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Sample records for evolutionary constraints permeate

  1. Breaking evolutionary constraint with a tradeoff ratchet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, De Marjon G.J.; Dawid, Alexandre; Sunderlikova, Vanda; Tans, Sander J.

    2015-01-01

    Epistatic interactions can frustrate and shape evolutionary change. Indeed, phenotypes may fail to evolve when essential mutations are only accessible through positive selection if they are fixed simultaneously. How environmental variability affects such constraints is poorly understood. Here, we

  2. On the evolutionary constraint surface of hydra

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    Slobodkin, L. B.; Dunn, K.

    1983-01-01

    Food consumption, body size, and budding rate were measured simultaneously in isolated individual hydra of six strains. For each individual hydra the three measurements define a point in the three dimensional space with axes: food consumption, budding rate, and body size. These points lie on a single surface, regardless of species. Floating rate and incidence of sexuality map onto this surface. It is suggested that this surface is an example of a general class of evolutionary constraint surfaces derived from the conjunction of evolutinary theory and the theory of ecological resource budgets. These constraint surfaces correspond to microevolutionary domains.

  3. Comparing Evolutionary Algorithms on Binary Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craenen, B.G.W.; Eiben, A.E.; van Hemert, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Constraint handling is not straightforward in evolutionary algorithms (EAs) since the usual search operators, mutation and recombination, are 'blind' to constraints. Nevertheless, the issue is highly relevant, for many challenging problems involve constraints. Over the last decade, numerous EAs for

  4. Evolutionary stability for matrix games under time constraints.

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    Garay, József; Csiszár, Villő; Móri, Tamás F

    2017-02-21

    Game theory focuses on payoffs and typically ignores time constraints that play an important role in evolutionary processes where the repetition of games can depend on the strategies, too. We introduce a matrix game under time constraints, where each pairwise interaction has two consequences: both players receive a payoff and they cannot play the next game for a specified time duration. Thus our model is defined by two matrices: a payoff matrix and an average time duration matrix. Maynard Smith's concept of evolutionary stability is extended to this class of games. We illustrate the effect of time constraints by the well-known prisoner's dilemma game, where additional time constraints can ensure the existence of unique evolutionary stable strategies (ESS), both pure and mixed, or the coexistence of two pure ESS. Our general results may be useful in several fields of biology where evolutionary game theory is applied, principally in ecological games, where time constraints play an inevitable role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of evolutionary rates and constraints in three mammalian genomes

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    Cooper, Gregory M.; Brudno, Michael; Stone, Eric A.; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

    2004-02-15

    We present an analysis of rates and patterns of microevolutionary phenomena that have shaped the human, mouse, and rat genomes since their last common ancestor. We find evidence for a shift in the mutational spectrum between the mouse and rat lineages, with the net effect being a relative increase in GC content in the rat genome. Our estimate for the neutral point substitution rate separating the two rodents is 0.196 substitutions per site, and 0.65 substitutions per site for the tree relating all three mammals. Small insertions and deletions of 1-10 bp in length (''microindels'') occur at approximately 5 percent of the point substitution rate. Inferred regional correlations in evolutionary rates between lineages and between types of sites support the idea that rates of evolution are influenced by local genomic or cell biological context. No substantial correlations between rates of point substitutions and rates of microindels are found, however, implying that the influences that affect these processes are distinct. Finally, we have identified those regions in the human genome that are evolving slowly, which are likely to include functional elements important to human biology. At least 5 percent of the human genome is under substantial constraint, most of which is noncoding.

  6. Constrained Optimization Based on Hybrid Evolutionary Algorithm and Adaptive Constraint-Handling Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong; Cai, Zixing; Zhou, Yuren

    2009-01-01

    A novel approach to deal with numerical and engineering constrained optimization problems, which incorporates a hybrid evolutionary algorithm and an adaptive constraint-handling technique, is presented in this paper. The hybrid evolutionary algorithm simultaneously uses simplex crossover and two...... mutation operators to generate the offspring population. Additionally, the adaptive constraint-handling technique consists of three main situations. In detail, at each situation, one constraint-handling mechanism is designed based on current population state. Experiments on 13 benchmark test functions...... and four well-known constrained design problems verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. The experimental results show that integrating the hybrid evolutionary algorithm with the adaptive constraint-handling technique is beneficial, and the proposed method achieves competitive...

  7. Assessing facial attractiveness: individual decisions and evolutionary constraints

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    Ferenc Kocsor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies showed that facial attractiveness, as a highly salient social cue, influences behavioral responses. It has also been found that attractive faces evoke distinctive neural activation compared to unattractive or neutral faces. Objectives: Our aim was to design a face recognition task where individual preferences for facial cues are controlled for, and to create conditions that are more similar to natural circumstances in terms of decision making. Design: In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI experiment, subjects were shown attractive and unattractive faces, categorized on the basis of their own individual ratings. Results: Statistical analysis of all subjects showed elevated brain activation for attractive opposite-sex faces in contrast to less attractive ones in regions that previously have been reported to show enhanced activation with increasing attractiveness level (e.g. the medial and superior occipital gyri, fusiform gyrus, precentral gyrus, and anterior cingular cortex. Besides these, females showed additional brain activation in areas thought to be involved in basic emotions and desires (insula, detection of facial emotions (superior temporal gyrus, and memory retrieval (hippocampus. Conclusions: From these data, we speculate that because of the risks involving mate choice faced by women during evolutionary times, selection might have preferred the development of an elaborated neural system in females to assess the attractiveness and social value of male faces.

  8. Evolutionary constraints shape caste-specific gene expression across 15 ant species.

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    Morandin, Claire; Mikheyev, Alexander S; Pedersen, Jes Søe; Helanterä, Heikki

    2017-05-01

    Development of polymorphic phenotypes from similar genomes requires gene expression differences. However, little is known about how morph-specific gene expression patterns vary on a broad phylogenetic scale. We hypothesize that evolution of morph-specific gene expression, and consequently morph-specific phenotypic evolution, may be constrained by gene essentiality and the amount of pleiotropic constraints. Here, we use comparative transcriptomics of queen and worker morphs, that is, castes, from 15 ant species to understand the constraints of morph-biased gene expression. In particular, we investigate how measures of evolutionary constraints at the sequence level (expression level, connectivity, and number of gene ontology [GO] terms) correlate with morph-biased expression. Our results show that genes indeed vary in their potential to become morph-biased. The existence of genes that are constrained in becoming caste-biased potentially limits the evolutionary decoupling of the caste phenotypes, that is, it might result in "caste load" occasioning from antagonistic fitness variation, similarly to sexually antagonistic fitness variation between males and females. On the other hand, we suggest that genes under low constraints are released from antagonistic variation and thus more likely to be co-opted for morph specific use. Overall, our results suggest that the factors that affect sequence evolutionary rates and evolution of plastic expression may largely overlap. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Indirect genetics effects and evolutionary constraint: an analysis of social dominance in red deer, Cervus elaphus.

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    Wilson, A J; Morrissey, M B; Adams, M J; Walling, C A; Guinness, F E; Pemberton, J M; Clutton-Brock, T H; Kruuk, L E B

    2011-04-01

    By determining access to limited resources, social dominance is often an important determinant of fitness. Thus, if heritable, standard theory predicts mean dominance should evolve. However, dominance is usually inferred from the tendency to win contests, and given one winner and one loser in any dyadic contest, the mean proportion won will always equal 0.5. Here, we argue that the apparent conflict between quantitative genetic theory and common sense is resolved by recognition of indirect genetic effects (IGEs). We estimate selection on, and genetic (co)variance structures for, social dominance, in a wild population of red deer Cervus elaphus, on the Scottish island of Rum. While dominance is heritable and positively correlated with lifetime fitness, contest outcomes depend as much on the genes carried by an opponent as on the genotype of a focal individual. We show how this dependency imposes an absolute evolutionary constraint on the phenotypic mean, thus reconciling theoretical predictions with common sense. More generally, we argue that IGEs likely provide a widespread but poorly recognized source of evolutionary constraint for traits influenced by competition. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. An adaptive evolutionary algorithm for traveling salesman problem with precedence constraints.

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    Sung, Jinmo; Jeong, Bongju

    2014-01-01

    Traveling sales man problem with precedence constraints is one of the most notorious problems in terms of the efficiency of its solution approach, even though it has very wide range of industrial applications. We propose a new evolutionary algorithm to efficiently obtain good solutions by improving the search process. Our genetic operators guarantee the feasibility of solutions over the generations of population, which significantly improves the computational efficiency even when it is combined with our flexible adaptive searching strategy. The efficiency of the algorithm is investigated by computational experiments.

  11. Can evolutionary constraints explain the rarity of nitrogen-fixing trees in high-latitude forests?

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    Menge, Duncan N L; Crews, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    Contents 1195 I. 1195 II. 1196 III. 1196 IV. 1200 1200 References 1200 SUMMARY: The rarity of symbiotic nitrogen (N)-fixing trees in temperate and boreal ('high-latitude') forests is curious. One explanation - the evolutionary constraints hypothesis - posits that high-latitude N-fixing trees are rare because few have evolved. Here, we consider traits necessary for high-latitude N-fixing trees. We then use recent developments in trait evolution to estimate that > 2000 and > 500 species could have evolved from low-latitude N-fixing trees and high-latitude N-fixing herbs, respectively. Evolution of N-fixing from nonfixing trees is an unlikely source of diversity. Dispersal limitation seems unlikely to limit high-latitude N-fixer diversity. The greater number of N-fixing species predicted to evolve than currently inhabit high-latitude forests suggests a greater role for ecological than evolutionary constraints. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Comparison of Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms for Operations Scheduling under Machine Availability Constraints

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    M. Frutos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the problems that arise in production systems can be handled with multiobjective techniques. One of those problems is that of scheduling operations subject to constraints on the availability of machines and buffer capacity. In this paper we analyze different Evolutionary multiobjective Algorithms (MOEAs for this kind of problems. We consider an experimental framework in which we schedule production operations for four real world Job-Shop contexts using three algorithms, NSGAII, SPEA2, and IBEA. Using two performance indexes, Hypervolume and R2, we found that SPEA2 and IBEA are the most efficient for the tasks at hand. On the other hand IBEA seems to be a better choice of tool since it yields more solutions in the approximate Pareto frontier.

  13. Characterization of the avian Trojan gene family reveals contrasting evolutionary constraints.

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    Petar Petrov

    Full Text Available "Trojan" is a leukocyte-specific, cell surface protein originally identified in the chicken. Its molecular function has been hypothesized to be related to anti-apoptosis and the proliferation of immune cells. The Trojan gene has been localized onto the Z sex chromosome. The adjacent two genes also show significant homology to Trojan, suggesting the existence of a novel gene/protein family. Here, we characterize this Trojan family, identify homologues in other species and predict evolutionary constraints on these genes. The two Trojan-related proteins in chicken were predicted as a receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase and a transmembrane protein, bearing a cytoplasmic immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif. We identified the Trojan gene family in ten other bird species and found related genes in three reptiles and a fish species. The phylogenetic analysis of the homologues revealed a gradual diversification among the family members. Evolutionary analyzes of the avian genes predicted that the extracellular regions of the proteins have been subjected to positive selection. Such selection was possibly a response to evolving interacting partners or to pathogen challenges. We also observed an almost complete lack of intracellular positively selected sites, suggesting a conserved signaling mechanism of the molecules. Therefore, the contrasting patterns of selection likely correlate with the interaction and signaling potential of the molecules.

  14. Characterization of the avian Trojan gene family reveals contrasting evolutionary constraints.

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    Petrov, Petar; Syrjänen, Riikka; Smith, Jacqueline; Gutowska, Maria Weronika; Uchida, Tatsuya; Vainio, Olli; Burt, David W

    2015-01-01

    "Trojan" is a leukocyte-specific, cell surface protein originally identified in the chicken. Its molecular function has been hypothesized to be related to anti-apoptosis and the proliferation of immune cells. The Trojan gene has been localized onto the Z sex chromosome. The adjacent two genes also show significant homology to Trojan, suggesting the existence of a novel gene/protein family. Here, we characterize this Trojan family, identify homologues in other species and predict evolutionary constraints on these genes. The two Trojan-related proteins in chicken were predicted as a receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase and a transmembrane protein, bearing a cytoplasmic immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif. We identified the Trojan gene family in ten other bird species and found related genes in three reptiles and a fish species. The phylogenetic analysis of the homologues revealed a gradual diversification among the family members. Evolutionary analyzes of the avian genes predicted that the extracellular regions of the proteins have been subjected to positive selection. Such selection was possibly a response to evolving interacting partners or to pathogen challenges. We also observed an almost complete lack of intracellular positively selected sites, suggesting a conserved signaling mechanism of the molecules. Therefore, the contrasting patterns of selection likely correlate with the interaction and signaling potential of the molecules.

  15. Covariation and phenotypic integration in chemical communication displays: biosynthetic constraints and eco-evolutionary implications.

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    Junker, Robert R; Kuppler, Jonas; Amo, Luisa; Blande, James D; Borges, Renee M; van Dam, Nicole M; Dicke, Marcel; Dötterl, Stefan; Ehlers, Bodil K; Etl, Florian; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Glinwood, Robert; Gols, Rieta; Groot, Astrid T; Heil, Martin; Hoffmeister, Mathias; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Jarau, Stefan; John, Lena; Kessler, Andre; Knudsen, Jette T; Kost, Christian; Larue-Kontic, Anne-Amélie C; Leonhardt, Sara Diana; Lucas-Barbosa, Dani; Majetic, Cassie J; Menzel, Florian; Parachnowitsch, Amy L; Pasquet, Rémy S; Poelman, Erik H; Raguso, Robert A; Ruther, Joachim; Schiestl, Florian P; Schmitt, Thomas; Tholl, Dorothea; Unsicker, Sybille B; Verhulst, Niels; Visser, Marcel E; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Köllner, Tobias G

    2017-03-03

    Chemical communication is ubiquitous. The identification of conserved structural elements in visual and acoustic communication is well established, but comparable information on chemical communication displays (CCDs) is lacking. We assessed the phenotypic integration of CCDs in a meta-analysis to characterize patterns of covariation in CCDs and identified functional or biosynthetically constrained modules. Poorly integrated plant CCDs (i.e. low covariation between scent compounds) support the notion that plants often utilize one or few key compounds to repel antagonists or to attract pollinators and enemies of herbivores. Animal CCDs (mostly insect pheromones) were usually more integrated than those of plants (i.e. stronger covariation), suggesting that animals communicate via fixed proportions among compounds. Both plant and animal CCDs were composed of modules, which are groups of strongly covarying compounds. Biosynthetic similarity of compounds revealed biosynthetic constraints in the covariation patterns of plant CCDs. We provide a novel perspective on chemical communication and a basis for future investigations on structural properties of CCDs. This will facilitate identifying modules and biosynthetic constraints that may affect the outcome of selection and thus provide a predictive framework for evolutionary trajectories of CCDs in plants and animals. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Ecological, evolutionary and social constraints on reproductive effort: are hoary marmots really biennial breeders?

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    Patil, Vijay P; Karels, Timothy J; Hik, David S

    2015-01-01

    Biennial breeding is a rare life-history trait observed in animal species living in harsh, unproductive environments. This reproductive pattern is thought to occur in 10 of 14 species in the genus Marmota, making marmots useful model organisms for studying its ecological and evolutionary implications. Biennial breeding in marmots has been described as an obligate pattern which evolved as a mechanism to mitigate the energetic costs of reproduction (Evolved Constraint hypothesis). However, recent anecdotal evidence suggests that it is a facultative pattern controlled by annual variation in climate and food availability (Environmental Constraint hypothesis). Finally, in social animals like marmots, biennial breeding could result from reproductive competition between females within social groups (Social Constraint hypothesis). We evaluated these three hypotheses using mark-recapture data from an 8-year study of hoary marmot (Marmota caligata) population dynamics in the Yukon. Annual variation in breeding probability was modeled using multi-state mark-recapture models, while other reproductive life-history traits were modeled with generalized linear mixed models. Hoary marmots were neither obligate nor facultative biennial breeders, and breeding probability was insensitive to evolved, environmental, or social factors. However, newly mature females were significantly less likely to breed than older individuals. Annual breeding did not result in increased mortality. Female survival and, to a lesser extent, average fecundity were correlated with winter climate, as indexed by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Hoary marmots are less conservative breeders than previously believed, and the evidence for biennial breeding throughout Marmota, and in other arctic/alpine/antarctic animals, should be re-examined. Prediction of future population dynamics requires an accurate understanding of life history strategies, and of how life history traits allow animals to cope with changes in

  17. Ecological, evolutionary and social constraints on reproductive effort: are hoary marmots really biennial breeders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay P Patil

    Full Text Available Biennial breeding is a rare life-history trait observed in animal species living in harsh, unproductive environments. This reproductive pattern is thought to occur in 10 of 14 species in the genus Marmota, making marmots useful model organisms for studying its ecological and evolutionary implications. Biennial breeding in marmots has been described as an obligate pattern which evolved as a mechanism to mitigate the energetic costs of reproduction (Evolved Constraint hypothesis. However, recent anecdotal evidence suggests that it is a facultative pattern controlled by annual variation in climate and food availability (Environmental Constraint hypothesis. Finally, in social animals like marmots, biennial breeding could result from reproductive competition between females within social groups (Social Constraint hypothesis. We evaluated these three hypotheses using mark-recapture data from an 8-year study of hoary marmot (Marmota caligata population dynamics in the Yukon. Annual variation in breeding probability was modeled using multi-state mark-recapture models, while other reproductive life-history traits were modeled with generalized linear mixed models. Hoary marmots were neither obligate nor facultative biennial breeders, and breeding probability was insensitive to evolved, environmental, or social factors. However, newly mature females were significantly less likely to breed than older individuals. Annual breeding did not result in increased mortality. Female survival and, to a lesser extent, average fecundity were correlated with winter climate, as indexed by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Hoary marmots are less conservative breeders than previously believed, and the evidence for biennial breeding throughout Marmota, and in other arctic/alpine/antarctic animals, should be re-examined. Prediction of future population dynamics requires an accurate understanding of life history strategies, and of how life history traits allow animals to cope

  18. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

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    Steven E. Massey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard genetic code (SGC is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P, and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome

  19. A high-resolution map of human evolutionary constraint using 29 mammals

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    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Garber, Manuel; Zuk, Or; Lin, Michael F.; Parker, Brian J.; Washietl, Stefan; Kheradpour, Pouya; Ernst, Jason; Jordan, Gregory; Mauceli, Evan; Ward, Lucas D.; Lowe, Craig B.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Clamp, Michele; Gnerre, Sante; Alfoldi, Jessica; Beal, Kathryn; Chang, Jean; Clawson, Hiram; Cuff, James; Di Palma, Federica; Fitzgerald, Stephen; Flicek, Paul; Guttman, Mitchell; Hubisz, Melissa J; Jaffe, David B.; Jungreis, Irwin; Kent, W James; Kostka, Dennis; Lara, Marcia; Martins, Andre L; Massingham, Tim; Moltke, Ida; Raney, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Robinson, Jim; Stark, Alexander; Vilella, Albert J.; Wen, Jiayu; Xie, Xiaohui; Zody, Michael C.; Worley, Kim C.; Kovar, Christie L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Warren, Wesley C.; Mardis, Elaine R; Weinstock, George M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Birney, Ewan; Margulies, Elliott H.; Herrero, Javier; Green, Eric D.; Haussler, David; Siepel, Adam; Goldman, Nick; Pollard, Katherine S.; Pedersen, Jakob S.; Lander, Eric S.; Kellis, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of related genomes has emerged as a powerful lens for genome interpretation. Here, we report the sequencing and comparative analysis of 29 eutherian genomes. We confirm that at least 5.5% of the human genome has undergone purifying selection, and report constrained elements covering ~4.2% of the genome. We use evolutionary signatures and comparison with experimental datasets to suggest candidate functions for ~60% of constrained bases. These elements reveal a small number of new coding exons, candidate stop codon readthrough events, and over 10,000 regions of overlapping synonymous constraint within protein-coding exons. We find 220 candidate RNA structural families, and nearly a million elements overlapping potential promoter, enhancer and insulator regions. We report specific amino acid residues that have undergone positive selection, 280,000 non-coding elements exapted from mobile elements, and ~1,000 primate- and human-accelerated elements. Overlap with disease-associated variants suggests our findings will be relevant for studies of human biology and health. PMID:21993624

  20. Beyond the Pleistocene: Using Phylogeny and Constraint to Inform the Evolutionary Psychology of Human Mating

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    Eastwick, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary psychologists explore the adaptive function of traits and behaviors that characterize modern Homo sapiens. However, evolutionary psychologists have yet to incorporate the phylogenetic relationship between modern Homo sapiens and humans' hominid and pongid relatives (both living and extinct) into their theorizing. By considering the…

  1. Amino acid positions subject to multiple co-evolutionary constraints can be robustly identified by their eigenvector network centrality scores

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    Parente, Daniel J.; Ray, J. Christian J.; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2015-01-01

    As proteins evolve, amino acid positions key to protein structure or function are subject to mutational constraints. These positions can be detected by analyzing sequence families for amino acid conservation or for co-evolution between pairs of positions. Co-evolutionary scores are usually rank-ordered and thresholded to reveal the top pairwise scores, but they also can be treated as weighted networks. Here, we used network analyses to bypass a major complication of co-evolution studies: For a given sequence alignment, alternative algorithms usually identify different, top pairwise scores. We reconciled results from five commonly-used, mathematically divergent algorithms (ELSC, McBASC, OMES, SCA, and ZNMI), using the LacI/GalR and 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase protein families as models. Calculations used unthresholded co-evolution scores from which column-specific properties such as sequence entropy and random noise were subtracted; “central” positions were identified by calculating various network centrality scores. When compared among algorithms, network centrality methods, particularly eigenvector centrality, showed markedly better agreement than comparisons of the top pairwise scores. Positions with large centrality scores occurred at key structural locations and/or were functionally sensitive to mutations. Further, the top central positions often differed from those with top pairwise co-evolution scores: Instead of a few strong scores, central positions often had multiple, moderate scores. We conclude that eigenvector centrality calculations reveal a robust evolutionary pattern of constraints – detectable by divergent algorithms – that occur at key protein locations. Finally, we discuss the fact that multiple patterns co-exist in evolutionary data that, together, give rise to emergent protein functions. PMID:26503808

  2. Calibrated permeation standards

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    Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Reese, Matthew O.; Kempe, Michael D.

    2017-11-21

    A permeation standard is provided. The permeation standard may include a substrate that is impermeable to an analyte, an orifice disposed in the substrate, and a permeable material filling the orifice. The orifice and the permeable material are configured to provide a predetermined transmission rate of the analyte through the permeation standard. Also provided herein are methods for forming the permeation standard.

  3. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

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    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  4. Evolutionary Meta-Analysis of Association Studies Reveals Ancient Constraints Affecting Disease Marker Discovery

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    Dudley, Joel T.; Chen, Rong; Sanderford, Maxwell; Butte, Atul J.; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide disease association studies contrast genetic variation between disease cohorts and healthy populations to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other genetic markers revealing underlying genetic architectures of human diseases. Despite scores of efforts over the past decade, many reproducible genetic variants that explain substantial proportions of the heritable risk of common human diseases remain undiscovered. We have conducted a multispecies genomic analysis of 5,831 putative human risk variants for more than 230 disease phenotypes reported in 2,021 studies. We find that the current approaches show a propensity for discovering disease-associated SNPs (dSNPs) at conserved genomic positions because the effect size (odds ratio) and allelic P value of genetic association of an SNP relates strongly to the evolutionary conservation of their genomic position. We propose a new measure for ranking SNPs that integrates evolutionary conservation scores and the P value (E-rank). Using published data from a large case-control study, we demonstrate that E-rank method prioritizes SNPs with a greater likelihood of bona fide and reproducible genetic disease associations, many of which may explain greater proportions of genetic variance. Therefore, long-term evolutionary histories of genomic positions offer key practical utility in reassessing data from existing disease association studies, and in the design and analysis of future studies aimed at revealing the genetic basis of common human diseases. PMID:22389448

  5. Deciding to Cooperate in Northern Ghana: Trust as an Evolutionary Constraint Across Cultural Diversity.

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    Acedo-Carmona, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2015-11-27

    The upper-east and northern regions of Ghana offers a unique opportunity to study the influence of evolutionary social dynamics in making cooperation possible, despite cultural differences. These regions are occupied by several distinct ethnic groups, in interaction, such as the Kussasi, Mamprusi, Bimoba, Konkomba, and Fulani. We will report our fieldwork related to how cooperation takes places there, both within each group and among people from the different groups. Methods included personal networks of cooperation (ego networks), interviews and analysis of group contexts. The most important result is that, while each ethnic group may differ in terms of family and clan structure, a similar pattern can be found in all of them, of cooperation structured around small groups of trust-based close relationships. The study suggests that habitual decisions about cooperation are not strategic or self-interested, but instead are based on unconscious processes sustained by the emotional bonds of trust. These kind of emotional bonds are claimed to be relevant from an evolutionary point of view.

  6. Effects of hybridization and evolutionary constraints on secondary metabolites: the genetic architecture of phenylpropanoids in European populus species.

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    Celine Caseys

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the origin, maintenance and evolution of plant secondary metabolite diversity remain largely unknown. Decades of phenotypic studies suggest hybridization as a key player in generating chemical diversity in plants. Knowledge of the genetic architecture and selective constraints of phytochemical traits is key to understanding the effects of hybridization on plant chemical diversity and ecological interactions. Using the European Populus species P. alba (White poplar and P. tremula (European aspen and their hybrids as a model, we examined levels of inter- and intraspecific variation, heritabilities, phenotypic correlations, and the genetic architecture of 38 compounds of the phenylpropanoid pathway measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS. We detected 41 quantitative trait loci (QTL for chlorogenic acids, salicinoids and flavonoids by genetic mapping in natural hybrid crosses. We show that these three branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway exhibit different geographic patterns of variation, heritabilities, and genetic architectures, and that they are affected differently by hybridization and evolutionary constraints. Flavonoid abundances present high species specificity, clear geographic structure, and strong genetic determination, contrary to salicinoids and chlorogenic acids. Salicinoids, which represent important defence compounds in Salicaceae, exhibited pronounced genetic correlations on the QTL map. Our results suggest that interspecific phytochemical differentiation is concentrated in downstream sections of the phenylpropanoid pathway. In particular, our data point to glycosyltransferase enzymes as likely targets of rapid evolution and interspecific differentiation in the 'model forest tree' Populus.

  7. Effects of Hybridization and Evolutionary Constraints on Secondary Metabolites: The Genetic Architecture of Phenylpropanoids in European Populus Species

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    Caseys, Celine; Stritt, Christoph; Glauser, Gaetan; Blanchard, Thierry; Lexer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the origin, maintenance and evolution of plant secondary metabolite diversity remain largely unknown. Decades of phenotypic studies suggest hybridization as a key player in generating chemical diversity in plants. Knowledge of the genetic architecture and selective constraints of phytochemical traits is key to understanding the effects of hybridization on plant chemical diversity and ecological interactions. Using the European Populus species P. alba (White poplar) and P. tremula (European aspen) and their hybrids as a model, we examined levels of inter- and intraspecific variation, heritabilities, phenotypic correlations, and the genetic architecture of 38 compounds of the phenylpropanoid pathway measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). We detected 41 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for chlorogenic acids, salicinoids and flavonoids by genetic mapping in natural hybrid crosses. We show that these three branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway exhibit different geographic patterns of variation, heritabilities, and genetic architectures, and that they are affected differently by hybridization and evolutionary constraints. Flavonoid abundances present high species specificity, clear geographic structure, and strong genetic determination, contrary to salicinoids and chlorogenic acids. Salicinoids, which represent important defence compounds in Salicaceae, exhibited pronounced genetic correlations on the QTL map. Our results suggest that interspecific phytochemical differentiation is concentrated in downstream sections of the phenylpropanoid pathway. In particular, our data point to glycosyltransferase enzymes as likely targets of rapid evolution and interspecific differentiation in the ‘model forest tree’ Populus. PMID:26010156

  8. Effects of hybridization and evolutionary constraints on secondary metabolites: the genetic architecture of phenylpropanoids in European populus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseys, Celine; Stritt, Christoph; Glauser, Gaetan; Blanchard, Thierry; Lexer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the origin, maintenance and evolution of plant secondary metabolite diversity remain largely unknown. Decades of phenotypic studies suggest hybridization as a key player in generating chemical diversity in plants. Knowledge of the genetic architecture and selective constraints of phytochemical traits is key to understanding the effects of hybridization on plant chemical diversity and ecological interactions. Using the European Populus species P. alba (White poplar) and P. tremula (European aspen) and their hybrids as a model, we examined levels of inter- and intraspecific variation, heritabilities, phenotypic correlations, and the genetic architecture of 38 compounds of the phenylpropanoid pathway measured by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). We detected 41 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for chlorogenic acids, salicinoids and flavonoids by genetic mapping in natural hybrid crosses. We show that these three branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway exhibit different geographic patterns of variation, heritabilities, and genetic architectures, and that they are affected differently by hybridization and evolutionary constraints. Flavonoid abundances present high species specificity, clear geographic structure, and strong genetic determination, contrary to salicinoids and chlorogenic acids. Salicinoids, which represent important defence compounds in Salicaceae, exhibited pronounced genetic correlations on the QTL map. Our results suggest that interspecific phytochemical differentiation is concentrated in downstream sections of the phenylpropanoid pathway. In particular, our data point to glycosyltransferase enzymes as likely targets of rapid evolution and interspecific differentiation in the 'model forest tree' Populus.

  9. Geographical gradients in selection can reveal genetic constraints for evolutionary responses to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Marshall, Dustin; Dupont, Sam; Bacigalupe, Leonardo D; Bodrossy, Levente; Hobday, Alistair J

    2017-02-01

    Geographical gradients in selection can shape different genetic architectures in natural populations, reflecting potential genetic constraints for adaptive evolution under climate change. Investigation of natural pH/pCO2 variation in upwelling regions reveals different spatio-temporal patterns of natural selection, generating genetic and phenotypic clines in populations, and potentially leading to local adaptation, relevant to understanding effects of ocean acidification (OA). Strong directional selection, associated with intense and continuous upwellings, may have depleted genetic variation in populations within these upwelling regions, favouring increased tolerances to low pH but with an associated cost in other traits. In contrast, diversifying or weak directional selection in populations with seasonal upwellings or outside major upwelling regions may have resulted in higher genetic variances and the lack of genetic correlations among traits. Testing this hypothesis in geographical regions with similar environmental conditions to those predicted under climate change will build insights into how selection may act in the future and how populations may respond to stressors such as OA. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Evolutionary constraints on visual cortex architecture from the dynamics of hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas Charles; Benayoun, Marc; Wallace, Edward; van Drongelen, Wim; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Cowan, Jack

    2012-01-10

    In the cat or primate primary visual cortex (V1), normal vision corresponds to a state where neural excitation patterns are driven by external visual stimuli. A spectacular failure mode of V1 occurs when such patterns are overwhelmed by spontaneously generated spatially self-organized patterns of neural excitation. These are experienced as geometric visual hallucinations. The problem of identifying the mechanisms by which V1 avoids this failure is made acute by recent advances in the statistical mechanics of pattern formation, which suggest that the hallucinatory state should be very robust. Here, we report how incorporating physiologically realistic long-range connections between inhibitory neurons changes the behavior of a model of V1. We find that the sparsity of long-range inhibition in V1 plays a previously unrecognized but key functional role in preserving the normal vision state. Surprisingly, it also contributes to the observed regularity of geometric visual hallucinations. Our results provide an explanation for the observed sparsity of long-range inhibition in V1--this generic architectural feature is an evolutionary adaptation that tunes V1 to the normal vision state. In addition, it has been shown that exactly the same long-range connections play a key role in the development of orientation preference maps. Thus V1's most striking long-range features--patchy excitatory connections and sparse inhibitory connections--are strongly constrained by two requirements: the need for the visual state to be robust and the developmental requirements of the orientational preference map.

  11. Evolutionary constraint and disease associations of post-translational modification sites in human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Reimand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting the impact of human genome variation on phenotype is challenging. The functional effect of protein-coding variants is often predicted using sequence conservation and population frequency data, however other factors are likely relevant. We hypothesized that variants in protein post-translational modification (PTM sites contribute to phenotype variation and disease. We analyzed fraction of rare variants and non-synonymous to synonymous variant ratio (Ka/Ks in 7,500 human genomes and found a significant negative selection signal in PTM regions independent of six factors, including conservation, codon usage, and GC-content, that is widely distributed across tissue-specific genes and function classes. PTM regions are also enriched in known disease mutations, suggesting that PTM variation is more likely deleterious. PTM constraint also affects flanking sequence around modified residues and increases around clustered sites, indicating presence of functionally important short linear motifs. Using target site motifs of 124 kinases, we predict that at least ∼180,000 motif-breaker amino acid residues that disrupt PTM sites when substituted, and highlight kinase motifs that show specific negative selection and enrichment of disease mutations. We provide this dataset with corresponding hypothesized mechanisms as a community resource. As an example of our integrative approach, we propose that PTPN11 variants in Noonan syndrome aberrantly activate the protein by disrupting an uncharacterized cluster of phosphorylation sites. Further, as PTMs are molecular switches that are modulated by drugs, we study mutated binding sites of PTM enzymes in disease genes and define a drug-disease network containing 413 novel predicted disease-gene links.

  12. Evolutionary Constraint and Disease Associations of Post-Translational Modification Sites in Human Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimand, Jüri; Wagih, Omar; Bader, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting the impact of human genome variation on phenotype is challenging. The functional effect of protein-coding variants is often predicted using sequence conservation and population frequency data, however other factors are likely relevant. We hypothesized that variants in protein post-translational modification (PTM) sites contribute to phenotype variation and disease. We analyzed fraction of rare variants and non-synonymous to synonymous variant ratio (Ka/Ks) in 7,500 human genomes and found a significant negative selection signal in PTM regions independent of six factors, including conservation, codon usage, and GC-content, that is widely distributed across tissue-specific genes and function classes. PTM regions are also enriched in known disease mutations, suggesting that PTM variation is more likely deleterious. PTM constraint also affects flanking sequence around modified residues and increases around clustered sites, indicating presence of functionally important short linear motifs. Using target site motifs of 124 kinases, we predict that at least ∼180,000 motif-breaker amino acid residues that disrupt PTM sites when substituted, and highlight kinase motifs that show specific negative selection and enrichment of disease mutations. We provide this dataset with corresponding hypothesized mechanisms as a community resource. As an example of our integrative approach, we propose that PTPN11 variants in Noonan syndrome aberrantly activate the protein by disrupting an uncharacterized cluster of phosphorylation sites. Further, as PTMs are molecular switches that are modulated by drugs, we study mutated binding sites of PTM enzymes in disease genes and define a drug-disease network containing 413 novel predicted disease-gene links. PMID:25611800

  13. Permeation through graphene ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; He, Guangyu; Wu, Xu; Ren, Jindong; Guo, Hongxuan; Kong, Yuhan; Iwai, Hideo; Fujita, Daisuke; Gao, Hongjun; Guo, Haiming; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Real graphene sheets show limited anti-permeation performance deviating from the ideally flat honeycomb carbon lattice that is impermeable to gases. Ripples in graphene are prevalent and they could significantly influence carrier transport. However, little attention has been paid to the role of ripples in the permeation properties of graphene. Here, we report that gases can permeate through graphene ripples at room temperature. The feasibility of gas permeation through graphene ripples is determined by detecting the initial oxidation sites of Cu surface covered with isolated graphene domain. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations demonstrate that the oxygen atom permeation occurs via the formation of C-O-C bond, in which process the energy barrier through the rippled graphene lattice is much smaller than that through a flat graphene lattice, rendering permeation through ripples more favorable. Combining with the recent advances in atoms intercalation between graphene and metal substrate for transfer-free and electrically insulated graphene, this discovery provides new perspectives regarding graphene’s limited anti-permeation performance and evokes for rational design of graphene-based encapsulation for barrier and selective gas separation applications through ripple engineering.

  14. A constraint-based evolutionary learning approach to the expectation maximization for optimal estimation of the hidden Markov model for speech signal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Shamsul; Yearwood, John; Togneri, Roberto

    2009-02-01

    This paper attempts to overcome the tendency of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to locate a local rather than global maximum when applied to estimate the hidden Markov model (HMM) parameters in speech signal modeling. We propose a hybrid algorithm for estimation of the HMM in automatic speech recognition (ASR) using a constraint-based evolutionary algorithm (EA) and EM, the CEL-EM. The novelty of our hybrid algorithm (CEL-EM) is that it is applicable for estimation of the constraint-based models with many constraints and large numbers of parameters (which use EM) like HMM. Two constraint-based versions of the CEL-EM with different fusion strategies have been proposed using a constraint-based EA and the EM for better estimation of HMM in ASR. The first one uses a traditional constraint-handling mechanism of EA. The other version transforms a constrained optimization problem into an unconstrained problem using Lagrange multipliers. Fusion strategies for the CEL-EM use a staged-fusion approach where EM has been plugged with the EA periodically after the execution of EA for a specific period of time to maintain the global sampling capabilities of EA in the hybrid algorithm. A variable initialization approach (VIA) has been proposed using a variable segmentation to provide a better initialization for EA in the CEL-EM. Experimental results on the TIMIT speech corpus show that CEL-EM obtains higher recognition accuracies than the traditional EM algorithm as well as a top-standard EM (VIA-EM, constructed by applying the VIA to EM).

  15. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion and permeation are discussed within the context of irreversible thermodynamics. A new expression for the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is obtained which links the permeability to the diffusivity of a two-component solution and contains the poroelastic Biot-Willis coefficient. The theory is illustrated by predicting the concentration and pressure profiles during the filtration of a protein solution. At low concentrations the proteins diffuse independently while at higher concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. © 2009 Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.

  16. Application of On-Board Evolutionary Algorithms to Underwater Robots to Optimally Replan Missions with Energy Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Seto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to show that on-board mission replanning for an AUV sensor coverage mission, based on available energy, enhances mission success. Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs are tasked to increasingly long deployments, consequently energy management issues are timely and relevant. Energy shortages can occur if the AUV unexpectedly travels against stronger currents, is not trimmed for the local water salinity has to get back on course, and so forth. An on-board knowledge-based agent, based on a genetic algorithm, was designed and validated to replan a near-optimal AUV survey mission. It considers the measured AUV energy consumption, attitudes, speed over ground, and known response to proposed missions through on-line dynamics and control predictions. For the case studied, the replanned mission improves the survey area coverage by a factor of 2 for an energy budget, that is, a factor of 2 less than planned. The contribution is a novel on-board cognitive capability in the form of an agent that monitors the energy and intelligently replans missions based on energy considerations with evolutionary methods.

  17. Stylus: a system for evolutionary experimentation based on a protein/proteome model with non-arbitrary functional constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Axe

    Full Text Available The study of protein evolution is complicated by the vast size of protein sequence space, the huge number of possible protein folds, and the extraordinary complexity of the causal relationships between protein sequence, structure, and function. Much simpler model constructs may therefore provide an attractive complement to experimental studies in this area. Lattice models, which have long been useful in studies of protein folding, have found increasing use here. However, while these models incorporate actual sequences and structures (albeit non-biological ones, they incorporate no actual functions--relying instead on largely arbitrary structural criteria as a proxy for function. In view of the central importance of function to evolution, and the impossibility of incorporating real functional constraints without real function, it is important that protein-like models be developed around real structure-function relationships. Here we describe such a model and introduce open-source software that implements it. The model is based on the structure-function relationship in written language, where structures are two-dimensional ink paths and functions are the meanings that result when these paths form legible characters. To capture something like the hierarchical complexity of protein structure, we use the traditional characters of Chinese origin. Twenty coplanar vectors, encoded by base triplets, act like amino acids in building the character forms. This vector-world model captures many aspects of real proteins, including life-size sequences, a life-size structural repertoire, a realistic genetic code, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure, structural domains and motifs, operon-like genetic structures, and layered functional complexity up to a level resembling bacterial genomes and proteomes. Stylus is a full-featured implementation of the vector world for Unix systems. To demonstrate the utility of Stylus, we generated a sample set of

  18. Hydrodynamics of active permeating gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan-Jones, A C [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5521 CNRS-UM2, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Juelicher, F, E-mail: andrew.callan-jones@univ-montp2.fr [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzerstrasse 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    We develop a hydrodynamic theory of active permeating gels with viscoelasticity in which a polymer network is embedded in a background fluid. This situation is motivated by active processes in the cell cytoskeleton in which motor molecules generate elastic stresses in the network, which can drive permeation flows of the cytosol. Our approach differs from earlier ones by considering the elastic strain in the polymer network as a slowly relaxing dynamical variable. We first present the general ideas for the case of a passive, isotropic gel and then extend this description to a polar, active gel. We discuss two specific cases to illustrate the role of permeation in active gels: self-propulsion of a thin slab of gel relative to a substrate driven by filament polymerization and depolymerization; and non-equilibrium deswelling of a gel driven by molecular motors.

  19. Hydrogen permeation through tritium permeation barrier in Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, A. E-mail: aiello@brasimone.enea.ie; Benamati, G.; Chini, M.; Fazio, C.; Serra, E.; Yao, Z

    2001-11-01

    One of the main problems in the development of water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) DEMO fusion reactor is the reduction of the tritium permeation from the Pb-17Li, or the plasma, into the cooling water. The control of tritium losses is an important issue in fusion technology because of its safety and operational implications. This goal can be achieved using a tritium permeation barrier (TPB). The use of aluminium rich coatings, which forms Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at their surface, has been selected as reference solution for WCLL blanket in order to produce reliable TPB. The hot dipping process is one of the two candidates for the production of coatings on large blanket segments. The effectiveness of hot dipped aluminium coating on MANET II steel has been verified in gas phase and in liquid Pb-17Li, using a test apparatus named Corelli II. The permeation rate measured in gas phase is one order of magnitude lower than the one in liquid metal phase. Performing SEM-EDS analysis on the specimen, it was observed that micro cracks on the coating surface were present. The permeation curves in gas and Pb-17Li are reported and discussed. The characteristics of the new experimental device Vivaldi will be briefly described.

  20. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  1. Water permeation through anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Wright, Andrew; Weissbach, Thomas; Holdcroft, Steven

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of water permeation through solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes is crucial to offset the unbalanced water activity within SPE fuel cells. We examine water permeation through an emerging class of anion exchange membranes, hexamethyl-p-terphenyl poly (dimethylbenzimidazolium) (HMT-PMBI), and compare it against series of membrane thickness for a commercial anion exchange membrane (AEM), Fumapem® FAA-3, and a series of proton exchange membranes, Nafion®. The HMT-PMBI membrane is found to possess higher water permeabilities than Fumapem® FAA-3 and comparable permeability than Nafion (H+). By measuring water permeation through membranes of different thicknesses, we are able to decouple, for the first time, internal and interfacial water permeation resistances through anion exchange membranes. Permeation resistances on liquid/membrane interface is found to be negligible compared to that for vapor/membrane for both series of AEMs. Correspondingly, the resistance of liquid water permeation is found to be one order of magnitude smaller compared to that of vapor water permeation. HMT-PMBI possesses larger effective internal water permeation coefficient than both Fumapem® FAA-3 and Nafion® membranes (60 and 18% larger, respectively). In contrast, the effective interfacial permeation coefficient of HMT-PMBI is found to be similar to Fumapem® (±5%) but smaller than Nafion®(H+) (by 14%).

  2. Comparison of primary and secondary 26S rRNA structures in two Tetrahymena species: evidence for a strong evolutionary and structural constraint in expansion segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Nielsen, Henrik; Lenaers, G

    1990-01-01

    . These are regions within the common core of secondary structure where expansions have taken place during the evolution of the rRNA of higher eukaryotes. The dispensable nature of some of the expansion segments has been taken as evidence of their non-functionality. However, our data show that a considerable......We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the 26S large subunit (LSU) rRNA genes for two Tetrahymena species, T. thermophila and T. pyriformis. The inferred rRNA sequences are presented in their most probable secondary structures based on compensatory mutations, energy, and conservation...... selective constraint has operated to preserve the secondary structure of these segments. Especially in the case of the D2 and D8 segments, the presence of a considerable number of compensatory base changes suggests that the secondary structure of these regions is of functional importance. Alternatively...

  3. Evolutionary constrained optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2015-01-01

    This book makes available a self-contained collection of modern research addressing the general constrained optimization problems using evolutionary algorithms. Broadly the topics covered include constraint handling for single and multi-objective optimizations; penalty function based methodology; multi-objective based methodology; new constraint handling mechanism; hybrid methodology; scaling issues in constrained optimization; design of scalable test problems; parameter adaptation in constrained optimization; handling of integer, discrete and mix variables in addition to continuous variables; application of constraint handling techniques to real-world problems; and constrained optimization in dynamic environment. There is also a separate chapter on hybrid optimization, which is gaining lots of popularity nowadays due to its capability of bridging the gap between evolutionary and classical optimization. The material in the book is useful to researchers, novice, and experts alike. The book will also be useful...

  4. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  5. Evolutionary Constraints in the β-Globin Cluster: The Signature of Purifying Selection at the δ-Globin (HBD) Locus and Its Role in Developmental Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleirinho, Ana; Seixas, Susana; Lopes, Alexandra M.; Bento, Celeste; Prata, Maria J.; Amorim, António

    2013-01-01

    Human hemoglobins, the oxygen carriers in the blood, are composed by two α-like and two β-like globin monomers. The β-globin gene cluster located at 11p15.5 comprises one pseudogene and five genes whose expression undergoes two critical switches: the embryonic-to-fetal and fetal-to-adult transition. HBD encodes the δ-globin chain of the minor adult hemoglobin (HbA2), which is assumed to be physiologically irrelevant. Paradoxically, reduced diversity levels have been reported for this gene. In this study, we sought a detailed portrait of the genetic variation within the β-globin cluster in a large human population panel from different geographic backgrounds. We resequenced the coding and noncoding regions of the two adult β-globin genes (HBD and HBB) in European and African populations, and analyzed the data from the β-globin cluster (HBE, HBG2, HBG1, HBBP1, HBD, and HBB) in 1,092 individuals representing 14 populations sequenced as part of the 1000 Genomes Project. Additionally, we assessed the diversity levels in nonhuman primates using chimpanzee sequence data provided by the PanMap Project. Comprehensive analyses, based on classic neutrality tests, empirical and haplotype-based studies, revealed that HBD and its neighbor pseudogene HBBP1 have mainly evolved under purifying selection, suggesting that their roles are essential and nonredundant. Moreover, in the light of recent studies on the chromatin conformation of the β-globin cluster, we present evidence sustaining that the strong functional constraints underlying the decreased contemporary diversity at these two regions were not driven by protein function but instead are likely due to a regulatory role in ontogenic switches of gene expression. PMID:23431002

  6. Permeation of Ionic Liquids through the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Júlio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative forms of drug delivery such as delivery through the skin, have been developed to explore other routes. However, the incorporation of poorly soluble or partially insoluble drugs into these delivery systems represents a major problem. Ionic liquids (ILs may be incorporated in aqueous, oily or hydroalcoholic solutions and thus, may be used as excipients in drug delivery systems to increase/improve the topical and transdermal drug delivery. However, it is fundamental to consider the cytotoxicity of these salts and it is also crucial to evaluate if these compounds permeate through the skin. Herein, three imidazole-based ILs: [C2mim][Br], [C4mim][Br] and [C6mim][Br], were synthesized and each IL was incorporated within caffeine saturated solutions. Permeation studies of the active (caffeine in these solutions were performed to evaluate the amount of IL that permeated through the porcine ear skin in the presence of the active. To achieve this, gravimetric studies of the receptor compartment were performed. Results showed that the more lipophilic IL [C6mim][Br] presented the highest permeation through the skin. The permeation is dependent upon the size of the alkyl chain of the IL, and as more than 60% of the ILs permeate is it vital to consider the cytotoxicity of these salts when considering their incorporation in topical systems.

  7. Oxygen permeation through perovskitic membranes: The influence of steam in the sweep on the permeation performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Müller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental approaches are employed for the understanding of oxygen permeation through membranes. For the experiments, different oxygen partial pressures are applied to both sides of a BSCF5582 membrane, using synthetic air as feed and vacuum or steam/argon as sweep gas. Beside the partial pressure gradient, the permeation rate depends on the temperature and the membrane thickness. Sufficient permeation rates can be achieved by sweeping the membrane with water vapor (steam instead of a noble gas, which is optimized by ascending water content in the sweep gas. The influence of the steam content on the permeation performance as well as microstructural changes are demonstrated.

  8. Constraints in Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    1996-01-01

    Genetic programming refers to a class of genetic algorithms utilizing generic representation in the form of program trees. For a particular application, one needs to provide the set of functions, whose compositions determine the space of program structures being evolved, and the set of terminals, which determine the space of specific instances of those programs. The algorithm searches the space for the best program for a given problem, applying evolutionary mechanisms borrowed from nature. Genetic algorithms have shown great capabilities in approximately solving optimization problems which could not be approximated or solved with other methods. Genetic programming extends their capabilities to deal with a broader variety of problems. However, it also extends the size of the search space, which often becomes too large to be effectively searched even by evolutionary methods. Therefore, our objective is to utilize problem constraints, if such can be identified, to restrict this space. In this publication, we propose a generic constraint specification language, powerful enough for a broad class of problem constraints. This language has two elements -- one reduces only the number of program instances, the other reduces both the space of program structures as well as their instances. With this language, we define the minimal set of complete constraints, and a set of operators guaranteeing offspring validity from valid parents. We also show that these operators are not less efficient than the standard genetic programming operators if one preprocesses the constraints - the necessary mechanisms are identified.

