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Sample records for evolutional approach proven

  1. Bangladesh-Burma Accretionary Prism: Evolution and Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R.; Najman, Y.; Carter, A.; Willett, E.; Garzanti, E.; Wijbrans, J.; Bickle, M.; Vezzoli, G.; Ando, S.; Alexandre, P.; Uddin, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh and the Indo-Burman Ranges (Arakan Yoma) of Myanmar constitute an accretionary prism which runs along the India-Asian subduction zone. It consists of Palaeogene as well as Neogene sedimentary rocks that may preserve a record of early Himalayan erosion, which is as yet inaccessible in the deeper parts of the Bengal Fan, or missing in other sediment repositories of the region (Curray et al. 1979, 2003 and Gani et al. 1999). However, a Burman provenance has also been suggested for these rocks (Mitchell, 1993; Pal et al. 2003). In order to characterise the provenance signature of the accretionary prism rocks and determine Himalayan or Burman source, we have used petrographic, heavy mineral, U-Pb, fission track, Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar analyses. We present results of the initial study, including new seismic data (obtained by Cairn Energy plc.) which provides a seismic stratigraphy of the Chittagong Hill Tracts calibrated to offshore well seismic data, as well as comprehensive palaeoshelf mapping of the Bengal Basin region during the Eocene to Pliocene, which documents source input direction.

  2. Rapid evolution and range expansion of an invasive plant are driven by provenance-environment interactions.

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    Zenni, Rafael D; Bailey, Joseph K; Simberloff, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    To improve our ability to prevent and manage biological invasions, we must understand their ecological and evolutionary drivers. We are often able to explain invasions after they happen, but our predictive ability is limited. Here, we show that range expansions of introduced Pinus taeda result from an interaction between genetic provenance and climate and that temperature and precipitation clines predict the invasive performance of particular provenances. Furthermore, we show that genotypes can occupy climate niche spaces different from those observed in their native ranges and, at least in our case, that admixture is not a main driver of invasion. Genotypes respond to climate in distinct ways, and these interactions affect the ability of populations to expand their ranges. While rapid evolution in introduced ranges is a mechanism at later stages of the invasion process, the introduction of adapted genotypes is a key driver of naturalisation of populations of introduced species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  3. Provenance of Des Moines lobe till records ice-stream catchment evolution during Laurentide deglaciation

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    Lusardi, B.A.; Jennings, C.E.; Harris, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Mapping and analysis of deposits of the Des Moines lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, active after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), reveal several texturally and lithologically distinct tills within what had been considered to be a homogeneous deposit. Although the differences between tills are subtle, minor distinctions are predictable and mappable, and till sheets within the area covered by the lobe can be correlated for hundreds of kilometres parallel to ice flow. Lateral till-sheet contacts are abrupt or overlap in a narrow zone, coincident with a geomorphic discontinuity interpreted to be a shear margin. Till sheets 10 to 20m thick show mixing in their lower 2 to 3m. We suggest that: (i) lithologically distinct till sheets correspond to unique ice-stream source areas; (ii) the sequence of tills deposited by the Des Moines lobe was the result of the evolution and varying dominance of nearby and competing ice streams and their tributaries; and (iii) in at least one instance, more than one ice stream simultaneously contributed to the lobe. Therefore the complex sequence of tills of subtly different provenances, and the unconformities between them record the evolution of an ice-catchment area during Laurentide Ice Sheet drawdown. Till provenance data suggest that, after till is created in the ice-stream source area, the subglacial conditions required for transporting till decline and incorporation of new material is limited. ?? 2011 The Authors. Boreas ?? 2011 The Boreas Collegium.

  4. Ethiopian plants with proven and suspected molluscicidal activity: a new approach in plant evaluation.

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    Kloos, H; McCullough, F S

    1985-06-01

    Using available information on the toxicity, phytochemistry, ethnomedical uses and geographic distribution of plants, potentially suitable species are identified for the control of intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis in Ethiopia's lowlands where endod (Phytolacca dodecandra) is not available. Of 46 species with moderate to high snail-killing potency, 35 are indigenous to Ethiopia. They include 12 plant species with molluscicidal levels similar to those of endod, four of which are particularly suitable for snail control because of their low mammalian toxicity. Another 127 species indigenous to Ethiopia belong to genera with proven molluscicidal activity. The model for plant screening used here permits preliminary assessment of the suitability of plant resources in a given region or locality for snail control programs using existing data, without prior testing of local plants, making this approach appropriate for many developing countries.

  5. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution teaching can be particularly challenging for student teachers who are just beginning to gain pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge related to evolution teaching and who seek approval from university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Science teacher educators need to know how to best support student teachers as they broach the sometimes daunting task of teaching evolution within student teaching placements. This multiple case study report documents how three student teachers approached evolution instruction and what influenced their approaches. Data sources included student teacher interviews, field note observations for 4-5 days of evolution instruction, and evolution instructional artifacts. Data were analyzed using grounded theory approaches to develop individual cases and a cross-case analysis. Seven influences (state exams and standards, cooperating teacher, ideas about teaching and learning, concerns about evolution controversy, personal commitment to evolution, knowledge and preparation for teaching evolution, and own evolution learning experiences) were identified and compared across cases. Implications for science teacher preparation and future research are provided.

  6. Provenance of sediments in the Marwar Supergroup, Rajasthan, India: Implications for basin evolution and Neoproterozoic global events

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Bivin G.; Ray, Jyotiranjan S.

    2017-10-01

    The Marwar Supergroup of NW India is one of the largest Neoproterozoic sedimentary successions of India. Deposited in an intracratonic sag basin, the Supergroup contains largely unmetamorphosed and undeformed fluvial and marginal marine siliciclastics, marine carbonates, and minor volcaniclastics which hold clues to the geotectonic evolution of India subsequent to the disintegration of the Rodinia and during the formation of the Gondwanaland. Here, we present age constraints for the initiation of sedimentation and evolution of the basin. The Rb-Sr whole rock isochron of a felsic tuff from the lower part of the Supergroup, yields an age of 703 ± 40 Ma, which suggests that the sedimentation in the Marwar basin started in the Cryogenian period. The result of Sr isotope stratigraphy suggests a depositional age of ∼570 Ma (Late Ediacaran) for the carbonate sequences in the middle part of the Supergroup, indicating a depositional hiatus of ∼100 Ma between the lower and middle Marwars. We speculate that this relapse in the sedimentation could be related to the widespread Pan-African event (Malagasy Orogeny). Provenance analysis using Neodymium (Nd) isotopes and trace elements shows that sediments in the lower Marwars were contributed by the Delhi Supergroup (∼1.6 Ga), Banded Gneissic Complex-2 (>1.8 Ga) and possibly the Erinpura Granites (∼850 Ma), whereas the siliciclastics deposited in the middle and upper Marwars were predominantly sourced from the Delhi Supergroup. Interestingly, the contribution from the Malani Igneous Suite (MIS) to the sedimentation is limited only to the basal formation near the basin margin.

  7. Biomechanical differences in the stem straightening process among Pinus pinaster provenances. A new approach for early selection of stem straightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-de-Grado, Rosario; Pando, Valentín; Martínez-Zurimendi, Pablo; Peñalvo, Alejandro; Báscones, Esther; Moulia, Bruno

    2008-06-01

    Stem straightness is an important selection trait in Pinus pinaster Ait. breeding programs. Despite the stability of stem straightness rankings in provenance trials, the efficiency of breeding programs based on a quantitative index of stem straightness remains low. An alternative approach is to analyze biomechanical processes that underlie stem form. The rationale for this selection method is that genetic differences in the biomechanical processes that maintain stem straightness in young plants will continue to control stem form throughout the life of the tree. We analyzed the components contributing most to genetic differences among provenances in stem straightening processes by kinetic analysis and with a biomechanical model defining the interactions between the variables involved (Fournier's model). This framework was tested on three P. pinaster provenances differing in adult stem straightness and growth. One-year-old plants were tilted at 45 degrees, and individual stem positions and sizes were recorded weekly for 5 months. We measured the radial extension of reaction wood and the anatomical features of wood cells in serial stem cross sections. The integral effect of reaction wood on stem leaning was computed with Fournier's model. Responses driven by both primary and secondary growth were involved in the stem straightening process, but secondary-growth-driven responses accounted for most differences among provenances. Plants from the straight-stemmed provenance showed a greater capacity for stem straightening than plants from the sinuous provenances mainly because of (1) more efficient reaction wood (higher maturation strains) and (2) more pronounced secondary-growth-driven autotropic decurving. These two process-based traits are thus good candidates for early selection of stem straightness, but additional tests on a greater number of genotypes over a longer period are required.

  8. Evolution of the northern Albertine Rift reflected in the provenance of synrift sediments (Nkondo-Kaiso area, Uganda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Rift sediments are important archives for the evolution of the East African Rift System. We present a source-to-sink study of the Nkondo-Kaiso area in the northern Albertine Rift from a ∼200 m thick late Miocene to early Pleistocene sediment succession. The multi-proxy provenance analysis includes framework petrography, heavy mineral studies and single grain studies of garnet and rutile. Mineral textures and provenance signatures indicate two major stages. Sediment of Stage 1 (late Miocene - late Pliocene; ∼6.5-2.6 Ma) is less mature with quartz contents of 58-81%, K-feldspar of 9-15%, plagioclase of 4-15%, and rock fragments of 1-9%. Heavy mineral spectra are dominated by epidote and amphibole with minor abundances of zircon, sillimanite and garnet. Garnet is almandine-rich and can be grouped according to grossular contents (10%). Rutile exhibits a wide range of Nb and Cr concentrations, most of them typical for a metapelitic origin. Zr-in-rutile formation temperatures range between ∼570 and 940 °C. Garnet and rutile geochemistry mainly correspond to amphibolite-to granulite-facies igneous and metasedimentary rocks, which exist in the Mesoarchean Karuma Group and the Neoarchean granitoid gneiss of the North Uganda Terrane. Both are part of the adjacent eastern rift flank of the Albertine Rift. A slight change of the heavy mineral composition at ∼4.5 Ma can be correlated with the onset of the synrift stage ∼0.5-1.0 Ma later than in the southern Albertine Rift. Sediment of Stage 2 (early Pleistocene ∼2.6-1.0 Ma) shows a higher quartz content of 82-93%, and lower contents of K-feldspar of 5-11%, plagioclase of 1-7%, and rock fragments of 1-2%. Stable heavy minerals (ZTR index: 19-63) and epidote dominate with minor amphibole and garnet. Rutile and garnet chemical compositions remain largely unchanged to Stage 1 pointing to the same primary source. Obviously, Pleistocene sediment was mainly recycled from sedimentary rocks of the Neoproterozoic Bunyoro

  9. Transparent heavy minerals and magnetite geochemical composition of the Yangtze River sediments: Implication for provenance evolution of the Yangtze Delta

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    Yue, Wei; Jin, Bingfu; Zhao, Baocheng

    2018-02-01

    Heavy mineral and detrital magnetite geochemistry were analyzed to extract sediment provenance indexes from different reaches of the modern Yangtze River which were used to trace sediment source of the Yangtze Delta and to speculate its geomorphology change since the Pliocene. Our results show that diagnostic heavy minerals of the upper Yangtze sediment are characterized by clinopyroxene (12% on average) and magnetite (7% on average); the middle reaches by ilmenite, zircon and tourmaline; and the local small rivers by fluorite. Detrital magnetite composition of Ti, Mg, V and Cr is high in the upper Yangtze from the underlying basalt. These diagnostic indexes are then used in the Pliocene sediment core to extract provenance signal of different Yangtze reaches. Analysis of core sediment of the Yangtze Delta reveals that sediment provenance of the Pliocene was from local small rivers. Since the beginning of the Pleistocene, core sediments provenance was similar to that of the middle Yangtze tributaries. After 1.2 Ma, high content of pyroxene and magnetite grains that are rich in Ti, Mg, V, Cr imply sediment provenance signals from the upper Yangtze. Sediment provenance shift from short-distance sources to more distant sources indicates that the geomorphology of the Yangtze Delta region has undergone a great transformation since the Pliocene. This dramatic landform change is likely in response to continuous uplift of the Tibetan plateau and accelerated subsidence of the east China coast since the Pliocene.

  10. Detrital zircon (U-Th)/(He-Pb) double-dating constraints on provenance and foreland basin evolution of the Ainsa Basin, south-central Pyrenees, Spain

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    Thomson, Kelly D.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Clark, Julian D.; Puigdefàbregas, Cai; Fildani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    South central Pyrenean foreland basin fill preserves the eroded remnants of the early stages of fold-thrust belt evolution and topographic growth. Specifically, the Eocene Hecho Group in the Ainsa Basin contains a succession of turbiditic channels and levees deposited in the transition zone between the fluvial-deltaic and deep marine depozones. Detailed isotopic provenance analyses allow for the reconstruction of sediment sources of the ancient sediment routing systems. This study presents 2332 new detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb ages and 246 new DZ double-dated (U-Th)/(He-Pb) ages from 19 turbiditic and fluvio-deltatic sandstones in the Ainsa Basin. These data indicate a progressive provenance shift from Cadomian/Caledonian plutonic and metamorphic rocks of the eastern Pyrenees to Variscan plutonic rocks in the central Pyrenees. Minor sediment contributions from sources located to the S and SE of the basin are seen throughout the section. New DZ (U-Th)/He results identify four main cooling events: Pyrenean orogenesis ( 56 Ma), initial basin inversion ( 80 Ma), Cretaceous rifting ( 100 Ma), and pre-Mesozoic cooling ages related to earlier tectonic phases. This study imposes new constraints on the paleogeographic evolution of the Pyrenees and illustrates that high-frequency fluctuations in sediment delivery processes and sediment routing introduce superimposed noise upon the basin-scale long-term provenance evolution during orogenesis.

  11. Marketing moxie for librarians fresh ideas, proven techniques, and innovative approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Watson-Lakamp, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Robust, resilient, and flexible marketing is an absolute necessity for today's libraries. Fortunately, marketing can be fun. Through this savvy guide, you'll discover a wealth of fresh, actionable ideas and approaches that can be combined with tried-and-true marketing techniques to serve any library. Focusing on building platforms rather than chasing trends, the book offers low- and no-budget ideas for those in small libraries as well as information that can be used by libraries that have a staff of professionals. The guide opens with an overview of the basics of marketing and continues throug

  12. Insights from heavy minerals and zircon U-Pb ages into the middle Miocene-Pliocene provenance evolution of the Yinggehai Basin, northwestern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Cao, Licheng; Xie, Xinong; Wang, Zhenfeng; Li, Xushen; Zhang, Yingzhao; Zhang, Daojun; Sun, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The well-preserved Cenozoic sedimentary record in the Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea, is suitable to explore the tectonic and climatic evolution of SE Asia. Red River, a large-scale fluvial system in this region, was previously regarded as the major sediment source for the basin. Here we combine heavy mineral analysis and detrital zircon U-Pb dating to shed new light on the middle Miocene-Pliocene provenance evolution at a basin scale. The results clearly reveal potential source areas additional to the Red River. Sediments have been delivered to the proximal areas from Hainan Island, as indicated by the high zircon content and the Yanshanian U-Pb ages in the southern segment of the Yingdong Slope. A provenance from Central Vietnam is explicitly discerned in the upper Miocene of the Central Depression, where sediments are characterized by few metamorphic heavy minerals and the U-Pb age pattern peaking at around 250 Ma and 440 Ma. Coeval large-scale relative sea-level fall and rapid exhumation along the Vietnamese margin together may have facilitated this long-distance sediment transport. Provenance of sediments from the Red River seems to change over time. Song Lo River, on the north side of the main stream, probably flowed from the NE and carried Neoproterozoic-early Paleozoic zircons to the Yinggehai Basin during the middle Miocene. Since the late Miocene, rocks along the Red River Fault Zone have become the dominant source. Subsequently, widespread metamorphic minerals in the Central Depression of the Yinggehai Basin, combined with the strong river incision and high offshore sedimentation rates, indicate an increased sediment supply from the Red River in the Pliocene.

  13. Provenance evolution of the Jurassic northern Qaidam Basin (West China) and its geological implications: evidence from detrital zircon geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long; Xiao, Ancheng; Wu, Lei; Tian, Yuntao; Rittner, Martin; Lou, Qianqian; Pan, Xiaotian

    2017-03-01

    The Jurassic system is the major hydrocarbon source rock and of crucial importance for understanding the Mesozoic intra-continental tectonics in West China. This paper presents systematic detrital zircon geochronology of the Jurassic outcropping at the Dameigou locality in the northern Qaidam Basin, and reports 1000 single-grain U-Pb zircon ages that have implications for the provenance, the corresponding basin property as well as the tectonic setting of West China during Jurassic. Zircon ages exhibit two major clusters at 250 and 2400 Ma whereas two minor clusters at 450 and 850 Ma, suggesting primary sources from the East Kunlun Shan and Oulongbuluke Block, secondary sources from the North Qaidam UHP belt and South Qilian Shan. Combined with observation of lithology and sedimentary facies, two rifting periods were inferred in the earliest Jurassic and the early stage of the Middle Jurassic, respectively, accompanied by further extension throughout the Jurassic. Our results do not support a foreland basin related to the Jurassic southward thrusting of the South Qilian Shan, but favor that the Mesozoic intra-continental tectonics in West China were characterised by pulsed responses to specific collisions rather than a persisting contractional setting during Jurassic period.

  14. An evolutionary developmental approach to cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Claes; Törnberg, Anton; Törnberg, Petter

    2014-04-01

    Evolutionary developmental theories in biology see the processes and organization of organisms as crucial for understanding the dynamic behavior of organic evolution. Darwinian forces are seen as necessary but not sufficient for explaining observed evolutionary patterns. We here propose that the same arguments apply with even greater force to culture vis-à-vis cultural evolution. In order not to argue entirely in the abstract, we demonstrate the proposed approach by combining a set of different models into a provisional synthetic theory and by applying this theory to a number of short case studies. What emerges is a set of concepts and models that allow us to consider entirely new types of explanations for the evolution of cultures. For example, we see how feedback relations--both within societies and between societies and their ecological environment--have the power to shape evolutionary history in profound ways. The ambition here is not to produce a definitive statement on what such a theory should look like but rather to propose a starting point along with an argumentation and demonstration of its potential.

  15. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  16. Sedimentary provenance in response to Carboniferous arc-basin evolution of East Junggar and North Tianshan belts in the southwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Fu, Dong; Kusky, Timothy; Ruan, Kunpeng; Zhou, Wenxiao; Zhang, Xionghua

    2018-01-01

    The North Tianshan and East Junggar belts in north Xinjiang, China, are two key terranes for the Paleozoic tectonic reconstruction of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). However, their Carboniferous paleogeographic setting and arc-basin relationships remain disputed. To better-constrain these problems, we carried out an investigation on the provenance of Carboniferous sandstones from the Yaomoliang Formation in East Junggar and the Qijiaojing Formation in North Tianshan. Modal and geochemical analyses reveal that the sediments are mainly derived from arc-related terranes. Detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra show distinct differences between the East Junggar and North Tianshan belts. The upper Yaomoliang Formation has a Late Carboniferous depositional age (ca. 315 Ma) with a single peak spectrum of detrital zircon ages, which is similar with zircon ages from the igneous rocks and associated accretionary complexes in East Junggar belt, suggesting that it was probably derived from the East Junggar arc. The samples from the Qijiaojing Formation have Early Carboniferous depositional ages (ca. 330 Ma to 354 Ma). Their complicated detrital zircon age peaks resemble the detrital and igneous zircon ages from the Harlik-Dananhu arc, implying that their source terrane could be the Harlik-Dananhu arc, as revealed by the near-source petrographic and arc-derived geochemical features. In combination with our results and the published data, we suggest two distinctive Carboniferous arc-basin systems, the Kelamaili Ocean-related arc-basin which is characterized by the northward subduction beneath the East Junggar arc, and the Bogda intra-arc basin which evolved from splitting the previous Harlik-Dananhu arc by the rollback of the subducting North Tianshan oceanic plate. The sedimentary provenance evidence reveals that the Kelamaili Ocean has not closed until ca. 315 Ma. The multiple arc-basin systems in North Xinjiang indicate an archipelago-type subduction and accretionary

  17. Microbial composition analyses by 16S rRNA sequencing: A proof of concept approach to provenance determination of archaeological ochre.

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    Lenehan, Claire E; Tobe, Shanan S; Smith, Renee J; Popelka-Filcoff, Rachel S

    2017-01-01

    Many archaeological science studies use the concept of "provenance", where the origins of cultural material can be determined through physical or chemical properties that relate back to the origins of the material. Recent studies using DNA profiling of bacteria have been used for the forensic determination of soils, towards determination of geographic origin. This manuscript presents a novel approach to the provenance of archaeological minerals and related materials through the use of 16S rRNA sequencing analysis of microbial DNA. Through the microbial DNA characterization from ochre and multivariate statistics, we have demonstrated the clear discrimination between four distinct Australian cultural ochre sites.

  18. Microbial composition analyses by 16S rRNA sequencing: A proof of concept approach to provenance determination of archaeological ochre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Lenehan

    Full Text Available Many archaeological science studies use the concept of "provenance", where the origins of cultural material can be determined through physical or chemical properties that relate back to the origins of the material. Recent studies using DNA profiling of bacteria have been used for the forensic determination of soils, towards determination of geographic origin. This manuscript presents a novel approach to the provenance of archaeological minerals and related materials through the use of 16S rRNA sequencing analysis of microbial DNA. Through the microbial DNA characterization from ochre and multivariate statistics, we have demonstrated the clear discrimination between four distinct Australian cultural ochre sites.

  19. Evolution of the western East African Rift System reflected in provenance changes of Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments (Albertine Rift, Uganda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra; Hornung, Jens; Hinderer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Miocene to Pleistocene synrift sediments in the Albertine Graben reflect the complex geodynamic evolution in the Western branch of the East African Rift System. In this study we focus on the provenance of these siliciclastic deposits to identify sediment sources and supply paths with the ultimate goal to reconstruct the exhumation history of different tectonic blocks during prolonged rifting, with specific focus on the uplift of the Rwenzori Mountains in Uganda. We present framework and heavy mineral petrographic data combined with varietal studies of detrital garnet and rutile, based on logged sediment sections on the Ugandan side of Lake Albert (Kisegi-Nyabusosi area). The analyzed sedimentary units have a feldspatho-quartzose composition and distinct variations in heavy mineral assemblages and mineral chemical composition indicating two provenance changes. The Miocene part of the stratigraphy is dominated by garnet, zircon, tourmaline and rutile, whereas Pliocene to Pleistocene sediment yields high amounts of less stable amphibole and epidote. An abrupt switch in heavy mineral assemblages occurs during the early Pliocene ( 5.5-5.0 Ma) and clearly postdates the formation of Palaeolake Obweruka at 8 Ma. Provenance signatures point to major sediment supply from the northeast and subsequently from the southeast. We interpret this first shift as transition from the pre-rift to the syn-rift stage. In this scenario, formation of Palaeolake Obweruka is due to higher humidity in the upper Miocene, rather than forced rifting. A second change of sediment composition is documented by mineral geochemistry and coincides with fragmentation of Palaeolake Obweruka starting at 2.5 Ma. Detrital garnet in sediment of Miocene to Pliocene age is rich in pyrope and almandine and calculated Zr-in-rutile temperatures range between 550 and 950 °C. In contrast, garnet occurring in Pleistocene sediment (Nyabusosi Formation) has a higher spessartine component and rutile thermometry is

  20. Information Provenance in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

    Information appearing in social media provides a challenge for determining the provenance of the information. However, the same characteristics that make the social media environment challenging provide unique and untapped opportunities for solving the information provenance problem for social media. Current approaches for tracking provenance information do not scale for social media and consequently there is a gap in provenance methodologies and technologies providing exciting research opportunities for computer scientists and sociologists. This paper introduces a theoretical approach aimed guiding future efforts to realize a provenance capability for social media that is not available today. The guiding vision is the use of social media information itself to realize a useful amount provenance data for information in social media.

  1. A Constructive Approach To Software Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Aksit, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    In many software design and evaluation techniques, either the software evolution problem is not systematically elaborated, or only the impact of evolution is considered. Thus, most of the time software is changed by editing the components of the software system, i.e. breaking down the software

  2. Provenance of unknown plutonium material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, G

    2008-10-01

    The determination of the provenance of 'unknown' plutonium material is demonstrated through a simulation study based on an isotopic fingerprinting approach. Plutonium of known provenance was considered as the 'unknown' nuclear material in order to evaluate the potential of the approach and verify its predictive capabilities. Factor analysis was used to compare the Pu isotopic composition of the 'unknown' material with Pu isotopic compositions simulating well known spent fuels from a range of commercial nuclear power stations. The provenance of the 'unknown material' is assigned to the commercial fuel with which exhibits the highest degree of similarity with respect to the Pu composition. The approach appears promising since it accurately predicted the provenance of the one 'unknown' sample considered; nevertheless, the approach is still at the development stage. Important challenging issues related to the simulation uncertainties and its testing on real laboratory samples have to be explored prior to evaluating the potential of the approach.

  3. Provenance and detrital zircon geochronologic evolution of lower Brookian foreland basin deposits of the western Brooks Range, Alaska, and implications for early Brookian tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Potter, Christopher J.; Donelick, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    The Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous part of the Brookian sequence of northern Alaska consists of syntectonic deposits shed from the north-directed, early Brookian orogenic belt. We employ sandstone petrography, detrital zircon U-Pb age analysis, and zircon fission-track double-dating methods to investigate these deposits in a succession of thin regional thrust sheets in the western Brooks Range and in the adjacent Colville foreland basin to determine sediment provenance, sedimentary dispersal patterns, and to reconstruct the evolution of the Brookian orogen. The oldest and structurally highest deposits are allochthonous Upper Jurassic volcanic arc–derived sandstones that rest on accreted ophiolitic and/or subduction assemblage mafic igneous rocks. These strata contain a nearly unimodal Late Jurassic zircon population and are interpreted to be a fragment of a forearc basin that was emplaced onto the Brooks Range during arc-continent collision. Synorogenic deposits found at structurally lower levels contain decreasing amounts of ophiolite and arc debris, Jurassic zircons, and increasing amounts of continentally derived sedimentary detritus accompanied by broadly distributed late Paleozoic and Triassic (359–200 Ma), early Paleozoic (542–359 Ma), and Paleoproterozoic (2000–1750 Ma) zircon populations. The zircon populations display fission-track evidence of cooling during the Brookian event and evidence of an earlier episode of cooling in the late Paleozoic and Triassic. Surprisingly, there is little evidence for erosion of the continental basement of Arctic Alaska, its Paleozoic sedimentary cover, or its hinterland metamorphic rocks in early foreland basin strata at any structural and/or stratigraphic level in the western Brooks Range. Detritus from exhumation of these sources did not arrive in the foreland basin until the middle or late Albian in the central part of the Colville Basin.These observations indicate that two primary provenance areas provided

  4. Sociohistorical evolution of judo: introductory approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozimbo Cordeiro Júnior

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The sociohistorical evolution of judo provided by the research project Methodology for teaching judo from the critical–excelling stance is discussed in this article. The aim of the project was to establish a plan for systematizing judo as body culture constituent and scholastic knowledge of physical education. The ancillary pedagogical material is constituted by an introduction, objectives, contents, teaching methodology and evaluation system.

  5. A Cultural Evolution Approach to Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Digital media have today an enormous diffusion, and their influence on the behavior of a vast part of the human population can hardly be underestimated. In this review I propose that cultural evolution theory, including both a sophisticated view of human behavior and a methodological attitude to modeling and quantitative analysis, provides a useful framework to study the effects and the developments of media in the digital age. I will first give a general presentation of the cultural evolution framework, and I will then introduce this more specific research program with two illustrative topics. The first topic concerns how cultural transmission biases, that is, simple heuristics such as “copy prestigious individuals” or “copy the majority,” operate in the novel context of digital media. The existence of transmission biases is generally justified with their adaptivity in small-scale societies. How do they operate in an environment where, for example, prestigious individuals possess not-relevant skills, or popularity is explicitly quantified and advertised? The second aspect relates to fidelity of cultural transmission. Digitally-mediated interactions support cheap and immediate high-fidelity transmission, in opposition, for example, to oral traditions. How does this change the content that is more likely to spread? Overall, I suggest the usefulness of a “long view” to our contemporary digital environment, contextualized in cognitive science and cultural evolution theory, and I discuss how this perspective could help us to understand what is genuinely new and what is not. PMID:28018200

  6. A Cultural Evolution Approach to Digital Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Digital media have today an enormous diffusion, and their influence on the behavior of a vast part of the human population can hardly be underestimated. In this review I propose that cultural evolution theory, including both a sophisticated view of human behavior and a methodological attitude to modeling and quantitative analysis, provides a useful framework to study the effects and the developments of media in the digital age. I will first give a general presentation of the cultural evolution framework, and I will then introduce this more specific research program with two illustrative topics. The first topic concerns how cultural transmission biases, that is, simple heuristics such as "copy prestigious individuals" or "copy the majority," operate in the novel context of digital media. The existence of transmission biases is generally justified with their adaptivity in small-scale societies. How do they operate in an environment where, for example, prestigious individuals possess not-relevant skills, or popularity is explicitly quantified and advertised? The second aspect relates to fidelity of cultural transmission. Digitally-mediated interactions support cheap and immediate high-fidelity transmission, in opposition, for example, to oral traditions. How does this change the content that is more likely to spread? Overall, I suggest the usefulness of a "long view" to our contemporary digital environment, contextualized in cognitive science and cultural evolution theory, and I discuss how this perspective could help us to understand what is genuinely new and what is not.

  7. A Proven Way to Incorporate Catholic Social Thought in Business School Curricula: Teaching Two Approaches to Management in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Widespread agreement suggests that it is appropriate and desirable to develop and teach business theory and practice consistent with Catholic social teaching (CST) in Catholic business schools. Such a curriculum would cover the same mainstream material taught in other business schools, but then offer a CST approach to business that can be…

  8. Perturbative evolution: a different approach at small x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnachie, A. [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astromony, Manchester (United Kingdom); Landshoff, P.V. [DAMTP, Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We propose an approach to DGLAP evolution at small x that circumvents the usual problem that a perturbation expansion is not valid there. The data for the charm structure function are important to motivate the method, and it describes them much more successfully than the conventional approach. (orig.)

  9. Flow-Based Provenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sabah Al-Fedaghi

    2017-01-01

    ...: Multiple models for abstract representation of provenance have been proposed to describe entities, people, and activities involved in producing a piece of data, including the Open Provenance Model (OPM...

  10. New Approach to Interpret the Firm Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amir Yazdanparast Abatari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  This article is a preliminary step to introduce a new approach for interpreting how a firm evolves. The core idea of this approach is to verify the firms as the dynamic organization which can change and gain different trait upon time. The change and adaption mechanism can be explained through evolutionary theory. This approach could be used as a good tool to interpret reaction of firms to future environmental and internal changes. To achieve this goal, the firm has been defined as a set of Resource, Ideas and capabilities (RIC. As evolutionary theory has been adopted, a wining rule needs to be determined for selection and struggle process. This winning rule has been developed using the transaction cost theory to verify the effect of this so called RIC mechanism, over 200 hours’ interview has been set up to identify and trace a changing capability in Iranian Construction industry. Applying this view to gathered information shows the power of this method for analyzing the firm’s capabilities.

  11. A new detrital mica 40Ar/39Ar dating approach for provenance and exhumation of the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemignani, L.; Sun, Xilin; Braun, J.; van Gerve, T. D.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2017-08-01

    Detrital thermochronology can be used as a tool to quantitatively constrain exhumation rates and its spatial variability from active mountain belts. Commonly used methods for this purpose assume a steady state relationship between tectonic uplift and erosion. However, this assumption does not account for the transitory response of a dynamic orogenic system to changes in the boundary conditions. We propose a different approach that uses the observed detrital age distributions as "markers" of the past exhumation and of the present-day erosion and mixing occurring in a river system. In this paper, we present new 40Ar/39Ar biotite and white mica age distributions for 19 modern river sands from the Eastern Alps north of the Periadriatic line. The results present three main clusters of ages at 0.5-50, 60-120, and 250-350 Ma that record the main orogenic phases in this sector of the Alps. We have applied two numerical methods to the cooling ages to (a) linearly compute the spatial variability of the relative present-day erosion of a set of four detrital mineral samples from drainage basins along the Inn River and (b) quantify the rates of the cooling and erosion in the Tauern Window during Paleocene-Miocene time of the Alpine orogeny. Our results suggest a 0.34-0.84 mm/yr range of exhumation rates for the Tauern Window since the Miocene. Our estimates of exhumation rates of the western Tauern Window are higher than those for the eastern Tauern Window, which is consistent with the previous studies.

  12. Layering in Provenance Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Margo I.; Muniswamy-Reddy, Kiran-Kumar; Braun, Uri Jacob; Holland, David A.; Macko, Peter; Maclean, Diana; Margo, Daniel Wyatt; Smogor, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Digital provenance describes the ancestry or history of a digital object. Most existing provenance systems, however, operate at only one level of abstraction: the sys- tem call layer, a workflow specification, or the high-level constructs of a particular application. The provenance collectable in each of these layers is different, and all of it can be important. Single-layer systems fail to account for the different levels of abstraction at which users need to reason about their data and proc...

  13. Direct approach for solving nonlinear evolution and two-point ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 81; Issue 6. Direct approach for solving nonlinear evolution and two-point ... demonstrate the use and computational efficiency of the method. This method can easily be applied to many nonlinear problems and is capable of reducing the size of computational work.

  14. Flow-Based Provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Al-Fedaghi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: With information almost effortlessly created and spontaneously available, current progress in Information and Communication Technology (ICT has led to the complication that information must be scrutinized for trustworthiness and provenance. Information systems must become provenance-aware to be satisfactory in accountability, reproducibility, and trustworthiness of data. Background:\tMultiple models for abstract representation of provenance have been proposed to describe entities, people, and activities involved in producing a piece of data, including the Open Provenance Model (OPM and the World Wide Web Consortium. These models lack certain concepts necessary for specifying workflows and encoding the provenance of data products used and generated. Methodology: Without loss of generality, the focus of this paper is on OPM depiction of provenance in terms of a directed graph. We have redrawn several case studies in the framework of our proposed model in order to compare and evaluate it against OPM for representing these cases. Contribution: This paper offers an alternative flow-based diagrammatic language that can form a foundation for modeling of provenance. The model described here provides an (abstract machine-like representation of provenance. Findings: The results suggest a viable alternative in the area of diagrammatic representation for provenance applications. Future Research: Future work will seek to achieve more accurate comparisons with current models in the field.

  15. Empirical approaches to the study of language evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-02-01

    The study of language evolution, and human cognitive evolution more generally, has often been ridiculed as unscientific, but in fact it differs little from many other disciplines that investigate past events, such as geology or cosmology. Well-crafted models of language evolution make numerous testable hypotheses, and if the principles of strong inference (simultaneous testing of multiple plausible hypotheses) are adopted, there is an increasing amount of relevant data allowing empirical evaluation of such models. The articles in this special issue provide a concise overview of current models of language evolution, emphasizing the testable predictions that they make, along with overviews of the many sources of data available to test them (emphasizing comparative, neural, and genetic data). The key challenge facing the study of language evolution is not a lack of data, but rather a weak commitment to hypothesis-testing approaches and strong inference, exacerbated by the broad and highly interdisciplinary nature of the relevant data. This introduction offers an overview of the field, and a summary of what needed to evolve to provide our species with language-ready brains. It then briefly discusses different contemporary models of language evolution, followed by an overview of different sources of data to test these models. I conclude with my own multistage model of how different components of language could have evolved.

  16. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. ... you feel better. There are proven ways to lose weight. You can find what works for you. Research ...

  17. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  18. Tectonomagmatic setting and provenance of the Santa Marta Schists, northern Colombia: Insights on the growth and approach of Cretaceous Caribbean oceanic terranes to the South American continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Bustamante, C.; García-Casco, A.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Saldarriaga, M.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    Metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks accreted to the northern South American continental margin are major vestiges of the Caribbean oceanic plate evolution and its interactions with the continent. Selected whole rock geochemistry, Nd-Sr isotopes and detrital zircon geochronology were obtained in metabasic and metasedimentary rocks from the Santa Marta and San Lorenzo Schists in northernmost Colombia. Trace element patterns are characterized by primitive island arc and MORB signatures. Similarly initial 87Sr/ 86Sr-ɛ Nd isotopic relations correlate with oceanic arcs and MORB reservoirs, suggesting that the protoliths were formed within a back-arc setting or at the transition between the inta-oceanic arc and the Caribbean oceanic crust. Trace element trends from associated metasedimentary rocks show that the provenance was controlled by a volcanic arc and a sialic continental domain, whereas detrital U/Pb zircons from the Santa Marta Schists and adjacent southeastern metamorphic units show Late Cretaceous and older Mesozoic, Late Paleozoic and Mesoproterozoic sources. Comparison with continental inland basins suggests that this arc-basin is allocthonous to its current position, and was still active by ca. 82 Ma. The geological features are comparable to other arc remnants found in northeastern Colombia and the Netherland Antilles. The geochemical and U/Pb detrital signatures from the metasedimentary rocks suggest that this tectonic domain was already in proximity to the continental margin, in a configuration similar to the modern Antilles or the Kermadec arc in the Pacific. The older continental detritus were derived from the ongoing Andean uplift feeding the intra-oceanic tectonic environment. Cross-cutting relations with granitoids and metamorphic ages suggest that metamorphism was completed by ca. 65 Ma.

  19. Depositional and provenance record of the Paleogene transition from foreland to hinterland basin evolution during Andean orogenesis, northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Christopher J.; Horton, Brian K.; Caballero, Victor; Mora, Andrés; Parra, Mauricio; Sierra, Jair

    2011-10-01

    The Central Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera of the northern Andes form the topographic flanks of the north-trending Magdalena Valley Basin. Constraining the growth of these ranges and intervening basin has implications for Andean shortening and the transformation from a foreland to hinterland basin configuration. We present sedimentological, paleocurrent, and sandstone petrographic results from Cenozoic type localities to provide insights into the tectonic history of the northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of Colombia. In the Nuevo Mundo Syncline, the mid-Paleocene transition from marine to nonmarine deposystems of the Lisama Formation corresponds with a paleocurrent shift from northward to eastward transport. These changes match detrital geochronological evidence for a contemporaneous shift from cratonic (Amazonian) to orogenic (Andean) provenance, suggesting initial shortening-related uplift of the Central Cordillera and foreland basin generation in the Magdalena Valley by mid-Paleocene time. Subsequent establishment of a meandering fluvial system is recorded in lower-middle Eocene strata of the lower La Paz Formation. Eastward paleocurrents in mid-Paleocene through uppermost Eocene fluvial deposits indicate a continuous influence of western sediment source areas. However, at the upper middle Eocene (˜40 Ma) boundary between the lower and upper La Paz Formation, sandstone compositions show a drastic decrease in lithic content, particularly lithic volcanic fragments. This change is accompanied by a facies shift from mixed channel and overbank facies to thick, amalgamated braided fluvial deposits of possible fluvial megafans, reflecting changes in both the composition and proximity of western sediment sources. We attribute these modifications to the growing influence of exhumed La Cira-Infantas paleohighs in the axial Magdalena Valley, features presently buried beneath upper Eocene-Quaternary basin fill along the western flank of the Nuevo Mundo Syncline. In

  20. Provenance in neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Van Horn, John D; Woods, Roger P; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2008-08-01

    Provenance, the description of the history of a set of data, has grown more important with the proliferation of research consortia-related efforts in neuroimaging. Knowledge about the origin and history of an image is crucial for establishing data and results quality; detailed information about how it was processed, including the specific software routines and operating systems that were used, is necessary for proper interpretation, high fidelity replication and re-use. We have drafted a mechanism for describing provenance in a simple and easy to use environment, alleviating the burden of documentation from the user while still providing a rich description of an image's provenance. This combination of ease of use and highly descriptive metadata should greatly facilitate the collection of provenance and subsequent sharing of data.

  1. Provenance in bioinformatics workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Renato; Holanda, Maristela; Gomes, Luciana S A; Lifschitz, Sergio; Walter, Maria Emilia M T

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we used the PROV-DM model to manage data provenance in workflows of genome projects. This provenance model allows the storage of details of one workflow execution, e.g., raw and produced data and computational tools, their versions and parameters. Using this model, biologists can access details of one particular execution of a workflow, compare results produced by different executions, and plan new experiments more efficiently. In addition to this, a provenance simulator was created, which facilitates the inclusion of provenance data of one genome project workflow execution. Finally, we discuss one case study, which aims to identify genes involved in specific metabolic pathways of Bacillus cereus, as well as to compare this isolate with other phylogenetic related bacteria from the Bacillus group. B. cereus is an extremophilic bacteria, collected in warm water in the Midwestern Region of Brazil, its DNA samples having been sequenced with an NGS machine.

  2. An optimization-based approach to calculating neutrino flavor evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Eve; Patwardhan, Amol V.; Johns, Lucas; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Fuller, George M.

    2017-10-01

    We assess the utility of an optimization-based data assimilation (D.A.) technique for treating the problem of nonlinear neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae. D.A. uses measurements obtained from a physical system to estimate the state variable evolution and parameter values of the associated model. Formulated as an optimization procedure, D.A. can offer an integration-blind approach to predicting model evolution, which offers an advantage for models that thwart solution via traditional numerical integration techniques. Further, D.A. performs most optimally for models whose equations of motion are nonlinearly coupled. In this exploratory work, we consider a simple steady-state model with two monoenergetic neutrino beams coherently interacting with each other and a background medium. As this model can be solved via numerical integration, we have an independent consistency check for D.A. solutions. We find that the procedure can capture key features of flavor evolution over the entire trajectory, even given measurements of neutrino flavor only at the endpoint, and with an assumed known initial flavor distribution. Further, the procedure permits an examination of the sensitivity of flavor evolution to estimates of unknown model parameters, locates degeneracies in parameter space, and can identify the specific measurements required to break those degeneracies.

  3. Holistic Approach of the Evolution Theory to TNC Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybalko Yuliia S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of the world economy at the modern stage is characterised with formation of the global model of economic development. Economic evolution theory, from the point of view of its supporters, considers economic development as an irreversible process of growth of complexity, variability and productiveness of production by means of periodical repetition of replacement of technologies, types of products, organisations and institutes, quite surprisingly, insufficiently exhaustively reacted in its development on modern challenges in the form of globalisation and processes caused by a new type of reproduction in the post-industrial society. The article, based on main provisions of the economic evolution theory and modern empiricism, specifies general and specific characteristics of development of trans-national corporations (TNC and provides an improved justification of periodisation of the TNC evolution. The holistic approach of the economic evolution theory to periodisation of the TNC development and the author’s analysis of stages of establishment of TNC give a possibility to identify specific regularities of this development and formulate the hypothesis on probability of coincidence of stages of TNC development and stages of development of the world currency system in the context of time periods, and also to mark out the tendency of formation of corporations of a new generation – mondialised global compositely combined structures.

  4. Unraveling the tectonic evolution of a Neoproterozoic-Cambrian active margin in the Ribeira Orogen (Se Brazil): U-Pb and Lu-Hf provenance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Gabriel Lamounier de F. [Servico Geologico do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (DRM-RJ), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Schmitt, Renata; Bongiolo, Everton M.; Mendes, Julio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Basei, Miguel S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Full text: The Neoproterozoic-Ordovician Central Ribeira Orogen, in SE Brazil, presents two contrasting tectonic domains in its southern portion: (a) The Arc Domain constituted of Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic magmatic rocks and low P-high T metamorphic para (Sao Fidelis Group) - and ortho- derived units (in Oriental Terrane); and (b) The Basement Domain, constituted of a Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic medium P-high T metamorphic para (Palmital-Buzios Succession)- and ortho-derived units (in Cabo Frio Tectonic Domain). Our work focuses on paraderived rocks sequences from both domains. The provenance analysis using U-Pb and Lu-Hf in zircon grains is presented here as an effective tool to unravel the paleogeography and nature of the pre-collisional sedimentary basins. We performed 505 analyses (U-Pb) on detrital zircon grains and some metamorphic overgrowths from six paragneiss samples. Besides, 141 analyses (Lu-Hf) in six samples only on the detrital zircon grains domains. All samples present a main peak from Neoproterozoic sources (750-570 Ma) and the other minor peak in the Stenian/Tonian periods (1200-850Ma), this indicate an orogenic contribution for this basin. Scarce register from the Mesoproterozoic and two peaks in the Archean/Paleoproterozoic (2.6 and 1.9 Ga) are recognized as a contribution from an ancient continent. The Lu-Hf data reveals a juvenile source for the detrital zircon grains from Buzios Succession while Palmital and Sao Fidelis Group units show a main crustal signature for their detrital zircon population. Based on the U-Pb and Lu-Hf data presented here, plus petrological data, geological correlations, and compilation of data from literature, we propose a tectonic model for the origin of para-derived rocks from the eastern part of the Ribeira Orogen. Starting with an extensional environment of ca. 600 Ma in a back-arc basin (Buzios succession deposition) and continuing as an active margin between 570 and 550 Ma in the fore-arc and prism

  5. Triadic conceptual structure of the maximum entropy approach to evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten; Salthe, Stanley N

    2011-03-01

    Many problems in evolutionary theory are cast in dyadic terms, such as the polar oppositions of organism and environment. We argue that a triadic conceptual structure offers an alternative perspective under which the information generating role of evolution as a physical process can be analyzed, and propose a new diagrammatic approach. Peirce's natural philosophy was deeply influenced by his reception of both Darwin's theory and thermodynamics. Thus, we elaborate on a new synthesis which puts together his theory of signs and modern Maximum Entropy approaches to evolution in a process discourse. Following recent contributions to the naturalization of Peircean semiosis, pointing towards 'physiosemiosis' or 'pansemiosis', we show that triadic structures involve the conjunction of three different kinds of causality, efficient, formal and final. In this, we accommodate the state-centered thermodynamic framework to a process approach. We apply this on Ulanowicz's analysis of autocatalytic cycles as primordial patterns of life. This paves the way for a semiotic view of thermodynamics which is built on the idea that Peircean interpretants are systems of physical inference devices evolving under natural selection. In this view, the principles of Maximum Entropy, Maximum Power, and Maximum Entropy Production work together to drive the emergence of information carrying structures, which at the same time maximize information capacity as well as the gradients of energy flows, such that ultimately, contrary to Schrödinger's seminal contribution, the evolutionary process is seen to be a physical expression of the Second Law. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Laughter as an approach to vocal evolution: The bipedal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Robert R

    2017-02-01

    Laughter is a simple, stereotyped, innate, human play vocalization that is ideal for the study of vocal evolution. The basic approach of describing the act of laughter and when we do it has revealed a variety of phenomena of social, linguistic, and neurological significance. Findings include the acoustic structure of laughter, the minimal voluntary control of laughter, the punctuation effect (which describes the placement of laughter in conversation and indicates the dominance of speech over laughter), and the role of laughter in human matching and mating. Especially notable is the use of laughter to discover why humans can speak and other apes cannot. Quadrupeds, including our primate ancestors, have a 1:1 relation between breathing and stride because their thorax must absorb forelimb impacts during running. The direct link between breathing and locomotion limits vocalizations to short, simple utterances, such as the characteristic panting chimpanzee laugh (one sound per inward or outward breath). The evolution of bipedal locomotion freed the respiration system of its support function during running, permitting greater breath control and the selection for human-type laughter (a parsed exhalation), and subsequently the virtuosic, sustained, expiratory vocalization of speech. This is the basis of the bipedal theory of speech evolution.

  7. Provenance and tectonic setting of siliciclastic rocks associated with the Neoproterozoic Dahongliutan BIF: Implications for the Precambrian crustal evolution of the Western Kunlun orogenic belt, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Wang, He; Wang, Min

    2017-10-01

    The Late Neoproterozoic Dahongliutan BIF is associated with siliciclastic rocks in the Tianshuihai terrane of the Western Kunlun orogenic belt (WKO), NW China. The sedimentary rocks have various weathering indices (e.g., CIA = 57-87, PIA = 61-96 and Th/U = 4.85-12.45), indicative of varying degrees of weathering in the source area. The rocks have trace element ratios, such as Th/Sc = 0.60-1.21 and Co/Th = 0.29-1.67, and light rare earth element (LREE) enriched chondrite-normalized REE patterns, suggesting that they were mainly sourced from intermediate and felsic rocks. Available U-Pb ages of detrital zircon from these rocks reveal that the detrital sources may have been igneous and metamorphic rocks from the WKO and the Tarim Block. Our study suggests that the Dahongliutan BIF and hosting siliciclastic rocks may have deposited in a setting transitional from a passive to active continental margin, probably related to the Late Neoproterozoic-Early Cambrian seafloor spreading and subduction of the Proto-Tethys Ocean. U-Pb dating of 163 detrital zircons defines five major age populations at 2561-2329 Ma, 2076-1644 Ma, 1164-899 Ma, 869-722 Ma and 696-593 Ma. These age groups broadly correspond to the major stages of supercontinent assembly and breakup events widely accepted for Columbia, Rodinia and Gondwana. Some zircons have TDM2 model ages of 3.9-1.8 Ga and negative εHf(t) values, suggesting that the Archean to Paleoproterozoic (as old as Eoarchean) crustal materials were episodically reworked and incorporated into the late magmatic process in the WKO. Some Neoproterozoic zircons have TDM2 model ages of 1.47-1.07 Ga and 1.81-1.53 Ga and positive εHf(t) values, indicating juvenile crustal growth during the Mesoproterozoic. Our new results, combined with published data, imply that both the Tianshuihai terrane in the WKO and the Tarim Block share the same Precambrian tectonic evolution history.

  8. A systems approach to physiologic evolution: From micelles to consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2018-01-01

    A systems approach to evolutionary biology offers the promise of an improved understanding of the fundamental principles of life through the effective integration of many biologic disciplines. It is presented that any critical integrative approach to evolutionary development involves a paradigmatic shift in perspective, more than just the engagement of a large number of disciplines. Critical to this differing viewpoint is the recognition that all biological processes originate from the unicellular state and remain permanently anchored to that phase throughout evolutionary development despite their macroscopic appearances. Multicellular eukaryotic development can, therefore, be viewed as a series of connected responses to epiphenomena that proceeds from that base in continuous iterative maintenance of collective cellular homeostatic equipoise juxtaposed against an ever-changing and challenging environment. By following this trajectory of multicellular eukaryotic evolution from within unicellular First Principles of Physiology forward, the mechanistic nature of complex physiology can be identified through a step-wise analysis of a continuous arc of vertebrate evolution based upon serial exaptations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Preparing Biology Teachers to Teach Evolution in a Project-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kristin; Buck, Gayle; Park Rogers, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates a project-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching evolution to inform efforts in teacher preparation. Data analysis of a secondary biology educator teaching evolution through a PBL approach illuminated: (1) active student voice, which allowed students to reflect on their positioning on evolution and consider multiple…

  10. Data Provenance and Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stratis D Viglas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Oxford Dictionary defines provenance as “the place of origin, or earliest known history of something.” The term, when transferred to its digital counterpart, has morphed into a more general meaning. It is not only used to refer to the origin of a digital artefact but also to its changes over time. By changes in this context we may not only refer to its digital snapshots but also to the processes that caused and materialised the change. As an example, consider a database record r created at point in time t0; an update u to that record at time t1 causes it to have a value r’. In terms of provenance, we do not only want to record the snapshots (t0, r and (t1, r’ but also the transformation u that when applied to (t0, r results in (t1, r’, that is u(t0, r = (t1, r’.

  11. Provenance Store Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  12. An automaton approach for waiting times in DNA evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Behrens, S; Nicodeme, P

    2011-01-01

    In a recent article, Behrens and Vingron (JCB 17, 12, 2010) compute waiting times for k-mers to appear during DNA evolution under the assumption that the considered k-mers do not occur in the initial DNA sequence, an issue arising when studying the evolution of regulatory DNA sequences with regard to transcription factor (TF) binding site emergence. The mathematical analysis underlying their computation assumes that occurrences of words under interest do not overlap. We relax here this assumption by use of an automata approach. In an alphabet of size 4 like the DNA alphabet, most words have no or a low autocorrelation; therefore, globally, our results confirm those of Behrens and Vingron. The outcome is quite different when considering highly autocorrelated k-mers; in this case, the autocorrelation pushes down the probability of occurrence of these k-mers at generation 1 and, consequently, increases the waiting time for apparition of these k-mers up to 40%. An analysis of existing TF binding sites unveils a s...

  13. A systemic approach for modeling biological evolution using Parallel DEVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Daniel; Sanz, Victorino; Urquia, Alfonso; Sandín, Máximo

    2015-08-01

    A new model for studying the evolution of living organisms is proposed in this manuscript. The proposed model is based on a non-neodarwinian systemic approach. The model is focused on considering several controversies and open discussions about modern evolutionary biology. Additionally, a simplification of the proposed model, named EvoDEVS, has been mathematically described using the Parallel DEVS formalism and implemented as a computer program using the DEVSLib Modelica library. EvoDEVS serves as an experimental platform to study different conditions and scenarios by means of computer simulations. Two preliminary case studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model and validate its results. EvoDEVS is freely available at http://www.euclides.dia.uned.es. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Active Provenance in Data-intensive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Mihajlovski, Andrej; Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities are building platforms where the usage of data-intensive workflows is crucial to conduct their research campaigns. However managing and effectively support the understanding of the 'live' processes, fostering computational steering, sharing and re-use of data and methods, present several bottlenecks. These are often caused by the poor level of documentation on the methods and the data and how users interact with it. This work wants to explore how in such systems, flexibility in the management of the provenance and its adaptation to the different users and application contexts can lead to new opportunities for its exploitation, improving productivity. In particular, this work illustrates a conceptual and technical framework enabling tunable and actionable provenance in data-intensive workflow systems in support of reproducible science. It introduces the concept of Agile data-intensive systems to define the characteristic of our target platform. It shows a novel approach to the integration of provenance mechanisms, offering flexibility in the scale and in the precision of the provenance data collected, ensuring its relevance to the domain of the data-intensive task, fostering its rapid exploitation. The contributions address aspects of the scale of the provenance records, their usability and active role in the research life-cycle. We will discuss the use of dynamically generated provenance types as the approach for the integration of provenance mechanisms into a data-intensive workflow system. Enabling provenance can be transparent to the workflow user and developer, as well as fully controllable and customisable, depending from their expertise and the application's reproducibility, monitoring and validation requirements. The API that allows the realisation and adoption of a provenance type is presented, especially for what concerns the support of provenance profiling, contextualisation and precision. An actionable approach to provenance

  15. A quantitative approach to evolution of music and philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vilson; Fabbri, Renato; Travieso, Gonzalo; Oliveira, Osvaldo N., Jr.; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    The development of new statistical and computational methods is increasingly making it possible to bridge the gap between hard sciences and humanities. In this study, we propose an approach based on a quantitative evaluation of attributes of objects in fields of humanities, from which concepts such as dialectics and opposition are formally defined mathematically. As case studies, we analyzed the temporal evolution of classical music and philosophy by obtaining data for 8 features characterizing the corresponding fields for 7 well-known composers and philosophers, which were treated with multivariate statistics and pattern recognition methods. A bootstrap method was applied to avoid statistical bias caused by the small sample data set, with which hundreds of artificial composers and philosophers were generated, influenced by the 7 names originally chosen. Upon defining indices for opposition, skewness and counter-dialectics, we confirmed the intuitive analysis of historians in that classical music evolved according to a master-apprentice tradition, while in philosophy changes were driven by opposition. Though these case studies were meant only to show the possibility of treating phenomena in humanities quantitatively, including a quantitative measure of concepts such as dialectics and opposition, the results are encouraging for further application of the approach presented here to many other areas, since it is entirely generic.

  16. Sandstone provenance and U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from Permian-Triassic forearc sediments within the Sukhothai Arc, northern Thailand: Record of volcanic-arc evolution in response to Paleo-Tethys subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hidetoshi; Kunii, Miyuki; Miyake, Yoshihiro; Hisada, Ken-ichiro; Kamata, Yoshihito; Ueno, Katsumi; Kon, Yoshiaki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Ueda, Hayato; Assavapatchara, San; Treerotchananon, Anuwat; Charoentitirat, Thasinee; Charusiri, Punya

    2017-09-01

    Provenance analysis and U-Pb dating of detrital zircons in Permian-Triassic forearc sediments from the Sukhothai Arc in northern Thailand clarify the evolution of a missing arc system associated with Paleo-Tethys subduction. The turbidite-dominant formations within the forearc sediments include the Permian Ngao Group (Kiu Lom, Pha Huat, and Huai Thak formations), the Early to earliest Late Triassic Lampang Group (Phra That and Hong Hoi formations), and the Late Triassic Song Group (Pha Daeng and Wang Chin formations). The sandstones are quartzose in the Pha Huat, Huai Thak, and Wang Chin formations, and lithic wacke in the Kiu Lom, Phra That, Hong Hoi and Pha Daeng formations. The quartzose sandstones contain abundant quartz, felsic volcanic and plutonic fragments, whereas the lithic sandstones contain mainly basaltic to felsic volcanic fragments. The youngest single-grain (YSG) zircon U-Pb age generally approximates the depositional age in the study area, but in the case of the limestone-dominant Pha Huat Formation the YSG age is clearly older. On the other hand, the youngest cluster U-Pb age (YC1σ) represents the peak of igneous activity in the source area. Geological evidence, geochemical signatures, and the YC1σ ages of the sandstones have allowed us to reconstruct the Sukhothai arc evolution. The initial Sukhothai Arc (Late Carboniferous-Early Permian) developed as a continental island arc. Subsequently, there was general magmatic quiescence with minor I-type granitic activity during the Middle to early Late Permian. In the latest Permian to early Late Triassic, the Sukhothai Arc developed in tandem with Early to Middle Triassic I-type granitic activity, Middle to Late Triassic volcanism, evolution of an accretionary complex, and an abundant supply of sediments from the volcanic rocks to the trench through a forearc basin. Subsequently, the Sukhothai Arc became quiescent as the Paleo-Tethys closed after the Late Triassic. In addition, parts of sediments of

  17. Interpreting Evidence: An Approach to Teaching Human Evolution in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Paleoanthropology, which is the study of human evolution through fossil records, can be used as a tool for teaching human evolution in the classrooms. An updated approach to teaching human evolution and a model for explaining what is science and how it is done, is presented.

  18. Provenance Context Entity (PaCE): Scalable Provenance Tracking for Scientific RDF Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Bodenreider, Olivier; Hitzler, Pascal; Sheth, Amit; Thirunarayan, Krishnaprasad

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) format is being used by a large number of scientific applications to store and disseminate their datasets. The provenance information, describing the source or lineage of the datasets, is playing an increasingly significant role in ensuring data quality, computing trust value of the datasets, and ranking query results. Current provenance tracking approaches using the RDF reification vocabulary suffer from a number of known issues, including lack of formal semantics, use of blank nodes, and application-dependent interpretation of reified RDF triples. In this paper, we introduce a new approach called Provenance Context Entity (PaCE) that uses the notion of provenance context to create provenance-aware RDF triples. We also define the formal semantics of PaCE through a simple extension of the existing RDF(S) semantics that ensures compatibility of PaCE with existing Semantic Web tools and implementations. We have implemented the PaCE approach in the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR) project at the US National Library of Medicine. The evaluations demonstrate a minimum of 49% reduction in total number of provenance-specific RDF triples generated using the PaCE approach as compared to RDF reification. In addition, performance for complex queries improves by three orders of magnitude and remains comparable to the RDF reification approach for simpler provenance queries.

