for evolving networks. In this paper, on top of the dynamic Estrada index, we study the dynamic Laplacian Estrada index and the dynamic normalized Laplacian Estrada index of evolving graphs. Using linear algebra techniques, we established general upper and lower bounds for these graph-spectrum-based invariants through a couple of intuitive graph-theoretic measures, including the number of vertices or edges. Synthetic random evolving small-world networks are employed to show the relevance of the proposed dynamic Estrada indices. It is found that neither the static snapshot graphs nor the aggregated graph can approximate the evolving graph itself, indicating the fundamental difference between the static and dynamic Estrada indices.