  9. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  10. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Mike Patterson

    2010-10-01

    Idaho National Laboratory developed the Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC) for tritium permeation in the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR). All the component models in the VHTR were developed and were embedded into the MATHLAB SIMULINK package with a Graphic User Interface. The governing equations of the nuclear ternary reaction and thermal neutron capture reactions from impurities in helium and graphite core, reflector, and control rods were implemented. The TPAC code was verified using analytical solutions for the tritium birth rate from the ternary fission, the birth rate from 3He, and the birth rate from 10B. This paper also provides comparisons of the TPAC with the existing other codes. A VHTR reference design was selected for tritium permeation study from the reference design to the nuclear-assisted hydrogen production plant and some sensitivity study results are presented based on the HTGR outlet temperature of 750 degrees C.

  11. Permeation barrier for lightweight liquid hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, D.

    2007-04-16

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the insulating vacuum. The derived objective of this dissertation was to find and apply an adequate permeation barrier (liner) on CFRP. The investigated liners were either foils adhered on CFRP specimens or coatings deposited on CFRP specimens. The coatings were produced by means of thermal spraying, metal plating or physical vapor deposition (PVD). The materials of the liners included Al, Au, Cu, Ni and Sn as well as stainless steel and diamond-like carbon. The produced liners were tested for their permeation behavior, thermal shock resistance and adherence to the CFRP substrate. Additionally, SEM micrographs were used to characterize and qualify the liners. The foils, although being a good permeation barrier, adhered weakly to the substrate. Furthermore, leak-free joining of foil segments is a challenge still to be solved. The metal plating liners exhibited the best properties. For instance, no permeation could be detected through a 50 {mu}m thick Cu coating within the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. This corresponds to a reduction of the permeation gas flow by more than factor 7400 compared to uncoated CFRP. In addition, the metal platings revealed a high adherence and thermal shock resistance. The coatings produced by means of thermal spraying and PVD did not show a sufficient permeation barrier effect. After having investigated the specimens, a 170 liter CFRP tank was fully coated with 50 {mu}m Cu by means of metal plating. (orig.)

  12. Alcohol enhanced permeation in model membranes. Part I. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of membrane permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Beezer, Anthony E; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2010-06-30

    While it is well recognised that formulation components influence drug permeation, few studies have addressed the influence of vehicles on drug transport in artificial or biological membranes Previously we have investigated the effects of temperature on the uptake of model vehicles (i.e. alcohols) into silicone membrane. The present study evaluates the permeation of the model drug methyl paraben in the presence of butanol or heptanol. Drug permeation through silicone membranes was studied at different temperatures for each vehicle. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the permeation data were conducted to elucidate the possible mechanisms of drug transport. Independent examination of the partition and diffusion coefficients estimated for the permeation studies at different temperatures showed a break point occurring near 20 degrees C for butanol, but not heptanol. This transition temperature separated two different mechanisms of solute diffusion and partitioning, which may be associated with a change in the properties of the solvent. This was not observed from an analysis of flux data, owing to compensatory influences on the diffusion and partition behaviour of the drug. The study underlines the importance of appropriate temperature control when studying drug permeation. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolutionary Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2017-05-01

    Progressive kidney disease follows nephron loss, hyperfiltration, and incomplete repair, a process described as "maladaptive." In the past 20 years, a new discipline has emerged that expands research horizons: evolutionary medicine. In contrast to physiologic (homeostatic) adaptation, evolutionary adaptation is the result of reproductive success that reflects natural selection. Evolutionary explanations for physiologically maladaptive responses can emerge from mismatch of the phenotype with environment or evolutionary tradeoffs. Evolutionary adaptation to a terrestrial environment resulted in a vulnerable energy-consuming renal tubule and a hypoxic, hyperosmolar microenvironment. Natural selection favors successful energy investment strategy: energy is allocated to maintenance of nephron integrity through reproductive years, but this declines with increasing senescence after ~40 years of age. Risk factors for chronic kidney disease include restricted fetal growth or preterm birth (life history tradeoff resulting in fewer nephrons), evolutionary selection for APOL1 mutations (that provide resistance to trypanosome infection, a tradeoff), and modern life experience (Western diet mismatch leading to diabetes and hypertension). Current advances in genomics, epigenetics, and developmental biology have revealed proximate causes of kidney disease, but attempts to slow kidney disease remain elusive. Evolutionary medicine provides a complementary approach by addressing ultimate causes of kidney disease. Marked variation in nephron number at birth, nephron heterogeneity, and changing susceptibility to kidney injury throughout life history are the result of evolutionary processes. Combined application of molecular genetics, evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), developmental programming and life history theory may yield new strategies for prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  14. Development of a Contact Permeation Test Fixture and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Permeation and Analytical Solutions Team Quality System documentation and the guidance found in the ISO 17025 standard. All permeation and...annular ring (left) and no pressure (right). 2.2.4 Quality Controls Analytical permeation testing was conducted in accordance with ISO 17025 quality

  15. Effect of Permeation Enhancers on the Release Behavior and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this research work was to formulate, characterize and evaluate the in vitro permeation behavior of tramadol lotion containing propylene glycol (PG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as permeation enhancers. Methods: The permeation experiments were conducted in vitro using full thickness rabbit skin in ...

  16. Fermentation of lactose to ethanol in cheese whey permeate and concentrated permeate by engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Zucca, Susanna; Casanova, Michela; Micoli, Giuseppina; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2017-06-02

    Whey permeate is a lactose-rich effluent remaining after protein extraction from milk-resulting cheese whey, an abundant dairy waste. The lactose to ethanol fermentation can complete whey valorization chain by decreasing dairy waste polluting potential, due to its nutritional load, and producing a biofuel from renewable source at the same time. Wild type and engineered microorganisms have been proposed as fermentation biocatalysts. However, they present different drawbacks (e.g., nutritional supplements requirement, high transcriptional demand of recombinant genes, precise oxygen level, and substrate inhibition) which limit the industrial attractiveness of such conversion process. In this work, we aim to engineer a new bacterial biocatalyst, specific for dairy waste fermentation. We metabolically engineered eight Escherichia coli strains via a new expression plasmid with the pyruvate-to-ethanol conversion genes, and we carried out the selection of the best strain among the candidates, in terms of growth in permeate, lactose consumption and ethanol formation. We finally showed that the selected engineered microbe (W strain) is able to efficiently ferment permeate and concentrated permeate, without nutritional supplements, in pH-controlled bioreactor. In the conditions tested in this work, the selected biocatalyst could complete the fermentation of permeate and concentrated permeate in about 50 and 85 h on average, producing up to 17 and 40 g/l of ethanol, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing efficient ethanol production from the lactose contained in whey permeate with engineered E. coli. The selected strain is amenable to further metabolic optimization and represents an advance towards efficient biofuel production from industrial waste stream.

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose of whey permeate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nascimento de Almeida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The whey permeate is the residual of the concentration process of the whey proteins by ultrafiltration method. It contains important nutrients such as lactose, minerals and some proteins and lipids. It is without an ending industrial waste that causes serious damage to the environment. For its full use the lactose must be hydrolyzed to enable its consumption by intolerant people. The enzymatic hydrolysis by lactase (β-galactosidase of Kluyveromyces lactis yeast is a safe method that does not compromise the integrity of other nutrients, enabling further use of the permeate as a raw material. This study aimed to perform tests of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate formulations in a concentration of 0.2%, 0.7% and 1% at 30, 60 and 90 minutes with pH 6.3 medium and 37 °C. The reactions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography which showed that the enzyme concentration of 0.7% at time 30 minutes formulations became safe for consumption by lactose intolerant people, according to minimum levels established by law.

  18. Evolutionary Nephrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Chevalier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Progressive kidney disease follows nephron loss, hyperfiltration, and incomplete repair, a process described as “maladaptive.” In the past 20 years, a new discipline has emerged that expands research horizons: evolutionary medicine. In contrast to physiologic (homeostatic adaptation, evolutionary adaptation is the result of reproductive success that reflects natural selection. Evolutionary explanations for physiologically maladaptive responses can emerge from mismatch of the phenotype with environment or from evolutionary tradeoffs. Evolutionary adaptation to a terrestrial environment resulted in a vulnerable energy-consuming renal tubule and a hypoxic, hyperosmolar microenvironment. Natural selection favors successful energy investment strategy: energy is allocated to maintenance of nephron integrity through reproductive years, but this declines with increasing senescence after ∼40 years of age. Risk factors for chronic kidney disease include restricted fetal growth or preterm birth (life history tradeoff resulting in fewer nephrons, evolutionary selection for APOL1 mutations (which provide resistance to trypanosome infection, a tradeoff, and modern life experience (Western diet mismatch leading to diabetes and hypertension. Current advances in genomics, epigenetics, and developmental biology have revealed proximate causes of kidney disease, but attempts to slow kidney disease remain elusive. Evolutionary medicine provides a complementary approach by addressing ultimate causes of kidney disease. Marked variation in nephron number at birth, nephron heterogeneity, and changing susceptibility to kidney injury throughout the life history are the result of evolutionary processes. Combined application of molecular genetics, evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo, developmental programming, and life history theory may yield new strategies for prevention and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  19. Organic fluid permeation through fluoropolymer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemser, Stuart M.; Kosaraju, Praveen; Bowser, John

    2015-07-14

    Separation of the components of liquid mixtures is achieved by contacting a liquid mixture with a nonporous membrane having a fluoropolymer selectively permeable layer and imposing a pressure gradient across the membrane from feed side to permeate side. Unusually high transmembrane flux is obtained when the membrane is subjected to one or more process conditions prior to separation. These include (a) leaving some residual amount of membrane casting solvent in the membrane, and (b) contacting the membrane with a component of the mixture to be separated for a duration effective to saturate the membrane with the component.

  20. Dissolution and permeation characteristics of artemether tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    characterized by delayed drug release but enhanced permeation of the released drug. Keywords: ... peaks of the FTIR spectrum of artemether while prosopis ... Maize starch BP. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. 10.0. Lactose. 79.7. 78.7. 77.7. 76.7. 79.7. 78.7. 77.7. 76.7. 77.7. Cashew gum (CSG). 1.0. 2.0. 3.0. 4.0.

  1. Evolutionary psychology: its programs, prospects, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The emerging specialty of evolutionary psychology presents a challenge to mainstream psychology. It proposes that cognitive, notjust more fundamental, traits in humans are grounded in dedicated evolutionary programs. Specifically, it maintains that the common assumption in psychology-that the complexities of our psyches have been largely freed from evolutionary constraints and are instead based in a general learning capacity-is mistaken. The major premises of evolutionary psychology are examined in light of arguments and evidence presented by both supporters and detractors. Although some of these premises are well grounded, others are questionable and limit the development of the specialty and its integration into mainstream psychology.

  2. Bacterial permeation in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steenfatt, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to establish a method of bacterial permeation through human intestinal gut ex vivo. Assuming that the inflammed epithelial layer exhibits barrier defects in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, we accomplished our research. In the study under consideration, we demonstrated the bacterial permeation in human intestinal gut layer ex vivo for the first time. Concerning the lowely rate of permeation we examine the miscellaneous causes: A modification of...

  3. Permeation of nanopores by water the effects of channel polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, R; Hansen, J P

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to characterize the permeation by water of cylindrical nanopores, modelling ion channels, as a function of channel radius R and dielectric permittivity epsilon. Intermittent permeation is found in a narrow range around the threshold values of R and epsilon. While channel permeation is highly sensitive to channel polarization effects, no effect on structural properties of the confined water is found on varying epsilon.

  4. Permeation of urea through various polyurethane membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Takebayashi, Yoshihiro; Ohtsubo, Toshiro; Furukawa, Mutsuhisa

    2009-11-01

    Controlled-release systems using polymer membranes are very important in agriculture for labour-saving and effective delivery of pesticides and other agents. Polymer-coated granules are one of the most useful formulations, and a study of the factors for polymer design is necessary to achieve various release patterns. A permeation study using plain membranes was carried out in order to clarify parameters, and the results were compared with the release from polymer-coated granules. The permeation coefficient of urea through a plain polyurethane membrane decreased significantly as the urethane and alkyl side chain content increased. The glass transition temperature and crosslink density of the polyurethanes hardly influenced its permeability. The release rate from polyurethane-coated granules was also reduced by alkyl side chains. However, it was faster than that through a plain membrane because of capsule expansion by continuous water penetration and structural changes in the membrane. The release rate of urea through a polyurethane plain membrane and from polyurethane-coated granules can be controlled by changing the chemical properties of the membrane. In addition, physical properties such as the glass transition temperature T(g) or crosslink density should be considered to assess the release profile from polyurethane-coated granules. (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Evolutionary Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Gorelik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we advance the concept of “evolutionary awareness,” a metacognitive framework that examines human thought and emotion from a naturalistic, evolutionary perspective. We begin by discussing the evolution and current functioning of the moral foundations on which our framework rests. Next, we discuss the possible applications of such an evolutionarily-informed ethical framework to several domains of human behavior, namely: sexual maturation, mate attraction, intrasexual competition, culture, and the separation between various academic disciplines. Finally, we discuss ways in which an evolutionary awareness can inform our cross-generational activities—which we refer to as “intergenerational extended phenotypes”—by helping us to construct a better future for ourselves, for other sentient beings, and for our environment.

  6. Evolutionary macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macroecology focuses on ecological questions at broad spatial and temporal scales, providing a statistical description of patterns in species abundance, distribution and diversity. More recently, historical components of these patterns have begun to be investigated more deeply. We tentatively refer to the practice of explicitly taking species history into account, both analytically and conceptually, as ‘evolutionary macroecology’. We discuss how the evolutionary dimension can be incorporated into macroecology through two orthogonal and complementary data types: fossils and phylogenies. Research traditions dealing with these data have developed more‐or‐less independently over the last 20–30 years, but merging them will help elucidate the historical components of diversity gradients and the evolutionary dynamics of species’ traits. Here we highlight conceptual and methodological advances in merging these two research traditions and review the viewpoints and toolboxes that can, in combination, help address patterns and unveil processes at temporal and spatial macro‐scales.

  7. Evolutionary Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    cognitive bounds will perceive business opportunities identically. In addition, because cues provide information about latent causal structures of the environment, changes in causality must be accompanied by changes in cognitive representations if adaptation is to be maintained. The concept of evolutionary......, they are correlated among people who share environments because these individuals satisfice within their cognitive bounds by using cues in order of validity, as opposed to using cues arbitrarily. Any difference in expectations thereby arise from differences in cognitive ability, because two individuals with identical......The concept of evolutionary expectations descends from cue learning psychology, synthesizing ideas on rational expectations with ideas on bounded rationality, to provide support for these ideas simultaneously. Evolutionary expectations are rational, but within cognitive bounds. Moreover...

  8. [Evolutionary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wjst, M

    2013-12-01

    Evolutionary medicine allows new insights into long standing medical problems. Are we "really stoneagers on the fast lane"? This insight might have enormous consequences and will allow new answers that could never been provided by traditional anthropology. Only now this is made possible using data from molecular medicine and systems biology. Thereby evolutionary medicine takes a leap from a merely theoretical discipline to practical fields - reproductive, nutritional and preventive medicine, as well as microbiology, immunology and psychiatry. Evolutionary medicine is not another "just so story" but a serious candidate for the medical curriculum providing a universal understanding of health and disease based on our biological origin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Evolutionary mysteries in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenormand, Thomas; Engelstädter, Jan; Johnston, Susan E; Wijnker, Erik; Haag, Christoph R

    2016-10-19

    Meiosis is a key event of sexual life cycles in eukaryotes. Its mechanistic details have been uncovered in several model organisms, and most of its essential features have received various and often contradictory evolutionary interpretations. In this perspective, we present an overview of these often 'weird' features. We discuss the origin of meiosis (origin of ploidy reduction and recombination, two-step meiosis), its secondary modifications (in polyploids or asexuals, inverted meiosis), its importance in punctuating life cycles (meiotic arrests, epigenetic resetting, meiotic asymmetry, meiotic fairness) and features associated with recombination (disjunction constraints, heterochiasmy, crossover interference and hotspots). We present the various evolutionary scenarios and selective pressures that have been proposed to account for these features, and we highlight that their evolutionary significance often remains largely mysterious. Resolving these mysteries will likely provide decisive steps towards understanding why sex and recombination are found in the majority of eukaryotes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Beck, Roland R.; Bond, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

  11. A personal ammonia monitor utilizing permeation sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, A.F. (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Baton Rouge, LA); Reiszner, K.D.; West, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the time-weighted-average personal exposure to ammonia. Sample collection was achieved by permeation through a silicone membrane into a boric acid solution. The trapped ammonia was then determined spectrophotometrically with Nessler's reagent or potentiometrically with an ion selective electrode. The device may be used for sampling periods as short as 5 minutes and was not affected by changes in the environmental parameters normally encountered at industrial locations. The detection limit is 0.4 ppm for an 8 hr sampling period and the monitor responds linearly to at least 150 ppm. The Nessler's method may be utilized in industrial environments containing monoethanol amine in conjunction with ammonia with no significant interference. Although some interference was observed from ethylenediamine with the Nessler's technique, little interference was found with the potentiometric determination.

  12. Skin permeation and metabolism of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, N B; Berthet, A; Vernez, D; Langard, E; Spring, P; Gaudin, R

    2014-01-03

    Phthalates are suspected to be endocrine disruptors. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is assumed to have low dermal absorption; however, previous in vitro skin permeation studies have shown large permeation differences. Our aims were to determine DEHP permeation parameters and assess extent of skin DEHP metabolism among workers highly exposed to these lipophilic, low volatile substances. Surgically removed skin from patients undergoing abdominoplasty was immediately dermatomed (800 μm) and mounted on flow-through diffusion cells (1.77 cm(2)) operating at 32°C with cell culture media (aqueous solution) as the reservoir liquid. The cells were dosed either with neat DEHP or emulsified in aqueous solution (166 μg/ml). Samples were analysed by HPLC-MS/MS. DEHP permeated human viable skin only as the metabolite MEHP (100%) after 8h of exposure. Human skin was able to further oxidize MEHP to 5-oxo-MEHP. Neat DEHP applied to the skin hardly permeated skin while the aqueous solution readily permeated skin measured in both cases as concentration of MEHP in the receptor liquid. DEHP pass through human skin, detected as MEHP only when emulsified in aqueous solution, and to a far lesser degree when applied neat to the skin. Using results from older in vitro skin permeation studies with non-viable skin may underestimate skin exposures. Our results are in overall agreement with newer phthalate skin permeation studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  14. Effect of Nutrient Formulations on Permeation of Proteins and Lipids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of nutrient formulations on the permeation of proteins and lipids through porcine intestine in vitro. Method: In vitro permeation studies of proteins and lipids of two peptide-based formulations, composed of various compounds and sources of hydrolyzed protein was carried out, and compared ...

  15. A study on reverse osmosis permeating treatment for yarn dyeing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a fuzzy linear regression model for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters conditions. The proposed model can effectively take on non-crisp, fuzzy and crisp data. This study model used for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters data from Tirupur examines the variables that ...

  16. A study on reverse osmosis permeating treatment for yarn dyeing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... This paper presents a fuzzy linear regression model for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters conditions. The proposed model can effectively take on non-crisp, fuzzy and crisp data. This study model used for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters data from Tirupur examines ...

  17. Evaluation of a dynamic dissolution/permeation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sironi, Daniel; Christensen, Mette; Rosenberg, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Combined dissolution/permeation testing is gaining increasing attention as an in vitro tool for predictive performance ranking of enabling oral formulations. The current aim was to study how in vitro drug permeation evolves under conditions, where the donor concentration is changing (non-steady s...

  18. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-12-06

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild.

  19. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  20. Atom-Driven Permeation of Deuterium Through Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkoshi, K.; Tohda, S.; Shimura, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.

    In order to investigate the difference of the hydrogen transport behavior of IDP (ion-driven permeation, i.e. permeation under impingement of the energetic hydrogen ion beam) and ADP (atom-driven permeation, i.e. permeation under exposure of thermal atom beam), an ADP experiment through Nb (niobium) was performed. The dependence of the ADP flux on the specimen temperature turned out to be different from the IDP, where the maximum was observed in the temperature range of 500--1000 K. Such a case has not been seen in the IDP or GDP (gas-driven permeation) case. The deuterium concentration at the downstream-side end bulk volume was estimated employing the phenomenological recombination rate coefficient. Computer calculation showed that the profile of the deuterium concentration becomes almost “flat” under the experimental conditions. Though the experiment'was performed under UHV conditions, the assumption of Sieverts' law-like relation between P*U (virtual pressure of atomic gas, or pressure equivalent to “atomic flow” in the upstream-side vacuum in terms of the molecular flow theory), bulk concentration and PD (pressure of permeated molecules) explains well the strange temperature dependence of the permeation plot.

  1. Transdermal Permeation of Drugs in Various Animal Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todo, Hiroaki

    2017-09-06

    Excised human skin is utilized for in vitro permeation experiments to evaluate the safety and effect of topically-applied drugs by measuring its skin permeation and concentration. However, ethical considerations are the major problem for using human skin to evaluate percutaneous absorption. Moreover, large variations have been found among human skin specimens as a result of differences in age, race, and anatomical donor site. Animal skins are used to predict the in vivo human penetration/permeation of topically-applied chemicals. In the present review, skin characteristics, such as thickness of skin, lipid content, hair follicle density, and enzyme activity in each model are compared to human skin. In addition, intra- and inter-individual variation in animal models, permeation parameter correlation between animal models and human skin, and utilization of cultured human skin models are also descried. Pig, guinea pig, and hairless rat are generally selected for this purpose. Each animal model has advantages and weaknesses for utilization in in vitro skin permeation experiments. Understanding of skin permeation characteristics such as permeability coefficient ( P ), diffusivity ( D ), and partition coefficient ( K ) for each skin model would be necessary to obtain better correlations for animal models to human skin permeation.

  2. A multimedia constraint system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.A. van Hintum; G.J. Reynolds

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe MADE constraint system provides excellent opportunities to introduce constraints in a multimedia application. Multimedia applications are not only a good place to experiment with constraint systems; constraints in a multimedia environment are almost indispensable. Due to the

  3. Further Note on the Probabilistic Constraint Handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciftcioglu, O.; Bittermann, M.S.; Datta, R

    2016-01-01

    A robust probabilistic constraint handling approach in the framework of joint evolutionary-classical optimization has been presented earlier. In this work, the
    theoretical foundations of the method are presented in detail. The method is known as bi-objective method, where the conventional

  4. Mechanisms of oxygen permeation through plastic films and barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilski, Stefan; Wipperfürth, Jens; Jaritz, Montgomery; Kirchheim, Dennis; Mitschker, Felix; Awakowicz, Peter; Dahlmann, Rainer; Hopmann, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Oxygen and water vapour permeation through plastic films in food packaging or other applications with high demands on permeation are prevented by inorganic barrier films. Most of the permeation occurs through small defects (PET) are investigated and the mass transport through the polymer is simulated in a 3D approach. Calculations of single defects showed that there is no linear correlation between the defect area and the resulting permeability. The influence of adjacent defects in different distances was observed and led to flow reduction functions depending on the defect spacing and defect area. A critical defect spacing where no interaction between defects occurs was found and compared to other findings. According to the superposition principle, the permeability of single defects was added up and compared to experimentally determined oxygen permeation. The results showed the same trend of decreasing permeability with decreasing defect densities.

  5. Skin permeation of lidocaine from crystal suspended oily formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Rakan; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Ishida, Masami; Ebata, Toshiya; Namiki, Noriyuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2005-09-01

    In vitro permeation of lidocaine (lidocaine base, LID) through excised rat skin was investigated using several LID-suspended oily formulations. The first skin permeation of LID from an LID-suspended oily solution such as liquid paraffin (LP), isopropyl myristate (IPM), polyoxyethylene (2) oleylether (BO-2), and diethyl sebacate (DES) was evaluated and compared with that from polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) solution, a hydrophilic base. The obtained permeation rate of LID, Japp, from PEG400, LP, IPM, BO-2, and DES was in the order of DES>BO-2=IPM>LP>PEG400, and increased with LID solubility in the oily solvents, although LID crystals were dispersed in all solvents. Subsequently, oily formulations that consisted of different ratios of the first oily solvent (IPM, BO-2, or DES) (each 0-20%), the second oily solvent (LP) and an oily mixture of microcrystalline wax/white petrolatum/paraffin (1/5/4) were evaluated. BO-2 groups at a concentration of 5% and 10% had the highest Japp among the oily formulations, although a higher BO-2 resulted in lower skin permeation. In addition, pretreatment with BO-2 increased the skin permeation of LID. These results suggest that the penetration enhancing effect by the system may be related to the skin penetration of BO-2 itself. Finally, mathematical analysis was done to evaluate the effect of BO-2, and it was shown that BO-2 improved the LID solubility in stratum corneum lipids to efficiently enhance the LID permeation through skin.

  6. Evolutionary Trends of Developer Coordination: A Network Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Joblin, Mitchell; Apel, Sven; Mauerer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Software evolution is a fundamental process that transcends the realm of technical artifacts and permeates the entire organizational structure of a software project. By means of a longitudinal empirical study of 18 large open-source projects, we examine and discuss the evolutionary principles that govern the coordination of developers. By applying a network-analytic approach, we found that the implicit and self-organizing structure of developer coordination is ubiquitously described by non-ra...

  7. Constraints and spandrels of interareal connectomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinov, Mikail

    2016-12-01

    Interareal connectomes are whole-brain wiring diagrams of white-matter pathways. Recent studies have identified modules, hubs, module hierarchies and rich clubs as structural hallmarks of these wiring diagrams. An influential current theory postulates that connectome modules are adequately explained by evolutionary pressures for wiring economy, but that the other hallmarks are not explained by such pressures and are therefore less trivial. Here, we use constraint network models to test these postulates in current gold-standard vertebrate and invertebrate interareal-connectome reconstructions. We show that empirical wiring-cost constraints inadequately explain connectome module organization, and that simultaneous module and hub constraints induce the structural byproducts of hierarchies and rich clubs. These byproducts, known as spandrels in evolutionary biology, include the structural substrate of the default-mode network. Our results imply that currently standard connectome characterizations are based on circular analyses or double dipping, and we emphasize an integrative approach to future connectome analyses for avoiding such pitfalls.

  8. Constraints and plasticity in genome and molecular-phenome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V.; Wolf, Yuri I.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple constraints variously affect different parts of the genomes of diverse life forms. The selective pressures that shape the evolution of viral, archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes differ markedly, even among relatively closely related animal and bacterial lineages; by contrast, constraints affecting protein evolution seem to be more universal. The constraints that shape the evolution of genomes and phenomes are complemented by the plasticity and robustness of genome architecture, expression and regulation. Taken together, these findings are starting to reveal complex networks of evolutionary processes that must be integrated to attain a new synthesis of evolutionary biology. PMID:20548290

  9. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  10. Parent-Offspring Conflict Theory: An Evolutionary Framework for Understanding Conflict within Human Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlomer, Gabriel L.; Del Giudice, Marco; Ellis, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research demonstrate that conflict shapes and permeates a broad range of family processes. In the current article, we argue that greater insight, integration of knowledge, and empirical achievement in the study of family conflict can be realized by utilizing a powerful theory from evolutionary biology that is barely known within…

  11. Questioning Clerkship: Applying Popper's Evolutionary Analysis of Learning to Medical Student Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitpin, Jeremy Sebastian; Chitpin, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Through a series of critical discussions on Karl Popper's evolutionary analysis of learning and the non-authoritarian values it promotes, the purpose of this paper is to advocate a Popperian approach for building medical student knowledge. Specifically, it challenges positivist assumptions that permeate the design and management of many…

  12. Drug Release and Skin Permeation from Lipid Liquid Crystalline Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Balogh, F. O.; Sparr, E.; Sousa, J. J. S.; Pais, A. A. C. C.

    We have studied drug release and skin permeation from several different liquid crystalline lipid formulations that may be used to control the respective release rates. We have studied the release and permeation through human skin of a water-soluble and amphiphilic drug, propranolol hydrochloride, from several formulations prepared with monoolein and phytantriol as permeation enhancers and controlled release excipients. Diolein and cineol were added to selected formulations. We observed that viscosity decreases with drug load, wich is compatible with the occurrence of phase changes. Diolein stabilizes the bicontinuous cubic phases leading to an increase in viscosity and sustained release of the drug. The slowest release was found for the cubic phases with higher viscosity. Studies on skin permeation showed that these latter formulations also presented lower permeability than the less viscous monoolein lamellar phases. Formulations containing cineol originated higher permeability with higher enhancement ratios. Thus, the various formulations are adapted to different circumstances and delivery routes. While a slow release is usually desired for drug sustained delivery, the transdermal route may require a faster release. Lamellar phases, which are less viscous, are more adapted to transdermal applications. Thus, systems involving lamellar phases of monoolein and cineol are good candidates to be used as skin permeation enhancers for propranolol hydrochloride.

  13. Brincadeiras de faz-de-conta em crianças autistas: limites e possibilidades numa perspectiva evolucionista Make-Believe play in autistic children: constraints and possibilities in the evolutionary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Silva Fiaes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A constatação da presença universal da brincadeira na infância sugere que tal comportamento deva ter grande valor adaptativo para a espécie. Apesar de universal, a brincadeira sofre interferência do estado desenvolvimental do indivíduo. Crianças com autismo, por exemplo, apresentam dificuldades no brincar, o que nos leva a questionamentos sobre a natureza da sua brincadeira simbólica, se todo faz-de-conta necessariamente inclui teoria da mente e porque um fenômeno considerado universal surge de modo tão atípico no autismo. O artigo discute essas questões à luz da psicologia evolucionista, ilustrando relatos de brincadeiras espontâneas de crianças autistas coletados em instituições educacionais na cidade de Salvador (BA. Os resultados sugerem que os episódios de faz-de-conta envolvem freqüentemente a presença de objetos como apoio para o desenvolvimento da brincadeira. Tal fato está em acordo com a descrição de alguns autores sobre o desenvolvimento do faz-de-conta, com seu início mais sustentado por objetos e independente de metarepresentação.The universal presence of play into the infancy suggests that this behavior must to have a great value adaptative to specie. Although universal, the play receive interference of developmental degree, as children with autism. The difficulties presented by autistic children on the play have came questions about the nature of symbolic play, if all make-believe include theory of mind and why a phenomenon universal emerge of differentiated way in the autism. The article discuss this questions to view of evolutionary psychology, illustrating relates of autistic children's spontaneous play collecting in educational institutions in the Salvador's City. The results suggests that the make believe episodes involves the presence of objects as supportive to developmental of the play. This fact is in accord with the description of some authors about the make-believe developmental, with the

  14. Soft Concurrent Constraint Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Bistarelli, S.; Montanari, U.; Rossi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Soft constraints extend classical constraints to represent multiple consistency levels, and thus provide a way to express preferences, fuzziness, and uncertainty. While there are many soft constraint solving formalisms, even distributed ones, by now there seems to be no concurrent programming framework where soft constraints can be handled. In this paper we show how the classical concurrent constraint (cc) programming framework can work with soft constraints, and we also propose an extension ...

  15. Permeation of "Hydromer" Film: An Elastomeric Hydrogen-Capturing Biopolymer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Friddle, Raymond William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Geoffrey [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This report analyzes the permeation resistance of a novel and proprietary polymer coating for hydrogen isotope resistance that was developed by New Mexico State University. Thermal gravimetric analysis and thermal desoprtion spectroscopy show the polymer is stable thermally to approximately 250 deg C. Deuterium gas-driven permeation experiments were conducted at Sandia to explore early evidence (obtained using Brunauer - Emmett - Teller) of the polymer's strong resistance to hydrogen. With a relatively small amount of the polymer in solution (0.15%), a decrease in diffusion by a factor of 2 is observed at 100 and 150 deg C. While there was very little reduction in permeability, the preliminary findings reported here are meant to demonstrate the sensitivity of Sandia's permeation measurements and are intended to motivate the future exploration of thicker barriers with greater polymer coverage.

  16. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihua College, Huaihua 418008 (China); Yu, G., E-mail: yuganghnu@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. {yields} Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. {yields} Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. {yields} Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  17. Electrostatic tuning of permeation and selectivity in aquaporin water channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens O Stibius; Tajkhorshid, E.; Schulten, K.

    2003-01-01

    of the single file remains intact during the permeation, indicating that a disrupted water chain is unlikely to be the mechanism of proton exclusion in aquaporins. Specific hydrogen bonds between permeating water and protein at the channel center (at two conserved Asp-Pro-Ala "NPA'' motifs), together...... stronger than water-protein interactions, except near a conserved, positively charged Arg residue. We find that variations of the protein electrostatic field through the channel, owing to preserved structural features, completely explain the bipolar orientation of water. This orientation persists despite...... water translocation in single. le and blocks proton transport. Furthermore, we find that for permeation of a cation, ion-protein electrostatic interactions are more unfavorable at the conserved NPA motifs than at the conserved Arg, suggesting that the major barrier against proton transport in aquaporins...

  18. Transbuccal delivery of doxepin: studies on permeation and histological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Alvaro; Calpena, Ana C; Sanz, Roser; Mallandrich, Mireia; Peraire, Concepción; Clares, Beatriz

    2014-12-30

    According to previous studies reporting the anesthetic/analgesic action of oral topical doxepin administration, this study evaluated a model of buccal permeation to determine the depth of delivery of doxepin into excised porcine buccal mucosa following topical application of a saturated aqueous doxepin solution. Buccal mucosa permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Cumulative amounts of doxepin permeated were plotted as a function of time. Kinetic permeation parameters as flux (Js), lag time (Tl) and permeability coefficient (Kp) were calculated. Theoretical human plasmatic steady-state doxepin concentration and drug retained in the tissue were also determined in order to evaluate its potential therapeutic use, central or peripheral. Finally, a histological evaluation of the buccal mucosa was performed to test potential damage due to the permeation phenomenon. Obtained results showed a poor aqueous doxepin permeation through buccal mucosa membrane (median parameters Js=34.79 μg/h, Kp=0.49×10(-3)cm/h and Tl=2.8h). Predicted doxepin plasma concentrations would reach 46 ng/mL, far from the required to have central nervous system activity as tricyclic agent. However, median doxepin amount remaining in the mucosa membrane was 0.24 μg/cm(2)/μg tissue, which evidenced a reservoir function of the buccal mucosa. Histologically, no structural damage was observed in the tissues. This study lays the foundation for further research within this area with a view to potentially adopting alternative strategies for enhanced buccal absorption of doxepin in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. How membrane permeation is affected by donor delivery solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Elliott, Russell P

    2012-11-28

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally how the rate and extent of membrane permeation is affected by switching the donor delivery solvent from water to squalane for different permeants and membranes. In a model based on rate-limiting membrane diffusion, we derive explicit equations showing how the permeation extent and rate depend mainly on the membrane-donor and membrane-receiver partition coefficients of the permeant. Permeation results for systems containing all combinations of hydrophilic or hydrophobic donor solvents (aqueous solution or squalane), permeants (caffeine or testosterone) and polymer membranes (cellulose or polydimethylsiloxane) have been measured using a cell with stirred donor and re-circulating receiver compartments and continuous monitoring of the permeant concentration in the receiver phase. Relevant partition coefficients are also determined. Quantitative comparison of model and experimental results for the widely-differing permeation systems successfully enables the systematic elucidation of all possible donor solvent effects in membrane permeation. For the experimental conditions used here, most of the permeation systems are in agreement with the model, demonstrating that the model assumptions are valid. In these cases, the dominant donor solvent effects arise from changes in the relative affinities of the permeant for the donor and receiver solvents and the membrane and are quantitatively predicted using the separately measured partition coefficients. We also show how additional donor solvent effects can arise when switching the donor solvent causes one or more of the model assumptions to be invalid. These effects include a change in rate-limiting step, permeant solution non-ideality and others.

  20. Penetratin-Mediated Transepithelial Insulin Permeation: Importance of Cationic Residues and pH for Complexation and Permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Franzyk, Henrik; Klausen, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    permeation. Besides penetratin, three analogues were studied. The carrier peptide-insulin complexes were characterized in terms of size and morphology at pH 5, 6.5, and 7.4 by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. At pH 7.4 mainly very large complexes were...... increased insulin permeation as compared to that of the parent penetratin. In general, pre-complexation with penetratin and its analogues at pH 5 gave rise to increased insulin permeation as compared to that observed at pH 7.4; this finding was further supported by a preliminary in vivo study using......Penetratin is a widely used carrier peptide showing promising potential for mucosal delivery of therapeutic proteins. In the present study, the importance of specific penetratin residues and pH was investigated with respect to complexation with insulin and subsequent transepithelial insulin...

  1. Evolutionary Information Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Burgin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary information theory is a constructive approach that studies information in the context of evolutionary processes, which are ubiquitous in nature and society. In this paper, we develop foundations of evolutionary information theory, building several measures of evolutionary information and obtaining their properties. These measures are based on mathematical models of evolutionary computations, machines and automata. To measure evolutionary information in an invariant form, we construct and study universal evolutionary machines and automata, which form the base for evolutionary information theory. The first class of measures introduced and studied in this paper is evolutionary information size of symbolic objects relative to classes of automata or machines. In particular, it is proved that there is an invariant and optimal evolutionary information size relative to different classes of evolutionary machines. As a rule, different classes of algorithms or automata determine different information size for the same object. The more powerful classes of algorithms or automata decrease the information size of an object in comparison with the information size of an object relative to weaker4 classes of algorithms or machines. The second class of measures for evolutionary information in symbolic objects is studied by introduction of the quantity of evolutionary information about symbolic objects relative to a class of automata or machines. To give an example of applications, we briefly describe a possibility of modeling physical evolution with evolutionary machines to demonstrate applicability of evolutionary information theory to all material processes. At the end of the paper, directions for future research are suggested.

  2. Stochastic Constraint Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Toby

    2009-01-01

    To model combinatorial decision problems involving uncertainty and probability, we introduce stochastic constraint programming. Stochastic constraint programs contain both decision variables (which we can set) and stochastic variables (which follow a probability distribution). They combine together the best features of traditional constraint satisfaction, stochastic integer programming, and stochastic satisfiability. We give a semantics for stochastic constraint programs, and propose a number...

  3. Vacuum Permeator Analysis for Extraction of Tritium from DCLL Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humrickhouse, Paul Weston [Idaho National Laboratory; Merrill, Brad Johnson [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-11-01

    It is envisioned that tritium will be extracted from DCLL blankets using a vacuum permeator. We derive here an analytical solution for the extraction efficiency of a permeator tube, which is a function of only two dimensionless numbers: one that indicates whether radial transport is limited in the PbLi or in the solid membrane, and another that is the ratio of axial and radial transport times in the PbLi. The permeator efficiency is maximized by decreasing the velocity and tube diameter, and increasing the tube length. This is true regardless of the mass transport correlation used; we review several here and find that they differ little, and the choice of correlation is not a source of significant uncertainty here. The PbLi solubility, on the other hand, is a large source of uncertainty, and we identify upper and lower bounds from the literature data. Under the most optimistic assumptions, we find that a ferritic steel permeator operating at 550 °C will need to be at least an order of magnitude larger in volume than previous conceptual designs using niobium and operating at higher temperatures.

  4. Hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, S.; Katayama, K.; Shimozori, M.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Ushida, H. [Energy Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-03-15

    F82H is a primary candidate of structural material and coolant pipe material in a blanket of a fusion reactor. Understanding tritium permeation behavior through F82H is important. In a normal operation of a fusion reactor, the temperature of F82H will be controlled below 550 C. degrees because it is considered that F82H can be used up to 30,000 hours at 550 C. degrees. However, it is necessary to assume the situation where F82H is heated over 550 C. degrees in a severe accident. In this study, hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H was investigated in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C. degrees. In some cases, water vapor was added in a sample gas to investigate an effect of water vapor on hydrogen permeation. The permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range from 500 to 700 C. degrees agreed well with the permeability reported by E. Serra et al. The degradation of the permeability by water vapor was not observed. After the hydrogen permeation reached in a steady state at 700 C. degrees, the F82H sample was heated to 800 C. degrees. The permeability of hydrogen through F82H sample which was once heated up to 800 C. degrees was lower than that of the original one. (authors)

  5. Effect of Nutrient Formulations on Permeation of Proteins and Lipids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: In vitro permeation studies of proteins and lipids of two peptide-based formulations, composed of various compounds and sources of hydrolyzed protein was carried out, and compared with a conservative polymeric formulation as control, The test was undertaken using Franz diffusion cell apparatus incorporating ...

  6. Effect of concentration on skin permeation of caffeine from gel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For this study, three same base gels were used at 1, 3 and 5% of caffeine to evaluate the effect of concentration on in vitro release through synthetic membrane and on ex vivo permeation of caffeine through human skin. No correlation was found between transfer through synthetic membrane and that observed through the ...

  7. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  8. Effect of Permeation Enhancers on the Release Behavior and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Methods: The permeation experiments were conducted in vitro using full thickness rabbit skin in Franz diffusion cells. The donor compartment was ... isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and sodium chloride. (NaCl) were purchased from Merck, Germany. ... ethanol (5 mL) and PBS (pH 7.4) added to make up the final volume to 100 mL.

  9. Isolation of avocado volatiles using gel permeation chromotography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation of avocado volatiles using gel permeation chromotography (GPC). S. Sinyida. Abstract. (Journal of Science and Technology: 1997 1(1): 68-74). Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. No metrics found. Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  10. Effect of piperidones on hydrogen permeation and corrosion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The influence of 3-methyl-2,6-diphenyl piperidin-4-one (MDPO) and 2- phenyl decahydroquinoline-4-one (PDQO) synthesised in the laboratory on hydrogen permeation and corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1N H2SO4 has been studied using weight loss and various electrochemical AC and DC ...

  11. Effect of Nutrient Formulations on Permeation of Proteins and Lipids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Lipids through Porcine Intestine In vitro. Prasopchai Tonglairoum and Praneet ... Method: In vitro permeation studies of proteins and lipids of two peptide-based formulations, composed of various compounds and sources of ..... triglyceride which needs to digest or break down before absorption. Thus, formulation A and ...

  12. Standardization procedure for the in vitro skin permeation of anticholinergics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, I.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of seven anticholinergics was studied in vitro on pig epidermal membranes, using static Franz diffusion cells. The donor solution consisted of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4 with ethanol, propylene glycol and Azone(R). Tritium-labelled dexetimide was added as an internal

  13. Qualification of tritium permeation barriers in liquid Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, A. E-mail: antonio.aiello@brasimone.enea.it; Ricapito, I.; Benamati, G.; Ciampichetti, A

    2003-09-01

    The reduction of tritium permeation from the Pb-17Li, or plasma, into the coolant is of crucial importance in order to reduce the radiological hazard in the steam generator vault as well as in the turbine/condenser area and to optimise the tritium balance in the reactor. The use of aluminium rich coatings has been selected as reference solution for the water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) blanket in order to produce reliable tritium permeation barriers (TPB). TPB qualification activities performed in the past allowed the selection of two reference deposition techniques, the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process developed on laboratory scale by CEA, and the hot dipping (HD) process developed by FZK. On the basis of the results obtained in the past with the Corelli I-II devices, a new apparatus named Vivaldi was designed to perform comparative tests on two hollow cylindrical specimens in the same operating conditions. The performance of alumina coating on EUROFER 97 steel has been tested in gas and liquid metal phase. The obtained results in terms of permeated fluxes and permeation reduction factors (PRF) are herein presented and discussed. A post experiment examination of coatings was performed by use of optical and SEM microscopy.

  14. Gel permeation chromatography of proteins in partly aqueous eluents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligny, C.L. de; Gelesma, W.J.; Roozen, A.M.P.

    1984-01-01

    Gel permeation chromatography of a number of proteins has been performed with Sephadex G-100 and G-200, using mixtures of water and organic solvents as eluents. It appears that the chromatographic distribution coefficients of the proteins are enhanced by the addition of organic co-solvents to the

  15. Gas Permeation in Semicrystalline Polyethylene as Studied by Molecular Simulation and Elastic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memari P.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We have employed molecular simulation to study the permeation of two different gases (CH4 and CO2 in polyethylene. The simulations have been performed at temperatures below the polymer melting point. Although under such conditions, polyethylene is in a semicrystalline state, we have used simulation boxes containing only a purely amorphous material. We showed in previous works [Memari P., Lachet V., Rousseau B. (2010 Polymer 51, 4978] that the effects of the complex morphology of semicrystalline materials on solubility can be implicitly taken into account by an ad-hoc constraint exerted on the amorphous phase. Here, it has been shown that our method can be applied not only for the calculation of equilibrium properties but also for transport properties like diffusion coefficients. In addition, the ad-hoc constraint has been theoretically related to the fraction of elastically effective chains in the material by making use of Michaels and Hausslein elastic model [Michaels A.S., Hausslein R.W. (1965 J. Polymer Sci.: Part C 10, 61]. We observe that the transport properties in amorphous regions are strongly governed by this fraction of elastically effective chains.

  16. Towards a unified model of passive drug permeation I: origins of the unstirred water layer with applications to ionic permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we provide a unified theoretical framework describing how drug molecules can permeate across membranes in neutral and ionized forms for unstirred in vitro systems. The analysis provides a self-consistent basis for the origin of the unstirred water layer (UWL) within the Nernst-Planck framework in the fully unstirred limit and further provides an accounting mechanism based simply on the bulk aqueous solvent diffusion constant of the drug molecule. Our framework makes no new assumptions about the underlying physics of molecular permeation. We hold simply that Nernst-Planck is a reasonable approximation at low concentrations and all physical systems must conserve mass. The applicability of the derived framework has been examined both with respect to the effect of stirring and externally applied voltages to measured permeability. The analysis contains data for 9 compounds extracted from the literature representing a range of permeabilities and aqueous diffusion coefficients. Applicability with respect to ionized permeation is examined using literature data for the permanently charged cation, crystal violet, providing a basis for the underlying mechanism for ionized drug permeation for this molecule as being due to mobile counter-current flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Counter-diffusion and -permeation of deuterium and hydrogen through metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizu, Kaname; Tanabe; Tetsuo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The first experiments for counter-diffusion and -permeation of deuterium and hydrogen through palladium were performed. Deuterium permeation rates against D{sub 2} pressure were measured under the condition where hydrogen permeated to opposite direction by supplying H{sub 2} gas at the permeated side of D{sub 2}. It was found that not a small amount of deuterium was clearly permeated even if the deuterium pressure was much smaller than the hydrogen pressure. Deuterium permeation rate was gradually reduced by increasing the counter H permeation. The deuterium permeation rate under the counter H permeation is well represented by a simple model in which the ratio of the deuterium permeation rates with and without the counter H permeation was proportional to the fractional concentration of deuterium in the bulk. As increasing the hydrogen counter flow, however, the deuterium permeation rate deviates from the model. This means that adsorption (absorption) of D{sub 2} from gas phase is inhibited and surface recombination of deuterium is blocked by hydrogen. (author)

  18. 40 CFR 1060.521 - How do I test fuel caps for permeation emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test fuel caps for permeation... EQUIPMENT Test Procedures § 1060.521 How do I test fuel caps for permeation emissions? If you measure a fuel tank's permeation emissions with a nonpermeable covering in place of the fuel cap under § 1060.520(b)(5...

  19. Evolutionary cell biology: two origins, one objective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Field, Mark C; Goodson, Holly V; Malik, Harmit S; Pereira-Leal, José B; Roos, David S; Turkewitz, Aaron P; Sazer, Shelley

    2014-12-02

    All aspects of biological diversification ultimately trace to evolutionary modifications at the cellular level. This central role of cells frames the basic questions as to how cells work and how cells come to be the way they are. Although these two lines of inquiry lie respectively within the traditional provenance of cell biology and evolutionary biology, a comprehensive synthesis of evolutionary and cell-biological thinking is lacking. We define evolutionary cell biology as the fusion of these two eponymous fields with the theoretical and quantitative branches of biochemistry, biophysics, and population genetics. The key goals are to develop a mechanistic understanding of general evolutionary processes, while specifically infusing cell biology with an evolutionary perspective. The full development of this interdisciplinary field has the potential to solve numerous problems in diverse areas of biology, including the degree to which selection, effectively neutral processes, historical contingencies, and/or constraints at the chemical and biophysical levels dictate patterns of variation for intracellular features. These problems can now be examined at both the within- and among-species levels, with single-cell methodologies even allowing quantification of variation within genotypes. Some results from this emerging field have already had a substantial impact on cell biology, and future findings will significantly influence applications in agriculture, medicine, environmental science, and synthetic biology.

  20. Total enzyme activity constraint and homeostatic constraint impact on the optimization potential of a kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasilovs, Vitalijs; Pentjuss, Agris; Elsts, Atis; Stalidzans, Egils

    2017-09-28

    The application of biologically and biochemically relevant constraints during the optimization of kinetic models reduces the impact of suggested changes in processes not included in the scope of the model. This increases the probability that the design suggested by model optimization can be carried out by an organism after implementation of design in vivo. A case study was carried out to determine the impact of total enzyme activity and homeostatic constraints on the objective function values and the following ranking of adjustable parameter combinations. The application of constraints on the model of sugar cane metabolism revealed that a homeostatic constraint caused heavier limitations of the objective function than a total enzyme activity constraint. Both constraints changed the ranking of adjustable parameter combinations: no "universal" constraint-independent top-ranked combinations were found. Therefore, when searching for the best subset of adjustable parameters, a full scan of their combinations is suggested for a small number of adjustable parameters, and evolutionary search strategies are suggested for a large number. Simultaneous application of both constraints is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Costs and constraints conspire to produce honest signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke

    2012-01-01

    positive allometric slopes than cheap ones. The new framework is applied to an experimental study of an ant queen pheromone that honestly signals fecundity. Juvenile hormone was found to have opposing, dose-dependent effects on pheromone production and fecundity and was fatal at high doses, indicating...... that endocrine-mediated trade-offs preclude dishonesty. Several lines of evidence suggest that the realized cost of pheromone production may be nontrivial, and the antagonistic effects of juvenile hormone indicate the presence of significant evolutionary constraints. I conclude that the honesty of queen...... pheromones and other signals is likely enforced by both the cost of dishonesty and a suite of evolutionary constraints....