  19. Provenance for distributed biomedical workflow execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madougou, Souley; Santcroos, Mark; Benabdelkader, Ammar; van Schaik, Barbera D C; Shahand, Shayan; Korkhov, Vladimir; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D

    2012-01-01

    Scientific research has become very data and compute intensive because of the progress in data acquisition and measurement devices, which is particularly true in Life Sciences. To cope with this deluge of data, scientists use distributed computing and storage infrastructures. The use of such infrastructures introduces by itself new challenges to the scientists in terms of proper and efficient use. Scientific workflow management systems play an important role in facilitating the use of the infrastructure by hiding some of its complexity. Although most scientific workflow management systems are provenance-aware, not all of them come with provenance functionality out of the box. In this paper we describe the improvement and integration of a provenance system into an e-infrastructure for biomedical research based on the MOTEUR workflow management system. The main contributions of the paper are: presenting an OPM implementation using relational database backend for the provenance store, providing an e-infrastructure with a comprehensive provenance system, defining a generic approach to provenance implementation, potentially suitable for other workflow systems and application domains and demonstrating the value of this system based on use cases presenting the provenance data through a user-friendly web interface.

  20. Provenance tracking in the ViroLab Virtual Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliś, B.; Bubak, M.; Wach, J.

    2008-01-01

    Provenance describes the process which led to the creation of a piece of data. Tracking provenance of experiment results is essential in modern environments which support conducting of in silico experiments. We present a provenance tracking approach developed as part of the virtual laboratory of the

  1. Aggregation by Provenance Types: A Technique for Summarising Provenance Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Moreau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As users become confronted with a deluge of provenance data, dedicated techniques are required to make sense of this kind of information. We present Aggregation by Provenance Types, a provenance graph analysis that is capable of generating provenance graph summaries. It proceeds by converting provenance paths up to some length k to attributes, referred to as provenance types, and by grouping nodes that have the same provenance types. The summary also includes numeric values representing the frequency of nodes and edges in the original graph. A quantitative evaluation and a complexity analysis show that this technique is tractable; with small values of k, it can produce useful summaries and can help detect outliers. We illustrate how the generated summaries can further be used for conformance checking and visualization.

  2. Detrital Zircons U-Pb Age and Hf Isotope from the Western Side of the Taiwan Strait: Implications for Sediment Provenance and Crustal Evolution of the Northeast Cathaysia Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ detrital zircons U-Pb and Hf isotope analyses from the Min and Jiulong River of Southeast China were carried out to identify sediment provenance and crustal evolution of the northeast Cathaysia Block. Detrital zircons from both rivers displayed similar spectrum peaks at 236, 155, and 110 Ma, but samples from the Min River displayed a distinct Caledonian peak (ca. 460 Ma and contained more Precambrian particles (ca. 1.8 Ga, which likely stemmed from the upstream area of the Wuyishan terrain. Interestingly, because Taiwan Island cannot supply Caledonian and Paleoproterozoic detrital materials and because the Ou and Jiulong River also lack components from these two populations, it is highly likely that the sediment in the western Taiwan coast partially originates from the Min River. The sediments from the Min River in Fujian are also considered the most likely source of the beach sands of western Taiwan (Chen et al. 2006. However, we stress that the ~1.8 Ga age source in the western Taiwan sediments was found and recognized. Combining U-Pb dating and Hf-isotope suggests that the northeast Cathaysia Block contains some Neoarchean detrital zircons, which derived from the incorporation of juvenile mantle materials and re-melting of ancient crustal substances. The wide ranges of εHf(t value in the Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic demonstrate the re-melting of ancient crustal materials with minor juvenile mantle materials. Phanerozoic zircons stemmed from re-melting and recycling of Proterozoic crustal materials with or without the invasion of juvenile mantle-derived magmas.

  3. A Taxonomy for a Constructive Approach to Software Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; van den Broek, P.M.; Aksit, Mehmet

    In many software design and evaluation techniques, either the software evolution problem is not systematically elaborated, or only the impact of evolution is considered. Thus, most of the time software is changed by editing the components of the software system, i.e. breaking down the software

  4. Tracking Provenance of Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Yelena; Halem, Milton

    2010-01-01

    Tremendous volumes of data have been captured, archived and analyzed. Sensors, algorithms and processing systems for transforming and analyzing the data are evolving over time. Web Portals and Services can create transient data sets on-demand. Data are transferred from organization to organization with additional transformations at every stage. Provenance in this context refers to the source of data and a record of the process that led to its current state. It encompasses the documentation of a variety of artifacts related to particular data. Provenance is important for understanding and using scientific datasets, and critical for independent confirmation of scientific results. Managing provenance throughout scientific data processing has gained interest lately and there are a variety of approaches. Large scale scientific datasets consisting of thousands to millions of individual data files and processes offer particular challenges. This paper uses the analogy of art history provenance to explore some of the concerns of applying provenance tracking to earth science data. It also illustrates some of the provenance issues with examples drawn from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Data Processing System (OMIDAPS) run at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center by the first author.

  5. A unified framework for managing provenance information in translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Satya S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical aspect of the NIH Translational Research roadmap, which seeks to accelerate the delivery of "bench-side" discoveries to patient's "bedside," is the management of the provenance metadata that keeps track of the origin and history of data resources as they traverse the path from the bench to the bedside and back. A comprehensive provenance framework is essential for researchers to verify the quality of data, reproduce scientific results published in peer-reviewed literature, validate scientific process, and associate trust value with data and results. Traditional approaches to provenance management have focused on only partial sections of the translational research life cycle and they do not incorporate "domain semantics", which is essential to support domain-specific querying and analysis by scientists. Results We identify a common set of challenges in managing provenance information across the pre-publication and post-publication phases of data in the translational research lifecycle. We define the semantic provenance framework (SPF, underpinned by the Provenir upper-level provenance ontology, to address these challenges in the four stages of provenance metadata: (a Provenance collection - during data generation (b Provenance representation - to support interoperability, reasoning, and incorporate domain semantics (c Provenance storage and propagation - to allow efficient storage and seamless propagation of provenance as the data is transferred across applications (d Provenance query - to support queries with increasing complexity over large data size and also support knowledge discovery applications We apply the SPF to two exemplar translational research projects, namely the Semantic Problem Solving Environment for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi SPSE and the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR project, to demonstrate its effectiveness. Conclusions The SPF provides a unified framework to effectively manage provenance

  6. A unified framework for managing provenance information in translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Nguyen, Vinh; Bodenreider, Olivier; Parikh, Priti; Minning, Todd; Sheth, Amit P

    2011-11-29

    A critical aspect of the NIH Translational Research roadmap, which seeks to accelerate the delivery of "bench-side" discoveries to patient's "bedside," is the management of the provenance metadata that keeps track of the origin and history of data resources as they traverse the path from the bench to the bedside and back. A comprehensive provenance framework is essential for researchers to verify the quality of data, reproduce scientific results published in peer-reviewed literature, validate scientific process, and associate trust value with data and results. Traditional approaches to provenance management have focused on only partial sections of the translational research life cycle and they do not incorporate "domain semantics", which is essential to support domain-specific querying and analysis by scientists. We identify a common set of challenges in managing provenance information across the pre-publication and post-publication phases of data in the translational research lifecycle. We define the semantic provenance framework (SPF), underpinned by the Provenir upper-level provenance ontology, to address these challenges in the four stages of provenance metadata:(a) Provenance collection - during data generation(b) Provenance representation - to support interoperability, reasoning, and incorporate domain semantics(c) Provenance storage and propagation - to allow efficient storage and seamless propagation of provenance as the data is transferred across applications(d) Provenance query - to support queries with increasing complexity over large data size and also support knowledge discovery applicationsWe apply the SPF to two exemplar translational research projects, namely the Semantic Problem Solving Environment for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi SPSE) and the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR) project, to demonstrate its effectiveness. The SPF provides a unified framework to effectively manage provenance of translational research data during pre and post

  7. Sex differences, sexual selection, and ageing: an experimental evolution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Bonduriansky, Russell; Brooks, Robert C

    2009-10-01

    Life-history (LH) theory predicts that selection will optimize the trade-off between reproduction and somatic maintenance. Reproductive ageing and finite life span are direct consequences of such optimization. Sexual selection and conflict profoundly affect the reproductive strategies of the sexes and thus can play an important role in the evolution of life span and ageing. In theory, sexual selection can favor the evolution of either faster or slower ageing, but the evidence is equivocal. We used a novel selection experiment to investigate the potential of sexual selection to influence the adaptive evolution of age-specific LH traits. We selected replicate populations of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus for age at reproduction ("Young" and "Old") either with or without sexual selection. We found that LH selection resulted in the evolution of age-specific reproduction and mortality but these changes were largely unaffected by sexual selection. Sexual selection depressed net reproductive performance and failed to promote adaptation. Nonetheless, the evolution of several traits differed between males and females. These data challenge the importance of current sexual selection in promoting rapid adaptation to environmental change but support the hypothesis that sex differences in LH-a historical signature of sexual selection-are key in shaping trait responses to novel selection.

  8. Quantum evolution near unstable equilibrium point: an algebraic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Z Q

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantum evolution of an unstable system in su(1,1) algebra. The evolution of any initial state |k, nu) is recursively obtained. When t -> infinity, |(k', nu| exp (-i/h-bar Ht)|k, nu)| sup 2 decays as e sup - sup 4 supnu sup t or t sup - sup 4 supnu in the hyperbolic (H = 2K sub 1) or parabolic (H 2K sub 1 + 2K sub 3) unstable cases, respectively. The quantum-classic correspondence independent of the Bargmann index nu is established based on the long-time and large-scale behaviour of wavefunctions.

  9. Quantum evolution near unstable equilibrium point: an algebraic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Zai-Qiao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, People' s Republic of (China); Zheng, Wei-Mou [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100080, People' s Republic of (China)

    2003-03-21

    We study the quantum evolution of an unstable system in su(1,1) algebra. The evolution of any initial state |k, {nu}) is recursively obtained. When t {yields} {infinity}, |(k', {nu}| exp (-i/h-bar Ht)|k, {nu})|{sup 2} decays as e{sup -4{nu}}{sup t} or t{sup -4{nu}} in the hyperbolic (H = 2K{sub 1}) or parabolic (H 2K{sub 1} + 2K{sub 3}) unstable cases, respectively. The quantum-classic correspondence independent of the Bargmann index {nu} is established based on the long-time and large-scale behaviour of wavefunctions.

  10. An approach of community evolution based on gravitational relationship refactoring in dynamic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Guisheng; Chi, Kuo, E-mail: chik89769@hrbeu.edu.cn; Dong, Yuxin; Dong, Hongbin

    2017-04-25

    In this paper, an approach of community evolution based on gravitational relationship refactoring between the nodes in a dynamic network is proposed, and it can be used to simulate the process of community evolution. A static community detection algorithm and a dynamic community evolution algorithm are included in the approach. At first, communities are initialized by constructing the core nodes chains, the nodes can be iteratively searched and divided into corresponding communities via the static community detection algorithm. For a dynamic network, an evolutionary process is divided into three phases, and behaviors of community evolution can be judged according to the changing situation of the core nodes chain in each community. Experiments show that the proposed approach can achieve accuracy and availability in the synthetic and real world networks. - Highlights: • The proposed approach considers both the static community detection and dynamic community evolution. • The approach of community evolution can identify the whole 6 common evolution events. • The proposed approach can judge the evolutionary events according to the variations of the core nodes chains.

  11. Analysis Traceability and Provenance for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, Jetendr; McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Kovács, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the use of the CRISTAL software in the N4U project. CRISTAL was used to create a set of provenance aware analysis tools for the Neuroscience domain. This paper advocates that the approach taken in N4U to build the analysis suite is sufficiently generic to be able to be applied to the HEP domain. A mapping to the PROV model for provenance interoperability is also presented and how this can be applied to the HEP domain for the interoperability of HEP analyses.

  12. From Scripts Towards Provenance Inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Apers, Peter M.G.; Wada, Y.; van Beek, L.P.H.; Wombacher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Scientists require provenance information either to validate their model or to investigate the origin of an unexpected value. However, they do not maintain any provenance information and even designing the processing workflow is rare in practice. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a solution that

  13. Complexity and evolution of dissipative systems an analytical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulenko, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This book focusses ondynamic complexity of neural and genetic networks, reaction diffusion systems and equations of fluid dynamics.It considersviability problems for such systems and discusses an interesting hypothesis of M. Gromov andA. Carbone on biological evolution.Several applications are considered.

  14. Material inhomogeneities and their evolution a geometric approach

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Presents a unified treatment of the inhomogeneity theory using some of the tools of modern differential geometry. This book deals with the geometrical description of uniform bodies and their homogeneity conditions. It also develops a theory of material evolution and discusses its relevance in various applied contexts.

  15. The Ecology of Language Evolution. Cambridge Approaches to Language Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufwene, Salikoko S.

    This book explores the development of creoles and other new languages, highlighting conceptual and methodological issues for genetic linguistics and discussing the significance of ecologies that influence language evolution. It presents examples of changes in the structure, function, and vitality of languages, suggesting that similar ecologies…

  16. Model-based Abstraction of Data Provenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2014-01-01

    to bigger models, and the analyses adapt accordingly. Our approach extends provenance both with the origin of data, the actors and processes involved in the handling of data, and policies applied while doing so. The model and corresponding analyses are based on a formal model of spatial and organisational......Identifying provenance of data provides insights to the origin of data and intermediate results, and has recently gained increased interest due to data-centric applications. In this work we extend a data-centric system view with actors handling the data and policies restricting actions....... This extension is based on provenance analysis performed on system models. System models have been introduced to model and analyse spatial and organisational aspects of organisations, to identify, e.g., potential insider threats. Both the models and analyses are naturally modular; models can be combined...

  17. Evolution of approaches to intellectual property’s classification

    OpenAIRE

    Virchenko V.

    2013-01-01

    Article is devoted to analysis of the theoretical approaches to intellectual property classification. History of development of theoretical approaches to intellectual property classification is investigated. Advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to intellectual property classification are considered. The contents and peculiarities of incorporate intellectual property are analyzed.

  18. Biological evolution of replicator systems: towards a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Osmel; Horvath, J E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the features of a simple replicator chemical model of the relation between kinetic stability and entropy production under the action of external perturbations. We quantitatively explore the different paths leading to evolution in a toy model where two independent replicators compete for the same substrate. To do that, the same scenario described originally by Pross (J Phys Org Chem 17:312-316, 2004) is revised and new criteria to define the kinetic stability are proposed. Our results suggest that fast replicator populations are continually favored by the effects of strong stochastic environmental fluctuations capable to determine the global population, the former assumed to be the only acting evolution force. We demonstrate that the process is continually driven by strong perturbations only, and that population crashes may be useful proxies for these catastrophic environmental fluctuations. As expected, such behavior is particularly enhanced under very large scale perturbations, suggesting a likely dynamical footprint in the recovery patterns of new species after mass extinction events in the Earth's geological past. Furthermore, the hypothesis that natural selection always favors the faster processes may give theoretical support to different studies that claim the applicability of maximum principles like the Maximum Metabolic Flux (MMF) or Maximum Entropy Productions Principle (MEPP), seen as the main goal of biological evolution.

  19. The evolution of “Life”: A Metadarwinian integrative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is undeniably very logical to first formulate an unambiguous definition of “Life” before engaging in defining the parameters instrumental to Life's evolution. Because nearly everybody assumes, erroneously in my opinion, that catching Life's essence in a single sentence is impossible, this way of thinking remained largely unexplored in evolutionary theory. Upon analyzing what exactly happens at the transition from “still alive” to “just dead,” the following definition emerged. What we call “Life” (L) is an activity. It is nothing other than the total sum (∑) of all communication acts (C) executed, at moment t, by entities organized as sender-receiver compartments: L = ∑C Such “living” entities are self-electrifying and talking ( = communicating) aggregates of fossil stardust operating in an environment heavily polluted by toxic calcium. Communication is a multifaceted, complex process that is seldom well explained in introductory textbooks of biology. Communication is instrumental to adaptation because, at the cellular level, any act of communication is in fact a problem-solving act. It can be logically deduced that not Natural Selection itself but communication/problem-solving activity preceding selection is the universal driving force of evolution. This is against what textbooks usually claim, although doubt on the status of Natural Selection as driving force has been around for long. Finally, adopting the sender-receiver with its 2 memory systems (genetic and cognitive, both with their own rules) and 2 types of progeny (”physical children” and “pupils”) as the universal unit of architecture and function of all living entities, also enables the seamless integration of cultural and organic evolution, another long-standing tough problem in evolutionary theory. Paraphrasing Theodosius Dobzhansky, the very essence of biology is: “Nothing in biology and evolutionary theory makes sense except in the light of the ability of

  20. The evolution of "Life": A Metadarwinian integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Loof, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    It is undeniably very logical to first formulate an unambiguous definition of "Life" before engaging in defining the parameters instrumental to Life's evolution. Because nearly everybody assumes, erroneously in my opinion, that catching Life's essence in a single sentence is impossible, this way of thinking remained largely unexplored in evolutionary theory. Upon analyzing what exactly happens at the transition from "still alive" to "just dead," the following definition emerged. What we call "Life" (L) is an activity. It is nothing other than the total sum (∑) of all communication acts (C) executed, at moment t, by entities organized as sender-receiver compartments: L = ∑C Such "living" entities are self-electrifying and talking ( = communicating) aggregates of fossil stardust operating in an environment heavily polluted by toxic calcium. Communication is a multifaceted, complex process that is seldom well explained in introductory textbooks of biology. Communication is instrumental to adaptation because, at the cellular level, any act of communication is in fact a problem-solving act. It can be logically deduced that not Natural Selection itself but communication/problem-solving activity preceding selection is the universal driving force of evolution. This is against what textbooks usually claim, although doubt on the status of Natural Selection as driving force has been around for long. Finally, adopting the sender-receiver with its 2 memory systems (genetic and cognitive, both with their own rules) and 2 types of progeny ("physical children" and "pupils") as the universal unit of architecture and function of all living entities, also enables the seamless integration of cultural and organic evolution, another long-standing tough problem in evolutionary theory. Paraphrasing Theodosius Dobzhansky, the very essence of biology is: "Nothing in biology and evolutionary theory makes sense except in the light of the ability of living matter to communicate, and by

  1. An anthropometric approach to the study of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vark, G N

    1987-01-01

    The study of human evolution has always been a major issue in physical anthropology. Since computers became available this study became a new dimension in that it became feasible to apply advanced mathematical multivariate methods which make use of morphometric data. However, looking back on what has been achieved so far with these methods, it must be admitted that the results obtained are often unsatisfactory. This has led to a certain lack of acceptance of these methods. In the present paper it is argued that very useful results may be obtained by applying more sophisticated multivariate methods which are specifically designed for the anthropological problems at issue. Three examples are given. The first deals with the controversy between "Creationism" on the one hand and "Evolutionism" on the other. Our results strongly support the Evolutionists' point of view. The second example deals with the reconstruction of human phylogeny. An investigation is discussed which has led to a startling new hypothesis concerning the evolution of man. The last example concerns a preliminary investigation of trends in human sexual dimorphism. The results obtained so far seem to support the opinion expressed by other workers that tendencies exist in our modern society which lead to changes in the present dimorphism.

  2. Protein Engineering by Combined Computational and In Vitro Evolution Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Lior; Heyne, Michael; Shifman, Julia M; Papo, Niv

    2016-05-01

    Two alternative strategies are commonly used to study protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and to engineer protein-based inhibitors. In one approach, binders are selected experimentally from combinatorial libraries of protein mutants that are displayed on a cell surface. In the other approach, computational modeling is used to explore an astronomically large number of protein sequences to select a small number of sequences for experimental testing. While both approaches have some limitations, their combination produces superior results in various protein engineering applications. Such applications include the design of novel binders and inhibitors, the enhancement of affinity and specificity, and the mapping of binding epitopes. The combination of these approaches also aids in the understanding of the specificity profiles of various PPIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-organizing maps in geothermal exploration-A new approach for understanding geochemical processes and fluid evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Maren; Bauer, Klaus; Nukman, Mochamad; Regenspurg, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Understanding geochemical processes is an important part of geothermal exploration to get information about the source and evolution of geothermal fluids. However, in most cases knowledge of fluid properties is based on few parameters determined in samples from the shallow subsurface. This study presents a new approach that allows to conclude from the combination of a variety of these data on processes occurring at depth in a geothermal reservoir. The neural network clustering technique called ;self-organizing maps; (SOMs) successfully distinguished two different geothermal settings based on a hydrochemical database and disclosed the source, evolution and flow pathways of geothermal fluids. Scatter plots, as shown in this study, are appropriate presentations of element concentrations and the chemical interaction of water and rock at depth. One geological setting presented here is marked by fault dominated fluid pathways and minor influence of volcanic affected fluids with high concentrations of HCO3, Ca and Sr. The second is a magmatically dominated setting showing strong alteration features in volcanic rocks and accommodates acidic fluids with high SO4 and Si concentrations. Former studies, i.e., Giggenbach (1988), suggested Cl, HCO3 and SO4 to be generally the most important elements for understanding hydrochemical processes in geothermal reservoirs. Their relation has been widely used to classify different water types in geothermal fields. However, this study showed that non-standard elements are at least of same importance to reveal different fluid types in geothermal systems. Therefore, this study is an extended water classification approach using SOM for element correlations. SOM have been proven to be a successful method for analyzing even relatively small hydrochemical datasets in geothermal applications.

  4. EVOLUTION OF THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO ENTERPRISE RISKS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kravchenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern state of the Ukrainian clannish-oligarchic economy can be characterized in the terms of extraordinarily high degree of riskiness that makes actual use of scientifically based approach to the entrepreneurial risk management. Paper analyses certain types of enterprise risks than are connected with the certain forms of rotation of capital. Approaches of the different scientific schools to enterprise and its risks (classic political economy, Austrian, Marxism, Austro -German, Keynesianism, behavioral economics, neoclassical school, institutionalism are considered in the article. Formation of the modern Ukrainian theory of enterprise risks must include achievements of other scientific schools.

  5. Permian arc evolution associated with Panthalassa subduction along the eastern margin of the South China block, based on sandstone provenance and U-Pb detrital zircon ages of the Kurosegawa belt, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hidetoshi; Hirano, Miho; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Toshiro; Ueda, Hayato

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the petrography, geochemistry, and detrital zircon U-Pb ages of sandstones from shallow-marine forearc sediments, accretionary complexes (ACs), and metamorphosed accretionary complexes (Meta-ACs) within the Kurosegawa belt of Southwest Japan. Those rocks formed in a forearc region of a Permian island arc associated with subduction of the Panthalassa oceanic crust along the eastern margin of the South China block (Yangtze block). The provenance of the shallow-marine sediments was dominated by basaltic to andesitic volcanic rocks and minor granitic rocks during the late Middle to Late Permian. The ACs were derived from felsic to andesitic volcanic rocks during the Late Permian. The provenance of Meta-ACs was dominated by andesitic volcanic rocks in the Middle Permian. The provenance, source rock compositions, and zircon age distribution for the forearc sediments, ACs and Meta-ACs have allowed us to reconstruct the geological history of the Permian arc system of the Kurosegawa belt. During the Middle Permian, the ACs were accreted along the eastern margin of the South China block. The Middle Permian arc was an immature oceanic island arc consisting of andesitic volcanic rocks. During the Late Permian, the ACs formed in a mature arc, producing voluminous felsic to andesitic volcanic rocks. A forearc basin developed during the late Middle to Late Permian. Subsequently, the Middle Permian ACs and part of the Late Permian AC underwent low-grade metamorphism in the Late to Early Jurassic, presenting the Meta-ACs.

  6. VATS Lobectomy: Surgical Evolution from Conventional VATS to Uniportal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gonzalez-Rivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no standardized technique for the VATS lobectomy, though most centres use 2 ports and add a utility incision. However, the procedure can be performed by eliminating the two small ports and using only the utility incision with similar outcomes. Since 2010, when the uniportal approach was introduced for major pulmonary resection, the technique has been spreading worldwide. The single-port technique provides a direct view to the target tissue. The conventional triple port triangulation creates a new optical plane with genesis of dihedral or torsional angle that is not favorable with standard two-dimension monitors. The parallel instrumentation achieved during single-port approach mimics inside the maneuvers performed during open surgery. Furthermore, it represents the less invasive approach possible, and avoiding the use of trocar, we minimize the compression of the intercostal nerve. Further development of new technologies like sealing devices for all vessels and fissure, robotic arms that open inside the thorax, and wireless cameras will facilitate the uniportal approach to become the standard surgical procedure for pulmonary resection in most thoracic departments.

  7. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase through evolution: A bioinformatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Hemmati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL is the first entry enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that converts phenylalanine to cinnamic acid which is the precursor of various secondary metabolites. PAL is recently formulated for phenylketonuric patients in pegylated forms; therefore, screening a PAL with the highest affinity to the substrate is of a great importance. PAL exists in all higher plants and some fungi and few bacteria. Ancestors of land plants have been adopted by evolving metabolic pathways. A multi-gene family encodes PAL by gene duplication events in most plants. In this study, the taxonomic distribution and phylogeny of pal gene found in land plants, fungi and bacteria have been analyzed. It seems that the ancestor of plants acquired a pal gene via horizontal gene transfer in symbioses with bacteria and fungi. Gymnosperms have kept a diverse set of pal genes that arose from gene duplication events. In angiosperms, after the divergence of dicotyledons from monocots, pal genes were duplicated many times. The close paralogues of pal genes in some species indicate expansion of gene families after the divergence in plant pal gene evolution. Interestingly, some of the plant pals clustered by species in a way that pals within one species are more closely related to each other than to homologs in the other species which indicates this duplication event occurred more recently.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE PLACE ATTACHMENT: AN ECONOMIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar J. Sánchez Carrera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite relatively cheap mobility and intensive globalization processes, the place attachment remains an important part the human existence (Lewicka, 2010:226, . Our aim is to understand the evolution of the place attachment. For this purpose we apply evolutionary game theory with the replicator dynamics and we follow the literature on the identity economics. A novelty which Akerlof i Kranton (2000 introduce is that an individual may choose an activity opposite to her identity in order to maximize her own utility. In other words, the choice of identity and activities is separated. Pavlinović (2012 develops a basic evolutionary game-theory model of spatial identity where agents can only act in line with their own identity. On the contrary, Akerlof i Kranton (2000 introduce the assumption that an individual may choose an activity opposite to her. Thus, we modify the model in Pavlinović (2012 and consider the choice of identity and action separately. We explore if this modification significantly affects the results.

  9. Computational Approaches to Viral Evolution and Rational Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2006-10-01

    Viral pandemics, including HIV, are a major health concern across the world. Experimental techniques available today have uncovered a great wealth of information about how these viruses infect, grow, and cause disease; as well as how our body attempts to defend itself against them. Nevertheless, due to the high variability and fast evolution of many of these viruses, the traditional method of developing vaccines by presenting a heuristically chosen strain to the body fails and an effective intervention strategy still eludes us. A large amount of carefully curated genomic data on a number of these viruses are now available, often annotated with disease and immunological context. The availability of parallel computers has now made it possible to carry out a systematic analysis of this data within an evolutionary framework. I will describe, as an example, how computations on such data has allowed us to understand the origins and diversification of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS. On the practical side, computations on the same data is now being used to inform choice or defign of optimal vaccine strains.

  10. Provenance an introduction to PROV

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The World Wide Web is now deeply intertwined with our lives, and has become a catalyst for a data deluge, making vast amounts of data available online, at a click of a button. With Web 2.0, users are no longer passive consumers, but active publishers and curators of data. Hence, from science to food manufacturing, from data journalism to personal well-being, from social media to art, there is a strong interest in provenance, a description of what influenced an artifact, a data set, a document, a blog, or any resource on the Web and beyond. Provenance is a crucial piece of information that can

  11. Evolution of the the ART approach: highlights and achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jo E

    2009-01-01

    Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) was initiated in the mid-eighties in Tanzania in response to an inappropriately functioning community oral health programme that was based on western health care models and western technology. The approach has evolved to its present standing as an effective minimal intervention approach mainly because the originators anticipated the great potential of ART to alleviate inequality in oral health care, and because they recognised the need to carry out research to investigate its effectiveness and applicability. Twenty-five years later, ART was accepted by the World Health Organisation (1994) and the FDI World Dental Federation (2002). It is included in textbooks on cariology, restorative dentistry and minimal intervention dentistry. It is being systematically introduced into public oral health service systems in a number of low- and middle income countries. Private practitioners use it. Many publications related to aspects of ART have been published and many more will follow. To achieve quality results with ART one has to attend well-conducted and sufficiently long training courses, preferably in combination with other caries preventive strategies. ART should, therefore, not be considered in isolation and must be part of an evidence-based approach to oral health with a strong foundation based on prevention.

  12. Evolution of the the ART approach: highlights and achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo E. Frencken

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART was initiated in the mid-eighties in Tanzania in response to an inappropriately functioning community oral health programme that was based on western health care models and western technology. The approach has evolved to its present standing as an effective minimal intervention approach mainly because the originators anticipated the great potential of ART to alleviate inequality in oral health care, and because they recognised the need to carry out research to investigate its effectiveness and applicability. Twenty-five years later, ART was accepted by the World Health Organisation (1994 and the FDI World Dental Federation (2002. It is included in textbooks on cariology, restorative dentistry and minimal intervention dentistry. It is being systematically introduced into public oral health service systems in a number of low- and middle income countries. Private practitioners use it. Many publications related to aspects of ART have been published and many more will follow. To achieve quality results with ART one has to attend well-conducted and sufficiently long training courses, preferably in combination with other caries preventive strategies. ART should, therefore, not be considered in isolation and must be part of an evidence-based approach to oral health with a strong foundation based on prevention.

  13. [Modern evolutional developmental biology: mechanical and molecular genetic or phenotypic approaches?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'eva, É I

    2010-01-01

    Heightened interest in the evolutionary problems of developmental biology in the 1980s was due to the success of molecular genetics and disappointment in the synthetic theory of evolution, where the chapters of embryology and developmental biology seem to have been left out. Modern evo-devo, which turned out to be antipodean to the methodology of the synthetic theory of evolution, propagandized in the development of evolutionary problems only the mechanical and molecular genetic approach to the evolution of ontogenesis, based on cellular and intercellular interactions. The phonotypical approach to the evaluation of evolutionary occurrences in ontogenesis, which aids in the joining of the genetic and epigenetic levels of research, the theory of natural selection, the nomogenetic conception, and the problem of the wholeness of the organism in onto- and phylogenesis may be against this. The phenotypic approach to ontogenesis is methodologically the most perspective for evolutionary developmental biology.

  14. Research traceability using provenance services for biomedical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Branson, Andrew; Habib, Irfan; McClatchey, Richard; Solomonides, Tony; Soomro, Kamran; The Neugrid Consortium

    2010-01-01

    We outline the approach being developed in the neuGRID project to use provenance management techniques for the purposes of capturing and preserving the provenance data that emerges in the specification and execution of workflows in biomedical analyses. In the neuGRID project a provenance service has been designed and implemented that is intended to capture, store, retrieve and reconstruct the workflow information needed to facilitate users in conducting user analyses. We describe the architecture of the neuGRID provenance service and discuss how the CRISTAL system from CERN is being adapted to address the requirements of the project and then consider how a generalised approach for provenance management could emerge for more generic application to the (Health)Grid community.

  15. How Can a Multimodal Approach to Primate Communication Help Us Understand the Evolution of Communication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M. Waller

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Scientists studying the communication of non-human animals are often aiming to better understand the evolution of human communication, including human language. Some scientists take a phylogenetic perspective, where the goal is to trace the evolutionary history of communicative traits, while others take a functional perspective, where the goal is to understand the selection pressures underpinning specific traits. Both perspectives are necessary to fully understand the evolution of communication, but it is important to understand how the two perspectives differ and what they can and cannot tell us. Here, we suggest that integrating phylogenetic and functional questions can be fruitful in better understanding the evolution of communication. We also suggest that adopting a multimodal approach to communication might help to integrate phylogenetic and functional questions, and provide an interesting avenue for research into language evolution.

  16. How can a multimodal approach to primate communication help us understand the evolution of communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Bridget M; Liebal, Katja; Burrows, Anne M; Slocombe, Katie E

    2013-07-18

    Scientists studying the communication of non-human animals are often aiming to better understand the evolution of human communication, including human language. Some scientists take a phylogenetic perspective, where the goal is to trace the evolutionary history of communicative traits, while others take a functional perspective, where the goal is to understand the selection pressures underpinning specific traits. Both perspectives are necessary to fully understand the evolution of communication, but it is important to understand how the two perspectives differ and what they can and cannot tell us. Here, we suggest that integrating phylogenetic and functional questions can be fruitful in better understanding the evolution of communication. We also suggest that adopting a multimodal approach to communication might help to integrate phylogenetic and functional questions, and provide an interesting avenue for research into language evolution.

  17. PAV ontology: provenance, authoring and versioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarese, Paolo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Belhajjame, Khalid; Gray, Alasdair Jg; Goble, Carole; Clark, Tim

    2013-11-22

    approaches, namely Provenance Vocabulary (PRV), DC Terms and BIBFRAME. We identify similarities and analyze differences between those vocabularies and PAV, outlining strengths and weaknesses of our proposed model. We specify SKOS mappings that align PAV with DC Terms. We conclude the paper with general remarks on the applicability of PAV.

  18. Evolution of dust shells in Tolman-Bondi space-time according to the Weierstrass approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Ivana; Laserra, Ettore

    2009-12-01

    The Einstein evolution of a dust shell universe with spatial spherical symmetry is analyzed. The implicit and parametric solutions of Tolman-Bondi equations are proposed in order to show its agreement with the rectilinear solutions of Kepler’s problem. Finally, a complete systematization of Tolman-Bondi models is obtained through the classical Weierstrass approach.

  19. Looking Inside the Black-Box: Capturing Data Provenance using Dynamic Instrumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamatogiannakis, M.; Groth, P.T.; Bos, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the provenance of a data item helps in ascertaining its trustworthiness. Various approaches have been proposed to track or infer data provenance. However, these approaches either treat an executing program as a black-box, limiting the fidelity of the captured provenance, or require

  20. Provenance management in Swift with implementation details.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelha, L. M. R; Clifford, B.; Mattoso, M.; Wilde, M.; Foster, I. (Mathematics and Computer Science); ( CLS-CI); (Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro); (National Lab. for Scientific Computing, Brazil); (Univ. of Chicago)

    2011-04-01

    The Swift parallel scripting language allows for the specification, execution and analysis of large-scale computations in parallel and distributed environments. It incorporates a data model for recording and querying provenance information. In this article we describe these capabilities and evaluate interoperability with other systems through the use of the Open Provenance Model. We describe Swift's provenance data model and compare it to the Open Provenance Model. We also describe and evaluate activities performed within the Third Provenance Challenge, which consisted of implementing a specific scientific workflow, capturing and recording provenance information of its execution, performing provenance queries, and exchanging provenance information with other systems. Finally, we propose improvements to both the Open Provenance Model and Swift's provenance system.

  1. Logical provenance in data-oriented workflows?

    KAUST Repository

    Ikeda, R.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the problem of defining, generating, and tracing provenance in data-oriented workflows, in which input data sets are processed by a graph of transformations to produce output results. We first give a new general definition of provenance for general transformations, introducing the notions of correctness, precision, and minimality. We then determine when properties such as correctness and minimality carry over from the individual transformations\\' provenance to the workflow provenance. We describe a simple logical-provenance specification language consisting of attribute mappings and filters. We provide an algorithm for provenance tracing in workflows where logical provenance for each transformation is specified using our language. We consider logical provenance in the relational setting, observing that for a class of Select-Project-Join (SPJ) transformations, logical provenance specifications encode minimal provenance. We have built a prototype system supporting the features and algorithms presented in the paper, and we report a few preliminary experimental results. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Provenance as First Class Cloud Data

    OpenAIRE

    Muniswamy-Reddy, Kiran-Kumar; Seltzer, Margo I.

    2010-01-01

    Digital provenance is meta-data that describes the ancestry or history of a digital object. Most work on provenance focuses on how provenance increases the value of data to consumers. However, provenance is also valuable to storage providers. For example, provenance can provide hints on access patterns, detect anomalous behavior, and provide enhanced user search capabilities. As the next generation storage providers, cloud vendors are in the unique position to capitalize on this opportunity t...

  3. Insight provenance for spatiotemporal visual analytics: Theory, review, and guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hall

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on provenance, which focuses on different ways to describe and record the history of changes and advances made throughout an analysis process, is an integral part of visual analytics. This paper focuses on providing the provenance of insight and rationale through visualizations while emphasizing, first, that this entails a profound understanding of human cognition and reasoning and that, second, the special nature of spatiotemporal data needs to be acknowledged in this process. A recently proposed human reasoning framework for spatiotemporal analysis, and four guidelines for the creation of visualizations that provide the provenance of insight and rationale published in relation to that framework, work as a starting point for this paper. While these guidelines are quite abstract, this paper set out to create a set of more concrete guidelines. On the basis of a review of available provenance solutions, this paper identifies a set of key features that are of relevance when providing the provenance of insight and rationale and, on the basis of these features, produces a new set of complementary guidelines that are more practically oriented than the original ones. Together, these two sets of guidelines provide both a theoretical and practical approach to the problem of providing the provenance of insight and rationale. Providing these kinds of guidelines represents a new approach in provenance research.

  4. Provenance data in social media

    CERN Document Server

    Barbier, Geoffrey; Gundecha, Pritam

    2013-01-01

    Social media shatters the barrier to communicate anytime anywhere for people of all walks of life. The publicly available, virtually free information in social media poses a new challenge to consumers who have to discern whether a piece of information published in social media is reliable. For example, it can be difficult to understand the motivations behind a statement passed from one user to another, without knowing the person who originated the message. Additionally, false information can be propagated through social media, resulting in embarrassment or irreversible damages. Provenance data

  5. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  6. Launch Services, a Proven Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafton, W. C.; Simpson, J.

    2002-01-01

    From a commercial perspective, the ability to justify "leap frog" technology such as reusable systems has been difficult to justify because the estimated 5B to 10B investment is not supported in the current flat commercial market coupled with an oversupply of launch service suppliers. The market simply does not justify investment of that magnitude. Currently, next generation Expendable Launch Systems, including Boeing's Delta IV, Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5, Ariane V ESCA and RSC's H-IIA are being introduced into operations signifying that only upgrades to proven systems are planned to meet the changes in anticipated satellite demand (larger satellites, more lifetime, larger volumes, etc.) in the foreseeable future. We do not see a new fleet of ELVs emerging beyond that which is currently being introduced, only continuous upgrades of the fleet to meet the demands. To induce a radical change in the provision of launch services, a Multinational Government investment must be made and justified by World requirements. The commercial market alone cannot justify such an investment. And if an investment is made, we cannot afford to repeat previous mistakes by relying on one system such as shuttle for commercial deployment without having any back-up capability. Other issues that need to be considered are national science and security requirements, which to a large extent fuels the Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Former Soviet Union, European and United States space transportation entries. Additionally, this system must support or replace current Space Transportation Economies with across-the-board benefits. For the next 10 to 20 years, Multinational cooperation will be in the form of piecing together launch components and infrastructure to supplement existing launch systems and reducing the amount of non-recurring investment while meeting the future requirements of the End-User. Virtually all of the current systems have some form of multinational participation: Sea Launch

  7. Handling Undiscovered Vulnerabilities Using a Provenance Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Anantharaj

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates on a novel approach at preventing exploits from vulnerabilities which remain uncovered during the testing phase of a system's development lifecycle. The combination of predicted usage patterns, a Provenance network model and a clustering methodology provide a secure failure mechanism for both known and unknown security issues within the system. The paper also addresses of the requisite supporting infrastructure and deployment issues related to the model. The idea is to approach the growing problem of newer and more complex vulnerabilities in an ever more intricate and vast set of systems using a generic software state mapping procedure for recognizable (and thus the complementary unrecognizable patterns to judge the stability at each step in an operation sequence. Thus abstracting these vulnerabilities at a higher level provides us a generic technique to classify and handle such concerns in the future and in turn prevent exploits before a corrective patch is released.

  8. In silico approach to the evolution of ionotropic glutamate receptor gene family in four primate species.

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Alejo, Nury E.; Grupo de Bioquímica Computacional y Estructural y Bioinformática. Departamento de Nutrición y Bioquímica. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.,; Reyes-Montaño, Edgar A.; Grupo de Investigación en Proteínas. Departamento de Química. Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Bogotá, D.C; Lareo, Leonardo; Grupo de Bioquímica Computacional y Estructural y Bioinformática. Departamento de Nutrición y Bioquímica. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Man as a species has a brain unique in analysis capabilities due to its structure and organizational patterns that are presumably the basis of intelligence and the ability to manipulate the environment. Additionally, the development and evolution of the brain respond underlying genetic processes. Objective. To present an approach to the evolutionary process of the iGluR with the maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian (By) phylogenetic analysis methods. Materials and methods. we used in si...

  9. [The cost of cancer in France: macroeconomic and microeconomic approaches, evolution towards a prospective payment system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Lionel; Borella, Laurent; Philip, Thierry

    2003-11-01

    In this article we have reviewed the cost of cancer in France, based on a literature review. The cost of the treatment of cancer is estimated to be 10 thousand million euros for 75,000 lives saved annually. The increasing number of economic evaluations of cancer use both a macro economic approach, based on DRG data, and a micro economic approach, based on cost result analysis. These cost studies provide the elements for a decision aid in the context of social demands, budget constraints and the evolution towards a DRG's prospective payment system which characterises present organisation of health care in France.

  10. Cleft palate repair: description of an approach, its evolution, and analysis of post-operative fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Raymond W; Siebold, Babette

    2018-01-12

    Fistulas following cleft palate repair impair speech, health, and hygiene and occur in up to 35% cases. The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the evolution of a surgical approach to cleft palate repair; (2) assess the rates, causes, and predictive factors of fistulas; (3) assess the temporal association of modifications to fistula rates during six years of a single surgeon experience. Consecutive patients (N=146) undergoing cleft palate repair were included. The technique of repair was based on cleft type and a common surgical approach was used for all repairs. Modifications to the approach were made around specific anatomic features including peri-articular bony hillocks, maxilla-palatine suture, velopalatine pits, and tensor insertion. Fistula rate after primary repair was 2.4% (N=125) and after secondary repair was 0% (N=22). All complications occurred in patients with Type 3 or 4 clefts. Cleft width and cleft:total palatal width were associated with fistulas whereas syndromes, age, and adoption were not.Traumatic dissection and inadequate release were suspected in cases of delayed healing and flap necrosis during the first 2 years. Modifications were introduced following these complications. The fistula rate declined by one half in subsequent years. We describe a surgical approach to cleft palate repair and its evolution. Fistulas were rare but associated with increasing cleft severity (type, width).A reduction in frequency and severity of fistulas was consistent with a learning curve and may in part be associated with modifications to the surgical approach.

  11. Provenance tracking and querying in the ViroLab Virtual Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balis, B.; Bubak, M.; Pelczar, M.; Wach, J.; Priol, T.; Lefevre, L.; Buyya, R.

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to provenance tracking and querying which enables end-users to construct complex queries over provenance records. The use of ontologies for modeling provenance, data and applications enables query construction in an end-user oriented manner, i.e. by using terms of the

  12. Digital provenance - models, systems, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Salmin

    2014-01-01

    Data provenance refers to the history of creation and manipulation of a data object and is being widely used in various application domains including scientific experiments, grid computing, file and storage system, streaming data etc. However, existing provenance systems operate at a single layer of abstraction (workflow/process/OS) at which they record and store provenance whereas the provenance captured from different layers provide the highest benefit when integrated through a unified prov...

  13. Strategic flight assignment approach based on multi-objective parallel evolution algorithm with dynamic migration interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuejun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of air traffic has led to acute airspace congestion and severe delays, which threatens operation safety and cause enormous economic loss. Flight assignment is an economical and effective strategic plan to reduce the flight delay and airspace congestion by reasonably regulating the air traffic flow of China. However, it is a large-scale combinatorial optimization problem which is difficult to solve. In order to improve the quality of solutions, an effective multi-objective parallel evolution algorithm (MPEA framework with dynamic migration interval strategy is presented in this work. Firstly, multiple evolution populations are constructed to solve the problem simultaneously to enhance the optimization capability. Then a new strategy is proposed to dynamically change the migration interval among different evolution populations to improve the efficiency of the cooperation of populations. Finally, the cooperative co-evolution (CC algorithm combined with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II is introduced for each population. Empirical studies using the real air traffic data of the Chinese air route network and daily flight plans show that our method outperforms the existing approaches, multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA, multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition (MOEA/D, CC-based multi-objective algorithm (CCMA as well as other two MPEAs with different migration interval strategies.

  14. Anatomical diversity and regressive evolution in trichomanoid filmy ferns (Hymenophyllaceae): a phylogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Jean-Yves; Hennequin, Sabine; Bary, Sophie; Ebihara, Atsushi; Boucheron-Dubuisson, Elodie

    2011-12-01

    To infer the anatomical evolution of the Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) and to test previously suggested scenarios of regressive evolution, we performed an exhaustive investigation of stem anatomy in the most variable lineage of the family, the trichomanoids, using a representative sampling of 50 species. The evolution of qualitative and quantitative anatomical characters and possibly related growth-forms was analyzed using a maximum likelihood approach. Potential correlations between selected characters were then statistically tested using a phylogenetic comparative method. Our investigations support the anatomical homogeneity of this family at the generic and sub-generic levels. Reduced and sub-collateral/collateral steles likely derived from an ancestral massive protostele, and sub-collateral/collateral types appear to be related to stem thickness reduction and root apparatus regression. These results corroborate the hypothesis of regressive evolution in the lineage, in terms of morphology as well as anatomy. In addition, a heterogeneous cortex, which is derived in the lineage, appears to be related to a colonial strategy and likely to a climbing phenotype. The evolutionary hypotheses proposed in this study lay the ground for further evolutionary analyses that take into account trichomanoid habitats and accurate ecological preferences. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding collaborative studies through interoperable workflow provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altintas, I.; Anand, M.K.; Crawl, D.; Bowers, S.; Belloum, A.; Missier, P.; Ludäscher, B.; Goble, C.A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The provenance of a data product contains information about how the product was derived, and is crucial for enabling scientists to easily understand, reproduce, and verify scientific results. Currently, most provenance models are designed to capture the provenance related to a single run, and mostly

  16. Federated provenance of oceanographic research cruises: from metadata to data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rob; Leadbetter, Adam; Shepherd, Adam

    2016-04-01

    more formally in data journals. Use of the SPARQL 1.1 standard allows queries to be federated across these endpoints to create a distributed network of provenance documents. Future research directions will add further nodes to the federated network of oceanographic research cruise provenance to determine the true scalability of this approach, and will involve analysis of and possible evolution of the data release lifecycle ontology. References Nitin Arora et al., 2006. Information object design pattern for modeling domain specific knowledge. 1st ECOOP Workshop on Domain-Specific Program Development. Simon Cox, 2015. Pitfalls in alignment of observation models resolved using PROV as an upper ontology. Abstract IN33F-07 presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 14-18 December, San Francisco. Adam Leadbetter & Justin Buck, 2015. Where did my data layer come from?" The semantics of data release. Geophysical Research Abstracts 17, EGU2015-3746-1. Xiaogang Ma et al., 2014. Ontology engineering in provenance enablement for the National Climate Assessment. Environmental Modelling & Software 61, 191-205. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2014.08.002

  17. A conceptual approach to model co-evolution of urban structures

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Urban structures encompass settlements, characterized by the spatial distribution of built-up areas, but also transportation structures, to connect these built-up areas. These two structures are very different in their origin and function, fulfilling complementary needs: (i) to access space, and (ii) to occupy space. Their evolution cannot be understood by looking at the dynamics of urban aggregations and transportation systems separately. Instead, existing built-up areas feed back on the further development of transportation structures, and the availability of the latter feeds back on the future growth of urban aggregations. To model this co-evolution, we propose an agent-based approach that builds on existing agent-based models for the evolution of trail systems and of urban settlements. The key element in these separate approaches is a generalized communication of agents by means of an adaptive landscape. This landscape is only generated by the agents, but once it exists, it feeds back on their further act...

  18. A Shannon entropy approach to the temporal evolution of SEP energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenza, M.; Consolini, G.; Storini, M.; Damiani, A.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of solar energetic particle (SEP) events contain information on the particle acceleration mechanisms. A novel approach is proposed to investigate the time evolution of the spectral shape for the 20 February 2002 SEP event. Proton differential fluxes recorded by the ERNE instrument aboard SOHO, in the energy range 1.67-112 MeV, are analyzed. The solar source is associated with this SEP event by studying solar and interplanetary conditions during the considered time period. The energy spectrum evolution is studied by evaluating the time history of Shannon's differential entropy derived from the SEP fluxes. Our findings suggest that particle acceleration in the considered event is produced by a perpendicular shock in the solar corona. Moreover, dropouts in the particle flux are clearly identified up to energies of at least ~10 MeV.

  19. Intergranular Strain Evolution During Biaxial Loading: A Multiscale FE-FFT Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, M. V.; Capek, J.; Van Petegem, S.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2017-05-01

    Predicting the macroscopic and microscopic mechanical response of metals and alloys subjected to complex loading conditions necessarily requires a synergistic combination of multiscale material models and characterization techniques. This article focuses on the use of a multiscale approach to study the difference between intergranular lattice strain evolution for various grain families measured during in situ neutron diffraction on dog bone and cruciform 316L samples. At the macroscale, finite element simulations capture the complex coupling between applied forces and gauge stresses in cruciform geometries. The predicted gauge stresses are used as macroscopic boundary conditions to drive a mesoscale full-field elasto-viscoplastic fast Fourier transform crystal plasticity model. The results highlight the role of grain neighborhood on the intergranular strain evolution under uniaxial and equibiaxial loading.

  20. A Family-Based Evolutional Approach for Kernel Tree Selection in SVMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methasate, Ithipan; Theeramunkong, Thanaruk

    Finding a kernel mapping function for support vector machines (SVMs) is a key step towards construction of a high-performanced SVM-based classifier. While some recent methods exploited an evolutional approach to construct a suitable multifunction kernel, most of them searched randomly and diversely. In this paper, the concept of a family of identical-structured kernel trees is proposed to enable exploration of structure space using genetic programming whereas to pursue investigation of parameter space on a certain tree using evolution strategy. To control balance between structure and parameter search towards an optimal kernel, simulated annealing is introduced. By experiments on a number of benchmark datasets in the UCI and text classification collection, the proposed method is shown to be able to find a better optimal solution than other search methods, including grid search and gradient search.

  1. Evolution of syncarpy and other morphological characters in African Annonaceae: a posterior mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, T L P; Richardson, J E; Sosef, M S M; Erkens, R H J; Chatrou, L W

    2008-04-01

    The congenital fusion of carpels, or syncarpy, is considered a key innovation as it is found in more than 80% of angiosperms. Within the magnoliids however, syncarpy has rarely evolved. Two alternative evolutionary origins of syncarpy were suggested in order to explain the evolution of this feature: multiplication of a single carpel vs. fusion of a moderate number of carpels. The magnoliid family Annonaceae provides an ideal situation to test these hypotheses as two African genera, Isolona and Monodora, are syncarpous in an otherwise apocarpous family with multicarpellate and unicarpellate genera. In addition to syncarpy, the evolution of six other morphological characters was studied. Well-supported phylogenetic relationships of African Annonaceae and in particular those of Isolona and Monodora were reconstructed. Six plastid regions were sequenced and analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. The Bayesian posterior mapping approach to study character evolution was used as it accounts for both mapping and phylogenetic uncertainty, and also allows multiple state changes along the branches. Our phylogenetic analyses recovered a fully resolved clade comprising twelve genera endemic to Africa, including Isolona and Monodora, which was nested within the so-called long-branch clade. This is the largest and most species-rich clade of African genera identified to date within Annonaceae. The two syncarpous genera were inferred with maximum support to be sister to a clade characterized by genera with multicarpellate apocarpous gynoecia, supporting the hypothesis that syncarpy arose by fusion of a moderate number of carpels. This hypothesis was also favoured when studying the floral anatomy of both genera. Annonaceae provide the only case of a clear evolution of syncarpy within an otherwise apocarpous magnoliid family. The results presented here offer a better understanding of the evolution of syncarpy in Annonaceae and within angiosperms in general.

  2. PROX: Approximated Summarization of Data Provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainy, Eleanor; Bourhis, Pierre; Davidson, Susan B; Deutch, Daniel; Milo, Tova

    2016-03-01

    Many modern applications involve collecting large amounts of data from multiple sources, and then aggregating and manipulating it in intricate ways. The complexity of such applications, combined with the size of the collected data, makes it difficult to understand the application logic and how information was derived. Data provenance has been proven helpful in this respect in different contexts; however, maintaining and presenting the full and exact provenance may be infeasible, due to its size and complex structure. For that reason, we introduce the notion of approximated summarized provenance, where we seek a compact representation of the provenance at the possible cost of information loss. Based on this notion, we have developed PROX, a system for the management, presentation and use of data provenance for complex applications. We propose to demonstrate PROX in the context of a movies rating crowd-sourcing system, letting participants view provenance summarization and use it to gain insights on the application and its underlying data.

  3. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its "culture-bound" status. The narrative finally attempts to discuss the integrated approach for the treatment of this disorder.

  4. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its "culture-bound" status. The narrative finally attempts to discuss the integrated approach for the treatment of this disorder.

  5. Effects of extrinsic mortality on the evolution of aging: a stochastic modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokhirev, Maxim Nikolaievich; Johnson, Adiv Adam

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary theories of aging are useful for gaining insights into the complex mechanisms underlying senescence. Classical theories argue that high levels of extrinsic mortality should select for the evolution of shorter lifespans and earlier peak fertility. Non-classical theories, in contrast, posit that an increase in extrinsic mortality could select for the evolution of longer lifespans. Although numerous studies support the classical paradigm, recent data challenge classical predictions, finding that high extrinsic mortality can select for the evolution of longer lifespans. To further elucidate the role of extrinsic mortality in the evolution of aging, we implemented a stochastic, agent-based, computational model. We used a simulated annealing optimization approach to predict which model parameters predispose populations to evolve longer or shorter lifespans in response to increased levels of predation. We report that longer lifespans evolved in the presence of rising predation if the cost of mating is relatively high and if energy is available in excess. Conversely, we found that dramatically shorter lifespans evolved when mating costs were relatively low and food was relatively scarce. We also analyzed the effects of increased predation on various parameters related to density dependence and energy allocation. Longer and shorter lifespans were accompanied by increased and decreased investments of energy into somatic maintenance, respectively. Similarly, earlier and later maturation ages were accompanied by increased and decreased energetic investments into early fecundity, respectively. Higher predation significantly decreased the total population size, enlarged the shared resource pool, and redistributed energy reserves for mature individuals. These results both corroborate and refine classical predictions, demonstrating a population-level trade-off between longevity and fecundity and identifying conditions that produce both classical and non

  6. Effects of extrinsic mortality on the evolution of aging: a stochastic modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Nikolaievich Shokhirev

    Full Text Available The evolutionary theories of aging are useful for gaining insights into the complex mechanisms underlying senescence. Classical theories argue that high levels of extrinsic mortality should select for the evolution of shorter lifespans and earlier peak fertility. Non-classical theories, in contrast, posit that an increase in extrinsic mortality could select for the evolution of longer lifespans. Although numerous studies support the classical paradigm, recent data challenge classical predictions, finding that high extrinsic mortality can select for the evolution of longer lifespans. To further elucidate the role of extrinsic mortality in the evolution of aging, we implemented a stochastic, agent-based, computational model. We used a simulated annealing optimization approach to predict which model parameters predispose populations to evolve longer or shorter lifespans in response to increased levels of predation. We report that longer lifespans evolved in the presence of rising predation if the cost of mating is relatively high and if energy is available in excess. Conversely, we found that dramatically shorter lifespans evolved when mating costs were relatively low and food was relatively scarce. We also analyzed the effects of increased predation on various parameters related to density dependence and energy allocation. Longer and shorter lifespans were accompanied by increased and decreased investments of energy into somatic maintenance, respectively. Similarly, earlier and later maturation ages were accompanied by increased and decreased energetic investments into early fecundity, respectively. Higher predation significantly decreased the total population size, enlarged the shared resource pool, and redistributed energy reserves for mature individuals. These results both corroborate and refine classical predictions, demonstrating a population-level trade-off between longevity and fecundity and identifying conditions that produce both

  7. Distinguishing Provenance Equivalence of Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Curt; Yesha, Ye; Halem, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reproducibility of scientific research relies on accurate and precise citation of data and the provenance of that data. Earth science data are often the result of applying complex data transformation and analysis workflows to vast quantities of data. Provenance information of data processing is used for a variety of purposes, including understanding the process and auditing as well as reproducibility. Certain provenance information is essential for producing scientifically equivalent data. Capturing and representing that provenance information and assigning identifiers suitable for precisely distinguishing data granules and datasets is needed for accurate comparisons. This paper discusses scientific equivalence and essential provenance for scientific reproducibility. We use the example of an operational earth science data processing system to illustrate the application of the technique of cascading digital signatures or hash chains to precisely identify sets of granules and as provenance equivalence identifiers to distinguish data made in an an equivalent manner.

  8. Leveraging Data Provenance to Enhance Cyber Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    using data provenance. Data provenance is the history of ownership/processing or modification that we can use to guide its authenticity. Provenance...ProvToolbox [24], a library that presents an implementation of the W3C PROV specification for Java ap- plications. In addition to using these libraries...database 12c. O’Reilly Media, Inc., 2013. [15] R. Hasan, R. Sion, and M. Winslett. The Case of the Fake Picasso: Preventing History Forgery with Secure

  9. AB005. Evolution for pulmonary sequestration resection by VATS approach in NCKUH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chang, Chao-Chun; Huang, Wei-Li; Yen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ying Yuan; Tseng, Yau-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical intervention is a cure method for pulmonary sequestration. Patients usually complain upper airway symptoms after being adult. We reviewed those patients diagnosed pulmonary sequestration and underwent surgery in NCKUH. Since uniportal video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) anatomical resection started in 2016, we collected the information to figure out the evolution from multi-portal approach to uniportal approach. Methods We reviewed the patients who had pulmonary sequestration and received surgical treatment. The general data such as surgery procedure and postoperative care is collected. The uniportal approach is beginning in 2016. We make a comparison between multiportal group and uniportal group. Results This study is from 2007 to 2017 and the total patient number is eighteen. We exclude wedge resection for anatomical resection comparison. There are five patients in multiportal group and six patients in uniportal group. There is no difference in surgery time and blood loss between the two groups. However, the chest tube extraction is shorter in uniportal group. Conclusions Anatomical resection is an optimal approach for treating pulmonary sequestration. After ten years practice for thoracoscopic surgery, uniportal approach is evolving and being mature in our hospital.