  2. The Soft Cumulative Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Thierry; Poder, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    This research report presents an extension of Cumulative of Choco constraint solver, which is useful to encode over-constrained cumulative problems. This new global constraint uses sweep and task interval violation-based algorithms.

  3. Functional constraints on adaptive evolution of protein ubiquitination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhongyang; Liang, Fengji; Guo, Feifei; Yang, Shuai; Wang, Dan; He, Yangzhige; Xiong, Jianghui; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2017-01-05

    It is still unclear whether there exist functional constraints on the evolution of protein ubiquitination sites, because most previous studies regarded all protein ubiquitination sites as a whole or only focused on limited structural properties. We tried to clarify the relation between functional constraints and ubiquitination sites evolution. We investigated the evolutionary conservation of human ubiquitination sites in a broad evolutionary scale from G. gorilla to S. pombe, and we found that in organisms originated after the divergence of vertebrate, ubiquitination sites are more conserved than their flanking regions, while the opposite tendency is observed before this divergence time. By grouping the ubiquitination proteins into different functional categories, we confirm that many functional constraints like certain molecular functions, protein tissue expression specificity and protein connectivity in protein-protein interaction network enhance the evolutionary conservation of ubiquitination sites. Furthermore, by analyzing the gains of ubiquitination sites at different divergence time and their functional characters, we validate that the emergences of ubiquitination sites at different evolutionary time were also affected by the uncovered functional constraints. The above results suggest that functional constraints on the adaptive evolution of ubiquitination sites increase the opportunity for ubiquitination to synthetically regulate various cellular and developmental processes during evolution.

  4. Human compulsivity: A perspective from evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Hermesh, Haggai; Eilam, David; Segalas, Cosi; Zohar, Joseph; Menchon, Jose; Nesse, Randolph M

    2016-05-01

    Biological explanations address not only proximal mechanisms (for example, the underlying neurobiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder), but also distal mechanisms (that is, a consideration of how particular neurobiological mechanisms evolved). Evolutionary medicine has emphasized a series of explanations for vulnerability to disease, including constraints, mismatch, and tradeoffs. The current paper will consider compulsive symptoms in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and behavioral addictions from this evolutionary perspective. It will argue that while obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is typically best conceptualized as a dysfunction, it is theoretically and clinically valuable to understand some symptoms of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders in terms of useful defenses. The symptoms of behavioral addictions can also be conceptualized in evolutionary terms (for example, mismatch), which in turn provides a sound foundation for approaching assessment and intervention. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Structural and functional significance of water permeation through cotransporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Gorraitz, Edurne; Her, Ka

    2016-01-01

    through the intestinal sodium/glucose cotransporter SGLT1. Molecular dynamics simulations using the atomic structure of the bacterial transporter vSGLT suggest that water permeates the same path as Na+ and sugar. On a structural model of SGLT1, based on the homology structure of vSGLT, we identified...... to be due to alterations in steric hindrance to water and urea, and/or changes in protein folding caused by mismatching of side chains in the water pathway. Water permeation through SGLT1 and other transporters bears directly on the structural mechanism for the transport of polar solutes through......Membrane transporters, in addition to their major role as specific carriers for ions and small molecules, can also behave as water channels. However, neither the location of the water pathway in the protein nor their functional importance is known. Here, we map the pathway for water and urea...

  6. Gas Permeation Characteristics across Nano-Porous Inorganic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Othman, H. Mukhtar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An overview of parameters affecting gas permeation in inorganic membranes is presented. These factors include membrane physical characteristics, operational parameters and gas molecular characteristics. The membrane physical characteristics include membrane materials and surface area, porosity, pore size and pore size distribution and membrane morphology. The operational parameters include feed flow rate and concentration, stage cut, temperature and pressure. The gas molecular characteristics include gas molecular weight, diameter, critical temperature, critical pressure, Lennard-Jones parameters and diffusion volumes. The current techniques of material characterization may require complementary method in describing microscopic heterogeneity of the porous ceramic media. The method to be incorporated in the future will be to apply a stochastic model and/or fractal dimension. Keywords: Inorganic membrane, surface adsorption, Knudsen diffusion, Micro-porous membrane, permeation, gas separation.

  7. Intact penetratin metabolite permeates across Caco-2 monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Ditlev; Christensen, Malene Vinther; Stærk, Dan

    . Previous studies have demonstrated that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) may be used as carriers in order to improve the bioavailability of a therapeutic cargo like insulin after oral administration. Penetratin, a commonly used CPP, has been shown to increase the uptake of insulin across Caco-2 cell......, the aim of the present study was to investigate penetratin metabolites with respect to effects on cellular viability, their epithelial permeation and cell uptake. Methods Extracellular and intracellular degradation of penetratin was assessed by incubation of the carrier peptide on the apical side of Caco......-2 cells cultured on permeable filter inserts and in cell lysates, respectively. The epithelial permeation of penetratin and the formed metabolites was assessed by using Caco-2 monolayers cultured on permeable filter inserts. Results Preliminary data revealed that at least one specific metabolite...

  8. Low-Volatility Agent Permeation (LVAP) Verification and Validation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    custody procedures were obtained from the ISO /IEC 17025 :2005 standard13 as well as the current version of Permeation and Analytical Solutions Branch...Testing and Calibration Laboratories; ISO /IEC 17025 :2005; International Organization for Standardization: Geneva, Switzerland, 2005. 14. Box, G.E...ECBC, as detailed in Section 6.4.4 The International Organization for Standardization ( ISO ) method, 5725-3 (1994), was used to calculate the standard

  9. MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION AND DEUTERIUM PERMEATION TESTING OF ADVANCED COATINGS FOR TRITIUM SERVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P.

    2004-01-24

    A plant directed research and development task to develop and study new, improved, and low cost tritium permeation barriers was initiated in FY02. The project was intended to determine the permeation rate and permeation reduction factor of substrate materials and coated materials. The samples were characterized for microstructural and microchemical consistency. Permeation tests were also run. The sample geometry and sample sealing method selected for the coatings posed significant schedule and technical challenges. Diffusivity were consistent with published values but permeation data exhibited an unexpected sample to sample variation. The effort has lead to an improved sample design that will be used to support a Process Development task.

  10. Composing constraint solvers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zoeteweij (Peter)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractComposing constraint solvers based on tree search and constraint propagation through generic iteration leads to efficient and flexible constraint solvers. This was demonstrated using OpenSolver, an abstract branch-and-propagate tree search engine that supports a wide range of relevant

  11. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems.

  12. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  13. Gas-driven hydrogen permeation through tungsten-coated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Spitsyn, A.V., E-mail: spitsyn@nfi.kiae.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cherkez, D.I. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Koch, F.; Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Skovoroda, A.A. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen gas-driven permeation through graphite coated with different types of tungsten coatings with thicknesses up to 200 {mu}m has been investigated. The substrate material was fine-grain graphite R5710 and R6710, which properties with respect to hydrogen transport are well known . Magnetron-sputtered W coatings of thicknesses 1 and 3 {mu}m and two coatings of ASDEX Upgrade were investigated: A 3 {mu}m thick layer of tungsten deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD-W) and 200 {mu}m thick layers of tungsten deposited by plasma-spaying in vacuum (VPS-W). The gas-driven permeation was investigated at a pressure gradient of 10{sup -2}-150 Pa. The gas-driven permeation occurs through the carbon base-materials by hydrogen molecular gas flow through the internal porosity network rather than hydrogen atom diffusion through the graphite lattice. It was found that W coatings with thicknesses up to 3 {mu}m are transparent for hydrogen gas penetration and do not influence the permeability of coated fine-grain graphite, because the open porosity system of graphite remains open. Even a 200 {mu}m thick layer of VPS-W has an open system of connected pores, which connects the front and rear surfaces of the deposited layer.

  14. Chiral polymers of intrinsic microporosity: selective membrane permeation of enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xilun; Baez, José E; Khiterer, Mariya; Hoe, Madelene Y; Bao, Zongbi; Shea, Kenneth J

    2015-09-14

    Following its resolution by diastereomeric complexation, 5,5',6,6'-tetrahydroxy-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-1,1'-spirobisindane (TTSBI) was used to synthesize a chiral ladder polymer, (+)-PIM-CN. (+)-PIM-COOH was also synthesized by the acid hydrolysis of (+)-PIM-CN. Following characterization, both (+)-PIM-CN and (+)-PIM-COOH were solvent cast directly into semipermeable membranes and evaluated for their ability to enable the selective permeation of a range of racemates, including mandelic acid (Man), Fmoc-phenylalanine, 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (binol), and TTSBI. High ee values were observed for a number of analytes, and both materials exhibited high permeation rates. A selective diffusion-permeation mechanism was consistent with the results obtained with these materials. Their high permeability, processability, and ease of chemical modification offer considerable potential for liquid-phase membrane separations and related separation applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, A.L.; Fiege, J.D.; Leahy, D.A.; Morsink, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron

  16. Evolutionary molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Randolph M; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2012-05-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but some major advances in evolutionary biology from the twentieth century that provide foundations for evolutionary medicine are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the need for both proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, competition between alleles, co-evolution, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are transforming evolutionary biology in ways that create even more opportunities for progress at its interfaces with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and related principles to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine.

  17. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  18. Evolutionary heritage influences Amazon tree ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho de Souza, Fernanda; Dexter, Kyle G; Phillips, Oliver L; Brienen, Roel J W; Chave, Jerome; Galbraith, David R; Lopez Gonzalez, Gabriela; Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel; Pennington, R Toby; Poorter, Lourens; Alexiades, Miguel; Álvarez-Dávila, Esteban; Andrade, Ana; Aragão, Luis E O C; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J M M; Aymard C, Gerardo A; Baraloto, Christopher; Barroso, Jorcely G; Bonal, Damien; Boot, Rene G A; Camargo, José L C; Comiskey, James A; Valverde, Fernando Cornejo; de Camargo, Plínio B; Di Fiore, Anthony; Elias, Fernando; Erwin, Terry L; Feldpausch, Ted R; Ferreira, Leandro; Fyllas, Nikolaos M; Gloor, Emanuel; Herault, Bruno; Herrera, Rafael; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio Coronado, Eurídice N; Killeen, Timothy J; Laurance, William F; Laurance, Susan; Lloyd, Jon; Lovejoy, Thomas E; Malhi, Yadvinder; Maracahipes, Leandro; Marimon, Beatriz S; Marimon-Junior, Ben H; Mendoza, Casimiro; Morandi, Paulo; Neill, David A; Vargas, Percy Núñez; Oliveira, Edmar A; Lenza, Eddie; Palacios, Walter A; Peñuela-Mora, Maria C; Pipoly, John J; Pitman, Nigel C A; Prieto, Adriana; Quesada, Carlos A; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Rudas, Agustin; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Salomão, Rafael P; Silveira, Marcos; Stropp, Juliana; Ter Steege, Hans; Thomas-Caesar, Raquel; van der Hout, Peter; van der Heijden, Geertje M F; van der Meer, Peter J; Vasquez, Rodolfo V; Vieira, Simone A; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A; Wang, Ophelia; Young, Kenneth R; Zagt, Roderick J; Baker, Timothy R

    2016-12-14

    Lineages tend to retain ecological characteristics of their ancestors through time. However, for some traits, selection during evolutionary history may have also played a role in determining trait values. To address the relative importance of these processes requires large-scale quantification of traits and evolutionary relationships among species. The Amazonian tree flora comprises a high diversity of angiosperm lineages and species with widely differing life-history characteristics, providing an excellent system to investigate the combined influences of evolutionary heritage and selection in determining trait variation. We used trait data related to the major axes of life-history variation among tropical trees (e.g. growth and mortality rates) from 577 inventory plots in closed-canopy forest, mapped onto a phylogenetic hypothesis spanning more than 300 genera including all major angiosperm clades to test for evolutionary constraints on traits. We found significant phylogenetic signal (PS) for all traits, consistent with evolutionarily related genera having more similar characteristics than expected by chance. Although there is also evidence for repeated evolution of pioneer and shade tolerant life-history strategies within independent lineages, the existence of significant PS allows clearer predictions of the links between evolutionary diversity, ecosystem function and the response of tropical forests to global change. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Evolutionary heritage influences Amazon tree ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho de Souza, Fernanda; Dexter, Kyle G.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Brienen, Roel J. W.; Chave, Jerome; Galbraith, David R.; Lopez Gonzalez, Gabriela; Monteagudo Mendoza, Abel; Pennington, R. Toby; Poorter, Lourens; Alexiades, Miguel; Álvarez-Dávila, Esteban; Andrade, Ana; Aragão, Luis E. O. C.; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Arets, Eric J. M. M.; Aymard C, Gerardo A.; Baraloto, Christopher; Barroso, Jorcely G.; Bonal, Damien; Boot, Rene G. A.; Camargo, José L. C.; Comiskey, James A.; Valverde, Fernando Cornejo; de Camargo, Plínio B.; Di Fiore, Anthony; Erwin, Terry L.; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Ferreira, Leandro; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Gloor, Emanuel; Herault, Bruno; Herrera, Rafael; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio Coronado, Eurídice N.; Killeen, Timothy J.; Laurance, William F.; Laurance, Susan; Lloyd, Jon; Lovejoy, Thomas E.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Maracahipes, Leandro; Marimon, Beatriz S.; Marimon-Junior, Ben H.; Mendoza, Casimiro; Morandi, Paulo; Neill, David A.; Vargas, Percy Núñez; Oliveira, Edmar A.; Lenza, Eddie; Palacios, Walter A.; Peñuela-Mora, Maria C.; Pipoly, John J.; Pitman, Nigel C. A.; Prieto, Adriana; Quesada, Carlos A.; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Rudas, Agustin; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Salomão, Rafael P.; Silveira, Marcos; ter Steege, Hans; Thomas-Caesar, Raquel; van der Hout, Peter; van der Heijden, Geertje M. F.; van der Meer, Peter J.; Vasquez, Rodolfo V.; Vieira, Simone A.; Vilanova, Emilio; Vos, Vincent A.; Wang, Ophelia; Young, Kenneth R.; Zagt, Roderick J.; Baker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Lineages tend to retain ecological characteristics of their ancestors through time. However, for some traits, selection during evolutionary history may have also played a role in determining trait values. To address the relative importance of these processes requires large-scale quantification of traits and evolutionary relationships among species. The Amazonian tree flora comprises a high diversity of angiosperm lineages and species with widely differing life-history characteristics, providing an excellent system to investigate the combined influences of evolutionary heritage and selection in determining trait variation. We used trait data related to the major axes of life-history variation among tropical trees (e.g. growth and mortality rates) from 577 inventory plots in closed-canopy forest, mapped onto a phylogenetic hypothesis spanning more than 300 genera including all major angiosperm clades to test for evolutionary constraints on traits. We found significant phylogenetic signal (PS) for all traits, consistent with evolutionarily related genera having more similar characteristics than expected by chance. Although there is also evidence for repeated evolution of pioneer and shade tolerant life-history strategies within independent lineages, the existence of significant PS allows clearer predictions of the links between evolutionary diversity, ecosystem function and the response of tropical forests to global change. PMID:27974517

  20. Measurement of skin permeation/penetration of nanoparticles for their safety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Eriko; Kawano, Yuichiro; Todo, Hiroaki; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the skin permeation/penetration of nanomaterials and to consider their penetration pathway through skin. Firstly, penetration/permeation of a model fluorescent nanoparticle, Fluoresbrite®, was determined through intact rat skin and several damaged skins. Fluoresbrite® permeated through only needle-punctured skin. The permeation profiles of soluble high molecular compounds, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FITC-dextrans, FDs), with different molecular weights were also measured for comparison. The effects of molecular sizes and different skin pretreatments on the skin barrier were determined on the skin penetration/permeation of Fluoresbrite® and FDs. Fluoresbrite® was not permeated the intact skin, but FDs were permeated the skin. The skin distribution of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles was also observed after topical application of commercial cosmetics. Nanoparticles in sunscreen cosmetics were easily distributed into the groove and hair follicles after their topical application, but seldom migrated from the groove or follicles to viable epidermis and dermis. The obtained results suggested that nanoparticles did not permeate intact skin, but permeated pore-created skin. No or little permeation was observed for these nanomaterials through the stratum corneum.

  1. Remembering the evolutionary Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan

    2006-03-01

    Throughout his career as a writer, Sigmund Freud maintained an interest in the evolutionary origins of the human mind and its neurotic and psychotic disorders. In common with many writers then and now, he believed that the evolutionary past is conserved in the mind and the brain. Today the "evolutionary Freud" is nearly forgotten. Even among Freudians, he is regarded to be a red herring, relevant only to the extent that he diverts attention from the enduring achievements of the authentic Freud. There are three ways to explain these attitudes. First, the evolutionary Freud's key work is the "Overview of the Transference Neurosis" (1915). But it was published at an inopportune moment, forty years after the author's death, during the so-called "Freud wars." Second, Freud eventually lost interest in the "Overview" and the prospect of a comprehensive evolutionary theory of psychopathology. The publication of The Ego and the Id (1923), introducing Freud's structural theory of the psyche, marked the point of no return. Finally, Freud's evolutionary theory is simply not credible. It is based on just-so stories and a thoroughly discredited evolutionary mechanism, Lamarckian use-inheritance. Explanations one and two are probably correct but also uninteresting. Explanation number three assumes that there is a fundamental difference between Freud's evolutionary narratives (not credible) and the evolutionary accounts of psychopathology that currently circulate in psychiatry and mainstream journals (credible). The assumption is mistaken but worth investigating.

  2. Ionic Selectivity and Permeation Properties of Human PIEZO1 Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Gnanasambandam

    Full Text Available Members of the eukaryotic PIEZO family (the human orthologs are noted hPIEZO1 and hPIEZO2 form cation-selective mechanically-gated channels. We characterized the selectivity of human PIEZO1 (hPIEZO1 for alkali ions: K+, Na+, Cs+ and Li+; organic cations: TMA and TEA, and divalents: Ba2+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Mn2+. All monovalent ions permeated the channel. At a membrane potential of -100 mV, Cs+, Na+ and K+ had chord conductances in the range of 35-55 pS with the exception of Li+, which had a significantly lower conductance of ~ 23 pS. The divalents decreased the single-channel permeability of K+, presumably because the divalents permeated slowly and occupied the open channel for a significant fraction of the time. In cell-attached mode, 90 mM extracellular divalents had a conductance for inward currents carried by the divalents of: 25 pS for Ba2+ and 15 pS for Ca2+ at -80 mV and 10 pS for Mg2+ at -50 mV. The organic cations, TMA and TEA, permeated slowly and attenuated K+ currents much like the divalents. As expected, the channel K+ conductance increased with K+ concentration saturating at ~ 45 pS and the KD of K+ for the channel was 32 mM. Pure divalent ion currents were of lower amplitude than those with alkali ions and the channel opening rate was lower in the presence of divalents than in the presence of monovalents. Exposing cells to the actin disrupting reagent cytochalasin D increased the frequency of openings in cell-attached patches probably by reducing mechanoprotection.

  3. Effects of Stress on Permeation and Diffusive Properties of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.

    2008-12-01

    Safety assessment of facilities associated with geological disposal of various kinds of hazardous wastes, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed by means of mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and natural barrier system is principally controlled by the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Among these mechanisms, chain decay can be determined from nuclear physics, sorption can be evaluated from chemical properties of both the nuclides and rock minerals, advection and dispersion are controlled by the permeation and diffusive properties of a rock. Compared to properties related to the former two mechanisms, properties related to the latter two mechanisms are very sensitive to stress conditions. Although the effects of stress conditions on permeation or hydraulic properties of rock specimens are relatively easier to be determined and/or assessed through laboratory permeability tests, diffusion tests on rock specimens under high confining and pore pressure conditions are technically impractical, and most of laboratory diffusion tests have been performed only under atmospheric conditions. In this study, an overview of the studies related to the effects of stress on permeation properties of different types of rock is performed. Some representative experimental results illustrating the effects of stress history on permeability of sedimentary and igneous rocks obtained by the author are also presented. An approach based on empirical equations between rock permeability and porosity, effective diffusion coefficient and porosity, porosity and ground pressure, and diffusive coefficient of an interested tracer in water is proposed to predict the effective diffusion coefficient at depths, i.e., the effects of stress on diffusive properties of rocks. The applicabilities of this newly proposed approach are discussed and

  4. Mechanism of transdermal permeation promotion of lipophilic drugs by ethosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Lifang; Wu, Dongze; Shi, Deshun; Wang, Tai; Zhu, Xiaoliang

    2017-01-01

    Ethosomes can promote the penetration of lipophilic drugs into the skin, but the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of transdermal permeation promotion of lipophilic drugs by ethosomes. The formulation of ethosomes was optimized using the Box-Behnken experimental design, in which Rhodamine B and 1-palmitoyl-2-{12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were used to simulate a model lipophilic drug and act as a fluorescent tracer of ethosomal phospholipids, respectively. Liposomes with the same phospholipid concentration and a hydroethanolic solution with the same ethanol concentration were also prepared as controls. The percutaneous progression of the above fluorescent preparations was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the fluorescence intensity of the images was analyzed. The optimized ethosome formulation consisted of 2.45% yolk phospholipids, 30% ethanol, and 67.55% distilled water. The percutaneous permeation of Rhodamine B in the optimized ethosomes was superior to that in hydroethanolic solution (Pethosomes could penetrate the skin via the percutaneous pathway of the hair follicle and stratum corneum, while during the process of penetration, the vesicles were broken and the phospholipids were retained in the upper epidermis, with the test compounds penetrating gradually. The superior percutaneous penetration of ethosomes was linked to the synergistic effects of their ingredients. The percutaneous pathways of ethosomes included open hair follicles and stratum corneum pathways. In addition, the vesicles might break up during percutaneous penetration in the superficial layer of the skin, allowing the test compounds to keep permeating into the deeper layer alone, while the phospholipid was retained in the upper epidermis.

  5. Discrimination of Car Headlight Plastic by Gel Permeation Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Car headlight plastic as a kind of evidence often can be seen in traffic accidents and some other cases. We tested 20 brands of car headlight plastic using gel chromatography. The data were processed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the discrimination rate was 97.14%. This indicated that we could discriminate between different headlights by the molecular weight of their headlight plastic. Gel permeation chromatography is an effective method of discriminating between headlights, particularly in the case of a traffic accident.

  6. Enhanced skin permeation using polyarginine modified nanostructured lipid carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit P; Desai, Pinaki R; Channer, Debra; Singh, Mandip

    2012-08-10

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of polyarginine chain length on topical delivery of surface modified NLCs. Design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimize number of arginines required to deliver active drug into deeper skin layers. The NLCs were prepared by hot-melt technique and the surface of NLCs was modified with six-histidine tagged cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) or YKA. In vivo confocal microscopy and Raman confocal spectroscopy studies were performed using fluorescent dye encapsulated NLCs and NLC-CPPs. Spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP) were used as model drugs for combined delivery. In vitro skin permeation and drug release studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Inflammatory response corresponding to higher skin permeation was investigated in allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) mouse model. NLCs had a particle size of 140±20nm with higher encapsulation efficiencies. The negative charge of NLC was reduced from -17.54 to -8.47 mV after surface modification with CPPs. In vivo confocal microscopy and Raman confocal spectroscopy studies suggested that a peptide containing 11 arginines (R11) had significant permeation enhancing ability than other polyarginines and TAT peptides. The amount of SP and KP retained in dermis after topical application of NLC-R11 was significantly higher than solution and NLC after 24 h of skin permeation. SP was not found in receiver compartment. However, KP was found in receiver compartment and the amount of KP present in receiver compartment was increased approximately 7.9 and 2.6 times compared to the control solution and NLCs, respectively. In an ACD mouse model, SP+KP-NLC-R11 showed significant reduction (p<0.05) in ear thickness compared to SP+KP solution and SP+KP-NLC. Our results strongly suggest that the surface modification of NLC with R11 improved transport of SP and KP across the deeper skin layers and thus results in reduction of inflammation associated with ACD. Copyright

  7. Permeation of PLGA nanoparticles across different in vitro models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkabinde, LA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available , Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom, 2520, South Africa Email: sias.hamman@nwu.ac.za Tel: +27 18 299 4035 Fax: +27 18 293 5219 2 ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death and is intensified by HIV co... on release of the Rhodamine 6G because it can be detected while attached to the nanoparticles. The PAMPA model has certain disadvantages and is only suitable for pre-screening of drug molecules that can permeate the membrane passively and no metabolic...

  8. In Vitro Permeation of Micronized and Nanonized Alaptide from Semisolid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Opatrilova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on in vitro permeation of the original Czech compound, a skin/mucosa tissue regeneration promoter, known under the international nonproprietary name “alaptide,” in micronized and nanonized forms. Alaptide showed a great potential for local applications for treatment and/or regeneration of the injured skin. The above mentioned technological modifications influence the permeation of alaptide through artificial or biological membranes, such as PAMPA or skin. The permeation of micronized and nanonized form of alaptide formulated to various semisolid pharmaceutical compositions through full-thickness pig ear skin using a Franz cell has been investigated in detail. In general, it can be concluded that the nanonized alaptide permeated through the skin less than the micronized form; different observations were made for permeation through the PAMPA system, where the micronized form showed lower permeation than the nanonized alaptide.

  9. Evolutionary Biology Today

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 11. Evolutionary Biology Today - The Domain of Evolutionary Biology. Amitabh Joshi. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 11 November 2002 pp 8-17. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Part E: Evolutionary Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    evolutionary algorithms, such as memetic algorithms, which have emerged as a very promising tool for solving many real-world problems in a multitude of areas of science and technology. Moreover, parallel evolutionary combinatorial optimization has been presented. Search operators, which are crucial in all...

  11. Evolutionary Biology Today

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi studies and teaches evolutionary ' genetics and population ecology at the Jawaharlal. Nehru Centre for Advanced. Scientific Research,. Bangalore. His current research interests are in life- history, evolution, the evolutionary genetics of biological clocks, the evolution of ecological specialization dynamics. He.

  12. Evolutionary humanoid robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Eaton, Malachy

    2015-01-01

    This book examines how two distinct strands of research on autonomous robots, evolutionary robotics and humanoid robot research, are converging. The book will be valuable for researchers and postgraduate students working in the areas of evolutionary robotics and bio-inspired computing.

  13. Evolutionary Biology Today

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 2. Evolutionary Biology Today - What do Evolutionary Biologists do? Amitabh Joshi. Series Article Volume 8 Issue 2 February 2003 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Applying evolutionary anthropology

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also h...

  15. SKIN PERMEATION ENHANCEMENT EFFECTS OF ASCORBIC ACID AND TRIETHYL CITRATE ON ROFECOXIB

    OpenAIRE

    Malay K Das; ABDUL B. AHMED

    2008-01-01

    The enhancing effect of ascorbic acid and triethyl citrate (TEC) on the in vitro skin permeation of rofecoxib across rat epidermis was investigated. Skin pre-treatment with ascorbic acid and TEC at different concentrations, followed by application of rofecoxib gel, showed higher permeation flux than the control condition. The mechanism underlying this permeation enhancement was probed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The FTIR spectra of rat epidermis treated with ascorbic ...

  16. Temperature influencing permeation pattern of alfuzosin: an investigation using DoE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, Satyanarayan; Swain, Kalpana; Rao, Jupally Venkateshwar; Varun, Talla; Mallick, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    There has been relatively little investigation of the effect of temperature on skin permeation compared to other methods of penetration enhancement. A principal physicochemical factor which controls the passive diffusion of a solute from a vehicle into the skin arises from the skin temperature. The aim of this ex vivo study was to probe into the effect of heat on transdermal absorption of alfuzosin hydrochloride from ethyl cellulose-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (EC-PVP) based transdermal systems. Principles of design of experiment (DoE) were used to systematically study the influence of temperature on transdermal permeation of alfuzosin. Ex vivo transdermal permeation studies were carried out at varied donor compartment temperatures. Permeation data analysis was carried out and activation energy for transdermal permeation was estimated. Temperature found to enhance ex vivo permeation parameters of alfuzosin hydrochloride from its transdermal systems. It was also noted that chemical permeation enhancers potentiate permeation enhancing effect of temperature. The permeation flux values approximately doubled after exposure to 45°C. The activation energy for transdermal permeation was found lower for the runs with chemical permeation enhancers indicating existence of a lower energy barrier in the presence of chemical permeation enhancers. The method reported here is a simple and useful tool for studying the effect of heat on percutaneous absorption. Such temperature dependent enhancement of flux can be more pronounced at skin surface temperatures >45°C. Copyright © 2015 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. Symbolic Constraints in Constructive Geometric Constraint Solving

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Christoph M.; Joan-Arinyo, Robert

    1997-01-01

    In design and manufacturing applications, users of computer aided design systems want to define relationships between dimension variables, since such relationships express design intent very flexibly. This work reports on a technique developed to enhance a class of constructive geometric constraint solvers with the capability of managing functional relationships between dimension variables. The method is shown to be correct.

  18. Ancient evolutionary trade-offs between yeast ploidy states

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zörgö, Enikö; Chwialkowska, Karolina; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Garré, Elena; Sunnerhagen, Per; Liti, Gianni; Blomberg, Anders; Omholt, Stig W; Warringer, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    ...] and promoting tumor progression [9]. Despite the biological impact of ploidy differences, the underlying molecular, evolutionary and ecological constraints controlling these remain murky [10]. Mutational models are based on chromosome set additions increasing the number of mutable sites but masking recessive variation, thereby affecti...

  19. A constraint consensus memetic algorithm for solving constrained optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Noha M.; Sarker, Ruhul A.; Essam, Daryl L.; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Elsayed, Saber M.

    2014-11-01

    Constraint handling is an important aspect of evolutionary constrained optimization. Currently, the mechanism used for constraint handling with evolutionary algorithms mainly assists the selection process, but not the actual search process. In this article, first a genetic algorithm is combined with a class of search methods, known as constraint consensus methods, that assist infeasible individuals to move towards the feasible region. This approach is also integrated with a memetic algorithm. The proposed algorithm is tested and analysed by solving two sets of standard benchmark problems, and the results are compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. The comparisons show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other similar algorithms. The algorithm has also been applied to solve a practical economic load dispatch problem, where it also shows superior performance over other algorithms.

  20. Asymmetric osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Zhao, Yunzhen; Fang, Chang; Shi, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the water permeation through a cell membrane is of primary importance for biological activities and a key step to capture its shape transformation in salt solution. In this work, we reveal the dynamical behaviors of osmotically driven transport of water molecules across a vesicle membrane by molecular dynamics simulations. Of particular interest is that the water transport in and out of vesicles is highly distinguishable given the osmotic force are the same, suggesting an asymmetric osmotic transportation. This asymmetric phenomenon exists in a broad range of parameter space such as the salt concentration, temperature, and vesicle size and can be ascribed to the similar asymmetric potential energy of lipid-ion, lipid-water, lipid-solution, lipid-lipid, and the lipid-lipid energy fluctuation. Specifically, the water flux has a linear increase with the salt concentration, similar to the prediction by Nernst-Planck equation or Fick's first law. Furthermore, due to the Arrhenius relation between the membrane permeability and temperature, the water flux also exhibits excellent Arrhenius dependence on the temperature. Meanwhile, the water flux shows a linear increase with the vesicle surface area since the flux amount across a unit membrane area should be a constant. Finally, we also present the anonymous diffusion behaviors for the vesicle itself, where transitions from normal diffusion at short times to subdiffusion at long times are identified. Our results provide significant new physical insights for the osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane and are helpful for future experimental studies.

  1. Ultrafast permeation of water through protein-based membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinsheng; Jin, Jian; Nakamura, Yoshimichi; Ohno, Takahisa; Ichinose, Izumi

    2009-06-01

    Pressure-driven filtration by porous membranes is widely used in the production of drinking water from ground and surface water. Permeation theory predicts that filtration rate is proportional to the pressure difference across the filtration membrane and inversely proportional to the thickness of the membrane. However, these membranes need to be able to withstand high water fluxes and pressures, which means that the active separation layers in commercial filtration systems typically have a thickness of a few tens to several hundreds of nanometres. Filtration performance might be improved by the use of ultrathin porous silicon membranes or carbon nanotubes immobilized in silicon nitride or polymer films, but these structures are difficult to fabricate. Here, we report a new type of filtration membrane made of crosslinked proteins that are mechanically robust and contain channels with diameters of less than 2.2 nm. We find that a 60-nm-thick membrane can concentrate aqueous dyes from fluxes up to 9,000 l h-1 m-2 bar-1, which is ~1,000 times higher than the fluxes that can be withstood by commercial filtration membranes with similar rejection properties. Based on these results and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that protein-surrounded channels with effective lengths of less than 5.8 nm can separate dye molecules while allowing the ultrafast permeation of water at applied pressures of less than 1 bar.

  2. Single-crystal membrane for anisotropic and efficient gas permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Satoshi; Takasaki, Yuichi; Miyake, Ryosuke

    2010-03-10

    Development of gas separation materials has been one of the basic requirements of industry. Microporous materials have adequate pores for gas separation and have contributed to the advancement of gas purification techniques. Because the simplest and most economical method would be membrane separation, various microporous membranes have been prepared and explored for their separation properties. However, a key issue remains as to how to generate defect-free membranes with practical gas permeance. Here we report the preparation of a well-oriented single-crystal membrane with high permeance by using a flexible single crystal of [Cu(2)(bza)(4)(pyz)](n) possessing one-dimensional (1D) penetration channels; this membrane exhibits anisotropic gas permeation through the 1D channels with high permselectivity for H(2) and CO(2). Although the diameter of the neck of the narrow channels is smaller than the kinetic diameters of the sample gases, various gases pass through the 1D channels. This report provides a new way of developing gas permeation membranes as sophisticated crystal devices for gas purification techniques.

  3. Permeation Resistance of Personal Protective Equipment Materials to Monomethyhydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Williams, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    Permeation resistance was determined by measuring the breakthrough time and time-averaged vapor transmission rate of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) through two types of personal protective equipment (PPE). The two types of PPE evaluated were the totally encapsulating ILC Dover Chemturion Model 1212 chemical protective suit with accessories, and the FabOhio polyvinyl chloride (PVC) splash garment. Two exposure scenarios were simulated: (1) a saturated vapor exposure for 2 hours (h), and (2) a brief MMH 'splash' followed by a 2-h saturated vapor exposure. Time-averaged MMH concentrations inside the totally-encapsulating suit were calculated by summation of the area-weighted contributions made by each suit component. Results show that the totally encapsulating suit provides adequate protection at the new 10 ppb Threshold Limit Value Time-Weighted Average (TLV-TWA). The permeation resistance of the PVC splash garment to MMH was poorer than any of the totally encapsulating suit materials tested. Breakthrough occurred soon after initial vapor or 'splash' exposure.

  4. Hydrogen permeation through Flinabe fluoride molten salts for blanket candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiumi, Ryosuke, E-mail: r.nishiumi@aees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fukada, Satoshi; Nakamura, Akira; Katayama, Kazunari

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • H{sub 2} diffusivity, solubility and permeability in Flinabe as T breeder are determined. • Effects in composition differences among Flibe, Fnabe and Flinabe are compared. • Changes of pressure dependence of Flinabe permeation rate are clarified. - Abstract: Fluoride molten salt Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}) is a promising candidate for the liquid blanket of a nuclear fusion reactor, because of its large advantages of tritium breeding ratio and heat-transfer fluid. Since its melting point is higher than other liquid candidates, another new fluoride molten salt Flinabe (LiF + NaF + BeF{sub 2}) is recently focused on because of its lower melting point while holding proper breeding properties. In this experiment, hydrogen permeation behavior through the three molten salts of Flibe (2LiF + BeF{sub 2}), Fnabe (NaF + BeF{sub 2}) and Flinabe are investigated in order to clarify the effects of their compositions on hydrogen transfer properties. After making up any of the three molten salts and purifying it using HF, hydrogen permeability, diffusivity and solubility of the molten salts are determined experimentally by using a system composed of tertiary cylindrical tubes. Close agreement is obtained between experimental data and analytical solutions. H{sub 2} permeability, diffusivity and solubility are correlated as a function of temperature and are compared among the three molten salts.

  5. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Palamidessi, Catuscia; Valencia, Frank Dan

    2002-01-01

    The ntcc calculus is a model of non-deterministic temporal concurrent constraint programming. In this paper we study behavioral notions for this calculus. In the underlying computational model, concurrent constraint processes are executed in discrete time intervals. The behavioral notions studied...

  6. Credit Constraints in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance; Monge-Naranjo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We review studies of the impact of credit constraints on the accumulation of human capital. Evidence suggests that credit constraints have recently become important for schooling and other aspects of households' behavior. We highlight the importance of early childhood investments, as their response largely determines the impact of credit…

  7. The Antigone Constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuggy, David

    This paper presents a class of sentences that certain syntactic rules of English would be expected to produce, but that are not grammatical. The sentences all involve the raising of a sentential Noun Phrase (NP) and the subsequent application of some syntactic rule to that senential NP. A constraint, referred to as the Antigone Constraint, is…

  8. Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Aage U.

    2004-01-01

    Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process.......Tankegangen bag Theory of Constraints samt planlægningsprincippet Drum-Buffer-Rope. Endvidere skitse af The Thinking Process....

  9. Evaluating Distributed Timing Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C.H.; Drejer, N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems.......In this paper we describe a solution to the problem of implementing time-optimal evaluation of timing constraints in distributed real-time systems....

  10. Development of Novel Formulations to Enhance in Vivo Transdermal Permeation of Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Aly H.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tocopherol represents a big challenge for transdermal permeation owing to its extreme hydrophobicity and large molecular mass. The aim of the present study was to develop alpha-tocopherol (T topical formulations and evaluate their ex vivo and in vivo permeation. Franz diffusion cells were used for ex vivo permeation, and neonatal rats were used for in vivo permeation. Seven gel formulations and 21 liquid formulations were investigated for physical stability, viscosity and permeation of T. Analysis of T was performed by a validated HPLC method using a UV detector. The ex vivo permeation from gel and emulsion formulations was very poor (0.001-0.015 %. Highest permeation was observed from monophasic liquid formulations containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, tocopheryl polyethylene glycols (TPGs, propylene glycol, ethanol and 9.5 % T. The in vivo results demonstrated higher retention in the epidermis compared to subcutaneous tissues, 1377 and 1.13 μg g-1, respectively. Increasing T concentration from 4.8 to 9.5 % did not increase the amount permeated or % of T retained. It was concluded that simple solutions of T in the presence of DMSO and TPGs were more promising systems for effective transdermal permeation compared to gel, emulsion or oleaginous systems.

  11. Permeation of limonene through disposable nitrile gloves using a dextrous robot hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaee, Sean; S Que Hee, Shane

    2017-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the permeation of the low-volatile solvent limonene through different disposable, unlined, unsupported, nitrile exam whole gloves (blue, purple, sterling, and lavender, from Kimberly-Clark). This study utilized a moving and static dextrous robot hand as part of a novel dynamic permeation system that allowed sampling at specific times. Quantitation of limonene in samples was based on capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the internal standard method (4-bromophenol). The average post-permeation thicknesses (before reconditioning) for all gloves for both the moving and static hand were more than 10% of the pre-permeation ones (P≤0.05), although this was not so on reconditioning. The standardized breakthrough times and steady-state permeation periods were similar for the blue, purple, and sterling gloves. Both methods had similar sensitivity. The lavender glove showed a higher permeation rate (0.490±0.031 μg/cm2/min) for the moving robotic hand compared to the non-moving hand (P≤0.05), this being ascribed to a thickness threshold. Permeation parameters for the static and dynamic robot hand models indicate that both methods have similar sensitivity in detecting the analyte during permeation and the blue, purple, and sterling gloves behave similarly during the permeation process whether moving or non-moving.

  12. Natural Constraints to Species Diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Lewitus

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Identifying modes of species diversification is fundamental to our understanding of how biodiversity changes over evolutionary time. Diversification modes are captured in species phylogenies, but characterizing the landscape of diversification has been limited by the analytical tools available for directly comparing phylogenetic trees of groups of organisms. Here, we use a novel, non-parametric approach and 214 family-level phylogenies of vertebrates representing over 500 million years of evolution to identify major diversification modes, to characterize phylogenetic space, and to evaluate the bounds and central tendencies of species diversification. We identify five principal patterns of diversification to which all vertebrate families hold. These patterns, mapped onto multidimensional space, constitute a phylogenetic space with distinct properties. Firstly, phylogenetic space occupies only a portion of all possible tree space, showing family-level phylogenies to be constrained to a limited range of diversification patterns. Secondly, the geometry of phylogenetic space is delimited by quantifiable trade-offs in tree size and the heterogeneity and stem-to-tip distribution of branching events. These trade-offs are indicative of the instability of certain diversification patterns and effectively bound speciation rates (for successful clades within upper and lower limits. Finally, both the constrained range and geometry of phylogenetic space are established by the differential effects of macroevolutionary processes on patterns of diversification. Given these properties, we show that the average path through phylogenetic space over evolutionary time traverses several diversification stages, each of which is defined by a different principal pattern of diversification and directed by a different macroevolutionary process. The identification of universal patterns and natural constraints to diversification provides a foundation for understanding the

  13. Dark matter constraints from stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A.; Domínguez, I.; Straniero, O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of dark matter constraints from its effect on star evolution has been discussed in recent years. We propose a star evolution simulation approach to determine those costraints from properties related to star evolutionary stages and propose globular cluster observables in order to check those constraints. My work in progress (my PhD project research) employs FRANEC code to simulate complete star evolution from pre-main sequence to AGB phase, and regards several DM candidates like axions or WIMPs, motivated by different unsolved physical problems. Detailed energy production or energy loss due to DM particles are included, taking into account the expected interaction between dark matter particles and stellar plasma within different models.

  14. Droplet spreading and permeating on the hybrid-wettability porous substrates: a lattice Boltzmann method study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wen-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spreading and permeation of droplets on porous substrates is a fundamental process in a variety of applications, such as coating, dyeing, and printing. The spreading and permeating usually occur synchronously but play different roles in the practical applications. The mechanisms of the competition between spreading and permeation is significant but still unclear. A lattice Boltzmann method is used to study the spreading and permeation of droplets on hybrid-wettability porous substrates, with different wettability on the surface and the inside pores. The competition between the spreading and the permeation processes is studied in this work from the effects of the substrate and the fluid properties, including the substrate wettability, the porous parameters, as well as the fluid surface tension and viscosity. The results show that increasing the surfacewettability and the porosity contact angle both inhibit the spreading and the permeation processes. When the inside porosity contact angle is larger than 90° (hydrophobic, the permeation process does not occur. The droplets suspend on substrates with Cassie state. The droplets are more easily to permeate into substrates with a small inside porosity contact angle (hydrophilic, as well as large pore sizes. Otherwise, the droplets are more easily to spread on substrate surfaces with small surface contact angle (hydrophilic and smaller pore sizes. The competition between droplet spreading and permeation is also related to the fluid properties. The permeation process is enhanced by increasing of surface tension, leading to a smaller droplet lifetime. The goals of this study are to provide methods to manipulate the spreading and permeation separately, which are of practical interest in many industrial applications.

  15. Constraint-based reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gotlieb

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iterative imperative programs can be considered as infinite-state systems computing over possibly unbounded domains. Studying reachability in these systems is challenging as it requires to deal with an infinite number of states with standard backward or forward exploration strategies. An approach that we call Constraint-based reachability, is proposed to address reachability problems by exploring program states using a constraint model of the whole program. The keypoint of the approach is to interpret imperative constructions such as conditionals, loops, array and memory manipulations with the fundamental notion of constraint over a computational domain. By combining constraint filtering and abstraction techniques, Constraint-based reachability is able to solve reachability problems which are usually outside the scope of backward or forward exploration strategies. This paper proposes an interpretation of classical filtering consistencies used in Constraint Programming as abstract domain computations, and shows how this approach can be used to produce a constraint solver that efficiently generates solutions for reachability problems that are unsolvable by other approaches.

  16. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  17. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks, adaptive dynamics and evolutionary rescue theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Regis; Legendre, Stéphane

    2013-01-19

    Adaptive dynamics theory has been devised to account for feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary processes. Doing so opens new dimensions to and raises new challenges about evolutionary rescue. Adaptive dynamics theory predicts that successive trait substitutions driven by eco-evolutionary feedbacks can gradually erode population size or growth rate, thus potentially raising the extinction risk. Even a single trait substitution can suffice to degrade population viability drastically at once and cause 'evolutionary suicide'. In a changing environment, a population may track a viable evolutionary attractor that leads to evolutionary suicide, a phenomenon called 'evolutionary trapping'. Evolutionary trapping and suicide are commonly observed in adaptive dynamics models in which the smooth variation of traits causes catastrophic changes in ecological state. In the face of trapping and suicide, evolutionary rescue requires that the population overcome evolutionary threats generated by the adaptive process itself. Evolutionary repellors play an important role in determining how variation in environmental conditions correlates with the occurrence of evolutionary trapping and suicide, and what evolutionary pathways rescue may follow. In contrast with standard predictions of evolutionary rescue theory, low genetic variation may attenuate the threat of evolutionary suicide and small population sizes may facilitate escape from evolutionary traps.

  18. Xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris using whey permeate medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvides, A L; Katsifas, E A; Hatzinikolaou, D G; Karagouni, A D

    2012-08-01

    Xanthan gum is a polysaccharide that is widely used as stabilizer and thickener with many industrial applications in food industry. Our aim was to estimate the ability of Xanthomonas campestris ATCC 13951 for the production of xanthan gum by using whey as a growth medium, a by-product of dairy industry. X. campestris ATCC 13951 has been studied in batch cultures using a complex medium for the determination of the optimal concentration of glucose, galactose and lactose. In addition, whey was used under various treatment procedures (de-proteinated, partially hydrolyzed by β-lactamase and partially hydrolyzed and de-proteinated) as culture medium, to study the production of xanthan in a 2 l bioreactor with constant stirring and aeration. A production of 28 g/l was obtained when partially hydrolysed β-lactamase was used, which proved to be one of the highest xanthan gum production reported so far. At the same time, an effort has been made for the control and selection of the most appropriate procedure for the preservation of the strain and its use as inoculant in batch cultures, without loss of its viability and its capability of xanthan gum production. The pre-treatment of whey (whey permeate medium hydrolyzed, WPH) was very important for the production of xanthan by the strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 during batch culture conditions in a 2 l bioreactor. Preservation methods such as lyophilization, cryopreservation at various glycerol solution and temperatures have been examined. The results indicated that the best preservation method for the producing strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 was the lyophilization. Taking into account that whey permeate is a low cost by-product of the dairy industry, the production of xanthan achieved under the studied conditions was considered very promising for industrial application.

  19. Design, performance and manufacturing analysis for a compact permeator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacristan, R., E-mail: mrosa.sacristan@sener.es [SENER Ingenieria y Sistemas, Provenza 392, 5a 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Veredas, G. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Fusion Assoc., BBTU, Av. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Bonjoch, I. [SENER Ingenieria y Sistemas, Provenza 392, 5a 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez, I. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Fusion Assoc., BBTU, Av. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Martin, G. [SENER Ingenieria y Sistemas, Provenza 392, 5a 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Sanmarti, M. [b-FUS, Jardins de les Dones de Negre, 08930 Santa Adria de Besos, Barcelona (Spain); Sedano, L. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Fusion Assoc., BBTU, Av. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Not a single manufacturing option fulfills fully all the requirements that the PAV needs due to complicated manufacturing geometry and materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To avoid permeation in piping joints is a challenge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD sensibility analysis and efficiency analysis show that the aim of the experiment can be accomplished. - Abstract: A fast and efficient recovery of bred tritium is a major milestone of tritium breeding technologies R and D for the demonstration of a fusion reactor tritium self-sufficiency. Permeator against vacuum (PAV) runs as a single-step process for tritium on-line recovery, acts as passive systems allowing to be thermally governed can be easily in-pipe integrated in LiPb loop systems and can be conceived with high compactness. An optimal PAV design is proposed with detailed design parameterization of tritium recovery efficiency at different velocity ranges from numerical simulation based on properly developed Openfoam{sup Registered-Sign} CFD code BelFoam{sup Registered-Sign} customized solver. Diverse structural design options are being considered to manufacture the PAV component that presents diverse manufacturing concerns. Fabrication options are exploring rolling of thin plate with internal armor in the vacuum gap up to the coating of a porous controlled thick wall. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the advanced performance of the PAV proposed concept, to present and discuss the different technical solutions that have been studied as well as the fabrication tests carried out.

  20. Evolutionary Mechanisms for Loneliness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2013-01-01

    Robert Weiss (1973) conceptualized loneliness as perceived social isolation, which he described as a gnawing, chronic disease without redeeming features. On the scale of everyday life, it is understandable how something as personally aversive as loneliness could be regarded as a blight on human existence. However, evolutionary time and evolutionary forces operate at such a different scale of organization than we experience in everyday life that personal experience is not sufficient to understand the role of loneliness in human existence. Research over the past decade suggests a very different view of loneliness than suggested by personal experience, one in which loneliness serves a variety of adaptive functions in specific habitats. We review evidence on the heritability of loneliness and outline an evolutionary theory of loneliness, with an emphasis on its potential adaptive value in an evolutionary timescale. PMID:24067110

  1. Evolutionary behavioral genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietsch, Brendan P; de Candia, Teresa R; Keller, Matthew C

    2015-04-01

    We describe the scientific enterprise at the intersection of evolutionary psychology and behavioral genetics-a field that could be termed Evolutionary Behavioral Genetics-and how modern genetic data is revolutionizing our ability to test questions in this field. We first explain how genetically informative data and designs can be used to investigate questions about the evolution of human behavior, and describe some of the findings arising from these approaches. Second, we explain how evolutionary theory can be applied to the investigation of behavioral genetic variation. We give examples of how new data and methods provide insight into the genetic architecture of behavioral variation and what this tells us about the evolutionary processes that acted on the underlying causal genetic variants.

  2. Marine mammals: evolutionary biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berta, Annalisa; Sumich, James L; Kovacs, Kit M

    2015-01-01

    The third edition of Marine Mammals: Evolutionary Biology provides a comprehensive and current assessment of the diversity, evolution, and biology of marine mammals, while highlighting the latest tools and techniques for their study...

  3. Transdermal permeation of Zanthoxylum bungeanum essential oil on TCM components with different lipophilicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lan

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Z. bungeanum oil facilitated transdermal permeation of drugs with different lipophilicity, including the extremely hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs, whereas it exhibited greater enhancement activity for strongly hydrophilic drugs. The mechanisms of transdermal permeation enhancement by the oil could be explained with SC/vehicle partition coefficient, saturation solubility, and the interactions with SC lipids.

  4. Modeling benzene permeation through drinking water high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feng; Ong, Say Kee; Gaunt, James A

    2015-09-01

    Organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and o-, m-, and p-xylene from contaminated soil and groundwater may permeate through thermoplastic pipes which are used for the conveyance of drinking water in water distribution systems. In this study, permeation parameters of benzene in 25 mm (1 inch) standard inside dimension ratio (SIDR) 9 high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipes were estimated by fitting the measured data to a permeation model based on a combination of equilibrium partitioning and Fick's diffusion. For bulk concentrations between 6.0 and 67.5 mg/L in soil pore water, the concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients of benzene were found to range from 2.0×10(-9) to 2.8×10(-9) cm2/s while the solubility coefficient was determined to be 23.7. The simulated permeation curves of benzene for SIDR 9 and SIDR 7 series of HDPE pipes indicated that small diameter pipes were more vulnerable to permeation of benzene than large diameter pipes, and the breakthrough of benzene into the HDPE pipe was retarded and the corresponding permeation flux decreased with an increase of the pipe thickness. HDPE pipes exposed to an instantaneous plume exhibited distinguishable permeation characteristics from those exposed to a continuous source with a constant input. The properties of aquifer such as dispersion coefficients (DL) also influenced the permeation behavior of benzene through HDPE pipes.

  5. Oxygen permeation through oxygen ion oxide-noble metal dual phase composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.S.; Chen, C.S.; Kruidhof, H.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.; Verweij, H.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen permeation behaviour of three composites, yttria-stabilized zirconia-palladium, erbia-stabilized bismuth oxidenoble metal (silver, gold) was studied. Oxygen permeation measurements were performed under controlled oxygen pressure gradients at elevated temperatures. Air was supplied at one side

  6. Time-dependent permeation of carbon dioxide through a polyimide membrane above the plasticization pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessling, Matthias; Huisman, I.; van den Boomgaard, Anthonie; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent permeation behavior of a glassy polyimide is studied above and below the plasticization pressure with carbon dioxide as the permeating gas. The work particularly focuses on the quantification of the slow increase in permeability at feed pressures above the plasticization pressure.

  7. Effect of plasma surface treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane on the permeation of pharmaceutical compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Waters

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane, i.e. PDMS, using plasma surface treatment and a novel application of the membrane created. A set of model compounds were analysed to determine their permeation through PDMS, both with and without plasma treatment. It was found that plasma treatment reduced permeation for the majority of compounds but had little effect on some compounds, such as caffeine, with results indicating that polarity plays an important role in permeation, as is seen in human skin. Most importantly, a direct correlation was observed between plasma-modified permeation data and literature data through calculation of membrane permeability (Kp values suggesting plasma-modified silicone membrane (PMSM could be considered as a suitable in vivo replacement to predict clinical skin permeation.

  8. Dermal permeation of biocides and aromatic chemicals in three generic formulations of metalworking fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Vikrant; White, Eugene M; Kaminski, Michael D; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWF) are complex mixtures consisting of a variety of components and additives. A lack of scientific data exists regarding the dermal permeation of its components, particularly biocides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermal permeation of biocides and other aromatic chemicals in water and in three generic soluble oil, semi-synthetic, and synthetic MWF types in order to evaluate any differences in their permeation profiles. An in vitro flow-through diffusion cell study was performed to determine dermal permeation. An infinite dose of different groups of chemicals (6 biocides and 29 aromatic chemicals) was applied to porcine skin, with perfusate samples being collected over an 8-h period. Perfusate samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS), and permeability was calculated from the analysis of the permeated chemical concentration-time profile. In general, the permeation of chemicals was highest in aqueous solution, followed by synthetic, semi-synthetic, and soluble oil MWF. The absorption profiles of most of the chemicals including six biocides were statistically different among the synthetic and soluble oil MWF formulations, with reduced permeation occurring in oily formulations. Permeation of almost all chemicals was statistically different between aqueous and three MWF formulation types. Data from this study show that permeation of chemicals is higher in a generic synthetic MWF when compared to a soluble oil MWF. This indicates that a soluble oil MWF may be safer than a synthetic MWF in regard to dermal permeation of chemicals to allow for an increased potential of systemic toxicity. Therefore, one may conclude that a synthetic type of formulation has more potential to produce contact dermatitis and induce systemic toxicological effects. The dilution of these MWF formulations with water may increase dermal permeability of biocides

  9. Whole glove permeation of cyclohexanol through disposable nitrile gloves on a dextrous robot hand: Fist clenching vs. non-clenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Airek R; Que Hee, Shane S

    2017-04-01

    The differences in permeation parameters when a gloved dextrous robot hand clenched and did not were investigated with the dynamic permeation system described in the companion paper. Increased permeation through the gloves of the present study for cyclohexanol when the gloved hand clenched depended on glove thickness and porosity for cyclohexanol permeation. The Sterling glove, the thinnest and most porous, was the least protective. Hand clenching promoted more permeation for the Sterling glove in terms of breakthrough times, steady state permeation rate, and diffusion coefficient. The Safeskin glove showed increased permeation only for the steady state permeation rate but not breakthrough times or diffusion coefficient. The Blue and Purple gloves showed no differences when the hand was clenching or not. The correlational analysis supported differences between the clenching and non-clenching situations, and the risk assessment considered the worst and best scenarios relative to one and two hydrated hands that were and were not protected by specific gloves.

  10. Constraint handling using tournament selection: abductive inference in partly deterministic bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Severino F; Mengshoel, Ole J

    2009-01-01

    Constraints occur in many application areas of interest to evolutionary computation. The area considered here is Bayesian networks (BNs), which is a probability-based method for representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. This work deals with constraints in BNs and investigates how tournament selection can be adapted to better process such constraints in the context of abductive inference. Abductive inference in BNs consists of finding the most probable explanation given some evidence. Since exact abductive inference is NP-hard, several approximate approaches to this inference task have been developed. One of them applies evolutionary techniques in order to find optimal or close-to-optimal explanations. A problem with the traditional evolutionary approach is this: As the number of constraints determined by the zeros in the conditional probability tables grows, performance deteriorates because the number of explanations whose probability is greater than zero decreases. To minimize this problem, this paper presents and analyzes a new evolutionary approach to abductive inference in BNs. By considering abductive inference as a constraint optimization problem, the novel approach improves performance dramatically when a BN's conditional probability tables contain a significant number of zeros. Experimental results are presented comparing the performances of the traditional evolutionary approach and the approach introduced in this work. The results show that the new approach significantly outperforms the traditional one.

  11. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  12. Paleoanthropology and evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Paleoanthropologists of the first half of the twentieth century were little concerned either with evolutionary theory or with the technicalities and broader implications of zoological nomenclature. In consequence, the paleoanthropological literature of the period consisted largely of a series of descriptions accompanied by authoritative pronouncements, together with a huge excess of hominid genera and species. Given the intellectual flimsiness of the resulting paleoanthropological framework, it is hardly surprising that in 1950 the ornithologist Ernst Mayr met little resistance when he urged the new postwar generation of paleoanthropologists to accept not only the elegant reductionism of the Evolutionary Synthesis but a vast oversimplification of hominid phylogenetic history and nomenclature. Indeed, the impact of Mayr's onslaught was so great that even when developments in evolutionary biology during the last quarter of the century brought other paleontologists to the realization that much more has been involved in evolutionary histories than the simple action of natural selection within gradually transforming lineages, paleoanthropologists proved highly reluctant to follow. Even today, paleoanthropologists are struggling to reconcile an intuitive realization that the burgeoning hominid fossil record harbors a substantial diversity of species (bringing hominid evolutionary patterns into line with that of other successful mammalian families), with the desire to cram a huge variety of morphologies into an unrealistically minimalist systematic framework. As long as this theoretical ambivalence persists, our perception of events in hominid phylogeny will continue to be distorted.

  13. Applying evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Yang, K.; Cui, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2011-01-01

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustic, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency (7.44 MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5 MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40 µs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d = 0.75. The maximum mean radius of the

  15. Achieving diversity in the face of constraints: lessons from metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron; Last, Robert L

    2012-06-29

    Metabolic engineering of plants can reduce the cost and environmental impact of agriculture while providing for the needs of a growing population. Although our understanding of plant metabolism continues to increase at a rapid pace, relatively few plant metabolic engineering projects with commercial potential have emerged, in part because of a lack of principles for the rational manipulation of plant phenotype. One underexplored approach to identifying such design principles derives from analysis of the dominant constraints on plant fitness, and the evolutionary innovations in response to those constraints, that gave rise to the enormous diversity of natural plant metabolic pathways.

  16. Effect of permeation enhancers on the penetration mechanism of transfersomal gel of ketoconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research work was to investigate the potential of transfersome formulations for transdermal delivery of Ketoconazole (KTZ. KTZ is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent that is active against a wide variety of fungi and yeasts. It is readily but incompletely absorbed after oral dosing and is highly variable. The transfersomes were formulated by lipid film hydration technique using Rotary vacuum Evaporator. The prepared transfersomes were converted into suitable gel formulation and is evaluated for their gel characteristics like pH, viscosity, spreadability, extrudability, homogeneity, drug content, etc. Suitable essential oils acting as natural permeation enhancers were added to the transfersomal formulation of KTZ for their release studies. Studies proved that addition of suitable permeation enhancers to the transfersomal formulation improved the release and permeation of KTZ, which showed that the permeation enhancers modify the barrier to penetration present in skin without itself undergoing any change. From the various essential oils which are used as permeation enhancers, the formulation containing Eucalyptus oil showed better in vitro release and permeation as compared with other formulations containing different permeation enhancers.

  17. Effect of formulation factors on in vitro transcorneal permeation of voriconazole from aqueous drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswaranjan Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effect the formulation factors on in vitro permeation of voriconazole through freshly isolated goat and sheep corneas. An increase in the pH of the drops from 4.0 to 8.0 resulted in significant (P < 0.05 increase drug permeation. Raising concentration of the drops from 0.05% to 0.2% (w/v significantly, (P < 0.05 increased drug permeation, but decreased the percent permeation. Corneal transport of voriconazole is both pH and concentration dependent. Eye drops containing disodium edetate (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid alone or combination with benzalkonium chloride showed significantly (P < 0.05 higher permeation as compared with control formulation. Addition of beta-cyclodextrin to the formulation enhanced corneal permeation of voriconazole. Compared with control formulation, voriconazole 0.2% (w/v drop containing viscosity modifier produced significant (P < 0.05 decrease in permeation. Most of the formulations showed higher zone of inhibition against Candida albicans.

  18. SAMPA: A free software tool for skin and membrane permeation data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrouk, Aleš; Fiala, Zdeněk; Kotingová, Lenka; Krulichová, Iva Selke; Kopečná, Monika; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-10-01

    Skin and membrane permeation experiments comprise an important step in the development of a transdermal or topical formulation or toxicological risk assessment. The standard method for analyzing these data relies on the linear part of a permeation profile. However, it is difficult to objectively determine when the profile becomes linear, or the experiment duration may be insufficient to reach a maximum or steady state. Here, we present a software tool for Skin And Membrane Permeation data Analysis, SAMPA, that is easy to use and overcomes several of these difficulties. The SAMPA method and software have been validated on in vitro and in vivo permeation data on human, pig and rat skin and model stratum corneum lipid membranes using compounds that range from highly lipophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to highly hydrophilic antiviral drug, with and without two permeation enhancers. The SAMPA performance was compared with the standard method using a linear part of the permeation profile and a complex mathematical model. SAMPA is a user-friendly, open-source software tool for analyzing the data obtained from skin and membrane permeation experiments. It runs on a Microsoft Windows platform and is freely available as a Supporting file to this article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term permeator experiment PETRA at the tritium laboratory Karlsruhe: commissioning tests with tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Berndt, U.; Kirste, E.; Hellriegel, W.; Jung, W.; Pejsa, R.; Romer, O. [Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    During the commissioning of the PETRA facility, the PETRA PdAg permeator was characterized using hydrogen isotopes by determining the hydrogen curves for H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} and DT as well as He curves for various H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}/He gas mixtures at 300 and 400{degree}C. A method was developed to verify the mechanical integrity of the permeator during runs with the tritium. The H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} permeation losses into the isolation vacuum of the permeator were quantified. Hydrogen permeation into the isolation vacuum could be kept at levels low enough to permit an undisturbed continuous operation of the permeator using a ZrCo tritium storage vessel. It was shown that the combination of the PETRA facility with a Normetex scroll pump, it is possible to extract at <320{degree}C >98% of the hydrogen isotopes from the ZrCo storage vessel with (a) negligible permeation losses, (b) without the danger of disproportionation of the intermetallic compound and (c) with the minimization of the tritium inventory in the facility. 5 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Psychological constraints on egalitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Debates over egalitarianism for the most part are not concerned with constraints on achieving an egalitarian society, beyond discussions of the deficiencies of egalitarian theory itself. This paper looks beyond objections to egalitarianism as such and investigates the relevant psychological...... philosophy, which aim to construct moral goals with current social and political constraints in mind, to argue that human psychology must be part of a non-ideal theory of egalitarianism. The descriptive thesis holds that the most fundamental psychological challenge to egalitarian ideals comes from what...... processes motivating people to resist various aspects of egalitarianism. I argue for two theses, one normative and one descriptive. The normative thesis holds that egalitarians must take psychological constraints into account when constructing egalitarian ideals. I draw from non-ideal theories in political...

  1. Archaeogenetics in evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Abigail; Rühli, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Archaeogenetics is the study of exploration of ancient DNA (aDNA) of more than 70 years old. It is an important part of the wider studies of many different areas of our past, including animal, plant and pathogen evolution and domestication events. Hereby, we address specifically the impact of research in archaeogenetics in the broader field of evolutionary medicine. Studies on ancient hominid genomes help to understand even modern health patterns. Human genetic microevolution, e.g. related to abilities of post-weaning milk consumption, and specifically genetic adaptation in disease susceptibility, e.g. towards malaria and other infectious diseases, are of the upmost importance in contributions of archeogenetics on the evolutionary understanding of human health and disease. With the increase in both the understanding of modern medical genetics and the ability to deep sequence ancient genetic information, the field of archaeogenetic evolutionary medicine is blossoming.

  2. Evolutionary synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisajovich, Sergio G

    2012-06-15

    Signaling networks process vast amounts of environmental information to generate specific cellular responses. As cellular environments change, signaling networks adapt accordingly. Here, I will discuss how the integration of synthetic biology and directed evolution approaches is shedding light on the molecular mechanisms that guide the evolution of signaling networks. In particular, I will review studies that demonstrate how different types of mutations, from the replacement of individual amino acids to the shuffling of modular domains, lead to markedly different evolutionary trajectories and consequently to diverse network rewiring. Moreover, I will argue that intrinsic evolutionary properties of signaling proteins, such as the robustness of wild type functions, the promiscuous nature of evolutionary intermediates, and the modular decoupling between binding and catalysis, play important roles in the evolution of signaling networks. Finally, I will argue that rapid advances in our ability to synthesize DNA will radically alter how we study signaling network evolution at the genome-wide level.

  3. Total Integrative Evolutionary Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard Thomsen, Ole; Brier, Søren

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we outline a cybersemiotic foundation for the trend of pragmatics-based functional linguistics, Functional Discourse Grammar. Cybersemiotics is a substantial inter- and transdisciplinary semiotic theory which integrates, on the one hand, second-order cybernetics and autopoiesis theory...... and, on the other, Peircean biosemiotics. According to Cybersemiotics, language is primarily a creative process of total integrative evolutionary communication. It comprises three evolutionary stages: (1) biological reflexive languaging (the reflexive foundation of social coordination), (2......). In this inclusive hierarchy language games subsume the other stages, and thus human evolutionary communication is primarily a symbolic-conventional practice. It is intertwined with the practice of living, that is, with different life forms, including other forms of semiotic behavior. Together they form a coherent...

  4. Teaching evolutionary biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Tidon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Biology integrates several disciplines of Biology in a complex and interactive manner, where a deep understanding of the subject demands knowledge in diverse areas. Since this knowledge is often inaccessible to the majority of specialized professionals, including the teachers, we present some reflections in order to stimulate discussions aimed at the improvement of the conditions of education in this area. We examine the profile of evolutionary teaching in Brazil, based on questionnaires distributed to teachers in Secondary Education in the Federal District, on data provided by the "National Institute for Educational Studies and Research", and on information collected from teachers working in various regions of this country. Issues related to biological misconceptions, curriculum and didactic material are discussed, and some proposals are presented with the objective of aiding discussions aimed at the improvement of the teaching of evolutionary biology.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Interfacial Characteristics on Gas Permeation Behavior of Nanotube-Mixed Matrix Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehrazi, Ehsan; Sharif, Alireza; Omidkhah, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Mohammad

    2017-10-25

    Theoretical approaches that accurately predict the gas permeation behavior of nanotube-containing mixed matrix membranes (nanotube-MMMs) are scarce. This is mainly due to ignoring the effects of nanotube/matrix interfacial characteristics in the existing theories. In this paper, based on the analogy of thermal conduction in polymer composites containing nanotubes, we develop a model to describe gas permeation through nanotube-MMMs. Two new parameters, "interfacial thickness" (aint) and "interfacial permeation resistance" (Rint), are introduced to account for the role of nanotube/matrix interfacial interactions in the proposed model. The obtained values of aint, independent of the nature of the permeate gas, increased by increasing both the nanotubes aspect ratio and polymer-nanotube interfacial strength. An excellent correlation between the values of aint and polymer-nanotube interaction parameters, χ, helped to accurately reproduce the existing experimental data from the literature without the need to resort to any adjustable parameter. The data includes 10 sets of CO2/CH4 permeation, 12 sets of CO2/N2 permeation, 3 sets of CO2/O2 permeation, and 2 sets of CO2/H2 permeation through different nanotube-MMMs. Moreover, the average absolute relative errors between the experimental data and the predicted values of the proposed model are very small (less than 5%) in comparison with those of the existing models in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where such a systematic comparison between model predictions and such extensive experimental data is presented. Finally, the new way of assessing gas permeation data presented in the current work would be a simple alternative to complex approaches that are usually utilized to estimate interfacial thickness in polymer composites.

  6. Changes in chemical permeation of disposable latex, nitrile, and vinyl gloves exposed to simulated movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, Robert N; Le, Thi; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-01-01

    Glove movement can affect chemical permeation of organic compounds through polymer glove products. However, conflicting reports make it difficult to compare the effects of movement on chemical permeation through commonly available glove types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of movement on chemical permeation of an organic solvent through disposable latex, nitrile, and vinyl gloves. Simulated whole-glove permeation testing was conducted using ethyl alcohol and a previously designed permeation test system. With exposure to movement, a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.001) in breakthrough time (BT) was observed for the latex (-23%) and nitrile gloves (-31%). With exposure to movement, only the nitrile glove exhibited a significant increase (p ≤ 0.001) in steady-state permeation rate (+47%) and cumulative permeation at 30 min (+111%). Even though the nitrile glove provided optimum chemical resistance against ethyl alcohol, it was most affected by movement. With exposure to movement, the latex glove was an equivalent option for overall worker protection, because it was less affected by movement and the permeation rate was lower than that of the nitrile glove. In contrast, the vinyl glove was the least affected by movement, but did not provide adequate chemical resistance to ethyl alcohol in comparison with the nitrile and latex gloves. Glove selection should take movement and polymer type into account. Some glove polymer types are less affected by movement, most notably the latex glove in this test. With nitrile gloves, at least a factor of three should be used when attempting to assign a protection factor when repetitive hand motions are anticipated. Ultimately, the latex gloves outperformed nitrile and vinyl in these tests, which evaluated the effect of movement on chemical permeation. Future research should aim to resolve some of the observed discrepancies in test results with latex and vinyl gloves.

  7. Random Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Coja-Oghlan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Random instances of constraint satisfaction problems such as k-SAT provide challenging benchmarks. If there are m constraints over n variables there is typically a large range of densities r=m/n where solutions are known to exist with probability close to one due to non-constructive arguments. However, no algorithms are known to find solutions efficiently with a non-vanishing probability at even much lower densities. This fact appears to be related to a phase transition in the set of all solutions. The goal of this extended abstract is to provide a perspective on this phenomenon, and on the computational challenge that it poses.

  8. Linear combination methods for prediction of drug skin permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Scheler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many in-vitro methods for prediction of skin permeability have been reported in literature. Cerasome electrokinetic chromatography is one of the most sophisticated approaches representing a maximum level of similarity to the lipid phase of the stratum corneum. One goal of this study was to investigate the affinity pattern of Cerasome and to compare it with the permeability profile of human skin. Another purpose was to study the applicability of Hansen solubility parameters for modelling skin permeation and to investigate the predictive and explanatory potential of this method. Visualisation in Hansen diagrams revealed very similar profiles of Cerasome electrokinetic chromatography retention factors and skin permeability coefficients. In both cases, the characteristic pattern with two clusters of highly retained or highly permeable substances could be shown to be mainly caused by two groups of compounds, one of them with high affinity to ceramides, fatty acids and lecithin and the other being more affine to cholesterol. If based on a sufficiently comprehensive experimental dataset, model-independent predictions of skin permeability data using three-component Hansen solubility parameters are able to achieve similar accuracy as calculations made with an Abraham linear free energy relationship model in which the compounds are characterized by seven physicochemical descriptors.

  9. Calcipotriol delivery into the skin as emulgel for effective permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Sravan Kumar Varma, V.; Maheshwari, P.V.; Navya, M.; Reddy, Sharath Chandra; Shivakumar, H.G.; Gowda, D.V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to formulate and evaluate an emulgel containing calcipotriol for treatment of psoriasis. Emulgels have emerged as a promising drug delivery system for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Isopropyl alcohol and polyethylene glycol have been employed as permeation enhancers. Formulation chart is made with seven formulations, evaluated for physical parameters, drug content, viscosity, thixotropy, spreadability, extrudability, mucoadhesion, diffusion studies, skin irritation test along with short term stability studies. Carbopolis is reported to have a direct influence on appearance and viscosity of final formulation. The photomicroscopic evaluations showed the presence of spherical globules in size range of 10–15 μm. Rheograms revealed that all the formulations exhibited pseudoplastic flow. Optimized formulation (F6) had shown 86.42 ± 2.0% drug release at the end of 8 h study. The release rate through dialysis membrane and rat skin is higher when compared to commercial calcipotriol ointment. Hence it is concluded that calcipotriol can be delivered topically with enhanced penetration properties when formulated as emulgel. PMID:25561873

  10. Drug permeation across intestinal epithelial cells using porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2011-04-01

    Mesoporous silicon particles hold great potential in improving the solubility of otherwise poorly soluble drugs. To effectively translate this feature into the clinic, especially via oral or parenteral administration, a thorough understanding of the interactions of the micro- and nanosized material with the physiological environment during the delivery process is required. In the present study, the behaviour of thermally oxidized porous silicon particles of different sizes interacting with Caco-2 cells (both non-differentiated and polarized monolayers) was investigated in order to establish their fate in a model of intestinal epithelial cell barrier. Particle interactions and TNF-α were measured in RAW 264.7 macrophages, while cell viabilities, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels, together with transmission electron microscope images of the polarized monolayers, were assessed with both the Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results showed a concentration and size dependent influence on cell viability and ROS-, NO- and TNF-α levels. There was no evidence of the porous nanoparticles crossing the Caco-2 cell monolayers, yet increased permeation of the loaded poorly soluble drug, griseofulvin, was shown. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  12. Ion Permeation and Mechanotransduction Mechanisms of Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Wu, Kun; Geng, Jie; Chi, Shaopeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Zhi, Peng; Zhang, Mingmin; Xiao, Bailong

    2016-03-16

    Piezo proteins have been proposed as the long-sought-after mechanosensitive cation channels in mammals that play critical roles in various mechanotransduction processes. However, the molecular bases that underlie their ion permeation and mechanotransduction have remained functionally undefined. Here we report our finding of the miniature pore-forming module of Piezo1 that resembles the pore architecture of other trimeric channels and encodes the essential pore properties. We further identified specific residues within the pore module that determine unitary conductance, pore blockage and ion selectivity for divalent and monovalent cations and anions. The non-pore-containing region of Piezo1 confers mechanosensitivity to mechano-insensitive trimeric acid-sensing ion channels, demonstrating that Piezo1 channels possess intrinsic mechanotransduction modules separate from their pore modules. In conclusion, this is the first report on the bona fide pore module and mechanotransduction components of Piezo channels, which define their ion-conducting properties and gating by mechanical stimuli, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective Ion-permeation through Strained and Charged Graphene Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Tao, Yi; Li, Zhongwu; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-11-16

    By means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that stretched and charged graphene can act as ion sieve membranes. It is observed that loading 30% strain on graphene can induce pores in the dense electron cloud to allow ions to pass through the aromatic rings. Meanwhile, charged surface is helpful to peel the hydration layers from the ions and decrease the energy barrier for ion translocation through nanopores. Our results suggest that with membrane charge density of 6.80 e/nm2, Li+ can be highly purified from the mixed solution including Li+, K+, Na+ and Cl- ions. Further increasing the charge density to 15.78 e/nm2 can obtain excellent Na+/K+ selectivity. The potential of mean force (PMF) profiles of ion permeation reveal that the potential for each ion is quite different. Fine tuning membrane charge density, pristine monolayer graphene can act as ion sieves with both high permeability and high selectivity. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Liquid permeation and chemical stability of anodic alumina membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii I. Petukhov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the chemical stability of anodic alumina membranes and their performance in long-term water and organic solvent permeation experiments is reported. Anodic alumina possesses high stability for both protonic and aprotonic organic solvents. However, serious degradation of the membrane occurs in pure water, leading to a drastic decrease of permeance (over 20% of the initial value after the passing of 0.250 m3/m2 of pure water. The drying of the membrane induces further permeance drop-off. The rate of membrane degradation strongly depends on the pH of the penetrant solution and increases in basic media. According to 27Al NMR and thermogravimetry results, the degradation of the membranes is associated with the dissolution of water-soluble [Al13O4(OH24(H2O12]7+ polyhydroxocomplexes and their further redeposition in the form of [Al(OH4]−, resulting in channels blocking. This process intensifies in basic pH due to the high positive charge of the anodic alumina surface. An approach for improving anodic aluminum oxide stability towards dissolution in water by carbon CVD coating of the membrane walls is suggested.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of the Enhanced Permeation and Retention (EPR Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Wong

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is characterized by a variety of abnormalities including irregular architecture, poor lymphatic drainage, and the upregulation of factors that increase the paracellular permeability. The increased permeability is important in mediating the uptake of an intravenously administered drug in a solid tumor and is known as the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR effect. Studies in animal models have demonstrated a cut-off size of 500 nm - 1 µm for molecules or nanoparticles to extravasate into a tumor, however, surprisingly little is known about the kinetics of the EPR effect. Here we present a pharmacokinetic model to quantitatively assess the influence of the EPR effect on the uptake of a drug into a solid tumor. We use pharmacokinetic data for Doxil and doxorubicin from human clinical trials to illustrate how the EPR effect influences tumor uptake. This model provides a quantitative framework to guide preclinical trials of new chemotherapies and ultimately to develop design rules that can increase targeting efficiency and decrease unwanted side effects in normal tissue.

  16. Selective ion-permeation through strained and charged graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Tao, Yi; Li, Zhongwu; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-01-01

    By means of molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that stretched and charged graphene can act as ion sieve membranes. It is observed that loading 30% strain on graphene can induce pores in the dense electron cloud to allow ions to pass through the aromatic rings. Meanwhile, a charged surface is helpful to peel the hydration layers from the ions and decrease the energy barrier for ion translocation through nanopores. Our results suggest that with a membrane charge density of 6.80 e nm‑2, Li+ can be highly purified from the mixed solution including Li+, K+, Na+ and Cl‑ ions. Further increasing the charge density to 15.78 e nm‑2 can obtain excellent Na+/K+ selectivity. The potential of mean force profiles of ion permeation reveal that the potential for each ion is quite different. By fine tuning membrane charge density, pristine monolayer graphene can act as ion sieves with both high permeability and high selectivity.

  17. Permeation properties of Concrete Added with a Petrochemical Industry Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth Torres-Agredo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the permeation properties of concrete added with a residue of a petrochemical industry located in Colombia, called catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FCC. Concrete samples with 10, 20 and 30 % of FCC incorporated as cement replacement were evaluated. As reference materials, concrete without addition and concrete added with 20 % of metakaolin (MK were used. MK is a high performance pozzolan of chemical composition similar to the FCC. The properties studied, in addition to the compressive strength, were: water absorption by total immersion, porosity, surface absorption and capillary sorption. The results showed that the concrete added with FCC and MK had similar behavior, and were slightly higher than the control sample. The total absorption and porosity were below 5 % and 10 % respectively for all samples; this means that the incorporation of the addition reduces the permeability of concrete. In this sense, FCC is considered as a good alternative for producing more durable concrete, being the optimum percentage, 10 % cement replacement.

  18. Evolutionary Design in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Jon

    Evolution is one of the most interesting and creative processes we currently understand, so it should come as no surprise that artists and designers are embracing the use of evolution in problems of artistic creativity. The material in this section illustrates the diversity of approaches being used by artists and designers in relation to evolution at the boundary of art and science. While conceptualising human creativity as an evolutionary process in itself may be controversial, what is clear is that evolutionary processes can be used to complement, even enhance human creativity, as the chapters in this section aptly demonstrate.

  19. Evolutionary Statistical Procedures

    CERN Document Server

    Baragona, Roberto; Poli, Irene

    2011-01-01

    This proposed text appears to be a good introduction to evolutionary computation for use in applied statistics research. The authors draw from a vast base of knowledge about the current literature in both the design of evolutionary algorithms and statistical techniques. Modern statistical research is on the threshold of solving increasingly complex problems in high dimensions, and the generalization of its methodology to parameters whose estimators do not follow mathematically simple distributions is underway. Many of these challenges involve optimizing functions for which analytic solutions a

  20. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  1. Practical experience of backwashing with SWRO permeate for UF fouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) permeate backwash on fouling control of seawater ultrafiltration was investigated at a pilot scale. A standard membrane module was used in this pilot to represent full-scale desalination plants. Results of the pilot show a good reproducibility. When the UF permeate was used for backwash, the frequency of chemically enhanced backwash (CEB) was around once per day. However, results of the pilot show that SWRO permeate backwashing could significantly reduce the CEB frequency. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  2. EVOLUTIONARY FOUNDATIONS FOR MOLECULAR MEDICINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesse, Randolph M.; Ganten, Detlev; Gregory, T. Ryan; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has long provided a foundation for population genetics, but many major advances in evolutionary biology from the 20th century are only now being applied in molecular medicine. They include the distinction between proximate and evolutionary explanations, kin selection, evolutionary models for cooperation, and new strategies for tracing phylogenies and identifying signals of selection. Recent advances in genomics are further transforming evolutionary biology and creating yet more opportunities for progress at the interface of evolution with genetics, medicine, and public health. This article reviews 15 evolutionary principles and their applications in molecular medicine in hopes that readers will use them and others to speed the development of evolutionary molecular medicine. PMID:22544168

  3. Constraint-based scheduling applying constraint programming to scheduling problems

    CERN Document Server

    Baptiste, Philippe; Nuijten, Wim

    2001-01-01

    Constraint Programming is a problem-solving paradigm that establishes a clear distinction between two pivotal aspects of a problem: (1) a precise definition of the constraints that define the problem to be solved and (2) the algorithms and heuristics enabling the selection of decisions to solve the problem. It is because of these capabilities that Constraint Programming is increasingly being employed as a problem-solving tool to solve scheduling problems. Hence the development of Constraint-Based Scheduling as a field of study. The aim of this book is to provide an overview of the most widely used Constraint-Based Scheduling techniques. Following the principles of Constraint Programming, the book consists of three distinct parts: The first chapter introduces the basic principles of Constraint Programming and provides a model of the constraints that are the most often encountered in scheduling problems. Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5 are focused on the propagation of resource constraints, which usually are responsibl...

  4. Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin's forgotten synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J.

    2009-11-01

    Charles Darwin dedicated more than 20 years of his life to a variety of investigations on higher plants (angiosperms). It has been implicitly assumed that these studies in the fields of descriptive botany and experimental plant physiology were carried out to corroborate his principle of descent with modification. However, Darwin’s son Francis, who was a professional plant biologist, pointed out that the interests of his father were both of a physiological and an evolutionary nature. In this article, we describe Darwin’s work on the physiology of higher plants from a modern perspective, with reference to the following topics: circumnutations, tropisms and the endogenous oscillator model; the evolutionary patterns of auxin action; the root-brain hypothesis; phloem structure and photosynthesis research; endosymbioses and growth-promoting bacteria; photomorphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity; basal metabolic rate, the Pfeffer-Kleiber relationship and metabolic optimality theory with respect to adaptive evolution; and developmental constraints versus functional equivalence in relationship to directional natural selection. Based on a review of these various fields of inquiry, we deduce the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and define this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.

  5. Investigating intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieri, Fabio; Parisi, Domenico; Patacchiola, Massimiliano; Petrosino, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    In intertemporal choices, subjects face a trade-off between value and delay: achieving the most valuable outcome requires a longer time, whereas the immediately available option is objectively poorer. Intertemporal choices are ubiquitous, and comparative studies reveal commonalities and differences across species: all species devalue future rewards as a function of delay (delay aversion), yet there is a lot of inter-specific variance in how rapidly such devaluation occurs. These differences are often interpreted in terms of ecological rationality, as depending on environmental factors (e.g., feeding ecology) and the physiological and morphological constraints of different species (e.g., metabolic rate). Evolutionary hypotheses, however, are hard to verify in vivo, since it is difficult to observe precisely enough real environments, not to mention ancestral ones. In this paper, we discuss the viability of an approach based on evolutionary robotics: in Study 1, we evolve robots without a metabolism in five different ecologies; in Study 2, we evolve metabolic robots (i.e., robots that consume energy over time) in three different ecologies. The intertemporal choices of the robots are analyzed both in their ecology and under laboratory conditions. Results confirm the generality of delay aversion and the usefulness of studying intertemporal choice through experimental evolutionary robotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolutionary ecology of C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Osborne, Colin P

    2014-12-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a physiological syndrome resulting from multiple anatomical and biochemical components, which function together to increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco and reduce photorespiration. It evolved independently multiple times and C4 plants now dominate many biomes, especially in the tropics and subtropics. The C4 syndrome comes in many flavours, with numerous phenotypic realizations of C4 physiology and diverse ecological strategies. In this work, we analyse the events that happened in a C3 context and enabled C4 physiology in the descendants, those that generated the C4 physiology, and those that happened in a C4 background and opened novel ecological niches. Throughout the manuscript, we evaluate the biochemical and physiological evidence in a phylogenetic context, which demonstrates the importance of contingency in evolutionary trajectories and shows how these constrained the realized phenotype. We then discuss the physiological innovations that allowed C4 plants to escape these constraints for two important dimensions of the ecological niche--growth rates and distribution along climatic gradients. This review shows that a comprehensive understanding of C4 plant ecology can be achieved by accounting for evolutionary processes spread over millions of years, including the ancestral condition, functional convergence via independent evolutionary trajectories, and physiological diversification. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, Frank Dan

    Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a formalism for concurrency in which agents interact with one another by telling (adding) and asking (reading) information in a shared medium. Temporal ccp extends ccp by allowing agents to be constrained by time conditions. This dissertation studies...

  8. When development matters: From evolutionary psychology to evolutionary developmental psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Blasi, Carlos; Gardiner, Amy K.; Bjorklund, David F.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents evolutionary developmental psychology (EDP) as an emerging field of evolutionary psychology (EP). In describing the core tenets of both approaches and the differences between them, we emphasize the important roles that evolution and development have in understanding human behaviour. We suggest that developmental psychologists should pay more attention to evolutionary issues and, conversely, evolutionary psychologists should take development seriously. Key words: evol...

  9. Applying BAT Evolutionary Optimization to Image-Based Visual Servoing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Perez-Cisneros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a predictive control strategy for an image-based visual servoing scheme that employs evolutionary optimization. The visual control task is approached as a nonlinear optimization problem that naturally handles relevant visual servoing constraints such as workspace limitations and visibility restrictions. As the predictive scheme requires a reliable model, this paper uses a local model that is based on the visual interaction matrix and a global model that employs 3D trajectory data extracted from a quaternion-based interpolator. The work assumes a free-flying camera with 6-DOF simulation whose results support the discussion on the constraint handling and the image prediction scheme.

  10. Movement adds bite to the evolutionary morphology of mammalian teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Polly P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection and constraints put limits on morphological evolution. Mammalian teeth are no exception, and the need for them to meet precisely exerts exacting constraints on a staggering array of developmental and functional factors that must be integrated to maintain their performance as they evolve. A study in BMC Evolutionary Biology demonstrates that mandibular movement is an important component of this integration, and one that should not be neglected in the quantitiative study of the evolution of tooth morphology. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/12/146/

  11. Origins of evolutionary transitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-15

    Mar 15, 2014 ... I define an evolutionary transition as a shift in the hierarchical level at which heritable fitness variance ... life, for example in eusocial insects, around 150 million years ago. None of these transformations was ...... affecting and heritable trait, and to introduce a mechanism which inhibits them from subsequent ...

  12. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  13. Evolutionary trends in Heteroptera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, R.H.

    1968-01-01

    1. This work, the first volume of a series dealing with evolutionary trends in Heteroptera, is concerned with the egg system of about 400 species. The data are presented systematically in chapters 1 and 2 with a critical review of the literature after each family.

    2. Chapter 3 evaluates facts

  14. Towards Adaptive Evolutionary Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Sebastian HOlt; Rask, Nina; Risi, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents first results from an interdisciplinary project, in which the fields of architecture, philosophy and artificial life are combined to explore possible futures of architecture. Through an interactive evolutionary installation, called EvoCurtain, we investigate aspects of how...

  15. Origins of evolutionary transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Ellen

    2014-04-01

    An 'evolutionary transition in individuality' or 'major transition' is a transformation in the hierarchical level at which natural selection operates on a population. In this article I give an abstract (i.e. level-neutral and substrate-neutral) articulation of the transition process in order to precisely understand how such processes can happen, especially how they can get started.

  16. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, W.E.

    1995-09-19

    This paper defines a class of evolutionary algorithms called evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) and analyzes their convergence properties. This class of algorithms is closely related to evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategie and real-coded genetic algorithms. EPSAs are self-adapting systems that modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The rule used to adapt the step size can be used to provide a stationary point convergence theory for EPSAs on any continuous function. This convergence theory is based on an extension of the convergence theory for generalized pattern search methods. An experimental analysis of the performance of EPSAs demonstrates that these algorithms can perform a level of global search that is comparable to that of canonical EAs. We also describe a stopping rule for EPSAs, which reliably terminated near stationary points in our experiments. This is the first stopping rule for any class of EAs that can terminate at a given distance from stationary points.

  17. Optimal Mixing Evolutionary Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Thierens (Dirk); P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); N. Krasnogor

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractA key search mechanism in Evolutionary Algorithms is the mixing or juxtaposing of partial solutions present in the parent solutions. In this paper we look at the efficiency of mixing in genetic algorithms (GAs) and estimation-of-distribution algorithms (EDAs). We compute the mixing

  18. Learning: An Evolutionary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    This paper draws on the philosophy of Karl Popper to present a descriptive evolutionary epistemology that offers philosophical solutions to the following related problems: "What happens when learning takes place?" and "What happens in human learning?" It provides a detailed analysis of how learning takes place without any direct transfer of…

  19. Evolutionary mysteries in meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenormand, Thomas; Engelstädter, Jan; Johnston, Susan E.; Wijnker, Erik; Haag, Christoph R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a key event of sexual life cycles in eukaryotes. Its mechanistic details have been uncovered in several model organisms, and most of its essential features have received various and often contradictory evolutionary interpretations. In this perspective, we present an overview of these

  20. Editorial overview: Evolutionary psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gangestad, S.W.; Tybur, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Functional approaches in psychology - which ask what behavior is good for - are almost as old as scientific psychology itself. Yet sophisticated, generative functional theories were not possible until developments in evolutionary biology in the mid-20th century. Arising in the last three decades,

  1. Evolutionary Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C.; Bjorklund, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Describes evolutionary developmental psychology as the study of the genetic and ecological mechanisms that govern the development of social and cognitive competencies common to all human beings and the epigenetic (gene-environment interactions) processes that adapt these competencies to local conditions. Outlines basic assumptions and domains of…

  2. Origins of evolutionary transitions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An `evolutionary transition in individuality' or `major transition' is a transformation in the hierarchical level at which natural selection operates on a population. In this article I give an abstract (i.e. level-neutral and substrate-neutral) articulation of the transition process in order to precisely understand how such processes can ...

  3. Evolutionary Theory under Fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Roger

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes events of a conference on evolutionary biology in Chicago entitled: "Macroevolution." Reviews the theory of modern synthesis, a term used to explain Darwinism in terms of population biology and genetics. Issues presented at the conference are discussed in detail. (CS)

  4. Evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-02-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection with the study of human development, focusing on the epigenetic effects that occur between humans and their environment in a way that attempts to explain how evolved psychological mechanisms become expressed in the phenotypes of adults. An evolutionary developmental perspective includes an appreciation of comparative research and we, among others, argue that contrasting the cognition of humans with that of nonhuman primates can provide a framework with which to understand how human cognitive abilities and intelligence evolved. Furthermore, we argue that several aspects of childhood (e.g., play and immature cognition) serve both as deferred adaptations as well as imparting immediate benefits. Intense selection pressure was surely exerted on childhood over human evolutionary history and, as a result, neglecting to consider the early developmental period of children when studying their later adulthood produces an incomplete picture of the evolved adaptations expressed through human behavior and cognition.

  5. Evolutionary Theories of Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, J P

    2005-04-29

    Current, mid-term and long range technologies for detection of pathogens and toxins are briefly described in the context of performance metrics and operational scenarios. Predictive (evolutionary) and speculative (revolutionary) assessments are given with trade-offs identified, where possible, among competing performance goals.

  6. Partially clairvoyant scheduling for aggregate constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Subramani

    2005-01-01

    constraints. In this paper, we extend the class of constraints for which partially clairvoyant schedules can be determined efficiently, to include aggregate constraints. Aggregate constraints form a strict superset of standard constraints and can be used to model performance metrics.

  7. Evolutionary Thinking in Environmental Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary and environmental economics have a potentially close relationship. This paper reviews past and identifies potential applications of evolutionary concepts and methods to environmental economics. This covers a number of themes: resource use and ecosystem management; growth and

  8. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman Mohammadi-Samani

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: This study set out to determine that thymol plays as a skin permeation enhancer and increases the meloxicam skin absorption and this enhancement is significant at the eutectic point of drug-enhancer mixture.

  9. Experimental Validation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Energy Efficient Ethanol-Water Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step,...

  10. Potential Stable Low-Permeation Rate Standard Based on Micro-machined Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwolf, Adrian; Poling, Chris; Barbosa, Nick; White, Grady; Rentz, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    Silicon wafers with micro-machined holes were evaluated for use as low-permeation-rate standard artifacts. Accuracy, stability, and reliability were assessed. Two independent experimental techniques for evaluating permeation were used: chilled mirror hygrometer and mass loss. The wafers exhibited a well-defined linear relationship between hole area and resultant water partial pressure for both techniques, although the mass loss curve exhibited a constant vertical offset from the hygrometer curve, attributed to water loss through the O-ring seal. In contrast to polymer permeation standards, Si wafers provided long-term reproducible permeation rates. However, they were also highly fragile, with most of them cracking during the course of the investigation.

  11. Pervaporation and vapour permeation of methanol and MTBE through a microporous methylated silica membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, F.T.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of conventional unit operations with pervaporation or vapour permeation membrane separation processes offers opportunities for process intensification in terms of augmenting capacity and decreasing energy consumption of conventional unit operations. The MTBE production process is an

  12. Formation of permeation barriers on ceramic SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racault, C. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Serra, E. [Safety Technology Institute, Ispra Establishment, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Fenici, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    1996-10-01

    The effectiveness as permeation barriers of the following CVD and PVD (sputtering) coatings has been investigated: TiC+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(CVD), SiC(CVD), SiO{sub 2}(CVD), TiN(CVD), TiN(CVD)+TiN(PVD) and SiC(CVD)+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(PVD). The substrate material was a SiC/SiC composite, proposed as low activation structural material for fusion applications. Permeation measurements were performed in the temperature range 300-750 K using deuterium at pressures in the range 0.5-150 kPa. A linear dependence of permeation rate on pressure was measured. The efficiency of the coatings as deuterium permeation barriers is discussed in terms of coating microstructure. The best result was obtained with a bilayer of TiN(CVD) (15 {mu}m) +TiN(PVD) (8 {mu}m). (orig.).

  13. Steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus elucidated by particle diffusion and peptide permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; García-Díaz, María; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-01-01

    monolayers. The aim of the present study was to gain more insight into the steric and interactive barrier properties of intestinal mucus by studying the permeation of peptides and model compounds across the biosimilar mucus as well as across porcine intestinal mucus (PIM). As PIM disrupted the Caco-2 cell...... monolayers, a cell-free mucus barrier model was implemented in the studies. Both the biosimilar mucus and the PIM reduced the permeation of the selected peptide drugs to varying degrees illustrating the interactive properties of both mucus matrices. The reduction in peptide permeation was decreased depending...... on the cationicity and H-bonding capacity of the permeant clearly demonstrated by using the biosimilar mucus, whereas the larger inter sample variation of the PIM matrix obstructed similarly clear conclusions. Thus, for mechanistic studies of permeation across mucus and mucosa the biosimilar mucus offers a relevant...

  14. Potential Stable Low-Permeation Rate Standard Based on Micro-machined Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwolf, Adrian; Poling, Chris; Barbosa, Nick; White, Grady; Rentz, Nikki

    2015-01-01

    Silicon wafers with micro-machined holes were evaluated for use as low-permeation-rate standard artifacts. Accuracy, stability, and reliability were assessed. Two independent experimental techniques for evaluating permeation were used: chilled mirror hygrometer and mass loss. The wafers exhibited a well-defined linear relationship between hole area and resultant water partial pressure for both techniques, although the mass loss curve exhibited a constant vertical offset from the hygrometer curve, attributed to water loss through the O-ring seal. In contrast to polymer permeation standards, Si wafers provided long-term reproducible permeation rates. However, they were also highly fragile, with most of them cracking during the course of the investigation. PMID:26958454

  15. Water vapor permeation and dehumidification performance of poly(vinyl alcohol)/lithium chloride composite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Bui, Duc Thuan

    2015-10-09

    Thin and robust composite membranes comprising stainless steel scaffold, fine and porous TiO2 and polyvinyl alcohol/lithium chloride were fabricated and studied for air dehumidification application. Higher hydrophilicity, sorption and permeation were observed for membranes with increased lithium chloride content up to 50%. The permeation and sorption properties of the membranes were investigated under different temperatures. The results provided a deeper insight into the membrane water vapor permeation process. It was specifically noted that lithium chloride significantly reduces water diffusion energy barrier, resulting in the change of permeation energy from positive to negative values. Higher water vapor permeance was observed for the membrane with higher LiCl content at lower temperature. The isothermal air dehumidification tests show that the membrane is suitable for dehumidifying air in high humid condition. Additionally, results also indicate a trade-off between the humidity ratio drop with the water vapor removal rate when varying air flowrate.