  10. The floral morphospace--a modern comparative approach to study angiosperm evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Marion; Jabbour, Florian; Gerber, Sylvain; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Sauquet, Hervé; von Balthazar, Maria; Staedler, Yannick; Crane, Peter R; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Morphospaces are mathematical representations used for studying the evolution of morphological diversity and for the evaluation of evolved shapes among theoretically possible ones. Although widely used in zoology, they--with few exceptions--have been disregarded in plant science and in particular in the study of broad-scale patterns of floral structure and evolution. Here we provide basic information on the morphospace approach; we review earlier morphospace applications in plant science; and as a practical example, we construct and analyze a floral morphospace. Morphospaces are usually visualized with the help of ordination methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) or nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). The results of these analyses are then coupled with disparity indices that describe the spread of taxa in the space. We discuss these methods and apply modern statistical tools to the first and only angiosperm-wide floral morphospace published by Stebbins in 1951. Despite the incompleteness of Stebbins’ original dataset, our analyses highlight major, angiosperm-wide trends in the diversity of flower morphology and thereby demonstrate the power of this previously neglected approach in plant science.

  11. Representing distributed systems using the Open Provenance Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, P.T.; Moreau, L

    2011-01-01

    From the World Wide Web to supply chains and scientific simulations, distributed systems are a widely used and important approach to building computational systems. Tracking provenance within these systems is crucial for determining the trustworthiness of data they produce, troubleshooting problems,

  12. Facilitating Fine Grained Data Provenance using Temporal Data Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Wombacher, Andreas; Apers, Peter M.G.

    2010-01-01

    E-science applications use fine grained data provenance to maintain the reproducibility of scientific results, i.e., for each processed data tuple, the source data used to process the tuple as well as the used approach is documented. Since most of the e-science applications perform on-line

  13. Constructive Approaches for Understanding the Origin of Self-Replication and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norikazu Ichihashi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mystery of the origin of life can be divided into two parts. The first part is the origin of biomolecules: under what physicochemical conditions did biomolecules such as amino acids, nucleotides, and their polymers arise? The second part of the mystery is the origin of life-specific functions such as the replication of genetic information, the reproduction of cellular structures, metabolism, and evolution. These functions require the coordination of many different kinds of biological molecules. A direct strategy to approach the second part of the mystery is the constructive approach, in which life-specific functions are recreated in a test tube from specific biological molecules. Using this approach, we are able to employ design principles to reproduce life-specific functions, and the knowledge gained through the reproduction process provides clues as to their origins. In this mini-review, we introduce recent insights gained using this approach, and propose important future directions for advancing our understanding of the origins of life.

  14. Computational Experiment Approach to Controlled Evolution of Procurement Pattern in Cluster Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Companies have been aware of the benefits of developing Cluster Supply Chains (CSCs, and they are spending a great deal of time and money attempting to develop the new business pattern. Yet, the traditional techniques for identifying CSCs have strong theoretical antecedents, but seem to have little traction in the field. We believe this is because the standard techniques fail to capture evolution over time, nor provide useful intervention measures to reach goals. To address these problems, we introduce an agent-based modeling approach to evaluate CSCs. Taking collaborative procurement as research object, our approach is composed of three parts: model construction, model instantiation, and computational experiment. We use the approach to explore the service charging policy problem in collaborative procurement. Three kinds of service charging polices are compared in the same experiment environment. Finally, “Fixed Cost” is identified as the optimal policy under the stable market environment. The case study can help us to understand the workflow of applying the approach, and provide valuable decision support applications to industry.

  15. Integrated management system - management standards evolution and the IAEA new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Ipero, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: dirceupo@hotmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The management standards application began in military and nuclear areas towards the end of Second World War, when some westerns countries developed quality standards to improve their means to assess suppliers' conditions to assure their products conformance, which was increasingly complex and required a higher degree of reliability. Afterwards, the quality standards application was extended to the consumer market focused on consumers' requirements satisfaction. Coming along the society crescent concern about quality of life, other management standards were developed, such as those dealing with environmental and sustainable development, occupational health and safety, social accountability and so on. As a consequence, the management process became complex. The management system integrated form approach makes possible the compatibility of distinct and complementary interests from several functions and disciplines involved and supply the absence of the organizations' holistic approach. According to this integrated management approach, the Agency - 'International Atomic Energy Agency' (IAEA) - decided to review the structure of the 50-C-Q standard - 'Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and Other Nuclear Installations', from 1996, publishing in 2006 the new GS-R-3 standard - 'The Management System for Facilities and Activities - Safety Requirements'. This work presents a brief evolution of management standards and integrated management approach, showing the Agency's new vision concerning this issue with the GS-R-3 standard publication. (author)

  16. A combined NLP-differential evolution algorithm approach for the optimization of looped water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feifei; Simpson, Angus R.; Zecchin, Aaron C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization approach for the least cost design of looped water distribution systems (WDSs). Three distinct steps are involved in the proposed optimization approach. In the first step, the shortest-distance tree within the looped network is identified using the Dijkstra graph theory algorithm, for which an extension is proposed to find the shortest-distance tree for multisource WDSs. In the second step, a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver is employed to optimize the pipe diameters for the shortest-distance tree (chords of the shortest-distance tree are allocated the minimum allowable pipe sizes). Finally, in the third step, the original looped water network is optimized using a differential evolution (DE) algorithm seeded with diameters in the proximity of the continuous pipe sizes obtained in step two. As such, the proposed optimization approach combines the traditional deterministic optimization technique of NLP with the emerging evolutionary algorithm DE via the proposed network decomposition. The proposed methodology has been tested on four looped WDSs with the number of decision variables ranging from 21 to 454. Results obtained show the proposed approach is able to find optimal solutions with significantly less computational effort than other optimization techniques.

  17. Phenotypic variation among five provenances of Pterocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic variation among five provenances of Pterocarpus angolensis in Zimbabwe and Zambia. E Chisha-Kasumu, S Woodward, A Price. Abstract. The feasibility of utilising morphological markers for determining existing provenance variation in the African savanna tree Pterocarpus angolensis was assessed.

  18. Early performance of Casuarina junghuhniana provenances / land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early performance of Casuarina junghuhniana provenances / land races at Lushoto, Tanzania: scientific paper. ... Abstract. A trial involving 21 provenances form Indonesia and 7 ";local"; seed sources of Casuarina junghuhniana was established at Lushoto, Tanzania in March 1997. At 22 and 48 months of age, the following ...

  19. Provenance-based refresh in data-oriented workflows

    KAUST Repository

    Ikeda, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We consider a general workflow setting in which input data sets are processed by a graph of transformations to produce output results. Our goal is to perform efficient selective refresh of elements in the output data, i.e., compute the latest values of specific output elements when the input data may have changed. We explore how data provenance can be used to enable efficient refresh. Our approach is based on capturing one-level data provenance at each transformation when the workflow is run initially. Then at refresh time provenance is used to determine (transitively) which input elements are responsible for given output elements, and the workflow is rerun only on that portion of the data needed for refresh. Our contributions are to formalize the problem setting and the problem itself, to specify properties of transformations and provenance that are required for efficient refresh, and to provide algorithms that apply to a wide class of transformations and workflows. We have built a prototype system supporting the features and algorithms presented in the paper. We report preliminary experimental results on the overhead of provenance capture, and on the crossover point between selective refresh and full workflow recomputation. © 2011 ACM.

  20. Modeling of microstructure evolution in direct metal laser sintering: A phase field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Jyotirmoy; Sarangi, Hrushikesh; Sahoo, Seshadev

    2017-02-01

    Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is a new technology in the field of additive manufacturing, which builds metal parts in a layer by layer fashion directly from the powder bed. The process occurs within a very short time period with rapid solidification rate. Slight variations in the process parameters may cause enormous change in the final build parts. The physical and mechanical properties of the final build parts are dependent on the solidification rate which directly affects the microstructure of the material. Thus, the evolving of microstructure plays a vital role in the process parameters optimization. Nowadays, the increase in computational power allows for direct simulations of microstructures during materials processing for specific manufacturing conditions. In this study, modeling of microstructure evolution of Al-Si-10Mg powder in DMLS process was carried out by using a phase field approach. A MATLAB code was developed to solve the set of phase field equations, where simulation parameters include temperature gradient, laser scan speed and laser power. The effects of temperature gradient on microstructure evolution were studied and found that with increase in temperature gradient, the dendritic tip grows at a faster rate.

  1. A population memetics approach to cultural evolution in chaffinch song: meme diversity within populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, A; Baker, A J

    1993-04-01

    We investigated cultural evolution in populations of common chaffinches (Fringilla coelebs) in the Atlantic islands (Azores, Madeira, Canaries) and neighboring continental regions (Morocco, Iberia) by employing a population memetics approach. To quantify variability within populations, we used the concept of a song meme, defined as a single syllable or a series of linked syllables capable of being transmitted. The frequency distribution of memes within populations generally fit a neutral model in which there is an equilibrium between mutation, migration, and drift, which suggests that memes are functionally equivalent. The diversity of memes of single syllables is significantly greater in the Azores compared to all other regions, consistent with higher population densities of chaffinches there. On the other hand, memes of two to five syllables have greater diversity in Atlantic island and Moroccan populations compared to their Iberian counterparts. This higher diversity emanates from a looser syntax and increased recombination in songs, presumably because of relaxed selection for distinctive songs in these peripheral and depauperate avifaunas. We urge comparative population memetic studies of other species of songbirds and predict that they will lead to a formulation of a general theory for the cultural evolution of bird song analogous to population genetics theory for biological traits.

  2. Cultural transmission and the evolution of human behaviour: a general approach based on the Price equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouden, C; André, J-B; Morin, O; Nettle, D

    2014-02-01

    Transmitted culture can be viewed as an inheritance system somewhat independent of genes that is subject to processes of descent with modification in its own right. Although many authors have conceptualized cultural change as a Darwinian process, there is no generally agreed formal framework for defining key concepts such as natural selection, fitness, relatedness and altruism for the cultural case. Here, we present and explore such a framework using the Price equation. Assuming an isolated, independently measurable culturally transmitted trait, we show that cultural natural selection maximizes cultural fitness, a distinct quantity from genetic fitness, and also that cultural relatedness and cultural altruism are not reducible to or necessarily related to their genetic counterparts. We show that antagonistic coevolution will occur between genes and culture whenever cultural fitness is not perfectly aligned with genetic fitness, as genetic selection will shape psychological mechanisms to avoid susceptibility to cultural traits that bear a genetic fitness cost. We discuss the difficulties with conceptualizing cultural change using the framework of evolutionary theory, the degree to which cultural evolution is autonomous from genetic evolution, and the extent to which cultural change should be seen as a Darwinian process. We argue that the nonselection components of evolutionary change are much more important for culture than for genes, and that this and other important differences from the genetic case mean that different approaches and emphases are needed for cultural than genetic processes. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. A subgradient approach for constrained binary optimization via quantum adiabatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sahar; Ronagh, Pooya

    2017-08-01

    Outer approximation method has been proposed for solving the Lagrangian dual of a constrained binary quadratic programming problem via quantum adiabatic evolution in the literature. This should be an efficient prescription for solving the Lagrangian dual problem in the presence of an ideally noise-free quantum adiabatic system. However, current implementations of quantum annealing systems demand methods that are efficient at handling possible sources of noise. In this paper, we consider a subgradient method for finding an optimal primal-dual pair for the Lagrangian dual of a constrained binary polynomial programming problem. We then study the quadratic stable set (QSS) problem as a case study. We see that this method applied to the QSS problem can be viewed as an instance-dependent penalty-term approach that avoids large penalty coefficients. Finally, we report our experimental results of using the D-Wave 2X quantum annealer and conclude that our approach helps this quantum processor to succeed more often in solving these problems compared to the usual penalty-term approaches.

  4. A Novel Resource-Leveling Approach for Construction Project Based on Differential Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hai Tran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In construction engineering, project schedules are commonly established by the critical path method. Nevertheless, these schedules often lead to substantial fluctuations in the resource profile that are not only impractical but also costly for the contractors to execute. Therefore, in order to smooth out the resource profile, construction managers need to perform resource-leveling procedures. This paper proposes a novel approach for resource leveling, named as resource leveling based on differential evolution (RLDE. The performance of the RLDE is compared to that of Microsoft Project software, the genetic algorithm, and the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Experiments have proved that the newly developed method can deliver the most desirable resource-leveling result. Thus, the RLDE is an effective method and it can be a useful tool for assisting managers/planners in the field of project management.

  5. The tectonic evolution of the Neoproterozoic Brasília Belt, central Brazil: a geochronological and isotopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Martins Pimentel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The Brasília Belt is one of the most complete Neoproterozoic orogens in western Gondwana. Rapid progress on the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the belt was achieved due to new U-Pb data, combined with Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf analyses. The evolution of the Brasília orogen happened over a long period of time (900 - 600 Ma involving subduction, magmatism and terrain accretion, as a result of the consumption of the Goiás oceanic lithosphere. Provenance studies, based on U-Pb zircon data, indicate that the sedimentary rock units record different tectonic settings and stages of the evolution of the orogen. The Paranoá and Canastra groups represent passive margin sequences derived from the erosion of the São Francisco Craton. The Araxá and Ibiá groups, however, have dominant Neoproterozoic detrital zircon populations, as young as 650 Ma, suggesting derivation from the Goiás Magmatic Arc. The Goiás Magmatic Arc represents a composite arc terrain, formed by the accretion of older (ca. 0.9 - 0.8 Ga intraoceanic island arc(s, followed by more evolved continental arcs. It extends for several thousand kilometers, from SW Goiás, through NE Brazil and into Africa. Metamorphism took place between 650 - 630 Ma reflecting final closure of the Goiás Ocean and continental collision.

  6. Personalized blood glucose prediction: A hybrid approach using grammatical evolution and physiological models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Contreras

    Full Text Available The large patient variability in human physiology and the effects of variables such as exercise or meals challenge current prediction modeling techniques. Physiological models are very precise but they are typically complex and specific physiological knowledge is required. In contrast, data-based models allow the incorporation of additional inputs and accurately capture the relationship between these inputs and the outcome, but at the cost of losing the physiological meaning of the model. In this work, we designed a hybrid approach comprising physiological models for insulin and grammatical evolution, taking into account the clinical harm caused by deviations from the target blood glucose by using a penalizing fitness function based on the Clarke error grid. The prediction models were built using data obtained over 14 days for 100 virtual patients generated by the UVA/Padova T1D simulator. Midterm blood glucose was predicted for the 100 virtual patients using personalized models and different scenarios. The results obtained were promising; an average of 98.31% of the predictions fell in zones A and B of the Clarke error grid. Midterm predictions using personalized models are feasible when the configuration of grammatical evolution explored in this study is used. The study of new alternative models is important to move forward in the development of alarm-and-control applications for the management of type 1 diabetes and the customization of the patient's treatments. The hybrid approach can be adapted to predict short-term blood glucose values to detect continuous glucose-monitoring sensor errors and to estimate blood glucose values when the continuous glucose-monitoring system fails to provide them.

  7. Special Section: The third provenance challenge on using the open provenance model for interoperability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmhan, Y; Groth, P.T.; Moreau, L

    2011-01-01

    The third provenance challenge was organized to evaluate the efficacy of the Open Provenance Model (OPM) in representing and sharing provenance with the goal of improving the specification. A data loading scientific workflow that ingests data files into a relational database for the Pan-STARRS sky

  8. Provenance for Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, H.; Tilmes, C.; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Duggan, B.; Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G. J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Earth Science Data Systems across NASA play a critical role in data processing, management, and analysis of NASA observations. However, there is a growing need to provide the provenance of these datasets as scientists increasingly need more transparency of the data products to improve their understanding and trust of the science results. Lessons learned from Climategate show that there is public demand for more transparency and understanding in the science process. Science data systems are key to enabling the capture, management, and use of production provenance information. Science analysis now also may involve merging multi-sensor datasets where lineage can facilitate the understanding of the data. But there does not exist a formal recommendation for an interoperable standard for provenance representation for use in NASA's Earth Science Data Systems. The W3C Provenance Working Group has a specification for the representation of provenance information. The standard is very general and intended to support the breadth of any domain. To better serve the needs of specific domain communities, the standard has several built in points of extensibility. We will present efforts by NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) on Provenance to develop an Earth Science extension to the PROV specification (PROV-ES) and how it can be used in science data system to capture, consume, and interpret provenance information.

  9. Archives and societal provenance Australian essays

    CERN Document Server

    Piggott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Records and archival arrangements in Australia are globally relevant because Australia's indigenous people represent the oldest living culture in the world, and because modern Australia is an ex-colonial society now heavily multicultural in outlook. Archives and Societal Provenance explores this distinctiveness using the theoretical concept of societal provenance as propounded by Canadian archival scholars led by Dr Tom Nesmith. The book's seventeen essays blend new writing and re-workings of earlier work, comprising the fi rst text to apply a societal provenance perspective to a national sett

  10. Provenance trials of larch in Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyutin, L.I. [V.N. Sukachev Inst. of Forest SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Some results of provenance trials of larch in Siberia are given. These provenance trials were established in the last thirty years by efforts of V.N. Sukaczev Inst. of Forest. Provenances and species of larch were tested in some field trials distributed over Siberia between Lat. N 52 deg and 66 deg, Long. E 88 deg and 113 deg: near Krasnoyarsk, in Republic Khakasia (an altitudes of 800 and 1200 metres), in the Lower Yenisei near Turukhansk, in the west and south regions of Krasnoyarsk territory, in the Upper Lena, near Chita. 2 refs

  11. A Provenance Tracking Model for Data Updates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ciobanu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available For data-centric systems, provenance tracking is particularly important when the system is open and decentralised, such as the Web of Linked Data. In this paper, a concise but expressive calculus which models data updates is presented. The calculus is used to provide an operational semantics for a system where data and updates interact concurrently. The operational semantics of the calculus also tracks the provenance of data with respect to updates. This provides a new formal semantics extending provenance diagrams which takes into account the execution of processes in a concurrent setting. Moreover, a sound and complete model for the calculus based on ideals of series-parallel DAGs is provided. The notion of provenance introduced can be used as a subjective indicator of the quality of data in concurrent interacting systems.

  12. Causality and the Semantics of Provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cheney

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Provenance, or information about the sources, derivation, custody or history of data, has been studied recently in a number of contexts, including databases, scientific workflows and the Semantic Web. Many provenance mechanisms have been developed, motivated by informal notions such as influence, dependence, explanation and causality. However, there has been little study of whether these mechanisms formally satisfy appropriate policies or even how to formalize relevant motivating concepts such as causality. We contend that mathematical models of these concepts are needed to justify and compare provenance techniques. In this paper we review a theory of causality based on structural models that has been developed in artificial intelligence, and describe work in progress on using causality to give a semantics to provenance graphs.

  13. Solving stochastic programming problems using new approach to Differential Evolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Wagdy Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to Differential Evolution algorithm for solving stochastic programming problems, named DESP. The proposed algorithm introduces a new triangular mutation rule based on the convex combination vector of the triangle and the difference vector between the best and the worst individuals among the three randomly selected vectors. The proposed novel approach to mutation operator is shown to enhance the global and local search capabilities and to increase the convergence speed of the new algorithm compared with conventional DE. DESP uses Deb’s constraint handling technique based on feasibility and the sum of constraint violations without any additional parameters. Besides, a new dynamic tolerance technique to handle equality constraints is also adopted. Two models of stochastic programming (SP problems are considered: Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming Problems and Multi-objective Stochastic Linear Programming Problems. The comparison results between the DESP and basic DE, basic particle swarm optimization (PSO, Genetic Algorithm (GA and the available results from where it is indicated that the proposed DESP algorithm is competitive with, and in some cases superior to, other algorithms in terms of final solution quality, efficiency and robustness of the considered problems in comparison with the quoted results in the literature.

  14. Integrated approach for sinkhole evaluation and evolution prediction in the Central Ebro Basin (NE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Pueyo Anchuela

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of karst hazards benefits from the integration of different techniques, methodologies and approaches. Each one presents a different signature and is sensitive to certain indicators related to karst hazards. In some cases, detailed analysis permits the evaluation of representativeness either from isolated approaches or by means of integrated analyses. In this study, we present the evaluation of an area with high density of karstic collapses at different evolutionary stages through the integration of surficial, historical, geomorphological and geophysical data in order to finally define the evolutionary model for karst activity development. The obtained dataset permits to identify different steps in sinkhole evolution: (i cavities and open sinkholes, (ii filling of these cavities, with materials having different signatures, (iii the progression from collapses to subsidence sinkholes and (iv enlargement through collapses in marginal areas of previous sinkholes. The presence of different stages of this evolutionary model permits to determine their own signatures that can be of application in contexts where analysis cannot be so systematic and also to evaluate the definition of the marginal areas of previous sinkholes as the most hazardous sectors.

  15. Teaching and Learning Evolution: Testing the Principles of a Constructivist Approach through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mary

    2011-01-01

    A tenth grade class in an international school studied evolution for four weeks as part of the study of Biology. A diagnostic test was used to determine the main misconceptions students have as they come to the study of evolution. This was followed by a series of explorations of different conceptual models to account for evolution, structured…

  16. Multi-analytical approach applied to the provenance study of marbles used as covering slabs in the archaeological submerged site of Baia (Naples, Italy): The case of the “Villa con ingresso a protiro”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricca, Michela, E-mail: michela.ricca@unical.it [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), University of Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS) (Italy); Belfiore, Cristina Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali, University of Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania (Italy); Ruffolo, Silvestro Antonio; Barca, Donatella [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), University of Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS) (Italy); De Buergo, Monica Alvarez [Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM), Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, planta 7, despacho 17.4c/José Antonio Nováis 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Crisci, Gino Mirocle; La Russa, Mauro Francesco [Dipartimento di Biologia, Ecologia e Scienze della Terra (DiBEST), University of Calabria, Via Pietro Bucci, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Archaeometric investigations of ancient marbles from underwater environment. • Distinguish the different variety of marbles by using minero-petrographic and geochemical-isotopic investigations. • Compare the results with literature data allowing to broaden the existing database. - Abstract: This paper is focused on archaeometric investigations of white marbles taken from the submerged archaeological site of Baia (Naples). The marine area includes the ruins of this ancient Roman city, whose structures range from luxurious maritime villas and imperial buildings with private thermae and tabernae, to more simple and modest houses. Analyses were carried out on fifty marble fragments of covering slabs, belonging to several pavements of the monumental villa, called the Villa con ingresso a protiro, in order to ascertain their provenance. The most distinctive properties of marbles are their variety of textural property especially regarding grain size (MGS), associated with the Mn content and the variation of stable isotopes. These features, supported by the contribution of other variables and studies, establish the basis for the correct identification of the marbles. For this purpose, minero-petrographic and geochemical techniques were used. Results were compared with literature data of white marbles commonly used in antiquity, especially in the Mediterranean basin and showed that a variety of precious marbles from Carrara, Docimium (Afyon), Thasos-D, Aphrodisias, Proconnesos (Marmara), Paros and Pentelicon were used in the ancient roman city of Baia, confirming the importance of the submerged archaeological site and also allowing researchers to broaden the existing database.

  17. Macroscopic dielectric function within time-dependent density functional theory—Real time evolution versus the Casida approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Tobias; Kresse, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Linear optical properties can be calculated by solving the time-dependent density functional theory equations. Linearization of the equation of motion around the ground state orbitals results in the so-called Casida equation, which is formally very similar to the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Alternatively one can determine the spectral functions by applying an infinitely short electric field in time and then following the evolution of the electron orbitals and the evolution of the dipole moments. The long wavelength response function is then given by the Fourier transformation of the evolution of the dipole moments in time. In this work, we compare the results and performance of these two approaches for the projector augmented wave method. To allow for large time steps and still rely on a simple difference scheme to solve the differential equation, we correct for the errors in the frequency domain, using a simple analytic equation. In general, we find that both approaches yield virtually indistinguishable results. For standard density functionals, the time evolution approach is, with respect to the computational performance, clearly superior compared to the solution of the Casida equation. However, for functionals including nonlocal exchange, the direct solution of the Casida equation is usually much more efficient, even though it scales less beneficial with the system size. We relate this to the large computational prefactors in evaluating the nonlocal exchange, which renders the time evolution algorithm fairly inefficient.

  18. A non-deterministic approach to forecasting the trophic evolution of lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bertoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Limnologists have long recognized that one of the goals of their discipline is to increase its predictive capability. In recent years, the role of prediction in applied ecology escalated, mainly due to man’s increased ability to change the biosphere. Such alterations often came with unplanned and noticeably negative side effects mushrooming from lack of proper attention to long-term consequences. Regression analysis of common limnological parameters has been successfully applied to develop predictive models relating the variability of limnological parameters to specific key causes. These approaches, though, are biased by the requirement of a priori cause-relation assumption, oftentimes difficult to find in the complex, nonlinear relationships entangling ecological data. A set of quantitative tools that can help addressing current environmental challenges avoiding such restrictions is currently being researched and developed within the framework of ecological informatics. One of these approaches attempting to model the relationship between a set of inputs and known outputs, is based on genetic algorithms and programming (GP. This stochastic optimization tool is based on the process of evolution in natural systems and was inspired by a direct analogy to sexual reproduction and Charles Darwin’s principle of natural selection. GP works through genetic algorithms that use selection and recombination operators to generate a population of equations. Thanks to a 25-years long time-series of regular limnological data, the deep, large, oligotrophic Lake Maggiore (Northern Italy is the ideal case study to test the predictive ability of GP. Testing of GP on the multi-year data series of this lake has allowed us to verify the forecasting efficacy of the models emerging from GP application. In addition, this non-deterministic approach leads to the discovery of non-obvious relationships between variables and enabled the formulation of new stochastic models.

  19. A new approach to the automatic identification of organism evolution using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperski, Andrzej; Kasperska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Automatic identification of organism evolution still remains a challenging task, which is especially exiting, when the evolution of human is considered. The main aim of this work is to present a new idea to allow organism evolution analysis using neural networks. Here we show that it is possible to identify evolution of any organisms in a fully automatic way using the designed EvolutionXXI program, which contains implemented neural network. The neural network has been taught using cytochrome b sequences of selected organisms. Then, analyses have been carried out for the various exemplary organisms in order to demonstrate capabilities of the EvolutionXXI program. It is shown that the presented idea allows supporting existing hypotheses, concerning evolutionary relationships between selected organisms, among others, Sirenia and elephants, hippopotami and whales, scorpions and spiders, dolphins and whales. Moreover, primate (including human), tree shrew and yeast evolution has been reconstructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fuzzy reasoning of accident provenance in pervasive healthcare monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Hu, Xiaohua

    2013-11-01

    In pervasive healthcare monitoring environments, data provenance, as one metadata, can help people analyze the reasons for medical accidents that are generated by complex events. This reasoning processing often encounters inaccurate time and irreversible reasoning problems. How to solve the uncertain process and fuzzy transformation time presents many challenges to the study of data provenance. In this paper, we propose a backward derivation model with the provenance semantic, backward fuzzy time reasoning net (BFTRN), to solve these two problems. We design a backward reasoning algorithm motivated by time automation theory based on this model. With regard to given life-critical alarms and some constraints, it cannot only derive all evolution paths and the possibility distribution of paths from historical information, but also efficiently compute the value of fuzzy time function for each transition of lift-critical complex alarms in the healthcare monitoring system. We also analyze the properties of BFTRN model in this paper. Experiments on real dataset show that the proposed model is efficient.

  1. Simulating mesoscale coastal evolution for decadal coastal management: A new framework integrating multiple, complementary modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Barend; Nicholls, Robert J.; French, Jon R.; Barkwith, Andrew; Bonaldo, Davide; Burningham, Helene; Brad Murray, A.; Payo, Andres; Sutherland, James; Thornhill, Gillian; Townend, Ian H.; van der Wegen, Mick; Walkden, Mike J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Coastal and shoreline management increasingly needs to consider morphological change occurring at decadal to centennial timescales, especially that related to climate change and sea-level rise. This requires the development of morphological models operating at a mesoscale, defined by time and length scales of the order 101 to 102 years and 101 to 102 km. So-called 'reduced complexity' models that represent critical processes at scales not much smaller than the primary scale of interest, and are regulated by capturing the critical feedbacks that govern landform behaviour, are proving effective as a means of exploring emergent coastal behaviour at a landscape scale. Such models tend to be computationally efficient and are thus easily applied within a probabilistic framework. At the same time, reductionist models, built upon a more detailed description of hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes, are capable of application at increasingly broad spatial and temporal scales. More qualitative modelling approaches are also emerging that can guide the development and deployment of quantitative models, and these can be supplemented by varied data-driven modelling approaches that can achieve new explanatory insights from observational datasets. Such disparate approaches have hitherto been pursued largely in isolation by mutually exclusive modelling communities. Brought together, they have the potential to facilitate a step change in our ability to simulate the evolution of coastal morphology at scales that are most relevant to managing erosion and flood risk. Here, we advocate and outline a new integrated modelling framework that deploys coupled mesoscale reduced complexity models, reductionist coastal area models, data-driven approaches, and qualitative conceptual models. Integration of these heterogeneous approaches gives rise to model compositions that can potentially resolve decadal- to centennial-scale behaviour of diverse coupled open coast, estuary and inner

  2. Prov-O-Viz - Understanding the Role of Activities in Provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Rinke; Groth, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents PROV-O-Viz, aWeb-based visualizationtool for PROV-based provenance traces coming from various sources, that leverages Sankey Diagrams to reflect the flow of information through activities.We briefly discuss the advantages of this approach compared to other provenance

  3. PROV-O-Viz - Understanding the Role of Activities in Provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Groth, P.; Ludäscher, B.; Plale, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents PROV-O-Viz, a Web-based visualization tool for PROV-based provenance traces coming from various sources, that leverages Sankey Diagrams to reflect the flow of information through activities. We briefly discuss the advantages of this approach compared to other provenance

  4. Soil evolution in spruce forest ecosystems: role and influence of humus studied by morphological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chersich S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the role and the mutual influences of humus and soil in alpine spruce forest ecosystems we studied and classified 7 soil - humic profiles on the 4 main forestry dynamics: open canopy, regeneration, young stand, tree stage. We studied the role of humification process in the pedologic process involving soils and vegetations studing humic and soil horizons. Study sites are located at an altitude of 1740 m a.s.l near Pellizzano (TN, and facing to the North. The parent soil material is predominantly composed of morenic sediments, probably from Cevedale glacier lying on a substrate of tonalite from Presanella (Adamello Tertiary pluton. The soil temperature regime is frigid, while the moisture regime is udic. The characteristics observed in field were correlated with classical chemical and physical soil analyses (MIPAF 2000. In order to discriminate the dominant soil forming process, the soils were described and classified in each site according to the World Reference Base (FAO-ISRIC-ISSS 1998. Humus was described and classified using the morphological-genetic approach (Jabiol et al. 1995. The main humus forms are acid and they are for the greater part Dysmoder on PODZOLS. The main pedogenetic processes is the podzolization, locally there are also hydromorphic processes. We associate a definite humus form with a pedological process at a particular step of the forest evolution. We concluded thath the soil study for a correct pedological interpretation must take count of the characteristics of the humic epipedon.

  5. Novel Approaches to Manipulating Bacterial Pathogen Biofilms: Whole-Systems Design Philosophy and Steering Microbial Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Alexandra S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and manipulating bacterial biofilms is crucial in medicine, ecology and agriculture and has potential applications in bioproduction, bioremediation and bioenergy. Biofilms often resist standard therapies and the need to develop new means of intervention provides an opportunity to fundamentally rethink our strategies. Conventional approaches to working with biological systems are, for the most part, "brute force", attempting to effect control in an input and effort intensive manner and are often insufficient when dealing with the inherent non-linearity and complexity of living systems. Biological systems, by their very nature, are dynamic, adaptive and resilient and require management tools that interact with dynamic processes rather than inert artefacts. I present an overview of a novel engineering philosophy which aims to exploit rather than fight those properties, and hence provide a more efficient and robust alternative. Based on a combination of evolutionary theory and whole-systems design, its essence is what I will call systems aikido; the basic principle of aikido being to interact with the momentum of an attacker and redirect it with minimal energy expenditure, using the opponent's energy rather than one's own. In more conventional terms, this translates to a philosophy of equilibrium engineering, manipulating systems' own self-organisation and evolution so that the evolutionarily or dynamically stable state corresponds to a function which we require. I illustrate these ideas with a description of a proposed manipulation of environmental conditions to alter the stability of co-operation in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection of the cystic fibrosis lung.

  6. A New Fokker-Planck Approach for the Relaxation-driven Evolution of Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2017-10-01

    We present an approach for simulating the collisional evolution of spherical isotropic stellar systems based on the one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. A novel aspect is that we use the phase volume as the argument of the distribution function instead of the traditionally used energy, which facilitates the solution. The publicly available code PhaseFlow implements a high-accuracy finite-element method for the Fokker-Planck equation, and can handle multiple-component systems, optionally with the central black hole and taking into account loss-cone effects and star formation. We discuss the energy balance in the general setting, and in application to the Bahcall-Wolf cusp around a central black hole, for which we derive a perturbative solution. We stress that the cusp is not a steady-state structure, but rather evolves in amplitude while retaining an approximately ρ \\propto {r}-7/4 density profile. Finally, we apply the method to the nuclear star cluster of the milky Way, and illustrate a possible evolutionary scenario in which a two-component system of lighter main-sequence stars and stellar-mass black holes develops a Bahcall-Wolf cusp in the heavier component and a weaker ρ \\propto {r}-3/2 cusp in the lighter, visible component, over the period of several Gyr. The present-day density profile is consistent with the recently detected mild cusp inside the central parsec, and is weakly sensitive to initial conditions.

  7. Meeting Report on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Daniel; Dudley, Aimée M

    2017-08-16

    The fourth EMBO-sponsored conference on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems (https://www.embl.de/training/events/2016/EAE16-01/), was held at the EMBL in Heidelberg, Germany, October 19-23, 2016. The conference was organized by Judith Berman (Tel Aviv University), Maitreya Dunham (University of Washington), Jun-Yi Leu (Academia Sinica), and Lars Steinmetz (EMBL Heidelberg and Stanford University). The meeting attracted ~120 researchers from 28 countries and covered a wide range of topics in the fields of genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology with a unifying focus on yeast as a model system. Attendees enjoyed the Keith Haring inspired yeast florescence microscopy artwork (Figure 1), a unique feature of the meeting since its inception, and the one-minute flash talks that catalyzed discussions at two vibrant poster sessions. The meeting coincided with the 20th anniversary of the publication describing the sequence of the first eukaryotic genome, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Goffeau et al. 1996). Many of the conference talks focused on important questions about what is contained in the genome, how genomes evolve, and the architecture and behavior of communities of phenotypically and genotypically diverse microorganisms. Here, we summarize highlights of the research talks around these themes. Nearly all presentations focused on novel findings, and we refer the reader to relevant manuscripts that have subsequently been published. Copyright © 2017, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  8. Meeting Report on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Jarosz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fourth EMBO-sponsored conference on Experimental Approaches to Evolution and Ecology Using Yeast and Other Model Systems (https://www.embl.de/training/events/2016/EAE16-01/, was held at the EMBL in Heidelberg, Germany, October 19–23, 2016. The conference was organized by Judith Berman (Tel Aviv University, Maitreya Dunham (University of Washington, Jun-Yi Leu (Academia Sinica, and Lars Steinmetz (EMBL Heidelberg and Stanford University. The meeting attracted ∼120 researchers from 28 countries and covered a wide range of topics in the fields of genetics, evolutionary biology, and ecology, with a unifying focus on yeast as a model system. Attendees enjoyed the Keith Haring-inspired yeast florescence microscopy artwork (Figure 1, a unique feature of the meeting since its inception, and the 1 min flash talks that catalyzed discussions at two vibrant poster sessions. The meeting coincided with the 20th anniversary of the publication describing the sequence of the first eukaryotic genome, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many of the conference talks focused on important questions about what is contained in the genome, how genomes evolve, and the architecture and behavior of communities of phenotypically and genotypically diverse microorganisms. Here, we summarize highlights of the research talks around these themes. Nearly all presentations focused on novel findings, and we refer the reader to relevant manuscripts that have subsequently been published.

  9. A global approach for solving evolutive heat transfer for image denoising and inpainting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Fortier, Marie-Flavie; Ziou, Djemel

    2006-09-01

    This paper proposes an alternative to partial differential equations (PDEs) for solving problems in computer vision based on evolutive heat transfer. Traditionally, the method for solving such physics-based problems is to discretize and solve a PDE by a purely mathematical process. Instead of using the PDE, we propose to use the global heat principle and to decompose it into basic laws. We show that some of these laws admit an exact global version since they arise from conservative principles. We also show that the assumptions made about the other basic Iaws can be made wisely, taking into account knowledge about the problem and the domain. The numerical scheme is derived in a straightforward way from the modeled problem, thus providing a physical explanation for each step in the solution. The advantage of such an approach is that it minimizes the approximations made during the whole process and it modularizes it, allowing changing the application to a great number of problems. We apply the scheme to two applications: image denoising and inpainting which are modeled with heat transfer. For denoising, we propose a new approximation for the conductivity coefficient and we add thin lines to the features in order to block diffusion.

  10. A Bayesian Approach to the Evolution of Metabolic Networks on a Phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz Mithani; Preston, Gail M.; Jotun Hein

    2010-01-01

    The availability of genomes of many closely related bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities offers the possibility of tracing metabolic evolution on a phylogeny relating the genomes to understand the evolutionary processes and constraints that affect the evolution of metabolic networks. Using simple (independent loss/gain of reactions) or complex (incorporating dependencies among reactions) stochastic models of metabolic evolution, it is possible to study how metabolic networks evolve ov...

  11. Evaluation of filesystem provenance visualization tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkin, Michelle A; Yeh, Chelsea S; Boyd, Madelaine; Macko, Peter; Gajos, Krzysztof Z; Seltzer, Margo; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2013-12-01

    Having effective visualizations of filesystem provenance data is valuable for understanding its complex hierarchical structure. The most common visual representation of provenance data is the node-link diagram. While effective for understanding local activity, the node-link diagram fails to offer a high-level summary of activity and inter-relationships within the data. We present a new tool, InProv, which displays filesystem provenance with an interactive radial-based tree layout. The tool also utilizes a new time-based hierarchical node grouping method for filesystem provenance data we developed to match the user's mental model and make data exploration more intuitive. We compared InProv to a conventional node-link based tool, Orbiter, in a quantitative evaluation with real users of filesystem provenance data including provenance data experts, IT professionals, and computational scientists. We also compared in the evaluation our new node grouping method to a conventional method. The results demonstrate that InProv results in higher accuracy in identifying system activity than Orbiter with large complex data sets. The results also show that our new time-based hierarchical node grouping method improves performance in both tools, and participants found both tools significantly easier to use with the new time-based node grouping method. Subjective measures show that participants found InProv to require less mental activity, less physical activity, less work, and is less stressful to use. Our study also reveals one of the first cases of gender differences in visualization; both genders had comparable performance with InProv, but women had a significantly lower average accuracy (56%) compared to men (70%) with Orbiter.

  12. Structure and Evolution of Mediterranean Forest Research: A Science Mapping Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Pierfrancesco; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Palahi, Marc; Scarascia Mugnozza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at conducting the first science mapping analysis of the Mediterranean forest research in order to elucidate its research structure and evolution. We applied a science mapping approach based on co-term and citation analyses to a set of scientific publications retrieved from the Elsevier's Scopus database over the period 1980-2014. The Scopus search retrieved 2,698 research papers and reviews published by 159 peer-reviewed journals. The total number of publications was around 1% (N = 17) during the period 1980-1989 and they reached 3% (N = 69) in the time slice 1990-1994. Since 1995, the number of publications increased exponentially, thus reaching 55% (N = 1,476) during the period 2010-2014. Within the thirty-four years considered, the retrieved publications were published by 88 countries. Among them, Spain was the most productive country, publishing 44% (N = 1,178) of total publications followed by Italy (18%, N = 482) and France (12%, N = 336). These countries also host the ten most productive scientific institutions in terms of number of publications in Mediterranean forest subjects. Forest Ecology and Management and Annals of Forest Science were the most active journals in publishing research in Mediterranean forest. During the period 1980-1994, the research topics were poorly characterized, but they become better defined during the time slice 1995-1999. Since 2000s, the clusters become well defined by research topics. Current status of Mediterranean forest research (20092014) was represented by four clusters, in which different research topics such as biodiversity and conservation, land-use and degradation, climate change effects on ecophysiological responses and soil were identified. Basic research in Mediterranean forest ecosystems is mainly conducted by ecophysiological research. Applied research was mainly represented by land-use and degradation, biodiversity and conservation and fire research topics. The citation analyses revealed highly

  13. Structure and Evolution of Mediterranean Forest Research: A Science Mapping Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfrancesco Nardi

    Full Text Available This study aims at conducting the first science mapping analysis of the Mediterranean forest research in order to elucidate its research structure and evolution. We applied a science mapping approach based on co-term and citation analyses to a set of scientific publications retrieved from the Elsevier's Scopus database over the period 1980-2014. The Scopus search retrieved 2,698 research papers and reviews published by 159 peer-reviewed journals. The total number of publications was around 1% (N = 17 during the period 1980-1989 and they reached 3% (N = 69 in the time slice 1990-1994. Since 1995, the number of publications increased exponentially, thus reaching 55% (N = 1,476 during the period 2010-2014. Within the thirty-four years considered, the retrieved publications were published by 88 countries. Among them, Spain was the most productive country, publishing 44% (N = 1,178 of total publications followed by Italy (18%, N = 482 and France (12%, N = 336. These countries also host the ten most productive scientific institutions in terms of number of publications in Mediterranean forest subjects. Forest Ecology and Management and Annals of Forest Science were the most active journals in publishing research in Mediterranean forest. During the period 1980-1994, the research topics were poorly characterized, but they become better defined during the time slice 1995-1999. Since 2000s, the clusters become well defined by research topics. Current status of Mediterranean forest research (20092014 was represented by four clusters, in which different research topics such as biodiversity and conservation, land-use and degradation, climate change effects on ecophysiological responses and soil were identified. Basic research in Mediterranean forest ecosystems is mainly conducted by ecophysiological research. Applied research was mainly represented by land-use and degradation, biodiversity and conservation and fire research topics. The citation analyses

  14. Model-based Abstraction of Data Provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    Identifying provenance of data provides insights to the origin of data and intermediate results, and has recently gained increased interest due to data-centric applications. In this work we extend a data-centric system view with actors handling the data and policies restricting actions. This

  15. Provenance studies through petrography and heavy mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty five sandstone samples of Lokoja and Agbaja Formations were collected for textural, geochemical, petrographic and heavy minerals analysis with a view to determining the provenance of the sedimentary rocks.The texture of Lokoja Sandstones reveals poorly sorted sub-arkose immature sandstone with the quartz ...

  16. Geographic characterisation of African provenances of Faidherbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of the study were to: (i) determine the phylogenetic relationship among the 16 provenances in order to establish the species centre of origin, and (ii) determine the extent of genetic diversity in F. alb ida using PCR markers. ITS data did not produce any consistent regional or geographic pattern. RAPD data ...

  17. provenance studies through petrography and heavy mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Fifty five sandstone samples of Lokoja and Agbaja Formations were collected for textural, geochemical, petrographic and heavy minerals analysis with a view to determining the provenance of the sedimentary rocks.The texture of Lokoja Sandstones reveals poorly sorted sub-arkose immature sandstone with the quartz.

  18. A Bayesian approach to the evolution of metabolic networks on a phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Aziz; Preston, Gail M; Hein, Jotun

    2010-08-05

    The availability of genomes of many closely related bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities offers the possibility of tracing metabolic evolution on a phylogeny relating the genomes to understand the evolutionary processes and constraints that affect the evolution of metabolic networks. Using simple (independent loss/gain of reactions) or complex (incorporating dependencies among reactions) stochastic models of metabolic evolution, it is possible to study how metabolic networks evolve over time. Here, we describe a model that takes the reaction neighborhood into account when modeling metabolic evolution. The model also allows estimation of the strength of the neighborhood effect during the course of evolution. We present Gibbs samplers for sampling networks at the internal node of a phylogeny and for estimating the parameters of evolution over a phylogeny without exploring the whole search space by iteratively sampling from the conditional distributions of the internal networks and parameters. The samplers are used to estimate the parameters of evolution of metabolic networks of bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas and to infer the metabolic networks of the ancestral pseudomonads. The results suggest that pathway maps that are conserved across the Pseudomonas phylogeny have a stronger neighborhood structure than those which have a variable distribution of reactions across the phylogeny, and that some Pseudomonas lineages are going through genome reduction resulting in the loss of a number of reactions from their metabolic networks.

  19. A Bayesian approach to the evolution of metabolic networks on a phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mithani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The availability of genomes of many closely related bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities offers the possibility of tracing metabolic evolution on a phylogeny relating the genomes to understand the evolutionary processes and constraints that affect the evolution of metabolic networks. Using simple (independent loss/gain of reactions or complex (incorporating dependencies among reactions stochastic models of metabolic evolution, it is possible to study how metabolic networks evolve over time. Here, we describe a model that takes the reaction neighborhood into account when modeling metabolic evolution. The model also allows estimation of the strength of the neighborhood effect during the course of evolution. We present Gibbs samplers for sampling networks at the internal node of a phylogeny and for estimating the parameters of evolution over a phylogeny without exploring the whole search space by iteratively sampling from the conditional distributions of the internal networks and parameters. The samplers are used to estimate the parameters of evolution of metabolic networks of bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas and to infer the metabolic networks of the ancestral pseudomonads. The results suggest that pathway maps that are conserved across the Pseudomonas phylogeny have a stronger neighborhood structure than those which have a variable distribution of reactions across the phylogeny, and that some Pseudomonas lineages are going through genome reduction resulting in the loss of a number of reactions from their metabolic networks.

  20. The PBase Scientific Workflow Provenance Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Cuevas-Vicenttín

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific workflows and their supporting systems are becoming increasingly popular for compute-intensive and data-intensive scientific experiments. The advantages scientific workflows offer include rapid and easy workflow design, software and data reuse, scalable execution, sharing and collaboration, and other advantages that altogether facilitate “reproducible science”. In this context, provenance – information about the origin, context, derivation, ownership, or history of some artifact – plays a key role, since scientists are interested in examining and auditing the results of scientific experiments. However, in order to perform such analyses on scientific results as part of extended research collaborations, an adequate environment and tools are required. Concretely, the need arises for a repository that will facilitate the sharing of scientific workflows and their associated execution traces in an interoperable manner, also enabling querying and visualization. Furthermore, such functionality should be supported while taking performance and scalability into account. With this purpose in mind, we introduce PBase: a scientific workflow provenance repository implementing the ProvONE proposed standard, which extends the emerging W3C PROV standard for provenance data with workflow specific concepts. PBase is built on the Neo4j graph database, thus offering capabilities such as declarative and efficient querying. Our experiences demonstrate the power gained by supporting various types of queries for provenance data. In addition, PBase is equipped with a user friendly interface tailored for the visualization of scientific workflow provenance data, making the specification of queries and the interpretation of their results easier and more effective.

  1. Identifying provenance-specific features of detrital heavy mineral assemblages in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Andrew C.; Hallsworth, Claire

    1994-05-01

    The composition of heavy mineral assemblages in sandstones may be heavily influenced by processes operating during transport, deposition and diagenesis. As a consequence, conventional heavy mineral data may not be a reliable guide to the nature of sediment source material. Certain features of heavy mineral suites, however, are inherited directly from the source area without significant modification, such as the varietal characteristics of individual mineral species. This paper describes an alternative approach to varietal studies that concentrates on relative abundances of minerals that are stable during diagenesis and have similar hydraulic behaviour. Ratios of apatite to tourmaline, TiO 2 minerals to zircon, monazite to zircon, and chrome spinel to zircon provide a good reflection of the source rock characteristics, because they are comparatively immune to alteration during the sedimentary cycle. These ratios are described as index values (ATi, RZi, MZi and CZi, respectively). This approach avoids some of the practical problems associated with varietal studies, such as the need to make subjective decisions about mineral properties or to use advanced analytical techniques that may not be accessible to the analyst. It also makes use of more components of the heavy mineral suite and thus provides a more balanced view of provenance characteristics. The use of these ratios is illustrated with examples from Upper Jurassic sandstones in the Outer Moray Firth area of the UK continental shelf and Triassic sandstones from onshore and offshore UK. Heavy mineral indices, notably ATi and MZi, show marked variations in Upper Jurassic Piper sandstones of the Outer Moray Firth. Main Piper sandstones have lower ATi and MZi values compared with Supra Piper sandstones, indicating significant stratigraphic evolution of provenance. The UK Triassic shows major regional variations in a number of index values, including ATi, MZi and CZi, demonstrating that sediment was supplied from

  2. How can a multimodal approach to primate communication help us understand the evolution of communication?

    OpenAIRE

    Bridget M Waller; Katja Liebal; Burrows, Anne M.; Slocombe, Katie E.

    2013-01-01

    Scientists studying the communication of non-human animals are often aiming to better understand the evolution of human communication, including human language. Some scientists take a phylogenetic perspective, where the goal is to trace the evolutionary history of communicative traits, while others take a functional perspective, where the goal is to understand the selection pressures underpinning specific traits. Both perspectives are necessary to fully understand the evolution of communicati...

  3. Characterizing Provenance in Visualization and Data Analysis: An Organizational Framework of Provenance Types and Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Eric D; Endert, Alex; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    While the primary goal of visual analytics research is to improve the quality of insights and findings, a substantial amount of research in provenance has focused on the history of changes and advances throughout the analysis process. The term, provenance, has been used in a variety of ways to describe different types of records and histories related to visualization. The existing body of provenance research has grown to a point where the consolidation of design knowledge requires cross-referencing a variety of projects and studies spanning multiple domain areas. We present an organizational framework of the different types of provenance information and purposes for why they are desired in the field of visual analytics. Our organization is intended to serve as a framework to help researchers specify types of provenance and coordinate design knowledge across projects. We also discuss the relationships between these factors and the methods used to capture provenance information. In addition, our organization can be used to guide the selection of evaluation methodology and the comparison of study outcomes in provenance research.

  4. Provenance Representation in the Global Change Information System (GCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is a topic that has become very controversial despite strong support within the scientific community. It is common for agencies releasing information about climate change to be served with Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for everything that led to that conclusion. Capturing and presenting the provenance, linking to the research papers, data sets, models, analyses, observation instruments and satellites, etc. supporting key findings has the potential to mitigate skepticism in this domain. The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) is now coordinating the production of a National Climate Assessment (NCA) that presents our best understanding of global change. We are now developing a Global Change Information System (GCIS) that will present the content of that report and its provenance, including the scientific support for the findings of the assessment. We are using an approach that will present this information both through a human accessible web site as well as a machine readable interface for automated mining of the provenance graph. We plan to use the developing W3C PROV Data Model and Ontology for this system.

  5. Titian: Data Provenance Support in Spark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interlandi, Matteo; Shah, Kshitij; Tetali, Sai Deep; Gulzar, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Seunghyun; Kim, Miryung; Millstein, Todd; Condie, Tyson

    2015-11-01

    Debugging data processing logic in Data-Intensive Scalable Computing (DISC) systems is a difficult and time consuming effort. Today's DISC systems offer very little tooling for debugging programs, and as a result programmers spend countless hours collecting evidence (e.g., from log files) and performing trial and error debugging. To aid this effort, we built Titian, a library that enables data provenance-tracking data through transformations-in Apache Spark. Data scientists using the Titian Spark extension will be able to quickly identify the input data at the root cause of a potential bug or outlier result. Titian is built directly into the Spark platform and offers data provenance support at interactive speeds-orders-of-magnitude faster than alternative solutions-while minimally impacting Spark job performance; observed overheads for capturing data lineage rarely exceed 30% above the baseline job execution time.

  6. MCloud: Secure Provenance for Mobile Cloud Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 fraud detection , data protection, provenance, mobile device, social network REPORT DOCUMENTATION...trackers. In addition, at mobile application level, we have introduced Marco and Vamos, systems that detect plagiarized videos, falsely claimed to have...our results on each dimension studied. 1. Mobile Video Fraud Detection We have focused on detecting plagiarized mobile videos. For instance, let

  7. The stones and historic mortars of the Santissima Trinità di Saccargia Romanesque Basilica (Sardinia, Italy): a multi-analytical techniques' approach for the study of their features and provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbu, Stefano; Palomba, Marcella; Sitzia, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    A research project devoted to the study of building materials of the Romanesque churches in Sardinia is currently underway. One of the objectives of the project is to focus the mineral, chemical-physical and petrographic characterisation of the construction materials, as well as the alteration processes. To make a contribution to the preservation of Sardinian monuments, we suggests a new approach to define the different alteration-modes of rocks in function of their local exposure to the weather, studying: 1) the changes of physical properties on surface of stone (porosity, water absorption, micro-morphology) determined through laboratory tests and photogrammetry observations, 2) the alteration phases present on surface (e.g., secondary minerals, soluble salts) determined by mineralogical and chemical investigations. This methodological approach will allow to select appropriate, suitable and compatible materials for replacing the original altered one's, and to plan appropriate strategies devoted to the restoration work. In this paper the geomaterials used for construct the Santissima Trinità di Saccargia Basilica have been investigated. The church, finished in 1116 over the ruins of a pre-existing monastery, is the most important Romanesque site in the island. Have been studied the chemical alterations and physical decay of two different stones, as volcanic rocks (i.e., basalt) and sedimentary rocks (i.e., limestones) used in bichromy on the Basilica. The main purpose is to observe the different modes of alteration of these two lithologies with different petrophysical characteristics, placed in the same conditions of weathering. Macroscopic evidences show that the limestones, while not having a high porosity, they were strongly affected by alteration phenomena, especially in the outer surface of ashlars, due to the solubilization of the carbonate matrix. The basalt rocks show no obvious physical alteration. Occasionally, in some ashlar located in basal zone of the

  8. Quantitative genetics approaches to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology; a perspective from research on the evolution of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Paul L; Xie, Lingtian; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative genetic approaches are often used to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology. This paper focuses on the evolution of resistance to environmental contaminants-an important evolutionary process in ecotoxicology. Three approaches are commonly employed to study the evolution of resistance: (1) Assessing whether a contaminant-exposed population has an increased resistance relative to a control population, using either spatial or temporal comparisons. (2) Estimating a population's heritability of resistance. (3) Investigating responses in a laboratory selection experiment. All three approaches provide valuable information on the potential for contaminants to affect a population's evolutionary trajectory via natural selection. However, all three approaches have inherent limitations, including difficulty in separating the various genetic and environmental variance components, responses being dependent on specific population and testing conditions, and inability to fully capture natural conditions in the laboratory. In order to maximize insights into the long-term consequences of adaptation, it is important to not just look at resistance itself, but also at the fitness consequences and at correlated responses in characteristics other than resistance. The rapid development of molecular genetics has yielded alternatives to the "black box" approach of quantitative genetics, but the presence of different limitations and strengths in the two fields means that they should be viewed as complementary rather than exchangeable. Quantitative genetics is benefiting from the incorporation of molecular tools and remains an important field for studying evolutionary toxicology. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  9. Querying Provenance Information: Basic Notions and an Example from Paleoclimate Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, V.; Ludaescher, B.; Bocinsky, K.; Kintigh, K.; Kohler, T.; McPhillips, T.; Rush, J.

    2016-12-01

    Computational models are used to reconstruct and explain past environments and to predict likely future environments. For example, Bocinsky and Kohler have performed a 2,000-year reconstruction of the rain-fed maize agricultural niche in the US Southwest. The resulting academic publications not only contain traditional method descriptions, figures, etc. but also links to code and data for basic transparency and reproducibility. Examples include ResearchCompendia.org and the new project "Merging Science and Cyberinfrastructure Pathways: The Whole Tale." Provenance information provides a further critical element to understand a published study and to possibly extend or challenge the findings of the original authors. We present different notions and uses of provenance information using a computational archaeology example, e.g., the common use of "provenance for others" (for transparency and reproducibility), but also the more elusive but equally important use of "provenance for self". To this end, we distinguish prospective provenance (a.k.a. workflow) from retrospective provenance (a.k.a. data lineage) and show how combinations of both forms of provenance can be used to answer different kinds of important questions about a workflow and its execution. Since many workflows are developed using scripting or special purpose languages such as Python and R, we employ an approach and toolkit called YesWorkflow that brings provenance modeling, capture, and querying into the realm of scripting. YesWorkflow employs the basic W3C PROV standard, as well as the ProvONE extension for sharing and exchanging retrospective and prospective provenance information, respectively. Finally, we argue that the utility of provenance information should be maximized by developing different kinds provenance questions and queries during the early phases of computational workflow design and implementation.

  10. Geoscience Australia's enterprise application of provenance standards and systems for physical and digital objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, C.; Car, N. J.

    2016-12-01

    Geoscience Australia (GA) is a government agency that provides advice on the geology and geography of Australia. It is the custodian of many digital and physical datasets of national significance. For several years GA has been implementing an enterprise approach to provenance management. The goal for transparency and reproducibility for all of GA's information products; an objective supported at the highest levels and explicitly listed in its Science Principles. Currently GA is finalising a set of enterprise tools to assist with provenance management and rolling out provenance reporting to different science areas. GA has adopted or developed: provenance storage systems; provenance collection code libraries (for use within automated systems); reporting interfaces (for manual use) and provenance representation capability within legacy catalogues. Using these tools within GA's science areas involves modelling the scenario first and then assessing whether the area has its data managed in such a way that allows links to data within provenance to be resolvable in perpetuity. We don't just want to represent provenance (demonstrating transparency), we want to access data via provenance (allowing for reproducibility). A subtask of GA's current work is to link physical samples to information products (datasets, reports, papers) by uniquely and persistently identifying samples using International GeoSample Numbers and then modelling automated & manual laboratory workflows and associated tasks, such as data delivery to corporate databases using the W3C's PROV Data Model. We use PROV DM throughout our modelling and systems. We are also moving to deliver all sample and digital dataset metadata across the agency in the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and exposing it via Linked Data methods in order to allow Semantic Web querying of multiple systems allowing provenance to be leveraged using as a single method and query point. Through the Science First Transformation Program GA is

  11. Hybrid phase-space-Fock-space approach to evolution of a driven nonlinear resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Mostafa; Korotkov, Alexander N.

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the quantum evolution of a weakly nonlinear resonator due to a classical near-resonant drive and damping. The resonator nonlinearity leads to squeezing and heating of the resonator state. Using a hybrid phase-space-Fock-space representation for the resonator state within the Gaussian approximation, we derive evolution equations for the four parameters characterizing the Gaussian state. Numerical solution of these four ordinary differential equations is much simpler and faster than simulation of the full density matrix evolution, while providing good accuracy for the system analysis during transients and in the steady state. We show that steady-state squeezing of the resonator state is limited by 3 dB; however, this limit can be exceeded during transients.