  16. Analysis of electro-permeation of hydrogen in metallic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, A; Deshpande, V S; Fleck, N A

    2017-07-28

    A reaction-diffusion type modelling framework is presented to analyse both electro-permeation (EP) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) measurements of hydrogen in metallic alloys. It is assumed that the kinetics of hydrogen motion is governed by diffusion through the lattice, along with trapping/detrapping at specific sites such as dislocations, grain boundaries, etc. It is shown that the trapping and detrapping rates are typically much faster than the diffusion rate, and consequently a simplification of the governing equations suffices such that local equilibrium exists between lattice and trapped hydrogen. Using this local equilibrium assumption, we then present an asymptotic analysis of the governing kinetic equation for the EP test. This asymptotic analysis reveals that four regimes of behaviour exist, ranging from negligible trapping to the complete filling of deep traps. The analysis suggests that EP tests should be so-arranged that three regimes of behaviour are spanned, in order to extract the relevant material properties associated with hydrogen transport. The numerical solutions presented in this study support the asymptotic analysis. The hydrogen kinetics framework is also deployed to analyse both EP and TDS tests on the same martensitic steel. The EP measurements all lie in regime I and are thus insufficient to uniquely determine both the trap density and binding energy. Reasonable agreement is obtained between measurements and numerical predictions of TDS tests using parameters estimated from the EP tests. Further improvements in measurements are required to confirm the fidelity of this modelling approach.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Tritium permeation reduction through the HCPB steam generator by in-situ oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perujo, A [E.C. Joint Research Centre-Ispra Site, Institute for advanced Materials, Ispra (Italy); Feuerstein, H.; Reimann, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The permeation through the steam generator of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket concept can be strongly reduced by natural oxides formed on the INCOLOY 800 tubes. This paper presents the results of different experiments with different deuterium to humidity ratios. All experiments show that INCOLOY 800 readily oxidizes and that permeation reduction factors of at least 100 are easily obtained for blanket conditions. (authors)

  18. Enhanced Permeation of a Hydrophobic Fluid through Particles with Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Patterned Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Renliang Zhang; Yousheng Xu; Binghai Wen; Nan Sheng; Haiping Fang

    2014-01-01

    The wetting properties of solid surfaces are significant in oil/gas and liquid displacement processes. It is difficult for hydrophobic fluids to permeate channels filled with hydrophilic particles and an aqueous phase, and this is thought to be the primary cause of low yields in low permeability reservoir operations. Using three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann simulations, we show that particles with hydrophobic and hydrophilic patterned surfaces can greatly improve hydrophobic fluid permeation...

  19. Ontogenetic constraints on foraminiferal test construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caromel, Aude G M; Schmidt, Daniela N; Rayfield, Emily J

    2017-05-01

    Developmental processes represent one of the main constraints on the generation of adult form. Determining how constructional and energetic demands operate throughout growth is es-sential to understanding fundamental growth rules and trade-offs that define the framework within which new species originate. In organisms producing spiral shells, coiling patterns can inform on the constructional constraints acting throughout development that dictated the diversification of forms within a group. Here, we use Synchrotron radiation X-Ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) reconstructions of eight planktic foraminifera repre-sentative of the major morphotypic groups to determine disparity of coiling patterns by measuring Raupian parameters. The results show that foraminifera are a morphologically highly conservative group, exploiting a limited range of poten-tial coiling patterns. Very similar coiling patterns during early ontogeny, regardless of species, point toward strong constraints in early ontogeny and to common develop-mental processes acting across all morphogroups. Dispersion and lateral displacement of taxa in morphospace are limited to the adult stage. Accretion with low translation down the coiling axis in juveniles may maximize lateral growth and metabolic efficiency in light of costly calcification. Increased translation in the adult stages allows growth to accommo-date new chamber shapes, mediated by changes in aperture location and the site of accretion over ontogeny. These constructional constraints, and the accretion of a small number of discrete chambers, limit the potential for novel forms within the foraminifera compared to other groups of coiling organisms and may explain the repeated evolution of similar morphotypes throughout the evolutionary history of the group. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Using Evolutionary Computation to Solve the Economic Load Dispatch Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir SAYAH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an evolutionary algorithm based method for solving the economic load dispatch (ELD problem. The objective is to minimize the nonlinear function, which is the total fuel cost of thermal generating units, subject to the usual constraints.The IEEE 30 bus test system was used for testing and validation purposes. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for solving the economic load dispatch problem.

  1. Differential permeation of piroxicam-loaded PLGA micro/nanoparticles and their in vitro enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankarayan, Raju; Kumar, Sumit; Mishra, Prashant, E-mail: pmishra@dbeb.iitd.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology (India)

    2013-03-15

    Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain. The main problem encountered when piroxicam is administered orally is its gastric side-effect (ulcer, bleeding and holes in the stomach). Transmucosal delivery and encapsulation of piroxicam in biodegradable particles offer potential advantages over conventional oral delivery. The present study was aimed to develop an alternative to piroxicam-delivery which could overcome the direct contact of the drug at the mucosal membrane and its permeation through the mucosal membrane was studied. To achieve this, the piroxicam was encapsulated in Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (size 1-4 {mu}m, encapsulation efficiency 80-85 %) and nanoparticles (size 151.6 {+-} 28.6 nm, encapsulation efficiency 92.17 {+-} 3.08 %). Various formulation process parameters were optimised for the preparation of piroxicam-loaded PLGA nanoparticles of optimal size and encapsulation efficiency. Transmucosal permeability of piroxicam-loaded PLGA micro- and nanoparticles through the porcine oesophageal mucosa was studied. Using fluorescently labelled PLGA micro- and nanoparticles, size-dependent permeation was demonstrated. Furthermore, the effect of different permeation enhancers on the flux rate and permeability coefficient for the permeation of nanoparticles was investigated. The results suggested that amongst the permeation enhancers used the most efficient enhancement of permeation was observed with 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulphate.

  2. Ionisation effects on the permeation of pharmaceutical compounds through silicone membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L J; Bhuiyan, A K M M H

    2016-05-01

    Silicone membrane is frequently used as an in vitro skin mimic whereby experiments incorporate a range of buffered media which may vary in pH. As a consequence of such variability in pH there is a corresponding variability in the degree of ionisation which in turn, could influence permeation through the mainly hydrophobic-rich membrane structure. This study reports the effect of pH on the permeation of five model compounds (benzoic acid, benzotriazole, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and lidocaine). For the five compounds analysed, each at three distinct percentages of ionisation, it was found that the greater extent of permeation was always for the more 'neutral', i.e. more greatly unionised, species rather than the anionic or cationic species. These findings fit with the theory that the hydrophobic membrane encourages permeation of 'lipid-like' structures, i.e. the more unionised form of compounds. However, results obtained with an Inverse Gas Chromatography Surface Energy Analyser (iGC SEA) indicate the membrane surface to be an electron dense environment. In the knowledge that unionised forms of compounds permeate (rather than the charged species) this negatively charged surface was not anticipated, i.e. the basic membrane surface did not appear to affect permeation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential permeation of piroxicam-loaded PLGA micro/nanoparticles and their in vitro enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankarayan, Raju; Kumar, Sumit; Mishra, Prashant

    2013-03-01

    Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain. The main problem encountered when piroxicam is administered orally is its gastric side-effect (ulcer, bleeding and holes in the stomach). Transmucosal delivery and encapsulation of piroxicam in biodegradable particles offer potential advantages over conventional oral delivery. The present study was aimed to develop an alternative to piroxicam-delivery which could overcome the direct contact of the drug at the mucosal membrane and its permeation through the mucosal membrane was studied. To achieve this, the piroxicam was encapsulated in Poly (lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles (size 1-4 μm, encapsulation efficiency 80-85 %) and nanoparticles (size 151.6 ± 28.6 nm, encapsulation efficiency 92.17 ± 3.08 %). Various formulation process parameters were optimised for the preparation of piroxicam-loaded PLGA nanoparticles of optimal size and encapsulation efficiency. Transmucosal permeability of piroxicam-loaded PLGA micro- and nanoparticles through the porcine oesophageal mucosa was studied. Using fluorescently labelled PLGA micro- and nanoparticles, size-dependent permeation was demonstrated. Furthermore, the effect of different permeation enhancers on the flux rate and permeability coefficient for the permeation of nanoparticles was investigated. The results suggested that amongst the permeation enhancers used the most efficient enhancement of permeation was observed with 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulphate.

  4. Effect of tungsten and carbon surface mixed layer on deuterium permeation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.Y., E-mail: penghanyee_8388@st.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Lee, H.T.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Deuterium ion-driven permeation in tungsten under mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation at 1 keV was studied to investigate the incident flux dependency on deuterium permeation. Permeation experiments were performed at three temperatures (T{sub w} = 610 K, 710 K, 850 K) under incident flux of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The variation of incident flux leads to similar temperature-dependent increase in steady-state deuterium permeation flux under mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation as observed in previous study. It is also found that the rise in permeation at high temperature larger than 800 K cannot be explained by changes in front diffusivity of W–C mixed layer. Also, the incident flux dependency in deuterium permeation cannot be explained only by the hydrogen transport theory of Doyle and Brice. It is deducted that a mixed deuterium and carbon irradiation could cause an oversaturation state of deuterium in tungsten at temperature lower than 700 K.

  5. Comparison of liquid membrane permeation with sulfolane extraction on aromatics separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Satoru; Kawasaki, Junjiro

    1987-11-01

    This paper describes the comparison of the liquid membrane permeation method with the sulfolane extraction method for separating aromatics. There is no difference in the yield of aromatics from the lighter hydrocarbons such as reformate and naphtha between those two methods. The yield of aromatics from the heavier hydrocarbons such as kerosene by the liquid membrane permeation method is much higher than the equilibrium yield in the extraction method. The rate of permeation through the liquid membrane of aromatics without the accelerating method by adding a lipophilic surfactant is lower than the rate of extraction. The selectivity of aromatics in the extraction method is sharply decreased while that in the liquid membrane permeation method is increased, as the temperature is raised. The selectivity (based on n-hexane) of benzene in the extraction method from the feed of a model hydrocarbon assumed to be reformate is approximately 7 at 50/sup 0/C while that in the liquid membrane permeation method from the same feed exceeds 30. It is expected to apply the liquid membrane permeation method to the separation and purification of polymethyl benzenes waiting for the development of separation technology and uses on synthetic chemistry. (8 figs, 2 tabs, 17 refs.)

  6. Compensation effect in H 2 permeation kinetics of PdAg membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Gaofeng

    2012-08-30

    Knowledge about the (inter)dependence of permeation kinetic parameters on the stoichiometry of H 2-selective alloys is still rudimentary, although uncovering the underlying systematic correlations will greatly facilitate current efforts into the design of novel high-performance H 2 separation membranes. Permeation measurements with carefully engineered, 2-7 μm thick supported Pd 100-xAg x membranes reveal that the activation energy and pre-exponential factor of H 2 permeation laws vary systematically with alloy composition, and both kinetic parameters are strongly correlated for x ≤ 50. We show that this permeation kinetic compensation effect corresponds well with similar correlations in the hydrogen solution thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics of PdAg alloys that govern H 2 permeation rates. This effect enables the consistent description of permeation characteristics over wide temperature and alloy stoichiometry ranges, whereas hydrogen solution thermodynamics may play a role, too, as a yet unrecognized source of kinetic compensation in, for example, H 2-involving reactions over metal catalysts or hydrogenation/ dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Bacterial adhesion onto nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes: effect of permeate flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semião, Andrea J C; Habimana, Olivier; Casey, Eoin

    2014-10-15

    The influence of permeate flux on bacterial adhesion to NF and RO membranes was examined using two model Pseudomonas species, namely Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida. To better understand the initial biofouling profile during NF/RO processes, deposition experiments were conducted in cross flow under permeate flux varying from 0.5 up to 120 L/(h m(2)), using six NF and RO membranes each having different surface properties. All experiments were performed at a Reynolds number of 579. Complementary adhesion experiments were performed using Pseudomonas cells grown to early-, mid- and late-exponential growth phases to evaluate the effect of bacterial cell surface properties during cell adhesion under permeate flux conditions. Results from this study show that initial bacterial adhesion is strongly dependent on the permeate flux conditions, where increased adhesion was obtained with increased permeate flux, until a maximum of 40% coverage was reached. Membrane surface properties or bacterial growth stages was further found to have little impact on bacterial adhesion to NF and RO membrane surfaces under the conditions tested. These results emphasise the importance of conducting adhesion and biofouling experiments under realistic permeate flux conditions, and raises questions about the efficacy of the methods for the evaluation of antifouling membranes in which bacterial adhesion is commonly assessed under zero-flux or low flux conditions, unrepresentative of full-scale NF/RO processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Vehicles and Enhancers on the Skin Permeation of Phytoestrogenic Diarylheptanoids from Curcuma comosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiyasawasdikul, Sarunya; Limpongsa, Ekapol; Jaipakdee, Napaphak; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2017-04-01

    Curcuma comosa (C. comosa) is widely used in traditional medicine as a dietary supplement for health promotion in postmenopausal women in Thailand. It contains several diarylheptanoids, which are considered to be a novel class of phytoestrogens. However, the diarylheptanoids isolated from the plant rhizome are shown to have low oral bioavailability and faster elimination characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the permeation behavior of the active compounds of diarylheptanoids. The effects of binary vehicle systems and permeation enhancers on diarylheptanoids permeation and accumulation within the skin were studied using side-by-side diffusion cells through the porcine ear skin. Among the tested binary vehicle systems, the ethanol/water vehicle appeared to be the most effective system for diarylheptanoids permeation with the highest flux and shortest lag time. The presence of transcutol in the vehicle system significantly increased diarylheptanoid's permeation and accumulation within the skin in a concentration-dependent manner. Although the presence of terpenes in formulation decreased the flux of diarylheptanoids, it raised the amount of diarylheptanoids retained within the skin substantially. Based on the feasibility of diarylheptanoid permeation, C. comosa extract should be further developed into an effective transdermal product for health benefits and hormone replacement therapy.

  9. Skin permeation mechanism and bioavailability enhancement of celecoxib from transdermally applied nanoemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Javed

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celecoxib, a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor has been recommended orally for the treatment of arthritis and osteoarthritis. Long term oral administration of celecoxib produces serious gastrointestinal side effects. It is a highly lipophilic, poorly soluble drug with oral bioavailability of around 40% (Capsule. Therefore the aim of the present investigation was to assess the skin permeation mechanism and bioavailability of celecoxib by transdermally applied nanoemulsion formulation. Optimized oil-in-water nanoemulsion of celecoxib was prepared by the aqueous phase titration method. Skin permeation mechanism of celecoxib from nanoemulsion was evaluated by FTIR spectral analysis, DSC thermogram, activation energy measurement and histopathological examination. The optimized nanoemulsion was subjected to pharmacokinetic (bioavailability studies on Wistar male rats. Results FTIR spectra and DSC thermogram of skin treated with nanoemulsion indicated that permeation occurred due to the disruption of lipid bilayers by nanoemulsion. The significant decrease in activation energy (2.373 kcal/mol for celecoxib permeation across rat skin indicated that the stratum corneum lipid bilayers were significantly disrupted (p Conclusion Results of skin permeation mechanism and pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the nanoemulsions can be successfully used as potential vehicles for enhancement of skin permeation and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs.

  10. Scoping Analyses on Tritium Permeation to VHTR Integarted Industrial Application Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tritium permeation is a very important current issue in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) because tritium is easily permeated through high temperature metallic surfaces. Tritium permeations in the VHTR-integrated systems were investigated in this study using the tritium permeation analysis code (TPAC) that was developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL TPAC is a numerical tool that is based on the mass balance equations of tritium containing species and hydrogen (i.e. HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, TI) coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and thermal neutron caption reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including high temperature electrolysis (HTSE) and sulfur-iodine processes.

  11. Changes on iron electrode surface during hydrogen permeation in borate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modiano, S.; Carreno, J.A.V. [LNDC - Laboratorio de Ensaios Nao-Destrutivos e Corrosao, Prof. ' Manoel de Castro' , DEM/PEMM/EE/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68505, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fugivara, C.S. [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Quimica, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Torresi, R.M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 26077, 05513-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vivier, V. [UPR 15 du CNRS, Laboratoire Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, UPMC, 4 place Jussieu, B.P. 133, 75252 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Benedetti, A.V. [UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Quimica, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Mattos, O.R. [LNDC - Laboratorio de Ensaios Nao-Destrutivos e Corrosao, Prof. ' Manoel de Castro' , DEM/PEMM/EE/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68505, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: omattos@metalmat.ufrj.br

    2008-04-01

    Hydrogen interaction with oxide films grown on iron electrodes at open circuit potential (E{sub oc}) and in the passive region (+0.30 V{sub ECS}) was studied by chronopotentiometry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The results were obtained in deaerated 0.3 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} + 0.075 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (BB, pH 8.4) solution before, during and after hydrogen permeation. The iron oxide film modification was also investigated by means of in situ X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) before and during hydrogen permeation. The main conclusion was that the passive film is reduced during the hydrogen diffusion. The hydrogen permeation stabilizes the iron surface at a potential close to the thermodynamic water stability line where hydrogen evolution can occur. The stationary condition required for the determination of the permeation parameters cannot be easily attained on iron surface during hydrogen permeation. Moreover, additional attention must be paid when obtaining the transport parameters using the classical permeation cell.

  12. Environment determines evolutionary trajectory in a constrained phenotypic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraebel, David T; Mickalide, Harry; Schnitkey, Diane; Merritt, Jason; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Kuehn, Seppe

    2017-03-27

    Constraints on phenotypic variation limit the capacity of organisms to adapt to the multiple selection pressures encountered in natural environments. To better understand evolutionary dynamics in this context, we select Escherichia coli for faster migration through a porous environment, a process which depends on both motility and growth. We find that a trade-off between swimming speed and growth rate constrains the evolution of faster migration. Evolving faster migration in rich medium results in slow growth and fast swimming, while evolution in minimal medium results in fast growth and slow swimming. In each condition parallel genomic evolution drives adaptation through different mutations. We show that the trade-off is mediated by antagonistic pleiotropy through mutations that affect negative regulation. A model of the evolutionary process shows that the genetic capacity of an organism to vary traits can qualitatively depend on its environment, which in turn alters its evolutionary trajectory.

  13. The NCL natural constraint language

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jianyang

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the Natural Constraint Language (NCL) language, a description language in conventional mathematical logic for modeling and solving constraint satisfaction problems. It uses illustrations and tutorials to detail NCL and its applications.

  14. Studies in evolutionary agroecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Wibke

    Darwinian evolution by natural selection is driven primarily by differential survival and reproduction among individuals in a population. When the evolutionary interest of an individual is in conflict with the interests of the population, the genes increasing individual fitness at the cost...... performance are not in conflict, it is unlikely that plant breeding can radically improve the results of millions of years of evolution through natural selection. However, efforts to improve crops can be very successful, when breeding is directed towards goals diverging from natural selection. The potential...... of Evolutionary Agroecology that the highest yielding individuals do not necessarily perform best as a population. The investment of resources into strategies and structures increasing individual competitive ability carries a cost. If a whole population consists of individuals investing resources to compete...

  15. Selective Constraint on Noncoding Regions of Hominid Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for human evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic basis of human-chimpanzee differences. One influential idea holds that such differences depend, to a large extent, on adaptive changes in gene expression. An important step in assessing this hypothesis involves gaining a better understanding of selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes. In noncoding sequence, functional elements are frequently small and can be separated by large nonfunctional regions. For this reason, constraint in hominid genomes is likely to be patchy. Here we use conservation in more distantly related mammals and amniotes as a way of identifying small sequence windows that are likely to be functional. We find that putatively functional noncoding elements defined in this manner are subject to significant selective constraint in hominids.

  16. Selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot C Bush

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for human evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic basis of human-chimpanzee differences. One influential idea holds that such differences depend, to a large extent, on adaptive changes in gene expression. An important step in assessing this hypothesis involves gaining a better understanding of selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes. In noncoding sequence, functional elements are frequently small and can be separated by large nonfunctional regions. For this reason, constraint in hominid genomes is likely to be patchy. Here we use conservation in more distantly related mammals and amniotes as a way of identifying small sequence windows that are likely to be functional. We find that putatively functional noncoding elements defined in this manner are subject to significant selective constraint in hominids.

  17. Evolutionary design assistants for architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Onur Sönmez

    2015-04-01

    evolutionary decisions. In this way, the Interleaved EA enables the use of different settings and operators for each of the objectives within an overall task, which would be the same for all objectives in a regular multi-objective EA. This property gives the algorithm a modular structure, which offers an improvable method for the utilization of domain-specific knowledge for each sub-task, i.e., objective. The Interleaved EA can be used by Evolutionary Computation (EC researchers and by practitioners who employ EC for their tasks. As a third main output, the “Architectural Stem Cells Framework” is a conceptual framework for architectural design assistants. It proposes a dynamic and multi-layered method for combining a set of design assistants for larger tasks in architectural design. The first component of the framework is a layer-based, parallel task decomposition approach, which aims at obtaining a dynamic parallelization of sub-tasks within a more complicated problem. The second component of the framework is a conception for the development mechanisms for building drafts, i.e., Architectural Stem Cells (ASC. An ASC can be conceived as a semantically marked geometric structure, which contains the information that specifies the possibilities and constraints for how an abstract building may develop from an undetailed stage to a fully developed building draft. ASCs are required for re-integrating the separated task layers of an architectural problem through solution-based development. The ASC Framework brings together many of the ideas of this thesis for a practical research agenda and it is presented to the AD researchers in architecture. Finally, the “design_proxy.layout” (d_p.layout is an architectural layout design assistant based on the design_proxy approach and the IEA. The system uses a relaxed problem definition (producing draft layouts and a flexible layout representation that permits the overlapping of design units and boundaries. User interaction with the

  18. Evolutionary design assistants for architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Onur Sönmez

    2015-04-01

    decisions. In this way, the Interleaved EA enables the use of different settings and operators for each of the objectives within an overall task, which would be the same for all objectives in a regular multi-objective EA. This property gives the algorithm a modular structure, which offers an improvable method for the utilization of domain-specific knowledge for each sub-task, i.e., objective. The Interleaved EA can be used by Evolutionary Computation (EC researchers and by practitioners who employ EC for their tasks.As a third main output, the “Architectural Stem Cells Framework” is a conceptual framework for architectural design assistants. It proposes a dynamic and multi-layered method for combining a set of design assistants for larger tasks in architectural design. The first component of the framework is a layer-based, parallel task decomposition approach, which aims at obtaining a dynamic parallelization of sub-tasks within a more complicated problem. The second component of the framework is a conception for the development mechanisms for building drafts, i.e., Architectural Stem Cells (ASC. An ASC can be conceived as a semantically marked geometric structure, which contains the information that specifies the possibilities and constraints for how an abstract building may develop from an undetailed stage to a fully developed building draft. ASCs are required for re-integrating the separated task layers of an architectural problem through solution-based development. The ASC Framework brings together many of the ideas of this thesis for a practical research agenda and it is presented to the AD researchers in architecture.Finally, the “design_proxy.layout” (d_p.layout is an architectural layout design assistant based on the design_proxy approach and the IEA. The system uses a relaxed problem definition (producing draft layouts and a flexible layout representation that permits the overlapping of design units and boundaries. User interaction with the system is

  19. Anxiety: an evolutionary approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Bateson, M; Brilot, B; Nettle, D.

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, with huge attendant suffering. Current treatments are not universally effective, suggesting that a deeper understanding of the causes of anxiety is needed. To understand anxiety disorders better, it is first necessary to understand the normal anxiety response. This entails considering its evolutionary function as well as the mechanisms underlying it. We argue that the function of the human anxiety response, and homologues in other ...

  20. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex McAvoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games.

  1. Evolutionary theory and teleology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, R T

    1984-04-21

    The order within and among living systems can be explained rationally by postulating a process of descent with modification, effected by factors which are extrinsic or intrinsic to the organisms. Because at the time Darwin proposed his theory of evolution there was no concept of intrinsic factors which could evolve, he postulated a process of extrinsic effects--natural selection. Biological order was thus seen as an imposed, rather than an emergent, property. Evolutionary change was seen as being determined by the functional efficiency (adaptedness) of the organism in its environment, rather than by spontaneous changes in intrinsically generated organizing factors. The initial incompleteness of Darwin's explanatory model, and the axiomatization of its postulates in neo-Darwinism, has resulted in a theory of functionalism, rather than structuralism. As such, it introduces an unnecessary teleology which confounds evolutionary studies and reduces the usefulness of the theory. This problem cannot be detected from within the neo-Darwinian paradigm because the different levels of end-directed activity--teleomatic, teleonomic, and teleological--are not recognized. They are, in fact, considered to influence one another. The theory of nonequilibrium evolution avoids these problems by returning to the basic principles of biological order and developing a structuralist explanation of intrinsically generated change. Extrinsic factors may affect the resultant evolutionary pattern, but they are neither necessary nor sufficient for evolution to occur.

  2. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games.

  3. Functionality of intergenic transcription: an evolutionary comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Khaitovich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts.

  4. Drug in adhesive type transdermal matrix systems of ondansetron hydrochloride: optimization of permeation pattern using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Kalpana; Pattnaik, Satyanarayan; Sahu, Sarat Chandra; Patnaik, Kiran Kumar; Mallick, Subrata

    2010-02-01

    The present investigation aims at development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) based drug in adhesive type transdermal systems of ondansetron hydrochloride with higher permeation flux. The effect of mixture of two chemical permeation enhancers (oleic acid and lauric acid diethanolamide); and drug loading dose on the ex vivo human cadaver skin permeation from the transdermal patches has been investigated using a d-optimal combined mixture design. Incorporation of chemical permeation enhancers significantly improved the permeability parameters and it was also found that blend of permeation enhancers is more effective than either permeation enhancer. Criterion of desirability was employed to numerically optimize the transdermal system. Optimized formulation was achieved with 67.5% lauric acid diethanolamide, 32.5% oleic acid and 10% drug loading in an acrylate based PSA matrix. Optimized formulation was found to be nonirritating and safe for dermatological application.

  5. Probing the Mobility of Supercooled Liquid 3-Methylpentane at Temperatures Near the Glass Transition Using Rare Gas Permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2012-08-14

    We study the diffusivity of three-methyl pentane (3MP) using the permeation of inert gases (Ar,Kr, Xe) through the supercooled created when initially amorphous overlayers are heated above Tg. We find that the permeation rates for all of the gases have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences that are well described by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. Comparison with the literature viscosity shows that the Stokes-Einstein equation breaks down at temperatures approaching Tg. The fractional Stokes-Einstein, D ∝ (T/η)n, does fit the permeation data, albeit with different values of n for each gas. There is qualitative agreement with the Stokes-Einstein equation in that the permeation rate decreases with increasing radius of the gas probe, but the differences in radii are not quantitatively proportional to the differences in the permeation rates. Instead the permeation rates are better correlated with the gas-3MP interaction energy than with the gas radius.

  6. Ultrathin graphene-based membrane with precise molecular sieving and ultrafast solvent permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Su, Y.; Chi, C.; Cherian, C. T.; Huang, K.; Kravets, V. G.; Wang, F. C.; Zhang, J. C.; Pratt, A.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Nair, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes continue to attract intense interest due to their unique molecular sieving properties combined with fast permeation. However, their use is limited to aqueous solutions because GO membranes appear impermeable to organic solvents, a phenomenon not yet fully understood. Here, we report efficient and fast filtration of organic solutions through GO laminates containing smooth two-dimensional (2D) capillaries made from large (10-20 μm) flakes. Without modification of sieving characteristics, these membranes can be made exceptionally thin, down to ~10 nm, which translates into fast water and organic solvent permeation. We attribute organic solvent permeation and sieving properties to randomly distributed pinholes interconnected by short graphene channels with a width of 1 nm. With increasing membrane thickness, organic solvent permeation rates decay exponentially but water continues to permeate quickly, in agreement with previous reports. The potential of ultrathin GO laminates for organic solvent nanofiltration is demonstrated by showing >99.9% rejection of small molecular weight organic dyes dissolved in methanol. Our work significantly expands possibilities for the use of GO membranes in purification and filtration technologies.

  7. Skin permeation of organic gunshot residue: implications for sampling and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jordan Wade; Bell, Suzanne

    2014-06-17

    Traditional gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is based on detection of particulates formed from metals found in the primer. Recent concerns regarding the interpretation of GSR evidence has led to interest in alternatives such as the organic constituents (organic gunshot residue, OGSR) found in propellants. Previous work has shown OGSR to be detectable on hands for several hours after a firing event, and given the lipophilic nature of these compounds, it was expected that losses due to secondary transfer (an issue with GSR particulates) would be negligible. However, other loss mechanisms have been identified, specifically skin permeation and evaporation. This paper describes experimental and modeling studies used to elucidate characteristics of skin permeation of 5 compounds present in OGSR. Pharmaceutical methods were adapted to characterize skin permeation using a skin surrogate and Franz diffusion cells. The amount of compounds deposited on skin after an authentic firing event (1 and 2 shots) was experimentally determined and applied for the permeation experiments. A fully validated selected ion monitoring GC/MS method was developed for quantitative analysis, and easily accessible online tools were employed for modeling. Results showed that OGSR residues should be detectable on skin for many hours after a firing event of as few as one or two shots, with detection capability being a function of the efficacy of sampling and sample preparation and the instrumental method employed. The permeation rates of the OGSR compounds were sufficiently different to suggest the potential to develop methods to approximate time-since-deposition.

  8. A method to visualize transdermal nickel permeation in mouse skin using a nickel allergy patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoko; Uo, Motohiro; Wada, Takahiro; Hongo, Toshio; Omagari, Daisuke; Komiyama, Kazuo; Oikawa, Masakazu; Kusama, Mikio; Mori, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Metal patch test is often used in clinical settings when metal-induced contact dermatitis is suspected. However, the transdermal permeation behavior of metal ions from the patch test remains unclear. Current patch tests using high concentrations of metal salt solutions have some side effects, e.g. acute skin reactions to high concentrations of metal salt. To resolve these, estimating metal ion transdermal permeation is wished. In this study, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and micro-focused particle-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) were used to visualize the time-dependent Ni permeation in mouse skin. The cross-sectional diffusion of Ni was visualized in a time-dependent manner. Our results indicate that maximum Ni permeation occurs after 24 h of patch treatment, and the permeated Ni content was high in the epidermis and spread into the dermis beyond the basal layer. This method may be useful to determine the appropriate solution concentration and duration of administration for the patch test. PMID:26484550

  9. Alfuzosin hydrochloride transdermal films: evaluation of physicochemical, in vitro human cadaver skin permeation and thermodynamic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayan Pattnaik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of the investigation was to develop a transdermal therapeutic system for alfuzosin hydrochloride and to study the effects of polymeric system and loading dose on the in vitro skin permeation pattern. Materials and methods: Principles of experimental design have been exploited to develop the dosage form. Ratio of ethyl cellulose (EC and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and loading dose were selected as independent variables and their influence on the cumulative amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride permeated per cm2 of human cadaver skin at 24 h (Q24, permeation flux (J and steady state permeability coefficient (P SS were studied using experimental design. Various physicochemical parameters of the transdermal films were also evaluated. Activation energy for in vitro transdermal permeation has been estimated. Results: Ratio of EC and PVP was found to be the main influential factor for all the dependent variables studied. Drug loading dose was also found to influence the dependent variables but to a lesser extent. Physicochemical parameters of the prepared films were evaluated and found satisfactory. Activation energy for alfuzosin permeation has also been estimated and reported. Conclusion: The therapeutic system was found to be dermatologically non-irritant and hence, a therapeutically effective amount of alfuzosin hydrochloride can be delivered via a transdermal route.

  10. Comparative study of silver nanoparticle permeation using Side-Bi-Side and Franz diffusion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevich, Raul A. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research (United States); Fernandez, Avelina, E-mail: velifdez@ific.uv.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universitat de València, Parc Científic, Instituto de Física Corpuscular (Spain); Watanabe, Fumiya; Mustafa, Thikra [University Arkansas at Little Rock, Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences (United States); Bryant, Matthew S. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Better understanding the mechanisms of nanoparticle permeation through membranes and packaging polymers has important implications for the evaluation of drug transdermal uptake, in food safety and the environmental implications of nanotechnology. In this study, permeation of 21 nm diameter silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was tested using Side-Bi-Side and Franz static diffusion cells through hydrophilic 0.1 and 0.05 µm pore diameter 125 µm thick synthetic cellulose membranes, and 16 and 120 µm thick low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films. Experiments performed with LDPE films discarded permeation of AgNPs or Ag ions over the investigated time-frame in both diffusion systems. But controlled release of AgNPs has been quantified using semipermeable hydrophilic membranes. The permeation followed a quasi-linear time-dependent model during the experimental time-frame, which represents surface reaction-limited permeation. Diffusive flux, diffusion coefficients, and membrane permeability were determined as a function of pore size and diffusion model. Concentration gradient and pore size were key to understand mass transfer phenomena in the diffusion systems.Graphical Abstract.

  11. In vitro and in vivo permeation of vitamin E and vitamin E acetate from cosmetic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Aly; Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Zaghloul, Abdel-Azim; Khattab, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the ability of α-tocopherol acetate (TA) and α-tocopherol (T), widely used ingredients in cosmetics, to cross the epidermal barrier using the neonatal rat as a model. The content of T and TA in four marketed products (A-D) and two experimental formulations (F1, F2) was investigated by HPLC. An in vitro permeation study was performed in neonatal rat epidermis using diffusion cells. In vivo permeation was studied in neonatal rats after repeated application of the products and analysis of T and TA in the stratum corneum/deeper skin layers. Variable contents of TA were found in the marketed products (0.12-0.53%). No vitamin permeation was detected through the stratum corneum as in vitro biological barrier after 4 h. No detectable T and TA were seen in the in vivo permeation study in the epidermis. Variable degrees of drug penetration (4.3-12.6%) of the applied dose into the deeper skin layers were observed, depending on the formulation. In vivo application of TA-containing preparations did not result in any transformation of TA into T under the described experimental conditions. TA and T exhibited variable skin penetration and TA did not transform into T under the experimental conditions. The data underscored the need for further studies to optimize such formulations to improve vitamin E transdermal permeation and eventually achieve the expected cosmetic/therapeutic outcome. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate for subsequent fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, A; Brown, W A; Cameron, D; van Walsum, G P

    2004-06-01

    Fermentation of lactose in whey permeate directly into ethanol has had only limited commercial success, as the yields and alcohol tolerances of the organisms capable of directly fermenting lactose are low. This study proposes an alternative strategy: treat the permeate with acid to liberate monomeric sugars that are readily fermented into ethanol. We identified optimum hydrolysis conditions that yield mostly monomeric sugars and limit formation of fermentation inhibitors such as hydroxymethyl furfural by caramelization reactions. Both lactose solutions and commercial whey permeates were hydrolyzed using inorganic acids and carbonic acid. In all cases, more glucose was consumed by secondary reactions than galactose. Galactose was recovered in approximately stoichiometric proportions. Whey permeate has substantial buffering capacity-even at high partial pressures (>5500 kPa[g]), carbon dioxide had little effect on the pH in whey permeate solutions. The elevated temperatures required for hydrolysis with CO2-generated inhibitory compounds through caramelization reactions. For these reasons, carbon dioxide was not a feasible acidulant. With mineral acids reversion reactions dominated, resulting in a stable amount of glucose released. However, the Maillard browning reactions also appeared to be involved. By applying Hammet's acidity function, kinetic data from all experiments were described by a single line. With concentrated inorganic acids, low reaction temperatures allowed lactose hydrolysis with minimal by-product formation and generated a hexose-rich solution amenable to fermentation.

  13. Resistance of gloves and protective clothing materials to permeation of cytostatic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemińska, Sylwia; Pośniak, Małgorzata; Szewczyńska, Małgorzata

    2018-01-15

    The objective of the work was to determine the resistance of selected protective clothing and glove materials to permeation of cytostatics such as docetaxel, fluorouracil, and doxorubicin. The following glove materials were used: natural rubber latex (code A), acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (code B) and chloroprene rubber (code C). In addition, we tested a layered material composed of a non-woven polyester (PES), a polypropylene (PP) film, and a non-woven PP used for protective coats (code D). The cytostatics were analyzed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The tested samples were placed in a purpose-built permeation cell modified to be different from that specified in the standard EN 6529:2001. The tested materials were characterized by good resistance to solutions containing 2 out of the 3 selected cytostatics: doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil, as indicated by a breakthrough time of over 480 min. Equally high resistance to permeation of the third cytostatic (docetaxel) was exhibited by natural rubber latex, acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber, and chloroprene rubber. However, docetaxel permeated much more readily through the clothing layered material, compromising its barrier properties. It was found that the presence of additional components in cytostatic preparations accelerated permeation through material samples, thus deteriorating their barrier properties. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(3):341-350.

  14. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Purification Simulation With Vapor Permeation and Distillation-Adsorption In Bioethanol Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misri Gozan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High purity of Bioethanol is required in biofuel mixing with gasoline (EXX. In bioethanol production line, the azeotropic property of ethanol-water becomes the barrier for purification process. This study examined two bioethanol separation processes by support of simulation tools, Superpro Designer 9.0 software. Ethanol purity and a low costeconomical process were the major considerations. Purification method of vapor permeation membrane technology was compared with distillation-adsorption method. Data from previous lab experiments and some literatures were used. The results showed that distillation-adsorption method is more economical compared to vapor permeation technology. Payback period of the simulation is 3.9 years and 4.3 years to distillation adsorption and vapor permeation respectively with each IRR value is 20.23% and 17.89%. Initial investment value of vapor permeation is 9.6% higher than distillation method. Significant difference observed in operating costs, since more units involved in vapor permeation require more labors to operate.

  16. A simplified approach for estimating skin permeation parameters from in vitro finite dose absorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Historically, percutaneous absorption permeation parameters have been derived from in vitro infinite dose studies, yet there is uncertainty in their accuracy if the applied vehicle saturates or damages the stratum corneum, or when the permeation parameters are inappropriately derived from cumulative absorption data. An approach is provided for determining penetration parameters from in vitro finite dose data. Key variables, and equations for their derivation, are identified from the literature and provide permeation parameters that use only Tmax , AUC, and AUMC from finite dose data. The equations are tested with computer-generated model data and to actual study data. Derived permeation parameters obtained from the computer model data match those used in generating the simulated finite dose data. Parameters obtained from actual study data reasonably and acceptably model the penetration profile kinetics of the study data. From in vitro finite dose absorption data, three parameters can be obtained: the diffusion transit time (td ), which characterizes the diffusion coefficient, the partition volume (Vm P), which characterizes the partition coefficient, and the permeation coefficient (Kp ). These parameters can be obtained from finite dose data without having to know the length of the diffusion pathway through the membrane. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Shed king cobra and cobra skins as model membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Prakongpan, Sompol; Panomsuk, Suwannee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Priprem, Aroonsri

    2002-10-01

    Shed king cobra skin (SKCS) and shed cobra skin (SCS) were investigated for use as barrier membranes, including some pre-hydration factors, for in-vitro nicotine permeation. Inter-specimen variations in nicotine fluxes using shed snake skin were compared with those using human epidermis. Nicotine in the form of 1% w/v aqueous buffer solution at pH 5 and transdermal patches (dose 14 mg day(-1)) were used. The nicotine fluxes across the shed snake skin were not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by temperature and duration of hydration pre-treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of SKCS and SCS revealed a remarkable difference in surface morphology, but the nicotine fluxes using both shed skins were not significantly different (P > 0.05). When compared with the results obtained using human epidermis, there were similarities in fluxes and permeation profiles of nicotine. Using nicotine solution, the nicotine permeation profiles of all membranes followed zero order kinetics. The amount of nicotine permeated provided good linearity with the square root of time over 24 h (R(2) > 0.98) when using nicotine patches. The nicotine fluxes using SKCS and SCS had less inter-specimen variation than those using human epidermis. The results suggest a potential use for SKCS or SCS as barrier membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

  18. Design with Nonlinear Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Chengcheng

    2015-12-10

    Most modern industrial and architectural designs need to satisfy the requirements of their targeted performance and respect the limitations of available fabrication technologies. At the same time, they should reflect the artistic considerations and personal taste of the designers, which cannot be simply formulated as optimization goals with single best solutions. This thesis aims at a general, flexible yet e cient computational framework for interactive creation, exploration and discovery of serviceable, constructible, and stylish designs. By formulating nonlinear engineering considerations as linear or quadratic expressions by introducing auxiliary variables, the constrained space could be e ciently accessed by the proposed algorithm Guided Projection, with the guidance of aesthetic formulations. The approach is introduced through applications in different scenarios, its effectiveness is demonstrated by examples that were difficult or even impossible to be computationally designed before. The first application is the design of meshes under both geometric and static constraints, including self-supporting polyhedral meshes that are not height fields. Then, with a formulation bridging mesh based and spline based representations, the application is extended to developable surfaces including origami with curved creases. Finally, general approaches to extend hard constraints and soft energies are discussed, followed by a concluding remark outlooking possible future studies.

  19. Evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedall, Gareth D.; Hall, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human pathogen that causes amoebic dysentery and leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genome and evolution of the parasite will help explain how, when and why it causes disease. Here we review current knowledge about the evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba: how differences between the genomes of different species may help explain different phenotypes, and how variation among E. histolytica parasites reveals patterns of population structure. The imminent expansion of the amount genome data will greatly improve our knowledge of the genus and of pathogenic species within it. PMID:21288488

  20. Evolutionary allometry reveals a shift in selection pressure on male horn size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidière, M; Lemaître, J-F; Pélabon, C; Gimenez, O; Gaillard, J-M

    2017-10-01

    How selection pressures acting within species interact with developmental constraints to shape macro-evolutionary patterns of species divergence is still poorly understood. In particular, whether or not sexual selection affects evolutionary allometry, the increase in trait size with body size across species, of secondary sexual characters, remains largely unknown. In this context, bovid horn size is an especially relevant trait to study because horns are present in both sexes, but the intensity of sexual selection acting on them is expected to vary both among species and between sexes. Using a unique data set of sex-specific horn size and body mass including 91 species of bovids, we compared the evolutionary allometry between horn size and body mass between sexes while accounting for both the intensity of sexual selection and phylogenetic relationship among species. We found a nonlinear evolutionary allometry where the allometric slope decreased with increasing species body mass. This pattern, much more pronounced in males than in females, suggests either that horn size is limited by some constraints in the largest bovids or is no longer the direct target of sexual selection in very large species. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. An evolutionary medicine approach to understanding factors that contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Tsuji, Takao; Itoh, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have been published on the causes and mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the reason for the existence of COPD and the reasons why COPD develops in humans have hardly been studied. Evolutionary medical approaches are required to explain not only the proximate factors, such as the causes and mechanisms of a disease, but the ultimate (evolutionary) factors as well, such as why the disease is present and why the disease develops in humans. According to the concepts of evolutionary medicine, disease susceptibility is acquired as a result of natural selection during the evolutionary process of traits linked to the genes involved in disease susceptibility. In this paper, we discuss the following six reasons why COPD develops in humans based on current evolutionary medical theories: (1) evolutionary constraints; (2) mismatch between environmental changes and evolution; (3) co-evolution with pathogenic microorganisms; (4) life history trade-off; (5) defenses and their costs, and (6) reproductive success at the expense of health. Our perspective pursues evolutionary answers to the fundamental question, 'Why are humans susceptible to this common disease, COPD, despite their long evolutionary history?' We believe that the perspectives offered by evolutionary medicine are essential for researchers to better understand the significance of their work.

  2. Comparative genomics and evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashov, A S

    1999-12-01

    Data of large-scale DNA sequencing are relevant to some of the most fundamental issues in evolutionary biology: suboptimality, homology, hierarchy, ancestry, novelties, the role of natural selection, and the relative importance of directional versus stabilizing selection. Already, these data provided the best available evidence for some evolutionary phenomena, and in several cases led to refinement of old concepts. Still, the Darwinian evolutionary paradigm will successfully accommodate comparative genomics.

  3. The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic killifish populations have rapidly adapted to normally lethal levels of pollution in four urban estuaries. Through analysis of 384 whole killifish genome sequences and comparative transcriptomics in four pairs of sensitive and tolerant populations, we identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–based signaling pathway as a shared target of selection. This suggests evolutionary constraint on adaptive solutions to complex toxicant mixtures at each site. However, distinct molecular variants apparently contribute to adaptive pathway modification among tolerant populations. Selection also targets other toxicity-mediatinggenes and genes of connected signaling pathways; this indicates complex tolerance phenotypes and potentially compensatory adaptations. Molecular changes are consistent with selection on standing genetic variation. In killifish, high nucleotide diversityhas likely been a crucial substrate for selective sweeps to propel rapid adaptation. This manuscript describes genomic evaluations that contribute to our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary risks associated with chronic contaminant exposures to wildlife populations. Here, we assessed genetic patterns associated with long-term response to an important class of highly toxic environmental pollutants. Specifically, chemical-specific tolerance has rapidly and repeatedly evolved in an estuarine fish species resident to estuaries of the Atlantic U.S. coast. We used laboratory studies to ch

  4. Evolutionary status of Polaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2015-05-01

    Hydrodynamic models of short-period Cepheids were computed to determine the pulsation period as a function of evolutionary time during the first and third crossings of the instability strip. The equations of radiation hydrodynamics and turbulent convection for radial stellar pulsations were solved with the initial conditions obtained from the evolutionary models of Population I stars (X = 0.7, Z = 0.02) with masses from 5.2 to 6.5 M⊙ and the convective core overshooting parameter 0.1 ≤ αov ≤ 0.3. In Cepheids with period of 4 d the rate of pulsation period change during the first crossing of the instability strip is over 50 times larger than that during the third crossing. Polaris is shown to cross the instability strip for the first time and to be the fundamental mode pulsator. The best agreement between the predicted and observed rates of period change was obtained for the model with mass of 5.4 M⊙ and the overshooting parameter αov = 0.25. The bolometric luminosity and radius are L = 1.26 × 103 L⊙ and R = 37.5 R⊙, respectively. In the HR diagram, Polaris is located at the red edge of the instability strip.

  5. The influence of corneocyte structure on the interpretation of permeation profiles of nanoparticles across skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, T. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: murmur@itn.pt; Pallon, J. [Lund Institute of Technology, Physics Department, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)]. E-mail: Jan.Pallon@pixe.lth.se; Alves, L.C. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: lcalves@itn.pt; Verissimo, A. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: averissimo@vims.edu; Filipe, P. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: pfilipe@fm.ul.pt; Silva, J.N. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: maiasilva@fm.ul.pt; Silva, R. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: rpalminhas@netcabo.pt

    2007-07-15

    The permeability of skin to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) used in sunscreens as a reflector of the UV wavelengths of sunlight, was examined using nuclear microscopy techniques. Special attention was given to the permeation characteristics of these nanoparticles across the outer layers of skin, the stratum corneum, in healthy and psoriatic skin condition. Aspects that may influence the interpretation of results such as sample preparation difficulties and skin condition were focused. Sample preparation can damage the integrity of the corneocyte layers inducing unwanted artefacts that may bias the evaluation of results. Irradiation conditions may also introduce distortions in the labile structures of human skin. Skin condition, such as loss of corneocyte cohesion occurring in psoriasis also influence the permeation profile of the nanoparticles. Weighing and accounting for these features in the examination of skin by nuclear microscopy is crucial to accurately assess the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permeation depth.

  6. Fractional CO2 laser treatment to enhance skin permeation of tranexamic acid with minimal skin disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Sung, Hsin-Ching; Hu, Sindy; Huang, Chun-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Topical tranexamic acid has been used to treat melasma and as a skin whitener. The aim of this study was to compare the skin histology and permeation of tranexamic acid after fractional and conventional CO2 laser pretreatment. The effect of treatment with different strengths of fractional and conventional CO2 laser treatment was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Permeation of tranexamic acid through porcine skin was tested in vitro using a Franz diffusion chamber. Four passes of fractional laser treatment caused less skin damage than conventional laser treatment at the same fluency. Fractional laser treatment caused at least 85% of the cumulative tranexamic aid permeation at the same fluency, and as fluency increased, the number of passes needed to achieve this goal decreased. Fractional laser treatment is as effective as conventional laser treatment in enhancing tranexamic acid delivery and causes less skin damage.

  7. Characterization and utilization of the permeate and retentate obtained after “dead-end” ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Vesna M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, with the increase in bioethanol production, the increasing amounts of distillery wastewater are generated. Such wastewater (stillage is one of the most polluted waste product of the food and beverage industries. The present study evaluates the treatment of distillery wastewater by ultrafiltration (UF, in order to reduce its pollution and evaluate the composition of the permeate and retentate. Polyethersulfone ultrafiltration membrane with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO 30000 Da, was used for the experiments. The UF was carried out in dead-end mode. The results of the analyses of the permeate and retentate obtained after ultrafiltration were considered as well as different ways for their further utilization. The pollutant level in the permeate was decreased significantly in comparison to the raw stillage, and suspended solids were completely removed from the stillage. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31002

  8. The oxidation kinetics of Incoloy 800 and its deuterium permeation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perujo, A. E-mail: adolfo.perujo@jrc.it; Reimann, J.; Feuerstein, H.; Mancinelli, B

    2000-12-01

    Tritium permeation through the steam generator of the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket (HCPB) concept can be strongly reduced by natural oxides formed on the Incoloy 800 tubes. This paper presents the results of different experiments with various deuterium to humidity ratios (p{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O}/p{sub D{sub 2}} from 300 vppm to 30%). All experiments show that Incoloy 800 readily oxidizes and that permeation reduction factors (PRF) of at least 100 are easily obtained for typical blanket conditions. The measured PRF values are explained in terms of the type and thickness of the oxides on the Incoloy surface. The observed reduction in permeation is very favorable for the design of the HCPB blanket system in order to reduce the amount of hydrogen needed for isotope swamping and hence, reducing the size of the tritium extraction system.

  9. Dynamic dissolution-/permeation-testing of nano- and microparticle formulations of fenofibrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sironi, Daniel; Rosenberg, Jörg; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2017-01-01

    , a microparticle formulation (Lipidil® 200mg) and a nanoparticle formulation (LIPIDIL 145 ONE®) using a pair of side-by side diffusion cells separated by a cellulose hydrate membrane. Under such dynamic conditions, transient supersaturation arising from the nanoparticle formulation could be demonstrated......-/ or nanoparticle-formulation was tested. Nondissolved nano-/microparticles served as a reservoir helping to maintain high levels of molecularly dissolved drug, which in turn caused high and constant permeation rates. The micelle-bound drug may also serve as a drug-reservoir, yet of subordinate importance as long...... as there are nano-/microparticles present. Despite the limitations of the current experimental set-up, combined dissolution-/permeation-testing appears a valuable new tool to promote mechanistic understanding during formulation development. Last but not least, the in vitro dissolution and permeation behavior...

  10. Preparation and Skin Permeation Study of N, N- Diethyl- meta-Toluamide Semi Solid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Ghaffari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available N,N-Diethyl meta Toluamide (DEET is an insect repellent agent that contrary to its benefits, if is used in formulations with high skin permeation, will produce side effects of different severity. This study attempted to achieve a semi-solid DEET containing formulation with good appearance, sufficient spreadity, suitable viscosity for tube and jar filling, compatible pH with skin, reasonable stability, longer release time, and the less skin permeation. To obtain such a formulation, three types of DEET containing semi solids including gels (hydrophile, creams (emulsion and ointments (lipophile, and their characteristics were compared with each other and with Off! Brand. Results showed that one of the prepared creams with the proper viscosity, stability, appearance and spreadity, had the least drug release in six hours and less skin permeation of DEET as compared with Off!. Hence the preparation was introduced as the optimal formulation.

  11. Effect of spatial constraints on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Shin; Su, Yi-Cheng; Pan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Panmixia is a key issue in maintaining genetic diversity, which facilitates evolutionary potential during environmental changes. Additionally, conservation biologists suggest the importance of avoiding small or subdivided populations, which are prone to losing genetic diversity. In this paper, computer simulations were performed to the genetic drift of neutral alleles in random mating populations with or without spatial constraints by randomly choosing a mate among the closest neighbours. The results demonstrated that the number of generations required for the neutral allele to become homozygous (Th) varied proportionally to the population size and also strongly correlated with spatial constraints. The average Th for populations of the same size with spatial constraints was approximately one-and-a-half times longer than without constraints. With spatial constraints, homozygous population clusters formed, which reduced local diversity but preserved global diversity. Therefore, panmixia might be harmful in preserving the genetic diversity of an entire population. The results also suggested that the gene flow or gene exchange among the subdivided populations must be carefully processed to restrict diseases transmission or death during transportation and to monitor the genetic diversity. The application of this concept to similar systems, such as information transfer among peers, is also discussed.

  12. SKIN PERMEATION ENHANCEMENT EFFECTS OF ASCORBIC ACID AND TRIETHYL CITRATE ON ROFECOXIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAY K. DAS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The enhancing effect of ascorbic acid and triethyl citrate (TEC on the in vitro skin permeation of rofecoxib across rat epidermis was investigated. Skin pre-treatment with ascorbic acid and TEC at different concentrations, followed by application of rofecoxib gel, showed higher permeation flux than the control condition. The mechanism underlying this permeation enhancement was probed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The FTIR spectra of rat epidermis treated with ascorbic acid revealed that ascorbic acid at low concentration appears to interact with dermal keratin, whereas at higher concentration it appears to interact with both dermal proteins and lipids. The FTIR spectra of rat epidermis treated with TEC showed a decrease in peak heights for both asymmetric and symmetric C-H stretching absorbance, indicating a change in the fluidity of alkyl chains in the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum (SC. The protein disruption effect of TEC was probably due to the solvation of keratin by the formation of hydrogen bonds between TEC hydroxyl groups and keratin chain C=O groups. Skin pre-treatment with different concentrations of permeation enhancers did not show any significant change in lag time in comparison to control. The amount of rofecoxib retained in the skin after skin pre-treatment with enhancers was found to be higher than in the experiment without skin pre-treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM confirmed the maintenance of skin integrity throughout the permeation experiment. The observed permeation enhancing effects of ascorbic acid and TEC in the present study indicate that a rapid percutaneous absorption of rofecoxib at effective therapeutic levels may facilitate faster anti-inflammatory activity.

  13. Analysis of Nanoporosity in Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Alberto; García, Santiago J; Michels, Jasper J; Andringa, Anne-Marije; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-07-29

    Water permeation in inorganic moisture permeation barriers occurs through macroscale defects/pinholes and nanopores, the latter with size approaching the water kinetic diameter (0.27 nm). Both permeation paths can be identified by the calcium test, i.e., a time-consuming and expensive optical method for determining the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) through barrier layers. Recently, we have shown that ellipsometric porosimetry (i.e., a combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry and isothermal adsorption studies) is a valid method to classify and quantify the nanoporosity and correlate it with the WVTR values. Nevertheless, no information is obtained about the macroscale defects or the kinetics of water permeation through the barrier, both essential in assessing the quality of the barrier layer. In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is shown as a sensitive and versatile method to obtain information on nanoporosity and macroscale defects, water permeation, and diffusivity of moisture barrier layers, complementing the barrier property characterization obtained by means of EP and calcium test. EIS is performed on thin SiO2 barrier layers deposited by plasma enhanced-CVD. It allows the determination of the relative water uptake in the SiO2 layers, found to be in agreement with the nanoporosity content inferred by EP. Furthermore, the kinetics of water permeation is followed by EIS, and the diffusivity (D) is determined and found to be in accordance with literature values. Moreover, differently from EP, EIS data are shown to be sensitive to the presence of local macrodefects, correlated with the barrier failure during the calcium test.

  14. Re-evaluation of SiC permeation coefficients at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi, E-mail: yama3707@kansai-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Murakami, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Hirosato; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yonetsu, Daigo [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Noborio, Kazuyuki [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Univ. of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The deuterium permeation coefficients of CVD-SiC at 600–950 °C were evaluated. • The wraparound flow was reduced to less than 1/100th of the permeation flow. • CVD-SiC materials are very effective as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. - Abstract: Since 2007, our group has studied the deuterium permeation and diffusion coefficients for SiC materials at temperatures above 600 °C as a means of evaluating the tritium inventory and permeation in fusion blankets. During such measurements, control and evaluation of the wraparound flow through the sample holder are important, and so the heated sample holder is enclosed by a glass tube and kept under vacuum during experimental trials. However, detailed studies regarding the required degree of vacuum based on model calculations have shown that the wraparound flow is much larger than expected, and so can affect measurements at high temperatures. We therefore modified the measurement apparatus based on calculations involving reduced pressure in the glass tube, and are now confident that the measurement error is only several percent, even at 950 °C. In this paper, recent experimental results obtained with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC sample over the temperature range of 600–950 °C are presented, showing that the permeation coefficient for CVD-SiC is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that for stainless steel (SS316) at 600 °C, and that at 950 °C, the coefficient for CVD-SiC is almost equal to that for SUS316 at 550 °C.

  15. Microneedle-assisted permeation of lidocaine carboxymethylcellulose with gelatine co-polymer hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Atul; Das, Diganta B; Vladisavljević, Goran T

    2014-05-01

    Lidocaine hydrochloride (LidH) was formulated in sodium carboxymethyl cellulose/ gelatine (NaCMC/GEL) hydrogel and a 'poke and patch' microneedle delivery method was used to enhance permeation flux of LidH. The microparticles were formed by electrostatic interactions between NaCMC and GEL macromolecules within a water/oil emulsion in paraffin oil and the covalent crosslinking was by glutaraldehyde. The GEL to NaCMC mass ratio was varied between 1.6 and 2.7. The LidH encapsulation yield was 1.2 to 7% w/w. LidH NaCMC/GEL was assessed for encapsulation efficiency, zeta potential, mean particle size and morphology. Subsequent in vitro skin permeation studies were performed via passive diffusion and microneedle assisted permeation of LidH NaCMC/GEL to determine the maximum permeation rate through full thickness skin. LidH 2.4% w/w NaCMC/GEL 1:1.6 and 1:2.3 respectively, possessed optimum zeta potential. LidH 2.4% w/w NaCMC/GEL 1:2.3 and 1:2.7 demonstrate higher pseudoplastic behaviour. Encapsulation efficiency (14.9-17.2%) was similar for LidH 2.4% w/w NaCMC/GEL 1:1.6-1:2.3. Microneedle assisted permeation flux was optimum for LidH 2.4% w/w NaCMC/GEL 1:2.3 at 6.1 μg/ml/h. LidH 2.4% w/w LidH NaCMC/GEL 1:2.3 crossed the minimum therapeutic drug threshold with microneedle skin permeation in less than 70 min.

  16. Constraints and Ambiguity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dove, Graham; Biskjær, Michael Mose; Lundqvist, Caroline Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Developing creative abilities is an important part of 21st century skills, and yet remains challenging. In this paper we describe a study investigating small-scale creative strategies that groups of Scandinavian high school students use when collaboratively building LEGO models. We recorded thirty...... groups of students building three models each. We studied groups building with traditional plastic bricks and also using a digital environment. The building tasks students undertake, and our subsequent analysis, are informed by the role constraints and ambiguity play in creative processes. Based...... on the insights we gained, we present three strategies for designing tools and environments that support students as they develop creative skills. These strategies relate to: tools and materials, mutual learning, and reflection...

  17. Relative constraints and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    2014-03-01

    Several mathematical models of evolving systems assume that changes in the micro-states are constrained to the search of an optimal value in a local or global objective function. However, the concept of evolution requires a continuous change in the environment and species, making difficult the definition of absolute optimal values in objective functions. In this paper, we define constraints that are not absolute but relative to local micro-states, introducing a rupture in the invariance of the phase space of the system. This conceptual basis is useful to define alternative mathematical models for biological (or in general complex) evolving systems. We illustrate this concept with a modified Ising model, which can be useful to understand and model problems like the somatic evolution of cancer.

  18. Evolutionary explanations for natural language: criteria from evolutionary biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, W.; de Boer, B.

    2008-01-01

    Theories of the evolutionary origins of language must be informed by empirical and theoretical results from a variety of different fields. Complementing recent surveys of relevant work from linguistics, animal behaviour and genetics, this paper surveys the requirements on evolutionary scenarios that

  19. An Introduction to 'Creativity Constraints'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder; Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    Constraints play a vital role as both restrainers and enablers in innovation processes by governing what the creative agent/s can and cannot do, and what the output can and cannot be. Notions of constraints are common in creativity research, but current contributions are highly dispersed due to n...... and sub-concepts, including ‘late’, ‘self-imposed’, and ‘continua of creativity constraints’, to inform future cross-disciplinary work on creativity constraints....

  20. Solving Sudoku with Constraint Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Broderick; Castro, Carlos; Monfroy, Eric

    Constraint Programming (CP) is a powerful paradigm for modeling and solving Complex Combinatorial Problems (generally issued from Decision Making). In this work, we model the known Sudoku puzzle as a Constraint Satisfaction Problems and solve it with CP comparing the performance of different Variable and Value Selection Heuristics in its Enumeration phase. We encourage this kind of benchmark problem because it may suggest new techniques in constraint modeling and solving of complex systems, or aid the understanding of its main advantages and limits.

  1. Constraint-Based Categorial Grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, G; Bouma, Gosse; Noord, Gertjan van

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Categorial Grammar in which lexical categories are defined by means of recursive constraints. In particular, the introduction of relational constraints allows one to capture the effects of (recursive) lexical rules in a computationally attractive manner. We illustrate the linguistic merits of the new approach by showing how it accounts for the syntax of Dutch cross-serial dependencies and the position and scope of adjuncts in such constructions. Delayed evaluation is used to process grammars containing recursive constraints.

  2. Deuterium permeation behavior of HTUPS4 steel with thermal oxidation layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu-Ping [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); Liu, Feng; Zhao, Si-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); An, Zhong-Qing; Lu, Tao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Liu, Hao-Dong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); Ding, Fang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhou, Hai-Shan, E-mail: haishanzhou@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei, 230031 (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, 230027 (China)

    2016-12-15

    The permeation behavior of creep-resistant, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming HTUPS austenitic stainless steels was studied using a gas driven permeation (GDP) device. The steel samples were first thermal oxidized at air condition, followed by GDP experiments. The permeability and diffusion coefficients of oxidized samples and bare 316L steels were derived and compared. In order to characterize the oxide layer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed. An oxide layer with a thickness of 200 nm which mainly consists of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected.

  3. Rapid MR imaging of cryoprotectant permeation in an engineered dermal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidault, N P; Hammer, B E; Hubel, A

    2000-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a powerful technique for monitoring the permeation of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) inside tissues. However, the techniques published until now suffer from inherently long imaging times, limiting the application of these techniques to slow diffusion processes and large CPA concentrations. In this study, we present a rapid MR imaging technique based on a CHESS-FLASH scheme combined with Keyhole image acquisition. This technique can image the fast permeation of Me(2)SO solutions into freeze-dried artificial dermal replacements for concentrations down to 10% v/v. Special attention is given to evaluating the technique for quantitative analysis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Teacher Practice and Pedagogical Competence Building in a Digitally Permeated Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    a qualitative research and development study conducted as an action research-based case study. The study aimed to explore the impact on teachers’ practice in a digitally permeated learning environment and to identify areas for their competence building. The research questions were as follows: 1) What options......’ awareness of and attitude toward the learners’ strategies and their way of inquiring into the students’ work and reasoning were more important teacher competences than digital skills when facilitating the students’ learning in a digitally permeated learning environment. Based on the findings, the paper...... presents areas for further teacher competence building....

  5. Microneedle-Assisted Skin Permeation by Nontoxic Bioengineerable Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andar, Abhay U; Karan, Ram; Pecher, Wolf T; DasSarma, Priya; Hedrich, William D; Stinchcomb, Audra L; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2017-03-06

    Gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) are hollow, buoyant protein organelles produced by the extremophilic microbe Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and are being developed as bioengineerable and biocompatible antigen and drug-delivery systems (DDS). Dynamic light scattering measurements of purified GVNP suspensions showed a mean diameter of 245 nm. In vitro diffusion studies using Yucatan miniature pig skin showed GVNP permeation to be enhanced after MN-treatment compared to untreated skin. GVNPs were found to be nontoxic to mammalian cells (human kidney and rat mycocardial myoblasts). These findings support the use of GVNPs as DDS for intradermal/transdermal permeation of protein- and peptide-based drugs.

  6. Five fundamental constraints on theories of the origins of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Bjorn; Morley, Iain; Zuidema, Willem

    2015-03-19

    The diverse forms and functions of human music place obstacles in the way of an evolutionary reconstruction of its origins. In the absence of any obvious homologues of human music among our closest primate relatives, theorizing about its origins, in order to make progress, needs constraints from the nature of music, the capacities it engages, and the contexts in which it occurs. Here we propose and examine five fundamental constraints that bear on theories of how music and some of its features may have originated. First, cultural transmission, bringing the formal powers of cultural as contrasted with Darwinian evolution to bear on its contents. Second, generativity, i.e. the fact that music generates infinite pattern diversity by finite means. Third, vocal production learning, without which there can be no human singing. Fourth, entrainment with perfect synchrony, without which there is neither rhythmic ensemble music nor rhythmic dancing to music. And fifth, the universal propensity of humans to gather occasionally to sing and dance together in a group, which suggests a motivational basis endemic to our biology. We end by considering the evolutionary context within which these constraints had to be met in the genesis of human musicality. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Five fundamental constraints on theories of the origins of music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Bjorn; Morley, Iain; Zuidema, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The diverse forms and functions of human music place obstacles in the way of an evolutionary reconstruction of its origins. In the absence of any obvious homologues of human music among our closest primate relatives, theorizing about its origins, in order to make progress, needs constraints from the nature of music, the capacities it engages, and the contexts in which it occurs. Here we propose and examine five fundamental constraints that bear on theories of how music and some of its features may have originated. First, cultural transmission, bringing the formal powers of cultural as contrasted with Darwinian evolution to bear on its contents. Second, generativity, i.e. the fact that music generates infinite pattern diversity by finite means. Third, vocal production learning, without which there can be no human singing. Fourth, entrainment with perfect synchrony, without which there is neither rhythmic ensemble music nor rhythmic dancing to music. And fifth, the universal propensity of humans to gather occasionally to sing and dance together in a group, which suggests a motivational basis endemic to our biology. We end by considering the evolutionary context within which these constraints had to be met in the genesis of human musicality. PMID:25646518

  8. Minimal Flavor Constraints for Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hidenori; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self-coupling and mas......We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self...

  9. Deepening Contractions and Collateral Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    and occasionally non-binding credit constraints. Easier credit access increases the likelihood that constraints become slack in the face of expansionary shocks, while contractionary shocks are further amplified due to tighter constraints. As a result, busts gradually become deeper than booms. Based...... on the differential impact that occasionally non-binding constraints exert on the shape of expansions and contractions, we are also able to reconcile a more negatively skewed business cycle with a moderation in its volatility. Finally, our model can account for an intrinsic feature of economic downturns preceded...

  10. A PERFORMANCE CONSTRAINT ON THE EVOLUTION OF TRILLED VOCALIZATIONS IN A SONGBIRD FAMILY (PASSERIFORMES: EMBERIZIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podos, Jeffrey

    1997-04-01

    Behavioral evolution can be influenced by constraints, for example, of phylogeny and performance. In this paper I describe a pattern in the evolution of birdsongs that may reflect a constraint on vocal performance. Trilled vocalizations from 34 species of songbirds (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) were analyzed. Two acoustic variables, trill rate and frequency bandwidth, were measured for different trill types. In most species, maximal values of frequency bandwidth were found to decrease with increasing trill rates. Further, trills with low trill rates exhibited wide variance in frequency bandwidth, and trills with high trill rates exhibited only narrow frequency bandwidths. The bounded nature of this pattern suggests that performance constraints have limited the evolutionary diversification of trills. In particular, I explore the role of constraints associated with vocal tract modulations during song production and evolution. Identification of this constraint may enhance our ability to explain particular patterns of trill evolution. © 1997 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Modifier constraint in alkali borophosphate glasses using topological constraint theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zeng, Huidan, E-mail: hdzeng@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Jiang, Qi [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Donghui [Unifrax Corporation, Niagara Falls, NY 14305 (United States); Chen, Guorong [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi [Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Polymer Program, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Chen, Jianding [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, composition-dependent properties of glasses have been successfully predicted using the topological constraint theory. The constraints of the glass network are derived from two main parts: network formers and network modifiers. The constraints of the network formers can be calculated on the basis of the topological structure of the glass. However, the latter cannot be accurately calculated in this way, because of the existing of ionic bonds. In this paper, the constraints of the modifier ions in phosphate glasses were thoroughly investigated using the topological constraint theory. The results show that the constraints of the modifier ions are gradually increased with the addition of alkali oxides. Furthermore, an improved topological constraint theory for borophosphate glasses is proposed by taking the composition-dependent constraints of the network modifiers into consideration. The proposed theory is subsequently evaluated by analyzing the composition dependence of the glass transition temperature in alkali borophosphate glasses. This method is supposed to be extended to other similar glass systems containing alkali ions.

  12. Anxiety: an evolutionary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Melissa; Brilot, Ben; Nettle, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses, with huge attendant suffering. Current treatments are not universally effective, suggesting that a deeper understanding of the causes of anxiety is needed. To understand anxiety disorders better, it is first necessary to understand the normal anxiety response. This entails considering its evolutionary function as well as the mechanisms underlying it. We argue that the function of the human anxiety response, and homologues in other species, is to prepare the individual to detect and deal with threats. We use a signal detection framework to show that the threshold for expressing the anxiety response ought to vary with the probability of threats occurring, and the individual's vulnerability to them if they do occur. These predictions are consistent with major patterns in the epidemiology of anxiety. Implications for research and treatment are discussed.

  13. Towards Adaptive Evolutionary Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Sebastian HOlt; Rask, Nina; Risi, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents first results from an interdisciplinary project, in which the fields of architecture, philosophy and artificial life are combined to explore possible futures of architecture. Through an interactive evolutionary installation, called EvoCurtain, we investigate aspects of how...... living in the future could occur, if built spaces could evolve and adapt alongside inhabitants. As such, present study explores the interdisciplinary possibilities in utilizing computational power to co-create with users and generate designs based on human input. We argue that this could lead...... to the development of designs tailored to the individual preferences of inhabitants, changing the roles of architects and designers entirely. Architecture-as-it-could-be is a philosophical approach conducted through artistic methods to anticipate the technological futures of human-centered development within...

  14. Topics of Evolutionary Computation 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursem, Rasmus Kjær

    This booklet contains the student reports from the course: Topics of Evolutionary Computation, Fall 2001, given by Thiemo Krink, Rene Thomsen and Rasmus K. Ursem......This booklet contains the student reports from the course: Topics of Evolutionary Computation, Fall 2001, given by Thiemo Krink, Rene Thomsen and Rasmus K. Ursem...

  15. Open Issues in Evolutionary Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernando; Duarte, Miguel; Correia, Luís; Oliveira, Sancho Moura; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-term goals in evolutionary robotics is to be able to automatically synthesize controllers for real autonomous robots based only on a task specification. While a number of studies have shown the applicability of evolutionary robotics techniques for the synthesis of behavioral control, researchers have consistently been faced with a number of issues preventing the widespread adoption of evolutionary robotics for engineering purposes. In this article, we review and discuss the open issues in evolutionary robotics. First, we analyze the benefits and challenges of simulation-based evolution and subsequent deployment of controllers versus evolution on real robotic hardware. Second, we discuss specific evolutionary computation issues that have plagued evolutionary robotics: (1) the bootstrap problem, (2) deception, and (3) the role of genomic encoding and genotype-phenotype mapping in the evolution of controllers for complex tasks. Finally, we address the absence of standard research practices in the field. We also discuss promising avenues of research. Our underlying motivation is the reduction of the current gap between evolutionary robotics and mainstream robotics, and the establishment of evolutionary robotics as a canonical approach for the engineering of autonomous robots.

  16. Conceptual foundations of evolutionary thought

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. P. MOHANAN

    2017-07-04

    Jul 4, 2017 ... This article seeks to explore the conceptual foundations of evolutionary thought in the physical, biological, and human sciences. Viewing evolution as symmetry breaking, it explores the concepts of change, history, and evolutionary history, and outlines a concept of biological macroevolution.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.; Antal, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary dynamics shape the living world around us. At the centre of every evolutionary process is a population of reproducing individuals. The structure of that population affects evolutionary dynamics. The individuals can be molecules, cells, viruses, multicellular organisms or humans. Whenever the fitness of individuals depends on the relative abundance of phenotypes in the population, we are in the realm of evolutionary game theory. Evolutionary game theory is a general approach that can describe the competition of species in an ecosystem, the interaction between hosts and parasites, between viruses and cells, and also the spread of ideas and behaviours in the human population. In this perspective, we review the recent advances in evolutionary game dynamics with a particular emphasis on stochastic approaches in finite sized and structured populations. We give simple, fundamental laws that determine how natural selection chooses between competing strategies. We study the well-mixed population, evolutionary graph theory, games in phenotype space and evolutionary set theory. We apply these results to the evolution of cooperation. The mechanism that leads to the evolution of cooperation in these settings could be called ‘spatial selection’: cooperators prevail against defectors by clustering in physical or other spaces. PMID:20008382

  18. Child Development and Evolutionary Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, David F.; Pellegrini, Anthony D.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that an evolutionary account provides insight into developmental function and individual differences. Outlines some assumptions of evolutionary psychology related to development. Introduces the developmental systems approach, differential influence of natural selection at different points in ontogeny, and development of evolved…

  19. An evolutionary strategy for fed-batch bioreactor optimization : concepts and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos, J.A.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    1999-01-01

    An evolutionary program, based on a real-code genetic algorithm (GA), is applied to calculate optimal control policies for bioreactors. The GA is used as a nonlinear optimizer in combination with simulation software and constraint handling procedures. A new class of GA-operators is introduced to

  20. Rapid Preliminary Design of Interplanetary Trajectories Using the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    This set of tutorial slides is an introduction to the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's autonomous tool for preliminary design of interplanetary missions. This slide set covers the basics of creating and post-processing simple interplanetary missions in EMTG using both high-thrust chemical and low-thrust electric propulsion along with a variety of operational constraints.

  1. Evolutionary Explanations of Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kardum

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews several most important evolutionary mechanisms that underlie eating disorders. The first part clarifies evolutionary foundations of mental disorders and various mechanisms leading to their development. In the second part selective pressures and evolved adaptations causing contemporary epidemic of obesity as well as differences in dietary regimes and life-style between modern humans and their ancestors are described. Concerning eating disorders, a number of current evolutionary explanations of anorexia nervosa are presented together with their main weaknesses. Evolutionary explanations of eating disorders based on the reproductive suppression hypothesis and its variants derived from kin selection theory and the model of parental manipulation were elaborated. The sexual competition hypothesis of eating disorder, adapted to flee famine hypothesis as well as explanation based on the concept of social attention holding power and the need to belonging were also explained. The importance of evolutionary theory in modern conceptualization and research of eating disorders is emphasized.

  2. Ecological and Temporal Constraints in the Evolution of Bacterial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Martínez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the experimental evolution of microorganisms, on their in vivo evolution (mainly in the case of bacteria producing chronic infections, as well as the availability of multiple full genomic sequences, are placing bacteria in the playground of evolutionary studies. In the present article we review the differential contribution to the evolution of bacterial genomes that processes such as gene modification, gene acquisition and gene loss may have when bacteria colonize different habitats that present characteristic ecological features. In particular, we review how the different processes contribute to evolution in microbial communities, in free-living bacteria or in bacteria living in isolation. In addition, we discuss the temporal constraints in the evolution of bacterial genomes, considering bacterial evolution from the perspective of processes of short-sighted evolution and punctual acquisition of evolutionary novelties followed by long stasis periods.

  3. Oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3 limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; van Hassel, B.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3-δ (y = 0.1, 0.2) in a large oxygen partial pressure gradient (air/CO, CO2 mixture) was found to be limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate at the low oxygen partial pressure side of the membrane. The oxygen permeation flux through the membrane

  4. Constraint Programming for Context Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    A close similarity is demonstrated between context comprehension, such as discourse analysis, and constraint programming. The constraint store takes the role of a growing knowledge base learned throughout the discourse, and a suitable con- straint solver does the job of incorporating new pieces...

  5. Constraints in vector meson photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F

    2000-01-31

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  6. Constraints in Vector Meson Photoproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F.

    2000-01-01

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  7. Thermodynamic Constraints Improve Metabolic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Elias W; Libourel, Igor G L

    2017-08-08

    In pursuit of establishing a realistic metabolic phenotypic space, the reversibility of reactions is thermodynamically constrained in modern metabolic networks. The reversibility constraints follow from heuristic thermodynamic poise approximations that take anticipated cellular metabolite concentration ranges into account. Because constraints reduce the feasible space, draft metabolic network reconstructions may need more extensive reconciliation, and a larger number of genes may become essential. Notwithstanding ubiquitous application, the effect of reversibility constraints on the predictive capabilities of metabolic networks has not been investigated in detail. Instead, work has focused on the implementation and validation of the thermodynamic poise calculation itself. With the advance of fast linear programming-based network reconciliation, the effects of reversibility constraints on network reconciliation and gene essentiality predictions have become feasible and are the subject of this study. Networks with thermodynamically informed reversibility constraints outperformed gene essentiality predictions compared to networks that were constrained with randomly shuffled constraints. Unconstrained networks predicted gene essentiality as accurately as thermodynamically constrained networks, but predicted substantially fewer essential genes. Networks that were reconciled with sequence similarity data and strongly enforced reversibility constraints outperformed all other networks. We conclude that metabolic network analysis confirmed the validity of the thermodynamic constraints, and that thermodynamic poise information is actionable during network reconciliation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  9. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  10. Weighted Constraints in Fuzzy Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Kaymak (Uzay); J.M. Sousa

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMany practical optimization problems are characterized by some flexibility in the problem constraints, where this flexibility can be exploited for additional trade-off between improving the objective function and satisfying the constraints. Especially in decision making, this type of

  11. Market segmentation using perceived constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhee Jun; Gerard Kyle; Andrew Mowen

    2008-01-01

    We examined the practical utility of segmenting potential visitors to Cleveland Metroparks using their constraint profiles. Our analysis identified three segments based on their scores on the dimensions of constraints: Other priorities--visitors who scored the highest on 'other priorities' dimension; Highly Constrained--visitors who scored relatively high on...

  12. Integrity Constraints in Trust Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etalle, Sandro; Winsborough, William H.

    We introduce the use, monitoring, and enforcement of integrity constraints in trust managementstyle authorization systems. We consider what portions of the policy state must be monitored to detect violations of integrity constraints. Then we address the fact that not all participants in a trust

  13. Ionic conductivity of perovskite LaCoO3 measured by oxygen permeation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.H.; Kruidhof, H.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen permeation measurement is demonstrated, not only for a mixed oxide ionic and electronic conductor, but also as a new alternative to determine ambipolar conductivities, which can be usually reduced to be partial conductivities (either ionic or electronic). As a model system and an end member

  14. A new approach for bio-oil characterization based on gel permeation chromatography preparative fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellvi Barnes, M.; Lange, Jean Paul; van Rossum, G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Analyzes of bio-oils obtained by direct liquefaction are obstructed by the interferences of the liquefaction solvent. We therefore developed a new analytical approach based on a preparative gel permeation chromatography (GPC) fractionation to remove the solvent from the bio-oil and, if convenient,

  15. Intestinal surfactant permeation enhancers and their interaction with enterocyte cell membranes in a mucosal explant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) are agents aimed to improve oral delivery of therapeutic drugs with poor bioavailability. The main permeability barrier for oral delivery is the intestinal epithelium, and PEs act to increase the paracellular and/or transcellular passage of drugs. Transcellular...

  16. A novel microdialysis-dissolution/permeation system for testing oral dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Poulsen, Jessie; Brandl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    compartment (representing the blood). The kinetics of both the dissolution process and the permeation process were simultaneously quantified under circumstances that mimic physiological conditions. For the current proof-of-concept study, hydrocortisone (HCS) in the form of slowly dissolving solvate crystals...... and as an ultimate goal, for betterdosage forms assessment....

  17. Investigating the influence of diffusional coupling on mixture permeation across porous membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A careful analysis of published experimental data on permeation of a variety of binary mixtures reveals that there are fundamentally two types of diffusional coupling effects that need to be recognized. The first type of coupling occurs when the less-mobile species slows down its more mobile partner

  18. Effect of Bile Salt on Permeation Characteristics of the Oral Mucosal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to study the effect of bile salt [sodium glycocholate (SG)] as a permeation enhancer on mucoadhesive buccal patches of diltiazem hydrochloride (anti-anginal drug) using various polymers like hydroxypropyl methyl cellulosee (HPMC), Eudragit RL100, ethyl cellulose alone and in combination with PVP.

  19. Permeation of atmospheric gases through polymer O-rings used in flasks for air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, P.; Leuenberger, M.; Sirignano, C.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Langenfelds, R.; Brand, W. A.; Tohjima, Y.

    2004-02-01

    Permeation of various gases through elastomeric O-ring seals can have important effects on the integrity of atmospheric air samples collected in flasks and measured some time later. Depending on the materials and geometry of flasks and valves and on partial pressure differences between sample and surrounding air, the concentrations of different components of air can be significantly altered during storage. The influence of permeation is discussed for O2/N2, Ar/N2, CO2, δ13C in CO2, and water vapor. Results of sample storage tests for various flask and valve types and different storage conditions are presented and are compared with theoretical calculations. Effects of permeation can be reduced by maintaining short storage times and small partial pressure differences and by using a new valve design that buffers exchange of gases with surrounding air or by using less permeable materials (such as Kel-F) as sealing material. General awareness of possible permeation effects helps to achieve more reliable measurements of atmospheric composition with flask sampling techniques.

  20. single gas permeation of thin zeolite (MFI) membranes: theory and analysis of experimental observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical expressions for single gas permeation are analysed and evaluated with selected literature and some new experimental data on Silicalite/ZSM-5 membranes. The phenomenological sorption–diffusion (PSD) description (and its equivalent Maxwell–Stefan equation) covers both the microscopic

  1. 40 CFR 1060.520 - How do I test fuel tanks for permeation emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test fuel tanks for... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Test Procedures § 1060.520 How do I test fuel tanks for permeation emissions? Measure... +15° to −15° from level. (4) Cap testing. Perform durability cycles on fuel caps intended for use with...

  2. Permeation of atmospheric gases through polymer O-rings used in flasks for air sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, P.; Leuenberger, M.; Sirignano, C.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Langenfelds, R.; Brand, W.A.; Tohjiama, Y.

    2004-01-01

    [1] Permeation of various gases through elastomeric O-ring seals can have important effects on the integrity of atmospheric air samples collected in flasks and measured some time later. Depending on the materials and geometry of flasks and valves and on partial pressure differences between sample

  3. Efficient ethanol recovery from fermentation broths with integrated distillation-vapor permeation hybrid process

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-molecular sieve systems for ethanol recovery/dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions. An alternative hybrid process integrating vapor stripping (like a beer still) with vapor compression and a vapor permeation membrane s...

  4. Evaluation of skin permeation and analgesic activity effects of carbopol lornoxicam topical gels containing penetration enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Taha, Ehab I; Al-Qahtani, Fahad M; Ahmed, Mahrous O; Badran, Mohamed M

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to develop a topical gel formulation for improved skin penetration of lornoxicam (LOR) for enhancement of its analgesic activity. Moreover, the effect of different penetration enhancers on LOR was studied. The LOR gel formulations were prepared by using hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and carbopol. The carbopol gels in presence of propylene glycol (PG) and ethanol were developed. The formulated gels were characterized for pH, viscosity, and LOR release using Franz diffusion cells. Also, in vitro skin permeation of LOR was conducted. The effect of hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP β-CD), beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD), Tween 80, and oleic acid on LOR permeation was evaluated. The optimized LOR gel formulation (LORF8) showed the highest flux (14.31 μg/cm(2)/h) with ER of 18.34 when compared to LORF3. Incorporation of PG and HP β-CD in gel formulation (LORF8) enhanced the permeation of LOR significantly. It was observed that LORF3 and LORF8 show similar analgesic activity compared to marketed LOR injection (Xefo). This work shows that LOR can be formulated into carbopol gel in presence of PG and HP β-CD and may be promising in enhancing permeation.

  5. Evaluation of Skin Permeation and Analgesic Activity Effects of Carbopol Lornoxicam Topical Gels Containing Penetration Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Al-Suwayeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to develop a topical gel formulation for improved skin penetration of lornoxicam (LOR for enhancement of its analgesic activity. Moreover, the effect of different penetration enhancers on LOR was studied. The LOR gel formulations were prepared by using hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose (HPMC and carbopol. The carbopol gels in presence of propylene glycol (PG and ethanol were developed. The formulated gels were characterized for pH, viscosity, and LOR release using Franz diffusion cells. Also, in vitro skin permeation of LOR was conducted. The effect of hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP β-CD, beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD, Tween 80, and oleic acid on LOR permeation was evaluated. The optimized LOR gel formulation (LORF8 showed the highest flux (14.31 μg/cm2/h with ER of 18.34 when compared to LORF3. Incorporation of PG and HP β-CD in gel formulation (LORF8 enhanced the permeation of LOR significantly. It was observed that LORF3 and LORF8 show similar analgesic activity compared to marketed LOR injection (Xefo. This work shows that LOR can be formulated into carbopol gel in presence of PG and HP β-CD and may be promising in enhancing permeation.

  6. The use of permeation liquid membranes for free zinc measurements in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramlich, A.; Tandy, S.; Slaveykova, V.; Duffner, A.; Schulin, R.

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of Zn in environmental water phases strongly depends on its speciation. One important species in studies on Zn deficiency or toxicity to organisms is the free ion. The Permeation Liquid Membrane (PLM) technique is a tool to measure free metal concentrations with a short analysis

  7. Novel organogels for topical delivery of naproxen: design, physicochemical characteristics and in vitro drug permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmałek, Tomasz; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Froelich, Anna; Górska, Sylwia; Białas, Wojciech; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Kapela, Marcin

    2017-06-01

    Taking into account possible irritation of the skin upon contact with naproxen (NPX) crystals and lower bioavailability after administration of the suspended or ionized drug, the aim of the work was to design and characterize novel and easy-to-formulate gels with the entirely dissolved drug in the acidic form. The formulations contained ethanol, SynperonicTMPE/L 62 and Arlasolve® DMI or Transcutol®. Carbopol®940 was used as the thickener. The properties of organogels were compared with six market products. The rheological measurements included steady flow experiments and oscillatory analysis. The texture profile analysis was conducted to calculate the mechanistic parameters. The in vitro permeation studies were performed on SOTAX CE 7 smart apparatus with the application of Strat-M artificial membranes. The obtained organogels fulfilled the requirements for topical products in terms of consistency, uniformity, stability, drug dissolution and permeation. The permeation studies revealed distinct differences among the commercial hydrogels according to permeation coefficients (kP), drug flux (Jss) and average cumulative amount of NPX per area after 12 h (Q12h). The presented work clearly shows that the organogels can be proposed as an alternative for commercial products where NPX occurs in the form of crystals.

  8. Gas-permeation properties of poly(ethylene oxide) poly(butylene terephthalate block copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the gas-permeation properties of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) segmented multiblock copolymers. These block copolymers allow a precise structural modification by the amount of PBT and the PEO segment length, enabling a systematic study of the

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of How Mercury Inhibits Water Permeation through Aquaporin-1: Understanding by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshinori; Okimoto, Noriaki; Kadohira, Ikuko; Suematsu, Makoto; Yasuoka, Kenji; Yasui, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aquaporin (AQP) functions as a water-conducting pore. Mercury inhibits the water permeation through AQP. Although site-directed mutagenesis has shown that mercury binds to Cys189 during the inhibition process, it is not fully understood how this inhibits the water permeation through AQP1. We carried out 40 ns molecular dynamics simulations of bovine AQP1 tetramer with mercury (Hg-AQP1) or without mercury (Free AQP1). In Hg-AQP1, Cys191 (Cys189 in human AQP1) is converted to Cys-SHg+ in each monomer. During each last 10 ns, we observed water permeation events occurred 23 times in Free AQP1 and never in Hg-AQP1. Mercury binding did not influence the whole structure, but did induce a collapse in the orientation of several residues at the ar/R region. In Free AQP1, backbone oxygen atoms of Gly190, Cys191, and Gly192 lined, and were oriented to, the surface of the water pore channel. In Hg-AQP1, however, the SHg+ of Cys191-SHg+ was oriented toward the outside of the water pore. As a result, the backbone oxygen atoms of Gly190, Cys191, and Gly192 became disorganized and the ar/R region collapsed, thereby obstructing the permeation of water. We suggest that mercury disrupts the water pore of AQP1 through local conformational changes in the ar/R region. PMID:20409470

  10. Design criteria for extraction with chemical reaction and liquid membrane permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, H. J.; Bauer, A.; Lorbach, D.; Marr, R.

    1988-01-01

    The design criteria for heterogeneous chemical reactions in liquid/liquid systems formally correspond to those of classical physical extraction. More complex models are presented which describe the material exchange at the individual droplets in an extraction with chemical reaction and in liquid membrane permeation.

  11. How do polymerized room-temperature ionic liquid membranes plasticize during high pressure CO2 permeation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons-Fischbein, K.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.; Bara, J.B.; Noble, R.D.; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are a class of organic solvents that have been explored as novel media for CO2 separations. Polymerized RTILs (poly(RTILs)) can be synthesized from RTIL monomers to form dense, solid gas selective membranes. It is of interest to understand the permeation

  12. Conservation constraints on random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Wen Jong; Hsieh, J

    2003-01-01

    We study the random matrices constrained by the summation rules that are present in the Hessian of the potential energy surface in the instantaneous normal mode calculations, as a result of momentum conservation. In this paper, we analyse the properties related to such conservation constraints in two classes of real symmetric matrices: one with purely row-wise summation rules and the other with the constraints on the blocks of each matrix, which underscores partially the spatial dimension. We show explicitly that the constraints are removable by separating the degrees of freedom of the zero-eigenvalue modes. The non-spectral degrees of freedom under the constraints can be realized in terms of the ordinary constraint-free orthogonal symmetry but with the rank deducted by the block dimension. We propose that the ensemble of real symmetric matrices with full randomness, constrained by the summation rules, is equivalent to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) with lowered rank. Independent of the joint probabil...

  13. Efficient Searching with Linear Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan; Erickson, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    We show how to preprocess a set S of points in d into an external memory data structure that efficiently supports linear-constraint queries. Each query is in the form of a linear constraint xd a0+∑d−1i=1 aixi; the data structure must report all the points of S that satisfy the constraint...... space and answers linear-constraint queries using an optimal number of I/Os in the worst case. For d=3, we present a near-linear-size data structure that answers queries using an optimal number of I/Os on the average. We present linear-size data structures that can answer d-dimensional linear-constraint...

  14. Evolutionary rate patterns of the Gibberellin pathway genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fu-min

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of molecular evolutionary patterns of different genes within metabolic pathways allows us to determine whether these genes are subject to equivalent evolutionary forces and how natural selection shapes the evolution of proteins in an interacting system. Although previous studies found that upstream genes in the pathway evolved more slowly than downstream genes, the correlation between evolutionary rate and position of the genes in metabolic pathways as well as its implications in molecular evolution are still less understood. Results We sequenced and characterized 7 core structural genes of the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway from 8 representative species of the rice tribe (Oryzeae to address alternative hypotheses regarding evolutionary rates and patterns of metabolic pathway genes. We have detected significant rate heterogeneity among 7 GA pathway genes for both synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. Such rate variation is mostly likely attributed to differences of selection intensity rather than differential mutation pressures on the genes. Unlike previous argument that downstream genes in metabolic pathways would evolve more slowly than upstream genes, the downstream genes in the GA pathway did not exhibited the elevated substitution rate and instead, the genes that encode either the enzyme at the branch point (GA20ox or enzymes catalyzing multiple steps (KO, KAO and GA3ox in the pathway had the lowest evolutionary rates due to strong purifying selection. Our branch and codon models failed to detect signature of positive selection for any lineage and codon of the GA pathway genes. Conclusion This study suggests that significant heterogeneity of evolutionary rate of the GA pathway genes is mainly ascribed to differential constraint relaxation rather than the positive selection and supports the pathway flux theory that predicts that natural selection primarily targets enzymes that have the greatest control on fluxes.

  15. Surface oxygen vacancy and oxygen permeation flux limits of perovskite ion transport membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Anton

    2015-09-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The mechanisms and quantitative models for how oxygen is separated from air using ion transport membranes (ITMs) are not well understood, largely due to the experimental complexity for determining surface exchange reactions at extreme temperatures (>800°C). This is especially true when fuels are present at the permeate surface. For both inert and reactive (fuels) operations, solid-state oxygen surface vacancies (δ) are ultimately responsible for driving the oxygen flux, JO2. In the inert case, the value of δ at either surface is a function of the local PO2 and temperature, whilst the magnitude of δ dictates both the JO2 and the inherent stability of the material. In this study values of δ are presented based on experimental measurements under inert (CO2) sweep: using a permeation flux model and local PO2 measurements, collected by means of a local gas-sampling probe in our large-scale reactor, we can determine δ directly. The ITM assessed was La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF); the relative resistances to JO2 were quantified using the pre-defined permeation flux model and local PO2 values. Across a temperature range from 825°C to 1056°C, δ was found to vary from 0.007 to 0.029 (<1%), safely within material stability limits, whilst the permeate surface exchange resistance dominates. An inert JO2 limit was identified owing to a maximum sweep surface δ, δmaxinert. The physical presence of δmaxinert is attributed to a rate limiting step shift from desorption to associative electron transfer steps on the sweep surface as PO2 is reduced. Permeate surface exchange limitations under non-reactive conditions suggest that reactive (fuel) operation is necessary to accelerate surface chemistry for future work, to reduce flux resistance and push δpast δmaxinert in a stable manner.

  16. In vitro skin permeation of sunscreen agents from O/W emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, L; Carbone, C; Paolino, D; Drago, R; Stancampiano, A H; Puglisi, G

    2008-02-01

    The effects of different emulsifiers on the in vitro permeation through human skin of two sunscreen agents [octylmethoxycinnamate (OMC) and butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane (BMBM)] were investigated from O/W emulsions. The test formulations were prepared using the same oil and aqueous phase ingredients and the following emulsifier and coemulsifier systems: Emulgade SE((R)) (ceteareth-12 and ceteareth-20 and cetearyl alcohol and cetyl palmitate) and glycerylmonostearate (emulsion 1); Brij 72((R)) (steareth-2), Brij 721((R)) (steareth-21) and cetearyl alcohol (emulsion 2); Phytocream((R)) (potassium palmitoyl-hydrolysed wheat protein and glyceryl stearate and cetearyl alcohol) and glycerylmonostearate (emulsion 3); Montanov 68((R)) (cetearyl glucoside and cetearyl alcohol) (emulsion 4); Xalifin-15((R)) (C(15-20) acid PEG-8 ester) and cetearyl alcohol (emulsion 5). The cumulative amount of OMC that permeated in vitro through human skin after 22 h from the formulations being tested decreased in the order 3 > 1 congruent with 4 > 5 > 2 and was about nine-fold higher from emulsion 3 compared with that from emulsion 2. As regards BMBM, no significant difference was observed as regards its skin permeation from emulsions 1, 3, 4 and 5, whereas formulation 2 allowed significantly lower amounts of BMBM to permeate the skin. In vitro release experiments of OMC and BMBM from emulsions 1-6 through cellulose acetate membranes showed that only emulsions 4 and 5 provided pseudo-first-order release rates only for OMC. The results of this study suggest that the type of emulsifying systems used to prepare an O/W emulsion may strongly affect sunscreen skin permeation from these formulations. Therefore, the vehicle effects should be carefully considered in the formulation of sunscreen products.

  17. Nanoemulsion containing dapsone for topical administration: a study of in vitro release and epidermal permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Vinécius Raphael de Almeida; Simon, Alice; Sena, Adrian Ricardo Cuello; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Topical administration of dapsone can be an alternative route for treatment of leprosy and can also provide new therapeutic applications for an established drug. However, the physicochemical properties of dapsone make it difficult to incorporate into conventional formulations. The current study was directed toward developing a stable nanoemulsion that contains dapsone which can be adapted for topical use. Nanoemulsions were prepared using isopropyl myristate or n-methyl-pyrrolidone as the oil phase, and characterized according to their mean droplet size, conductivity, refractive index, pH, drug content, and stability. The in vitro release of dapsone and its ability to permeate the epidermis were also evaluated. Physicochemical characterization demonstrated that nanosystems were formed, which had a uniform droplet distribution and a pH compatible with the skin surface. Use of n-methyl-pyrrolidone provided a greater nanoemulsion region and higher solubilization of dapsone, and increased the in vitro release rate when compared with a nanoemulsion prepared using isopropyl myristate. However, use of isopropyl myristate promoted an increase in in vitro epidermal permeation that followed the Higuchi model. This demonstrates the ability of a nanosystem to influence permeation of dapsone through the skin barrier. Furthermore, the nanoemulsions developed and evaluated here had ideal physicochemical stability over a 3-month period. Incorporation of dapsone into a nanoemulsion may be a promising system for enabling topical delivery of dapsone, while minimizing skin permeation, for the treatment of acne. The method developed here used isopropyl myristate as the oil phase, and promoted permeation of dapsone through the skin barrier for the treatment of leprosy upon use of n-methyl-pyrrolidone as the oil phase.

  18. Nanoemulsion containing dapsone for topical administration: a study of in vitro release and epidermal permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Borges, Vinécius Raphael; Simon, Alice; Sena, Adrian Ricardo Cuello; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Background Topical administration of dapsone can be an alternative route for treatment of leprosy and can also provide new therapeutic applications for an established drug. However, the physicochemical properties of dapsone make it difficult to incorporate into conventional formulations. The current study was directed toward developing a stable nanoemulsion that contains dapsone which can be adapted for topical use. Methods Nanoemulsions were prepared using isopropyl myristate or n-methyl-pyrrolidone as the oil phase, and characterized according to their mean droplet size, conductivity, refractive index, pH, drug content, and stability. The in vitro release of dapsone and its ability to permeate the epidermis were also evaluated. Results Physicochemical characterization demonstrated that nanosystems were formed, which had a uniform droplet distribution and a pH compatible with the skin surface. Use of n-methyl-pyrrolidone provided a greater nanoemulsion region and higher solubilization of dapsone, and increased the in vitro release rate when compared with a nanoemulsion prepared using isopropyl myristate. However, use of isopropyl myristate promoted an increase in in vitro epidermal permeation that followed the Higuchi model. This demonstrates the ability of a nanosystem to influence permeation of dapsone through the skin barrier. Furthermore, the nanoemulsions developed and evaluated here had ideal physicochemical stability over a 3-month period. Conclusion Incorporation of dapsone into a nanoemulsion may be a promising system for enabling topical delivery of dapsone, while minimizing skin permeation, for the treatment of acne. The method developed here used isopropyl myristate as the oil phase, and promoted permeation of dapsone through the skin barrier for the treatment of leprosy upon use of n-methyl-pyrrolidone as the oil phase. PMID:23411489

  19. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  20. Seawater ultrafiltration fouling control: Backwashing with demineralized water/SWRO permeate

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the effect of demineralized water backwashing on fouling control of seawater ultrafiltration was investigated. Seawater from Scheveningen beach in The Hague and a desalination plant of Evides Company at Zeeland in the Netherlands was used as feed water, while demineralized water and UF permeate were used as backwash water for a fouling control efficiency comparison under different fluxes and backwash durations. Furthermore, demineralized waters with 5 or 50 mmol/l NaCl were applied for backwashing as well, to check the influence of monovalent cations on UF fouling control. Additionally, SWRO permeate was used for backwashes in long-term experiments to check the possibility of it replacing demineralized water. Results show that seawater UF fouling control is substantially improved by demineralized water backwashing. However, due to the high salinity of seawater, more water was required to dilute the cation concentration and limit the dispersion effect near the membrane surface than was needed for surface water. A 2-min demineralized water backwash showed better fouling control efficiency than a 1-min backwash. Furthermore, the presence of monovalent cations in the backwash water deteriorated the fouling control efficiency of the backwash, indicating the existence of a charge screening effect. The demineralized water with 5 and 50 mmol/l NaCl both showed a similar fouling control efficiency which is better than the UF permeate backwash. The calcium ions in UF permeate probably deteriorates the fouling control efficiency by maintaining a Ca-bridging effect between the membranes and NOM. SWRO permeate backwashing successfully controls membrane fouling as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the Naturalistic Fallacy: A Conceptual Basis for Evolutionary Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Teehan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In debates concerning evolutionary approaches to ethics the Naturalistic Fallacy (i.e., deriving values from facts or “ought” from “is” is often invoked as a constraining principle. For example, Stephen Jay Gould asserts the most that evolutionary studies can hope to do is set out the conditions under which certain morals or values might have arisen, but it can say nothing about the validity of such values, on pain of committing the Naturalistic Fallacy. Such questions of moral validity, he continues, are best left in the domain of religion. This is a common critique of evolutionary ethics but it is based on an insufficient appreciation of the full implications of the Naturalistic Fallacy. Broadly conceived, the Naturalistic Fallacy rules out any attempt to treat morality as defined according to some pre-existent reality, whether that reality is expressed in natural or non-natural terms. Consequent to this is that morality must be treated as a product of natural human interactions. As such, any discipline which sheds light on the conditions under which values originate, and on the workings of moral psychology, may play a crucial role in questions of moral validity. The authors contend that rather than being a constraint on evolutionary approaches to ethics, the Naturalistic Fallacy, so understood, clears the way, conceptually, for just such an approach.