  12. An ecological and behavioural approach to hominin evolution during the Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Gabriele A.

    2014-07-01

    The study considers the turnover in hominins, together with carnivorans and other primates, at 3.5 Ma against an environmental backdrop. Communalities are identified between evolving guilds that may directly inform hominin evolution. These are the evolution of (a) dietary generalists and (b) evidence for sociality in carnivores, baboons and hominins. Sociality and behavioural flexibility are regarded advantageous for the procurement of resources while, at the same time, reducing intraspecific competition; in primates it may initially also have served to reduce predation risk. Behavioural flexibility explains the evolutionary success of Panthera leo, Papio and Homo. Viewed within a wider palaeoecological and environmental context, it is possible that sociality in hominins, including allocare, were triggered by abiotic changes at about 3.5 Ma. If confirmed in future studies, this would mark the beginning of hominin life history evolution.

  13. The Open Provenance Model core specification (v1.1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreau, L; Clifford, B; Freire, J; Futrelle, J; Gill, Y; Groth, P.T.; Kwasnikowska, N; Miles, S; Missier, P; Myers, J; Plale, B; Simmhan, Y; Stephan, E; Van den Bussche, J

    2011-01-01

    The Open Provenance Model is a model of provenance that is designed to meet the following requirements: (1) Allow provenance information to be exchanged between systems, by means of a compatibility layer based on a shared provenance model. (2) Allow developers to build and share tools that operate

  14. Provenance metadata gathering and cataloguing of EFIT++ code execution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupelli, I., E-mail: ivan.lupelli@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Muir, D.G.; Appel, L.; Akers, R.; Carr, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Abreu, P. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An approach for automatic gathering of provenance metadata has been presented. • A provenance metadata catalogue has been created. • The overhead in the code runtime is less than 10%. • The metadata/data size ratio is about ∼20%. • A visualization interface based on Gephi, has been presented. - Abstract: Journal publications, as the final product of research activity, are the result of an extensive complex modeling and data analysis effort. It is of paramount importance, therefore, to capture the origins and derivation of the published data in order to achieve high levels of scientific reproducibility, transparency, internal and external data reuse and dissemination. The consequence of the modern research paradigm is that high performance computing and data management systems, together with metadata cataloguing, have become crucial elements within the nuclear fusion scientific data lifecycle. This paper describes an approach to the task of automatically gathering and cataloguing provenance metadata, currently under development and testing at Culham Center for Fusion Energy. The approach is being applied to a machine-agnostic code that calculates the axisymmetric equilibrium force balance in tokamaks, EFIT++, as a proof of principle test. The proposed approach avoids any code instrumentation or modification. It is based on the observation and monitoring of input preparation, workflow and code execution, system calls, log file data collection and interaction with the version control system. Pre-processing, post-processing, and data export and storage are monitored during the code runtime. Input data signals are captured using a data distribution platform called IDAM. The final objective of the catalogue is to create a complete description of the modeling activity, including user comments, and the relationship between data output, the main experimental database and the execution environment. For an intershot or post-pulse analysis (∼1000

  15. Correction of a bootstrap approach to testing for evolution along lines of least resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, D

    2009-12-01

    Testing for an association between the leading vectors of multivariate trait (co)variation within populations (the 'line of least resistance') and among populations is an important tool for exploring variational bias in evolution. In a recent study of stickleback fish populations, a bootstrap-based test was introduced that takes into account estimation error in both vectors and hence improves the previously available bootstrap method. Because this test was implemented incorrectly, however, I here describe the correct test protocol and provide a reanalysis of the original data set. The application of this new test protocol should improve future investigations of evolution along lines of least resistance and other vector comparisons.

  16. Computers in Biological Education: Simulation Approaches. Genetics and Evolution. CAL Research Group Technical Report No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P. J.

    Three examples of genetics and evolution simulation concerning Mendelian inheritance, genetic mapping, and natural selection are used to illustrate the use of simulations in modeling scientific/natural processes. First described is the HERED series, which illustrates such phenomena as incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, lethal alleles,…

  17. Evolution of systems approaches to agricultural innovation: concepts, analysis and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Mierlo, van B.; Leeuwis, C.

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, there has been an evolution of systemic thinking in agricultural innovation studies, culminating in the agricultural innovation systems perspective. In an attempt to synthesize and organize the existing literature, this chapter reviews the literature on agricultural innovation, with

  18. Analyzing Trends in Software Product Lines Evolution Using aCladistics Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Benlarabi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A software product line is a complex system the aim of which is to provide a platform dedicated to large reuse. It necessitates a great investment. Thus, its ability to cope with customers’ ever-changing requirements is among its key success factors. Great effort has been made to deal with the software product line evolution. In our previous works, we carried out a classification of these works to provide an overview of the used techniques. We also identified the following key challenges of software product lines evolution: the ability to predict future changes, the ability to define the impact of a change easily and the improvement in understanding the change. We have already tackled the second and the third challenges. The objective of this paper is to deal with the first challenge. We use the cladistics classification which was used in biology to understand the evolution of organisms sharing the same ancestor and their process of descent at the aim of predicting their future changes. By analogy, we consider a population of applications for media management on mobile devices derived from the same platform and we use cladistics to construct their evolutionary tree. We conducted an analysis to show how to identify the evolution trends of the case study products and to predict future changes.

  19. A genomic approach to examine the complex evolution of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn M Hallström

    Full Text Available Recent phylogenomic studies have failed to conclusively resolve certain branches of the placental mammalian tree, despite the evolutionary analysis of genomic data from 32 species. Previous analyses of single genes and retroposon insertion data yielded support for different phylogenetic scenarios for the most basal divergences. The results indicated that some mammalian divergences were best interpreted not as a single bifurcating tree, but as an evolutionary network. In these studies the relationships among some orders of the super-clade Laurasiatheria were poorly supported, albeit not studied in detail. Therefore, 4775 protein-coding genes (6,196,263 nucleotides were collected and aligned in order to analyze the evolution of this clade. Additionally, over 200,000 introns were screened in silico, resulting in 32 phylogenetically informative long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE insertion events. The present study shows that the genome evolution of Laurasiatheria may best be understood as an evolutionary network. Thus, contrary to the common expectation to resolve major evolutionary events as a bifurcating tree, genome analyses unveil complex speciation processes even in deep mammalian divergences. We exemplify this on a subset of 1159 suitable genes that have individual histories, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgression, processes that can make the genealogy of mammalian genomes complex. These unexpected results have major implications for the understanding of evolution in general, because the evolution of even some higher level taxa such as mammalian orders may sometimes not be interpreted as a simple bifurcating pattern.

  20. Step-wise evolution of complex chemical defenses in millipedes: a phylogenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Juanita; Jones, Tappey H; Sierwald, Petra; Marek, Paul E; Shear, William A; Brewer, Michael S; Kocot, Kevin M; Bond, Jason E

    2018-02-16

    With fossil representatives from the Silurian capable of respiring atmospheric oxygen, millipedes are among the oldest terrestrial animals, and likely the first to acquire diverse and complex chemical defenses against predators. Exploring the origin of complex adaptive traits is critical for understanding the evolution of Earth's biological complexity, and chemical defense evolution serves as an ideal study system. The classic explanation for the evolution of complexity is by gradual increase from simple to complex, passing through intermediate "stepping stone" states. Here we present the first phylogenetic-based study of the evolution of complex chemical defenses in millipedes by generating the largest genomic-based phylogenetic dataset ever assembled for the group. Our phylogenomic results demonstrate that chemical complexity shows a clear pattern of escalation through time. New pathways are added in a stepwise pattern, leading to greater chemical complexity, independently in a number of derived lineages. This complexity gradually increased through time, leading to the advent of three distantly related chemically complex evolutionary lineages, each uniquely characteristic of each of the respective millipede groups.

  1. A solution for exterior and relative orientation in photogrammetry, a genetic evolution approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgasim Elamin Elnima

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a solution for the determination of the exterior orientation parameters (space resection based on genetic evolution algorithms. This optimization model for space resection can be implemented with or without redundancy and requires no linearization. The proposed model is simple and converges to the global optimal solution.

  2. RAPD profile variation amongst provenances of neem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, N; Ranade, S A; Sane, P V

    1998-08-01

    Neem, described as a tree for solving global problems, is an evergreen, long-lived, multipurpose tree of the tropics with a wide distribution range in India. It is believed to be highly cross-pollinated. Inter-provenance variations have been reported in neem in case of morphological and physiological characters. Yet no reports about the genetic determinism for these variations are available to our knowledge. In order to have an idea about the extent and/or nature of genetic (DNA) variation in neem, the powerful RAPD technique has been employed. RAPD profiles of 34 accessions/provenances of neem were generated with 200 decamer random primers, of which the data from the 49 primers, that resulted in reproducible amplification products, were considered for analysis. Based on the presence/absence of bands, a similarity matrix was computed. Dendrogram was constructed by UPGMA method based on the pairwise similarities amongst the RAPD profiles. The similarities in RAPD profiles amongst the different DNAs was more than that expected due to the cross-pollinated nature of the tree and furthermore, these more-than-expected similarities were not due to random chance. These results suggest that neem may have a narrow genetic base.

  3. Evolution of Decision Rules Used for IT Portfolio Management: An Inductive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhade, Prasanna P.; Shaw, Michael J.; Subramanyam, Ramanath

    IT portfolio management and the related planning decisions for IT-dependent initiatives are critical to organizational performance. Building on the logic of appropriateness theoretical framework, we define an important characteristic of decision rules used during IT portfolio planning; rule appropriateness with regards to the risk-taking criterion. We propose that rule appropriateness will be an important factor explaining the evolution of rules over time. Using an inductive learning methodology, we analyze a unique dataset of actual IT portfolio planning decisions spanning two consecutive years within one organization. We present systematic comparative analysis of the evolution of rules used in planning over two years to validate our research proposition. We find that rules that were inappropriate in the first year are being redefined to design appropriate rules for use in the second year. Our work provides empirical evidence demonstrating organizational learning and improvements in IT portfolio planning capabilities.

  4. Shell evolution at N = 20 in the constrained relativistic mean field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, Bao-Hua; LI, Jian

    2008-11-01

    The shell evolution at N = 20, a disappearing neutron magic number observed experimentally in very neutron-rich nuclides, is investigated in the constrained relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. The trend of the shell closure observed experimentally towards the neutron drip-line can be reproduced. The predicted two-neutron separation energies, neutron shell gap energies and deformation parameters of ground states are shown as well. These results are compared with the recent Hartree-Fock-Bogliubov (HFB-14) model and the available experimental data. The perspective towards a better understanding of the shell evolution is discussed. Supported by Major State Basic Research Developing Program (2007CB815000), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (10435010, 10775004, 10221003)

  5. Provenance of sediments from Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebermann, Christof; Hall, Robert; Gough, Amy

    2017-04-01

    The island of Sumatra is situated at the south-western margin of the Indonesian archipelago. Sumatra is affected by active continental margin volcanism along the Sunda Trench, west of Sumatra as a result of active northeast subduction of the Indian plate under the Eurasian plate. Exposures of the Palaeozoic meta-sedimentary basement are mainly limited in extent to the northeast-southwest trending Barisan Mountain chain. The younger Cenozoic rocks are widespread across Sumatra, but can be grouped into structurally subdivided 'fore-arc', 'intramontane', and 'back-arc' basins. However, the formation of the basins pre-dates the current magmatic arc, thus a classical arc-related generation model can not be applied. The Cenozoic formations are well studied due to hydrocarbon enrichment, but little is known about their provenance history. A comprehensive sedimentary provenance study of the Cenozoic formations can aid in the wider understanding of Sumatran petroleum plays, can contribute to palaeographic reconstruction of western SE Asia, and might help to simplify the overall stratigraphy of Sumatra. This work represents a multi-proxy provenance study of sedimentary rocks from the main Cenozoic basins of Sumatra, alongside sediment from present-day river systems. The project refines the provenance in two ways: first, by studying the heavy mineral assemblages of the targeted formations, and secondly, by U-Pb detrital zircon dating using LA-ICP-MS to identify the age-range of the potential sediment sources. Preliminary U-Pb zircon age-data of >1500 concordant grains (10% discordant cut-off), heavy mineral compositions, and thin section analysis from two fieldwork seasons indicate a mixed provenance model, with a proximal igneous source, and mature basement rocks. An increase of the proximal signature in Lower-Miocene strata indicated by the occurrence of unstable heavy mineral phases such as apatite, and clinopyroxene suggests a major change of the source at the Oligocene

  6. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sujita Kumar Kar; Siddharth Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its "culture-bound" status. The narrative finally attempts to disc...

  7. How film genres are a product of biology, evolution and culture - an embodied approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2017-01-01

    artiklen beskriver hvorledes den kropsforankrede hjernes kognitive og emotionelle systemer er et produkt af en lang evolutionsproces og disse har afgørende indflydelse på den måde hvorpå films genre-systemer er opbygget på. Artiklen viser sammenhænge mellem en række film genrer og kroppens og hje...... hjernens evolution og diskuterer også kulturens indflydelse på udformningen af genrer...

  8. Detective Work in the West Indies: Integrating Historical and Experimental Approaches to Study Island Lizard Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Losos, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary biology is a historical science, like astronomy and geology. Understanding how and why evolution has occurred requires synthesizing multiple lines of inquiry. Historical studies, such as those that estimate phylogenetic trees, can detail the pattern of evolutionary diversification, whereas studies on living species can provide insight into the processes that affect ecological interactions and evolutionary change. The evolutionary radiation of Anolis lizards in the Greater Antille...

  9. Future of DAQ Frameworks and Approaches, and Their Evolution towards the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Niko

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, a DAQ system is a complex network of processors, sensors and many other active devices. Historically, providing a framework for DAQ has been a very important role of host institutes of experiments. Reviewing evolution of such DAQ frameworks is a very interesting subject of the conference. “Internet of Things” is a recent buzz word but a DAQ framework could be a good example of IoT.

  10. Optimal Vaccine Distribution Strategy for Different Age Groups of Population: A Differential Evolution Algorithm Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Min Hu; Jun Zhang; Haihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the effective ways for protecting susceptible individuals from infectious diseases. Different age groups of population have different vulnerability to the disease and different contact frequencies. In order to achieve the maximum effects, the distribution of vaccine doses to the groups of individuals needs to be optimized. In this paper, a differential evolution (DE) algorithm is proposed to address the problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm has been tested b...

  11. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling 'Darwinian' and 'Spencerian' evolutionary approaches in anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thomas E; Mace, Ruth

    2011-04-12

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of 'Spencerian' cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader 'Darwinian' framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification.

  12. Exploring the past and the future of protein evolution with ancestral sequence reconstruction: the 'retro' approach to protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumulya, Yosephine; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2017-01-01

    A central goal in molecular evolution is to understand the ways in which genes and proteins evolve in response to changing environments. In the absence of intact DNA from fossils, ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) can be used to infer the evolutionary precursors of extant proteins. To date, ancestral proteins belonging to eubacteria, archaea, yeast and vertebrates have been inferred that have been hypothesized to date from between several million to over 3 billion years ago. ASR has yielded insights into the early history of life on Earth and the evolution of proteins and macromolecular complexes. Recently, however, ASR has developed from a tool for testing hypotheses about protein evolution to a useful means for designing novel proteins. The strength of this approach lies in the ability to infer ancestral sequences encoding proteins that have desirable properties compared with contemporary forms, particularly thermostability and broad substrate range, making them good starting points for laboratory evolution. Developments in technologies for DNA sequencing and synthesis and computational phylogenetic analysis have led to an escalation in the number of ancient proteins resurrected in the last decade and greatly facilitated the use of ASR in the burgeoning field of synthetic biology. However, the primary challenge of ASR remains in accurately inferring ancestral states, despite the uncertainty arising from evolutionary models, incomplete sequences and limited phylogenetic trees. This review will focus, firstly, on the use of ASR to uncover links between sequence and phenotype and, secondly, on the practical application of ASR in protein engineering. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. The evolution of the Behavioural Approach System (BAS) : Cooperative and competitive resource acquisition strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krupić, D.; Gracanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of approach motivation has not yet been adequately defined. Some authors view it as a unidimensional construct, while others consider it to be multidimensional. Its psychometric nature is explored in this study, which tests empirically the motivational account of the Behavioural Approach

  14. Variability of Physiological Parameters of European Beech Provenances in International Provenance Trials in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STOJNIĆ, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the variability of physiological parameters of five provenances of Europeanbeech (Fagus sylvatica, which were planted at two locations with different ecological conditions atFruška Gora and Debeli Lug, was estimated. Provenance trials were established in the framework ofCOST Action E52: "Evaluation of Beech Genetic Resources for Sustainable Forestry". 2-3 years oldseedlings originating from Croatia, Germany, Bosnia, Austria and Serbia were planted in blocks offifty plants with a spacing of 2 x 1 m. Physiological parameters such as net photosynthesis, rate oftranspiration and stomatal conductance were measured with a portable gas analysis system. Generally,provenances from Fruška Gora Mountain showed higher intensity of all physiological parameters thanprovenances located at site Debeli Lug. High correlations among rates of net photosynthesis andtranspiration, on one side, and stomatal conductance, on the other side, were found. ANOVA testindicates that variability of net photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance of investigatedprovenances, at the two locations, was influenced both by environmental conditions of sites andgenetic constitution of provenances.

  15. Microbial Experimental Evolution as a Novel Research Approach in the Vibrionaceae and Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eSoto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists. The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to a solid substrate such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study.

  16. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  17. Modeling the evolution of lithium-ion particle contact distributions using a fabric tensor approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stershic, Andrew [Duke University; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Nanda, Jagjit [ORNL

    2015-08-25

    Electrode microstructure and processing can strongly influence lithium-ion battery performance such as capacity retention, power, and rate. Battery electrodes are multi-phase composite structures wherein conductive diluents and binder bond active material to a current collector. The structure and response of this composite network during repeated electrochemical cycling directly affects battery performance characteristics. We propose the fabric tensor formalism for describing the structure and evolution of the electrode microstructure. Fabric tensors are directional measures of particulate assemblies based on inter-particle connectivity, relating to the structural and transport properties of the electrode. Fabric tensor analysis is applied to experimental data-sets for positive electrode made of lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide, captured by X-ray tomography for several compositions and consolidation pressures. We show that fabric tensors capture the evolution of inter-particle contact distribution and are therefore good measures for the internal state of and electronic transport within the electrode. The fabric tensor analysis is also applied to Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of electrode microstructures using spherical particles with size distributions from the tomography. Furthermore, these results do not follow the experimental trends, which indicates that the particle size distribution alone is not a sufficient measure for the electrode microstructures in DEM simulations.

  18. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  19. Hamiltonian approach to the derivation of evolution equations for wave trains in weakly unstable media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Romanova

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave trains in unstable media is studied. This dynamics is investigated in the framework of a broad class of dynamical systems having a Hamiltonian structure. Two different types of instability are considered. The first one is the instability in a weakly supercritical media. The simplest example of instability of this type is the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The second one is the instability due to a weak linear coupling of modes of different nature. The simplest example of a geophysical system where the instability of this and only of this type takes place is the three-layer model of a stratified shear flow with a continuous velocity profile. For both types of instability we obtain nonlinear evolution equations describing the dynamics of wave trains having an unstable spectral interval of wavenumbers. The transformation to appropriate canonical variables turns out to be different for each case, and equations we obtained are different for the two types of instability we considered. Also obtained are evolution equations governing the dynamics of wave trains in weakly subcritical media and in media where modes are coupled in a stable way. Presented results do not depend on a specific physical nature of a medium and refer to a broad class of dynamical systems having the Hamiltonian structure of a special form.

  20. Managing the Evolution of an Enterprise Architecture using a MAS-Product-Line Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Joaquin; Hinchey, Michael G.; Resinas, manuel; Sterritt, Roy; Rash, James L.

    2006-01-01

    We view an evolutionary system ns being n software product line. The core architecture is the unchanging part of the system, and each version of the system may be viewed as a product from the product line. Each "product" may be described as the core architecture with sonre agent-based additions. The result is a multiagent system software product line. We describe an approach to such n Software Product Line-based approach using the MaCMAS Agent-Oriented nzethoclology. The approach scales to enterprise nrchitectures as a multiagent system is an approprinre means of representing a changing enterprise nrchitectclre nnd the inferaction between components in it.

  1. Fagus sylvatica L. provenances maintain different leaf metabolic profiles and functional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Ismael; Sánchez-Gómez, David; de Miguel, Marina; Mancha, Jose Antonio; Guevara, María Angeles; Cadahía, Estrella; Fernández de Simón, María Brígida

    2017-07-01

    Most temperate forest tree species will suffer important environmental changes as result of the climate change. Adaptiveness to local conditions could change at different sites in the future. In this context, the study of intra-specific variability is important to clarify the singularity of different local populations. Phenotypic differentiation between three beech provenances covering a wide latitudinal range (Spain/ES, Germany/DE and Sweden/SE), was studied in a greenhouse experiment. Non-target leaf metabolite profiles and ecophysiological response was analyzed in well-watered and water stressed seedlings. There was a provenance-specific pattern in the relative concentrations of some leaf metabolites regardless watering treatment. The DE and SE from the center and north of the distribution area of the species showed a clear differentiation from the ES provenance in the relative concentration of some metabolites. Thus the ES provenance from the south maintained larger relative concentration of some organic and amino acids (e.g. fumaric and succinic acids or valine and isoleucine), and in some secondary metabolites (e.g. kaempferol, caffeic and ferulic acids). The ecophysiological response to mild water stress was similar among the three provenances as a consequence of the moderate water stress applied to seedlings, although leaf N isotope composition (δ15N) and leaf C:N ratio were higher and lower respectively in DE than in the other two provenances. This would suggest potential differences in the capacity to uptake and post-process nitrogen according to provenance. An important focus of the study was to address for the first time inter-provenance leaf metabolic diversity in beech from a non-targeted metabolic profiling approach that allowed differentiation of the three studied provenances.

  2. Evaluation of 19 provenances of Calliandra calothyrsus at Gairo and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance evaluation was conducted among nineteen provenances of Calliandra calothyrsus from meso-America, Indonesia and Tanzania. Two trials were established in February and March, 1996 at Gairo (8 provenances) and Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) Farm (17 provenances) in Morogoro, Tanzania.

  3. From Microactions to Macrostructure and Back : A Structurational Approach to the Evolution of Organizational Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitbred, Robert; Fonti, Fabio; Steglich, Christian; Contractor, Noshir

    Structuration theory (ST) and network analysis are promising approaches for studying the emergence of communication networks. We offer a model that integrates the conceptual richness of structuration with the precision of relevant concepts and mechanisms offered from communication network research.

  4. On the nature of fur evolution: A phylogenetic approach in Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson David R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of the evolution of global transcription regulators is essential for comprehending the complex networks of cellular metabolism that have developed among related organisms. The fur gene encodes one of those regulators – the ferric uptake regulator Fur – widely distributed among bacteria and known to regulate different genes committed to varied metabolic pathways. On the other hand, members of the Actinobacteria comprise an ecologically diverse group of bacteria able to inhabit various natural environments, and for which relatively little is currently understood concerning transcriptional regulation. Results BLAST analyses revealed the presence of more than one fur homologue in most members of the Actinobacteria whose genomes have been fully sequenced. We propose a model to explain the evolutionary history of fur within this well-known bacterial phylum: the postulated scenario includes one duplication event from a primitive regulator, which probably had a broad range of co-factors and DNA-binding sites. This duplication predated the appearance of the last common ancestor of the Actinobacteria, while six other duplications occurred later within specific groups of organisms, particularly in two genera: Frankia and Streptomyces. The resulting paralogues maintained main biochemical properties, but became specialised for regulating specific functions, coordinating different metal ions and binding to unique DNA sequences. The presence of syntenic regions surrounding the different fur orthologues supports the proposed model, as do the evolutionary distances and topology of phylogenetic trees built using both Neighbor-Joining and Maximum-Likelihood methods. Conclusion The proposed fur evolutionary model, which includes one general duplication and two in-genus duplications followed by divergence and specialization, explains the presence and diversity of fur genes within the Actinobacteria. Although a few rare

  5. Integrated approach for sinkhole evaluation and evolution prediction in the Central Ebro Basin (NE Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Pueyo Anchuela; Andrés Pocoví Juan; Casas Sainz, Antonio M.; Javier Gracia Abadias; Carlos L. Liesa Carrera

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of karst hazards benefits from the integration of different techniques, methodologies and approaches. Each one presents a different signature and is sensitive to certain indicators related to karst hazards. In some cases, detailed analysis permits the evaluation of representativeness either from isolated approaches or by means of integrated analyses. In this study, we present the evaluation of an area with high density of karstic collapses at different evolutionary stages through t...

  6. Stream-piracy impact on the long-term evolution of the Meuse basin. Physical approach "modeling with GOLEM"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaichouche, A.; Stab, O.; Cojan, I.; Brulhet, J.; Tijani, M.; Tessier, B.

    2012-04-01

    Landscape evolution results of antagonistic processes. In the Paris basin (France): tectonic uplift seems to be globally balanced by river incision. But the dynamic equilibrium of the relief can be disturbed by other processes and singularities may appear. A remarkable example is observed in the Meuse basin (NE of France), where the river is actually perched at more than +50m above the surrounding valleys: the Marne valley to the west and the Moselle valley to the east. This special morphology is the result of several stream piracies (at the expense of the Meuse) which has interested numerous researchers since a long time (Davis 1895, Blache 1943, Lesson-Quinif 2001 & Le Roux Harmand 1997-2009…). The most important ones of these piracies are: 1) the well-known capture of the Haute-Moselle by a tributary of the Meurthe near Toul; 2) at the north-west, the capture of the river Aire by the Aisne. On-going evolution suggests that similar events can be expected in the long-term future. Where and when next streams piracies could occur, what consequences may be expected? Our approach is to simulate the dynamic evolution of the landscape with an improved version of GOLEM (Geomorphic / Orogenic Landscape Evolution Model - LEM), software developed by Tucker & Slingerland in 1994 (http://csdms.colorado.edu/wiki/Model:GOLEM). The LEM characterizes erosion by incorporating diffusion and advection equations whose parameters must be fixed, according to local conditions. First simulations for next millions years with « detachment-limited » mode, let us locate several potential captures of the Meuse river by tributaries of the Moselle, therefore inducing a complete reorganization of the hydrographic network. The results of the localizations agree with local topography/geometry analysis. The first capture induces the propagation of a knickpoint and a significant lowering of the upstream part of the Meuse's basin. Downstream of the capture, the orientation of the abandoned valley

  7. Co-Evolution of Opinion and Strategy in Persuasion Dynamics:. AN Evolutionary Game Theoretical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Yun; Li, Yong

    In this paper, a new model of opinion formation within the framework of evolutionary game theory is presented. The model simulates strategic situations when people are in opinion discussion. Heterogeneous agents adjust their behaviors to the environment during discussions, and their interacting strategies evolve together with opinions. In the proposed game, we take into account payoff discount to join a discussion, and the situation that people might drop out of an unpromising game. Analytical and emulational results show that evolution of opinion and strategy always tend to converge, with utility threshold, memory length, and decision uncertainty parameters influencing the convergence time. The model displays different dynamical regimes when we set differently the rule when people are at a loss in strategy.

  8. Adaptive Differential Evolution Approach for Constrained Economic Power Dispatch with Prohibited Operating Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif HAMOUDA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic power dispatch (EPD is one of the main tools for optimal operation and planning of modern power systems. To solve effectively the EPD problem, most of the conventional calculus methods rely on the assumption that the fuel cost characteristic of a generating unit is a continuous and convex function, resulting in inaccurate dispatch. This paper presents the design and application of efficient adaptive differential evolution (ADE algorithm for the solution of the economic power dispatch problem, where the non-convex characteristics of the generators, such us prohibited operating zones and ramp rate limits of the practical generator operation are considered. The 26 bus benchmark test system with 6 units having prohibited operating zones and ramp rate limits was used for testing and validation purposes. The results obtained demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for solving the non-convex economic dispatch problem.

  9. A multiscale approach to defect evolution in tungsten under helium irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, G., E-mail: gonzalovallesalberdi@hotmail.com [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (IFN), C/ José Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cazalilla, A.L. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (IFN), C/ José Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Gonzalez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias – Universidad de Oviedo, C/ Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 22007 (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/ Enric Kandel, Getafe 28906 (Spain); Prada, A. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (IFN), C/ José Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Iglesias, R. [Facultad de Ciencias – Universidad de Oviedo, C/ Calvo Sotelo s/n, Oviedo 22007 (Spain); Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (IFN), C/ José Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    We have studied He irradiation in tungsten from a multiscale point of view: Density Functional Theory (DFT) to obtain the binding energies of He to vacancy clusters, Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) to produce defect cascades and Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) to study their evolution in larger temporal and spatial scales. A comparison between BCA and MD cascades produced by PKA at different energies has been done at different temperatures: at high temperature and at high PKA energies the OKMC results clearly depend on the defect cascades. 625 keV pulsed He ion irradiation has been simulated with cascades obtained by means of BCA and MD. The results show that in the case of ion irradiation, BCA results can provide good OKMC results. However, in the case of neutron irradiation producing high energy PKAs, BCA cascades clearly overestimate the number of FPs, which may have a strong influence on the OKMC results.

  10. A study on the evolution of a community population by cumulative and fractional calculus approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukkılıç, F; Demirhan, D

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in our globalized world,the local and intercountry movements of population have been increased. This situation makes it important for host countries to do right predictions for the future population of their native people as well as immigrant people. The knowledge of the attained number of accumulated population is necessary for future planning, concerning to education,health, job, housing, safety requirements, etc. In this work, for updating historically well known formulas of population dynamics of a community are revisited in the framework of compound growth and fractional calculus to get more realistic relations. Within this context, for a time t, the population evolution of a society which owns two different components is calculated. Concomitant relations have been developed to provide a comparison between the native population and the immigrant population that come into existence where at each time interval a colonial population is joined. Eventually at time t, the case where the native popula...

  11. Experimental Approach Reveals the Role of alx1 in the Evolution of the Echinoderm Larval Skeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Koga

    Full Text Available Over the course of evolution, the acquisition of novel structures has ultimately led to wide variation in morphology among extant multicellular organisms. Thus, the origins of genetic systems for new morphological structures are a subject of great interest in evolutionary biology. The larval skeleton is a novel structure acquired in some echinoderm lineages via the activation of the adult skeletogenic machinery. Previously, VEGF signaling was suggested to have played an important role in the acquisition of the larval skeleton. In the present study, we compared expression patterns of Alx genes among echinoderm classes to further explore the factors involved in the acquisition of a larval skeleton. We found that the alx1 gene, originally described as crucial for sea urchin skeletogenesis, may have also played an essential role in the evolution of the larval skeleton. Unlike those echinoderms that have a larval skeleton, we found that alx1 of starfish was barely expressed in early larvae that have no skeleton. When alx1 overexpression was induced via injection of alx1 mRNA into starfish eggs, the expression patterns of certain genes, including those possibly involved in skeletogenesis, were altered. This suggested that a portion of the skeletogenic program was induced solely by alx1. However, we observed no obvious external phenotype or skeleton. We concluded that alx1 was necessary but not sufficient for the acquisition of the larval skeleton, which, in fact, requires several genetic events. Based on these results, we discuss how the larval expression of alx1 contributed to the acquisition of the larval skeleton in the putative ancestral lineage of echinoderms.

  12. Croissance et forme des provenances des pins tropicaux au Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutanda, A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and Form of Provenances of Tropical Pines in Congo. In order to select the necessary vegetal material for the afforestation, provenances of central America, australian and the Caribbean Sea Pinus caribaea Morelet were compared from two randomised complete block design trials. Significant differences were observed between provenances according to some quantitative characters (survival rate, height and girth growth and form (thinness branches, pitchfork frequency, ... 9 and 18 years after planting. It was proposed to re-introduce provenances or the best descendants from the best provenances in order to improve genetic variety. Silvicultural systems are also necessary to improve both wood quality and stand productivity.

  13. Global Risk Evolution and Diversification: a Copula-DCC-GARCH Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brutti Righi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we estimate a dynamic portfolio composed by the U.S., German, British, Brazilian, Hong Kong and Australian markets, the period considered started on September 2001 and finished in September 2011. We ran the Copula-DCC-GARCH model on the daily returns conditional covariance matrix. The results allow us to conclude that there were changes in portfolio composition, occasioned by modifications in volatility and dependence between markets. The dynamic approach significantly reduced the portfolio risk if compared to the traditional static approach, especially in turbulent periods. Furthermore, we verified that the estimated copula model outperformed the conventional DCC model for the sample studied.

  14. Investigating reproducibility and tracking provenance - A genomic workflow case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Sehrish; Khan, Farah Zaib; Lonie, Andrew; Sinnott, Richard O

    2017-07-12

    Computational bioinformatics workflows are extensively used to analyse genomics data, with different approaches available to support implementation and execution of these workflows. Reproducibility is one of the core principles for any scientific workflow and remains a challenge, which is not fully addressed. This is due to incomplete understanding of reproducibility requirements and assumptions of workflow definition approaches. Provenance information should be tracked and used to capture all these requirements supporting reusability of existing workflows. We have implemented a complex but widely deployed bioinformatics workflow using three representative approaches to workflow definition and execution. Through implementation, we identified assumptions implicit in these approaches that ultimately produce insufficient documentation of workflow requirements resulting in failed execution of the workflow. This study proposes a set of recommendations that aims to mitigate these assumptions and guides the scientific community to accomplish reproducible science, hence addressing reproducibility crisis. Reproducing, adapting or even repeating a bioinformatics workflow in any environment requires substantial technical knowledge of the workflow execution environment, resolving analysis assumptions and rigorous compliance with reproducibility requirements. Towards these goals, we propose conclusive recommendations that along with an explicit declaration of workflow specification would result in enhanced reproducibility of computational genomic analyses.

  15. Big Data Provenance: Challenges, State of the Art and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Purawat, Shweta; Nguyen, Mai; Altintas, Ilkay

    2015-01-01

    Ability to track provenance is a key feature of scientific workflows to support data lineage and reproducibility. The challenges that are introduced by the volume, variety and velocity of Big Data, also pose related challenges for provenance and quality of Big Data, defined as veracity. The increasing size and variety of distributed Big Data provenance information bring new technical challenges and opportunities throughout the provenance lifecycle including recording, querying, sharing and utilization. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities of Big Data provenance related to the veracity of the datasets themselves and the provenance of the analytical processes that analyze these datasets. It also explains our current efforts towards tracking and utilizing Big Data provenance using workflows as a programming model to analyze Big Data.

  16. From Microactions to Macrostructure and Back: A Structurational Approach to the Evolution of Organizational Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitbred, Robert; Fonti, Fabio; Steglich, Christian; Contractor, Noshir

    2011-01-01

    Structuration theory (ST) and network analysis are promising approaches for studying the emergence of communication networks. We offer a model that integrates the conceptual richness of structuration with the precision of relevant concepts and mechanisms offered from communication network research. We leverage methodological advancements (i.e.,…

  17. Evolution of feeding specialization in Tanganyikan scale-eating cichlids: a molecular phylogenetic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika exhibit remarkable diversity in their feeding habits. Among them, seven species in the genus Perissodus are known for their unique feeding habit of scale eating with specialized feeding morphology and behaviour. Although the origin of the scale-eating habit has long been questioned, its evolutionary process is still unknown. In the present study, we conducted interspecific phylogenetic analyses for all nine known species in the tribe Perissodini (seven Perissodus and two Haplotaxodon species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP analyses of the nuclear DNA. On the basis of the resultant phylogenetic frameworks, the evolution of their feeding habits was traced using data from analyses of stomach contents, habitat depths, and observations of oral jaw tooth morphology. Results AFLP analyses resolved the phylogenetic relationships of the Perissodini, strongly supporting monophyly for each species. The character reconstruction of feeding ecology based on the AFLP tree suggested that scale eating evolved from general carnivorous feeding to highly specialized scale eating. Furthermore, scale eating is suggested to have evolved in deepwater habitats in the lake. Oral jaw tooth shape was also estimated to have diverged in step with specialization for scale eating. Conclusion The present evolutionary analyses of feeding ecology and morphology based on the obtained phylogenetic tree demonstrate for the first time the evolutionary process leading from generalised to highly specialized scale eating, with diversification in feeding morphology and behaviour among species.

  18. Approach in Theory of Nonlinear Evolution Equations: The Vakhnenko-Parkes Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Vakhnenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of methods for examining the properties and solutions of nonlinear evolution equations are explored by using the Vakhnenko equation (VE as an example. The VE, which arises in modelling the propagation of high-frequency waves in a relaxing medium, has periodic and solitary traveling wave solutions some of which are loop-like in nature. The VE can be written in an alternative form, known as the Vakhnenko-Parkes equation (VPE, by a change of independent variables. The VPE has an N-soliton solution which is discussed in detail. Individual solitons are hump-like in nature whereas the corresponding solution to the VE comprises N-loop-like solitons. Aspects of the inverse scattering transform (IST method, as applied originally to the KdV equation, are used to find one- and two-soliton solutions to the VPE even though the VPE’s spectral equation is third-order and not second-order. A Bäcklund transformation for the VPE is used to construct conservation laws. The standard IST method for third-order spectral problems is used to investigate solutions corresponding to bound states of the spectrum and to a continuous spectrum. This leads to N-soliton solutions and M-mode periodic solutions, respectively. Interactions between these types of solutions are investigated.

  19. Organization and evolution of Gorilla centromeric DNA from old strategies to new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catacchio, C R; Ragone, R; Chiatante, G; Ventura, M

    2015-09-21

    The centromere/kinetochore interaction is responsible for the pairing and segregation of replicated chromosomes in eukaryotes. Centromere DNA is portrayed as scarcely conserved, repetitive in nature, quickly evolving and protein-binding competent. Among primates, the major class of centromeric DNA is the pancentromeric α-satellite, made of arrays of 171 bp monomers, repeated in a head-to-tail pattern. α-satellite sequences can either form tandem heterogeneous monomeric arrays or assemble in higher-order repeats (HORs). Gorilla centromere DNA has barely been characterized, and data are mainly based on hybridizations of human alphoid sequences. We isolated and finely characterized gorilla α-satellite sequences and revealed relevant structure and chromosomal distribution similarities with other great apes as well as gorilla-specific features, such as the uniquely octameric structure of the suprachromosomal family-2 (SF2). We demonstrated for the first time the orthologous localization of alphoid suprachromosomal families-1 and -2 (SF1 and SF2) between human and gorilla in contrast to chimpanzee centromeres. Finally, the discovery of a new 189 bp monomer type in gorilla centromeres unravels clues to the role of the centromere protein B, paving the way to solve the significance of the centromere DNA's essential repetitive nature in association with its function and the peculiar evolution of the α-satellite sequence.

  20. Tracking Provenance in ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Zachary P [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    Provenance is dened as information about the origin of objects, a concept that applies to both physical and digital objects and often overlaps both. The use of provenance in systems designed for research is an important but forgotten feature. Provenance allows for proper and exact tracking of information, its use, its lineage, its derivations and other metadata that are important for correctly adhering to the scien- tic method. In our project's prescribed use of provenance, researchers can determine detailed information about the use of sensor data in their experiments on ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). Our project's provenance system, Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS), tracks information starting with the creation of information by an FRP sensor. The system determines station information, sensor information, and sensor channel information. The system allows researchers to derive generations of experiments from the sensor data and tracks their hierarchical flow. Key points can be seen in the history of the information as part of the information's workflow. The concept of provenance and its usage in science is relatively new and while used in other cases around the world, our project's provenance diers in a key area. To keep track of provenance, most systems must be designed or redesigned around the new provenance system. Our system is designed as a cohesive but sepa- rate entity and allows for researchers to continue using their own methods of analysis without being constrained in their ways in order to track the provenance. We have designed ProvDMS using a lightweight provenance library, Core Provenance Library (CPL) v.6 In addition to keeping track of sensor data experiments and its provenance, ProvDMS also provides a web-enabled visualization of the inheritance.

  1. A new approach predicting the evolution of laminated nanostructures—martensite in NiTi as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersmann, M.; Antretter, T.; Waitz, T.; Fischer, F. D.

    2017-04-01

    A model for laminated nanostructures, combining classical energy minimization with full-field finite element calculations in a computationally fully automated manner, is set up and used to quantitatively analyse the interaction of grains via self-accommodation of their transformation strains. The well known Koistinenwell established B2-B19’ martensitic phase transformation in nanocrystalline NiTi is treated as an exemplary case to demonstrate our new framework. A systematic search for an optimal energy minimizing transformation path is employed within a full-field model, including crystallographic transformation strains and fully anisotropic elastic constants, by using the Python scripting language. The microstructure is updated based on previous calculation results. The underlying incremental free energy minimization criterion naturally reproduces the transformation kinetics. The sequence of grains subjected to transformation as well as the selection of martensitic variants within the grains are obtained yielding the evolution of the total interface energy as well as the strain energy, dominating our approach.

  2. Data Provenance Architecture for the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F.; Irving, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    The pace at which geoscientific insights inform societal development quickens with time and these insights drive decisions and actions of ever-increasing human and economic significance. Until recently academic, commercial and government bodies have maintained distinct bodies of knowledge to support scientific enquiry as well as societal development. However, it has become clear that the curation of the body of data is an activity of equal or higher social and commercial value. We address the community challenges in the curation of, access to, and analysis of scientific data including: the tensions between creators, providers and users; incentives and barriers to sharing; ownership and crediting. We also discuss the technical and financial challenges in maximising the return on the effort made in generating geoscientific data. To illustrate how these challenges might be addressed in the broader geoscientific domain, we describe the high-level data governance and analytical architecture in the upstream Oil Industry. This domain is heavily dependent on costly and highly diverse geodatasets collected and assimilated over timeframes varying from seconds to decades. These data must support both operational decisions at the minute-hour timefame and strategic and economic decisions of enterprise or national scale, and yet be sufficiently robust to last the life of a producing field. We develop three themes around data provenance, data ownership and business models for data curation. 1/ The overarching aspiration is to ensure that data provenance and quality is maintained along the analytical workflow. Hence if data on which a publication or report changes, the report and its publishers can be notified and we describe a mechanism by which dependent knowledge products can be flagged. 2/ From a cost and management point of view we look at who "owns" data especially in cases where the cost of curation and stewardship is significant compared to the cost of acquiring the data

  3. The Evolution of South-South Development Cooperation: Guiding Principles and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bry, Sandra H.

    2017-01-01

    South-South Cooperation (SSC) has attracted the attention of the development community in terms of both its ‘impact’ on traditional aid and the integration of its values into the work of multilateral institutions, making it the new ‘buzzword’ of the aid community. However, few studies have been c...... its geographical component and the other for the guiding principles and approaches of SSDC....

  4. Spreadsheet Guardian: An Approach to Protecting Semantic Correctness throughout the Evolution of Spreadsheets

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesz, Daniel; Käfer, Verena; Wagner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Spreadsheets are powerful tools which play a business-critical role in many organizations. However, many bad decisions taken due to faulty spreadsheets show that these tools need serious quality assurance. Furthermore, while collaboration on spreadsheets for maintenance tasks is common, there has been almost no support for ensuring that the spreadsheets remain correct during this process. We have developed an approach named Spreadsheet Guardian which separates the specification of spreadsheet...

  5. A Bayesian approach to constrain the time evolution of tropospheric parameters in GNSS data processing : implications for meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmani, S.; Rebischung, P.; Bock, O.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric water vapor induces a delay in the propagation time of GNSS signals when they cross the troposphere. Zenithal Wet Delays (ZWD) are thus estimated during GNSS data processing and used to retrieve Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) with a usual precision of around 1-2 kg.m-2. These GNSS-derived IWV are now routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction models and are also used to validate satellite measurements and evaluate climate models. However, their accuracy remains to be precisely evaluated especially during intense weather events. Developing and evaluating advanced tropospheric products for monitoring severe weather events and climate is one of the main objectives of the COST Action ES1206 supported by the EU.In this study, we focus on a particular limitation of GNSS-derived IWV: in GNSS data processing, the temporal evolution of ZWD is usually modelled as a random walk (ZWD(t+dt) = ZWD(t) + ɛ(t)), where the variance of the white noise ɛ(t) is usually chosen arbitrarily, regardless of the location of the station and the local weather conditions. This approach is clearly not optimal, for instance in case of severe weather events, where an inappropriate variance choice for ɛ(t) can induce biases over 5 kg.m-2 on GNSS-derived IWV. We therefore use a Bayesian approach to determine optimal random walk variances for both ZWD and tropospheric gradients in PPP processing of GNSS data. We first present the methodology and validate it with simulated data. Then, we apply our method on real GNSS data and compare the obtained ZWD with those from a usual PPP processing. Finally, we plan to use data from microwave radiometers to get an external characterization of the temporal evolution of ZWD and to verify that the random walk variances obtained with our method adequately describe the variability of atmospheric water vapor.

  6. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  7. Enhanced provenance interpretation using combined U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double dating of detrital zircon grains from lower Miocene strata, proximal Gulf of Mexico Basin, North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Stockli, Daniel F.; Snedden, John W.

    2017-10-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb analysis is an effective approach for investigating sediment provenance by relating crystallization age to potential crystalline source terranes. Studies of large passive margin basins, such as the Gulf of Mexico Basin, that have received sediment from multiple terranes with non-unique crystallization ages or sedimentary strata, benefit from additional constraints to better elucidate provenance interpretation. In this study, U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double dating analyses on single zircons from the lower Miocene sandstones in the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin reveal a detailed history of sediment source evolution. U-Pb age data indicate that most zircon originated from five major crystalline provinces, including the Western Cordillera Arc (1800 Ma) terranes. Zircon (U-Th)/He ages record tectonic cooling and exhumation in the U.S. since the Mesoproterozoic related to the Grenville to Laramide Orogenies. The combined crystallization and cooling information from single zircon double dating can differentiate volcanic and plutonic zircons. Importantly, the U-Pb-He double dating approach allows for the differentiation between multiple possible crystallization-age sources on the basis of their subsequent tectonic evolution. In particular, for Grenville zircons that are present in all of lower Miocene samples, four distinct zircon U-Pb-He age combinations are recognizable that can be traced back to four different possible sources. The integrated U-Pb and (U-Th)/He data eliminate some ambiguities and improves the provenance interpretation for the lower Miocene strata in the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin and illustrate the applicability of this approach for other large-scale basins to reconstruct sediment provenance and dispersal patterns.

  8. Said another way: stroke, evolution, and the rainforests: an ancient approach to modern health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The relatively new discipline of evolutionary medicine. To raise awareness among healthcare professionals that our modern view of illness and health care might be flawed. Published literature in CINAHL, MEDLINE, Cochrane databases, and EMBASE. Our modern lifestyles and healthcare paradigms (using stroke as example), may be at odds with our palaeolithic genome. The dietary regimes of remaining hunter-gatherer communities merit attention and study in this regard. Time is running out as the rainforests dwindle and hunter-gatherer communities are acculturated. The selective forces that resulted in the evolution of the human species were mainly environmental. Our metabolism, physiology, and genome, therefore, are geared towards survival under certain environmental parameters. With the advent of agriculture, almost 11,000 years ago, those parameters changed. Our ancestors' lifestyles transformed from wandering hunter-gatherers to sedentary consumers of more than they needed to survive. Many studies link today's prevalence of metabolic syndrome (diabetes, obesity, and cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases) in developed countries with this historic change in human behavior. If this is a valid correlation to make, then the few remaining hunter-gatherer communities in today's rainforests must surely hold the key to human health. Certainly, physiological parameters in these people are impressive, but trends are worrying. There is clear derangement of these parameters when exposed to any degree of acculturated lifestyle. In addition, the natural homelands of these communities, the rainforests, are dwindling at an alarming rate in order to maintain our acculturated norms. The race is on, therefore, to learn what we can about diet, exercise, and natural medicine from the last few humans who live lifestyles that might be closest to our natural state.

  9. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: conceptual evolution and current approach to image-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J W; Wolpin, B; Clancy, T; Wang, J; Mamon, H; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J; Rosenthal, M

    2017-09-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Over the past decade, the concept of 'borderline resectable' pancreatic cancer has emerged to describe a distinct subset of patients existing along the spectrum from resectable to locally advanced disease for whom a microscopically margin-positive (R1) resection is considered relatively more likely, primarily due to the relationship of the primary tumor with surrounding vasculature. This review traces the conceptual evolution of borderline resectability from a radiological perspective, including the debates over the key imaging criteria that define the thresholds between resectable, borderline resectable, and locally advanced or metastatic disease. This review also addresses the data supporting neoadjuvant therapy in this population and discusses current imaging practices before and during treatment. A growing body of evidence suggests that the borderline resectable group of patients may particularly benefit from neoadjuvant therapy to increase the likelihood of an ultimately margin-negative (R0) resection. Unfortunately, anatomic and imaging criteria to define borderline resectability are not yet universally agreed upon, with several classification systems proposed in the literature and considerable variance in institution-by-institution practice. As a result of this lack of consensus, as well as overall small patient numbers and lack of established clinical trials dedicated to borderline resectable patients, accurate evidence-based diagnostic categorization and treatment selection for this subset of patients remains a significant challenge. Clinicians and radiologists alike should be cognizant of evolving imaging criteria for borderline resectability given their profound implications for treatment strategy, follow-up recommendations, and prognosis.

  10. Key Provenance of Earth Science Observational Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, H.; Plale, B.; Aktas, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Purohit, P.; Jensen, S.; Graves, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the sheer volume of data increases, particularly evidenced in the earth and environmental sciences, local arrangements for sharing data need to be replaced with reliable records about the what, who, how, and where of a data set or collection. This is frequently called the provenance of a data set. While observational data processing systems in the earth sciences have a long history of capturing metadata about the processing pipeline, current processes are limited in both what is captured and how it is disseminated to the science community. Provenance capture plays a role in scientific data preservation and stewardship precisely because it can automatically capture and represent a coherent picture of the what, how and who of a particular scientific collection. It reflects the transformations that a data collection underwent prior to its current form and the sequence of tasks that were executed and data products applied to generate a new product. In the NASA-funded Instant Karma project, we examine provenance capture in earth science applications, specifically the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Science Investigator-led Processing system (SIPS). The project is integrating the Karma provenance collection and representation tool into the AMSR-E SIPS production environment, with an initial focus on Sea Ice. This presentation will describe capture and representation of provenance that is guided by the Open Provenance Model (OPM). Several things have become clear during the course of the project to date. One is that core OPM entities and relationships are not adequate for expressing the kinds of provenance that is of interest in the science domain. OPM supports name-value pair annotations that can be used to augment what is known about the provenance entities and relationships, but in Karma, annotations cannot be added during capture, but only after the fact. This limits the capture system's ability to record something it

  11. Provenance Description of Metadata Vocabularies for the Long-term Maintenance of Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiu Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss provenance description of metadata terms and metadata vocabularies as a set of metadata terms. Provenance is crucial information to keep track of changes of metadata terms and metadata vocabularies for their consistent maintenance. Design/methodology/approach: The W3C PROV standard for general provenance description and Resource Description Framework (RDF are adopted as the base models to formally define provenance description for metadata vocabularies. Findings: This paper defines a few primitive change types of metadata terms, and a provenance description model of the metadata terms based on the primitive change types. We also provide examples of provenance description in RDF graphs to show the proposed model. Research limitations: The model proposed in this paper is defined based on a few primitive relationships (e.g. addition, deletion, and replacement between pre-version and post-version of a metadata term. The model is simplified and the practical changes of metadata terms can be more complicated than the primitive relationships discussed in the model. Practical implications: Formal provenance description of metadata vocabularies can improve maintainability of metadata vocabularies over time. Conventional maintenance of metadata terms is the maintenance of documents of terms. The proposed model enables effective and automated tracking of change history of metadata vocabularies using simple formal description scheme defined based on widely-used standards. Originality/value: Changes in metadata vocabularies may cause inconsistencies in the long-term use of metadata. This paper proposes a simple and formal scheme of provenance description of metadata vocabularies. The proposed model works as the basis of automated maintenance of metadata terms and their vocabularies and is applicable to various types of changes.

  12. Automatic Provenance Recording for Scientific Data using Trident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmhan, Y.; Barga, R.; van Ingen, C.

    2008-12-01

    Provenance is increasingly recognized as being critical to the understanding and reuse of scientific datasets. Given the rapid generation of scientific data from sensors and computational model results, it is not practical to manually record provenance for data and automated techniques for provenance capture are essential. Scientific workflows provide a framework for representing computational models and complex transformations of scientific data, and present a means for tracking the operations performed to derive a dataset. The Trident Scientific Workbench is a workflow system that natively incorporates provenance capture of data derived as part of the workflow execution. The applications used as part of a Trident workflow can execute on a remote computational cluster, such as a supercomputing center on in the Cloud, or on the local desktop of the researcher, and provenance on data derived by the applications is seamlessly captured. Scientists also have the option to annotate the provenance metadata using domain specific tags such as, for example, GCMD keywords. The provenance records thus captured can be exported in the Open Provenance Model* XML format that is emerging as a provenance standard in the eScience community or visualized as a graph of data and applications. The Trident workflow system and provenance recorded by it has been successfully applied in the Neptune oceanography project and is presently being tested in the Pan-STARRS astronomy project. *http://twiki.ipaw.info/bin/view/Challenge/OPM

  13. Data provenance assurance in the cloud using blockchain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sachin; Red, Val; Kamhoua, Charles; Kwiat, Kevin; Njilla, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    Ever increasing adoption of cloud technology scales up the activities like creation, exchange, and alteration of cloud data objects, which create challenges to track malicious activities and security violations. Addressing this issue requires implementation of data provenance framework so that each data object in the federated cloud environment can be tracked and recorded but cannot be modified. The blockchain technology gives a promising decentralized platform to build tamper-proof systems. Its incorruptible distributed ledger/blockchain complements the need of maintaining cloud data provenance. In this paper, we present a cloud based data provenance framework using block chain which traces data record operations and generates provenance data. We anchor provenance data records into block chain transactions, which provide validation on provenance data and preserve user privacy at the same time. Once the provenance data is uploaded to the global block chain network, it is extremely challenging to tamper the provenance data. Besides, the provenance data uses hashed user identifiers prior to uploading so the blockchain nodes cannot link the operations to a particular user. The framework ensures that the privacy is preserved. We implemented the architecture on ownCloud, uploaded records to blockchain network, stored records in a provenance database and developed a prototype in form of a web service.

  14. Management of choledochal cyst: Evolution with antenatal diagnosis and laparoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherqaoui, Abdelmounim; Haddad, Mirna; Roman, Celine; Gorincour, Guillaume; Marti, Jean Yves; Bonnard, Arnaud; Guys, Jean-Michel; de Lagausie, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Laparoscopic excision of a choledochal cyst (CC) with hepaticojejunostomy gained a wide acceptance in the treatment of children even in neonatal period. Although, the use of prenatal diagnostic techniques causes a significant increase in antenatal diagnosis of CC, the time of surgical intervention during infancy is still controversial. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the results of laparoscopic management of CC with special emphasis on antenatal diagnosis and treatment, and to compare the results with open procedure. The patients who were diagnosed with choledochal cyst and underwent either open or laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy in two centres, hopital d'enfant de La Timone from Marseille and hopital Robert Debre from Paris between November 2000 and December 2009 were included in the study. The data obtained from medical reports were evaluated for sex, time of antenatal diagnosis, age at time of operation, operative time, time of postoperation. A total of 19 hepaticojejunostomy were performed, including 10 open procedures (group A), and 9 laparoscopic procedures (group B, 4 were diagnosed prenatally, without conversion to open procedure). There were 3 boys and 16 girls, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 16 years. Patients in the group A were older than patients in the group B. The mean hospital stay and time to return of bowel fuction was longer in the group B. there were 60% of pre-operative complications in group A versus 22% in group B. There was one postoperative complications in group B (biliary leakage nedeed redo surgery). No significant differences were found between different parameters except for operative time (288.56 min in the group B versus 206 min in the group A. (p = 0.041)). Our initial experience indicates that the laparoscopic approach in infancy is technically feasible, safe, and effective, with a low morbidity and a comparable outcome to the open approach. Therefore, we propose a laparoscopic approach for antenatally diagnosed CC

  15. Provenance-aware optimization of workload for distributed data production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makatun, Dzmitry; Lauret, Jérôme; Rudová, Hana; Šumbera, Michal

    2017-10-01

    Distributed data processing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (HENP) is a prominent example of big data analysis. Having petabytes of data being processed at tens of computational sites with thousands of CPUs, standard job scheduling approaches either do not address well the problem complexity or are dedicated to one specific aspect of the problem only (CPU, network or storage). Previously we have developed a new job scheduling approach dedicated to distributed data production – an essential part of data processing in HENP (preprocessing in big data terminology). In this contribution, we discuss the load balancing with multiple data sources and data replication, present recent improvements made to our planner and provide results of simulations which demonstrate the advantage against standard scheduling policies for the new use case. Multi-source or provenance is common in computing models of many applications whereas the data may be copied to several destinations. The initial input data set would hence be already partially replicated to multiple locations and the task of the scheduler is to maximize overall computational throughput considering possible data movements and CPU allocation. The studies have shown that our approach can provide a significant gain in overall computational performance in a wide scope of simulations considering realistic size of computational Grid and various input data distribution.

  16. Management of choledochal cyst: Evolution with antenatal diagnosis and laparoscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmounim Cherqaoui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Laparoscopic excision of a choledochal cyst (CC with hepaticojejunostomy gained a wide acceptance in the treatment of children even in neonatal period. Although, the use of prenatal diagnostic techniques causes a significant increase in antenatal diagnosis of CC, the time of surgical intervention during infancy is still controversial. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the results of laparoscopic management of CC with special emphasis on antenatal diagnosis and treatment, and to compare the results with open procedure. Materials and Methods: The patients who were diagnosed with choledochal cyst and underwent either open or laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy in two centres, hopital d′enfant de La Timone from Marseille and hopital Robert Debre from Paris between November 2000 and December 2009 were included in the study. The data obtained from medical reports were evaluated for sex, time of antenatal diagnosis, age at time of operation, operative time, time of postoperation. Results: A total of 19 hepaticojejunostomy were performed, including 10 open procedures (group A, and 9 laparoscopic procedures (group B, 4 were diagnosed prenatally, without conversion to open procedure. There were 3 boys and 16 girls, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 16 years. Patients in the group A were older than patients in the group B. The mean hospital stay and time to return of bowel fuction was longer in the group B. there were 60% of pre-operative complications in group A versus 22% in group B. There was one postoperative complications in group B (biliary leakage nedeed redo surgery. No significant differences were found between different parameters except for operative time (288.56 min in the group B versus 206 min in the group A. (p = 0.041. Conclusions: Our initial experience indicates that the laparoscopic approach in infancy is technically feasible, safe, and effective, with a low morbidity and a comparable outcome to the open

  17. Surgical management of esophageal achalasia: Evolution of an institutional approach to minimally invasive repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Mikael; Khalafallah, Adham M; Guzzetta, Phillip C; Sandler, Anthony D; Darbari, Anil; Kane, Timothy D

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of esophageal achalasia (EA) in children has transitioned over the past 2 decades to predominantly involve laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or minimally invasive surgery (MIS). More recently, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been utilized to treat achalasia in children. Since the overall experience with surgical management of EA is contingent upon disease incidence and surgeon experience, the aim of this study is to report a single institutional contemporary experience for outcomes of surgical treatment of EA by LHM and POEM, with regards to other comparable series in children. An IRB approved retrospective review of all patients with EA who underwent treatment by a surgical approach at a tertiary US children's hospital from 2006 to 2015. Data including demographics, operative approach, Eckardt scores pre- and postoperatively, complications, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. A total of 33 patients underwent 35 operative procedures to treat achalasia. Of these operations; 25 patients underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) with Dor fundoplication; 4 patients underwent LHM alone; 2 patients underwent LHM with Thal fundoplication; 2 patients underwent primary POEM; 2 patients who had had LHM with Dor fundoplication underwent redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication. Intraoperative complications included 2 mucosal perforations (6%), 1 aspiration, 1 pneumothorax (1 POEM patient). Follow ranged from 8months to 7years (8-84months). There were no deaths and no conversions to open operations. Five patients required intervention after surgical treatment of achalasia for recurrent dysphagia including 3 who underwent between 1 and 3 pneumatic dilations; and 2 who had redo LHM with takedown of Dor fundoplication with all patients achieving complete resolution of symptoms. Esophageal achalasia in children occurs at a much lower incidence than in adults as documented by published series describing the surgical treatment in children. We

  18. Applications of biotite inclusion composition to zircon provenance determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Elizabeth A.; Boehnke, Patrick; Mark Harrison, T.

    2017-09-01

    Detrital zircons are the only confirmed surviving remnants of >4.03 Ga crust while younger detrital zircons provide a parallel record of more recent crustal evolution to that preserved in crystalline rocks. Zircons often preserve inclusions that may provide clues as to the origins of out-of-context grains in the sedimentary record. Previous studies have established that inclusions of biotite in magmatic zircon are compositionally well-matched to biotite in the source rock matrix, although a direct application to ancient detrital zircons has not been made. A number of studies have documented variations in the Fe, Mg, and Al contents of magmatic biotite from different source rocks and tectonic settings, suggesting that biotite inclusions may indeed serve as provenance indicators for detrital zircons. Consistent with earlier studies, we find that the FeO*/MgO ratio of magmatic biotite from continental arcs, collisional, and within-plate settings varies with relative oxidation state as well as whole-rock FeO*/MgO, while its Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO) varies with whole-rock A/CNK (molar Al/(2 ṡ Ca + Na + K)). Biotite from oxidized metaluminous and reduced S-type granitoids can be readily distinguished from each other using FeO*/MgO and Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO), while biotite from reduced I-type and oxidized peraluminous granites may in some cases be more ambiguous. Biotite from peralkaline and reduced A-type granites are also distinguishable from all other categories by Al2O3/(FeO* + MgO) and FeO*/MgO, respectively. Biotite inclusions in Hadean zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia indicate a mixture of metaluminous and reduced S-type host rocks, while inclusions in 3.6-3.8 Ga detrital zircons from the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt indicate more oxidized peraluminous magmas. These results highlight the diversity of felsic materials on the early Earth and suggest that biotite inclusions are applicable to zircon provenance throughout the sedimentary record.

  19. Data Provenance and Data Management in eScience

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Quan; Giugni, Stephen; Williamson, Darrell; Taylor, John

    2013-01-01

    eScience allows scientific research to be carried out in highly distributed environments. The complex nature of the interactions in an eScience infrastructure, which often involves a range of instruments, data, models, applications, people and computational facilities, suggests there is a need for data provenance and data management (DPDM). The W3C Provenance Working Group defines the provenance of a resource as a “record that describes entities and processes involved in producing and delivering or otherwise influencing that resource”. It has been widely recognised that provenance is a critical issue to enable sharing, trust, authentication and reproducibility of eScience process.   Data Provenance and Data Management in eScience identifies the gaps between DPDM foundations and their practice within eScience domains including clinical trials, bioinformatics and radio astronomy. The book covers important aspects of fundamental research in DPDM including provenance representation and querying. It also expl...

  20. Diversity and Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Moving to Whole-Genome-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Stefan; Supply, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains has become a standard tool for epidemiological tracing and for the investigation of the local and global strain population structure. Of special importance is the analysis of the expansion of multidrug (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains. Classical genotyping and, more recently, whole-genome sequencing have revealed that the strains of the MTBC are more diverse than previously anticipated. Globally, several phylogenetic lineages can be distinguished whose geographical distribution is markedly variable. Strains of particular (sub)lineages, such as Beijing, seem to be more virulent and associated with enhanced resistance levels and fitness, likely fueling their spread in certain world regions. The upcoming generalization of whole-genome sequencing approaches will expectedly provide more comprehensive insights into the molecular and epidemiological mechanisms involved and lead to better diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:25190252

  1. A sliding windows approach to analyse the evolution of bank shares in the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo; Dionísio, Andreia; Guedes, Everaldo Freitas; Zebende, Gilney Figueira

    2018-01-01

    Both sub-prime and Eurozone debt crisis problems caused severe financial crisis, which affected European markets in general, but particularly the banking sector. The continuous devaluation of bank shares in the financial sector caused a great decrease in market capitalization, and in citizen and investor confidence. Panic among investors led them to sell shares, while other agents took the opportunity to buy them. Therefore, the study of bank shares is important, particularly of their efficiency. In this paper, adopting a sliding windows detrended fluctuation approach, we analyse the efficiency concept dynamically with 63 European banks (both in and outside the Eurozone). The main results show that the crisis had an effect on changing the efficiency pattern.

  2. Aging as Evolution-Facilitating Program and a Biochemical Approach to Switch It Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    A concept is presented considering aging of living organisms as a final step of their ontogenetic program. It is assumed that such an aging program was invented by biological evolution to facilitate the evolutionary process. Indications are summarized suggesting that controlled production of toxic forms of oxygen (so called reactive oxygen species) by respiring intracellular organelles (mitochondria) is an obligatory component of the aging program. First results of a research project devoted to an attempt to interrupt aging program by antioxidants specifically addressed to mitochondria have been described. Within the framework of the project, antioxidants of a new type (SkQ) were synthesized. SkQs are composed of (i) plastoquinone (an antioxidant moiety), (ii) a penetrating cation, and (iii) a decane or pentane linker. Using planar bilayer phospholipid membranes, we selected SkQ derivatives of the highest penetrability, namely plastoquinonyl decyl triphenylphosphonium (SkQ1), plastoquinonyl decyl rhodamine 19 (SkQR1), and methylplastoquinonyl decyl triphenylphosphonium (SkQ3). Anti- and prooxidant properties of these substances and also of ubiquinonyl-decyl-triphenylphosphonium (MitoQ) were tested in isolated mitochondria. Micromolar concentrations of cationic quinones are found to be very strong prooxidants, but in the lower (sub-micromolar) concentrations they display antioxidant activity which decreases in the series SkQ1 = SkQR1 > SkQ3 > MitoQ. Thus, the window between the anti- and prooxidant effects is the smallest for MitoQ and the largest for SkQ1 and SkQR1. SkQ1 is rapidly reduced by complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, i.e. it is a rechargeable antioxidant. Extremely low concentrations of SkQ1 and SkQR1 completely arrest the H2O2-induced apoptosis in human fibroblasts and HeLa cells (for SkQ1, C 1/2 = 8 · 10-9M). Higher concentrations of SkQ1 are required to block necrosis initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In mice, SkQ1

  3. The metallic contamination of the Loire River Basin (France): Spatial and temporal evolution with a multi-scale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivert, Elie; Grosbois, Cécile; Desmet, Marc; Curie, Florence; Moatar, Florentina; Meybeck, Michel; Bourrain, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Since the early 19th century, important agricultural, mining and industrial development has been active in Western Europe. The Loire River Basin (117,800 km2, total population of 8.4 Mp) presents a long history of human pressures, reflecting temporal evolution of technological and urban activities (Grosbois et al, 2012). Hence, sediments of the Loire River and its tributaries have recorded partially and/or totally organic, nutrients and trace element contamination. Nowadays, can we determine history of metallic emissions in sediment records and what is the part of these past inputs relative to the actual contamination? Can we point out historical sources of contamination? To answer these questions, two approaches were used in this study. Firstly, in four coring sites in the Loire River Basin, a temporal re-enacting of metallic contamination trapped in sediments was carried out. Based on age-model and inter-element correlations in each core, trace element signals were deconvoluted and compared to actual and specific chemical signatures of anthropogenic inputs (300 bed sediment samples collected downstream of former and current industrial sites like mines, smelters, planting/coating plants, glassware and car industries, metal recycling plants and waste water treatment plants). The second approach was at a larger basin scale, comparing location of these former and actual contamination sources with explanatory factors such as geology, evolution of population density, of industrial activities and of land use. This was done in the main stream of the Loire River and its major tributaries and locally at a smaller scale (0-500 km²). All these approaches emphasized three temporal periods of metallic contamination: (i) the first period begins with the 20th century until 1950, it corresponds to the first increase of major contaminants like Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn; some trace elements like Hg and Sn seem to be present in the Loire sediments much earlier as they

  4. Towards a common provenance model for research publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L.; Ma, X.; West, P.; Beaulieu, S. E.; Di Stefano, M.; Fox, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. In a research publication, provenance includes entities, activities and people involved in the process leading to the parts of the publication such as figures, tables, paragraphs etc. Such information is often desirable for the readers to correctly interpret publication content and enables them to evaluate the credibility of the reported results by digging into the software in use, source data and responsible agents or even reproducing the results themselves. In this presentation, we will describe our ontology designed to model the preparing process of research publications based on our experience from two projects, both focusing on provenance capturing for research publications. The first project is about capturing provenance information for a National Climate Assessment (NCA) report of the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), and the second about capturing provenance information for an Ecosystem Status Report (ESR) of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC). Both projects base their provenance modeling on the W3C Provenance ontology (PROV-O), which proves to be an effective way to create models for provenance capturing. We will illustrate the commonalities and differences between use cases of these two projects and how we derive a common model from models specifically designed to capture provenance information for each of the projects.

  5. Semantic Workflows and Provenance-Aware Software (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Workflows are increasingly used in science to manage complex computations and data processing at large scale. Intelligent workflow systems provide assistance in setting up parameters and data, validating workflows created by users, and automating the generation of workflows from high-level user guidance. These systems use semantic workflows that extend workflow representations with semantic constraints that express characteristics of the data and analytic models. Reasoning algorithms propagate these semantic constraints throughout the workflow structure, select executable components for underspecified steps, and suggest parameter values. Semantic workflows also enhance provenance records with abstract steps that reflect the overall data analysis method rather than just execution traces. Intelligent workflow systems are provenance-aware, since they both use and generate provenance and metadata as the data is being processed. Provenance-aware software enhances scientific analysis by propagating upstream metadata and provenance to new data products. Through the use of provenance standards, such as the recent W3C PROV recommendation for provenance on the Web, provenance-aware software can significantly enhance scientific data analysis, publication, and reuse. New capabilities are enabled when provenance is brought to the forefront in the design of software systems for science.

  6. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (Ntr) Propulsion: A Proven Game-Changing Technology for Future Human Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The NTR represents the next evolutionary step in high performance rocket propulsion. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse (Isp) of approx.900 seconds (s) or more V twice that of today s best chemical rockets. The technology is also proven. During the previous Rover and NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications) nuclear rocket programs, 20 rocket reactors were designed, built and ground tested. These tests demonstrated: (1) a wide range of thrust; (2) high temperature carbide-based nuclear fuel; (3) sustained engine operation; (4) accumulated lifetime; and (5) restart capability V all the requirements needed for a human mission to Mars. Ceramic metal cermet fuel was also pursued, as a backup option. The NTR also has significant growth and evolution potential. Configured as a bimodal system, it can generate electrical power for the spacecraft. Adding an oxygen afterburner nozzle introduces a variable thrust and Isp capability and allows bipropellant operation. In NASA s recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the NTR was selected as the preferred propulsion option because of its proven technology, higher performance, lower launch mass, simple assembly and mission operations. In contrast to other advanced propulsion options, NTP requires no large technology scale-ups. In fact, the smallest engine tested during the Rover program V the 25,000 lbf (25 klbf) Pewee engine is sufficient for human Mars missions when used in a clustered engine arrangement. The Copernicus crewed spacecraft design developed in DRA 5.0 has significant capability and a human exploration strategy is outlined here that uses Copernicus and its key components for precursor near Earth asteroid (NEA) and Mars orbital missions prior to a Mars landing mission. Initially, the basic Copernicus vehicle can enable reusable 1-year round trip human missions to candidate NEAs like 1991 JW and Apophis in the late 2020 s to check out vehicle systems. Afterwards, the

  7. A Modern Approach to Disinfection, as Old as the Evolution of Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Migliarina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The immune system of vertebrates “naturally” produces hypochlorous acid (HOCl to fight against bacteria and pathogens. A patented electrochemical technology mirrors the above defense system, allowing the synthesis of HOCl solutions through the electrolysis of water enriched in salts, at the level of a few grams per liter. The system allows for the careful control of the pH of produced solutions, with consequent optimization of their activity. Once the HOCl is introduced into the water system; it is able to remove the biofilm from pipe network; significantly decreasing the level of Legionella colonization; within 8–10 weeks from the beginning of the disinfection approach. The technology has been applied in a variety of healthcare facilities, both in Italy and in neighboring European countries. In the present paper, two successful case studies are briefly presented: Data were obtained from experiences in two different healthcare facilities, one in Italy and the other in Germany. Destruction of biofilm was indirectly testified by an increase of total organic carbon content of water; as a consequence, and because of the dosing of the disinfecting agent, some μg/L of total halomethanes were also formed. However, both compositional features were only observed during the initial stages of the disinfection treatment.

  8. Phenotypes in obstructive sleep apnea: A definition, examples and evolution of approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchuk, Andrey V; Gentry, Mark J; Concato, John; Yaggi, Henry K

    2017-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a complex and heterogeneous disorder and the apnea hypopnea index alone can not capture the diverse spectrum of the condition. Enhanced phenotyping can improve prognostication, patient selection for clinical trials, understanding of mechanisms, and personalized treatments. In OSA, multiple condition characteristics have been termed "phenotypes." To help classify patients into relevant prognostic and therapeutic categories, an OSA phenotype can be operationally defined as: "A category of patients with OSA distinguished from others by a single or combination of disease features, in relation to clinically meaningful attributes (symptoms, response to therapy, health outcomes, quality of life)." We review approaches to clinical phenotyping in OSA, citing examples of increasing analytic complexity. Although clinical feature based OSA phenotypes with significant prognostic and treatment implications have been identified (e.g., excessive daytime sleepiness OSA), many current categorizations lack association with meaningful outcomes. Recent work focused on pathophysiologic risk factors for OSA (e.g., arousal threshold, craniofacial morphology, chemoreflex sensitivity) appears to capture heterogeneity in OSA, but requires clinical validation. Lastly, we discuss the use of machine learning as a promising phenotyping strategy that can integrate multiple types of data (genomic, molecular, cellular, clinical) to identify unique, meaningful OSA phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A neurophylogenetic approach provides new insight to the evolution of Scaphopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren H; Schrödl, Michael; Lodde-Bensch, Eva; Lindberg, David R; Heß, Martin; Brennan, Gerard P; Sigwart, Julia D

    2015-01-01

    The position of scaphopods in molluscan phylogeny remains singularly contentious, with several sister relationships supported by morphological and phylogenomic data: Scaphopoda + Bivalvia (Diasoma), Scaphopoda + Cephalopoda (Variopoda), and Scaphopoda + Gastropoda. Nervous system architecture has contributed significant insights to reconstructing phylogeny in the Mollusca and other invertebrate groups, but a modern neurophylogenetic approach has not been applied to molluscs, hampered by a lack of clearly defined homologous characters that can be unequivocally compared across the radical body plan disparity among the living clades. We present the first three-dimensional reconstruction of the anterior nervous system of a scaphopod, Rhabdus rectius, using histological tomography. We also describe a new putative sensory organ, a paired and pigmented sensory mantle slit. This structure is restricted to our study species and not a general feature of scaphopods, but it forms an integral part of the description of the nervous system in R. rectius. It also highlights the potential utility of neuro-anatomical characters for multiple levels of phylogenetic inference beyond this study. This potential has not previously been exploited for the thorny problem of molluscan phylogeny. The neuroanatomy of scaphopods demonstrates a highly derived architecture that shares a number of key characters with the cephalopod nervous system, and supports a Scaphopoda + Cephalopoda grouping. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Evolution of Cooperation in Managed Groundwater Systems: An Agent-Based Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Rho, J. C.; Mariethoz, G.; Rojas, R. F.; Andersen, M. S.; Kelly, B. F.; Holley, C.

    2014-12-01

    Human interactions with groundwater systems often exhibit complex features that hinder the sustainable management of the resource. This leads to costly and persistent conflicts over groundwater at the catchment scale. One possible way to address these conflicts is by gaining a better understanding of how social and groundwater dynamics coevolve using agent-based models (ABM). Such models allow exploring 'bottom-up' solutions (i.e., self-organised governance systems), where the behaviour of individual agents (e.g., farmers) results in the emergence of mutual cooperation among groundwater users. There is significant empirical evidence indicating that this kind of 'bottom-up' approach may lead to more enduring and sustainable outcomes, compared to conventional 'top-down' strategies such as centralized control and water right schemes (Ostrom 1990). New modelling tools are needed to study these concepts systematically and efficiently. Our model uses a conceptual framework to study cooperation and the emergence of social norms as initially proposed by Axelrod (1986), which we adapted to groundwater management. We developed an ABM that integrates social mechanisms and the physics of subsurface flow. The model explicitly represents feedback between groundwater conditions and social dynamics, capturing the spatial structure of these interactions and the potential effects on cooperation levels in an agricultural setting. Using this model, we investigate a series of mechanisms that may trigger norms supporting cooperative strategies, which can be sustained and become stable over time. For example, farmers in a self-monitoring community can be more efficient at achieving the objective of sustainable groundwater use than government-imposed regulation. Our coupled model thus offers a platform for testing new schemes promoting cooperation and improved resource use, which can be used as a basis for policy design. Importantly, we hope to raise awareness of agent-based modelling as

  11. Annotating and embedding provenance in science data repositories to enable next generation science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, D. L.; Fox, P.; Pinheiro da Silva, P.; Zednik, S.; Del Rio, N.; Ding, L.; West, P.; Chang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Recognizing the increased need for knowledge provenance in interdisciplinary eScience efforts, we have begun an effort to enhance a real-world data production pipeline and the resulting data services with semantic provenance. This work designing and implementing in an existing fielded virtual observatory setting has allowed us to collect key provenance requirements for a broad variety of end users. We have documented several image data pipelines for solar physics instruments at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory and have documented almost 20 use cases covering usage from instrument scientists, observers, data analysts and managers, and end-user scientists. These use cases have guided our work developing an initial infrastructure that can be searched, queried, or browsed by these users. We use a multi-stage approach to provenance as data and information artifacts progress along processing pipelines. Our motivation, is that both the qualitative and quantitative measures of uncertainty may be vastly improved when treated in an end-to-end manner. This also reduces the likelihood that critical information is left behind or obscurely represented, making the later use of the data and information difficult or impossible. Another motivation is that provenance captured consistently at ingest time supports transparency of sources and propagation of credit for data generation, thereby increasing the likelihood of contribution and reuse. We present the current stages of implementation of our provenance infrastructure, tools and impact on what users are able to learn from the annotated information streams. The Semantic Provenance Capture in Data Ingest Systems (SPCDIS) project is an NSF/OCI/SDCI funded effort involving the High Altitude Observatory at NCAR, McGuinness Associates and the University of Michigan.

  12. MRI findings in proven Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) spondylitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRI features of proven TB spondylitis in our setting is needed. Materials and methods. Histologically proven cases of TB spondylitis, with MR imaging performed at Universitas Hospital on a 1.5T scanner, were reviewed. Results. Typical findings of vertebral column involvement were seen in all patients, namely multiple ...

  13. Adaptation of eastern whitepine provenances to planting sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice E., Jr. Demeritt; Peter W. Garrett

    1996-01-01

    Eastern white pine provenances from the extreme limits of the natural range of this species are changing from above- and below-average stability to average stability for height growth with increasing age. The regression method is useful for evaluating the stability of provenance to planting sites. The same general conclusions are reached for the performance at...

  14. Growth and provenance variation of Pinus caribaea var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 21 provenances and sources of Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis were tested in 48 provenance / progeny trials in Brazil, South Africa, and Venezuela. Growth rates in Brazil and Venezuela were quite promising, and were less encouraging in Colombia. In Brazil and Venezuela, heights were around 12 m and mean ...

  15. Growth and quality of Grevillea robusta provenances in Ruhande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wood productivity has been observed to decline when tree germplasm used is collected from landrace populations of exotic species. This study intends to evaluate the performance of seven provenances and one landrace of G. robusta in terms of wood yield and quality. Although the outstanding provenances reported ...

  16. Analysis of Antarctic glacigenic sediment provenance through geochemical and petrologic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Kathy J.; Hemming, Sidney R.

    2017-05-01

    The number of provenance studies of glacigenic sediments in Antarctica has increased dramatically over the past decade, providing an enhanced understanding of ice sheet history and dynamics, along with the broader geologic history. Such data have been used to assess glacial erosion patterns at the catchment scale, flow path reconstructions over a wide range of scales, and ice sheet fluctuations indicated by iceberg rafted debris in circumantarctic glacial marine sediments. It is notable that even though most of the bedrock of the continent is ice covered and inaccessible, provenance data can provide such valuable information about Antarctic ice and can even be used to infer buried rock types along with their geo- and thermochronologic history. Glacigenic sediments provide a broader array of provenance analysis opportunities than any other sediment type because of their wide range of grain sizes, and in this paper we review methods and examples from all size fractions that have been applied to the Antarctic glacigenic sedimentary record. Interpretations of these records must take careful consideration of the choice of analytical methods, uneven patterns of erosion, and spatial variability in sediment transport and rock types, which all may lead to a preferential identification of different elements of sources in the provenance analyses. Because of this, we advocate a multi-proxy approach and highlight studies that demonstrate the value of selecting complementary provenance methods.

  17. Blood vessel tortuosity selects against evolution of aggressive tumor cells in confined tissue environments: A modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Szabó

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease of cellular regulation, often initiated by genetic mutation within cells, and leading to a heterogeneous cell population within tissues. In the competition for nutrients and growth space within the tumors the phenotype of each cell determines its success. Selection in this process is imposed by both the microenvironment (neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and diffusing substances, and the whole of the organism through for example the blood supply. In this view, the development of tumor cells is in close interaction with their increasingly changing environment: the more cells can change, the more their environment will change. Furthermore, instabilities are also introduced on the organism level: blood supply can be blocked by increased tissue pressure or the tortuosity of the tumor-neovascular vessels. This coupling between cell, microenvironment, and organism results in behavior that is hard to predict. Here we introduce a cell-based computational model to study the effect of blood flow obstruction on the micro-evolution of cells within a cancerous tissue. We demonstrate that stages of tumor development emerge naturally, without the need for sequential mutation of specific genes. Secondly, we show that instabilities in blood supply can impact the overall development of tumors and lead to the extinction of the dominant aggressive phenotype, showing a clear distinction between the fitness at the cell level and survival of the population. This provides new insights into potential side effects of recent tumor vasculature normalization approaches.

  18. Decentralized provenance-aware publishing with nanopublications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kuhn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Publication and archival of scientific results is still commonly considered the responsability of classical publishing companies. Classical forms of publishing, however, which center around printed narrative articles, no longer seem well-suited in the digital age. In particular, there exist currently no efficient, reliable, and agreed-upon methods for publishing scientific datasets, which have become increasingly important for science. In this article, we propose to design scientific data publishing as a web-based bottom-up process, without top-down control of central authorities such as publishing companies. Based on a novel combination of existing concepts and technologies, we present a server network to decentrally store and archive data in the form of nanopublications, an RDF-based format to represent scientific data. We show how this approach allows researchers to publish, retrieve, verify, and recombine datasets of nanopublications in a reliable and trustworthy manner, and we argue that this architecture could be used as a low-level data publication layer to serve the Semantic Web in general. Our evaluation of the current network shows that this system is efficient and reliable.

  19. Antimicrobial stewardship initiatives throughout Europe: proven value for money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J.M. Oberjé

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial stewardship is recognized as a key component to stop the current European spread of antimicrobial resistance. It has also become evident that antimicrobial resistance is a problem that cannot be tackled by single institutions or physicians. Prevention of antimicrobial resistance needs rigorous actions at ward level, institution level, national level and at supra-national levels. Countries can learn from each other and possibly transplant best practices across borders to prevent antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study is to highlight some of the success stories of proven cost-effective interventions, and to describe the actions that have been taken, the outcomes that have been found, and the difficulties that have been met. In some cases we came across substantial scope for real-life cost savings. Although the best approach to effectively hinder the spread of antimicrobial resistance remains unclear and may vary significantly among settings, several EU-wide examples demonstrate that cost-effective antimicrobial stewardship is possible. Such examples can encourage others to implement (the most cost-effective elements in their system.

  20. Antimicrobial Stewardship Initiatives Throughout Europe: Proven Value for Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberjé, Edwin J M; Tanke, Marit A C; Jeurissen, Patrick P T

    2017-03-30

    Antimicrobial stewardship is recognized as a key component to stop the current European spread of antimicrobial resistance. It has also become evident that antimicrobial resistance is a problem that cannot be tackled by single institutions or physicians. Prevention of antimicrobial resistance needs rigorous actions at ward level, institution level, national level and at supra-national levels. Countries can learn from each other and possibly transplant best practices across borders to prevent antimicrobial resistance. The aim of this study is to highlight some of the success stories of proven cost-effective interventions, and to describe the actions that have been taken, the outcomes that have been found, and the difficulties that have been met. In some cases we came across substantial scope for real-life cost savings. Although the best approach to effectively hinder the spread of antimicrobial resistance remains unclear and may vary significantly among settings, several EU-wide examples demonstrate that cost-effective antimicrobial stewardship is possible. Such examples can encourage others to implement (the most cost-effective) elements in their system.

  1. Komadu: A Capture and Visualization System for Scientific Data Provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru Suriarachchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Data provenance captured from scientific applications is a critical precursor to data sharing and reuse. For researchers wanting to repurpose data, it is a source of information about the lineage and attribution of the data and this is needed in order to establish trust in a data set. Komadu is a standalone provenance capture and visualization system for capturing, representing, and manipulating provenance coming from scientific tools, infrastructures, and repositories. It uses the W3C PROV standard [1] in representing data, and it is the successor of the Karma [2] provenance capture system which was based on Open Provenance Model (OPM [3]. Komadu comes with two different interfaces: a Web Services interface based on Apache Axis2 [4] and a messaging interface based on RabbitMQ [5]. Komadu is completely open source and the source code is publicly available on GitHub [6]. Even though Komadu has been used most extensively in relation to scientific research, its interfaces are designed to collect and visualize provenance of any kind of application needing provenance.

  2. Evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon in groundwater recharged by cyclones and groundwater age estimations using the 14C statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Cendón, D. I.; Crawford, J.; Hankin, S.; Peterson, M.; Hollins, S. E.

    2018-01-01

    The Canning Basin is the largest sedimentary basin in Western Australia and is located in one of the most cyclone prone regions of Australia. Despite its importance as a future resource, limited groundwater data is available for the Basin. The main aims of this paper are to provide a detailed understanding of the source of groundwater recharge, the chemical evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and provide groundwater age estimations using radiocarbon (14CDIC). To do this we combine hydrochemical and isotopic techniques to investigate the type of precipitation that recharge the aquifer and identify the carbon processes influencing 14CDIC, δ13CDIC, and [DIC]. This enables us to select an appropriate model for calculating radiocarbon ages in groundwater. The aquifer was found to be recharged by precipitation originating from tropical cyclones imparting lower average δ2H and δ18O values in groundwater (-56.9‰ and -7.87‰, respectively). Water recharges the soil zone rapidly after these events and the groundwater undergoes silicate mineral weathering and clay mineral transformation processes. It was also found that partial carbonate dissolution processes occur within the saturated zone under closed system conditions. Additionally, the processes could be lumped into a pseudo-first-order process and the age could be estimated using the 14C statistical approach. In the single-sample-based 14C models, 14C0 is the initial 14CDIC value used in the decay equation that considers only 14C decay rate. A major advantage of using the statistical approach is that both 14C decay and geochemical processes that cause the decrease in 14CDIC are accounted for in the calculation. The 14CDIC values of groundwater were found to increase from 89 pmc in the south east to around 16 pmc along the groundwater flow path towards the coast indicating ages ranging from modern to 5.3 ka. A test of the sensitivity of this method showed that a ∼15% error could be found for the oldest

  3. Provenance-by-environment interaction of reproductive traits in the invasion of Spartina alterniflora in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwen; Strong, Donald R; Pennings, Steven C; Zhang, Yihui

    2017-06-01

    Ecological invasions are facilitated by pre-adaptation and phenotypic plasticity, upon which evolution can act. The rapid invasion of the intertidal grass Spartina alterniflora in China during the last 36 yr is a test case for the roles of these mechanisms. A previous study of S. alterniflora in China found strong latitudinal clines in vegetative and sexual traits and concluded that most of this variation was due to phenotypic plasticity. Recent observations suggested provenance-by-environment interactions, and we employed common gardens at multiple latitudes as a test of this idea. Phenotypically, field plant height, which correlates strongly with biomass and other indices of vegetative performance in this species, showed a hump-shaped relationship across 10 sites, covering 19° of latitude; field seed set increased linearly with latitude. To assess the role of plasticity vs. genetic differentiation in these patterns, we grew plants from the ten field sites in three common gardens at low (20.9° N), mid (28.3° N), and high (38.0° N) latitudes to maturity, at 18 months. Plant height varied among common gardens, with the tallest plants at mid latitude, mirroring the field pattern, consistent with the previous study. Within the gardens, latitude of origin also affected plant height. Seed set varied among the gardens, with the greatest values at high latitudes, again mirroring the field pattern and indicating substantial plasticity. Evidence of evolution was found as increasing seed set with latitude among provenances within common gardens. However, the effect differed among common gardens, with the greatest slope in the high-latitude garden, lower slope in the mid-latitude garden, and no relationship in the low-latitude garden, indicating a provenance-by-environment interaction. The number of surviving plants also suggested a provenance-by-environment interaction; no relationship with latitude among provenances in the two southern gardens and increasing survival

  4. Provenance studies from 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of mineral inclusions in diamonds: Methodological tests on the Orapa kimberlite, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.; Harris, J. W.

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies indicate that clinopyroxene inclusions extracted from their host diamonds give 40Ar/ 39Ar ages approaching the time of source kimberlite eruption. This behaviour is attributed to diffusion of argon to the diamond/inclusion interface region during mantle residence, with subsequent loss of this component on cleaving of the diamond to release the inclusion(s). In this study, we investigate the potential of the 40Ar/ 39Ar inclusion dating method as a niche provenance tool. As diamondiferous kimberlites are uncommon igneous rocks, largely restricted to Archaean cratons and have limited age ranges, provenance studies of detrital diamond occurrences should provide unique information on craton erosional histories, palaeo-drainage evolution and related basin development. As a methodological test, 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating and in vacuo crushing experiments were conducted on 50 eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions extracted from diamonds from the ˜ 93 Ma Orapa kimberlite in Botswana. Low temperature steps and crushing experiments produced anomalously old ages (up to 2.98 ± 0.10 Ga), consistent with partial retention of pre-eruption (inherited) argon in sub-micron(?) defect sites. High temperature (fusion) steps yielded significantly younger ages, although only 35% are within error of the time of Orapa kimberlite eruption. However, 77% of results are within 50 Ma, and 92% within 100 Ma, of the Orapa eruption age. These results mandate that individual fusion ages be treated as maximum estimates of source kimberlite eruption ages, with analyses of several (> 6) inclusions required to date single-age detrital populations. For multi-source diamond deposits, only the youngest detrital population, or populations separated by > 100 Ma, will be resolvable. Despite these limitations, we conclude that the 40Ar/ 39Ar inclusion dating method is still capable of resolving key provenance questions, such as the source of detrital diamond deposits in southern Africa, where

  5. Evidence-based evolution of an integrated nutrition-focused agriculture approach to address the underlying determinants of stunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselow, Nancy J; Stormer, Ame; Pries, Alissa

    2016-05-01

    Despite progress in reducing hunger and malnutrition since the 1990s, many still suffer from undernutrition and food insecurity, particularly women and young children, resulting in preterm birth, low birthweight and stunting, among other conditions. Helen Keller International (HKI) has addressed malnutrition and household food insecurity through implementation of an Enhanced Homestead Food Production (EHFP) programme that increases year-round availability and intake of diverse micronutrient-rich foods and promotes optimal nutrition and hygiene practices among poor households. This paper reviews the evolution and impact of HKI's EHFP programme and identifies core components of the model that address the underlying determinants of stunting. To date, evaluations of EHFP have shown impact on food production, consumption by women and children and household food security. Sale of surplus produce has increased household income, and the use of a transformative gender approach has empowered women. EHFP has also realized nutrition improvements in many project sites. Results from a randomized control trial (RCT) in Baitadi district, Nepal showed a significant improvement in a range of practices known to impact child growth, although no impact on stunting. Additional non-RCT evaluations in Kailali district of Nepal, demonstrated a 10.5% reduction in stunting and in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh, revealed an 18% decrease in stunting. Based on evidence, the EHFP has evolved into an integrated package that includes agriculture, nutrition, water/hygiene/sanitation, linkages to health care, women's empowerment, income generation and advocacy. Closing the stunting gap requires long-term exposure to targeted multi-sectoral solutions and rigorous evaluation to optimize impact. © 2016 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Symbiotic Relationship between Scientific Workflow and Provenance (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the symbiotic nature of scientific workflows and provenance. We will also discuss the current trends and real world challenges facing these two distinct research areas. Although motivated differently, the needs of the international science communities are the glue that binds this relationship together. Understanding and articulating the science drivers to these communities is paramount as these technologies evolve and mature. Originally conceived for managing business processes, workflows are now becoming invaluable assets in both computational and experimental sciences. These reconfigurable, automated systems provide essential technology to perform complex analyses by coupling together geographically distributed disparate data sources and applications. As a result, workflows are capable of higher throughput in a shorter amount of time than performing the steps manually. Today many different workflow products exist; these could include Kepler and Taverna or similar products like MeDICI, developed at PNNL, that are standardized on the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). Provenance, originating from the French term Provenir “to come from”, is used to describe the curation process of artwork as art is passed from owner to owner. The concept of provenance was adopted by digital libraries as a means to track the lineage of documents while standards such as the DublinCore began to emerge. In recent years the systems science community has increasingly expressed the need to expand the concept of provenance to formally articulate the history of scientific data. Communities such as the International Provenance and Annotation Workshop (IPAW) have formalized a provenance data model. The Open Provenance Model, and the W3C is hosting a provenance incubator group featuring the Proof Markup Language. Although both workflows and provenance have risen from different communities and operate independently, their mutual

  7. Growth and quality of Grevillea robusta provenances in Ruhande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    . 11. Kalinganire, A. & Hall, J.B. 1993. Growth and biomass production of young Grevillea robusta provenances in Rwanda. Forest Ecology and. Management 62: 73-84. 12. Kalinganire, A. & ESEGU, F. 1995. Silviculture and genetic variation of.

  8. Evaluating fossil calibrations for dating phylogenies in light of rates of molecular evolution: a comparison of three approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi; Scott Keogh, J; Avise, John C

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary and biogeographic studies increasingly rely on calibrated molecular clocks to date key events. Although there has been significant recent progress in development of the techniques used for molecular dating, many issues remain. In particular, controversies abound over the appropriate use and placement of fossils for calibrating molecular clocks. Several methods have been proposed for evaluating candidate fossils; however, few studies have compared the results obtained by different approaches. Moreover, no previous study has incorporated the effects of nucleotide saturation from different data types in the evaluation of candidate fossils. In order to address these issues, we compared three approaches for evaluating fossil calibrations: the single-fossil cross-validation method of Near, Meylan, and Shaffer (2005. Assessing concordance of fossil calibration points in molecular clock studies: an example using turtles. Am. Nat. 165:137-146), the empirical fossil coverage method of Marshall (2008. A simple method for bracketing absolute divergence times on molecular phylogenies using multiple fossil calibration points. Am. Nat. 171:726-742), and the Bayesian multicalibration method of Sanders and Lee (2007. Evaluating molecular clock calibrations using Bayesian analyses with soft and hard bounds. Biol. Lett. 3:275-279) and explicitly incorporate the effects of data type (nuclear vs. mitochondrial DNA) for identifying the most reliable or congruent fossil calibrations. We used advanced (Caenophidian) snakes as a case study; however, our results are applicable to any taxonomic group with multiple candidate fossils, provided appropriate taxon sampling and sufficient molecular sequence data are available. We found that data type strongly influenced which fossil calibrations were identified as outliers, regardless of which method was used. Despite the use of complex partitioned models of sequence evolution and multiple calibrations throughout the tree, saturation

  9. DataONE: A Data Federation with Provenance Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yang [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Christopher [National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara; Cuevas-Vicenttin, Victor [ Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, Puebla, Mexico; Jones, Matthew B. [National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara; Ludascher, Bertram [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; McPhillips, Timothy [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Missier, Paolo [Newcastle University, UK; Schwalm, Christopher [Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC), Massachusetts; Slaughter, Peter [National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara; Vieglais, Dave [University of Kansas; Walker, Lauren [National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Santa Barbara

    2016-01-01

    DataONE is a federated data network focusing on earth and environmental science data. We present the provenance and search features of DataONE by means of an example involving three earth scientists who interact through a DataONE Member Node. DataONE provenance systems enable reproducible research and facilitate proper attribution of scientific results transitively across generations of derived data products.

  10. [Ecological adaptability of different provenance Eupatorium adenophorum Spreng].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meng; Liu, Wen-Yao; ma, Wen-Zhang; Zhao, Xiang-Jian

    2009-07-01

    By using reciprocal transplant method, Eupatorium adenophorum Spreng. seedlings of five different provenances were reciprocally transplanted into six different sites in Yunnan Province, with the survival rate, plant height, branch number, biomass, flower number per plant, and seed production measured during the period from April 2007 to May 2008. The seedlings growth and reproductive traits of different provenance E. adenophorum all showed strong plasticity to environmental conditions. With increasing latitude and altitude of transplant site, plant height, branch number, biomass, flower number per plant, and seed production of different provenance E. adenophorum decreased, and the differences in these growth and reproductive traits were significant among the transplant sites. However, there were no significant differences in these traits among different provenance E. adenophorum. Provenance and transplant site had no significant interactive effects on the above-mentioned traits except seed production. At each site, the survival rate, growth potential, and reproductive capability of local provenance E. adenophorum didn't have any superiority, illustrating that the success in the invasion of E. adenophorum in Yunnan Province was mainly due to the phenotypic plasticity of the plant, while local adaptability only played lesser important role.

  11. Lightweight Provenance Service for High-Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Ross, Robert

    2017-09-09

    Provenance describes detailed information about the history of a piece of data, containing the relationships among elements such as users, processes, jobs, and workflows that contribute to the existence of data. Provenance is key to supporting many data management functionalities that are increasingly important in operations such as identifying data sources, parameters, or assumptions behind a given result; auditing data usage; or understanding details about how inputs are transformed into outputs. Despite its importance, however, provenance support is largely underdeveloped in highly parallel architectures and systems. One major challenge is the demanding requirements of providing provenance service in situ. The need to remain lightweight and to be always on often conflicts with the need to be transparent and offer an accurate catalog of details regarding the applications and systems. To tackle this challenge, we introduce a lightweight provenance service, called LPS, for high-performance computing (HPC) systems. LPS leverages a kernel instrument mechanism to achieve transparency and introduces representative execution and flexible granularity to capture comprehensive provenance with controllable overhead. Extensive evaluations and use cases have confirmed its efficiency and usability. We believe that LPS can be integrated into current and future HPC systems to support a variety of data management needs.

  12. Insight: Semantic Provenance and Analysis Platform for Multi-center Neurology Healthcare Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Priya; Wei, Annan; Welter, Elisabeth; Bamps, Yvan; Stoll, Shelley; Bukach, Ashley; Sajatovic, Martha; Sahoo, Satya S

    2015-11-01

    Insight is a Semantic Web technology-based platform to support large-scale secondary analysis of healthcare data for neurology clinical research. Insight features the novel use of: (1) provenance metadata, which describes the history or origin of patient data, in clinical research analysis, and (2) support for patient cohort queries across multiple institutions conducting research in epilepsy, which is the one of the most common neurological disorders affecting 50 million persons worldwide. Insight is being developed as a healthcare informatics infrastructure to support a national network of eight epilepsy research centers across the U.S. funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This paper describes the use of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) PROV recommendation for provenance metadata that allows researchers to create patient cohorts based on the provenance of the research studies. In addition, the paper describes the use of descriptive logic-based OWL2 epilepsy ontology for cohort queries with "expansion of query expression" using ontology reasoning. Finally, the evaluation results for the data integration and query performance are described using data from three research studies with 180 epilepsy patients. The experiment results demonstrate that Insight is a scalable approach to use Semantic provenance metadata for context-based data analysis in healthcare informatics.

  13. Malarial parasite diversity in chimpanzees: the value of comparative approaches to ascertain the evolution of Plasmodium falciparum antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    . Msp2 and var2CSA, however, show extended recent polymorphism in P. falciparum that likely originated after the P. reichenowi-P. falciparum split. The accumulation of such diversity may indicate adaptation to the human host. These examples support the notion that comparative approaches among P. falciparum and its related species will be of great value in understanding the evolution of proteins that are important in parasite invasion of the human red blood cell, as well as those involved in malaria pathogenesis. PMID:24044371

  14. Covariant quantum Markovian evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum Markovian master equations with generally unbounded generators, having physically relevant symmetries, such as Weyl, Galilean or boost covariance, are characterized. It is proven in particular that a fully Galilean covariant zero spin Markovian evolution reduces to the free motion perturbed by a covariant stochastic process with independent stationary increments in the classical phase space. A general form of the boost covariant Markovian master equation is discussed and a formal dilation to the Langevin equation driven by quantum Boson noises is described.

  15. ISO TC211 standards on Provenance for Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, L.; Deng, M.

    2014-12-01

    Data provenance, also called lineage, records the derivation history of a data product. The history could include the algorithms used, the process steps taken, the computing environment run, data sources input to the processes, the organization/person responsible for the product, etc. Provenance provides important information to data users for them to determine the usability and reliability of the product. In the science domain, the data provenance is especially important since scientists need to use the information to determine the scientific validity of a data product and to decide if such a product can be used as the basis for further scientific analysis. Provenance is a kind of metadata. In Earth science domain, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 211 (ISO TC 211) have set geospatial metadata standards for geospatial data, including ISO 19115:2003-Metadata, ISO 19115-2:2009-Metadata-Part 2: Extensions for imagery and gridded data, and ISO 19115-1:2014 - Metadata -- Part 1: Fundamentals. ISO 19115 and ISO 19115-1 define the fundamental metadata for documenting geospatial data products, and ISO 19115-2 provides additional metadata classes for imagery and gridded data. ISO 19115-1:2014 is the revised version of ISO 19115:2003. ISO 19115 and ISO 19115-1 define fundamental lineage information classes and subclasses. They miss some key information classes needed for documenting the provenance in the Web service environment, such as the running environment, the algorithms, and software executables. However, ISO 19115-2 extends the lineage model in ISO 19115 and provides additional metadata classes needed for documenting provenance information. The combination of lineage models in ISO 19115 and ISO 19115-2 provides a comprehensive provenance information model needed for the web service environment. Currently the ISO Provence standard is not compatible with W3C Prov standard. The revision of ISO 19115-2 will be started in

  16. Generative Models in Deep Learning: Constraints for Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turp, Maximilian Dennis; Schawinski, Kevin; Zhang, Ce; Weigel, Anna K.

    2018-01-01

    New techniques are essential to make advances in the field of galaxy evolution. Recent developments in the field of artificial intelligence and machine learning have proven that these tools can be applied to problems far more complex than simple image recognition. We use these purely data driven approaches to investigate the process of star formation quenching. We show that Variational Autoencoders provide a powerful method to forward model the process of galaxy quenching. Our results imply that simple changes in specific star formation rate and bulge to disk ratio cannot fully describe the properties of the quenched population.

  17. Computational provenance in hydrologic science: a snow mapping example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jeff; Frew, James

    2009-03-13

    Computational provenance--a record of the antecedents and processing history of digital information--is key to properly documenting computer-based scientific research. To support investigations in hydrologic science, we produce the daily fractional snow-covered area from NASA's moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS). From the MODIS reflectance data in seven wavelengths, we estimate the fraction of each 500 m pixel that snow covers. The daily products have data gaps and errors because of cloud cover and sensor viewing geometry, so we interpolate and smooth to produce our best estimate of the daily snow cover. To manage the data, we have developed the Earth System Science Server (ES3), a software environment for data-intensive Earth science, with unique capabilities for automatically and transparently capturing and managing the provenance of arbitrary computations. Transparent acquisition avoids the scientists having to express their computations in specific languages or schemas in order for provenance to be acquired and maintained. ES3 models provenance as relationships between processes and their input and output files. It is particularly suited to capturing the provenance of an evolving algorithm whose components span multiple languages and execution environments.

  18. Sudetic larch in Germany - Results of provenance and progeny research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisgerber, H. [Forest Centre for Management Planning, Research and Ecology, Hann Muenden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    There are only a few older sources of Sudetic larch in Germany. They distinguish themselves by outstanding growth and low susceptibility to canker. This impression was confirmed by results of provenance research. The Sudetic larch tested in comparison with numerous other provenances proved to be fast-growing, site-tolerant, to a large extent insusceptible to canker, with straight but also slightly to moderately curved stems. The Sudetic provenances behave remarkably uniformly as regards these characteristics. In addition to provenance research investigations have been going on for a long time in Germany into individual differences within the Sudetic larch populations. A report is given on the results of progeny tests from free and controlled pollination, using the example of a seed orchard consisting of 54 clones. We point also to possibilities for improving stem quality by selection steps. The results of provenance and progeny research on Sudetic larch are in the meantime being put to use to a large extent in practical forestry. The forest administrations of various federal lands recommend the use of reproductive material of Sudetic origin and from seed orchards. 20 refs, 3 figs

  19. Impact of Ocean Gateways on Ocean Circulation, Climate and Evolution: a multidisciplinary approach to the closing of the Isthmus of Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkel, H.; Crudeli, D.; Groeneveld, J.; Nürnberg, D.; Steph, S.; Tiedemann, R.

    2003-04-01

    We investigated evolutionary and geochemical trends in calcareous plankton organisms (coccolithophores and planktic foraminiferas) to address the changes in the paleoceanography and evolution associated with the closure of the Isthmus of Panama. The closing of this major ocean Gateway lead to substantial reorganizations of surface and deep ocean currents, and thus global climate change. Moreover it provides a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary development of planktic organisms, that are associated with these changes as well as their geographic separation in the Carribean and eastern Equatorial Pacific. The geochemical analysis of stable oxygen and carbon isotopes as well as Mg/Ca of planktic foraminiferas, provide a detailed view on the changing surface water properties of the investigated area. First results are already achieved on the evolution of the genus Gephyrocapsa and its origination from the genus Reticulofenestra. Morphometric studies have been carried out on both genera as well as on Pseudoemiliania ovata which evolves into Pseudoemiliania lacunosa during this interval. The ecological investigation of the total coccolithophore assemblages provide valuable insights to high frequency fluctuation in the trophic structure of coccolithophores which can be correlated to the paleoceanographic reconstructions based on the stable carbon and oxygen isotope and Mg/Ca records of planktic foraminiferas. The multidisciplinary approach enables us to decipher to what extend evolution is driven by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, and the high-resolution framework of this study provides valuable insights in the tempo of evolution and climate change.

  20. Review of investigations performed in the USSR on close approaches of comets to Jupiter and the evolution of cometary orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimirchak-Polonskaya, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are reviewed for calculating the evolution of cometary orbits with emphasis on the orbital changes that take place when comets pass within the spheres of action of giant planets. Topics discussed include: differences and difficulties in methods used for the calculation of large perturbations by Jupiter; the construction of numerical theories of motion covering the whole period of observations of each comet, allowing for planetary perturbations and the effects of nongravitational forces; and investigations of the evolution of cometary orbits over the 400 year interval 1660-2060. The classical theory of cometary capture is briefly discussed.

  1. Provenance in Data Interoperability for Multi-Sensor Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leptoukh, Greg; Berrick, Steve; Shen, Suhung; Prados, Ana; Fox, Peter; Yang, Wenli; Min, Min; Holloway, Dan; Enloe, Yonsook

    2008-01-01

    As our inventory of Earth science data sets grows, the ability to compare, merge and fuse multiple datasets grows in importance. This requires a deeper data interoperability than we have now. Efforts such as Open Geospatial Consortium and OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) have broken down format barriers to interoperability; the next challenge is the semantic aspects of the data. Consider the issues when satellite data are merged, cross-calibrated, validated, inter-compared and fused. We must match up data sets that are related, yet different in significant ways: the phenomenon being measured, measurement technique, location in space-time or quality of the measurements. If subtle distinctions between similar measurements are not clear to the user, results can be meaningless or lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. Most of these distinctions trace to how the data came to be: sensors, processing and quality assessment. For example, monthly averages of satellite-based aerosol measurements often show significant discrepancies, which might be due to differences in spatio- temporal aggregation, sampling issues, sensor biases, algorithm differences or calibration issues. Provenance information must be captured in a semantic framework that allows data inter-use tools to incorporate it and aid in the intervention of comparison or merged products. Semantic web technology allows us to encode our knowledge of measurement characteristics, phenomena measured, space-time representation, and data quality attributes in a well-structured, machine-readable ontology and rulesets. An analysis tool can use this knowledge to show users the provenance-related distrintions between two variables, advising on options for further data processing and analysis. An additional problem for workflows distributed across heterogeneous systems is retrieval and transport of provenance. Provenance may be either embedded within the data payload, or transmitted

  2. The evolution of legal approaches to controlling nuclear and radiological weapons and combating the threat of nuclear terrorism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbach, J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter traces the evolution of international law related to the weaponization of nuclear and other radioactive materials, focusing in particular on the law pertaining to preventing acts of nuclear terrorism. International efforts to control atomic energy have evolved substantially since the

  3. Long term modeling of the links between economics, technical progress and environment: Evolution of approaches and new trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, J.

    1992-10-01

    This paper examines the evolution of modeling on greenhouse as emissions. The paper briefly highlights the origins and early efforts to model greenhouse gas emissions, efforts subsequent to 1988, and the shape of the next generation of greenhouse gas emissions models. Particular emphasis is placed on the author`s own contributions, including the Edmonds-Reilly Model and the second generation model.

  4. Long term modeling of the links between economics, technical progress and environment: Evolution of approaches and new trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, J.

    1992-10-01

    This paper examines the evolution of modeling on greenhouse as emissions. The paper briefly highlights the origins and early efforts to model greenhouse gas emissions, efforts subsequent to 1988, and the shape of the next generation of greenhouse gas emissions models. Particular emphasis is placed on the author's own contributions, including the Edmonds-Reilly Model and the second generation model.

  5. A new laboratory evolution approach to select for constitutive acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of causal mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Gonz?lez-Ramos, Daniel; Gorter de Vries, Arthur R.; Grijseels, Sietske S.; van Berkum, Margo C.; Swinnen, Steve; van den Broek, Marcel; Nevoigt, Elke; Daran, Jean-Marc G.; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetic acid, released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks for second generation bioethanol production, inhibits yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Yeast biomass generated in a propagation step that precedes ethanol production should therefore express a high and constitutive level of acetic acid tolerance before introduction into lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, earlier laboratory evolution strategies for increasing acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cere...

  6. Effects of therapeutic approach on the neonatal evolution of very low birth weight infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian S.R. Sadeck

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The conservative approach of PDA was associated to high mortality, the surgical approach to the occurrence of BPD36wks and ROPsur, and the pharmacological treatment was protective for the outcome death/BPD36wks.

  7. From Observation to Impacts: Provenance for Earth Science Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, H.; Tilmes, C.; Fox, P. A.; Zednik, S.; Duggan, B.; Aulenbach, S.; Wilson, B. D.; Manipon, G. J. M.; Privette, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Working Group (ESDSWG) on Provenance is working on a provenance specification for use in Earth science data systems to capture, consume, and interpret the end-to-end data life cycle information. Based on W3C PROV, this Earth Science extension can be used as an interoperable specification for representing Earth science resources that includes observations by instruments, data producers, data processing systems, data archive centers, data users, analysis findings, and societal impacts. NASA is participating in the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) and also leading a related Climate Data Initiative (CDI) effort. Under CDI, NASA is also working with the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and the U.S. Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) to identify and make interoperable relevant data from multiple interagency sources. These interagency efforts will improve the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of Federal data and information products derived from civil Earth observations. We will present our progress to develop a provenance specification for representing Earth science resources from observation to impacts and how it can be used to support these initiatives. We will show how it can be used in earth science data systems to automatically capture, consume, and interpret provenance information using semantic technologies.

  8. Scab susceptibility of a provenance collection of pecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scab (caused by Fusicladium effusum) is the most economically destructive disease of pecan in the Southeast US. Epidemics are favored by rainfall and high humidity. A provenance collection of ~950 pecan trees from 19 locations representing the native range of the species is located in Byron, Georgia...

  9. Towards automatic capturing of semi-structured process provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Huq, M.R.; Cudré-Mauroux, Philippe; Ceravolo, Paolo; Gasevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Often data processing is not implemented by a workflow system or an integration application but is performed manually by humans along the lines of a more or less specified procedure. Collecting provenance information in semi-structured processes can not be automated. Further, manual collection of

  10. Longleaf pine grown in Virginia: a provenance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Johnsen; Jerre L. Creighton; Chris A. Maier

    2015-01-01

    In 2006 the Virginia Department of Forestry established a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) provenance test on three sites near Richmond, VA, near the most northern native range of longleaf pine. Seedlings were grown in containers at the Virginia Department of Forestry New Kent Forestry Center during the 2005 growing season.

  11. Towards Automatic Capturing of Manual Data Processing Provenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Huq, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Often data processing is not implemented by a work ow system or an integration application but is performed manually by humans along the lines of a more or less specified procedure. Collecting provenance information during manual data processing can not be automated. Further, manual collection of

  12. Using provenance to manage knowledge of in silico experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert; Zhao, Jun; Goble, Carole

    2007-05-01

    This article offers a briefing in one of the knowledge management issues of in silico experimentation in bioinformatics. Recording of the provenance of an experiment-what was done; where, how and why, etc. is an important aspect of scientific best practice that should be extended to in silico experimentation. We will do this in the context of eScience which has been part of the move of bioinformatics towards an industrial setting. Despite the computational nature of bioinformatics, these analyses are scientific and thus necessitate their own versions of typical scientific rigour. Just as recording who, what, why, when, where and how of an experiment is central to the scientific process in laboratory science, so it should be in silico science. The generation and recording of these aspects, or provenance, of an experiment are necessary knowledge management goals if we are to introduce scientific rigour into routine bioinformatics. In Silico experimental protocols should themselves be a form of managing the knowledge of how to perform bioinformatics analyses. Several systems now exist that offer support for the generation and collection of provenance information about how a particular in silico experiment was run, what results were generated, how they were generated, etc. In reviewing provenance support, we will review one of the important knowledge management issues in bioinformatics.

  13. Provenance variation in growth and genetic potential of Aquilaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARUN KUMAR

    2015-06-17

    Jun 17, 2015 ... The genetic advance was high for shoot length followed by number of branches which indicated the reliability of these two parameters for inclusion in future improvement programme. Key words: Aquilaria malaccensis, provenances, variability, heritability, genetic divergence, intra and inter cluster distance.

  14. Combining User Reputation and Provenance Analysis for Trust Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceolin, D.; Groth, P.T.; Maccatrozzo, V.; Fokkink, W.J.; van Hage, W.R.; Nottamkandath, A.

    2016-01-01

    Trust is a broad concept that in many systems is often reduced to user reputation alone. However, user reputation is just one way to determine trust. The estimation of trust can be tackled from other perspectives as well, including by looking at provenance. Here, we present a complete pipeline for

  15. a case of biopsy proven lupus nephritis in Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of a 30 years old female patient who presented with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function which was diagnosed to have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with lupus nephritis. This is the first biopsy proven lupus nephritis in Tanzania. SLE is common among females and is reported be more ...

  16. An extensible framework for provenance in human terrain visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rick; Slingsby, Aiden; Dykes, Jason; Xu, Kai; Wood, Jo; Nguyen, Phong H; Stephens, Derek; Wong, B L William; Zheng, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate an extensible framework that supports data exploration and provenance in the context of Human Terrain Analysis (HTA). Working closely with defence analysts we extract requirements and a list of features that characterise data analysed at the end of the HTA chain. From these, we select an appropriate non-classified data source with analogous features, and model it as a set of facets. We develop ProveML, an XML-based extension of the Open Provenance Model, using these facets and augment it with the structures necessary to record the provenance of data, analytical process and interpretations. Through an iterative process, we develop and refine a prototype system for Human Terrain Visual Analytics (HTVA), and demonstrate means of storing, browsing and recalling analytical provenance and process through analytic bookmarks in ProveML. We show how these bookmarks can be combined to form narratives that link back to the live data. Throughout the process, we demonstrate that through structured workshops, rapid prototyping and structured communication with intelligence analysts we are able to establish requirements, and design schema, techniques and tools that meet the requirements of the intelligence community. We use the needs and reactions of defence analysts in defining and steering the methods to validate the framework.

  17. Growth and quality of Grevillea robusta provenances in Ruhande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    seven Queensland (Australia) provenances and one land race on an oxisol at Ruhande Arboretum,. Butare, Rwanda was carried out. The species is the commonest on farm tree species in Rwandan agroecosystems and serves many functions. Wood productivity has been observed to decline when tree germplasm used is ...

  18. Provenance of the Late Neogene Siwalik sandstone, Kumaun ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An understanding about lithology, tectonics and unroofing history of provenance is mostly drawn from ... history of Late Neogene Siwalik sandstone of the ...... and Tibet: Mountain Roots to Mountain Tops (eds). Macfarlane A, Sorkhabi R B and Quade (Colorado: Boulder), J. Geol. Soc. Am. Spec. Paper, pp. 239–256.

  19. Outcome of biopsy proven minimal change disease (MCD) in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: MCD is the most common histological sub-type of nephrotic syndrome with variable clinical course in children. There are limited studies in literature on the outcome of biopsy proven MCD. The objective was to look at the treatment response and outcome of patients with MCD treated at a tertiary ...