  2. Vocabulary Constraint on Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sutarsyah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study was carried out in the English Education Department of State University of Malang. The aim of the study was to identify and describe the vocabulary in the reading text and to seek if the text is useful for reading skill development. A descriptive qualitative design was applied to obtain the data. For this purpose, some available computer programs were used to find the description of vocabulary in the texts. It was found that the 20 texts containing 7,945 words are dominated by low frequency words which account for 16.97% of the words in the texts. The high frequency words occurring in the texts were dominated by function words. In the case of word levels, it was found that the texts have very limited number of words from GSL (General Service List of English Words (West, 1953. The proportion of the first 1,000 words of GSL only accounts for 44.6%. The data also show that the texts contain too large proportion of words which are not in the three levels (the first 2,000 and UWL. These words account for 26.44% of the running words in the texts.  It is believed that the constraints are due to the selection of the texts which are made of a series of short-unrelated texts. This kind of text is subject to the accumulation of low frequency words especially those of content words and limited of words from GSL. It could also defeat the development of students' reading skills and vocabulary enrichment.

  3. Industrial Applications of Evolutionary Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ernesto; Tonda, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This book is intended as a reference both for experienced users of evolutionary algorithms and for researchers that are beginning to approach these fascinating optimization techniques. Experienced users will find interesting details of real-world problems, and advice on solving issues related to fitness computation, modeling and setting appropriate parameters to reach optimal solutions. Beginners will find a thorough introduction to evolutionary computation, and a complete presentation of all evolutionary algorithms exploited to solve different problems. The book could fill the gap between the

  4. Recent advances in evolutionary multi-objective optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Rituparna; Gupta, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the most recent advances in the field of evolutionary multiobjective optimization. With the aim of drawing the attention of up-andcoming scientists towards exciting prospects at the forefront of computational intelligence, the authors have made an effort to ensure that the ideas conveyed herein are accessible to the widest audience. The book begins with a summary of the basic concepts in multi-objective optimization. This is followed by brief discussions on various algorithms that have been proposed over the years for solving such problems, ranging from classical (mathematical) approaches to sophisticated evolutionary ones that are capable of seamlessly tackling practical challenges such as non-convexity, multi-modality, the presence of multiple constraints, etc. Thereafter, some of the key emerging aspects that are likely to shape future research directions in the field are presented. These include:< optimization in dynamic environments, multi-objective bilevel programming, handling high ...

  5. Pancreatic cancer biology and genetics from an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makohon-Moore, Alvin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is an evolutionary disease, containing the hallmarks of an asexually reproducing unicellular organism subject to evolutionary paradigms. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (hereafter referred to as pancreatic cancer) is a particularly robust example of this phenomenon. Genomic features indicate that pancreatic cancer cells are selected for fitness advantages when encountering the geographic and resource-depleted constraints of the microenvironment. Phenotypic adaptations to these pressures help disseminated cells to survive in secondary sites, a major clinical problem for patients with this disease. In this Review we gather the wide-ranging aspects of pancreatic cancer research into a single concept rooted in Darwinian evolution, with the goal of identifying novel insights and opportunities for study.

  6. Pancreatic cancer biology and genetics from an evolutionary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makohon-Moore, Alvin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is an evolutionary disease, containing the hallmarks of an asexually reproducing unicellular organism subject to evolutionary paradigms. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (hereafter referred to as pancreatic cancer) is a particularly robust example of this phenomenon. Genomic features indicate that pancreatic cancer cells are selected for fitness advantages when encountering the geographic and resource-depleted constraints of the microenvironment. Phenotypic adaptations to these pressures help disseminated cells to survive in secondary sites, a major clinical problem for patients with this disease. In this Review we gather the wide-ranging aspects of pancreatic cancer research into a single concept rooted in Darwinian evolution, with the goal of identifying novel insights and opportunities for study. PMID:27444064

  7. Evolutionary biology redux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a novel, enlightened concept for determining the mechanism of evolution. It is based on homeostasis, which distinguishes life from non-life and as such is the universal mechanism for the evolution of all living organisms. This view of evolution is logical, mechanistic, non-scalar, predictive, testable, and falsifiable, and it illuminates the epistemological relationships between physics and biology, ontogeny and phylogeny, development and aging, ultimate and proximate causation, health and disease. In addition to validating Haeckel's biogenetic law and Lamarckian epigenetics, reflecting the enabling value of the cellular approach, this perspective also expresses the evolutionary process at the cell-molecular level, since the mechanism of cell communication itself is universal in biology, in keeping with a Kuhnian paradigm shift. This approach may even elucidate the nature and evolution of consciousness as a manifestation of the cellular continuum from unicellular to multicellular life. We need such a functional genomic mechanism for the process of evolution if we are to make progress in biology and medicine. Like Copernican heliocentrism, a cellular approach to evolution may fundamentally change humankind's perceptions about our place in the universe.

  8. CONSTRAINT PROGRAMMING AND UNIVERSITY TIMETABLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Groves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The technology of Constraint Programming is rapidly becoming a popular alternative for solving large-scale industry problems. This paper provides an introduction to Constraint Programming and to Constraint Logic Programming (CLP, an enabler of constraint programming. The use of Constraint Logic Programming is demonstrated by describing a system developed for scheduling university timetables. Timetabling problems have a high degree of algorithmic complexity (they are usually NP-Complete, and share features with scheduling problems encountered in industry. The system allows the declaration of both hard requirements, which must always be satisfied, and soft constraints which need not be satisfied, though this would be an advantage.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Hierdie artikel beskryf ’n familie van probleem-oplossingstegnieke bekend as “Constraint Programming”, wat al hoe meer gebruik word om groot-skaalse industriële probleme op te los. Die nut van hierdie tegnieke word gedemonstreer deur die beskrywing van ’n skeduleringsisteem om die roosters vir ’n universiteit te genereer. Roosterskeduleringsprobleme is in praktiese gevalle NP-volledig en deel baie eienskappe met industriële skeduleringsprobleme. Die sisteem wat hier beskryf word maak gebruik van beide harde beperkings (wat altyd bevredig moet word en sagte beperkings (bevrediging hiervan is wel voordelig maar dit is opsioneel.

  9. Limited locomotive ability relaxed selective constraints on molluscs mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shao'e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2017-09-06

    Mollusca are the second largest phylum in the animal kingdom with different types of locomotion. Some molluscs are poor-migrating, while others are free-moving or fast-swimming. Most of the energy required for locomotion is provided by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we conduct a comparative genomic analysis of 256 molluscs complete mitochondrial genomes and evaluate the role of energetic functional constraints on the protein-coding genes, providing a new insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution. The weakly locomotive molluscs, compared to strongly locomotive molluscs, show significantly higher Ka/Ks ratio, which suggest they accumulated more nonsynonymous mutations in mtDNA and have experienced more relaxed evolutionary constraints. Eleven protein-coding genes (CoxI, CoxII, ATP6, Cytb, ND1-6, ND4L) show significant difference for Ka/Ks ratios between the strongly and weakly locomotive groups. The relaxation of selective constraints on Atp8 arise in the common ancestor of bivalves, and the further relaxation occurred in marine bivalves lineage. Our study thus demonstrates that selective constraints relevant to locomotive ability play an essential role in evolution of molluscs mtDNA.

  10. Does the evolutionary conservation of microsatellite loci imply function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriver, M.D.; Deka, R.; Ferrell, R.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic tandem arrays of short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs which have been found widely distributed in the genomes of all eukaryotes. We have analyzed allele frequency data on 16 microsatellite loci typed in the great apes (human, chimp, orangutan, and gorilla). The majority of these loci (13) were isolated from human genomic libraries; three were cloned from chimpanzee genomic DNA. Most of these loci are not only present in all apes species, but are polymorphic with comparable levels of heterozygosity and have alleles which overlap in size. The extent of divergence of allele frequencies among these four species were studies using the stepwise-weighted genetic distance (Dsw), which was previously shown to conform to linearity with evolutionary time since divergence for loci where mutations exist in a stepwise fashion. The phylogenetic tree of the great apes constructed from this distance matrix was consistent with the expected topology, with a high bootstrap confidence (82%) for the human/chimp clade. However, the allele frequency distributions of these species are 10 times more similar to each other than expected when they were calibrated with a conservative estimate of the time since separation of humans and the apes. These results are in agreement with sequence-based surveys of microsatellites which have demonstrated that they are highly (90%) conserved over short periods of evolutionary time (< 10 million years) and moderately (30%) conserved over long periods of evolutionary time (> 60-80 million years). This evolutionary conservation has prompted some authors to speculate that there are functional constraints on microsatellite loci. In contrast, the presence of directional bias of mutations with constraints and/or selection against aberrant sized alleles can explain these results.

  11. Analysis of optical flow constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bimbo, A; Nesi, P; Sanz, J C

    1995-01-01

    Different constraint equations have been proposed in the literature for the derivation of optical flow. Despite of the large number of papers dealing with computational techniques to estimate optical flow, only a few authors have investigated conditions under which these constraints exactly model the velocity field, that is, the perspective projection on the image plane of the true 3-D velocity. These conditions are analyzed under different hypotheses, and the departures of the constraint equations in modeling the velocity field are derived for different motion conditions. Experiments are also presented giving measures of these departures and of the induced errors in the estimation of the velocity field.

  12. An Evolutionary Optimization Framework for Neural Networks and Neuromorphic Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuman, Catherine D [ORNL; Plank, James [University of Tennessee (UT); Disney, Adam [University of Tennessee (UT); Reynolds, John [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2016-01-01

    As new neural network and neuromorphic architectures are being developed, new training methods that operate within the constraints of the new architectures are required. Evolutionary optimization (EO) is a convenient training method for new architectures. In this work, we review a spiking neural network architecture and a neuromorphic architecture, and we describe an EO training framework for these architectures. We present the results of this training framework on four classification data sets and compare those results to other neural network and neuromorphic implementations. We also discuss how this EO framework may be extended to other architectures.

  13. Evolutionary computation for reinforcement learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whiteson, S.; Wiering, M.; van Otterlo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Algorithms for evolutionary computation, which simulate the process of natural selection to solve optimization problems, are an effective tool for discovering high-performing reinforcement-learning policies. Because they can automatically find good representations, handle continuous action spaces,

  14. Integrating genomics into evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Marigorta, Urko M; Navarro, Arcadi

    2014-12-01

    The application of the principles of evolutionary biology into medicine was suggested long ago and is already providing insight into the ultimate causes of disease. However, a full systematic integration of medical genomics and evolutionary medicine is still missing. Here, we briefly review some cases where the combination of the two fields has proven profitable and highlight two of the main issues hindering the development of evolutionary genomic medicine as a mature field, namely the dissociation between fitness and health and the still considerable difficulties in predicting phenotypes from genotypes. We use publicly available data to illustrate both problems and conclude that new approaches are needed for evolutionary genomic medicine to overcome these obstacles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A New DG Multiobjective Optimization Method Based on an Improved Evolutionary Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanxing Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A distribution generation (DG multiobjective optimization method based on an improved Pareto evolutionary algorithm is investigated in this paper. The improved Pareto evolutionary algorithm, which introduces a penalty factor in the objective function constraints, uses an adaptive crossover and a mutation operator in the evolutionary process and combines a simulated annealing iterative process. The proposed algorithm is utilized to the optimize DG injection models to maximize DG utilization while minimizing system loss and environmental pollution. A revised IEEE 33-bus system with multiple DG units was used to test the multiobjective optimization algorithm in a distribution power system. The proposed algorithm was implemented and compared with the strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm 2 (SPEA2, a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm, and nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NGSA-II. The comparison of the results demonstrates the validity and practicality of utilizing DG units in terms of economic dispatch and optimal operation in a distribution power system.

  16. Phenotypical Behavior and Evolutionary Slavery

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Andre C. R.

    2000-01-01

    A new evolutionary solution to Prisoner Dilemma situations is proposed in this paper. A specific genetic code may have different phenotypes, meaning different strategies for different individuals carrying that gene. This means that, under the right parameters, it is a good evolutionary solution to create two types of phenotypes with different strategies, here called as leaders and servants. In this solution, servants always cooperate with the leaders and leaders never do with the servants. In...

  17. Optimal Control of Evolutionary Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Raj; McLendon, George

    2008-01-01

    Elucidating the fitness measures optimized during the evolution of complex biological systems is a major challenge in evolutionary theory. We present experimental evidence and an analytical framework demonstrating how biochemical networks exploit optimal control strategies in their evolutionary dynamics. Optimal control theory explains a striking pattern of extremization in the redox potentials of electron transport proteins, assuming only that their fitness measure is a control objective functional with bounded controls.

  18. Evolutionary Origin of Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakryś, Bożena; Milanowski, Rafał; Karnkowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Euglenids (Excavata, Discoba, Euglenozoa, Euglenida) is a group of free-living, single-celled flagellates living in the aquatic environments. The uniting and unique morphological feature of euglenids is the presence of a cell covering called the pellicle. The morphology and organization of the pellicle correlate well with the mode of nutrition and cell movement. Euglenids exhibit diverse modes of nutrition, including phagotrophy and photosynthesis. Photosynthetic species (Euglenophyceae) constitute a single subclade within euglenids. Their plastids embedded by three membranes arose as the result of a secondary endosymbiosis between phagotrophic eukaryovorous euglenid and the Pyramimonas-related green alga. Within photosynthetic euglenids three evolutionary lineages can be distinguished. The most basal lineage is formed by one mixotrophic species, Rapaza viridis. Other photosynthetic euglenids are split into two groups: predominantly marine Eutreptiales and freshwater Euglenales. Euglenales are divided into two families: Phacaceae, comprising three monophyletic genera (Discoplastis, Lepocinclis, Phacus) and Euglenaceae with seven monophyletic genera (Euglenaformis, Euglenaria, Colacium, Cryptoglena, Strombomonas, Trachelomonas, Monomorphina) and polyphyletic genus Euglena. For 150 years researchers have been studying Euglena based solely on morphological features what resulted in hundreds of descriptions of new taxa and many artificial intra-generic classification systems. In spite of the progress towards defining Euglena, it still remains polyphyletic and morphologically almost undistinguishable from members of the recently described genus Euglenaria; members of both genera have cells undergoing metaboly (dynamic changes in cell shape), large chloroplasts with pyrenoids and monomorphic paramylon grains. Model organisms Euglena gracilis Klebs, the species of choice for addressing fundamental questions in eukaryotic biochemistry, cell and molecular biology, is a

  19. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  20. Synonymous genes explore different evolutionary landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Cambray

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary potential of a gene is constrained not only by the amino acid sequence of its product, but by its DNA sequence as well. The topology of the genetic code is such that half of the amino acids exhibit synonymous codons that can reach different subsets of amino acids from each other through single mutation. Thus, synonymous DNA sequences should access different regions of the protein sequence space through a limited number of mutations, and this may deeply influence the evolution of natural proteins. Here, we demonstrate that this feature can be of value for manipulating protein evolvability. We designed an algorithm that, starting from an input gene, constructs a synonymous sequence that systematically includes the codons with the most different evolutionary perspectives; i.e., codons that maximize accessibility to amino acids previously unreachable from the template by point mutation. A synonymous version of a bacterial antibiotic resistance gene was computed and synthesized. When concurrently submitted to identical directed evolution protocols, both the wild type and the recoded sequence led to the isolation of specific, advantageous phenotypic variants. Simulations based on a mutation isolated only from the synthetic gene libraries were conducted to assess the impact of sub-functional selective constraints, such as codon usage, on natural adaptation. Our data demonstrate that rational design of synonymous synthetic genes stands as an affordable improvement to any directed evolution protocol. We show that using two synonymous DNA sequences improves the overall yield of the procedure by increasing the diversity of mutants generated. These results provide conclusive evidence that synonymous coding sequences do experience different areas of the corresponding protein adaptive landscape, and that a sequence's codon usage effectively constrains the evolution of the encoded protein.

  1. Rationalizing the permeation of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Acosta-Gutierrez, Silvia; Benkerrou, Dehbia; D'Agostino, Tommaso; Malloci, Giuliano; Samanta, Susruta; Bodrenko, Igor; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2017-03-01

    The increasing level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, together with the lack of new potential drug scaffolds in the pipeline, make the problem of infectious diseases a global challenge for modern medicine. The main reason that Gram-negative bacteria are particularly challenging is the presence of an outer cell-protecting membrane, which is not present in Gram-positive species. Such an asymmetric bilayer is a highly effective barrier for polar molecules. Several protein systems are expressed in the outer membrane to control the internal concentration of both nutrients and noxious species, in particular: (i) water-filled channels that modulate the permeation of polar molecules and ions according to concentration gradients, and (ii) efflux pumps to actively expel toxic compounds. Thus, besides expressing specific enzymes for drugs degradation, Gram-negative bacteria can also resist by modulating the influx and efflux of antibiotics, keeping the internal concentration low. However, there are no direct and robust experimental methods capable of measuring the permeability of small molecules, thus severely limiting our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that ultimately control the permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane. This is the innovation gap to be filled for Gram-negative bacteria. This review is focused on the permeation of small molecules through porins, considered the main path for the entry of polar antibiotics into Gram-negative bacteria. A fundamental understanding of how these proteins are able to filter small molecules is a prerequisite to design/optimize antibacterials with improved permeation. The level of sophistication of modern molecular modeling algorithms and the advances in new computer hardware has made the simulation of such complex processes possible at the molecular level. In this work we aim to share our experience and perspectives in the context of a multidisciplinary extended collaboration within the IMI

  2. Topology Optimization with Stress Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbart, A.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis contains contributions to the development of topology optimization techniques capable of handling stress constraints. The research that led to these contributions was motivated by the need for topology optimization techniques more suitable for industrial applications. Currently, topology

  3. Decentralized systems with design constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoud, Magdi S

    2014-01-01

    This volume provides a rigorous examination of the analysis, stability and control of large-scale systems, and addresses the difficulties that arise because of dimensionality, information structure constraints, parametric uncertainty and time-delays.

  4. An Introduction to 'Creativity Constraints'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    Constraints play a vital role as both restrainers and enablers in innovation processes by governing what the creative agent/s can and cannot do, and what the output can and cannot be. Notions of constraints are common in creativity research, but current contributions are highly dispersed due...... to no overall conceptual framing or shared terminology. This lack of unity hinders overt opportunities for cross-disciplinary interchange. We argue that an improved understanding of constraints in creativity holds a promising potential for advancements in creativity research across domains and disciplines. Here......, we give an overview of the growing, but incohesive body of research into creativity and constraints, which leads us to introduce ‘creativity constraints’ as a unifying concept to help bridge these disjoint contributions to facilitate crossdisciplinary interchange. Finally, we suggest key topics...

  5. Can Leverage Constraints Help Investors?

    OpenAIRE

    Heimer, Rawley

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides causal evidence that leverage constraints can reduce the underperformance of individual investors. In accordance with Dodd-Frank, the CFTC was given regulatory authority over the retail market for foreign exchange and capped the maximum permissible leverage available to U.S. traders. By comparing U.S. traders on the same brokerages with their unregulated European counterparts, I show that the leverage constraint reduces average per-trade losses even after adjusting for ris...

  6. Risk Sharing under Incentive Constraints.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, W.B.

    2002-01-01

    In addressing the matter, this thesis covers issues such as the welfare gains from international risk sharing, the impact of international risk sharing on national economic policies and production efficiency, the welfare effects of international risk sharing in the presence of tax competition, and risk sharing among entrepreneurs that face financing constraints. The thesis outlines the implications of incentive constraints for the efficiency of the actual extent and pattern of risk sharing am...

  7. Enhancement of skin permeation of miconazole by phospholipid and dodecyl 2-(N,N-dimethyl amino)propionate (DDAIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M; Büyüktimkin, S; Büyüktimkin, N; Rytting, J H

    2002-03-02

    Miconazole (MCZ) has very low solubility in both water and oil. Permeation rates through shed snakeskin from an aqueous suspension and a mineral oil suspension were 0.5 microg/cm(2)/h and almost none, respectively. When hydrogenated phosphatidylcholine (HPC) was added to mineral oil and heated to 95 degrees C, the solubility of MCZ increased in proportion to the HPC concentration. DSC measurements also indicated an interaction between them. Thus, a gel formed by hydrogenated phospholipid and mineral oil, as vehicle was prepared. The solubility of MCZ in the gel was around 1% and the permeation rate was 1.3 microg/cm(2)/h, which was about 2.5 times that from an aqueous suspension. As an alternative approach, a skin permeation enhancer, dodecyl 2-(N,N-dimethyl amino)propionate (DDAIP) was applied 2 h before a skin permeation study. The permeation from an aqueous suspension became 11 times that of the suspension without DDAIP pretreatment. The concentration of MCZ in the skin increased 8-fold, indicating that the enhancement effect involved high partition of MCZ into the skin. On the other hand, when a gel formulation was used, pretreatment with DDAIP was not as effective as incorporation of DDAIP in the gel formulation. Following pretreatment, permeation was only two times that of the gel without DDAIP pretreatment, and half that of the water suspension with DDAIP pretreatment. This suggested that release from the gel was the rate-limiting step with the gel formulation. When DDAIP was added to the gel, the permeation rate of MCZ was 3.3 microg/cm(2)/h. It was also a release limited type permeation. The gel with DDAIP is potentially a useful formulation, because of relatively high permeation while possibly avoiding overdosing.

  8. Complex movement patterns: modifiability and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout, R G

    1998-01-01

    Most behaviours involve complex morphological systems and vice versa morphological systems are used by the organism in many different ways. During evolution and ontogeny changes in kinematics and function of skeletal and muscular systems must be coordinated with changes in their neural control. Neuromotor patterns are sometimes believed to be conserved in evolution, leading to diversification at the level of musculoskeletal design. Vertebrate motor patterns used in feeding are reviewed to examine this hypothesis. Stereotyped behaviour is not necessarily the result of phylogenetic constraints but may also result from the functional demands imposed by the mechanics of the jaw apparatus and the nature of the task performed. Sensory feedback and descending control not only contribute to 'online' control of movement but also shape the development of motor patterns and learning behaviour and indicate a potentially large flexibility. The neural and sensory apparatus that produces this flexibility will be subject to evolutionary modification. In the absence of a demand for flexibility motor patterns may become stereotyped in some species, while they are very flexible in others. To the extent that morphological systems perform independent movements during different behaviours, separate basic motor patterns may be required, which may be coordinated in different ways.

  9. Chronological age affects the permeation of fentanyl through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, R; Benfeldt, E; Sorensen, J A

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the influence of chronological age on fentanyl permeation through human skin in vitro using static diffusion cells. Elderly individuals are known to be more sensitive to opioids and obtain higher plasma concentrations following dermal application of fentanyl compared to younger...... individuals. The influence of age - as an isolated pharmacokinetic term - on the absorption of fentanyl has not been previously studied. METHOD: Human skin from 30 female donors was mounted in static diffusion cells, and samples were collected during 48 h. Donors were divided into three age groups: ... and old age groups: 5,922 and 4,050 ng, respectively). Furthermore, the lag time and absorption rate were different between the three groups, with a significantly higher rate in the young participants versus the oldest participants. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that fentanyl permeates the skin of young...

  10. Characterization and In Vitro Skin Permeation of Meloxicam-Loaded Liposomes versus Transfersomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureewan Duangjit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate the potential use of liposome and transfersome vesicles in the transdermal drug delivery of meloxicam (MX. MX-loaded vesicles were prepared and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency (%EE, loading efficiency, stability, and in vitro skin permeation. The vesicles were spherical in structure, 90 to 140 nm in size, and negatively charged (−23 to −43 mV. The %EE of MX in the vesicles ranged from 40 to 70%. Transfersomes provided a significantly higher skin permeation of MX compared to liposomes. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC analysis indicated that the application of transfersomes significantly disrupted the stratum corneum lipid. Our research suggests that MX-loaded transfersomes can be potentially used as a transdermal drug delivery system.

  11. Mucoadhesive buccal tablets containing silymarin Eudragit-loaded nanoparticles: formulation, characterisation and ex vivo permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahas, Amira E; Allam, Ahmed N; El-Kamel, Amal H

    2017-08-01

    Eudragit-loaded silymarin nanoparticles (SNPs) and their formulation into buccal mucoadhesive tablets were investigated to improve the low bioavailability of silymarin through buccal delivery. Characterisation of SNPs and silymarin buccal tablets (SBTs) containing the optimised NPs were performed. Ex vivo permeability of nominated SBTs were assessed using chicken pouch mucosa compared to SNPs and drug suspension followed by histopathological examination. Selected SNPs had a small size (77%) with drug release of about 90% after 6 h. For STBs, all physicochemical parameters were satisfactory for different polymers used. DSC and FT-IR studies suggested the presence of silymarin in an amorphous state. Ex vivo permeation significantly emphasised the great enhancement of silymarin permeation after NPs formation and much more increase after formulating into BTs relative to the corresponding drug dispersion with confirmed membrane integrity. Incorporation of SNPs into BTs could be an efficient vehicle for delivery of silymarin.

  12. Prediction of Permeation Resistance of Protective Gloves, etc. from Solubility Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, H. Risvig; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1997-01-01

    From users' and the safety officers' point of view, it is important among the products available in the market to find the protective glove, suit or accessory with the optimal permeation characteristics - breakthrough time and permeation rate. A reliable and efficient predictive method would be v...... and a new method to estimate of the 3D parameters for protective garment polymers is suggested. Some 3D parameters calculated this way are presented.......) permation rate (Henriksen 1982, 91, 92, 93, Henriksen et al., 1986,). Concrete products were designed and the new materials are today applied by several companies. Many researchers were inspired. In this presentation experience with practical prediction from the concept developed (MAXIPARDIF) is summarized...

  13. Effects of ozonation on the permeate flux of nanocrystalline ceramic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Bhavana S; Davies, Simon H R; Chen, Kuan C; Jaglowski, David R; Baumann, Melissa J; Masten, S J

    2005-02-01

    Titania membranes, with a molecular weight cut-off of 15 kD were used in an ozonation/membrane system that was fed with water from Lake Lansing, which had been pre-filtered through a 0.45 microm glass fiber filter. The application of ozone gas prior to filtration resulted in significant decreases in membrane fouling. The effects of ozonation could not be explained by physical scouring of the filter cake. Decrease in the pH resulted in a concomitant increase in the dissolved ozone concentration in the feed water and in an improvement in permeate flux recovery. Increasing the ozone concentration beyond a threshold value had no beneficial effect on permeate flux recovery. Ozone decomposition, resulting in the formation of OH or other radicals at the membrane surface, is thought to result in the decomposition of organic foulants at the membrane surface and reduce the extent of membrane fouling.

  14. Contaminant Permeation in the Ionomer-Membrane Water Processor (IWP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Laura K.; Finger, Barry W.; Pasadilla, Patrick; Perry, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The Ionomer-membrane Water Processor (IWP) is a patented membrane-distillation based urine brine water recovery system. The unique properties of the IWP membrane pair limit contaminant permeation from the brine to the recovered water and purge gas. A paper study was conducted to predict volatile trace contaminant permeation in the IWP system. Testing of a large-scale IWP Engineering Development Unit (EDU) with urine brine pretreated with the International Space Station (ISS) pretreatment formulation was then conducted to collect air and water samples for quality analysis. Distillate water quality and purge air GC-MS results are presented and compared to predictions, along with implications for the IWP brine processing system.

  15. Study on the Hydrogen Embrittlement of Aermet100 Using Hydrogen Permeation and SSRT Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yabo; Dong, Chaofang; Luo, Hong; Xiao, Kui; Zhong, Ping; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-09-01

    Aermet100 steel suffers greatly from hydrogen embrittlement due to its ultra-high strength. During the corrosion process as part of its service life, reduction of H+ in an acidic environment and H2O in a deaerated near-neutral environment are the main sources of hydrogen generation. Hydrogen permeation into Aermet100 steel can occur even in the atmosphere. After tempering, the coherent precipitations can hinder diffusion of hydrogen in the tempered steel, causing the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and steady hydrogen permeation current to decrease. The fracture morphology of tempered Aermet100 steel after a slow strain rate test in an acidic solution is predominantly micro-void coalescence with few inner cracks. As the solution pH decreases, micro-cracks initiate not only on the side surface but also within the steel. Coalition of micro-cracks accelerates the overall cracking process.

  16. Standard practice for evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals by an electrochemical technique

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This practice gives a procedure for the evaluation of hydrogen uptake, permeation, and transport in metals using an electrochemical technique which was developed by Devanathan and Stachurski. While this practice is primarily intended for laboratory use, such measurements have been conducted in field or plant applications. Therefore, with proper adaptations, this practice can also be applied to such situations. 1.2 This practice describes calculation of an effective diffusivity of hydrogen atoms in a metal and for distinguishing reversible and irreversible trapping. 1.3 This practice specifies the method for evaluating hydrogen uptake in metals based on the steady-state hydrogen flux. 1.4 This practice gives guidance on preparation of specimens, control and monitoring of the environmental variables, test procedures, and possible analyses of results. 1.5 This practice can be applied in principle to all metals and alloys which have a high solubility for hydrogen, and for which the hydrogen permeation is ...

  17. Effect of Different Skin Penetration Promoters in Halobetasol Propionate Permeation and Retention in Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Carvajal-Vidal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Halobetasol propionate (HB is a potent synthetic corticosteroid used against inflammatory skin diseases, such as dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis, among others. The aim of this study is to define how the presence of different skin penetration enhancers (nonane, menthone, limonene, azone, carene, decanol, linoleic acid and cetiol affects the penetration and retention in skin of HB. To determine drug penetration through skin, 5% of each promoter was used in an ex vivo system with human skin on Franz cells. The results showed that the highest permeation occurs in the presence of menthone, followed by nonane. Permeation parameters were determined. The in vivo test was assessed, and the formulation containing HB-menthone presented better anti-inflammatory efficacy. These results are useful to generate a specific treatment according to each patient’s needs, and the inflammatory characteristics of the disease.

  18. Candesartan cilexetil microemulsions for transdermal delivery: formulation, in-vitro skin permeation and stability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Jadupati; Basu, Aalok; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The work investigates the formulation and evaluation of microemulsions containing olive oil, Tween 80 and isopropyl alcohol for transdermal candesartan cilexetil delivery. The pseudoternary phase diagram was constructed to determine composition of microemulsions. These formulated microemulsions were evaluated for in vitro skin permeation and stability. The microemulsion containing 72 % olive oil, 8 % water, 15 % Tween 80, and 5 % isopropylalcohol showed maximum viscosity of 29.54±0.32 mPas, average small droplet size of 180.90 nm, smaller polydispersity index of 0.37, zeta potential of -12.20 and maximum candesartan cilexetil permeation flux of 0.49±0.05 μg/cm2/h through excised porcine skin. The degradation of candesartan cilexetil microemulsions after 3 months storage was found low and its shelf-life was calculated as 3.92 years at room temperature.

  19. Electro-Conductive Membranes for Permeation Enhancement and Fouling Mitigation: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Formoso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The research on electro-conductive membranes has expanded in recent years. These membranes have strong prospective as key components in next generation water treatment plants because they are engineered in order to enhance their performance in terms of separation, flux, fouling potential, and permselectivity. The present review summarizes recent developments in the preparation of electro-conductive membranes and the mechanisms of their response to external electric voltages in order to obtain an improvement in permeation and mitigation in the fouling growth. In particular, this paper deals with the properties of electro-conductive polymers and the preparation of electro-conductive polymer membranes with a focus on responsive membranes based on polyaniline, polypyrrole and carbon nanotubes. Then, some examples of electro-conductive membranes for permeation enhancement and fouling mitigation by electrostatic repulsion, hydrogen peroxide generation and electrochemical oxidation will be presented.

  20. Electro-Conductive Membranes for Permeation Enhancement and Fouling Mitigation: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantuso, Elvira; De Filpo, Giovanni; Nicoletta, Fiore Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    The research on electro-conductive membranes has expanded in recent years. These membranes have strong prospective as key components in next generation water treatment plants because they are engineered in order to enhance their performance in terms of separation, flux, fouling potential, and permselectivity. The present review summarizes recent developments in the preparation of electro-conductive membranes and the mechanisms of their response to external electric voltages in order to obtain an improvement in permeation and mitigation in the fouling growth. In particular, this paper deals with the properties of electro-conductive polymers and the preparation of electro-conductive polymer membranes with a focus on responsive membranes based on polyaniline, polypyrrole and carbon nanotubes. Then, some examples of electro-conductive membranes for permeation enhancement and fouling mitigation by electrostatic repulsion, hydrogen peroxide generation and electrochemical oxidation will be presented. PMID:28788091

  1. Permeation enhancement of ascorbic acid by self-dissolving micropile array tip through rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukako; Maeda, Tomohiro; Fukushima, Keizo; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2010-04-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) loaded self-dissolving micropiles (SDMP) were prepared using chondroitin sulfate as the base for the percutaneous administration of AA. AA solution was added to dense solution of chondroitin solution, glue, and array tip, 1.0 cm(2), containing 100 SDMPs of which length was 500 microm and basal diameter was 300 microm, were prepared. Two kinds of AA array tips containing 1344.2+/-1.7 microg (high content ones) and 638.7+/-4.3 microg (low content ones) were used. In vitro dissolution study showed that more than 90% of AA were released from both SDMP array tips within 5 min. Stability experiment showed that 99.2-99.4% of AA was detected in SDMP array tips when stored at 23 degrees C for 1 week. When in vitro permeation experiments were performed after AA SDMP array was inserted to the isolated rat abdominal skin, extremely high amounts of AA, 1285.3+/-369.0 microg (95.3%) for high content SDMP tip and 405.6+/-84.3 microg (65.8%) for low content SDMP tip, were permeated for 6 h into the receptor compartment due to the break down of the skin barrier function. When AA SDMP array tip was administered to the rat skin under anesthetized condition with the different contact times, 10, 20 and 30 min, the permeated amount of AA was dependent on both the AA content in SDMP array tips and the contact time. When AA SDMP was contact to the skin for 30 min, permeated amounts of AA were 146.8+/-22.9 microg (10.9%) for high content-SDMP tip and 61.2+/-18.2 microg (9.6%) for low content SDMP tip. These results suggest the usefulness of SDMP array tip for the percutaneous absorption of AA.

  2. Probe Into the Influence of Crosslinking on CO2 Permeation of Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jinghui; Chen, Zhuo; Umar, Ahmad; Liu, Yang; Shang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaokai; Wang, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Crosslinking is an effective way to fabricate high-selective CO2 separation membranes because of its unique crosslinking framework. Thus, it is essentially significant to study the influence of crosslinking degree on the permeation selectivities of CO2. Herein, we report a successful and facile synthesis of a series of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based diblock copolymers (BCP) incorporated with an unique UV-crosslinkable chalcone unit using Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polyme...

  3. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-Ichi

    2016-02-05

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Permeation studies of novel terbinafine formulations containing hydrophobins through human nails in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejnovic, Ivana; Huonder, Cornelia; Betz, Gabriele

    2010-09-15

    Existing treatments of onychomycosis are not satisfactory. Oral therapies have many side effects and topical formulations are not able to penetrate into the human nail plate and deliver therapeutical concentrations of active agent in situ. The purpose of the present study was to determine the amount of terbinafine, which permeates through the human nail plate, from liquid formulations containing enhancers, namely hydrophobins A-C in the concentration of 0.1% (w/v). The used reference solution contained 10% (w/v) of terbinafine in 60% (v/v) ethanol/water without enhancer. Permeability studies have been performed on cadaver nails using Franz diffusion cells modified to mount nail plates and filled with 60% (v/v) ethanol/water in the acceptor chamber. Terbinafine was quantitatively determined by HPLC. The amount of terbinafine remaining in the nail was extracted by 96% ethanol from pulverized nail material after permeation experiment and presented as percentage of the dry nail weight before the milling test. Permeability coefficient (PC) of terbinafine from reference solution was determined to be 1.52E-10 cm/s. Addition of hydrophobins improved PC in the range of 3E-10 to 2E-9 cm/s. Remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail from reference solution was 0.83% (n=2). An increase of remaining terbinafine reservoir in the nail was observed in two out of three tested formulations containing hydrophobins compared to the reference. In all cases, known minimum inhibitory concentration of terbinafine for dermatophytes (0.003 microg/ml) has been exceeded in the acceptor chamber of the diffusion cells. All tested proteins (hydrophobins) facilitated terbinafine permeation after 10 days of permeation experiment, however one of them achieved an outstanding enhancement factor of 13.05 compared to the reference. Therefore, hydrophobins can be included in the list of potential enhancers for treatment of onychomycosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Microencapsulation of citronella oil for mosquito-repellent application: formulation and in vitro permeation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, B; Sahle, F F; Gebre-Mariam, T; Asres, K; Neubert, R H H

    2012-01-01

    Citronella oil (CO) has been reported to possess a mosquito-repellent action. However, its application in topical preparations is limited due to its rapid volatility. The objective of this study was therefore to reduce the rate of evaporation of the oil via microencapsulation. Microcapsules (MCs) were prepared using gelatin simple coacervation method and sodium sulfate (20%) as a coacervating agent. The MCs were hardened with a cross-linking agent, formaldehyde (37%). The effects of three variables, stirring rate, oil loading and the amount of cross-linking agent, on encapsulation efficiency (EE, %) were studied. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the EE (%), and a polynomial regression model equation was generated. The effect of the amount of cross-linker was insignificant on EE (%). The response surface plot constructed for the polynomial equation provided an optimum area. The MCs under the optimized conditions provided EE of 60%. The optimized MCs were observed to have a sustained in vitro release profile (70% of the content was released at the 10th hour of the study) with minimum initial burst effect. Topical formulations of the microencapsulated oil and non-microencapsulated oil were prepared with different bases, white petrolatum, wool wax alcohol, hydrophilic ointment (USP) and PEG ointment (USP). In vitro membrane permeation of CO from the ointments was evaluated in Franz diffusion cells using cellulose acetate membrane at 32 °C, with the receptor compartment containing a water-ethanol solution (50:50). The receptor phase samples were analyzed with GC/MS, using citronellal as a reference standard. The results showed that microencapsulation decreased membrane permeation of the CO by at least 50%. The amount of CO permeated was dependent on the type of ointment base used; PEG base exhibited the highest degree of release. Therefore, microencapsulation reduces membrane permeation of CO while maintaining a constant supply of the oil

  6. Permeation measurement of gestodene for some biodegradable materials using Franz diffusion cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Danhua; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhen, Zhu; Wang, Ping; Li, Jianxin; Yi, Dongxu; Jin, Ying; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA), Poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC), polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(caprolactone-co-d,l-lactide) (PCDLLA) and poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-caprolactone) (PTCL) are recently used for clinical drug delivery system such as subcutaneous contraceptive implant capsule due to their biodegradable properties that they could possess long-term stable performance in vivo without removal, however their permeation rate is unknown. In the work, biodegradable material...

  7. Effects of hypothyroidism on vascular /sup 125/I-albumin permeation and blood flow in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, R.G.; Pugliese, G.; Chang, K.; Speedy, A.; Province, M.A.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1989-05-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on vascular 125I-albumin permeation and on blood flow were assessed in multiple tissues of male Sprague-Dawley rats rendered hypothyroid by dietary supplementation with 0.5% (wt/wt) 2-thiouracil or by thyroidectomy. In both thiouracil-treated and thyroidectomized rats, body weights, kidney weight, arterial blood pressure, and pulse rate were decreased significantly v age-matched controls. After 10 to 12 weeks of thiouracil treatment, 125I-albumin permeation was increased significantly in the kidney, aorta, eye (anterior uvea, choroid, retina), skin, and new granulation tissue, remained unchanged in brain, sciatic nerve, and heart, and was decreased in forelimb skeletal muscle. A similar pattern was observed in thyroidectomized rats, except that increases in 125I-albumin permeation for all tissues were smaller than those observed in thiouracil-treated rats, and 125I-albumin permeation in retina did not differ from controls. In both thiouracil-treated and thyroidectomized rats, changes in blood flow (assessed with 15-microns, 85Sr-labeled microspheres) relative to the decrease in arterial blood pressure were indicative of a decrease in regional vascular resistance except in the choroid and in the kidney, in which vascular resistance was increased significantly. Glomerular filtration rate was decreased, but filtration fraction and urinary excretion of albumin remained unchanged by thiouracil treatment and thyroidectomy. These results indicate that vascular hemodynamics and endothelial cell barrier functional integrity are modulated in many different tissues by the thyroid. In view of the correspondence of hypothyroid- and diabetes-induced vascular permeability changes, these results raise the possibility that altered thyroid function in diabetes may play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease.

  8. A comparative analysis of glove permeation resistance to paint stripping formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Jeffrey O; Thomas, Richard W; James, Lawrence E

    2002-01-01

    Although there is a wide variety of work gloves available to users of commercial paint stripping products, there are no published studies examining which type of gloves provide the best protection. To address this need, a multiphase study was undertaken to evaluate how several types of gloves resist multichemical-based paint stripping formulations. Due to the wide range of commercial paint stripping formulations available, seven categories of surrogate paint stripper formulations were created to evaluate glove performance initially. Twenty different glove types were identified for initial evaluation. Degradation resistance screening was carried out for each glove style and paint stripping formulation. Screening results were used to identify those glove styles least affected by the surrogate paint strippers. Those gloves were then evaluated for their resistance to permeation using continuous contact testing based on ASTM Test Method F 739. Glove styles showing extensive permeation with early breakthrough were then evaluated to see how they performed with only intermittent contact with the surrogate paint strippers using a modified form of ASTM Test Method F 1383. These results were used to select glove styles to be tested using commercially available paint stripping products. Gloves made of plastic laminate and butyl rubber were the most effective against the majority of paint strippers. More glove styles resisted permeation by N-methylpyrrolidone and dibasic ester-based paint strippers than conventional solvent products such as methylene chloride, methanol, isopropanol, acetone, and toluene. The study also found that decreased contact time caused relatively little change in permeation resistance and that the surrogate paint stripper data did not always accurately predict resistance to the commercial paint stripper formulations.

  9. Effect of chemical permeation enhancers on stratum corneum barrier lipid organizational structure and interferon alpha permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Shadi H; Saliaj, Evi; Wettig, Shawn D; Dong, Chilbert; Ivanova, Marina V; Huzil, J Torin; Foldvari, Marianna

    2013-06-03

    The outermost layer of the skin, known as the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of dead corneocytes embedded in an intercellular lipid matrix consisting of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. The high level of organization within this matrix protects the body by limiting the permeation of most compounds through the skin. While essential for its protective functions, the SC poses a significant barrier for the delivery of topically applied pharmaceutical agents. Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) can increase delivery of small drug compounds into the skin by interacting with the intercellular lipids through physical processes including extraction, fluidization, increased disorder, and phase separation. However, it is not clear whether these same mechanisms are involved in delivery of biotherapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins. Here we describe the effect of three categories of CPEs {solvents [ethanol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (transcutol), oleic acid], terpenes [menthol, nerol, camphor, methyl salicylate], and surfactants [Tween 80, SDS, benzalkonium chloride, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (Cremophor RH40), didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), didecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)]} on the lipid organizational structure of human SC as determined by X-ray scattering studies. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies were conducted to correlate the degree of structural changes and hydrocarbon chain packing in SC lipids caused by these various classes of CPEs to the extent of permeation of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα), a 19 kDa protein drug, into human skin. With the exception of solvents, propylene glycol and ethanol, all classes of CPEs caused increased disordering of lamellar and lateral packing of lipids. We observed that the highest degree of SC lipid disordering was caused by surfactants (especially SDS, DDAB, and DTAB) followed by terpenes, such as nerol. Interestingly, in vitro skin permeation studies

  10. Vapor permeation-stepwise injection simultaneous determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel with voltammetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishov, Andrey; Penkova, Anastasia; Zabrodin, Andrey; Nikolaev, Konstantin; Dmitrenko, Maria; Ermakov, Sergey; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    A novel vapor permeation-stepwise injection (VP-SWI) method for the determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel samples is discussed. In the current study, stepwise injection analysis was successfully combined with voltammetric detection and vapor permeation. This method is based on the separation of methanol and ethanol from a sample using a vapor permeation module (VPM) with a selective polymer membrane based on poly(phenylene isophtalamide) (PA) containing high amounts of a residual solvent. After the evaporation into the headspace of the VPM, methanol and ethanol were transported, by gas bubbling, through a PA membrane to a mixing chamber equipped with a voltammetric detector. Ethanol was selectively detected at +0.19 V, and both compounds were detected at +1.20 V. Current subtractions (using a correction factor) were used for the selective determination of methanol. A linear range between 0.05 and 0.5% (m/m) was established for each analyte. The limits of detection were estimated at 0.02% (m/m) for ethanol and methanol. The sample throughput was 5 samples h(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of anisotropy on the dynamic wetting and permeation of paper coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodurtha, Paul A; Matthews, G Peter; Kettle, John P; Roy, Ian M

    2005-03-01

    A void network model, named Pore-Cor, has been used to study the permeation of an ink solvent into paper coating formulations coated onto a synthetic substrate. The network model generated anisotropic void networks of rectangular cross-sectional pores connected by elliptical cross-sectional throats. These structures had porosities and mercury intrusion properties which closely matched those of the experimental samples. The permeation of hexadecane, used as an analogue for the experimental test oil, was then simulated through these void structures. The simulations were compared to measurements of the permeation of mineral oil into four types of paper coating formulation. The simulations showed that the inertia of the fluid as it enters void features causes a considerable change in wetting over a few milliseconds, a timescale relevant to printing in a modern press. They also showed that in the more anisotropic samples, fast advance wetting occurred through narrow void features. It was found that the match between experimental and simulated wetting could be improved by correcting the simulation for the number of surface throats. The simulations showed a more realistic experimental trend, and much greater preferential flow, than the traditional Lucas-Washburn and effective hydraulic radius approaches.

  12. Dynamics and energetics of permeation through aquaporins. What do we learn from molecular dynamics simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hub, Jochen S; Grubmüller, Helmut; de Groot, Bert L

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins, which facilitate the rapid and yet highly selective flux of water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations contributed substantially to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this remarkable efficiency and selectivity of aquaporin channels. This chapter reviews the current state of MD simulations of aquaporins and related aquaglyceroporins as well as the insights these simulations have provided. The mechanism of water permeation through AQPs and methods to determine channel permeabilities from simulations are described. Protons are strictly excluded from AQPs by a large electrostatic barrier and not by an interruption of the Grotthuss mechanism inside the pore. Both the protein's electric field and desolvation effects contribute to this barrier. Permeation of apolar gas molecules such as CO(2) through AQPs is accompanied by a large energetic barrier and thus can only be expected in membranes with a low intrinsic gas permeability. Additionally, the insights from simulations into the mechanism of glycerol permeation through the glycerol facilitator GlpF from E. coli are summarized. Finally, MD simulations are discussed that revealed that the aro-matic/arginine constriction region is generally the filter for uncharged solutes, and that AQP selectivity is controlled by a hydrophobic effect and steric restraints.

  13. Novel PdAgCu ternary alloy: Hydrogen permeation and surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarditi, Ana M.; Braun, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (FIQ, UNL-CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Cornaglia, Laura M., E-mail: lmcornag@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (FIQ, UNL-CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-15

    Dense PdAgCu ternary alloy composite membranes were synthesized by the sequential electroless plating of Pd, Ag and Cu on top of both disk and tubular porous stainless steel substrates. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the structure and morphology of the tested samples. The hydrogen permeation performance of these membranes was investigated over a 350-450 deg. C temperature range and a trans-membrane pressure up to 100 kPa. After annealing at 500 deg. C in hydrogen stream followed by permeation experiments, the alloy layer presented a FCC crystalline phase with a bulk concentration of 68% Pd, 7% Ag and 25% Cu as revealed by EDS. The PdAgCu tubular membrane was found to be stable during more than 300 h on hydrogen stream. The permeabilities of the PdAgCu ternary alloy samples were higher than the permeabilities of the PdCu alloy membranes with a FCC phase. The co-segregation of silver and copper to the membrane surface was observed after hydrogen permeation experiments at high temperature as determined by XPS.