  20. Provenances and fertilizer on early growth cedar seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Carlos Navroski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the initial development of different provenances and the influence of base fertilizer and coverage on growth of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Provenances of seeds were collected in Lapa, PR, Fernandes Pinheiro, PR and Itaara, RS. After germination, the seedlings were transplanted to plastic bags of 500 cm³, filled with commercial substrate. Total height (h, stem diameter (sd, and ratio h/sd seedlings were measured after 150 days of transplanting. Seedlings of Fernandes Pinheiro received basic fertilization after transplantation (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g dm-3  Osmocote® and cover (3 and 6 g L-1, respectively, of Peter’s® and urea. The provenance and doses of controlled-release fertilizer influenced early development of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Itaara provenance showed better seedlings growth. Cedar seedlings showed good growth when incorporated into the substrate 5 g dm-3 Osmocote® and, in addition, applied in topdressing 3 g L-1 of Peter’s®. Urea topdressing is rarely recommended for cedar seedlings.

  1. a case of biopsy proven lupus nephritis in Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    65001, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Abstract: We describe a case of a 30 years old female patient who presented with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function diagnosed to have systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This is the first biopsy proven lupus nephritis in Tanzania. SLE is common among females and is ...

  2. Representing annotation compositionality and provenance for the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kevin M; Bada, Michael; Hunter, Lawrence E; Verspoor, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Though the annotation of digital artifacts with metadata has a long history, the bulk of that work focuses on the association of single terms or concepts to single targets. As annotation efforts expand to capture more complex information, annotations will need to be able to refer to knowledge structures formally defined in terms of more atomic knowledge structures. Existing provenance efforts in the Semantic Web domain primarily focus on tracking provenance at the level of whole triples and do not provide enough detail to track how individual triple elements of annotations were derived from triple elements of other annotations. We present a task- and domain-independent ontological model for capturing annotations and their linkage to their denoted knowledge representations, which can be singular concepts or more complex sets of assertions. We have implemented this model as an extension of the Information Artifact Ontology in OWL and made it freely available, and we show how it can be integrated with several prominent annotation and provenance models. We present several application areas for the model, ranging from linguistic annotation of text to the annotation of disease-associations in genome sequences. With this model, progressively more complex annotations can be composed from other annotations, and the provenance of compositional annotations can be represented at the annotation level or at the level of individual elements of the RDF triples composing the annotations. This in turn allows for progressively richer annotations to be constructed from previous annotation efforts, the precise provenance recording of which facilitates evidence-based inference and error tracking.

  3. Free evolution of an incoherent mixture of states: a quantum mechanical approach to the van Cittert–Zernike theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, I.; Navarrete, F.; Sarkadi, L.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2018-01-01

    We study the time evolution of an incoherent mixture of quantum states and demonstrate, in very simple terms, a quantum mechanical equivalent of van Cittert–Zernike theorem, which can be easily explained to Quantum Physics students with a basic knowledge of the density matrix theory. Finally, we exemplify this result by applying it to the quantitative analysis of the coherence of a beam of particles in atomic collisions.

  4. A population genetics-based and phylogenetic approach to understanding the evolution of virulence in the genus Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Bundrant, Brittany N; Fortes, Esther D; Orsi, Renato H; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-09-01

    The genus Listeria includes (i) the opportunistic pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, (ii) the saprotrophs L. innocua, L. marthii, and L. welshimeri, and (iii) L. seeligeri, an apparent saprotroph that nevertheless typically contains the prfA virulence gene cluster. A novel 10-loci multilocus sequence typing scheme was developed and used to characterize 67 isolates representing six Listeria spp. (excluding L. grayi) in order to (i) provide an improved understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of the genus Listeria and (ii) use Listeria as a model to study the evolution of pathogenicity in opportunistic environmental pathogens. Phylogenetic analyses identified six well-supported Listeria species that group into two main subdivisions, with each subdivision containing strains with and without the prfA virulence gene cluster. Stochastic character mapping and phylogenetic analysis of hly, a gene in the prfA cluster, suggest that the common ancestor of the genus Listeria contained the prfA virulence gene cluster and that this cluster was lost at least five times during the evolution of Listeria, yielding multiple distinct saprotrophic clades. L. welshimeri, which appears to represent the most ancient clade that arose from an ancestor with a prfA cluster deletion, shows a considerably lower average sequence divergence than other Listeria species, suggesting a population bottleneck and a putatively different ecology than other saprotrophic Listeria species. Overall, our data suggest that, for some pathogens, loss of virulence genes may represent a selective advantage, possibly by facilitating adaptation to a specific ecological niche.

  5. A Population Genetics-Based and Phylogenetic Approach to Understanding the Evolution of Virulence in the Genus Listeria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C.; Bundrant, Brittany N.; Fortes, Esther D.; Orsi, Renato H.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The genus Listeria includes (i) the opportunistic pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, (ii) the saprotrophs L. innocua, L. marthii, and L. welshimeri, and (iii) L. seeligeri, an apparent saprotroph that nevertheless typically contains the prfA virulence gene cluster. A novel 10-loci multilocus sequence typing scheme was developed and used to characterize 67 isolates representing six Listeria spp. (excluding L. grayi) in order to (i) provide an improved understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of the genus Listeria and (ii) use Listeria as a model to study the evolution of pathogenicity in opportunistic environmental pathogens. Phylogenetic analyses identified six well-supported Listeria species that group into two main subdivisions, with each subdivision containing strains with and without the prfA virulence gene cluster. Stochastic character mapping and phylogenetic analysis of hly, a gene in the prfA cluster, suggest that the common ancestor of the genus Listeria contained the prfA virulence gene cluster and that this cluster was lost at least five times during the evolution of Listeria, yielding multiple distinct saprotrophic clades. L. welshimeri, which appears to represent the most ancient clade that arose from an ancestor with a prfA cluster deletion, shows a considerably lower average sequence divergence than other Listeria species, suggesting a population bottleneck and a putatively different ecology than other saprotrophic Listeria species. Overall, our data suggest that, for some pathogens, loss of virulence genes may represent a selective advantage, possibly by facilitating adaptation to a specific ecological niche. PMID:20656873

  6. The effect of lithology on valley width, terrace distribution, and coarse sediment provenance in a tectonically stable catchment with flat-lying stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda Keen-Zebert,; Hudson, Mark R.; Stephanie L. Shepherd,; Evan A. Thaler,

    2017-01-01

    How rock resistance or erodibility affects fluvial landforms and processes is an outstanding question in geomorphology that has recently garnered attention owing to the recognition that the erosion rates of bedrock channels largely set the pace of landscape evolution. In this work, we evaluate valley width, terrace distribution, and sediment provenance in terms of reach scale variation in lithology in the study reach and discuss the implications for landscape evolution in a catchment with relatively flat2

  7. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling ‘Darwinian’ and ‘Spencerian’ evolutionary approaches in anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thomas E.; Mace, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of ‘Spencerian’ cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader ‘Darwinian’ framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification. PMID:21357233

  8. Provenance for Runtime Workflow Steering and Validation in Computational Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Krischer, L.; Krause, A.; Filgueira, R.; Magnoni, F.; Muraleedharan, V.; David, M.

    2014-12-01

    Provenance systems may be offered by modern workflow engines to collect metadata about the data transformations at runtime. If combined with effective visualisation and monitoring interfaces, these provenance recordings can speed up the validation process of an experiment, suggesting interactive or automated interventions with immediate effects on the lifecycle of a workflow run. For instance, in the field of computational seismology, if we consider research applications performing long lasting cross correlation analysis and high resolution simulations, the immediate notification of logical errors and the rapid access to intermediate results, can produce reactions which foster a more efficient progress of the research. These applications are often executed in secured and sophisticated HPC and HTC infrastructures, highlighting the need for a comprehensive framework that facilitates the extraction of fine grained provenance and the development of provenance aware components, leveraging the scalability characteristics of the adopted workflow engines, whose enactment can be mapped to different technologies (MPI, Storm clusters, etc). This work looks at the adoption of W3C-PROV concepts and data model within a user driven processing and validation framework for seismic data, supporting also computational and data management steering. Validation needs to balance automation with user intervention, considering the scientist as part of the archiving process. Therefore, the provenance data is enriched with community-specific metadata vocabularies and control messages, making an experiment reproducible and its description consistent with the community understandings. Moreover, it can contain user defined terms and annotations. The current implementation of the system is supported by the EU-Funded VERCE (http://verce.eu). It provides, as well as the provenance generation mechanisms, a prototypal browser-based user interface and a web API built on top of a NoSQL storage

  9. Trends in the Evolution of Snake Toxins Underscored by an Integrative Omics Approach to Profile the Venom of the Colubrid Phalotris mertensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Pollyanna Fernandes; Andrade-Silva, Débora; Zelanis, André; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Rocha, Marisa Maria Teixeira; Menezes, Milene Cristina; Serrano, Solange M T; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio de Loiola Meirelles

    2016-08-16

    Only few studies on snake venoms were dedicated to deeply characterize the toxin secretion of animals from the Colubridae family, despite the fact that they represent the majority of snake diversity. As a consequence, some evolutionary trends observed in venom proteins that underpinned the evolutionary histories of snake toxins were based on data from a minor parcel of the clade. Here, we investigated the proteins of the totally unknown venom from Phalotris mertensi (Dipsadinae subfamily), in order to obtain a detailed profile of its toxins and to appreciate evolutionary tendencies occurring in colubrid venoms. By means of integrated omics and functional approaches, including RNAseq, Sanger sequencing, high-resolution proteomics, recombinant protein production, and enzymatic tests, we verified an active toxic secretion containing up to 21 types of proteins. A high content of Kunitz-type proteins and C-type lectins were observed, although several enzymatic components such as metalloproteinases and an L-amino acid oxidase were also present in the venom. Interestingly, an arguable venom component of other species was demonstrated as a true venom protein and named svLIPA (snake venom acid lipase). This finding indicates the importance of checking the actual protein occurrence across species before rejecting genes suggested to code for toxins, which are relevant for the discussion about the early evolution of reptile venoms. Moreover, trends in the evolution of some toxin classes, such as simplification of metalloproteinases and rearrangements of Kunitz and Wap domains, parallel similar phenomena observed in other venomous snake families and provide a broader picture of toxin evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Evolution of neck vertebral shape and neck retraction at the transition to modern turtles: an integrated geometric morphometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Wilson, Laura A B; Parr, William C H; Joyce, Walter G

    2015-03-01

    The unique ability of modern turtles to retract their head and neck into the shell through a side-necked (pleurodiran) or hidden-necked (cryptodiran) motion is thought to have evolved independently in crown turtles. The anatomical changes that led to the vertebral shapes of modern turtles, however, are still poorly understood. Here we present comprehensive geometric morphometric analyses that trace turtle vertebral evolution and reconstruct disparity across phylogeny. Disparity of vertebral shape was high at the dawn of turtle evolution and decreased after the modern groups evolved, reflecting a stabilization of morphotypes that correspond to the two retraction modes. Stem turtles, which had a very simple mode of retraction, the lateral head tuck, show increasing flexibility of the neck through evolution towards a pleurodiran-like morphotype. The latter was the precondition for evolving pleurodiran and cryptodiran vertebrae. There is no correlation between the construction of formed articulations in the cervical centra and neck mobility. An increasing mobility between vertebrae, associated with changes in vertebral shape, resulted in a more advanced ability to retract the neck. In this regard, we hypothesize that the lateral tucking retraction of stem turtles was not only the precondition for pleurodiran but also of cryptodiran retraction. For the former, a kink in the middle third of the neck needed to be acquired, whereas for the latter modification was necessary between the eighth cervical vertebra and first thoracic vertebra. Our paper highlights the utility of 3D shape data, analyzed in a phylogenetic framework, to examine the magnitude and mode of evolutionary modifications to vertebral morphology. By reconstructing and visualizing ancestral anatomical shapes, we provide insight into the anatomical features underlying neck retraction mode, which is a salient component of extant turtle classification. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press

  11. Testing the hypothesis on cognitive evolution of modern humans' learning ability: current status of past-climatic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Minoru; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Kawahata, Hodaka; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Oguchi, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    The impact of climate change on human evolution is important and debating topic for many years. Since 2010, we have involved in a general joint project entitled "Replacement of Neanderthal by Modern Humans: Testing Evolutional Models of Learning", which based on a theoretical prediction that the cognitive ability related to individual and social learning divide fates of ancient humans in very unstable Late Pleistocene climate. This model predicts that the human populations which experienced a series of environmental changes would have higher rate of individual learners, while detailed reconstructions of global climate change have reported fluent and drastic change based on ice cores and stalagmites. However, we want to understand the difference between anatomically modern human which survived and the other archaic extinct humans including European Neanderthals and Asian Denisovans. For this purpose the global synchronized change is not useful for understanding but the regional difference in the amplitude and impact of climate change is the information required. Hence, we invited a geophysicist busing Global Circulation Model to reconstruct the climatic distribution and temporal change in a continental scale. At the same time, some geochemists and geographers construct a database of local climate changes recorded in different proxies. At last, archaeologists and anthropologists tried to interpret the emergence and disappearance of human species in Europe and Asia on the reconstructed past climate maps using some tools, such as Eco-cultural niche model. Our project will show the regional difference in climate change and related archaeological events and its impact on the evolution of learning ability of modern humans.

  12. Accepting evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Plagányi, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Poor public perceptions and understanding of evolution are not unique to the developed and more industrialized nations of the world. International resistance to the science of evolutionary biology appears to be driven by both proponents of intelligent design and perceived incompatibilities between evolution and a diversity of religious faiths. We assessed the success of a first-year evolution course at the University of Cape Town and discovered no statistically significant change in the views of students before the evolution course and thereafter, for questions that challenged religious ideologies about creation, biodiversity, and intelligent design. Given that students only appreciably changed their views when presented with "facts," we suggest that teaching approaches that focus on providing examples of experimental evolutionary studies, and a strong emphasis on the scientific method of inquiry, are likely to achieve greater success. This study also reiterates the importance of engaging with students' prior conceptions, and makes suggestions for improving an understanding and appreciation of evolutionary biology in countries such as South Africa with an inadequate secondary science education system, and a dire lack of public engagement with issues in science.

  13. A new laboratory evolution approach to select for constitutive acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of causal mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Daniel; Gorter de Vries, Arthur R; Grijseels, Sietske S; van Berkum, Margo C; Swinnen, Steve; van den Broek, Marcel; Nevoigt, Elke; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid, released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks for second generation bioethanol production, inhibits yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Yeast biomass generated in a propagation step that precedes ethanol production should therefore express a high and constitutive level of acetic acid tolerance before introduction into lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, earlier laboratory evolution strategies for increasing acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, based on prolonged cultivation in the presence of acetic acid, selected for inducible rather than constitutive tolerance to this inhibitor. Preadaptation in the presence of acetic acid was shown to strongly increase the fraction of yeast cells that could initiate growth in the presence of this inhibitor. Serial microaerobic batch cultivation, with alternating transfers to fresh medium with and without acetic acid, yielded evolved S. cerevisiae cultures with constitutive acetic acid tolerance. Single-cell lines isolated from five such evolution experiments after 50-55 transfers were selected for further study. An additional constitutively acetic acid tolerant mutant was selected after UV-mutagenesis. All six mutants showed an increased fraction of growing cells upon a transfer from a non-stressed condition to a medium containing acetic acid. Whole-genome sequencing identified six genes that contained (different) mutations in multiple acetic acid-tolerant mutants. Haploid segregation studies and expression of the mutant alleles in the unevolved ancestor strain identified causal mutations for the acquired acetic acid tolerance in four genes (ASG1, ADH3, SKS1 and GIS4). Effects of the mutations in ASG1, ADH3 and SKS1 on acetic acid tolerance were additive. A novel laboratory evolution strategy based on alternating cultivation cycles in the presence and absence of acetic acid conferred a selective advantage to constitutively acetic acid-tolerant mutants and may be applicable for

  14. Combining x-ray diffraction contrast tomography and mesoscale grain growth simulations in strontium titanate: An integrated approach for the investigation of microstructure evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syha, Melanie; Baürer, Michael; Rheinheimer, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the recently reported a growth anomaly in strontium titatate bulk samples1, the microstructure of bulk strontium titanate has been investigated by an integrated approach comprising conventional metallography, three dimensional X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT)2, and the obs......Motivated by the recently reported a growth anomaly in strontium titatate bulk samples1, the microstructure of bulk strontium titanate has been investigated by an integrated approach comprising conventional metallography, three dimensional X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT)2......, and the observation of pore shapes in combination with mesoscale grain growth simulations. The microstructural evolution in strontium titanate has been characterized alternating ex-situ annealing and high energy X-ray DCT measurements, resulting in three dimensional microstructure reconstructions which...

  15. Bell-polynomial approach and Wronskian determinant solutions for three sets of differential-difference nonlinear evolution equations with symbolic computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Bo; Tian, Bo; Wang, Yu-Feng; Shen, Yu-Jia; Wang, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Under investigation in this paper are the Belov-Chaltikian (BC), Leznov and Blaszak-Marciniak (BM) lattice equations, which are associated with the conformal field theory, UToda(m_1,m_2) system and r-matrix, respectively. With symbolic computation, the Bell-polynomial approach is developed to directly bilinearize those three sets of differential-difference nonlinear evolution equations (NLEEs). This Bell-polynomial approach does not rely on any dependent variable transformation, which constitutes the key step and main difficulty of the Hirota bilinear method, and thus has the advantage in the bilinearization of the differential-difference NLEEs. Based on the bilinear forms obtained, the N-soliton solutions are constructed in terms of the N × N Wronskian determinant. Graphic illustrations demonstrate that those solutions, more general than the existing results, permit some new properties, such as the solitonic propagation and interactions for the BC lattice equations, and the nonnegative dark solitons for the BM lattice equations.

  16. Towards Provenance and Traceability in CRISTAL for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, Jetendr; Branson, Andrew; McClatchey, Richard

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the CRISTAL object lifecycle management system and its use in provenance data management and the traceability of system events. This software was initially used to capture the construction and calibration of the CMS ECAL detector at CERN for later use by physicists in their data analysis. Some further uses of CRISTAL in different projects (CMS, neuGRID and N4U) are presented as examples of its flexible data model. From these examples, applications are drawn for the High Energy Physics domain and some initial ideas for its use in data preservation HEP are outlined in detail in this paper. Currently investigations are underway to gauge the feasibility of using the N4U Analysis Service or a derivative of it to address the requirements of data and analysis logging and provenance capture within the HEP long term data analysis environment.

  17. Towards Provenance and Traceability in CRISTAL for HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Shamdasani, Jetendr; McClatchey, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the CRISTAL object lifecycle management system and its use in provenance data management and the traceability of system events. This software was initially used to capture the construction and calibration of the CMS ECAL detector at CERN for later use by physicists in their data analysis. Some further uses of CRISTAL in different projects (CMS, neuGRID and N4U) are presented as examples of its flexible data model. From these examples, applications are drawn for the High Energy Physics domain and some initial ideas for its use in data preservation HEP are outlined in detail in this paper. Currently investigations are underway to gauge the feasibility of using the N4U Analysis Service or a derivative of it to address the requirements of data and analysis logging and provenance capture within the HEP long term data analysis environment.

  18. Visualisation methods for large provenance collections in data-intensive collaborative platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Fligueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Gemuend, Andre

    2016-04-01

    This work investigates improving the methods of visually representing provenance information in the context of modern data-driven scientific research. It explores scenarios where data-intensive workflows systems are serving communities of researchers within collaborative environments, supporting the sharing of data and methods, and offering a variety of computation facilities, including HPC, HTC and Cloud. It focuses on the exploration of big-data visualization techniques aiming at producing comprehensive and interactive views on top of large and heterogeneous provenance data. The same approach is applicable to control-flow and data-flow workflows or to combinations of the two. This flexibility is achieved using the W3C-PROV recommendation as a reference model, especially its workflow oriented profiles such as D-PROV (Messier et al. 2013). Our implementation is based on the provenance records produced by the dispel4py data-intensive processing library (Filgueira et al. 2015). dispel4py is an open-source Python framework for describing abstract stream-based workflows for distributed data-intensive applications, developed during the VERCE project. dispel4py enables scientists to develop their scientific methods and applications on their laptop and then run them at scale on a wide range of e-Infrastructures (Cloud, Cluster, etc.) without making changes. Users can therefore focus on designing their workflows at an abstract level, describing actions, input and output streams, and how they are connected. The dispel4py system then maps these descriptions to the enactment platforms, such as MPI, Storm, multiprocessing. It provides a mechanism which allows users to determine the provenance information to be collected and to analyze it at runtime. For this work we consider alternative visualisation methods for provenance data, from infinite lists and localised interactive graphs, to radial-views. The latter technique has been positively explored in many fields, from text

  19. An integrative approach to understanding the evolution and diversity of Copiapoa (Cactaceae), a threatened endemic Chilean genus from the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larridon, Isabel; Walter, Helmut E; Guerrero, Pablo C; Duarte, Milén; Cisternas, Mauricio A; Hernández, Carol Peña; Bauters, Kenneth; Asselman, Pieter; Goetghebeur, Paul; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie

    2015-09-01

    Species of the endemic Chilean cactus genus Copiapoa have cylindrical or (sub)globose stems that are solitary or form (large) clusters and typically yellow flowers. Many species are threatened with extinction. Despite being icons of the Atacama Desert and well loved by cactus enthusiasts, the evolution and diversity of Copiapoa has not yet been studied using a molecular approach. Sequence data of three plastid DNA markers (rpl32-trnL, trnH-psbA, ycf1) of 39 Copiapoa taxa were analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference approaches. Species distributions were modeled based on geo-referenced localities and climatic data. Evolution of character states of four characters (root morphology, stem branching, stem shape, and stem diameter) as well as ancestral areas were reconstructed using a Bayesian and maximum likelihood framework, respectively. Clades of species are revealed. Though 32 morphologically defined species can be recognized, genetic diversity between some species and infraspecific taxa is too low to delimit their boundaries using plastid DNA markers. Recovered relationships are often supported by morphological and biogeographical patterns. The origin of Copiapoa likely lies between southern Peru and the extreme north of Chile. The Copiapó Valley limited colonization between two biogeographical areas. Copiapoa is here defined to include 32 species and five heterotypic subspecies. Thirty species are classified into four sections and two subsections, while two species remain unplaced. A better understanding of evolution and diversity of Copiapoa will allow allocating conservation resources to the most threatened lineages and focusing conservation action on real biodiversity. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  20. The Right Tools for the Job: Cooperative Breeding Theory and an Evaluation of the Methodological Approaches to Understanding the Evolution and Maintenance of Sociality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Hing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Why do we observe so many examples in nature in which individuals routinely delay or completely forgo their own reproductive opportunities in order to join and remain within a group? Cooperative breeding theory provides a rich framework with which to study the factors that may influence the costs and benefits of remaining philopatric as a non-breeder. This is often viewed as an initial step in the development of costly helping behavior provided by non-breeding subordinates. Despite many excellent empirical studies testing key concepts of the theory, there is still debate regarding the relative importance of various evolutionary forces, suggesting that there may not be a general explanation but rather a dynamic and taxonomically varied combination of factors influencing the evolution and maintenance of sociality. Here, we explore two potential improvements in the study of sociality that could aid in the progress of this field. The first addresses the fact that empirical studies of social evolution are typically conducted using either comparative, observational or manipulative methodologies. Instead, we suggest a holistic approach, whereby observational and experimental studies are designed with the explicit view of advancing comparative analyses of sociality for the taxon, and in tandem, where comparative work informs targeted research effort on specific (usually understudied species within the lineage. A second improvement relates to the broadening of tests of cooperative breeding theory to include taxa where subordinates do not necessarily provide active cooperation within the group. The original bias toward “helpful subordinates” arose from a focus on terrestrial taxa. However, recent consideration of other taxa, especially marine taxa, is slowly revealing that the theory can and should encompass a continuum of cooperative social systems, including those where subordinates do not actively help. This review summarizes the major hypotheses

  1. Selection of a T7 promoter mutant with enhanced in vitro activity by a novel multi-copy bead display approach for in vitro evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Siddhartha; Stang, Alexander; Lennartz, Klaus; Tenbusch, Matthias; Überla, Klaus

    2013-01-07

    In vitro evolution of nucleic acids and proteins is a powerful strategy to optimize their biological and physical properties. To select proteins with the desired phenotype from large gene libraries, the proteins need to be linked to the gene they are encoded by. To facilitate selection of the desired phenotype and isolation of the encoding DNA, a novel bead display approach was developed, in which each member of a library of beads is first linked to multiple copies of a clonal gene variant by emulsion polymerase chain reaction. Beads are transferred to a second emulsion for an in vitro transcription-translation reaction, in which the protein encoded by each bead's amplicon covalently binds to the bead present in the same picoliter reactor. The beads then contain multiple copies of a clonal gene variant and multiple molecules of the protein encoded by the bead's gene variant and serve as the unit of selection. As a proof of concept, we screened a randomized library of the T7 promoter for high expression levels by flow cytometry and identified a T7 promoter variant with an ~10-fold higher in vitro transcriptional activity, confirming that the multi-copy bead display approach can be efficiently applied to in vitro evolution.

  2. Provenance, tectonic setting and source-area weathering of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geochemical study of siliciclastic rocks from the Lower Cambrian of Parahio Valley has been studied to describe the provenance, chemical weathering and tectonic setting. The K ₂O/Al ₂O₃ ratio and positivecorrelation of Co (r = 0.85), Ni (r = 0.86), Zn (r = 0.82), Rb (r = 0.98) with K₂O reflects that the presence of clay ...

  3. Provenance of the lower Triassic bunter sandstone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Zircon U–Pb geochronometry, heavy mineral analyses and conventional seismic reflection data were used to interpret the provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation. The succession was sampled in five Danish wells in the northern part of the North German Basin. The results show...... in the platform area and marginal basin area, but the complex sand-body architecture makes it difficult to predict the reservoir quality. Continue reading full article...

  4. Perfonnance ,of Provenances of Sesbania macrontha at Gairo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of assessment to get tree survival. Root-collar diameter of all the surviving trees in th~ samp~~ lot was measured using a micro calliper to the. P d ' nearest 0.01 cm. Height was measure usmg the digital measring pole to the nearest .0.01 ,m. provenances of SisbiUJia mai:rantha 29. DeterQlination of;tree biomass:" ~ .

  5. Rate of occult specimen provenance complications in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, John D; Liu, Jingxia

    2013-01-01

    Occult specimen provenance complications (SPCs), which occur when there is an absence of any direct or indirect indication that a specimen switch or contamination may have occurred, constitute a significant patient safety and medical-legal problem because they can lead to misdiagnosis. However, the rate at which occult SPCs occur is unknown because, by definition, this category of errors is not identified by standard laboratory practices. In this study, we evaluated a data set comprising almost 13,000 prostate biopsies that were prospectively tested for specimen provenance errors as part of routine clinical practice. The frequency of occult type 1 errors (a complete transposition between patients) and type 2 errors (contamination of the patient's tissue with 1 or more unrelated patients) was 0.26% and 0.67%, respectively; every urology practice setting and surgical pathology laboratory type with a representative sample size experienced at least 1 type 1 and 1 type 2 error during the study period. Overall, the mean frequency of SPCs across practice settings was 0.22% for type 1 errors and 1.69% for type 2 errors. The type 1 rate showed no correlation with a surgical pathology laboratory setting or urologic practice group setting; the type 2 rate correlated solely with a surgical pathology laboratory setting. The occult SPC rate in this limited data set provides an estimate of the scope of the problem of potential misdiagnosis as a result of occult specimen provenance errors in routine clinical practice.

  6. A Provenance Model for Real-Time Water Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Bai, Q.; Zednik, S.; Taylor, P.; Fox, P. A.; Taylor, K.; Kloppers, C.; Peters, C.; Terhorst, A.; West, P.; Compton, M.; Shu, Y.; Provenance Management Team

    2010-12-01

    Generating hydrological data products, such as flow forecasts, involves complex interactions among instruments, data simulation models, computational facilities and data providers. Correct interpretation of the data produced at various stages requires good understanding of how data was generated or processed. Provenance describes the lineage of a data product. Making provenance information accessible to hydrologists and decision makers not only helps to determine the data’s value, accuracy and authorship, but also enables users to determine the trustworthiness of the data product. In the water domain, WaterML2 [1] is an emerging standard which describes an information model and format for the publication of water observations data in XML. The W3C semantic sensor network incubator group (SSN-XG) [3] is producing ontologies for the description of sensor configurations. By integrating domain knowledge of this kind into the provenance information model, the integrated information model will enable water domain researchers and water resource managers to better analyse how observations and derived data products were generated. We first introduce the Proof Mark Language (PML2) [2], WaterML2 and the SSN-XG sensor ontology as the proposed provenance representation formalism. Then we describe some initial implementations how these standards could be integrated to represent the lineage of water information products. Finally we will highlight how the provenance model for a distributed real-time water information system assists the interpretation of the data product and establishing trust. Reference [1] Taylor, P., Walker, G., Valentine, D., Cox, Simon: WaterML2.0: Harmonising standards for water observation data. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 12. [2] da Silva, P.P., McGuinness, D.L., Fikes, R.: A proof markup language for semantic web services. Inf. Syst. 31(4) (2006), 381-395. [3] W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator

  7. Offspring mortality was a determinant factor in the evolution of paternal investment in humans: An evolutionary game approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Alonso, Diego; Ortiz-Rodríguez, Isabel M

    2017-04-21

    Some researchers support the belief that man evolved philandering behavior because of the greater reproductive success of promiscuous males. According to this idea, deserting behavior from the man should be expected along with null paternal involvement in offspring care. Paradoxically however, the average offspring investment in the human male is far higher than that of any other male mammal, including other primates. In our work, we have addressed this conundrum by employing evolutionary game theory, using objective payoffs instead of, as are commonly used, arbitrary payoffs. Payoffs were computed as reproductive successes by a model based on trivial probabilities, implemented within the Barreto's Population Dynamics Toolbox (2014). The evolution of the parent conflict was simulated by a game with two players (the woman and the man). First, a simple game was assayed with two strategies, 'desert-unfaithful' and 'care-faithful'. Then, the game was played with a third mixed strategy, 'care-unfaithful'. The two-strategy game results were mainly determined by the offspring survival rate (s) and the non-paternity rate (z), with remaining factors playing a secondary role. Starting from two empirical estimates for both rates (s = 0.617 and z = 0.033) and decreasing the offspring mortality from near 0.4 to 0.1, the results were consistent with a win for the 'care-faithful' strategy. The 'desert-unfaithful' strategy only won at unrealistically high non-paternity rates (z>0.2). When three-strategy games were played, the mixed strategy of 'care-unfaithful' man could win the game in some less frequent cases. Regardless of the number of game strategies, 'care' fathers always won. These results strongly suggest that offspring mortality was the key factor in the evolution of paternal investment within the Homo branch. The 'care-faithful' strategy would have been the main strategy in human evolution but 'care-unfaithful' men did evolve at a lesser frequency. It can therefore be

  8. Investigation of the stator inductances of the expanded Park model and an approach on parameter identification using the evolution strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmuelling Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Commonly, the Park model is used to calculate transients or steady-state operations of synchronous machines. The expanded Park theory derives the Park equations from the phase-domain model of the synchronous machine by the use of transformations. Thereby, several hypothesis are made, which are under investigation in this article in respect to the main inductances of two different types of synchronous machines. It is shown, that the derivation of the Park equations from the phase-domain model does not lead to constant inductances, as it is usually assumed for these equations. Nevertheless the Park model is the most common analytic model of synchronous machines. Therefore, in the second part of this article a method using the evolution strategy is shown to obtain the parameters of the Park model.

  9. A dynamic monitoring approach for the surface morphology evolution measurement of plasma facing components by means of speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbei; Cui, Xiaoqian; Feng, Chunlei; Li, Yuanbo; Zhao, Mengge; Luo, Guangnan; Ding, Hongbin

    2017-11-01

    Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) in a magnetically confined fusion plasma device will be exposed to high heat load and particle fluxes, and it would cause PFCs' surface morphology to change due to material erosion and redeposition from plasma wall interactions. The state of PFCs' surface condition will seriously affect the performance of long-pulse or steady state plasma discharge in a tokamak; it will even constitute an enormous threat to the operation and the safety of fusion plasma devices. The PFCs' surface morphology evolution measurement could provide important information about PFCs' real-time status or damage situation and it would help to a better understanding of the plasma wall interaction process and mechanism. Meanwhile through monitoring the distribution of dust deposition in a tokamak and providing an upper limit on the amount of loose dust, the PFCs' surface morphology measurement could indirectly contribute to keep fusion operational limits and fusion device safety. Aiming at in situ dynamic monitoring PFCs' surface morphology evolution, a laboratory experimental platform DUT-SIEP (Dalian University of Technology-speckle interferometry experimental platform) based on the speckle interferometry technique has been constructed at Dalian University of Technology (DUT) in China. With directional specific designing and focusing on the real detection condition of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), the DUT-SIEP could realize a variable measurement range, widely increased from 0.1 μm to 300 μm, with high spatial resolution (<1 mm) and ultra-high time resolution (<2 s for EAST measuring conditions). Three main components of the DUT-SIEP are all integrated and synchronized by a time schedule control and data acquisition terminal and coupled with a three-dimensional phase unwrapping algorithm, the surface morphology information of target samples can be obtained and reconstructed in real-time. A local surface morphology of the real divertor

  10. An evolution in the management of fractures of the ankle: safety and efficacy of posteromedial approach for Haraguchi type 2 posterior malleolar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N; Aktselis, I; Ramasamy, A; Mitchell, S; Fenton, P

    2017-11-01

    There has been an evolution recently in the management of unstable fractures of the ankle with a trend towards direct fixation of a posterior malleolar fragment. Within these fractures, Haraguchi type 2 fractures extend medially and often cannot be fixed using a standard posterolateral approach. Our aim was to describe the posteromedial approach to address these fractures and to assess its efficacy and safety. We performed a review of 15 patients with a Haraguchi type 2 posterior malleolar fracture which was fixed using a posteromedial approach. Five patients underwent initial temporary spanning external fixation. The outcome was assessed at a median follow-up of 29 months (interquartile range (IQR) 17 to 36) using the Olerud and Molander score and radiographs were assessed for the quality of the reduction. The median Olerud and Molander score was 72 (IQR 70 to 75), representing a good functional outcome. The reduction was anatomical in ten, with a median step of 1.2 mm (IQR 0.9 to 1.85) in the remaining five patients. One patient had parasthaesiae affecting the medial forefoot, which resolved within three months. We found that the posteromedial approach to the ankle for the surgical treatment of Haraguchi type 2 posterior malleolar fractures is a safe technique that enables good visualisation and reduction of the individual fracture fragments with promising early outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1496-1501. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. µ-XRF Analysis of Trace Elements in Lapis Lazuli-Forming Minerals for a Provenance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Debora; Borghi, Alessandro; Chiarelli, Fabrizia; Cossio, Roberto; Gariani, Gianluca; Lo Giudice, Alessandro; Re, Alessandro; Pratesi, Giovanni; Vaggelli, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents new developments on the provenance study of lapis lazuli started by our group in 2008: during the years a multi-technique approach has been exploited to obtain minero-petrographic characterization and creation of a database considering only rock samples of known provenance. Since the final aim of the study is to develop a method to analyze archeological findings and artworks made with lapis lazuli in a completely non-invasive way, ion beam analysis techniques were employed to trace the provenance of the raw material used for the production of artifacts. Continuing this goal and focusing the analysis on determination of more significant minero-chemical markers for the provenance study of trace elements in different minerals, the method was extended with the use of micro X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF), to test the potential of the technique for this application. The analyzes were focused on diopside and pyrite in lapis lazuli samples of known provenance (Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Siberia). In addition, µ-XRF data were compared with micro proton-induced X-ray emission (µ-PIXE) results to verify the agreement between the two databases and to compare the analytical performance of both techniques for this application.

  12. The theory of evolution - a jewish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Avraham

    2010-07-01

    All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature-scientific, religious, and lay-in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought-religion and science-are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. JEWISH FAITH PERCEIVES THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNIVERSE IN A DIFFERENT WAY: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and revised as new scientific

  13. The Theory of Evolution - A Jewish Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Steinberg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available All possible pro and con arguments regarding the theory of evolution have been discussed and debated in the vast literature—scientific, religious, and lay—in the past 150 years. There is usually great zealotry in all debating parties, with mutual intolerance of ideas and concepts, disrespect toward opposing opinions and positions, and usage of very harsh language. This prejudiced approach usually does not allow for a reasonable debate. It is important to look at the facts, assumptions, and beliefs of the theory of evolution in a more calm and humble way. In this article a comparative analysis is offered between the scientific aspects of the theory of evolution and a Judaic approach to these aspects. The two sets of human thought—religion and science—are fundamentally different in their aims and purposes, in their methods of operation, in their scope of interest and issues, and in their origin and ramifications. Whenever science surpasses its limits, or religion exceeds its boundaries, it actually is a form of an abuse of both. This has happened to the theory of evolution in a more powerful mode than any other interaction between science and religion. The agenda of many scientists who promote the theory of evolution is to achieve the goal of understanding the existence of the universe as a random, purposeless, natural development, evolved slowly over billions of years from a common ancestor by way of natural selection, devoid of any supernatural metaphysical power. Jewish faith perceives the development of the universe in a different way: God created the world, with a purpose known to Him; He established natural laws that govern the world; and He imposed a moral-religious set of requirements upon Man. The discussion and comparative analysis in this article is based upon the current neo-Darwinian theory, although it seems almost certain that even the new and modern assumptions and speculations will continue to be challenged, changed, and

  14. Delphinella Shoot Blight on Abies lasiocarpa Provenances in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venche Talgø

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Delphinella shoot blight (Delphinella abietis attacks true firs (Abies spp. in Europe and North America. Especially subalpine fir (A. lasiocarpa, one of the main Christmas tree species in Norway, is prone to the disease. The fungus kills current year needles, and in severe cases entire shoots. Dead needles become covered with black fruiting bodies, both pycnidia and pseudothecia. Delphinella shoot blight has mainly been a problem in humid, coastal regions in the northwestern part of Southern Norway, but, probably due to higher precipitation in inland regions during recent years, heavy attacks were found in 2011 in a field trial with 76 provenances of subalpine fir in Southeastern Norway. However, the amount of precipitation seemed less important once the disease had established in the field. Significant differences in susceptibility between provenances were observed. In general, the more bluish the foliage was, the healthier the trees appeared. The analysis of provenance means indicated that, at least for the southern range, the disease ratings were correlated with foliage color. This study also includes isolation, identification, a pathogenicity test, a seed test and electron microscopy of the wax layer on the needles. The fungus was identified based on the morphology of spores and by sequencing the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS regions of the ribosomal DNA. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled. The fungus was found present on newly harvested seeds and may therefore spread via international seed trade. When comparing the wax layers on green and blue needles, those of the latter were significantly thicker, a factor that may be involved in disease resistance.

  15. Evolution of the Intracranial Approaches to Jugular Foramen Tumors: A Surgeon's Personal Perspective Through Three Illustrative Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Walter C; Felbaum, Daniel

    2016-03-12

    Tumors of the jugular foramen remain challenging lesions despite advances in surgical technique and medical technology. Tumors with extensive extra- and intracranial components necessitate both radical neck dissection maneuvers combined with skull base approaches. We present a single surgeon's perspective in managing these difficult tumors.

  16. Disentangling the Circularity in Sen's Capability Approach: An Analysis of the Co-Evolution of Functioning Achievement and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Martin; Coad, Alex

    2011-01-01

    There is an ambiguity in Amartya Sen's capability approach as to what constitutes an individual's resources, conversion factors and valuable functionings. What we here call the "circularity problem" points to the fact that all three concepts seem to be mutually endogenous and interdependent. To econometrically account for this…

  17. Capturing, Harmonizing and Delivering Data and Quality Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptoukh, Gregory; Lynnes, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing data have proven to be vital for various scientific and applications needs. However, the usability of these data depends not only on the data values but also on the ability of data users to assess and understand the quality of these data for various applications and for comparison or inter-usage of data from different sensors and models. In this paper, we describe some aspects of capturing, harmonizing and delivering this information to users in the framework of distributed web-based data tools.

  18. Provenance of coals recovered from the wreck of HMAV Bounty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, N.; Smith, A.H.V.; Crosdale, P.J. [Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2008-03-15

    Coal samples from HMAV Bounty were analysed using standard techniques to shed light on their provenance. Petrographic analysis indicated they were Carboniferous, with high vitrinite and liptinite content and a mean random reflectance of vitrinite of 0.99%. Palynological analysis indicated the samples were derived from the Middle Coal Measures, Westphalian B. Combining coal rank (vitrinite reflectance), age, knowledge of seam distributions and coalfield history indicates the most like source to be the Durham Coalfield, possibly the Hutton or Low Main Seams. These coals were mined along the valley of the Wear in the latter part of the 18th century.

  19. Recent advances in dentin hypersensitivity: clinically proven treatments for instant and lasting sensitivity relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Diane

    2010-05-01

    To provide a brief overview of the diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity, to discuss technical approaches to relieve sensitivity, with special emphasis on dentin tubule occlusion and the clinical evidence for efficacy of desensitizing toothpastes based upon this approach, and to summarize the science behind a new dentifrice technology, based upon arginine and calcium carbonate, and the clinical evidence which proves that it delivers both instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. Clinical studies have shown that a new toothpaste, containing arginine and calcium carbonate (known as Pro-Argin technology) with 1450 ppm fluoride, offers clinically proven instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. Three 8-week clinical studies have shown that this new toothpaste provides statistically significantly superior efficacy in reducing sensitivity to market leading desensitizing toothpastes containing 2% potassium ion. Importantly, three further clinical studies have shown that a single direct topical application of toothpaste to sensitive teeth, using a fingertip or cotton swab followed by 1 minute of massage, resulted in instant relief of dentin hypersensitivity and that the relief was maintained with subsequent twice-daily brushing. Mechanism of action studies have shown that this technology physically seals dentin tubules with a plug that contains arginine, calcium carbonate and phosphate. This plug, which is resistant to normal pulpal pressures and to acid challenge, effectively reduces dentin fluid flow and thereby relieves sensitivity. A new whitening variant of this desensitizing toothpaste, containing the Pro-Argin technology, fluoride and a high cleaning calcium carbonate system, has now been clinically and scientifically validated. This toothpaste works by the same mechanism of action as its non-whitening counterpart and is clinically proven to provide both instant and lasting relief of

  20. A directed evolution approach to select for novel Adeno-associated virus capsids on an HIV-1 producer T cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, Dawn P; Sharma, Priyanka; Weinstein, John R; Kotha Lakshmi Narayan, Poornima; Schaffer, David V; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2017-12-01

    A directed evolution approach was used to select for Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsids that would exhibit more tropism toward an HIV-1 producer T cell line with the long-term goal of developing improved gene transfer vectors. A library of AAV variants was used to infect H9 T cells previously infected or uninfected by HIV-1 followed by AAV amplification with wild-type adenovirus. Six rounds of biological selection were performed, including negative selection and diversification after round three. The H9 T cells were successfully infected with all three wild-type viruses (AAV, adenovirus, and HIV-1). Four AAV cap mutants best representing the small number of variants emerging after six rounds of selection were chosen for further study. These mutant capsids were used to package an AAV vector and subsequently used to infect H9 cells that were previously infected or uninfected by HIV-1. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was performed to measure cell-associated AAV genomes. Two of the four cap mutants showed a significant increase in the amount of cell-associated genomes as compared to wild-type AAV2. This study shows that directed evolution can be performed successfully to select for mutants with improved tropism for a T cell line in the presence of HIV-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An enhanced reliability-oriented workforce planning model for process industry using combined fuzzy goal programming and differential evolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighravwe, D. E.; Oke, S. A.; Adebiyi, K. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper draws on the "human reliability" concept as a structure for gaining insight into the maintenance workforce assessment in a process industry. Human reliability hinges on developing the reliability of humans to a threshold that guides the maintenance workforce to execute accurate decisions within the limits of resources and time allocations. This concept offers a worthwhile point of deviation to encompass three elegant adjustments to literature model in terms of maintenance time, workforce performance and return-on-workforce investments. These fully explain the results of our influence. The presented structure breaks new grounds in maintenance workforce theory and practice from a number of perspectives. First, we have successfully implemented fuzzy goal programming (FGP) and differential evolution (DE) techniques for the solution of optimisation problem in maintenance of a process plant for the first time. The results obtained in this work showed better quality of solution from the DE algorithm compared with those of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimisation algorithm, thus expressing superiority of the proposed procedure over them. Second, the analytical discourse, which was framed on stochastic theory, focusing on specific application to a process plant in Nigeria is a novelty. The work provides more insights into maintenance workforce planning during overhaul rework and overtime maintenance activities in manufacturing systems and demonstrated capacity in generating substantially helpful information for practice.

  2. Ecological adaptations and commensal evolution of the Polynoidae (Polychaeta) in the Southwest Indian Ocean Ridge: A phylogenetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetti, Natalia; Taylor, M. L.; Brennan, D.; Green, D. H.; Rogers, A. D.; Paterson, G. L. J.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.

    2017-03-01

    The polychaete family polynoid is very large and includes a high diversity of behaviours, including numerous examples of commensal species. The comparison between free-living and commensal behaviours and the evolution of the relationships between commensal species and their hosts are valuable case studies of ecological adaptations. Deep-sea species of Polynoidae were sampled at four seamounts in the Southwest Indian Ridge and twenty specimens from seven species were selected to be analysed. Among them, there were free-living species, living within the three-dimensional framework of cold-water coral reefs, on coral rubble and on mobile sediments, and commensal species, associated with octocorals, hydrocorals (stylasterids), antipatharians and echinoderms (holothurian and ophiuroids). We analysed two mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and two nuclear (18S, 28S) ribosomal genetic markers and their combined sequences were compared with other Genbank sequences to assess the taxonomic relationships within the species under study, and the potential role of hosts in speciation processes. Most basal species of the sub-family Polynoinae are obligate symbionts showing specific morphological adaptations. Obligate and facultative commensal species and free-living species have evolved a number of times, although, according to our results, the obligate coral commensal species appear to be monophyletic.

  3. Evolution of Lignocellulosic Macrocomponents in the Wastewater Streams of a Sulfite Pulp Mill: A Preliminary Biorefining Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Llano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of lignin, five- and six-carbon sugars, and other decomposition products derived from hemicelluloses and cellulose was monitored in a sulfite pulp mill. The wastewater streams were characterized and the mass balances throughout digestion and total chlorine free bleaching stages were determined. Summative analysis in conjunction with pulp parameters highlights some process guidelines and valorization alternatives towards the transformation of the traditional factory into a lignocellulosic biorefinery. The results showed a good separation of cellulose (99.64% during wood digestion, with 87.23% of hemicellulose and 98.47% lignin dissolved into the waste streams. The following steps should be carried out to increase the sugar content into the waste streams: (i optimization of the digestion conditions increasing hemicellulose depolymerization; (ii improvement of the ozonation and peroxide bleaching stages, avoiding deconstruction of the cellulose chains but maintaining impurity removal; (iii fractionation of the waste water streams, separating sugars from the rest of toxic inhibitors for 2nd generation biofuel production. A total of 0.173 L of second-generation ethanol can be obtained in the spent liquor per gram of dry wood. The proposed methodology can be usefully incorporated into other related industrial sectors.

  4. Approaches to adenomyomectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serene Thain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenomyosis is a common gynecological condition that affects women, causing menstrual disturbances, pain, and subfertility. Adenomyomectomy as an alternative to hysterectomy has been widely performed in those who have not completed childbearing or those refusing a hysterectomy for a variety of reasons. Whichever the surgical route, the challenges of adenomyomectomy include possible misdiagnosis, defining the extent of resection, technical difficulties, dealing with the associated complications, and managing the risks of uterine rupture during a subsequent pregnancy. The principles of surgery mimic those of myomectomy, but the evolution of adenomyomectomy has been relatively unexciting with a general paucity of published data to date. Laparoscopic techniques have proven feasible generally, avoiding the risks of open surgery while conferring the benefits of microsurgery. Limitations in tactile feedback and access constraints have been the main drawbacks via this route. Meticulous stitching and repair is still of paramount importance in these operations. Preoperative gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists have proven effective in shrinking the disease and reducing blood loss during surgery, whereas the postoperative use has resulted in a dramatic reduction in symptoms. Uterine artery ligation techniques have also been shown to be useful adjuncts, although we still need to be mindful of the potential effects in those desiring fertility. Furthermore, there is still no foolproof way in predicting those at risk of uterine rupture after adenomyomectomy. Hence, a nonprescriptive approach in managing adenomyomas is advised, where proper patient selection and counseling are important.

  5. From Adopt-a-Project to Permanent Services: The Evolution of Water For People’s Approach to Rural Water Supply in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fogelberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dominant paradigm in rural water provision in Bolivia has focused on the provision of infrastructure, whether by government agencies or international cooperation groups. However, the investment in infrastructure has led neither to universal access for all Bolivians nor to consistently high levels of services for those who do have access to a water system. This paper will describe the transition of one international non-profit organisation, Water For People, from supporting dispersed water projects throughout the country towards targeted support of water services at the municipal level, aiming to support permanent universal services. The institutional evolution – including changes in governance, implementation strategy, donor base, and indicators of success – that allowed field programmes to shift from projects to services provides the context for the change of approach in Bolivia. A discussion of the various aspects that have changed in the organisation’s operations in seven municipalities in Bolivia, from the scale of intervention, to municipal-wide planning information and tools, to support to service providers and service authorities, and an increased focus on post-construction monitoring, demonstrates how the Everyone, Forever approach is resulting in a more service- delivery-oriented approach in Bolivia.

  6. A logic-based dynamic modeling approach to explicate the evolution of the central dogma of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohieddin; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Azimzadeh, Sadegh; Mirzaie, Mehdi

    It is nearly half a century past the age of the introduction of the Central Dogma (CD) of molecular biology. This biological axiom has been developed and currently appears to be all the more complex. In this study, we modified CD by adding further species to the CD information flow and mathematically expressed CD within a dynamic framework by using Boolean network based on its present-day and 1965 editions. We show that the enhancement of the Dogma not only now entails a higher level of complexity, but it also shows a higher level of robustness, thus far more consistent with the nature of biological systems. Using this mathematical modeling approach, we put forward a logic-based expression of our conceptual view of molecular biology. Finally, we show that such biological concepts can be converted into dynamic mathematical models using a logic-based approach and thus may be useful as a framework for improving static conceptual models in biology.

  7. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-15

    Mar 15, 2014 ... while on the whole their genes do. He proposed that, there- fore, Darwinian evolution has acted on the genes. Dawkins' approach to evolution was presented in characteristically entertaining form when he suggested that the organism is. '… a robot vehicle blindly programmed to preserve its selfish genes'.

  8. MRI of pathology-proven peripheral nerve amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Gavin A.; Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Ringler, Michael D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To highlight the MRI characteristics of pathologically proven amyloidosis involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and determine the utility of MRI in directing targeted biopsy for aiding diagnosis. A retrospective study was performed for patients with pathologically proven PNS amyloidosis who also underwent MRI of the biopsied or excised nerve. MRI signal characteristics, nerve morphology, associated muscular denervation changes, and the presence of multifocal involvement were detailed. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine subtypes of amyloid. Charts were reviewed to gather patient demographics, neurological symptoms and radiologist interpretation. Four men and three women with a mean age of 62 ± 11 years (range 46-76) were identified. All patients had abnormal findings on EMG with mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. All lesions demonstrated diffuse multifocal neural involvement with T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, and variable enhancement on MRI. One lesion exhibited superimposed T2 hypointensity. Six of seven patients demonstrated associated muscular denervation changes. Peripheral nerve amyloidosis is rare, and the diagnosis is difficult because of insidious symptom onset, mixed sensorimotor neurologic deficits, and the potential for a wide variety of nerves affected. On MRI, peripheral nerve involvement is most commonly characterized by T1 hypointensity, T2 hyperintensity, variable enhancement, maintenance of the fascicular architecture with fusiform enlargement, multifocal involvement and muscular denervation changes. While this appearance mimics other inflammatory neuropathies, MRI can readily detect neural changes and direct-targeted biopsy, thus facilitating early diagnosis and appropriate management. (orig.)

  9. Negative Biopsy after Referral for Biopsy-Proven Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Chung Hyun; Lee, Jun Haeng; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Repeat endoscopy with biopsy is often performed in patients with previously diagnosed gastric cancer to determine further treatment plans. However, biopsy results may differ from the original pathologic report. We reviewed patients who had a negative biopsy after referral for gastric cancer. Methods A total of 116 patients with negative biopsy results after referral for biopsy-proven gastric cancer were enrolled. Outside pathology slides were reviewed. Images of the first and second endoscopic examinations were reviewed. We reviewed the clinical history from referral to the final treatment. Results Eighty-eight patients (76%) arrived with information about the lesion from the referring physician. Among 96 patients with available outside slides, the rate of interobserver variation was 24%. Endoscopy was repeated at our institution; 85 patients (73%) were found to have definite lesions, whereas 31 patients (27%) had indeterminate lesions. In the group with definite lesions, 71% of the lesions were depressed in shape. The most common cause of a negative biopsy was mistargeting. In the group with indeterminate lesions, 94% had insufficient information. All patients with adequate follow-up were successfully treated based on the findings in the follow-up endoscopy. Conclusions A negative biopsy after referral for biopsy-proven gastric cancer is mainly caused by mistargeting and insufficient information during the referral. PMID:25963084

  10. Triangulating the provenance of African elephants using mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Hondo, Tomoko; Roca, Alfred L

    2013-02-01

    African elephant mitochondrial (mt) DNA follows a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. As females do not migrate between elephant herds, mtDNA exhibits low geographic dispersal. We therefore examined the effectiveness of mtDNA for assigning the provenance of African elephants (or their ivory). For 653 savanna and forest elephants from 22 localities in 13 countries, 4258 bp of mtDNA was sequenced. We detected eight mtDNA subclades, of which seven had regionally restricted distributions. Among 108 unique haplotypes identified, 72% were found at only one locality and 84% were country specific, while 44% of individuals carried a haplotype detected only at their sampling locality. We combined 316 bp of our control region sequences with those generated by previous trans-national surveys of African elephants. Among 101 unique control region haplotypes detected in African elephants across 81 locations in 22 countries, 62% were present in only a single country. Applying our mtDNA results to a previous microsatellite-based assignment study would improve estimates of the provenance of elephants in 115 of 122 mis-assigned cases. Nuclear partitioning followed species boundaries and not mtDNA subclade boundaries. For taxa such as elephants in which nuclear and mtDNA markers differ in phylogeography, combining the two markers can triangulate the origins of confiscated wildlife products.

  11. Lapis lazuli provenance study by means of micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Re, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.re@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino and Centre of Excellence ' Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces' , Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giudice, Alessandro Lo [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino and Centre of Excellence ' Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces' , Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Angelici, Debora [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Calusi, Silvia; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Massi, Mirko [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Pratesi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra and Museo di Storia Naturale, Universita di Firenze, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we report about the micro-PIXE characterisation of lapis lazuli, for a provenance study of this semi-precious stone, used for glyptic as early as 7000 years ago. The final aim is to find markers permitting to identify the origin of the raw material coming from three quarries in regions of historical importance: Afghanistan, Pamir Mountains and Siberia. This may help to reconstruct trade routes, especially for ancient objects for which written testimonies are scanty or absent at all. Due to the heterogeneity of lapis lazuli we concentrate our attention on single phases instead of the whole stone; in particular we focused on two of the main phases: lazurite, responsible for the blue colour, and diopside, the most frequent accessory mineral. This study was preceded and completed by means of microanalysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDX) and Cold-Cathodoluminescence (cold-CL) analysis. Despite the limited number of analysed samples, results are sufficient to exclude/suggest a few features as provenance markers, partly confirming what has been previously published in literature.

  12. Provenance of Neoproterozoic sedimentary basement of northern Iran, Kahar Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad-Saeed, Najmeh; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh; Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Sadeghi, Abbas; Houshmandzadeh, Abdolrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article presents new data to understand the nature of the hidden crystalline basement of northern Iran and the tectonic setting of Iran during late Neoproterozoic time. The siliciclastic-dominated Kahar Formation represents the oldest known exposures of northern Iran and comprises late Ediacaran (ca. 560-550 Ma) compositionally immature sediments including mudrocks, sandstones, and conglomerates. This work focuses on provenance of three well preserved outcrops of this formation in Alborz Mountains: Kahar Mountain, Sarbandan, and Chalus Road, through petrographic and geochemical methods. Mineralogical Index of Alteration (MIA) and Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA-after correction for K-metasomatism) values combined with A-CN-K relations suggest moderate weathering in the source areas. The polymictic nature of Kahar conglomerates indicates a mixed provenance for them. However, modal analysis of Kahar sandstones (volcanic to plagioclase-rich lithic arkose) and whole rock geochemistry of mudrocks suggest that they are largely first-cycle sediments and that their sources were remarkably late Ediacaran, intermediate-felsic igneous rocks from proximal arc settings. Tectonic setting discrimination diagrams also indicate a convergent plate margin and continental arc related basin for Kahar sediments. This interpretation is supported by the phyllo-tectic to tectic composition and geochemistry of mudrocks. These results reveal the presence of a felsic/intermediate subduction-related basement (∼600-550 Ma) in this region, which provides new constraints on subduction scenario during this time interval in Iran, as a part of the Peri-Gondwanan terranes.

  13. Identifying redundancy and exposing provenance in crowdsourced data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Wesley; Ginosar, Shiry; Steinitz, Avital; Hartmann, Björn; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2013-12-01

    We present a system that lets analysts use paid crowd workers to explore data sets and helps analysts interactively examine and build upon workers' insights. We take advantage of the fact that, for many types of data, independent crowd workers can readily perform basic analysis tasks like examining views and generating explanations for trends and patterns. However, workers operating in parallel can often generate redundant explanations. Moreover, because workers have different competencies and domain knowledge, some responses are likely to be more plausible than others. To efficiently utilize the crowd's work, analysts must be able to quickly identify and consolidate redundant responses and determine which explanations are the most plausible. In this paper, we demonstrate several crowd-assisted techniques to help analysts make better use of crowdsourced explanations: (1) We explore crowd-assisted strategies that utilize multiple workers to detect redundant explanations. We introduce color clustering with representative selection--a strategy in which multiple workers cluster explanations and we automatically select the most-representative result--and show that it generates clusterings that are as good as those produced by experts. (2) We capture explanation provenance by introducing highlighting tasks and capturing workers' browsing behavior via an embedded web browser, and refine that provenance information via source-review tasks. We expose this information in an explanation-management interface that allows analysts to interactively filter and sort responses, select the most plausible explanations, and decide which to explore further.

  14. Provenance tracking for scientific software toolchains through on-demand release and archiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, David

    2017-04-01

    There is an emerging consensus that published computational science results must be backed by a provenance chain tying results to the exact versions of input data and the code which generated them. There is also now an impressive range of web services devoted to revision control of software, and the archiving in citeable form of both software and input data. However, much scientific software itself builds on libraries and toolkits, and these themselves have dependencies. Further, it is common for cutting edge research to depend on the latest version of software in online repositories, rather than the official release version. This creates a situation in which an author who wishes to follow best practice in recording the provenance chain of their results must archive and cite unreleased versions of a series of dependencies. Here, we present an alternative which toolkit authors can easily implement to provide a semi-automatic mechanism for creating and archiving custom software releases of the precise version of a package used in a particular simulation. This approach leverages the excellent services provided by GitHub and Zenodo to generate a connected set of citeable DOIs for the archived software. We present the integration of this workflow into the Firedrake automated finite element framework as a practical example of this approach in use on a complex geoscientific tool chain in practical use.

  15. A phylogenetic approach to study the origin and evolution of plasmodesmata-localized Glycosyl Hydrolases family 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio eGaudioso-Pedraza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the land by plants required major modifications in cellular structural composition and metabolism. Intercellular communication through plasmodesmata (PD plays a critical role in the coordination of growth and cell activities. Changes in the form, regulation or function of these channels are likely linked to plant adaptation to the terrestrial environments. Constriction of PD aperture by deposition of callose is the best-studied mechanism in PD regulation. Glycosyl hydrolases family 17 (GHL17 are callose degrading enzymes. In Arabidopsis this is a large protein family, few of which have been PD-localized. The objective here is to identify correlations between evolution of this protein family and their role at PD and to use this information as a tool to predict the localization of candidates isolated in a proteomic screen. With this aim, we studied phylogenetic relationship between Arabidopsis GHL17 sequences and those isolated from fungi, green algae, mosses and monocot representatives. Three distinct phylogenetic clades were identified. Clade alpha contained only embryophytes sequences suggesting that this subgroup appeared during land colonization in organisms with functional PD. Accordingly, all PD-associated GHL17 proteins identified so far in Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus are grouped in this ‘embryophytes only’ phylogenetic clade. Next, we tested the use of this knowledge to discriminate between candidates isolated in the PD proteome. Transient and stable expression of GFP protein fusions confirmed PD localization for candidates contained in clade alpha but not for candidates contained in clade beta. Our results suggest that GHL17 membrane proteins contained in the alpha clade evolved and expanded during land colonization to play new roles, among others, in PD regulation.

  16. A comparative proteomic approach to analyse structure, function and evolution of rice chitinases: a step towards increasing plant fungal resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Kishore; Dehury, Budheswar; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sarmah, Ranjan; Sahoo, Smita; Sahu, Mousumi; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Barooah, Madhumita

    2012-11-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 19 chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) widely distributed in plants, bacteria and viruses catalyse the hydrolysis of chitin and play a major role in plant defense mechanisms and development. Rice possesses several classes of chitinase, out of which a single structure of class I has been reported in PDB to date. In the present study an attempt was made to gain more insight into the structure, function and evolution of class I, II and IV chitinases of GH family 19 from rice. The three-dimensional structures of chitinases were modelled and validated based on available X-ray crystal structures. The structural study revealed that they are highly α-helical and bilobed in nature. These enzymes are single or multi domain and multi-functional in which chitin-binding domain (CBD) and catalytic domain (CatD) are present in class I and IV whereas class II lacks CBD. The CatD possesses a catalytic triad which is thought to be involved in catalytic process. Loop III, which is common in all three classes of chitinases, reflects that it may play a significant role in their function. Our study also confirms that the absence and presence of different loops in GH family 19 of rice may be responsible for various sized products. Molecular phylogeny revealed chitinases in monocotyledons and dicotyledons differed from each other forming two different clusters and may have evolved differentially. More structural study of this enzyme from different plants is required to enhance the knowledge of catalytic mechanism and substrate binding.

  17. Fossil pollen analysis of U-Pb-dated speleothems: a new approach to understanding Pliocene terrestrial climate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniderman, K.; Woodhead, J. D.; Porch, N.

    2013-12-01

    The nature of terrestrial environments in the Southern Hemisphere during the warm Pliocene is poorly known. This is not only because there are few published fossil records, but also because many of the existing records have very limited age control. For example, in Australia, the ages of most putative 'mid-Pliocene' fossil pollen records are based solely on biostratigraphic correlation. These correlations for the most part do not have the resolution to differentiate late Miocene from early Pliocene environments, let alone to pinpoint a Myrtaceae, with no sign of extensive cheonopod shrubland. Climate reconstructions based on presence of taxa now absent from the Nullarbor suggest that mean annual rainfall and/or summer rainfall were 50-100% higher than today. Second, vegetation near the Miocene/Pliocene boundary (at c. 5.5 Ma) was dominated by Gyrostemonaceae and Casuarinaceae. We interpret this transition from earliest Pliocene to mid-late Pliocene vegetation as an increase in biological productivity, from possibly very sparse woodland to forest, presumably in response to increased effective moisture in the mid-late Pliocene. Hence climate evolution within the Pliocene was substantial enough to drive complete biome turnover. Explanations of the mechanisms that drove Pliocene warmth thus need to explain not only why the Pliocene warm interval was terminated by Pleistocene cooling, but also why the mid-late Pliocene differed substantially from the earliest Pliocene. Our novel use of U/Pb dating of speleothem pollen records demonstrates that previous syntheses of 'mid-Pliocene' vegetation may, in regions with poor age control, have conflated biomes growing within different climatic regimes during different stages within the Pliocene.

  18. The chemical evolution of Kurnub Group palcowater in the Sinai-Negev province - A mass balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, E.; Jones, B.F.; Weinberger, G.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical evolution of the Kurnub Group paleowater was studied starting from rainwater in recharge areas of the Sinai and along groundwater flowpaths leading to the natural outlets of this regional aquifer. This was achieved by investigating the chemical composition of groundwater, ionic ratios, degrees of saturation with common mineral species, normative analysis of dissolved salts and by modeling of rock/water interaction and mixing processes occurring along groundwater flow paths. The initial groundwater composition used is from the Nakhel well in Sinai. It evolves from desert rainwater percolating through typical Kurnub Group lithology in Sinai. This rainwater dissolves mainly gypsum, halite and dolomite together with smaller amounts of marine aerosol and K-feldspar. At the same time it precipitates calcite, SiO2, smectite and degasses CO2. Between the area of Nakhel and the northern Negev the chemistry of Kurnub Group waters is influenced by dissolution of halite and lesser amounts of gypsum of surficial origin in recharge areas, small amounts of feldspars and of dolomite cement in sandstones eroded from the Arabo-Nubian igneous massif of Sinai and organic degradation-derived CO2. Concomitantly, there is precipitation of calcite, smectite, SiO2 and probably analcime characteristic of sediments in continental closed basins. North of the Negev, the Kurnub Group fluids are diluted and altered by mixing with Judea Group aquifer groundwaters. On the E there is mixing with residual brines from the water body ancestral to the Dead Sea, prior to discharge into the Arava valley. Rock/water interaction indicated by NETPATH and PHREEQC modeling is in agreement with lithology and facies changes previously observed in the Kurnub Group sequence.

  19. Assessment of Long-Term Evolution of Groundwater Hydrochemical Characteristics Using Multiple Approaches: A Case Study in Cangzhou, Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water shortage is severe in the North China Plain (NCP. In addition to a deficiency of water resources, deterioration of groundwater quality should be of great concern. In this study, hydrogeological analysis was conducted in combination with principal component analysis, correlation analysis and the co-kriging method to identify factors controlling the content of major ions and total dissolved solids (TDS in areal shallow and deep groundwater and to assess groundwater evolution in Cangzhou, China. The results suggested that groundwater quality degradation occurred and developed in the study area, as indicated by increasing concentrations of major ions, TDS and hardness in both shallow and deep groundwater. In shallow groundwater, whose hydrochemical water types changed from HCO3–Ca.Na.Mg and HCO3.Cl–Na in the west (Zone II to Cl.SO4–Na and Cl–Na in the east (Zone III. Areas with TDS concentrations between 1500 and 2000 mg/L occupied 79.76% of the total in the 1980s, while areas with a TDS concentration ranging from 2500 to 3000 mg/L comprised 59.11% of the total in the 2010s. In deep groundwater, the area with TDS over 1000 mg/L expanded from 5366.39 km2 in the 1960s to 7183.52 km2 in the 2010s. Natural processes (water-rock interactions and anthropogenic activities (groundwater exploitation were the dominant factors controlling the major ions’ content in local groundwater. Dissolution of dolomite, calcite, feldspar and gypsum were the primary sources of major ions in groundwater, and the ion exchange reaction had a strong effect on the cation content, especially for deep groundwater.

  20. Multi-Feature Segmentation for High-Resolution Polarimetric SAR Data Based on Fractal Net Evolution Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihao Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation techniques play an important role in understanding high-resolution polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR images. PolSAR image segmentation is widely used as a preprocessing step for subsequent classification, scene interpretation and extraction of surface parameters. However, speckle noise and rich spatial features of heterogeneous regions lead to blurred boundaries of high-resolution PolSAR image segmentation. A novel segmentation algorithm is proposed in this study in order to address the problem and to obtain accurate and precise segmentation results. This method integrates statistical features into a fractal net evolution algorithm (FNEA framework, and incorporates polarimetric features into a simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC superpixel generation algorithm. First, spectral heterogeneity in the traditional FNEA is substituted by the G0 distribution statistical heterogeneity in order to combine the shape and statistical features of PolSAR data. The statistical heterogeneity between two adjacent image objects is measured using a log likelihood function. Second, a modified SLIC algorithm is utilized to generate compact superpixels as the initial samples for the G0 statistical model, which substitutes the polarimetric distance of the Pauli RGB composition for the CIELAB color distance. The segmentation results were obtained by weighting the G0 statistical feature and the shape features, based on the FNEA framework. The validity and applicability of the proposed method was verified with extensive experiments on simulated data and three real-world high-resolution PolSAR images from airborne multi-look ESAR, spaceborne single-look RADARSAT-2, and multi-look TerraSAR-X data sets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method obtains more accurate and precise segmentation results than the other methods for high-resolution PolSAR images.

  1. The mid- to late-Holocene environmental evolution at the marsh of Vravron (Attiki, SE Greece): a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantaphyllou, M. V.; Kouli, K.; Tsourou, T.; Koukousioura, O.; Pavlopoulos, K.; Dermitzakis, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    The Vravron bay, in the vicinity of the homonym archaeological site is a marshy area located on the eastern coast of Attiki peninsula (eastern Greece). Vravron was inhabited already since the Early/ Middle Neolithic, although it's mainly known from the famous Archaic and Classical sanctuary of Vravronia Artemis. A sediment core from the marshy deposits of Vravron was submitted to detailed palynological, micropaleontological and sedimentological analyses, in order to investigate the environmental evolution of the area since approx. 3000 BC (AMS 14C). Benthic foraminifera and ostracoda assemblages were used to trace the depositional environment of the sequence: open shallow marine conditions with constant input of fresh water due to the influx of Erasinos River are recorded until 400BC, confirming the existence of the natural port known from a Mycenaean legend, while repeated flooding events recorded between 400BC and 50 AD should be linked with the destruction of the famous sanctuary of Artemis and the abandonment of the area. Around 50 AD the ongoing progression of Erasinos River resulted in the gradual development of lagoonal environment that after 1300AD got isolated from the sea becoming progressively a fresh water marsh. Pollen assemblages included representatives from all modern phytogeographic zones, indicating the complexity of the plant communities in the area and outlined the vegetation development since the Early Bronze Age. Even if human presence has been continuously recorded, its impact on natural environment appears profound only during the Mycenaean times, when cereal cultivation seems to be the main rural activity and after 1300AD, when a remarkable rise in like ploughing and herding evidence marks the introduction of the Arvanites population in the area. The establishment of the Vravronia Artemis sanctuary during the Geometric times coincides with a turnover in agricultural activities, as cereal cultivation is neglected and olive groves are

  2. Ontology-Driven Provenance Management in eScience: An Application in Parasite Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Weatherly, D. Brent; Mutharaju, Raghava; Anantharam, Pramod; Sheth, Amit; Tarleton, Rick L.

    Provenance, from the French word "provenir", describes the lineage or history of a data entity. Provenance is critical information in scientific applications to verify experiment process, validate data quality and associate trust values with scientific results. Current industrial scale eScience projects require an end-to-end provenance management infrastructure. This infrastructure needs to be underpinned by formal semantics to enable analysis of large scale provenance information by software applications. Further, effective analysis of provenance information requires well-defined query mechanisms to support complex queries over large datasets. This paper introduces an ontology-driven provenance management infrastructure for biology experiment data, as part of the Semantic Problem Solving Environment (SPSE) for Trypanosoma cruzi (T.cruzi). This provenance infrastructure, called T.cruzi Provenance Management System (PMS), is underpinned by (a) a domain-specific provenance ontology called Parasite Experiment ontology, (b) specialized query operators for provenance analysis, and (c) a provenance query engine. The query engine uses a novel optimization technique based on materialized views called materialized provenance views (MPV) to scale with increasing data size and query complexity. This comprehensive ontology-driven provenance infrastructure not only allows effective tracking and management of ongoing experiments in the Tarleton Research Group at the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), but also enables researchers to retrieve the complete provenance information of scientific results for publication in literature.

  3. Effects of therapeutic approach on the neonatal evolution of very low birth weight infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian S.R. Sadeck

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of treatment approach on the outcomes of newborns (birth weight [BW] < 1,000 g with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA, from the Brazilian Neonatal Research Network (BNRN on: death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH III/IV, retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgical (ROPsur, necrotizing enterocolitis requiring surgery (NECsur, and death/BPD. METHODS: This was a multicentric cohort study, retrospective data collection, including newborns (BW < 1000 g with gestational age (GA < 33 weeks and echocardiographic diagnosis of PDA, from 16 neonatal units of the BNRN from January 1, 2010 to Dec 31, 2011. Newborns who died or were transferred until the third day of life, and those with presence of congenital malformation or infection were excluded. Groups: G1 - conservative approach (without treatment, G2 - pharmacologic (indomethacin or ibuprofen, G3 - surgical ligation (independent of previous treatment. Factors analyzed: antenatal corticosteroid, cesarean section, BW, GA, 5 min. Apgar score < 4, male gender, Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology Perinatal Extension (SNAPPE II, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, late sepsis (LS, mechanical ventilation (MV, surfactant (< 2 h of life, and time of MV. Outcomes: death, O2 dependence at 36 weeks (BPD36wks, IVH III/IV, ROPsur, NECsur, and death/BPD36wks. Statistics: Student's t-test, chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact test; Odds ratio (95% CI; logistic binary regression and backward stepwise multiple regression. Software: MedCalc (Medical Calculator software, version 12.1.4.0. p-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: 1,097 newborns were selected and 494 newborns were included: G1 - 187 (37.8%, G2 - 205 (41.5%, and G3 - 102 (20.6%. The highest mortality was observed in G1 (51.3% and the lowest in G3 (14.7%. The highest frequencies of BPD36wks (70.6% and ROPsur were observed in G3 (23.5%. The lowest occurrence of

  4. A novel approach of groupwise fMRI-guided tractography allowing to characterize the clinical evolution of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giulia Preti

    Full Text Available Guiding diffusion tract-based anatomy by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we aim to investigate the relationship between structural connectivity and functional activity in the human brain. To this purpose, we introduced a novel groupwise fMRI-guided tractographic approach, that was applied on a population ranging between prodromic and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The study comprised of 15 subjects affected by amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, 14 diagnosed with AD and 14 elderly healthy adults who were used as controls. By creating representative (ensemble functionally guided tracts within each group of participants, our methodology highlighted the white matter fiber connections involved in verbal fluency functions for a specific population, and hypothesized on brain compensation mechanisms that potentially counteract or reduce cognitive impairment symptoms in prodromic AD. Our hope is that this fMRI-guided tractographic approach could have potential impact in various clinical studies, while investigating white/gray matter connectivity, in both health and disease.

  5. Teicoplanin versus vancomycin for proven or suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Alexandre B; Goncalves, Anderson R; Almeida, Claudia S; Bugano, Diogo Dg; Silva, Eliezer

    2010-06-16

    Vancomycin and teicoplanin are commonly used to treat gram-positive infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is uncertainty regarding the effects of teicoplanin compared to vancomycin on kidney function with some previous studies suggesting teicoplanin is less nephrotoxic than vancomycin. To investigate the efficacy and safety of vancomycin versus teicoplanin in patients with proven or suspected infection. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists of nephrology textbooks, review articles with relevant studies and sent letters seeking information about unpublished or incomplete studies to investigators involved in previous studies. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in any language comparing teicoplanin to vancomycin for patients with proven or suspected infection. Two authors independently evaluated methodological quality and extracted data using standardised data extraction forms. Study investigators were contacted for information not available in the original manuscripts. Random effects model was used to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We included 24 studies (2,610 patients) in this review. Teicoplanin reduced the risk of nephrotoxicity compared to vancomycin (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.90).The effects of teicoplanin or vancomycin were similar for clinical cure (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.08), microbiological cure (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.03) and mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.79 to1.30). Six studies reported no cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) needing dialysis. Adverse events were less frequent with teicoplanin including cutaneous rash (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.92), red man syndrome (RR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.59) and total adverse events (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00). A lower risk of nephrotoxicity with teicoplanin was observed in patients either with (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.88) or

  6. Strong and weak approximation of semilinear stochastic evolution equations

    CERN Document Server

    Kruse, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    In this book we analyze the error caused by numerical schemes for the approximation of semilinear stochastic evolution equations (SEEq) in a Hilbert space-valued setting. The numerical schemes considered combine Galerkin finite element methods with Euler-type temporal approximations. Starting from a precise analysis of the spatio-temporal regularity of the mild solution to the SEEq, we derive and prove optimal error estimates of the strong error of convergence in the first part of the book. The second part deals with a new approach to the so-called weak error of convergence, which measures the distance between the law of the numerical solution and the law of the exact solution. This approach is based on Bismut’s integration by parts formula and the Malliavin calculus for infinite dimensional stochastic processes. These techniques are developed and explained in a separate chapter, before the weak convergence is proven for linear SEEq.

  7. Effects of therapeutic approach on the neonatal evolution of very low birth weight infants with patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeck, Lilian S R; Leone, Cléa R; Procianoy, Renato S; Guinsburg, Ruth; Marba, Sergio T M; Martinez, Francisco E; Rugolo, Ligia M S S; Moreira, M Elisabeth L; Fiori, Renato M; Ferrari, Ligia L; Menezes, Jucille A; Venzon, Paulyne S; Abdallah, Vânia Q S; Duarte, José Luiz M B; Nunes, Marynea V; Anchieta, Leni M; Alves Filho, Navantino

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effects of treatment approach on the outcomes of newborns (birth weight [BW] patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), from the Brazilian Neonatal Research Network (BNRN) on: death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH III/IV), retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgical (ROPsur), necrotizing enterocolitis requiring surgery (NECsur), and death/BPD. This was a multicentric, cohort study, retrospective data collection, including newborns (BW gender, Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology Perinatal Extension (SNAPPE II), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), late sepsis (LS), mechanical ventilation (MV), surfactant (< 2 h of life), and time of MV. death, O2 dependence at 36 weeks (BPD36wks), IVH III/IV, ROPsur, NECsur, and death/BPD36wks. Student's t-test, chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact test; Odds ratio (95% CI); logistic binary regression and backward stepwise multiple regression. Software: MedCalc (Medical Calculator) software, version 12.1.4.0. p-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. 1,097 newborns were selected and 494 newborns were included: G1 - 187 (37.8%), G2 - 205 (41.5%), and G3 - 102 (20.6%). The highest mortality was observed in G1 (51.3%) and the lowest in G3 (14.7%). The highest frequencies of BPD36wks (70.6%) and ROPsur were observed in G3 (23.5%). The lowest occurrence of death/BPD36wks occurred in G2 (58.0%). Pharmacological (OR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.14-0.62) and conservative (OR 0.34; 95% CI: 0.14-0.79) treatments were protective for the outcome death/BPD36wks. The conservative approach of PDA was associated to high mortality, the surgical approach to the occurrence of BPD36wks and ROPsur, and the pharmacological treatment was protective for the outcome death/BPD36wks. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Modelling sediment clasts transport during landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretier, Sébastien; Martinod, Pierre; Reich, Martin; Godderis, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Over thousands to millions of years, the landscape evolution is predicted by models based on fluxes of eroded, transported and deposited material. The laws describing these fluxes, corresponding to averages over many years, are difficult to prove with the available data. On the other hand, sediment dynamics are often tackled by studying the distribution of certain grain properties in the field (e.g. heavy metals, detrital zircons, 10Be in gravel, magnetic tracers). There is a gap between landscape evolution models based on fluxes and these field data on individual clasts, which prevent the latter from being used to calibrate the former. Here we propose an algorithm coupling the landscape evolution with mobile clasts. Our landscape evolution model predicts local erosion, deposition and transfer fluxes resulting from hillslope and river processes. Clasts of any size are initially spread in the basement and are detached, moved and deposited according to probabilities using these fluxes. Several river and hillslope laws are studied. Although the resulting mean transport rate of the clasts does not depend on the time step or the model cell size, our approach is limited by the fact that their scattering rate is cell-size-dependent. Nevertheless, both their mean transport rate and the shape of the scattering-time curves fit the predictions. Different erosion-transport laws generate different clast movements. These differences show that studying the tracers in the field may provide a way to establish these laws on the hillslopes and in the rivers. Possible applications include the interpretation of cosmogenic nuclides in individual gravel deposits, provenance analyses, placers, sediment coarsening or fining, the relationship between magnetic tracers in rivers and the river planform, and the tracing of weathered sediment.

  9. Archaeometric researches on the provenance of Mediterranean Archaic Phoenician and Punic pottery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, M L; Del Vais, C; Fermo, P; Pallante, P

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to setup a first chemical database that could represent the starting point for a reliable classification method to discriminate between Archaic Phoenician and Punic pottery on the base of their chemical data. This database up to now can discriminate between several different areas of production and provenance and can be applied also to unknown ceramic samples of comparable age and production areas. More than 100 ceramic fragments were involved in this research, coming from various archaeological sites having a crucial importance in the context of the Phoenician and Punic settlement in central and western Mediterranean: Carthage (Tunisia), Toscanos (South Andalusia, Spain), Sulci, Monte Sirai, Othoca, Tharros (Sardinia, Italy) and Pithecusa (Campania, Italy). Since long-time archaeologists hypothesised that Mediterranean Archaic Phoenician and Punic pottery had mainly a local or just a regional diffusion, with the exception of some particular class like transport amphorae. To verify the pottery provenance, statistical analyses were carried out to define the existence of different ceramic compositional groups characterised by a local origin or imported from other sites. The existing literature data are now supplemented by new archaeometric investigations both on Archaic Phoenician ceramics and clayey raw materials from Sardinia. Therefore, diffractometric analyses, optical microscopy observations and X-ray fluorescence analyses were performed to identify the mineralogical and chemical composition of Othoca ceramics and clayey raw material. The obtained results were then compared with own literature data concerning Phoenician and Punic pottery in order to find features related to the different ceramic productions and their provenance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were also performed on the chemical compositional data in order to discriminate ceramic groups. A very complex situation was found

  10. The evolution of HIV policy in Vietnam: from punitive control measures to a more rights-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Ha, Pham; Pharris, Anastasia; Huong, Nguyen Thanh; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Brugha, Ruairi; Thorson, Anna

    2010-08-28

    Policymaking in Vietnam has traditionally been the preserve of the political elite, not open to the scrutiny of those outside the Communist Party. This paper aims to analyse Vietnam's HIV policy development in order to describe and understand the policy content, policy-making processes, actors and obstacles to policy implementation. Nine policy documents on HIV were analysed and 17 key informant interviews were conducted in Hanoi and Quang Ninh Province, based on a predesigned interview guide. Framework analysis, a type of qualitative content analysis, was applied for data analysis. Our main finding was that during the last two decades, developments in HIV policy in Vietnam were driven in a top-down way by the state organs, with support and resources coming from international agencies. Four major themes were identified: HIV policy content, the policy-making processes, the actors involved and human resources for policy implementation. Vietnam's HIV policy has evolved from one focused on punitive control measures to a more rights-based approach, encompassing harm reduction and payment of health insurance for medical costs of patients with HIV-related illness. Low salaries and staff reluctance to work with patients, many of whom are drug users and female sex workers, were described as the main barriers to low health staff motivation. Health policy analysis approaches can be applied in a traditional one party state and can demonstrate how similar policy changes take place, as those found in pluralistic societies, but through more top-down and somewhat hidden processes. Enhanced participation of other actors, like civil society in the policy process, is likely to contribute to policy formulation and implementation that meets the diverse needs and concerns of its population.

  11. The evolution of HIV policy in Vietnam: from punitive control measures to a more rights-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Nguyen Ha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Policymaking in Vietnam has traditionally been the preserve of the political elite, not open to the scrutiny of those outside the Communist Party. This paper aims to analyse Vietnam's HIV policy development in order to describe and understand the policy content, policy-making processes, actors and obstacles to policy implementation. Methods: Nine policy documents on HIV were analysed and 17 key informant interviews were conducted in Hanoi and Quang Ninh Province, based on a predesigned interview guide. Framework analysis, a type of qualitative content analysis, was applied for data analysis. Results: Our main finding was that during the last two decades, developments in HIV policy in Vietnam were driven in a top-down way by the state organs, with support and resources coming from international agencies. Four major themes were identified: HIV policy content, the policy-making processes, the actors involved and human resources for policy implementation. Vietnam's HIV policy has evolved from one focused on punitive control measures to a more rights-based approach, encompassing harm reduction and payment of health insurance for medical costs of patients with HIV-related illness. Low salaries and staff reluctance to work with patients, many of whom are drug users and female sex workers, were described as the main barriers to low health staff motivation. Conclusion: Health policy analysis approaches can be applied in a traditional one party state and can demonstrate how similar policy changes take place, as those found in pluralistic societies, but through more top-down and somewhat hidden processes. Enhanced participation of other actors, like civil society in the policy process, is likely to contribute to policy formulation and implementation that meets the diverse needs and concerns of its population.

  12. Functional Requirements for Information Resource Provenance on the Web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James P.; Lebo, Timothy; Graves, Alvaro; Difranzo, Dominic; Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo; McGuinness, Deborah L.

    2012-06-19

    We provide a means to formally explain the relationship between HTTP URLs and the representations returned when they are requested. According to existing World Wide Web architecture, the URL serves as an identier for a semiotic referent while the document returned via HTTP serves as a representation of the same referent. This begins with two sides of a semiotic triangle; the third side is the relationship between the URL and the representation received. We complete this description by extending the library science resource model Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Resources (FRBR) with cryptographic message and content digests to create a Functional Requirements for Information Resources (FRIR). We show how applying the FRIR model to HTTP GET and POST transactions disambiguates the many relationships between a given URL and all representations received from its request, provides fine-grained explanations that are complementary to existing explanations of web resources, and integrates easily into the emerging W3C provenance standard.

  13. Provenance graph query method based on double layer index structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing Qiu; Cui, Hong Gang; Tang, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Order to solve the problem that the efficiency of the existing source map is low and the resource occupancy rate is high, considering the relationship between the origin information and the data itself and the internal structure of the origin information, a method of provenance graph query based on double layer index structure is proposed. Firstly, we propose a two layer index structure based on the global index of the dictionary table and the local index based on the bitmap. The global index is used to query the server nodes stored in the source map. The local index is used to query the global index. Finally, based on the double-level index structure, a method of starting map query is designed. The experimental results show that the proposed method not only improves the efficiency of query and reduces the waste of memory resources.

  14. Evolving provenance in the Proterozoic Pranhita-Godavari Basin, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udeni Amarasinghe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Pranhita-Godavari Basin in central eastern India is one of the Proterozoic “Purāna” basins of cratonic India. New geochronology demonstrates that it has a vast depositional history of repeated basin reactivation from the Palaeoproterozoic to the Mesozoic. U-Pb laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry dating of detrital zircons from two samples of the Somanpalli Group—a member of the oldest sedimentary cycle in the valley—constrains its depositional age to ∼1620 Ma and demonstrates a tripartite age provenance with peaks at ∼3500 Ma, ∼2480 Ma and ∼1620 Ma, with minor age peaks in the Eoarchaean (∼3.8 Ga and at ∼2750 Ma. These ages are consistent with palaeocurrent data suggesting a southerly source from the Krishna Province and Enderby Land in East Antarctica. The similarity in the maximum depositional age with previously published authigenic glauconite ages suggest that the origin of the Pranhita-Godvari Graben originated as a rift that formed at a high angle to the coeval evolving late Meosproterozoic Krishna Province as Enderby Land collided with the Dharwar craton of India. In contrast, detrital zircons from the Cycle III Sullavai Group red sandstones yielded a maximum depositional age of 970 ± 20 Ma and had age peaks of ∼2550 Ma, ∼1600 Ma and then a number of Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons terminating in three analyses at ∼970 Ma. The provenance of these is again consistent with a southerly source from the Eastern Ghats Orogen and Antarctica. Later cycles of deposition include the overlying Albaka/Usur Formations and finally the late Palaeozoic to Mesozoic Gondwana Supergroup.

  15. ASDF: An Adaptable Seismic Data Format with Full Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Krischer, L.; Tromp, J.; Lefebvre, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    In order for seismologists to maximize their knowledge of how the Earth works, they must extract the maximum amount of useful information from all recorded seismic data available for their research. This requires assimilating large sets of waveform data, keeping track of vast amounts of metadata, using validated standards for quality control, and automating the workflow in a careful and efficient manner. In addition, there is a growing gap between CPU/GPU speeds and disk access speeds that leads to an I/O bottleneck in seismic workflows. This is made even worse by existing seismic data formats that were not designed for performance and are limited to a few fixed headers for storing metadata.The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) is a new data format for seismology that solves the problems with existing seismic data formats and integrates full provenance into the definition. ASDF is a self-describing format that features parallel I/O using the parallel HDF5 library. This makes it a great choice for use on HPC clusters. The format integrates the standards QuakeML for seismic sources and StationXML for receivers. ASDF is suitable for storing earthquake data sets, where all waveforms for a single earthquake are stored in a one file, ambient noise cross-correlations, and adjoint sources. The format comes with a user-friendly Python reader and writer that gives seismologists access to a full set of Python tools for seismology. There is also a faster C/Fortran library for integrating ASDF into performance-focused numerical wave solvers, such as SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. Finally, a GUI tool designed for visually exploring the format exists that provides a flexible interface for both research and educational applications. ASDF is a new seismic data format that offers seismologists high-performance parallel processing, organized and validated contents, and full provenance tracking for automated seismological workflows.

  16. Species choice, provenance and species trials among native Brazilian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumond, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Six papers from the conference are presented. Drumond, M.A., Potential of species native to the semi-arid tropics, 766-781, (Refs. 18), reports on Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa species, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Spondias tuberosa, Ziziphus joazeiro, Cnidoscolus phyllacanthus, Bursera leptophleos (leptophloeos), Tabebuia impetiginosa, Astronium urundeuva, and Mimosa caesalpinia. Monteiro, R.F.R., Speltz, R.M., Gurgel, J.T. do A.; Silvicultural performance of 24 provenances of Araucaria angustifolia in Parana, 814-824, (Refs. 8). Pires, C.L. da S., Kalil Filho, A.N., Rosa, P.R.F. da, Parente, P.R., Zanatto, A.C.S.; Provenance trials of Cordia alliodora in the State of Sao Paulo, 988-995, (Refs. 9). Nogueira, J.C.B., Siqueira, A.C.M.F., Garrido, M.A.O., Gurgel Garrido, L.M. do A., Rosa, P.R.F., Moraes, J.L. de, Zandarin, M.A., Gurgel Filho, O.A., Trials of some native species in various regions of the State of Sao Paulo, 1051-1063, (Refs. 9) describes Centrolobium tomentosum, Peltophorum dubium, Tabebuia vellosoi, Cariniana legalis, and Balfourodendron riedelianum. Batista, M.P., Borges, J.F., Franco, M.A.B.; Early growth of a native species in comparison with exotics in northeastern Para, Brazil, 1105-1110, (Refs. 3). Jacaranda copaia is compared with Gmelina arborea, Pinus caribaea various hondurensis, Eucalyptus deglupta, and E. urophylla. Lima, P.C.F., Souza, S.M. de, Drumond, M.A.; Trials of native forest species at Petrolina, Pernambuco, 1139-1148, (Refs. 8), deals with Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Piptadenia obliqua, Pithecellobium foliolosum, Astronium urundeuva, Schinopsis brasiliensis, Cassia excelsa, Caesalpinia pyramidalis, Parkia platycephala, Pseudobombax simplicifolium, Tabebuia impetiginosa, Caesalpinia ferrea, and Aspidosperma pyrifolium. 18 references.

  17. Project 1: Microbial Genomes: A Genomic Approach to Understanding the Evolution of Virulence. Project 2: From Genomes to Life: Drosophilia Development in Space and Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert DeSalle

    2004-09-10

    This project seeks to use the genomes of two close relatives, A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus, to understand the evolutionary changes that take place in a genome to make it more or less virulent. Our primary specific aim of this project was to sequence, annotate, and analyze the genomes of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (CU1000, serotype f) and Haemophilus aphrophilus. With these genome sequences we have then compared the whole genome sequences to each other and to the current Aa (HK1651 www.genome.ou.edu) genome project sequence along with other fully sequenced Pasteurellaceae to determine inter and intra species differences that may account for the differences and similarities in disease. We also propose to create and curate a comprehensive database where sequence information and analysis for the Pasteurellaceae (family that includes the genera Actinobacillus and Haemophilus) are readily accessible. And finally we have proposed to develop phylogenetic techniques that can be used to efficiently and accurately examine the evolution of genomes. Below we report on progress we have made on these major specific aims. Progress on the specific aims is reported below under two major headings--experimental approaches and bioinformatics and systematic biology approaches.

  18. Identifying food proteins with allergenic potential: evolution of approaches to safety assessment and research to provide additional tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladics, Gregory S; Selgrade, MaryJane K

    2009-08-01

    A safety assessment process exists for genetically engineered crops that includes the evaluation of the expressed protein for allergenic potential. The objectives of this evaluation are twofold: (1) to protect allergic consumers from exposure to known allergenic or cross-reactive proteins, and (2) protect the general population from risks associated with the introduction of genes encoding proteins that are likely to become food allergens. The first systematic approach to address these concerns was formulated by Metcalfe et al. [Metcalfe, D.D., Astwood, J.D., Townsend, R., Sampson, H.A., Taylor, S.L., and Fuchs, R.L. 1996. Assessment of the allergenic potential of foods from genetically engineered crop plants. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 36(5), 165-186.] and subsequently Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) [FAO/WHO, 2001. Evaluation of allergenicity of genetically modified foods. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Allergenicity of Foods Derived from Biotechnology. January 22-25, 2001. Rome, Italy]. More recently, Codex [Codex Alimentarius Commission, 2003. Alinorm 03/34: Joint FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Twenty-Fifth Session, Rome, Italy, 30 June-5 July, 2003. Appendix III, Guideline for the conduct of food safety assessment of foods derived from recombinant-DNA plants, and Appendix IV, Annex on the assessment of possible allergenicity. pp. 47-60], noting that no single factor is recognized as an identifier for protein allergenicity, suggested a weight of evidence approach be conducted that takes into account a variety of factors and approaches for an overall assessment of allergenic potential. These various recommendations are based on what is known about allergens, including the history of exposure and safety of the gene(s) source; amino acid sequence identity to human allergens; stability to pepsin digestion in vitro; protein abundance in the crop and

  19. Cenozoic foreland basins of Central Andes: a preliminary provenance U-Pb zircon analysis of sedimentary sequences of Calchaqui Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Alisson Lopes; Hauser, Natalia; Pimentel, Marcio Martins; Matteini, Massimo, E-mail: alisson_oliveira@hotmail.com [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Laboratorio de Geocronologia; Galli, Claudia Ines [Faculdad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Jujuy (Argentina); Coira, Beatriz [CIT Jujuy, CONICET. Instituto de Geologia y Mineria (Argentina); Alonso, Ricardo; Barrientos, Andrea [Instituto CEGA, CONICET. Universidad Nacional de Salta (Argentina)

    2015-07-01

    The Eocene of northwestern Argentina records complex basin and structural evolution, including continental sedimentation of the post-rift Salta Basin and the beginning of the Andean uplift and foreland system evolution. This illuminates a significant period of evolutionary history of this and surrounding basins in northwestern Argentina. U-Pb zircon analyses by LA-ICP-MS for three formations representing post-rift to foreland stages allowed interpretation about provenance terrains. The Lumbrera Formation, representing the post-rift stage, shows bimodal sources with a main zircon population around 462 Ma, and a second population around 1023 Ma. The Los Colorados and Angastaco Formations representing the sedimentation in a foreland basin, show a unimodal source around 490 Ma, and 517 Ma respectively. Zircons younger than 50 Ma were not identified during this study. (author)

  20. An ecological genetic delineation of local seed-source provenance for ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Siegfried L; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Bussell, John D; Hobbs, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    An increasingly important practical application of the analysis of spatial genetic structure within plant species is to help define the extent of local provenance seed collection zones that minimize negative impacts in ecological restoration programs. Here, we derive seed sourcing guidelines from a novel range-wide assessment of spatial genetic structure of 24 populations of Banksia menziesii (Proteaceae), a widely distributed Western Australian tree of significance in local ecological restoration programs. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of 100 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers revealed significant genetic differentiation among populations (ΦPT = 0.18). Pairwise population genetic dissimilarity was correlated with geographic distance, but not environmental distance derived from 15 climate variables, suggesting overall neutrality of these markers with regard to these climate variables. Nevertheless, Bayesian outlier analysis identified four markers potentially under selection, although these were not correlated with the climate variables. We calculated a global R-statistic using analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) to test the statistical significance of population differentiation and to infer a threshold seed collection zone distance of ∼60 km (all markers) and 100 km (outlier markers) when genetic distance was regressed against geographic distance. Population pairs separated by >60 km were, on average, twice as likely to be significantly genetically differentiated than population pairs separated by provenance seed collection zone for B. menziesii. Our approach is a novel probability-based practical solution for the delineation of a local seed collection zone to minimize negative genetic impacts in ecological restoration.

  1. Provenance variation in subalpine fir grown as an exotic tree species in Denmark and Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skúlason, Brynjar

    in a period of 15 growing seasons after establishment. Provenances showed significant differences for all measured traits. The northernmost provenances showed earliest bud set, highest autumn frost tolerance and a latitudinal cline was delineated, while the southernmost provenances showed earliest flushing...

  2. Assessing the Influence of Orogenic Inheritance on the Architecture, Time Evolution and Magmatic Budget of Hyper-extended Rift Systems: a Combined Mapping and Numerical Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenin, P.; Manatschal, G.; Lavier, L. L.; Erratt, D.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis is to assess the influence of inherited structures and heterogeneities on the architecture and tectonic evolution of hyper-extended rift systems, with special focus on the North Atlantic. We propose a new mapping approach using simple and robust observation-based criteria to identify key features of rift systems, namely: 1) structural elements of rift domains; 2) age of the major rift events; and 3) key structures and heterogeneities inherited from previous orogenic phases. We distinguish between 3 major rift domains: 1) the not or barely thinned proximal domain; 2) the unequivocal oceanic domain characterized by steady-state seafloor spreading; and, between them 3) the hyper-extended domain concentrating most of the deformation using gravity, magnetic and reflection and refraction seismic data. Previous studies mapped these domains along the magma-poor Iberia-Newfoundland and Bay of Biscay. One objective of this PhD is to extend this mapping further to the North, along the Irish, Scottish and Norwegian margins, into domains with polyphase rifting and magmatic additions. In addition, we assign an age to the two most important events in the development of rifted margins, namely the necking and the breakup. This approach requires us to determine how these two events are recorded in the stratigraphy and how they can be mapped in seismic sections. In order to highlight potential links between both rift domain architecture and timing of rifting and orogenic inheritance we map the structures and heterogeneities inherited from previous collision events that may have influenced significantly subsequent rifting. We consider features that: 1) are important enough to have had a potential impact on subsequent deformation; 2) are preserved through time; and 3) bear the potential to be reactivated. Based on these data, we try to link the architecture and evolution of the North Atlantic rift system with the nature and in-depth location of weak features

  3. The Dialectal Provenance of London, Wellcome Library, Ms 5262

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban-Segura Laura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes into consideration the language found in London, Wellcome Library, MS 5262, a one-volume codex from the early fifteenth century which holds a medical recipe collection. The manuscript, written in Middle English (and with a few fragments in Latin, represents a fine exemplar of a remedybook, a type of writing that has been traditionally considered to be popular. The main aim is to study the dialect of the text contained in folios 3v-61v in order to localise it geographically. The methodology followed for the purpose is grounded on the model supplied by the Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English (LALME (McIntosh et al. 1986, which consists of several stages including the completion of a survey questionnaire, the creation of the linguistic profile of the text and the application of the ‘fit’-technique (McIntosh et al. 1986, vol. 1: 10-12; Benskin 1991. Extralinguistic features of the manuscript may also be taken into consideration. This comprehensive analysis will help us to circumscribe the dialectal provenance and/or local origin of the text accurately.

  4. Maintenance techniques proven on CO/sub 2/ line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najera, G.

    1986-11-17

    Two-years' operation of the 218-mile, 20-in. Bravo CO/sub 2/ pipeline by Amoco Pipeline Co. in West Texas has proven several maintenance techniques for CO/sub 2/ pipeline operations. These techniques center on corrosion control, pipeline blowdown procedures, pipeline linefill procedures, high-pressure CO/sub 2/ pipeline hot-tap welding, and CO/sub 2/ pipeline material specifications. External corrosion on the Bravo line is prevented in the same manner as on any other conventional pipeline operated by Amoco. During construction, the entire pipeline was coated with a polyethylene extruded coating. After construction, rectifiers were equally spaced along the pipeline, keeping pipe-to-soil potential readings less than 3 v to prevent disbonding of this coating. Internal corrosion control is a different matter. One of the most critical parameters concerning internal corrosion is the amount of water contained in the CO/sub 2/ entering the pipeline. If the CO/sub 2/ contains more than a specified amount of water, carbonic acid may form and quickly corrode the inside of the pipe. Prior to commissioning, the pipeline was dehydrated to a -40/sup 0/F. dew point to prevent carbonic acid attack during initial line fill. It has been shown that CO/sub 2/ at pipeline operating conditions can hold up to 160 lb-mass water per MMscf in solution at 100% saturation.

  5. Experimental evaluation of job provenance in ATLAS environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Křenek, A.; Sitera, J.; Chudoba, J.; Dvořák, F.; Filipovič, J.; Kmuníček, J.; Matyska, L.; Mulaš, M.; Ruda, M.; Šustr, Z.; Campana, S.; Molinari, E.; Rebatto, D.

    2008-07-01

    Grid middleware stacks, including gLite, matured into the state of being able to process up to millions of jobs per day. Logging and Bookkeeping, the gLite job-tracking service, keeps pace with this rate; however, it is not designed to provide a long-term archive of information on executed jobs. ATLAS — representative of a large user community — addresses this issue with its own job catalogue (ProdDB). Development of such a customized service, not easily reusable, took considerable effort which is not affordable by smaller communities. On the contrary, Job Provenance (JP), a generic gLite service designed for long-term archiving of information on executed jobs focusing on scalability, extensibility, uniform data view, and configurability, allows more specialized catalogues to be easily built. We present the first results of an experimental JP deployment for the ATLAS production infrastructure where a JP installation was fed with a part of ATLAS jobs, and also stress tested with real production data. The main outcome of this work is a demonstration that JP can complement large-scale application-specific job catalogue services, while serving a similar purpose where there are none available.

  6. A global renewable mix with proven technologies and common materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Garcia-Olivares, A.; Garcia-Ladona, E.; Turiel, A.

    2012-04-01

    A global alternative mix to fossil fuels is proposed, based on proven renewable energy technologies that do not use scarce materials. Taking into account the availability of materials, the resulting mix consists of a combination of onshore and offshore wind turbines, concentrating solar power stations, hydroelectricity and wave power devices attached to the offshore turbines. Solar photovoltaic power could contribute to the mix if its dependence on scarce materials is solved. Material requirements are studied for the generation, power transport and for some future transport systems. The order of magnitude of copper, aluminium, neodymium, lithium, nickel, zinc and platinum that might be required for the proposed solution is obtained and compared with available reserves. While the proposed global alternative to fossil fuels seems technically feasible, lithium, nickel and platinum could become limiting materials for future vehicles fleet if no global recycling system were implemented and rechargeable zinc-air batteries could not be developed. As much as 60% of the current copper reserves would have to be employed in the implementation of the proposed solution. Altogether, the availability of materials may become a long-term physical constraint, preventing the continuation of the usual exponential growth of energy consumption.

  7. Descartes Mountains and Cayley Plains - Composition and provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M. J.; Taylor, G. J.; Goles, G. G.

    1974-01-01

    Trace element compositions of petrographically characterized 2-4 mm lithic fragments from Apollo 16 soil samples are used to calculate initial REE concentrations in liquids in equilibrium with lunar anorthosites and to discuss the provenance of the Cayley Formation. Lithic fragments may be subdivided into four groups: (1) ANT rocks, (2) K- and SiO2-rich mesostasis-bearing rocks, (3) poikiloblastic rocks, and (4) (spinel) troctolites. Model liquids in equilibrium with essentially monominerallic anorthosites have initial REE concentrations 5-8 times those of chondrites. The REE contents of K- and SiO2-rich mesostasis-bearing rocks and poikiloblastic rocks are dominated by the mesostasis phases. ANT rocks appear to be more abundant in the Descartes Mountains, while poikiloblastic rocks appear to be more abundant in the Cayley Plains. Poikiloblastic rocks have intermediate to high LIL-element concentrations yet the low gamma-ray activity of Mare Orientale implies low LIL-element concentrations. Consequently, it is unlikely that the Cayley Formation is Orientale ejecta. A local origin as ejecta from smaller impacts is a more plausible model for the deposition of the Cayley Formation.

  8. Opinion: Taking phytoremediation from proven technology to accepted practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Karen E; Gerwing, Perry D; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2017-03-01

    Phytoremediation is the use of plants to extract, immobilize, contain and/or degrade contaminants from soil, water or air. It can be an effective strategy for on site and/or in situ removal of various contaminants from soils, including petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solvents (e.g., trichloroethylene [TCE]), munitions waste (e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene [TNT]), metal(loid)s, salt (NaCl) and radioisotopes. Commercial phytoremediation technologies appear to be underutilized globally. The primary objective of this opinion piece is to discuss how to take phytoremediation from a proven technology to an accepted practice. An overview of phytoremediation of soil is provided, with the focus on field applications, to provide a frame of reference for the subsequent discussion on better utilization of phytoremediation. We consider reasons why phytoremediation is underutilized, despite clear evidence that, under many conditions, it can be applied quite successfully in the field. We offer suggestions on how to gain greater acceptance for phytoremediation by industry and government. A new paradigm of phytomanagement, with a specific focus on using phytoremediation as a "gentle remediation option" (GRO) within a broader, long-term management strategy, is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Scale models: A proven cost-effective tool for outage planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Morris, IL (United States); Segroves, R. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    As generation costs for operating nuclear stations have risen, more nuclear utilities have initiated efforts to improve cost effectiveness. Nuclear plant owners are also being challenged with lower radiation exposure limits and new revised radiation protection related regulations (10 CFR 20), which places further stress on their budgets. As source term reduction activities continue to lower radiation fields, reducing the amount of time spent in radiation fields becomes one of the most cost-effective ways of reducing radiation exposure. An effective approach for minimizing time spent in radiation areas is to use a physical scale model for worker orientation planning and monitoring maintenance, modifications, and outage activities. To meet the challenge of continued reduction in the annual cumulative radiation exposures, new cost-effective tools are required. One field-tested and proven tool is the physical scale model.

  10. Exploring electric field induced structural evolution of water clusters, (H2O)n [n = 9-20]: density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Dhurba; Kulkarni, Anant D; Gejji, Shridhar P; Bartolotti, Libero J; Pathak, Rajeev K

    2013-01-28

    Response of neutral water clusters (H(2)O)(n), n = 9-20, to external uniform dipolar static electric fields is studied for some lowest-energy conformers for each "n" within an energy band of about 9 kcal mol(-1) of their field-free counterparts. We perform density functional theory computations with B3LYP∕6-311++G(2d,2p) model chemistry. Increasing the electric field destabilizes and distorts a cluster by elongating, hence weakening its hydrogen bonds, culminating into a catastrophic structural breakdown beyond a specific threshold field-strength. The electric field induced conformational transitions to extended structures stretched along the field direction to lower-energy configurations that appear as local minima on their potential energy surface are presented. It is observed that a typical structural transition of this type is always accompanied by an abrupt increase in the electric dipole moment of the cluster over and above its smooth increment with increasing applied field; the increase being phenomenal during breakdown. Interestingly, the HOMO-LUMO energy gap for a given conformer is found to diminish with increasing field strength, abruptly approaching zero at structural breakdown. In essence, the structural evolution traced through hydrogen-bond networks of the clusters reveals multiple enhancements in size by "opening up" of three-dimensional morphologies to form net-like structures with less number of hydrogen bonds. These clusters exhibit greater structural complexity than that encountered in the relatively small clusters reported previously.

  11. Interdisciplinary Approach to the Study of Evolution of Humanities : Reviewing The History of Translation Movement in the Context of Public Policy-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Shah Abadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is about forty years that some of Iran’s policy makers and experts in social and human sciences are of the opinion that there should be an evolution in humanities. They are of the view that principles and basic assumptions of current humanities are in conflict with Islamic framework and consequently these doctrines are not appropriate to address local issues of Islamic countries. Since the Islamic Revolution of Iran of 1979, any change in these doctrines has been a matter of debate. But we need a new plan for making a change in our policies. Applying interdisciplinary approach permit us to find a new way for policy making in society. History is full of lessons to guide us in our present situations. Therefore, by taking into account, the sociology of science and issues of policy-making, we study the Translation Movement. This article shows the transfer and transformation of Greek philosophy to Islamic philosophy in 7- 10 A.D. in Islamic civilization and also proposes an alternative approach for the policy makers. We identify actors of transferring knowledge, scientific translators and the Abbasid State. Research model of this paper has been chosen from the sociology of science and also makes use of "Implication Research Methodology” with regard to history. Our suggestion is "Transformational Translation (Transforlation " that includes selecting best texts, translations, correction, explanation, criticism and innovation. Accordingly, policies should be revised after identifying discipline on Transforlation Chain and structures and human resources have to be formalized on the basis of revised policies.

  12. Provenance-Based Debugging and Drill-Down in Data-Oriented Workflows

    KAUST Repository

    Ikeda, Robert

    2012-04-01

    Panda (for Provenance and Data) is a system that supports the creation and execution of data-oriented workflows, with automatic provenance generation and built-in provenance tracing operations. Workflows in Panda are arbitrary a cyclic graphs containing both relational (SQL) processing nodes and opaque processing nodes programmed in Python. For both types of nodes, Panda generates logical provenance - provenance information stored at the processing-node level - and uses the generated provenance to support record-level backward tracing and forward tracing operations. In our demonstration we use Panda to integrate, process, and analyze actual education data from multiple sources. We specifically demonstrate how Panda\\'s provenance generation and tracing capabilities can be very useful for workflow debugging, and for drilling down on specific results of interest. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Multi-proxy geochemical analyses of Indus Submarine Fan sediments sampled by IODP Expedition 355: implications for sediment provenance and palaeoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; George, Simon C.; Bendle, James; Liddy, Hannah; Clift, Peter D.; Pandey, Dhananjai K.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Andò, Sergio; Tiwari, Manish; Khim, Boo-Keun; Griffith, Elizabeth; Steinke, Stephan; Suzuki, Kenta; Lee, Jongmin; Newton, Kate; Tripathi, Shubham; Expedition 355 Scientific Party

    2016-04-01

    petrography and heavy mineral analysis, geochemical data, isotope composition, and biomarker analysis. Preliminary organic geochemistry data suggest an increase of terrigenous organic matter input into sediment starting around 10.5 Ma, with a strong decrease in the last 1 Ma. Moreover, the detailed analyses of the glyceryl dialkyl glyceryl tetraether (GDGT) and alkenone lipids provide the first sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions in the region. These data indicate decreasing SST from the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum until today. This research provides an exceptional opportunity to apply a multiproxy approach to understand sediment provenance, erosional processes, and palaeoclimate evolution in the eastern Arabian Sea.

  14. A new model for the provenance of the Upper Devonian Old Red Sandstone (UORS) of southern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Meg; Meere, Pat; Timmerman, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The geology of Southern Ireland is dominated by the influence of both the Caledonian and Variscan orogenies which have shaped the landscape of today. The Old Red Sandstone (ORS) sequences of the Middle - Upper Devonian Munster Basin have traditionally been viewed as a post-orogenic molasse deposit sourced from the Caledonides (Friend et al. 2000 & references therein), which were subsequently deformed by the Late Carboniferous Variscan Orogeny. This model does not take into account the potential impact of the Acadian Orogeny, an Early to Mid Devonian transpressional tectonic event which culminated in Mid Emsian times and resulted in the deformation and inversion of Lower ORS (LORS) basins across Britain and Ireland (Soper & Woodcock 2003; Meere & Mulchrone 2006). Evidence of Acadian deformation in Southern Ireland is recorded in the LORS sequence of the Lower-Middle Devonian basin, the Dingle Basin. Meere & Mulchrone (2006) show that penetrative deformation visible in the LORS of the Dingle Basin has an Acadian signature and is not associated with Late Carboniferous Variscan compression (Parkin 1976; Todd 2000). The role of the Acadian Orogeny in the tectono-sedimentary evolution of Southern Ireland has been analyzed in this study using a multidisciplinary approach. Petrographic analysis of both the LORS and Upper ORS (UORS) of southern Ireland suggests an alternative provenance model in which there is a direct genetic link between the two Devonian deposits. There is a fining-up relationship between the two basins and the volcanic lithic fragments - while extremely limited in occurrence in the Munster Basin - are strikingly similar in both units. The absence of conglomeratic units at the base of the Munster Basin provide further evidence that the UORS does not represent a classic molasse deposit. This is supported by EMPA data from both basins which indicates identical mica chemistries in both the LORS and UORS. A comparison with the white mica chemistries from a

  15. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  16. Provenance based data integrity checking and verification in cloud environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Hlavacs, Helmut; Haq, Inam Ul; Jan, Bilal; Khan, Fakhri Alam; Ahmad, Awais

    2017-01-01

    Cloud computing is a recent tendency in IT that moves computing and data away from desktop and hand-held devices into large scale processing hubs and data centers respectively. It has been proposed as an effective solution for data outsourcing and on demand computing to control the rising cost of IT setups and management in enterprises. However, with Cloud platforms user's data is moved into remotely located storages such that users lose control over their data. This unique feature of the Cloud is facing many security and privacy challenges which need to be clearly understood and resolved. One of the important concerns that needs to be addressed is to provide the proof of data integrity, i.e., correctness of the user's data stored in the Cloud storage. The data in Clouds is physically not accessible to the users. Therefore, a mechanism is required where users can check if the integrity of their valuable data is maintained or compromised. For this purpose some methods are proposed like mirroring, checksumming and using third party auditors amongst others. However, these methods use extra storage space by maintaining multiple copies of data or the presence of a third party verifier is required. In this paper, we address the problem of proving data integrity in Cloud computing by proposing a scheme through which users are able to check the integrity of their data stored in Clouds. In addition, users can track the violation of data integrity if occurred. For this purpose, we utilize a relatively new concept in the Cloud computing called "Data Provenance". Our scheme is capable to reduce the need of any third party services, additional hardware support and the replication of data items on client side for integrity checking.

  17. Integrating proven falls prevention interventions into government programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Lesley; Donaldson, Alex; Thompson, Catherine; Thomas, Margaret

    2014-04-01

    To identify Department of Health programs with high potential to integrate evidence-based interventions to prevent falls among older people. Broad consultation within the Department followed by structured decision making. This work was informed by an analysis of Victorian hospital separations data and a Cochrane Systematic Review to identify relevant target groups and interventions. Ranking of the integration potential of interventions for a broad range of Department program areas was achieved through a facilitated workshop. A short list of program areas was then developed and scored, using pre-defined criteria, for their match with the interventions. The ranked order of interventions, from most to least suitable for integration, were: multifactorial risk assessment and intervention; multi-component group exercise; medication review; occupational therapy-based home safety; home-based exercise; and first eye cataract surgery. Four of six program areas had a strong match (a score of ≥75% of the maximum score) with one or more of three interventions. Two program areas (Primary Care Partnerships, and Home and Community Care) had strong matches with three interventions (group- and home-based exercise; occupational therapy-based home safety) and were selected as priority areas. The Hospital Admissions Risk Program had strong and good matches respectively with home-based exercise and medication review, and was also selected. Our systematic methods identified Department programs with strong potential for integration of proven falls prevention interventions. Matching departmental programs and evidence-based interventions for integration may lead to more efficient resource allocation for falls prevention in Victoria. © 2014 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  18. Provenance of coastal dune sands along Red Sea, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2017-06-01

    Texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element geochemistry of 26 coastal dune sand samples were studied to determine the provenance and tectonic environment of two dune fields close to the beaches of Safaga (SF) and Quseir (QS) at the Egyptian Red Sea coast. Onshore winds generate fine, moderate, moderately-well to well-sorted, coarse-skewed to near-symmetrical dune sands with mesokurtic distributions. Winds pick up and transport grains from nearby beach sands and alluvial deposits into a wide Red Sea coastal plain at the border of the beach. The mineralogical (Qt-Ft-Lt) and geochemical composition of the sands, indicate that SF and QS coastal dune sands are mature and influenced by quartz-rich sands. The average CIA values in SF and QS coastal dune sands are low relative to the range of the PAAS, suggesting an arid climate and a low intensity of chemical weathering. The SF and QS coastal dune sand samples are plotted in the recycled orogen and partly in craton interior fields suggesting recycled older sedimentary and partly metamorphic-plutonic sources. The high content of quartz with shell debris and carbonates in coastal dune sands support the recycled sedimentary beach and alluvial sand sources. The dominance of heavy minerals like amphiboles (hornblende) and biotite in the coastal dune sands also supports the effect of metamorphic-plutonic source rocks. The new tectonic discriminant-function diagrams suggest that the coastal dune sands were deposited in a passive margin of a synrift basin. The results provide a good evidence for the extension in the Red Sea rift system during Oligocene-post Pliocene, which is consistent with the general geology of Egypt.