  14. In vitro percutaneous permeation and skin accumulation of finasteride using vesicular ethosomal carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuefeng; Zheng, Feiyue; Zhang, Xingguo; Gao, Jianqing; Liang, Wenquan

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a novel transdermal drug delivery system that facilitates the skin permeation of finasteride encapsulated in novel lipid-based vesicular carriers (ethosomes)finasteride ethosomes were constructed and the morphological characteristics were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The particle size, zeta potential and the entrapment capacity of ethosome were also determined. In contrast to liposomes ethosomes were of more condensed vesicular structure and they were found to be oppositely charged. Ethosomes were found to be more efficient delivery carriers with high encapsulation capacities. In vitro percutaneous permeation experiments demonstrated that the permeation of finasteride through human cadaver skin was significantly increased when ethosomes were used. The finasteride transdermal fluxes from ethosomes containing formulation (1.34 +/- 0.11 microg/cm(2)/h) were 7.4, 3.2 and 2.6 times higher than that of finasteride from aqueous solution, conventional liposomes and hydroethanolic solution respectively (P ethosomes produced a significant (P ethosomes are promising vesicular carriers for enhancing percutaneous absorption of finasteride.

  15. Deuterium gas-driven permeation and subsequent retention in rolled tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou, Haishan [Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Yuping; An, Zhongqing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, Hongmin; Xing, Wenjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hou, Qing [Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610061 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Experiments concerning deuterium gas-driven permeation through rolled tungsten foils in the temperature range of 850–950 K and subsequent deuterium retention have been performed. The steady state permeation flux of deuterium is proportional to the square root of the driving pressure. The permeability of deuterium is in an order of 10{sup −14} mol m{sup −1} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1/2} in this temperature range and the activation energy for permeation is 1.21 eV. Measurements of diffusivity are significantly affected by the driving pressure, which can be well explained by a saturable-trap model. Thermal desorption spectra of samples feature a single deuterium release peak at about 873 K. TMAP 4 modeling of this peak gives a detrapping energy of 1.70 eV, which fits the dissociation enthalpy of deuterium desorbing from the inner wall of vacancy clusters or pores in tungsten.

  16. Evaluation of critical parameters for in vitro skin permeation and penetration studies using animal skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praça, Fabíola Silva Garcia; Medina, Wanessa Silva Garcia; Eloy, Josimar O; Petrilli, Raquel; Campos, Patrícia Mazureki; Ascenso, Andreia; Bentley, Maria Vitória L B

    2017-09-23

    In vitro skin permeation/penetration studies may be affected by many sources of variation. Herein, we aimed to investigate the major critical procedures of in vitro skin delivery studies. These experiments were performed with model drugs according to official guidelines. The influence of skin source on penetration studies was studied as well as the use of a cryopreservation agent on skin freezing evaluated by transepidermal water loss, electrical resistance, permeation/penetration profiles and histological changes of the skin. The best condition for tape stripping procedure was validated through the evaluation of the distribution of corneocytes, mass of stratum corneum (SC) removed and amount of protein removed using finger pressure, a 2kg weight and a roller. The interchangeability of the tape stripping procedures followed by the epidermis and dermis homogenate and the micrometric horizontal cryostat skin sectioning methods were also investigated, besides the effect of different formulations. Noteworthy, different skin sources were able to ensure reliable interchangeability for in vitro permeation studies. Furthermore, an increased penetration was obtained for stored frozen skin compared to fresh skin, even with the addition of a cryoprotectant agent. The best method for tape stripping was the finger pressure followed by the addition of a propylene glycol solvent leading to better SC removal. Finally, no significant difference was found in skin penetration studies performed by different methods suggesting their possible interchangeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Isopropyl Myristate on Transdermal Permeation of Testosterone From Carbopol Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Kamal, Nahid; Alayoubi, Alaadin; Seggel, Mark; Ibrahim, Sarah; Rahman, Ziyaur; Cruz, Celia N; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of isopropyl myristate (IPM) on the in vitro permeation of testosterone through human cadaver skin from carbopol gels. Six testosterone gel formulations were prepared using different IPM contents of 0%, 0.4%, 0.7%, 1%, 2%, and 3%. The gels were characterized for drug permeation, matrix morphology, pH, kinetics of ethanol evaporation, and viscosity. Mass balance studies were performed to estimate testosterone distribution among the compartments of diffusion cells. All formulations exhibited pH values of 5.1 and viscosities of 1.25-1.75 Pa.s depending on IPM contents. Under occlusive condition, testosterone flux was found to increase significantly (p testosterone flux. Mass balance analysis showed that testosterone was in a saturated state in the skin. Conducting permeation experiments under nonocclusive condition was nondiscriminating because of the evaporation of alcohol and consequent precipitation of drugs. Based on demonstrated effect of IPM on product performance, the final IPM concentration should be controlled with minimal variation during manufacturing and shelf life of drug product. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. An X-ray diffraction analysis of crystallised whey and whey-permeate powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Justin; Ibach, Alexander; Eichhorn, Klaus; Kind, Matthias

    2007-11-26

    Amorphous whey, whey-permeate and lactose powders have been crystallised at various air temperatures and humidities, and these crystallised powders have been examined using X-ray diffraction. The most stable lactose crystal under normal storage conditions, alpha-lactose monohydrate, forms preferentially in whey and whey-permeate powders at 50 degrees C, provided sufficient moisture is available, whereas anhydrous beta-lactose and mixed anhydrous lactose crystals, which are unstable under normal storage conditions, form preferentially at 90 degrees C. Thus, faster crystallisation at higher temperatures is offset by the formation of lactose-crystal forms that are less stable under normal storage conditions. Very little alpha-lactose monohydrate crystallised in the pure lactose powders over the range of temperatures and humidities tested, because the crystallisation of alpha- and beta-lactose is considerably more rapid than the mutarotation of beta- to alpha-lactose in the amorphous phase and the hydration of alpha-lactose during crystallisation. Protein and salts hinder the crystallisation process, which provides more time for mutarotation and crystal hydration in the whey and whey-permeate powders.

  19. A biorelevant in vitro release/permeation system for oral transmucosal dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvadia, Poonam R; Barr, William H; Karnes, H Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This research describes the development and validation of a biorelevant in vitro release/permeation system to predict the in vivo performance of oral transmucosal dosage forms. The system is a biorelevant bidirectional transmucosal apparatus which allows better simulation of oral cavity physiological variables in comparison to compendial dissolution apparatuses and therefore may be a better predictor of in vivo behavior. The feasibility of the bidirectional apparatus was studied using smokeless tobacco (snus) as a model oral transmucosal product. In this research, nicotine release and permeation was investigated from commercially available snus using a modified USP IV flow-through apparatus, a commercially available vertical diffusion cell and a fabricated novel bidirectional transmucosal apparatus. The percent nicotine released/permeated was utilized as an input function for the prediction of in vivo plasma nicotine profiles by back calculation based on the Wagner-Nelson method. The prediction errors in C(max) and AUC(0-∞) with the USP IV flow-through device, vertical diffusion cell and novel apparatus were 4.03, 22.85 and 1.59 and -5.85, 5.85 and -9.27% respectively. This work demonstrated the suitability of the novel bidirectional transmucosal apparatus for predicting the in vivo behavior of oral transmucosal products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Skin Permeation Studies with PPARγ Agonist to Improve Its Permeability and Efficacy in Inflammatory Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Silva-Abreu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rosacea is the most common inflammatory skin disease. It is characterized by erythema, inflammatory papules and pustules, visible blood vessels, and telangiectasia. The current treatment has limitations and unsatisfactory results. Pioglitazone (PGZ is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, a nuclear receptor that regulates important cellular functions, including inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeation of PGZ with a selection of penetration enhancers and to analyze its effectiveness for treating rosacea. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was validated for the quantitative determination of PGZ. Ex vivo permeation experiments were realized in Franz diffusion cells using human skin, in which PGZ with different penetration enhancers were assayed. The results showed that the limonene was the most effective penetration enhancer that promotes the permeation of PGZ through the skin. The cytotoxicity studies and the Draize test detected cell viability and the absence of skin irritation, respectively. The determination of the skin color using a skin colorimetric probe and the results of histopathological studies confirmed the ability of PGZ-limonene to reduce erythema and vasodilation. This study suggests new pharmacological indications of PGZ and its possible application in the treatment of skin diseases, namely rosacea.

  1. Evolutionary foundations for cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktipis, C Athena; Nesse, Randolph M

    2013-01-01

    New applications of evolutionary biology are transforming our understanding of cancer. The articles in this special issue provide many specific examples, such as microorganisms inducing cancers, the significance of within-tumor heterogeneity, and the possibility that lower dose chemotherapy may sometimes promote longer survival. Underlying these specific advances is a large-scale transformation, as cancer research incorporates evolutionary methods into its toolkit, and asks new evolutionary questions about why we are vulnerable to cancer. Evolution explains why cancer exists at all, how neoplasms grow, why cancer is remarkably rare, and why it occurs despite powerful cancer suppression mechanisms. Cancer exists because of somatic selection; mutations in somatic cells result in some dividing faster than others, in some cases generating neoplasms. Neoplasms grow, or do not, in complex cellular ecosystems. Cancer is relatively rare because of natural selection; our genomes were derived disproportionally from individuals with effective mechanisms for suppressing cancer. Cancer occurs nonetheless for the same six evolutionary reasons that explain why we remain vulnerable to other diseases. These four principles-cancers evolve by somatic selection, neoplasms grow in complex ecosystems, natural selection has shaped powerful cancer defenses, and the limitations of those defenses have evolutionary explanations-provide a foundation for understanding, preventing, and treating cancer.

  2. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as 'major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These 'synthetic' transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Structural symmetry in evolutionary games

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary game theory, an important measure of a mutant trait (strategy) is its ability to invade and take over an otherwise-monomorphic population. Typically, one quantifies the success of a mutant strategy via the probability that a randomly occurring mutant will fixate in the population. However, in a structured population, this fixation probability may depend on where the mutant arises. Moreover, the fixation probability is just one quantity by which one can measure the success of a mutant; fixation time, for instance, is another. We define a notion of homogeneity for evolutionary games that captures what it means for two single-mutant states, i.e. two configurations of a single mutant in an otherwise-monomorphic population, to be ‘evolutionarily equivalent’ in the sense that all measures of evolutionary success are the same for both configurations. Using asymmetric games, we argue that the term ‘homogeneous’ should apply to the evolutionary process as a whole rather than to just the population structure. For evolutionary matrix games in graph-structured populations, we give precise conditions under which the resulting process is homogeneous. Finally, we show that asymmetric matrix games can be reduced to symmetric games if the population structure possesses a sufficient degree of symmetry. PMID:26423436

  4. Evolutionary genomics of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Chemical toxins have been a persistent source of evolutionary challenges throughout the history of life, and deep within the genomic storehouse of evolutionary history lay ancient adaptations to diverse chemical poisons. However, the rate of change of contemporary environments mediated by human-introduced pollutants is rapidly screening this storehouse and severely testing the adaptive potential of many species. In this chapter, we briefly review the deep history of evolutionary adaptation to environmental toxins, and then proceed to describe the attributes of stressors and populations that may facilitate contemporary adaptation to pollutants introduced by humans. We highlight that phenotypes derived to enable persistence in polluted habitats may be multi-dimensional, requiring global genome-scale tools and approaches to uncover their mechanistic basis, and include examples of recent progress in the field. The modern tools of genomics offer promise for discovering how pollutants interact with genomes on physiological timescales, and also for discovering what genomic attributes of populations may enable resistance to pollutants over evolutionary timescales. Through integration of these sophisticated genomics tools and approaches with an understanding of the deep historical forces that shaped current populations, a more mature understanding of the mechanistic basis of contemporary ecological-evolutionary dynamics should emerge.

  5. The non-random clustering of non-synonymous substitutions and its relationship to evolutionary rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Eric A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequences are subject to a mosaic of constraint. Changes to functional domains and buried residues, for example, are more apt to disrupt protein structure and function than are changes to residues participating in loops or exposed to solvent. Regions of constraint on the tertiary structure of a protein often result in loose segmentation of its primary structure into stretches of slowly- and rapidly-evolving amino acids. This clustering can be exploited, and existing methods have done so by relying on local sequence conservation as a signature of selection to help identify functionally important regions within proteins. We invert this paradigm by leveraging the regional nature of protein structure and function to both illuminate and make use of genome-wide patterns of local sequence conservation. Results Our hypothesis is that the regional nature of structural and functional constraints will assert a positive autocorrelation on the evolutionary rates of neighboring sites, which, in a pairwise comparison of orthologous proteins, will manifest itself as the clustering of non-synonymous changes across the amino acid sequence. We introduce a dispersion ratio statistic to test this and related hypotheses. Using genome-wide interspecific comparisons of orthologous protein pairs, we reveal a strong log-linear relationship between the degree of clustering and the intensity of constraint. We further demonstrate how this relationship varies with the evolutionary distance between the species being compared. We provide some evidence that proteins with a history of positive selection deviate from genome-wide trends. Conclusions We find a significant association between the evolutionary rate of a protein and the degree to which non-synonymous changes cluster along its primary sequence. We show that clustering is a non-redundant predictor of evolutionary rate, and we speculate that conflicting signals of clustering and constraint may

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Hybrid Distillation-Vapor Permeation Process for Efficient Ethanol Recovery from Ethanol-Water Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The energy demand of distillation-based systems for ethanol recovery and dehydration can be significant, particularly for dilute solutions [1]. An alternative separation process integrating vapor stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation ...

  7. Membrane-assisted vapor stripping: energy efficient hybrid distillation-vapor permeation process for alcohol-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Energy efficient alternatives to distillation for alcohol recovery from dilute solution are needed to improve biofuel sustainability. A process integrating steam stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step is proposed. The...

  8. Effect of feed flow pattern on the distribution of permeate fluxes in desalination by direct contact membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Soukane, Sofiane

    2017-05-31

    The current study aims to highlight the effect of flow pattern on the variations of permeate fluxes over the membrane surface during desalination in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) flat module. To do so, a three dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with embedded pore scale calculations is implemented to predict flow, heat and mass transfer in the DCMD module. Model validation is carried out in terms of average permeate fluxes with experimental data of seawater desalination using two commercially available PTFE membranes. Average permeate fluxes agree within 6% and less with experimental values without fitting parameters. Simulation results show that the distribution of permeate fluxes and seawater salinity over the membrane surface are strongly dependent on momentum and heat transport and that temperature and concentration polarization follow closely the flow distribution. The analysis reveals a drastic effect of recirculation loops and dead zones on module performance and recommendations to improve MD flat module design are drawn consequently.

  9. Conjugation of a cell-penetrating peptide to parathyroid hormone affects its structure, potency, and transepithelial permeation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; de Groot, Anne Marit; Berthelsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    hormone, i.e. PTH(1-34), and to evaluate the effect with regards to secondary structure, potency in Saos-2 cells, immunogenicity, safety as well as the transepithelial permeation across monolayers by using the Caco-2 cell culture model. Further, co-administration of CPP and PTH(1-34) as an alternative......-34) fusion peptides and their potency was found, albeit a general decrease in permeation was observed for both N- and C-terminally CPP-conjugated PTH(1-34) as compared to native PTH(1-34). However, attachment of CPP to the N-terminus significantly increased permeation across Caco-2 cell monolayers...... with an unacceptable low level of cell viability. In conclusion, covalent conjugation of CPPs to PTH(1-34) influenced both the secondary structure, potency, and transepithelial permeation efficiency of the resulting conjugate, and hence this approach appears not to be favorable as compared to co-administration when...

  10. In vitro permeation of β-lactam antibiotics across rat jejunum and its correlation with oral bioavailability in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshi, Saitoh; Aungst, Bruce J; Tohyama, Masashi; Hatakeyama, Yuko; Ohwada, Keiko; Kobayashi, Michiya; Fujisaki, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Katsumi

    2002-01-01

    Aims To investigate the correlation between in vitro permeation of 11 β-lactam antibiotics across rat jejunum and their oral bioavailability in humans. Methods The absorptive and secretory permeation across rat jejunum was evaluated and apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) were determined. Results A steep, sigmoid-type curve was obtained for the relationship between Papp in the absorptive permeation and human oral bioavailability. When the ratios of Papp in the absorptive direction to Papp in the secretory direction were plotted against human oral bioavailability, a much improved correlation was obtained (r = 0.98, P ceftibuten and cephalexin from the absorptive to the secretory direction. Conclusions For 11 β-lactam antibiotics rat intestinal permeation correlated well with human oral bioavailability, especially when corrected for secretory transport. PMID:12392595

  11. Holonomic constraints: an analytical result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazars, Martial [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (UMR 8627), Universite de Paris Sud XI, Batiment 210, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2007-02-23

    Systems subjected to holonomic constraints follow quite complicated dynamics that could not be described easily with Hamiltonian or Lagrangian dynamics. The influence of holonomic constraints in equations of motions is taken into account by using Lagrange multipliers. Finding the value of the Lagrange multipliers allows us to compute the forces induced by the constraints and therefore, to integrate the equations of motions of the system. Computing analytically the Lagrange multipliers for a constrained system may be a difficult task that depends on the complexity of systems. For complex systems it is, most of the time, impossible to achieve. In computer simulations, some algorithms using iterative procedures estimate numerically Lagrange multipliers or constraint forces by correcting the unconstrained trajectory. In this work, we provide an analytical computation of the Lagrange multipliers for a set of linear holonomic constraints with an arbitrary number of bonds of constant length. In the appendix explicit formulae are shown for Lagrange multipliers for systems having 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 bonds of constant length, linearly connected.

  12. A backtracking evolutionary algorithm for power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou Ji-Pyng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a backtracking variable scaling hybrid differential evolution, called backtracking VSHDE, for solving the optimal network reconfiguration problems for power loss reduction in distribution systems. The concepts of the backtracking, variable scaling factor, migrating, accelerated, and boundary control mechanism are embedded in the original differential evolution (DE to form the backtracking VSHDE. The concepts of the backtracking and boundary control mechanism can increase the population diversity. And, according to the convergence property of the population, the scaling factor is adjusted based on the 1/5 success rule of the evolution strategies (ESs. A larger population size must be used in the evolutionary algorithms (EAs to maintain the population diversity. To overcome this drawback, two operations, acceleration operation and migrating operation, are embedded into the proposed method. The feeder reconfiguration of distribution systems is modelled as an optimization problem which aims at achieving the minimum loss subject to voltage and current constraints. So, the proper system topology that reduces the power loss according to a load pattern is an important issue. Mathematically, the network reconfiguration system is a nonlinear programming problem with integer variables. One three-feeder network reconfiguration system from the literature is researched by the proposed backtracking VSHDE method and simulated annealing (SA. Numerical results show that the perfrmance of the proposed method outperformed the SA method.

  13. Optimal power flow solution using evolutionary programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doraiswamy, T.; Ravikumar, R.; Ramya, S.C.; Vandhana, M.S.; Swarupini, S. [Rajalakshmi Engineering College, Chennai Tamil Nadu (India). Dept. of Electrical and Electronics Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is used to determine the optimal outputs of generators, bus voltages, and transformer tap settings in power systems. This paper provided details of an evolutionary programming (EP) algorithm for solving OPF. EP is a stochastic optimization method which analyzes the mechanics of evolution to produce optimal solutions by evolving a population of candidate solutions towards the global minimum through the use of a mutation operator and selection scheme. In this study, EP was used to determine the global optimum solution to the OPF for a range of constraints and objective functions as well as to develop non-convex generator cost curves. The proposed algorithm was applied to an IEEE 30-bus test system under different generator input-output curves. Two sets of generator cost curves were then used to illustrate the robustness of the technique. The first case considered all curves as quadratic. In the second case, a number of local optimal solutions for the dispatch problem were developed. The EP-based OPF algorithm method was then compared with results obtained from a genetic algorithm. Results showed that the EP-based algorithm was reliable even in nonlinear cases with value point loading. It was concluded that the proposed algorithm produced optimal results. 12 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. An evolutionary algorithm for a real vehicle routing problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamidis, P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The NP-hard Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP is central in the optimisation of distribution networks. Its main objective is to determine a set of vehicle trips of minimum total cost. The ideal schedule will efficiently exploit the company's recourses, service all customers and satisfy the given (mainly daily constraints. There have been many attempts to solve this problem with conventional techniques but applied to small-scale simplified problems. This is due to the complexity of the problem and the large volume of data to be processed. Evolutionary Algorithms are search and optimization techniques that are capable of confronting that kind of problems and reach a good feasible solution in a reasonable period of time. In this paper we develop an Evolutionary Algorithm in order to solve the VRP of a specific transportation company in Volos, Greece with different vehicle capacities. The algorithm has been tested with different configurations and constraints, and proved to be effective in reaching a satisfying solution for the company's needs.

  15. Evolutionary algorithm for automatic detection of blood vessel shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutics, Andrea

    1996-04-01

    Automatic detection of blood vessel shapes locating in the skin has a great diagnostic importance. In this work, an evolutionary approach operating on morphological operator and operation structures is proposed for the determination of the shape and network of blood vessels located in upper skin layers. A population of individuals comprising morphological structures is generated. A two-dimensional queue like data representation of individuals is applied in order to provide an appropriate representation of the connectivity constraints originated in the two dimensional nature of the structuring elements. Two-dimensional crossover and mutation type manipulation operations are carried out on selected elements of the population. Unlike the usual techniques, in our approach no constraints are used for background and smoothness as no matched filter or linear operator is applied. Also no a priori knowledge of the vessel shape is necessary due to the evolutionary method. Unlike the usual imaging techniques, that mainly use angiograms as input, in this work infrared filtered images taken by CCD camera are applied to investigate the blood vessels of broad skin areas. The method is implemented parallel on a lattice network of transputers resulting in a significantly decreased processing time compared to the usual techniques.

  16. Preparation of Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Nootropics and Their In Vivo Permeation through Blood-Brain Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Jampilek, Josef; Zaruba, Kamil; Oravec, Michal; Kunes, Martin; Babula, Petr; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Opatrilova, Radka; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an i...

  17. Evolutionary psychology and intelligence research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to unify two subfields of psychology that have hitherto stood separately: evolutionary psychology and intelligence research/differential psychology. I suggest that general intelligence may simultaneously be an evolved adaptation and an individual-difference variable. Tooby and Cosmides's (1990a) notion of random quantitative variation on a monomorphic design allows us to incorporate heritable individual differences in evolved adaptations. The Savanna-IQ Interaction Hypothesis, which is one consequence of the integration of evolutionary psychology and intelligence research, can potentially explain why less intelligent individuals enjoy TV more, why liberals are more intelligent than conservatives, and why night owls are more intelligent than morning larks, among many other findings. The general approach proposed here will allow us to integrate evolutionary psychology with any other aspect of differential psychology. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Constraint programming and decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    2014-01-01

    In many application areas, it is necessary to make effective decisions under constraints. Several area-specific techniques are known for such decision problems; however, because these techniques are area-specific, it is not easy to apply each technique to other applications areas. Cross-fertilization between different application areas is one of the main objectives of the annual International Workshops on Constraint Programming and Decision Making. Those workshops, held in the US (El Paso, Texas), in Europe (Lyon, France), and in Asia (Novosibirsk, Russia), from 2008 to 2012, have attracted researchers and practitioners from all over the world. This volume presents extended versions of selected papers from those workshops. These papers deal with all stages of decision making under constraints: (1) formulating the problem of multi-criteria decision making in precise terms, (2) determining when the corresponding decision problem is algorithmically solvable; (3) finding the corresponding algorithms, and making...

  19. Interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous-phase fuel conversion on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-02-01

    The interactions between oxygen permeation and homogeneous fuel oxidation reactions on the sweep side of an ion transport membrane (ITM) are examined using a comprehensive model, which couples the dependency of the oxygen permeation rate on the membrane surface conditions and detailed chemistry and transport in the vicinity of the membrane. We assume that the membrane surface is not catalytic to hydrocarbon or syngas oxidation. Results show that increasing the sweep gas inlet temperature and fuel concentration enhances oxygen permeation substantially. This is accomplished through promoting oxidation reactions (oxygen consumption) and the transport of the products and reaction heat towards the membrane, which lowers the oxygen concentration and increases the gas temperature near the membrane. Faster reactions at higher fuel concentration and higher inlet gas temperature support substantial fuel conversion and lead to a higher oxygen permeation flux without the contribution of surface catalytic activity. Beyond a certain maximum in the fuel concentration, extensive heat loss to the membrane (and feed side) reduces the oxidation kinetic rates and limits oxygen permeation as the reaction front reaches the membrane. The sweep gas flow rate and channel height have moderate impacts on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion due to the residence time requirements for the chemical reactions and the location of the reaction zone relative to the membrane surface. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Transdermal delivery of diclofenac using water-in-oil microemulsion: formulation and mechanistic approach of drug skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Priyanka J; Madan, Parshotam; Lin, Senshang

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to enhance skin permeation of diclofenac using water-in-oil microemulsion and to elucidate its skin permeation mechanism. The w/o microemulsion formulations were selected based on constructed pseudoternary phase diagrams depending on water solubilization capacity and thermodynamic stability. These formulations were also subjected to physical characterization based on droplet size, viscosity, pH and conductivity. Permeation of diclofenac across rat skin using side-by-side permeation cells from selected w/o microemulsion formulations were evaluated and compared with control formulations. The selected w/o microemulsion formulations were thermodynamically stable, and incorporation of diclofenac sodium into microemulsion did not affect the phase behavior of system. All microemulsion formulations had very low viscosity (11-17 cps) and droplet size range of 30-160 nm. Microemulsion formulations exhibited statistically significant increase in diclofenac permeation compared to oily solution, aqueous solution and oil-Smix solution. Higher skin permeation of diclofenac was observed with low Smix concentration and smaller droplet size. Increase in diclofenac loading in aqueous phase decreased the partition of diclofenac. Diclofenac from the oil phase of microemulsion could directly partition into skin, while diclofenac from the aqueous droplets was carried through skin by carrier effect.

  1. Incorporation of whey permeate, a dairy effluent, in ethanol fermentation to provide a zero waste solution for the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Archana; Jin, Yiqiong; Mason, Beth; Chae, Michael; Bressler, David C

    2016-03-01

    This study proposes a novel alternative for utilization of whey permeate, a by-product stream from the dairy industry, in wheat fermentation for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Whey permeates were hydrolyzed using enzymes to release fermentable sugars. Hydrolyzed whey permeates were integrated into wheat fermentation as a co-substrate or to partially replace process water. Cold starch hydrolysis-based simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was done as per the current industrial protocol for commercial wheat-to-ethanol production. Ethanol production was not affected; ethanol yield efficiency did not change when up to 10% of process water was replaced. Lactic acid bacteria in whey permeate did not negatively affect the co-fermentation or reduce ethanol yield. Whey permeate could be effectively stored for up to 4 wk at 4 °C with little change in lactose and lactic acid content. Considering the global abundance and nutrient value of whey permeate, the proposed strategy could improve economics of the dairy and biofuel sectors, and reduce environmental pollution. Furthermore, our research may be applied to fermentation strategies designed to produce value-added products other than ethanol. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetotail dynamics under isobaric constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Joachim; Schindler, Karl; Janicke, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Using linear theory and nonlinear MHD simulations, we investigate the resistive and ideal MHD stability of two-dimensional plasma configurations under the isobaric constraint dP/dt = 0, which in ideal MHD is equivalent to conserving the pressure function P = P(A), where A denotes the magnetic flux. This constraint is satisfied for incompressible modes, such as Alfven waves, and for systems undergoing energy losses. The linear stability analysis leads to a Schroedinger equation, which can be investigated by standard quantum mechanics procedures. We present an application to a typical stretched magnetotail configuration. For a one-dimensional sheet equilibrium characteristic properties of tearing instability are rediscovered. However, the maximum growth rate scales with the 1/7 power of the resistivity, which implies much faster growth than for the standard tearing mode (assuming that the resistivity is small). The same basic eigen-mode is found also for weakly two-dimensional equilibria, even in the ideal MHD limit. In this case the growth rate scales with the 1/4 power of the normal magnetic field. The results of the linear stability analysis are confirmed qualitatively by nonlinear dynamic MHD simulations. These results suggest the interesting possibility that substorm onset, or the thinning in the late growth phase, is caused by the release of a thermodynamic constraint without the (immediate) necessity of releasing the ideal MHD constraint. In the nonlinear regime the resistive and ideal developments differ in that the ideal mode does not lead to neutral line formation without the further release of the ideal MHD constraint; instead a thin current sheet forms. The isobaric constraint is critically discussed. Under perhaps more realistic adiabatic conditions the ideal mode appears to be stable but could be driven by external perturbations and thus generate the thin current sheet in the late growth phase, before a nonideal instability sets in.

  3. Diversity-Guided Evolutionary Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursem, Rasmus Kjær

    2002-01-01

    Population diversity is undoubtably a key issue in the performance of evolutionary algorithms. A common hypothesis is that high diversity is important to avoid premature convergence and to escape local optima. Various diversity measures have been used to analyze algorithms, but so far few...... algorithms have used a measure to guide the search. The diversity-guided evolutionary algorithm (DGEA) uses the wellknown distance-to-average-point measure to alternate between phases of exploration (mutation) and phases of exploitation (recombination and selection). The DGEA showed remarkable results...

  4. Exponential Expansion in Evolutionary Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Peter; Jagtfelt, Tue

    2013-01-01

    of Thomas Kuhn’s notion of scientific paradigms and criteria for a good theory (1977, 1996). The paper thus aims to augment and assimilate the fragmented and scattered body of concepts presently residing within the field of evolutionary economics, by presenting an intuitive framework, applicable within...... concepts are described in detail. Taken together it provides the rudimentary aspects of an economic system within an analytical perspective. It is argued that the main dynamic processes of the evolutionary perspective can be reduced to these four concepts. The model and concepts are evaluated in the light...

  5. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  6. The evolutionary psychology of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Aaron T

    2010-02-01

    This paper reviews theory and research on the evolutionary psychology of violence. First, I examine evidence suggesting that humans have experienced an evolutionary history of violence. Next, I discuss violence as a context-sensitive strategy that might have provided benefits to our ancestors under certain circumstances. I then focus on the two most common forms of violence that plague humans -violence over status contests and intimate partner violence- outlining psychological mechanisms involved in each. Finally, I suggest that greater progress will be made by shifting the study from contexts to mechanisms.

  7. The evolutionary psychology of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shawaf, Laith

    2016-10-01

    An evolutionary psychological perspective suggests that emotions can be understood as coordinating mechanisms whose job is to regulate various psychological and physiological programs in the service of solving an adaptive problem. This paper suggests that it may also be fruitful to approach hunger from this coordinating mechanism perspective. To this end, I put forward an evolutionary task analysis of hunger, generating novel a priori hypotheses about the coordinating effects of hunger on psychological processes such as perception, attention, categorization, and memory. This approach appears empirically fruitful in that it yields a bounty of testable new hypotheses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of Biological Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A.; Sigmund, Karl

    2004-02-01

    Darwinian dynamics based on mutation and selection form the core of mathematical models for adaptation and coevolution of biological populations. The evolutionary outcome is often not a fitness-maximizing equilibrium but can include oscillations and chaos. For studying frequency-dependent selection, game-theoretic arguments are more appropriate than optimization algorithms. Replicator and adaptive dynamics describe short- and long-term evolution in phenotype space and have found applications ranging from animal behavior and ecology to speciation, macroevolution, and human language. Evolutionary game theory is an essential component of a mathematical and computational approach to biology.

  9. New Constraints on Quantum Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical relationships between physical theories are discussed. It is explained how a lower rank theory imposes constraints on an acceptable structure of its higher rank theory. This principle is applied to the case of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory of massive particles. It is proved that the Dirac equation is consistent with these constraints whereas the Klein-Gordon equation, as well as all other second order quan- tum equations are inconsistent with the Schrödinger equation. This series of arguments undermines the theoretical structure of the Standard Model.

  10. Biophysics of protein evolution and evolutionary protein biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikosek, Tobias; Chan, Hue Sun

    2014-01-01

    The study of molecular evolution at the level of protein-coding genes often entails comparing large datasets of sequences to infer their evolutionary relationships. Despite the importance of a protein's structure and conformational dynamics to its function and thus its fitness, common phylogenetic methods embody minimal biophysical knowledge of proteins. To underscore the biophysical constraints on natural selection, we survey effects of protein mutations, highlighting the physical basis for marginal stability of natural globular proteins and how requirement for kinetic stability and avoidance of misfolding and misinteractions might have affected protein evolution. The biophysical underpinnings of these effects have been addressed by models with an explicit coarse-grained spatial representation of the polypeptide chain. Sequence–structure mappings based on such models are powerful conceptual tools that rationalize mutational robustness, evolvability, epistasis, promiscuous function performed by ‘hidden’ conformational states, resolution of adaptive conflicts and conformational switches in the evolution from one protein fold to another. Recently, protein biophysics has been applied to derive more accurate evolutionary accounts of sequence data. Methods have also been developed to exploit sequence-based evolutionary information to predict biophysical behaviours of proteins. The success of these approaches demonstrates a deep synergy between the fields of protein biophysics and protein evolution. PMID:25165599

  11. Design, synthesis of novel lipids as chemical permeation enhancers and development of nanoparticle system for transdermal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujan Marepally

    Full Text Available In the present study, we designed and developed novel lipids that include (Z-1-(Octadec-9-en-1-yl-pyrrolidine (Cy5T, 1, 1-Di-((Z-octadec-9-en-1-ylpyrrolidin-1-ium iodide (Cy5, (Z-1-(Octadec-9-en-1-yl-piperidine (Cy6T, and 1, 1-Di-((Z-octadec-9-en-1-yl piperidin-1-ium iodide (Cy6 to enhance the transdermal permeation of some selected drugs. Firstly, we evaluated the transdermal permeation efficacies of these lipids as chemical permeation enhancers in vehicle formulations for melatonin, ß-estradiol, caffeine, α-MSH, and spantide using franz diffusion cells. Among them Cy5 lipid was determined to be the most efficient by increasing the transdermal permeation of melatonin, ß-estradiol, caffeine, α-MSH, and spantide by 1.5 to 3.26-fold more at the epidermal layer and 1.3 to 2.5-fold more at the dermal layer, in comparison to either NMP or OA. Hence we developed a nanoparticle system (cy5 lipid ethanol drug nanoparticles to evaluate any further improvement in the drug penetration. Cy5 lipid formed uniformly sized nanoparticles ranging from 150-200 nm depending on the type of drug. Further, Cy5 based nanoparticle system significantly (p<0.05 increased the permeation of all the drugs in comparison to the lipid solution and standard permeation enhancers. There were about 1.54 to 22-fold more of drug retained in the dermis for the Cy5 based nanoparticles compared to OA/NMP standard enhancers and 3.87 to 66.67-fold more than lipid solution. In addition, epifluorescent microscopic analysis in rhodamine-PE permeation studies confirmed the superior permeation enhancement of LEDs (detection of fluorescence up to skin depth of 340 μm more than lipid solution, which revealed fluorescence up to skin depth of only 260 μm. In summary the present findings demonstrate that i cationic lipid with 5 membered amine heterocyclic ring has higher permeating efficacy than the 6 membered amine hertocyclic ring. ii The nanoparticle system prepared with Cy5 showed

  12. Biological Constraints on Literacy Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Investigates some of the biological constraints that shape the process of literacy acquisition. Explores the possibility of isolating processing components of reading which correspond to computational units of equivalent size in the neural architecture. Suggests that the process of literacy acquisition is largely constrained by a specific…

  13. Constraint Programming versus Mathematical Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) is a relatively new technique from the 80's with origins in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. Lately, much research have been focused on ways of using CLP within the paradigm of Operations Research (OR) and vice versa. The purpose of this paper...

  14. Intertemporal consumption and credit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Petersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    There is continuing controversy over the importance of credit constraints. This paper investigates whether total household expenditure and debt is affected by an exogenous increase in access to credit provided by a credit market reform that enabled Danish house owners to use housing equity...

  15. Conjoined Constraints and Phonological Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Bonilha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of Optimality Theory (Prince & Smolensky, 1993, research on phonological acquisition has explored the explanatory potential of constraint theories. This study, also based on Optimality Theory, attempts to analyze the acquisition of CVVC syllable structure by Brazilian Portuguese children and addresses the issue of Local Conjunction (Smolensky, 1995, 1997 in research that deals with problems of phonological acquisition.

  16. Continuous Optimization on Constraint Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates continuous optimization on the differentiable manifold formed by continuous constraint functions. The first order tensor geodesic differential equation is solved on the manifold in both numerical and closed analytic form for simple nonlinear programs. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to conventional optimization techniques are discussed.

  17. Sterile neutrino constraints from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of light particles beyond the standard model's three neutrino species can profoundly impact the physics of decoupling and primordial nucleosynthesis. I review the observational signatures of extra light species, present constraints from recent data, and discuss the implications of po...... of possible sterile neutrinos with O(eV)-masses for cosmology....

  18. Constraint-Based Scheduling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, Monte; Eskey, Megan; Stock, Todd; Taylor, Will; Kanefsky, Bob; Drascher, Ellen; Deale, Michael; Daun, Brian; Davis, Gene

    1995-01-01

    Report describes continuing development of software for constraint-based scheduling system implemented eventually on massively parallel computer. Based on machine learning as means of improving scheduling. Designed to learn when to change search strategy by analyzing search progress and learning general conditions under which resource bottleneck occurs.

  19. Evolutionary robotics – A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    MS received 26 June 2001; revised 9 May 2003. Abstract. In evolutionary robotics, a suitable robot control system is developed automatically through evolution due to the interactions between the robot and its environment. It is a complicated task, as the robot and the environment constitute a highly dynamical system.

  20. Evolutionary genetics: the Drosophila model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Evolutionary genetics straddles the two fundamental processes of life, development (the transition from egg to adult) and reproduction (the generation of eggs from adults), and scrutinizes, from an evolu- tionary perspective, the nature .... script profiles in aging and calorically restricted Drosophila melanogaster. Curr. Biol.

  1. Current Issues in Evolutionary Paleontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Erik Paul

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the contributions made by the field of paleontology to theories in geology and biology. Suggests that the two best examples of modern evolutionary paleontology relate to the theory of punctuated equilibria, and the possibility that mass extinctions may be cyclic. (TW)

  2. Conceptual foundations of evolutionary thought

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-07-04

    Jul 4, 2017 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 3. Conceptual foundations of evolutionary thought. K. P. MOHANAN. Perspectives Volume 96 Issue 3 July 2017 pp 401-412. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/096/03/0401-0412. Abstract ...

  3. Evolutionary Biology Research in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 10. Evolutionary Biology Research in India. Information and Announcements Volume 5 Issue 10 October 2000 pp 102-104. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/10/0102-0104 ...

  4. Haldane and modern evolutionary genetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 5. Haldane and modern evolutionary genetics. BRIAN CHARLESWORTH. HALDANE AT 125 Volume 96 Issue 5 November 2017 pp 773-782. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/096/05/0773-0782. Keywords.

  5. Evolutionary trends in directional hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Tympanic hearing is a true evolutionary novelty that arose in parallel within early tetrapods. We propose that in these tetrapods, selection for sound localization in air acted upon pre-existing directionally sensitive brainstem circuits, similar to those in fishes. Auditory circuits in birds...

  6. Is evolutionary biology strategic science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    There is a profound need for the scientific community to be better aware of the policy context in which it operates. To address this need, Evolution has established a new Outlook feature section to include papers that explore the interface between society and evolutionary biology. This first paper in the series considers the strategic relevance of evolutionary biology. Support for scientific research in general is based on governmental or institutional expenditure that is an investment, and such investment is based on strategies designed to achieve particular outcomes, such as advance in particular areas of basic science or application. The scientific community can engage in the development of scientific strategies on a variety of levels, including workshops to explicitly develop research priorities and targeted funding initiatives to help define emerging scientific areas. Better understanding and communication of the scientific achievements of evolutionary biology, emphasizing immediate and potential societal relevance, are effective counters to challenges presented by the creationist agenda. Future papers in the Outlook feature section should assist the evolutionary biology community in achieving a better collective understanding of the societal relevance of their field.

  7. The Evolutionary Ecology of Mutualism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivens, A.B.F.

    2012-01-01

    Mutualism, cooperation between different species, is wide-spread in nature. From bees pollinating plants to bacteria aiding digestion in the human gut: mutualism is essential for life on earth. But how does mutualism evolve? And what mechanisms keep mutualisms stable over evolutionary time and

  8. Evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This special volume of Cytogenetic and Genome Research (edited by Roscoe Stanyon, University of Florence and Alexander Graphodatsky, Siberian division of the Russian Academy of Sciences is dedicated to the fascinating long search of the forces behind the evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes, revealed after the hypotonic miracle of the 1950s....

  9. Defining fitness in evolutionary models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The analysis of evolutionary models requires an appropriate definition for fitness. In this paper, I review such definitions in relation to the five major dimensions by which models may be described, namely. finite versus infinite (or very large) population size,; type of environment (constant, fixed length, temporally stochastic, ...

  10. Euryhalinity in an evolutionary context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric T.; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the evolutionary importance and taxonomic distribution of euryhalinity. Euryhalinity refers to broad halotolerance and broad halohabitat distribution. Salinity exposure experiments have demonstrated that species vary tenfold in their range of tolerable salinity levels, primarily because of differences in upper limits. Halotolerance breadth varies with the species’ evolutionary history, as represented by its ordinal classification, and with the species’ halohabitat. Freshwater and seawater species tolerate brackish water; their empirically-determined fundamental haloniche is broader than their realized haloniche, as revealed by the halohabitats they occupy. With respect to halohabitat distribution, a minority of species (<10%) are euryhaline. Habitat-euryhalinity is prevalent among basal actinopterygian fishes, is largely absent from orders arising from intermediate nodes, and reappears in the most derived taxa. There is pronounced family-level variability in the tendency to be halohabitat-euryhaline, which may have arisen during a burst of diversification following the Cretaceous-Palaeogene extinction. Low prevalence notwithstanding, euryhaline species are potent sources of evolutionary diversity. Euryhalinity is regarded as a key innovation trait whose evolution enables exploitation of new adaptive zone, triggering cladogenesis. We review phylogenetically-informed studies that demonstrate freshwater species diversifying from euryhaline ancestors through processes such as landlocking. These studies indicate that some euryhaline taxa are particularly susceptible to changes in halohabitat and subsequent diversification, and some geographic regions have been hotspots for transitions to freshwater. Comparative studies on mechanisms among multiple taxa and at multiple levels of biological integration are needed to clarify evolutionary pathways to, and from, euryhalinity.

  11. Realism, Relativism, and Evolutionary Psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, M.

    Against recent attempts to forge a reconciliation between constructionism and realism, I contend that, in psychology at least, stirring up conflict is a more fruitful strategy. To illustrate this thesis, I confront a school of psychology with strong realist leanings, evolutionary psychology, with

  12. Evolutionary Psychology and Intelligence Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to unify two subfields of psychology that have hitherto stood separately: evolutionary psychology and intelligence research/differential psychology. I suggest that general intelligence may simultaneously be an evolved adaptation and an individual-difference variable. Tooby and Cosmides's (1990a) notion of random quantitative…

  13. Major evolutionary transitions in individuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, S.A.; Fisher, R.M.; Gardner, A.; Kiers, E.T.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of life on earth has been driven by a small number of major evolutionary transitions. These transitions have been characterized by individuals that could previously replicate independently, cooperating to form a new, more complex life form. For example, archaea and eubacteria formed

  14. Evolutionary biology of bacterial and fungal pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baquero, F

    2008-01-01

    ... and Evolutionary Dynamics of Pathogens * 21 Keith A. Crandall and Marcos Pérez-Losada II. Evolutionary Genetics of Microbial Pathogens 4. Environmental and Social Influences on Infectious Disea...

  15. Towards a mechanistic foundation of evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebeli, Michael; Ispolatov, Yaroslav; Simon, Burt

    2017-02-15

    Most evolutionary thinking is based on the notion of fitness and related ideas such as fitness landscapes and evolutionary optima. Nevertheless, it is often unclear what fitness actually is, and its meaning often depends on the context. Here we argue that fitness should not be a basal ingredient in verbal or mathematical descriptions of evolution. Instead, we propose that evolutionary birth-death processes, in which individuals give birth and die at ever-changing rates, should be the basis of evolutionary theory, because such processes capture the fundamental events that generate evolutionary dynamics. In evolutionary birth-death processes, fitness is at best a derived quantity, and owing to the potential complexity of such processes, there is no guarantee that there is a simple scalar, such as fitness, that would describe long-term evolutionary outcomes. We discuss how evolutionary birth-death processes can provide useful perspectives on a number of central issues in evolution.

  16. Dobzhansky and Evolutionary Cytogenetics-Pioneering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 10. Dobzhansky and Evolutionary Cytogenetics - Pioneering Evolutionary Studies with Chromosomes. Bimalendu B Nath. General Article Volume 5 Issue 10 October 2000 pp 61-65 ...

  17. COEVOLUTIONARY SEMANTICS OF TECHNOLOGICAL CIVILIZATION GENESIS AND EVOLUTIONARY RISK (BETWEEN THE BIOAESTHETICS AND BIOPOLITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Cheshko

    2016-12-01

    emotionally aesthetic image of «Self». In conclusion it should be noted that there is a causal link between the development of High Hume (NBIC technologies and the totality of the trend in the anthropological phenomenon of bio-power that permeates all the available human existence in modern civilization. As a result, there is a transformation of a contemporary social (man-made risk in the evolutionary civilization risk.

  18. Selective Permeation and Organic Extraction of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein (gfpuv from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Marina

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α with pGFPuv, induced by IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, express the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv during growth phases. E. coli subjected to the combination of selective permeation by freezing/thawing/sonication cycles followed by the three-phase partitioning extraction (TPP method were compared to the direct application of TPP to the same culture of E. coli on releasing gfpuv from the over-expressing cells. Material and Methods Cultures (37°C/100 rpm/ 24 h; μ = 0.99 h-1 - 1.10 h-1 of transformed (pGFP Escherichia coli DH5-α, expressing the green fluorescent protein (gfpuv, absorbance at 394 nm and emission at 509 nm were sonicated in successive intervals of sonication (25 vibrations/pulse to determine the maximum amount of gfpuv released from the cells. For selective permeation, the transformed previously frozen (-75°C cells were subjected to three freeze/thaw (-20°C/ 0.83°C/min cycles interlaid by sonication (3 pulses/ 6 seconds/ 25 vibrations. The intracellular permeate with gfpuv in extraction buffer (TE solution (25 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, 1 mM β-mercaptoethanol β-ME, 0.1 mM PMSF was subjected to the three-phase partitioning (TPP method with t-butanol and 1.6 M ammonium sulfate. Sonication efficiency was verified on the application to the cells previously treated by the TPP method. The intra-cell releases were mixed and eluted through methyl HIC column with a buffer solution (10 mM Tris-HCl, 10 mM EDTA, pH 8.0. Results The sonication maximum released amount obtained from the cells was 327.67 μg gfpuv/mL (20.73 μg gfpuv/mg total proteins – BSA, after 9 min of treatment. Through the selective permeation by three repeated freezing/thawing/sonication cycles applied to the cells, a close content of 241.19 μg gfpuv/mL (29.74 μg gfpuv/mg BSA was obtained. The specific mass range of gfpuv released from the same cultures, by the three-phase partitioning (TPP

  19. Creativity from Constraints in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onarheim, Balder

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of constraints in limiting and enhancing creativity in engineering design. Based on a review of literature relating constraints to creativity, the paper presents a longitudinal participatory study from Coloplast A/S, a major international producer of disposable...... medical equipment. At Coloplast, constraints played a fundamental role and the observations show the important, dual role of constraints in terms of being a limitation and a prerequisite for creativity. Too few or too many constraints had a negative impact on creativity, whereas the formulation, rationale...... and ownership of formal constraints played a crucial role in defining their influence on creativity – along with the tacit constraints held by the designers. The designers were found to be highly constraint focused, and four main creative strategies for constraint manipulation were observed: blackboxing...

  20. Release and in vitro skin permeation of polyphenols from cosmetic emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, O V; Schweiggert-Weisz, U; Hasenkopf, K; Eisner, P; Kerscher, M

    2013-10-01

    Polyphenols are natural antioxidants, which can inhibit oxidative chain reactions in human skin and prevent therefore some skin diseases and premature ageing. A prerequisite of this behaviour is their permeation through the skin barrier, in particular the stratum corneum (SC). In this study, we investigated the skin permeation kinetic of polyphenols, incorporated to semisolid emulsions, and the release of polyphenols from the emulsions. Mixtures of model substances, consisting of catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, quercetin, rutin and protocatechuic acid (PCA), were formulated into o/w emulsions with different oil phase content. The in vitro experiments were carried out in Franz-type diffusion cells by means of ex vivo pig skin and a cellulose membrane. The increased oil content in the emulsion led to a significant decrease in initial release coefficients (K(r)), diffusion coefficients within the formulation (D(v)) and skin permeation coefficients (K(p)), respectively. The study considered the dependence of K(r) on molecular weight and lipophilicity of polyphenolics. For both more hydrophilic and more lipophilic substance groups, the values for K(r) were inverse proportional to molecular weight. For catechin, quercetin, rutin, resveratrol and PCA, a good correlation between K(p) and K(r) parameters was obtained. The most permeable substance was PCA (K(p) = 1.2·10(-3) cm h(-1)), and the least permeable was quercetin (K(p) = 1.5·10(-5) cm h(-1)). All substances could pass the SC barrier and were found mostly in the epidermis and dermis, confirming the potential of polyphenols as anti-ageing active cosmetic ingredients. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.