  19. Infrared reflectance spectra: Effects of particle size, provenance and preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.; Szecsody, James E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-09-22

    We have recently developed methods for making more accurate infrared total and diffuse directional - hemispherical reflectance measurements using an integrating sphere. We have found that reflectance spectra of solids, especially powders, are influenced by a number of factors including the sample preparation method, the particle size and morphology, as well as the sample origin. On a quantitative basis we have investigated some of these parameters and the effects they have on reflectance spectra, particularly in the longwave infrared. In the IR the spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: In general, upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from strong surface scattering, i.e. rays that are reflected from the surface without bulk penetration, whereas downward-going peaks are due to either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signals reflected from solids usually encompass all such effects, but with strong dependencies on particle size and preparation. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to observe the effects on the spectral features: Bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions between 5 and 500 microns. The median particle size is demonstrated to have large effects on the reflectance spectra. For certain minerals we also observe significant spectral change depending on the geologic origin of the sample. All three such effects (particle size, preparation and provenance) result in substantial change in the reflectance spectra for solid materials; successful identification algorithms will require sufficient flexibility to account for these parameters.

  20. Congenital heart defects in molecularly proven Kabuki syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Gnazzo, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Baban, Anwar; Passarelli, Chiara; Capolino, Rossella; Angioni, Adriano; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in Kabuki syndrome ranges from 28% to 80%. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 28 patients had a molecularly proven diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D (MLL2) were detected in 27 patients, and in KDM6A gene in one. CHD was diagnosed in 19/27 (70%) patients with KMT2D (MLL2) variant, while the single patient with KDM6A change had a normal heart. The anatomic types among patients with CHD included aortic coarctation (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, bicuspid aortic valve (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, perimembranous subaortic ventricular septal defect (3/19 = 16%), atrial septal defect ostium secundum type (3/19 = 16%), conotruncal heart defects (3/19 = 16%). Additional CHDs diagnosed in single patients included aortic dilatation with mitral anomaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We also reviewed CHDs in patients with a molecular diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome reported in the literature. In conclusion, a CHD is detected in 70% of patients with KMT2D (MLL2) pathogenic variants, most commonly left-sided obstructive lesions, including multiple left-sided obstructions similar to those observed in the spectrum of the Shone complex, and septal defects. Clinical management of Kabuki syndrome should include echocardiogram at the time of diagnosis, with particular attention to left-sided obstructive lesions and mitral anomalies, and annual monitoring for aortic arch dilatation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Provenance based data integrity checking and verification in cloud environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a recent tendency in IT that moves computing and data away from desktop and hand-held devices into large scale processing hubs and data centers respectively. It has been proposed as an effective solution for data outsourcing and on demand computing to control the rising cost of IT setups and management in enterprises. However, with Cloud platforms user's data is moved into remotely located storages such that users lose control over their data. This unique feature of the Cloud is facing many security and privacy challenges which need to be clearly understood and resolved. One of the important concerns that needs to be addressed is to provide the proof of data integrity, i.e., correctness of the user's data stored in the Cloud storage. The data in Clouds is physically not accessible to the users. Therefore, a mechanism is required where users can check if the integrity of their valuable data is maintained or compromised. For this purpose some methods are proposed like mirroring, checksumming and using third party auditors amongst others. However, these methods use extra storage space by maintaining multiple copies of data or the presence of a third party verifier is required. In this paper, we address the problem of proving data integrity in Cloud computing by proposing a scheme through which users are able to check the integrity of their data stored in Clouds. In addition, users can track the violation of data integrity if occurred. For this purpose, we utilize a relatively new concept in the Cloud computing called "Data Provenance". Our scheme is capable to reduce the need of any third party services, additional hardware support and the replication of data items on client side for integrity checking.

  2. Avoiding the Theory Trap When Discussing Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David

    2006-02-01

    Public opinion polls tell us that we are losing the battle to explain the nature of evolution and its central role in science. One problem, I believe, is letting the opponents of evolution frame the discussion to our disadvantage. Framing involves the selective use of language or context to trigger responses, either support or opposition. As a prime example, we undercut our communications efforts with many nonscientists by defending the `theory of evolution.' Theory is the wrong word to use in addressing the public. In the contemporary U.S., theory means a hunch or idea that has not been established by evidence. It is thus no surprise that polls show that nearly three quarters of U.S. people think that ``evolution is commonly referred to as the theory of evolution because it has not yet been proven scientifically.'' Those who advocate adding ``only a theory'' disclaimers in textbooks know that to call evolution a theory is sufficient to undermine its acceptance.

  3. Discovery radiomics via evolutionary deep radiomic sequencer discovery for pathologically proven lung cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Chung, Audrey G; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    While lung cancer is the second most diagnosed form of cancer in men and women, a sufficiently early diagnosis can be pivotal in patient survival rates. Imaging-based, or radiomics-driven, detection methods have been developed to aid diagnosticians, but largely rely on hand-crafted features that may not fully encapsulate the differences between cancerous and healthy tissue. Recently, the concept of discovery radiomics was introduced, where custom abstract features are discovered from readily available imaging data. We propose an evolutionary deep radiomic sequencer discovery approach based on evolutionary deep intelligence. Motivated by patient privacy concerns and the idea of operational artificial intelligence, the evolutionary deep radiomic sequencer discovery approach organically evolves increasingly more efficient deep radiomic sequencers that produce significantly more compact yet similarly descriptive radiomic sequences over multiple generations. As a result, this framework improves operational efficiency and enables diagnosis to be run locally at the radiologist's computer while maintaining detection accuracy. We evaluated the evolved deep radiomic sequencer (EDRS) discovered via the proposed evolutionary deep radiomic sequencer discovery framework against state-of-the-art radiomics-driven and discovery radiomics methods using clinical lung CT data with pathologically proven diagnostic data from the LIDC-IDRI dataset. The EDRS shows improved sensitivity (93.42%), specificity (82.39%), and diagnostic accuracy (88.78%) relative to previous radiomics approaches.

  4. Armes provenant de tombes celtes d’un site inconnu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Petar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En automne 2003, lors d’un contrôle effectué à la frontière entre la Serbie et la Hongrie et en application de la loi sur la protection des biens culturels, les autorités de police ont confisqué à X une certaine quantité d’objets archéologiques en fer qui ont été confiés à la garde du Musée national de Belgrade. La plus grande partie de cette saisie, que l’on suppose être constituée de trouvailles originaires du Srem, était constituée d’armes celtes présentant divers degrés de conservation (Pl. I-III. Il s’agit de trois épées pliées avec leurs fourreaux, deux anneaux de ceinturon, six fers de lance, deux talons de lance, trois umbos dont un avec manipule en fer, deux grands coutelas, deux rasoirs, trois couteaux recourbés et un bracelet. Au vue de la nature du matériel en question il est permis d’en conclure que ces objets proviennent de tombes pillées, appartenant peut-être à une grande nécropole des Scordisques, qui correspondrait à La Tène Moyenne (LT C2, soit la première moitié et le milieu du IIe siècle av. n. è. En l’absence d’autres données on ne peut que supposer qu’il s’agit, pour le moins, de trois sépultures distinctes, en soulignant que ce matériel peut déjà être rangé parmi les plus remarquables panoplies de guerriers pour la période La Tène Moyenne provenant du territoire des Scordisques. Simultanément, il pourrait s’agir d’un excellent exemple du type d’armement des Celtes de l’Est pour cette époque.

  5. FDG uptake in the pathologically proven papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Yun, Mi Jin; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Metastatic thyroid cancers with I-131 uptake have been known to show no increase of FDG uptake whereas those without I-131 uptake tend to demonstrate increased uptake on PET. In this study, we evaluated the degree of FDG uptake in primary thyroid cancers of papillary histology before surgery. Forty FDG PET studies were performed on the patients who had papillary cancer proven by fine needle aspiration. The degree of FDG uptake was visually categorized as positive or negative (positive if the tumor showed discernible FDG; negative if the tumor didn't) and the peak standard uptake value (peak SUV) of the papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) were compared with the size of PTC. The mean size of 26 PTC with positive FDG uptake was 1.9{+-} 1.4 cm (0.5 {approx} 5 cm). In 13 PTC with negative FDG uptake, the mean size of those was 0.5 {+-} 0.2 cm (0.2 {approx} 0.9 cm). All PTC larger than 1 cm (2.5 {+-}1.4 cm, 1 {approx} 5 cm) have positive FDG uptake (peak SUV = 6.4 {+-} 5.7, 1.7 {approx} 22.7). Among the micropapillary thyroid cancer (microPTC; PTC smaller than 1 cm), 8 microPTC show positive FDG uptake (peak SUV = 2.9 {+-} 1.3, 1.7 {approx} 5.5), while 13 microPTC show negative finding (peak SUV 1.3 {+-} 0.2, 1.1{approx} 1.7). The size of microPTC with positive FDG uptake is significantly larger than that of microPTC with negative FDG uptake (0.7 {+-} 0.1cm vs 0.4 {+-} 0.2 cm, {rho} = 0.01). All PTCs larger than 1cm show positive FDG uptake in our study. In other words, thyroid lesions larger than 1cm with negative FDG uptake are unlikely to be PTC. So far, only poorly differentiated thyroid cancers are known to show increased FDG uptake. Our results seem to be contradictory to what is known in the literature. Further study is needed to understand better the significance of increased FDG uptake in PTC in relation to expression of NIS and GLUT.

  6. A straight forward approach to electrodeposit tungsten disulfide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) composites onto nanoporous gold for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xinxin [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Minwei [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kemitorvet 207, DK 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Li, Zheshen [ISA, Department of Physics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kemitorvet 207, DK 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Zhang, Jingdong, E-mail: jz@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Kemitorvet 207, DK 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Si, Pengchao, E-mail: pcsi@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Facile electrodeposition of the WS{sub 2} hybrid layer onto nanoporous gold. • Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) was approved to enhance the HER efficiency of WS{sub 2}. • The 1.1 nm deposition layer displayed a Tafel slope of 53 mV per decade. - Abstract: 1.1 nm tungsten disulfide/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was successfully electrodeposited on the surface of dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) surface to form uniform nanocomposites and offers an excellent electrocatalysis for the electrochemical dihydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic media. The approach is straight forward and does not require any expensive equipment or intensive energy. The morphology and composition of the nanocomposites were structurally mapped by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The roles of both the NPG substrate and PEDOT in the observed enhanced HER activity compared to planar Au-electrode surfaces and pure single-component WS{sub 2} have been deconvoluted experimentally. PEDOT itself is inert for the HER, but was found to improve significantly the conductivity and operating stability of the WS{sub 2} catalyst. The prepared nanocomposites reach the best in 2D WS{sub 2} catalyst family, exhibiting excellent electrochemical catalytic activity for the HER. The optimal electrode showed an onset potential of −164 mV vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), an apparent exchange current density as high as 0.04 mA cm{sup −2}, and a very low Tafel slope of 53 mV dec{sup −1}. These catalysts are promising electrocatalysts for generation a large amount of H{sub 2} from water.

  7. Investigating the provenance of thermal groundwater using compositional multivariate statistical analysis: a hydrogeochemical study from Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Murray, John; Flood, Rory; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The geothermal energy of thermal groundwater is currently being exploited for district-scale heating in many locations world-wide. The chemical compositions of these thermal waters reflect the provenance and hydrothermal circulation patterns of the groundwater, which are controlled by recharge, rock type and geological structure. Exploring the provenance of these waters using multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) techniques increases our understanding of the hydrothermal circulation systems, and provides a reliable tool for assessing these resources. Hydrochemical data from thermal springs situated in the Carboniferous Dublin Basin in east-central Ireland were explored using MSA, including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), to investigate the source aquifers of the thermal groundwaters. To take into account the compositional nature of the hydrochemical data, compositional data analysis (CoDa) techniques were used to process the data prior to the MSA. The results of the MSA were examined alongside detailed time-lapse temperature measurements from several of the springs, and indicate the influence of three important hydrogeological processes on the hydrochemistry of the thermal waters: 1) increased salinity due to evaporite dissolution and increased water-rock-interaction; 2) dissolution of carbonates; and 3) dissolution of metal sulfides and oxides associated with mineral deposits. The use of MSA within the CoDa framework identified subtle temporal variations in the hydrochemistry of the thermal springs, which could not be identified with more traditional graphing methods (e.g., Piper diagrams), or with a standard statistical approach. The MSA was successful in distinguishing different geological settings and different annual behaviours within the group of springs. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the application of MSA within the CoDa framework in order to better understand the underlying controlling processes

  8. Isotopic and magnetic provenance characterization of distal IRD in the Galicia Interior Basin (NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Morlote, Maider; Rey, Daniel; Francisco Santos, Jose; Ribeiro, Sara; Bernabeu, Ana; Mohamed, Kais; Heslop, David; Rubio, Belén; Martins, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    The sediments of the Galicia Interior Basin in NW Iberia Margin are of particular palaeoclimatic interest as they are located at the boundary where the climatic oscillations of the glacial interval were interrupted by extreme events such as Heinrich events. These events are well characterized in Northern North Atlantic areas, but little is known about their occurrence beyond the Ruddiman belt. This study presents a combined environmagnetic and geochemical approach to the provenance and characterization of distal ice-rafted detritus (IRD) that occurred during the last glacial period in core CI12PC3 from the Galicia Interior Basin. The last six Heinrich Layers were identified by their magneto-mineralogical and geochemical properties. Their Sr and Nd isotopic signatures indicated that the Laurentide Ice Sheet was the major source for HL1, HL2, HL4 and HL5. However, the European ice sheets also influenced the initial development stages of HL1, HL2, HL4. HL3, HL6 and partially HL1, HL2 and HL4 were influenced by more juvenile provinces, such as Iceland/Faroes sheets and/or by the Fram Strait/East Greenland nearby areas. Separate provenance analyses of the coarse and fine fractions in the studied Heinrich Layers also indicated that IRDs and glacial flour sources might not always be the same. Our results shed unequivocal evidence that Canadian-sourced distal IRD are preceded by European-sourced IRD, at least from the H4. In our view, LIS and EIS instabilities registered in the Iberian Margin respond to the same climate forcing at different velocities.

  9. Provenance-Based Approaches to Semantic Web Service Discovery and Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, Thomas William

    2012-01-01

    The World Wide Web Consortium defines a Web Service as "a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network." Web Services have become increasingly important both within and across organizational boundaries. With the recent advent of the Semantic Web, web services have evolved into semantic…

  10. A multi-analytical approach to gold in Ancient Egypt: Studies on provenance and corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissot, I., E-mail: isabeltissot@gmail.com [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Campo Grande, 1649-004 Lisbon (Portugal); Troalen, L.G. [National Museums Scotland, Collections Services Department, 242 West Granton Road, Edinburgh EH5 1JA (United Kingdom); Manso, M. [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Faculdade de Belas-Artes da Universidade de Lisboa, Largo da Academia Nacional de Belas-Artes, 1249-058 Lisbon (Portugal); Ponting, M. [Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ (United Kingdom); Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Barreiros, M.A. [LNEG, I.P., Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisbon (Portugal); Shaw, I. [Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, University of Liverpool, 12-14 Abercromby Square, Liverpool L69 7WZ (United Kingdom); Carvalho, M.L. [LIBPhys – UNL, Faculty of Science and Technology, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Guerra, M.F. [ArchAm, UMR 8096 CNRS - Université Paris Sorbonne, MAE, 21 allée de l' Université, 92023 Nanterre (France)

    2015-06-01

    Recent results from a three-year multi-disciplinary project on Ancient Egyptian gold jewellery revealed that items of jewellery from the Middle Kingdom to the New Kingdom were manufactured using a variety of alluvial gold alloys. These alloys cover a wide range of colours and the majority contain Platinum Group Elements inclusions. However, in all the gold foils analysed, these inclusions were found to be absent. In this work a selection of gilded wood and leather items and gold foil fragments, all from the excavations by John Garstang at Abydos (primarily from Middle Kingdom graves), were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF), Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (µPIXE) and Double Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (D{sup 2}XRF). The work allowed us to characterise the composition of the base-alloys and also to reveal the presence of Pt at trace levels, confirming the use of alluvial gold deposits. Corrosion products were also investigated in the foils where surface tarnish was visually observed. Results showed that the differences in the colour of corrosion observed for the foils are related not only to the thickness of the corrosion layer but also to a multi-layer structure containing the various corrosion products. - Highlights: • Multi-analytical protocol based on techniques with different MDLs and spatial resolution • Application of D{sup 2}XRF developed at synchrotron BESSY II for determination of Pt in Au with a MDL of 1 ppm • Egyptian gold alloys have nanoporous corrosion layers where distinct corrosion phases could be identified. • Egyptian gold foils are made with different gold base alloys, but all containing alluvial gold.

  11. A multi-analytical approach to gold in Ancient Egypt: Studies on provenance and corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, I.; Troalen, L. G.; Manso, M.; Ponting, M.; Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Barreiros, M. A.; Shaw, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Guerra, M. F.

    2015-06-01

    Recent results from a three-year multi-disciplinary project on Ancient Egyptian gold jewellery revealed that items of jewellery from the Middle Kingdom to the New Kingdom were manufactured using a variety of alluvial gold alloys. These alloys cover a wide range of colours and the majority contain Platinum Group Elements inclusions. However, in all the gold foils analysed, these inclusions were found to be absent. In this work a selection of gilded wood and leather items and gold foil fragments, all from the excavations by John Garstang at Abydos (primarily from Middle Kingdom graves), were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF), Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (μPIXE) and Double Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (D2XRF). The work allowed us to characterise the composition of the base-alloys and also to reveal the presence of Pt at trace levels, confirming the use of alluvial gold deposits. Corrosion products were also investigated in the foils where surface tarnish was visually observed. Results showed that the differences in the colour of corrosion observed for the foils are related not only to the thickness of the corrosion layer but also to a multi-layer structure containing the various corrosion products.

  12. The provenance of selected heavy metals in soils near power plant of Hamedan: A pedological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Nosratipoor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To determine the origin of heavy metals, the effects of parent materials, soil genesis, and human activities on the content and distribution of selected metals in soils near Mofateh Martyr powerhouse, Hamedan, were assessed. Six types of parent materials including shale, schist, limestone, alluvial plain, alluvial terraces and fan deposits were identified and soil genesis were studied. Total content of Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn, Pb, Fe were determined in soil horizons and parent materials. Concentration of the metals in four different chemical phases, including acetic acid extractable, reducible, oxidizable and residual fractions, was determined with four-step sequential extraction procedure. Soil development is limited in the studied region so that the discrepancy between solum and parent material in terms of heavy metal content is not great in general. Calcareous soils and limestone have the lowest amount of copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, lead and iron. Independent of soil types and parent materials, most of the heavy metals, except Mn, were present in the residual fraction. The concentration of Mn in all profiles is highest in reducible fraction. Low degree of soil development and the prevalent presence of metals in residual fraction show the influential role of parent materials in controlling metal concentration and distribution; pedogenic processes have minor effects. The role of human activities is limited for most of the selected metals; however, the tangible presence of Pb and, in some cases, Cd in acetic acid extractable fraction, reflects the impact of human activities on the concentrations of these two metals.

  13. Effects of provenance and seed size on seedling survival and mophology of Quercus pontica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aksu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of provenance and seed size on seedling survival and growth of Quercus pontica. The study showed that seed parameters showed significant differences among provenances. Provenance and seed size affected seedling survival and seedling morphology. Bigger seed size increased seedling survival, and also the large sized seed showed significant higher seedling height, root dry weight, shoot dry weight, and Dickson Quality Index in 1+0 seedlings.

  14. On the Expressiveness of Implicit Provenance in Query and Update Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Buneman, Peter; Cheney, James; Vansummeren, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    Information describing the origin of data, generally referred to as provenance, is important in scientific and curated databases where it is the basis for the trust one puts in their contents. Since such databases are constructed using operations of both query and update languages, it is of paramount importance to describe the effect of these languages on provenance. In this article we study provenance for query and update languages that are closely related to SQL, and compare two ways in wh...

  15. Geisinger's ProvenCare methodology: driving performance improvement within a shared governance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Ruth; Wary, Andrea; King, Megan; Laam, Leslie A; Hallick, Susan

    2011-05-01

    Many performance improvement projects fail because they occur in parallel to the organization's shared governance structure. Leveraging the full potential of its nursing shared governance structure, Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare methodology harnessed the full potential of its staff nurses to create truly reliable workflows that benefit patients and that the team finds professionally satisfying. Using ProvenCare Perinatal and its smoking cessation education intervention and outcomes as an example, the authors describe the ProvenCare methodology.

  16. PERFORMANCE OF 28-YEAR-OLD PROVENANCES OF LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AT TWO SITES IN WESTERN KENYA

    OpenAIRE

    Joram M. E. Mbinga; Ebby Chagala-Odera

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic variation in growth of ten 28-year-old Liquidambar styraciflua provenances was studied at two sites, Lugari and Kakamega in Western Kenya. The trial at each site was established in a Randomized Block Design with the ten provenances replicated in four blocks. Each block had ten square plots corresponding to the ten provenances and each plot had thirty six trees. Analysis of growth data gave results which showed a significant difference (P

  17. Leaf morphometric characteristics variability of different beech provenances in juvenile development stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijačić-Nikolić Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic status of beech from the Balkan Peninsula is not yet clearly defined. There is no agreement among different authors about the morphological characteristics discriminating between the Balkan and European and/or Eastern beech. For most characteristics, the mean values are different but the ranges of variation overlap considerably. Provenance trial of beech established in Serbia, at the locality Debeli Lug, has provided an opportunity for research of interprovenance variability at the level of leaf morphometric characteristics in juvenile development stage. Research included 10 provenances originating from the Western Balkans (Serbian provenance 36 and 38; Croatian provenance 24 and 25; Bosnian provenance 30 and 32 and from Central Europe (German provenance 47 and 49; Austrian provenance 56 and Hungarian provenance 42, where following morphometric characteristics were analyzed: leaf length (Ll, leaf width (Lw, petiole lenght (Pl, leaf base width on 1 cm (Blw, number of veins - left (Vl, number of veins - right (Vr, distance between 3rd and 4th vein - left (Dv 3-4. The results of this research show existence of clear differentiation among provenances from the Western Balkan and from Central Europe, from the point of leaf dimensions, number of veins and leaf base width. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31041: Establishment of Wood Plantations Intended for Afforestation of Serbia i br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  18. Growth dynamics variation of different larch provenances under the mountain conditions in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulej, M. [Univ. of Agriculture, Cracow (Poland). Section of Seed Production and Selection

    1995-12-31

    The results of 25-year investigations based on measurements and statistical analysis concerning the growth dynamics variation of larch provenances from the entire area of Poland are reported in this paper. This is the first larch provenance experiment in Poland under mountain conditions. The results obtained showed a significant variability among the provenances tested as regards the basic growth characters (height, d.b.h., growth index) at the age of 5, 8, 11, 15, 20 and 25 years. The larch from Klodzko and Proszkow turned out to be the best in respect of growth during the entire 25-years period. Decidedly bad were provenances from Marcule, Grojec, Rawa mazowiecka and Kroscienko. We cannot forecast the future growth of larch when trees are 5-years old since such prognosis may carry an error. However, on the basis of the results obtained it may be concluded that when trees are about 8 years old the stabilization of the position of individual provenances as regards growth takes place. The height growth curves for the individual provenances during the 25-years period (with exception of the provenance from Marcule) fall within the interval {+-} 0,5S from the compensated curve for the entire population studied. All larch provenances in the experiment had reached the height growth culmination. A greatest differentiation in respect of this character occurred in case of the provenances from Sudetes. 27 refs, 4 figs, 8 tabs

  19. An approach to non-traditional partners: the evolution of the ties between Argentina and the gulf monarchies during the administrations of Cristina Fernandez (2007-2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Fabani, Ornela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the evolution of the political-diplomatic and the economic and trade links between Argentina and the Gulf monarchies, as well as the factors that explain this evolution, during the administrations of Cristina Fernandez (2007- 2015). Meanwhile, the premise that informs it is that that during Fernandez's governments the political and diplomatic relations between Argentina and the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar became more dyna...

  20. A powerful toolkit for synthetic biology: Over 3.8 billion years of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J

    2010-04-01

    The combination of evolutionary with engineering principles will enhance synthetic biology. Conversely, synthetic biology has the potential to enrich evolutionary biology by explaining why some adaptive space is empty, on Earth or elsewhere. Synthetic biology, the design and construction of artificial biological systems, substitutes bio-engineering for evolution, which is seen as an obstacle. But because evolution has produced the complexity and diversity of life, it provides a proven toolkit of genetic materials and principles available to synthetic biology. Evolution operates on the population level, with the populations composed of unique individuals that are historical entities. The source of genetic novelty includes mutation, gene regulation, sex, symbiosis, and interspecies gene transfer. At a phenotypic level, variation derives from regulatory control, replication and diversification of components, compartmentalization, sexual selection and speciation, among others. Variation is limited by physical constraints such as diffusion, and chemical constraints such as reaction rates and membrane fluidity. While some of these tools of evolution are currently in use in synthetic biology, all ought to be examined for utility. A hybrid approach of synthetic biology coupled with fine-tuning through evolution is suggested.

  1. A Powerful Toolkit for Synthetic Biology: Over 3.8 Billion Years of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of evolutionary with engineering principles will enhance synthetic biology. Conversely, synthetic biology has the potential to enrich evolutionary biology by explaining why some adaptive space is empty, on Earth or elsewhere. Synthetic biology, the design and construction of artificial biological systems, substitutes bio-engineering for evolution, which is seen as an obstacle. But because evolution has produced the complexity and diversity of life, it provides a proven toolkit of genetic materials and principles available to synthetic biology. Evolution operates on the population level, with the populations composed of unique individuals that are historical entities. The source of genetic novelty includes mutation, gene regulation, sex, symbiosis, and interspecies gene transfer. At a phenotypic level, variation derives from regulatory control, replication and diversification of components, compartmentalization, sexual selection and speciation, among others. Variation is limited by physical constraints such as diffusion, and chemical constraints such as reaction rates and membrane fluidity. While some of these tools of evolution are currently in use in synthetic biology, all ought to be examined for utility. A hybrid approach of synthetic biology coupled with fine-tuning through evolution is suggested

  2. New markers to identify the provenance of lapis lazuli: trace elements in pyrite by means of micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Re, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Angelici, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Torino (Italy); Lo Giudice, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Maupas, E. [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Torino (Italy); Giuntini, L.; Calusi, S.; Massi, M.; Mando, P.A. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Fisica, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Gelli, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Borghi, A. [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Torino (Italy); Gallo, L.M. [Museo Regionale di Scienze Naturali, Torino (Italy); Pratesi, G. [Universita di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Firenze (Italy); Museo di Storia Naturale, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    Lapis lazuli has been used for glyptics and carving since the fifth millennium BC to produce jewels, amulets, seals, inlays, etc; the identification of the origin of the stone used for carving artworks may be valuable for reconstructing old trade routes. Since ancient lapis lazuli art objects are precious, only non-destructive techniques can be used to identify their provenance, and ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques allow us to characterise this stone in a fully non-invasive way. In addition, by using an ion microprobe, we have been able to focus the analysis on single crystals, as their typical dimensions may range from a few microns to hundreds of microns. Provenance markers, identified in previous IBA studies and already presented elsewhere, were based on the presence/absence of mineral phases, on the presence/quantity of trace elements inside a phase and on characteristic features of the luminescence spectra. In this work, a systematic study on pyrite crystals, a common accessory mineral in lapis lazuli, was carried out, following a multi-technique approach: optical microscopy and SEM-EDX to select crystals for successive trace element micro-PIXE measurements at two Italian facilities, the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and the INFN LABEC laboratory in Firenze. The results of this work allowed us to obtain new markers for lapis lazuli provenance identification. (orig.)

  3. Soils evolution and treeline fluctuations under late Holocene climatic changes: an integrated approach from Valle d'Aosta (Western European Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Anna; Leonelli, Giovanni; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Sebag, David; Pozzi, Emanuele D.; Pelfini, Manuela; Maggi, Valter; Trombino, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The treeline ecotone, defined as the transition belt in mountain vegetation between the closed forest (timberline) and the alpine grasslands, is one of the most distinctive features of mountain environments and it is widely considered as a climatic boundary. Treeline altitudinal fluctuations may be considered to assess past and ongoing climatic and environmental changes. Although the ecological dynamics of the alpine treeline ecotone is mainly influenced by climate, especially by soil temperature, climatic parameters are not the only factors that influence the treeline position. In fact, the treeline altitude may be locally influenced by environmental factors, geomorphological processes, soil development, and human activities. This study aims at the reconstruction of late Holocene soil evolution and environmental changes at the treeline on the SW slope of the Becca di Viou Mountain in Valle d'Aosta (Western Italian Alps). First, we performed a detailed reconstruction of the treeline altitudinal dynamics. In addition, field (including air and soil temperatures) and laboratory (of both mineral and organic compounds) characterizations have been performed along two transects of seven soil profiles developing at an altitude ranging from 2100 m a.s.l. (closed forest) to 2400 m a.s.l. (treeline ecotone), in order to understand the relationships between colonization by trees and soil development under the ongoing climate change. The upward shift of the treeline was assessed analyzing tree age distribution along the slope by means of a tree-ring based approach. The reconstruction of the treeline altitudinal dynamics (based on years at which the trees reached 2 m in height) at the study site reveals an upward shift of 115 m over the period 1901-2000, reaching the altitude of 2515 m a.s.l. in 2008. The recent treeline shift and the acceleration of tree colonization rates in the alpine belt can be mainly attributed to a climatic input, and particularly to an increasing

  4. Guiding Architects in Selecting Architectural Evolution Alternatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciraci, S.; Sözer, Hasan; Aksit, Mehmet

    Although there exist methods and tools to support architecture evolution, the derivation and evaluation of alternative evolution paths are realized manually. In this paper, we introduce an approach, where architecture specification is converted to a graph representation. Based on this

  5. Lowering the Barrier to Reproducible Research by Publishing Provenance from Common Analytical Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. B.; Slaughter, P.; Walker, L.; Jones, C. S.; Missier, P.; Ludäscher, B.; Cao, Y.; McPhillips, T.; Schildhauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific provenance describes the authenticity, origin, and processing history of research products and promotes scientific transparency by detailing the steps in computational workflows that produce derived products. These products include papers, findings, input data, software products to perform computations, and derived data and visualizations. The geosciences community values this type of information, and, at least theoretically, strives to base conclusions on computationally replicable findings. In practice, capturing detailed provenance is laborious and thus has been a low priority; beyond a lab notebook describing methods and results, few researchers capture and preserve detailed records of scientific provenance. We have built tools for capturing and publishing provenance that integrate into analytical environments that are in widespread use by geoscientists (R and Matlab). These tools lower the barrier to provenance generation by automating capture of critical information as researchers prepare data for analysis, develop, test, and execute models, and create visualizations. The 'recordr' library in R and the `matlab-dataone` library in Matlab provide shared functions to capture provenance with minimal changes to normal working procedures. Researchers can capture both scripted and interactive sessions, tag and manage these executions as they iterate over analyses, and then prune and publish provenance metadata and derived products to the DataONE federation of archival repositories. Provenance traces conform to the ProvONE model extension of W3C PROV, enabling interoperability across tools and languages. The capture system supports fine-grained versioning of science products and provenance traces. By assigning global identifiers such as DOIs, reseachers can cite the computational processes used to reach findings. And, finally, DataONE has built a web portal to search, browse, and clearly display provenance relationships between input data, the software

  6. Glucose test provenance recording in UK primary care: was that fasted or random?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, A P; Fieldhouse, H; Tippu, Z; Jones, S; Munro, N; de Lusignan, S

    2017-01-01

    To describe the proportion of glucose tests with unrecorded provenance in routine primary care data and identify the impact on clinical practice. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of blood glucose measurements from the Royal College of General Practitioner Research and Surveillance Centre database, which includes primary care records from >100 practices across England and Wales. All blood glucose results recorded during 2013 were identified. Tests were grouped by provenance (fasting, oral glucose tolerance test, random, none specified and other). A clinical audit in a single primary care practice was also performed to identify the impact of failing to record glucose provenance on diabetes diagnosis. A total of 2 137 098 people were included in the cross-sectional analysis. Of 203 350 recorded glucose measurements the majority (117 893; 58%) did not have any provenance information. The most commonly reported provenance was fasting glucose (75 044; 37%). The distribution of glucose values where provenance was not recorded was most similar to that of fasting samples. The glucose measurements of 256 people with diabetes in the audit practice (size 11 514 people) were analysed. The initial glucose measurement had no provenance information in 164 cases (64.1%). A clinician questioned the provenance of a result in 41 cases (16.0%); of these, 14 (34.1%) required repeating. Lack of provenance led to delays in the diagnosis of diabetes [median (range) 30 (3-614) days]. The recording of glucose provenance in UK primary care could be improved. Failure to record provenance causes unnecessary repeated testing, delayed diagnosis and wasted clinician time. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  7. Is cosmic acceleration proven by local cosmological probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutusaus, I.; Lamine, B.; Dupays, A.; Blanchard, A.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The cosmological concordance model (ΛCDM) matches the cosmological observations exceedingly well. This model has become the standard cosmological model with the evidence for an accelerated expansion provided by the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Hubble diagram. However, the robustness of this evidence has been addressed recently with somewhat diverging conclusions. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to assess the robustness of the conclusion that the Universe is indeed accelerating if we rely only on low-redshift (z ≲ 2) observations, that is to say with SNIa, baryonic acoustic oscillations, measurements of the Hubble parameter at different redshifts, and measurements of the growth of matter perturbations. Methods: We used the standard statistical procedure of minimizing the χ2 function for the different probes to quantify the goodness of fit of a model for both ΛCDM and a simple nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model. In this analysis, we do not assume that supernovae intrinsic luminosity is independent of the redshift, which has been a fundamental assumption in most previous studies that cannot be tested. Results: We have found that, when SNIa intrinsic luminosity is not assumed to be redshift independent, a nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model is able to fit the low-redshift background data as well as, or even slightly better, than ΛCDM. When measurements of the growth of structures are added, a nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model still provides an excellent fit to the data for all the luminosity evolution models considered. Conclusions: Without the standard assumption that supernovae intrinsic luminosity is independent of the redshift, low-redshift probes are consistent with a nonaccelerated universe.

  8. Can inferred provenance and its visualisation be used to detect erroneous annotation? A case study using UniProtKB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael J; Collison, Matthew; Lord, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    A constant influx of new data poses a challenge in keeping the annotation in biological databases current. Most biological databases contain significant quantities of textual annotation, which often contains the richest source of knowledge. Many databases reuse existing knowledge; during the curation process annotations are often propagated between entries. However, this is often not made explicit. Therefore, it can be hard, potentially impossible, for a reader to identify where an annotation originated from. Within this work we attempt to identify annotation provenance and track its subsequent propagation. Specifically, we exploit annotation reuse within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), at the level of individual sentences. We describe a visualisation approach for the provenance and propagation of sentences in UniProtKB which enables a large-scale statistical analysis. Initially levels of sentence reuse within UniProtKB were analysed, showing that reuse is heavily prevalent, which enables the tracking of provenance and propagation. By analysing sentences throughout UniProtKB, a number of interesting propagation patterns were identified, covering over [Formula: see text] sentences. Over [Formula: see text] sentences remain in the database after they have been removed from the entries where they originally occurred. Analysing a subset of these sentences suggest that approximately [Formula: see text] are erroneous, whilst [Formula: see text] appear to be inconsistent. These results suggest that being able to visualise sentence propagation and provenance can aid in the determination of the accuracy and quality of textual annotation. Source code and supplementary data are available from the authors website at http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/m.j.bell1/sentence_analysis/.

  9. Can Inferred Provenance and Its Visualisation Be Used to Detect Erroneous Annotation? A Case Study Using UniProtKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael J.; Collison, Matthew; Lord, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    A constant influx of new data poses a challenge in keeping the annotation in biological databases current. Most biological databases contain significant quantities of textual annotation, which often contains the richest source of knowledge. Many databases reuse existing knowledge; during the curation process annotations are often propagated between entries. However, this is often not made explicit. Therefore, it can be hard, potentially impossible, for a reader to identify where an annotation originated from. Within this work we attempt to identify annotation provenance and track its subsequent propagation. Specifically, we exploit annotation reuse within the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), at the level of individual sentences. We describe a visualisation approach for the provenance and propagation of sentences in UniProtKB which enables a large-scale statistical analysis. Initially levels of sentence reuse within UniProtKB were analysed, showing that reuse is heavily prevalent, which enables the tracking of provenance and propagation. By analysing sentences throughout UniProtKB, a number of interesting propagation patterns were identified, covering over sentences. Over sentences remain in the database after they have been removed from the entries where they originally occurred. Analysing a subset of these sentences suggest that approximately are erroneous, whilst appear to be inconsistent. These results suggest that being able to visualise sentence propagation and provenance can aid in the determination of the accuracy and quality of textual annotation. Source code and supplementary data are available from the authors website at http://homepages.cs.ncl.ac.uk/m.j.bell1/sentence_analysis/. PMID:24143170

  10. Russia-Ghana relations in the past and the present: a time-proven partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sergeevna Kulkova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article of Russian and Ghanaian authors describes the evolution of political and economic relations between Soviet Union/Russia and Ghana throughout different historical periods (starting from 1950s to present. Great attention is paid to the basis of the cooperation laid in Soviet period. The article also observes current tendencies of the bilateral relations, which are quite friendly and fruitful. Moscow regards the Republic of Ghana as a reliable, time-proven partner especially on international issues: the establishment of a more democratic polycentric world order, ensuring regional and strategic stability, disarmament, combating international terrorism and other global challenges and threats. Russia and Ghana provide each other mutual support in the election of representatives of the two countries in international organizations. Russia and Ghana also develop their cooperation in the field of security. The participation of USSR/Russia in foreign trade of Ghana is analyzed. The significant increase in the number of Ghanaian trade partners is indicated while the share of Great Britain decreases and the share of Asian, African and other states increases. In recent years, the favorable conditions for the development of Russian-Ghanaian trade and economic relations were created. The cooperation of the two countries also develops in the field of nuclear energy. The main bilateral visits between Ghana and Russia are examined in the article. The special attention is paid to the first meeting of the Russian-Ghanaian Inter-governmental commission on trade, economic, academic and technical cooperation took place in Moscow in October 2014.

  11. Dust provenance change of Chinese Loess Plateau during the past 7Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanzhi

    2017-04-01

    Aeolian deposit (e.g. loess, paleo-soil and Red Clay) in Chinese Loess Plateau is one of the most valuable climate archives on land in late Cenozoic. Surveying the origin of these aeolian sediments is essential for the interpretation of the climate proxies potentially over the past 25Ma. However, disputes still exist on whether or not there is shift of dust origin in tectonic time scale or glacial-interglacial time scale. Detrital zircon dating method is applied on aeolian sediments of Lantian site in south part of Chinese Loess Plateau, which is at the foot of Qinling Mountain in order to reveal the provenance evolution during the past 7Ma. The results indicate that the composition of aeolian sediments shifted at around 2.6 Ma. Detrital zircon age reveals that the tertiary Red Clay is mainly derived from the North Tibet Plateau and Qinling Mountain. This indicates that the origin area for the tertiary Red Clay is relative local. Quaternary Loess of this site is basically mixture of sediments from North Tibet Plateau and Gobi Altay Mountains. The composition of local sediments from Qinling Mountains is relatively low. Sediment in L1 layer contains the highest proportions of Gobi Altay Mountains material, which show completely different pattern from other loess sediments. Besides this, there are no consistent composition shifts between glacial and interglacial periods. The time of dust origin shift is in coincident with initiation of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheet. This suggests that the onset of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheet enhanced the surface erosion of the area of Gobi Altay Mountains. This process contributed more detrital material to be blown to the air. Furthermore, enhanced winter monsoon played an important role in the transportation of dust material. However, the reason for the unique characteristics of loess in L1 is not clear.

  12. An Inference-Based Framework to Manage Data Provenance in Geoscience Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Apers, Peter M.G.; Wombacher, Andreas

    Data provenance allows scientists to validate their model as well as to investigate the origin of an unexpected value. Furthermore, it can be used as a replication recipe for output data products. However, capturing provenance requires enormous effort by scientists in terms of time and training.

  13. Inferring Fine-Grained Data Provenance in Stream Data Processing: Reduced Storage Cost, High Accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Wombacher, Andreas; Apers, Peter M.G.; Hameurlain, Abdelkader; Liddle, Stephen W.; Schewe, Klaus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaofang

    Fine-grained data provenance ensures reproducibility of results in decision making, process control and e-science applications. However, maintaining this provenance is challenging in stream data processing because of its massive storage consumption, especially with large overlapping sliding windows.

  14. 77 FR 57637 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Place of Provenance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Place of Provenance--Regional... the exhibition ``The Place of Provenance--Regional Styles in Tibetan Painting,'' imported from abroad...

  15. Data Provenance Inference in Logic Programming: Reducing Effort of Instance-driven Debugging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Mileo, Alessandra; Wombacher, Andreas

    Data provenance allows scientists in different domains validating their models and algorithms to find out anomalies and unexpected behaviors. In previous works, we described on-the-fly interpretation of (Python) scripts to build workflow provenance graph automatically and then infer fine-grained

  16. Proven non-carriers in BRCA families have an earlier age of onset of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Janet; de Bock, G.H.; Teixeira, N.; van der Kolk, D.M.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Mourits, M.J.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.

    Background: Risk estimates for proven non-carriers in BRCA mutation families are inconsistent for breast cancer and lacking for ovarian cancer. We aimed to assess the age-related risks for breast and ovarian cancer for proven non-carriers in these families. Methods: A consecutive cohort study

  17. Plastic Growth response of European beech provenances to dry site conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojnic, S.; Sass, U.G.W.; Orlovic, S.; Matovic, B.; Eilmann, B.

    2013-01-01

    Due to projected global warming, there is a great concern about the ability of European beech to adapt to future climate conditions. Provenance trials provide an excellent basis to assess the potential of various provenances to adjust to given climate conditions. In this study we compared the

  18. Effect of light intensities on the photosynthetic characteristics of Abies holophylla seedlings from different provenances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The photosynthetic characteristics of Abies holophylla seedlings from six provenances under four artificial light intensities in a greenhouse (full light, 75.08%, 55.42%, and 30.38% of full light were studied to explore the underlying genetic differences in foliar photosynthesis. Varying light intensities significantly affected the foliar photosynthetic parameters of A. holophylla seedlings from six provenances. As the light intensity dropped, the foliar CO2 assimilation capacity of A. holophylla seedlings sharply decreased, and the foliar light utilization capacity significantly increased. Analysis of genetic variation showed highly significant differences in terms of CO2 assimilation capacity, light utilization capacity, and respiration depletion of A. holophylla seedlings among different provenances under different light intensities. The variations were mainly controlled by the genetic factors of the provenance itself. The obtained results revealed that different sensitivities of A. holophylla seedlings from different provenances in response to changed light intensities elicited significant differences in foliar photosynthesis among different provenances. The relationships between sensitivities and annual temperature difference, mean temperature in January, and mean annual evaporation of provenance were found to be the most closely related, which indicated that temperature range and effective precipitation of provenance were the main factors that affected photosynthetic plasticity of A. holophylla seedlings. 

  19. Five-year results of a ponderosa pine provenance study in the Black Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Van Deusen

    1974-01-01

    Survival and height growth data were collected after five field growing seasons from ponderosa pine progeny representing 75 provenances of natural stands in the Great Plains and Northern Rockies. Results showed that trees from no other provenance survived significantly better or grew significantly taller than trees from the Black Hills. Trees from southern Colorado,...

  20. High School Students' Perceptions of Evolution Instruction: Acceptance and Evolution Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.; Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

    2009-01-01

    Evolution is an important and sometimes controversial component of high school biology. In this study, we used a mixed methods approach to explore students' evolution acceptance and views of evolution teaching and learning. Students explained their acceptance and rejection of evolution in terms of evidence and conflicts with religion and…

  1. EFFECTS OF COLD STRATIFICATION AND GA3 ON GERMINATION OF ARBUTUS UNEDO SEEDS OF THREE PROVENANCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinis, Elias; Stampoulidis, Athanasios; Milios, Elias; Kitikidou, Kyriaki; Radoglou, Kalliopi

    2017-01-01

    Arbutus unedo is a valuable Mediterranean shrub as an ornamental plant as well as fruit tree. Fresh fruits of A. unedo are a good source of antioxidants, of vitamins C, E and carotenoids and also are characterized by the high content of mineral elements. The effects of gibberellic acid (GA3) and cold stratification (CS) on seed germination performance were investigated in A. unedo seeds collected from three provenances in the Northern part of Greece. Seeds of each provenance were soaked in solutions of GA3 (500, 1000 or 2000 ppm) for 24 h and subsequently were subjected to CS at 3 - 5°C for 0, 1, 2, and 3 months. Non-stratified seeds of the three A. unedo provenances which were not treated with GA3 solutions exhibited very low germination. However, seed germination was significantly improved after a one-month period of CS. Similarly, the non-stratified seeds of all three provenances became non-dormant after the treatment with 2000 ppm GA3 and they germinated at high percentages. However, in untreated seeds with GA3, after a one-month CS period the seeds of the Pieria provenance exhibited higher germination percentage than that of Rodopi provenance seeds. Furthermore, in non-stratified seeds, the Pieria provenance seeds treated with GA3 germinated at higher percentages and more rapidly than those of the other two provenances. The results indicated that untreated seeds exhibited very low germination at 20/25°C. However, in all three provenances seed germinability was significantly improved by a one-month period of CS or treatment of seeds with 2000 ppm GA3. Furthermore, there was a considerable variability among seed provenances in response to the treatments which were applied.

  2. Diverging Drought Resistance of Scots Pine Provenances Revealed by Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Seidel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With recent climate changes, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. forests have been affected by die-off events. Assisted migration of adapted provenances mitigates drought impacts and promotes forest regeneration. Although suitable provenances are difficult to identify by traditional ecophysiological techniques, which are time consuming and invasive, plant water status can be easily assessed by infrared thermography. Thus, we examined the stress responses of 2-year-old potted Scots pine seedlings from six provenances (Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain based on two thermal indices (crop water stress index and stomatal conductance index. Both indices were derived from infrared images during a six-week drought/control treatment in a greenhouse in the summer of 2013. The pines were monitored during the stress and subsequent recovery period. After controlling for fluctuating environmental conditions, soil moisture or treatment-specific water supply was the most important driver of drought stress. The stress magnitude and response to soil water deficit depended on provenance. Under moderate drought conditions, pines from western and eastern Mediterranean provenances (Bulgaria, France, and Spain expressed lower stress levels than those from both continental provenances (Germany and Poland. In pines from the Spanish and Bulgarian provenances, the stress level differences were significantly lower than in continental pines. Moreover, pines from continental provenances were less resilient (showed less recovery after the stress period than Mediterranean pines. Under extreme drought, all provenances were equally stressed with almost no significant differences in their thermal indices. Provenance-specific differences in drought resistance, which are associated with factors such as summer precipitation at the origin of Scots pine seedlings, may offer promising tracks of adaptation to future drought risks.

  3. Scientific Reproducibility in Biomedical Research: Provenance Metadata Ontology for Semantic Annotation of Study Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Valdez, Joshua; Rueschman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reproducibility is key to scientific progress as it allows the research community to build on validated results, protect patients from potentially harmful trial drugs derived from incorrect results, and reduce wastage of valuable resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a systematic guideline titled "Rigor and Reproducibility " for supporting reproducible research studies, which has also been accepted by several scientific journals. These journals will require published articles to conform to these new guidelines. Provenance metadata describes the history or origin of data and it has been long used in computer science to capture metadata information for ensuring data quality and supporting scientific reproducibility. In this paper, we describe the development of Provenance for Clinical and healthcare Research (ProvCaRe) framework together with a provenance ontology to support scientific reproducibility by formally modeling a core set of data elements representing details of research study. We extend the PROV Ontology (PROV-O), which has been recommended as the provenance representation model by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), to represent both: (a) data provenance, and (b) process provenance. We use 124 study variables from 6 clinical research studies from the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) to evaluate the coverage of the provenance ontology. NSRR is the largest repository of NIH-funded sleep datasets with 50,000 studies from 36,000 participants. The provenance ontology reuses ontology concepts from existing biomedical ontologies, for example the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), to model the provenance information of research studies. The ProvCaRe framework is being developed as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) data provenance project.

  4. Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, Jeanna

    2005-01-01

    Eighty years after the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," which tested a teacher's right to discuss the theory of evolution in the classroom, evolution--and its most recent counterview, called "intelligent design"--are in the headlines again, and just about everyone seems to have an opinion. This past July, President Bush weighed in, telling…

  5. Evolution. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Carol

    This teacher's guide was developed to assist teachers in the use of multimedia resources for the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) program, "Evolution." Each unit uses an inquiry-based approach to meet the National Science Education Standards. Units include: (1) "What is the Nature of Science?"; (2) "Who Was Charles Darwin?"; (3) "What is the…

  6. Darwinism: Evolution or Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Niles R.

    1989-01-01

    Maintains that Darwin's theory of evolution was more than a science versus religion debate; rather it was a revolutionary concept that influenced numerous social and political ideologies and movements throughout western history. Traces the impact of Darwin's work historically, utilizing a holistic approach. (RW)

  7. Evolution of rhizobium symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of rhizobium symbiosis is studied from several points of view in this thesis. The ultimate goal of the combined approaches is to unravel the genetic constrains of the symbiotic interaction. To this end the legume rhizobium symbiosis is studied in model plant species from the

  8. Presenting Provenance Based on User Roles - Experiences from the ACOS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, P.; Michaelis, J.; Fox, P. A.; Zednik, S.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    One goal of provenance is to provide users an understanding of the steps a system took to generate data products. Here, the level of detail captured by provenance becomes an important consideration. As detail is added, more questions can be hypothetically addressed. However, presenting significant provenance detail may also overwhelm end users, for one of two reasons: (i) the detail presented is irrelevant to the objectives, or (ii) the detail requires background knowledge a user lacks. Both of these challenges are present for data generated by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory’s (MLSO) Advanced Coronal Observing System (ACOS). In ACOS, photometer-based readings are taken of solar activity and subsequently processed into data products consumable by end users. To fully understand these sequences of steps, background knowledge corresponding to various areas (e.g., astronomy, digital imaging, and ACOS specific techniques) is required by end users. This makes reviewing provenance difficult for users outside the ACOS development team, where varying degrees of background may be expected (ranging from outside domain experts in Solar Physics to citizen scientists). Likewise, even when steps taken by ACOS are understandable, they may provide undesired detail to an end user if presented. The work with ACOS involved the development of a Semantic Web based framework to selectively present provenance detail for data products in ACOS. Here, provenance is captured according to two sets of ontologies, the Proof Markup Language, which is an ontology based domain-independent provenance model, and a step ontology, designed to capture hierarchies of provenance steps. Used in combination, these ontology sets enable the creation of multiple levels of provenance, ranging from coarse to fine grained detail. In this setting, users may choose to expand/collapse provenance steps to view desired details. However, the specific provenance details a user initially sees is defined through

  9. Extending eScience Provenance with User-Submitted Semantic Annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, J.; Zednik, S.; West, P.; Fox, P. A.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    eScience based systems generate provenance of their data products, related to such things as: data processing, data collection conditions, expert evaluation, and data product quality. Recent advances in web-based technology offer users the possibility of making annotations to both data products and steps in accompanying provenance traces, thereby expanding the utility of such provenance for others. These contributing users may have varying backgrounds, ranging from system experts to outside domain experts to citizen scientists. Furthermore, such users may wish to make varying types of annotations - ranging from documenting the purpose of a provenance step to raising concerns about the quality of data dependencies. Semantic Web technologies allow for such kinds of rich annotations to be made to provenance through the use of ontology vocabularies for (i) organizing provenance, and (ii) organizing user/annotation classifications. Furthermore, through Linked Data practices, Semantic linkages may be made from provenance steps to external data of interest. A desire for Semantically-annotated provenance has been motivated by data management issues in the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory’s (MLSO) Advanced Coronal Observing System (ACOS). In ACOS, photomoeter-based readings are taken of solar activity and subsequently processed into final data products consumable by end users. At intermediate stages of ACOS processing, factors such as evaluations by human experts and weather conditions are logged, which could impact data product quality. If such factors are linked via user-submitted annotations to provenance, it could be significantly beneficial for other users. Likewise, the background of a user could impact the credibility of their annotations. For example, an annotation made by a citizen scientist describing the purpose of a provenance step may not be as reliable as a similar annotation made by an ACOS project member. For this work, we have developed a software package that

  10. The Evolution of the DARWIN System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joan D.; Filman, Robert E.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    DARWIN is a web-based system for presenting the results of wind-tunnel testing and computational model analyses to aerospace designers. DARWIN captures the data, maintains the information, and manages derived knowledge (e.g. visualizations, etc.) of large quantities of aerospace data. In addition, it provides tools and an environment for distributed collaborative engineering. We are currently constructing the third version of the DARWIN software system. DARWN's development history has, in some sense, tracked the development of web applications. The 1995 DARWIN reflected the latest web technologies--CGI scripts, Java applets and a three-layer architecture--available at that time. The 1997 version of DARWIN expanded on this base, making extensive use of a plethora of web technologies, including Java/JavaScript and Dynamic HTML. While more powerful, this multiplicity has proven to be a maintenance and development headache. The year 2000 version of DARWIN will provide a more stable and uniform foundation environment, composed primarily of Java mechanisms. In this paper, we discuss this evolution, comparing the strengths and weaknesses of the various architectural approaches and describing the lessons learned about building complex web applications.

  11. Password-only authenticated three-party key exchange proven secure against insider dictionary attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Junghyun; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Paik, Juryon; Won, Dongho

    2014-01-01

    While a number of protocols for password-only authenticated key exchange (PAKE) in the 3-party setting have been proposed, it still remains a challenging task to prove the security of a 3-party PAKE protocol against insider dictionary attacks. To the best of our knowledge, there is no 3-party PAKE protocol that carries a formal proof, or even definition, of security against insider dictionary attacks. In this paper, we present the first 3-party PAKE protocol proven secure against both online and offline dictionary attacks as well as insider and outsider dictionary attacks. Our construct can be viewed as a protocol compiler that transforms any 2-party PAKE protocol into a 3-party PAKE protocol with 2 additional rounds of communication. We also present a simple and intuitive approach of formally modelling dictionary attacks in the password-only 3-party setting, which significantly reduces the complexity of proving the security of 3-party PAKE protocols against dictionary attacks. In addition, we investigate the security of the well-known 3-party PAKE protocol, called GPAKE, due to Abdalla et al. (2005, 2006), and demonstrate that the security of GPAKE against online dictionary attacks depends heavily on the composition of its two building blocks, namely a 2-party PAKE protocol and a 3-party key distribution protocol.

  12. Partitioning sediment flux by provenance and tracing erosion patterns in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resentini, Alberto; Goren, Liran; Castelltort, Sébastien; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2017-07-01

    We critically evaluate the potential and limitations of an alternative way to calculate erosion rates based on petrographic and mineralogical fingerprints of fluvial sediments coupled with gauged sediment fluxes. Our approach allows us to apportion sediment loads to different lithological units, and consequently to discriminate erosion rates in different tectonic domains within each catchment. Our provenance data on modern Taiwanese sands indicate focused erosion in the Backbone Range and Tananao Complex of the retrowedge. Lower rates are inferred for the northern part of the island characterized by tectonic extension and for the western foothills in the prowedge. The principal factor of uncertainty affecting our estimates is the inevitably inaccurate evaluation of total sediment load, because only the suspended flux was measured. Another is the assumption that suspended load and bed load are derived from the same sources in fixed proportions. Additional errors are caused by the insufficiently precise definition of lithologically similar compositional end-members and by the temporal variability of sediment composition at the outlet of each catchment related to the spatial variability of erosional processes and triggering agents such as earthquakes, typhoons, and landslides. To evaluate the robustness of our findings, we applied a morphometric technique based on the stream-power model. The results obtained are broadly consistent, with local discrepancies ascribed to poorly constrained assumptions and choices of scaling parameters. Our local erosion estimates are consistent with GPS uplift rates measured on a decadal timescale and generally higher than basin-wide results inferred from cosmogenic-nuclide and thermochronology data.

  13. Password-Only Authenticated Three-Party Key Exchange Proven Secure against Insider Dictionary Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Junghyun; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2014-01-01

    While a number of protocols for password-only authenticated key exchange (PAKE) in the 3-party setting have been proposed, it still remains a challenging task to prove the security of a 3-party PAKE protocol against insider dictionary attacks. To the best of our knowledge, there is no 3-party PAKE protocol that carries a formal proof, or even definition, of security against insider dictionary attacks. In this paper, we present the first 3-party PAKE protocol proven secure against both online and offline dictionary attacks as well as insider and outsider dictionary attacks. Our construct can be viewed as a protocol compiler that transforms any 2-party PAKE protocol into a 3-party PAKE protocol with 2 additional rounds of communication. We also present a simple and intuitive approach of formally modelling dictionary attacks in the password-only 3-party setting, which significantly reduces the complexity of proving the security of 3-party PAKE protocols against dictionary attacks. In addition, we investigate the security of the well-known 3-party PAKE protocol, called GPAKE, due to Abdalla et al. (2005, 2006), and demonstrate that the security of GPAKE against online dictionary attacks depends heavily on the composition of its two building blocks, namely a 2-party PAKE protocol and a 3-party key distribution protocol. PMID:25309956

  14. Password-Only Authenticated Three-Party Key Exchange Proven Secure against Insider Dictionary Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghyun Nam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While a number of protocols for password-only authenticated key exchange (PAKE in the 3-party setting have been proposed, it still remains a challenging task to prove the security of a 3-party PAKE protocol against insider dictionary attacks. To the best of our knowledge, there is no 3-party PAKE protocol that carries a formal proof, or even definition, of security against insider dictionary attacks. In this paper, we present the first 3-party PAKE protocol proven secure against both online and offline dictionary attacks as well as insider and outsider dictionary attacks. Our construct can be viewed as a protocol compiler that transforms any 2-party PAKE protocol into a 3-party PAKE protocol with 2 additional rounds of communication. We also present a simple and intuitive approach of formally modelling dictionary attacks in the password-only 3-party setting, which significantly reduces the complexity of proving the security of 3-party PAKE protocols against dictionary attacks. In addition, we investigate the security of the well-known 3-party PAKE protocol, called GPAKE, due to Abdalla et al. (2005, 2006, and demonstrate that the security of GPAKE against online dictionary attacks depends heavily on the composition of its two building blocks, namely a 2-party PAKE protocol and a 3-party key distribution protocol.

  15. Applying the Karma Provenance tool to NASA's AMSR-E Data Production Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Conover, H.; Regner, K.; Movva, S.; Goodman, H. M.; Pale, B.; Purohit, P.; Sun, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Current procedures for capturing and disseminating provenance, or data product lineage, are limited in both what is captured and how it is disseminated to the science community. For example, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) generates Level 2 and Level 3 data products for a variety of geophysical parameters. Data provenance and quality information for these data sets is either very general (e.g., user guides, a list of anomalous data receipt and processing conditions over the life of the missions) or difficult to access or interpret (e.g., quality flags embedded in the data, production history files not easily available to users). Karma is a provenance collection and representation tool designed and developed for data driven workflows such as the productions streams used to produce EOS standard products. Karma records uniform and usable provenance metadata independent of the processing system while minimizing both the modification burden on the processing system and the overall performance overhead. Karma collects both the process and data provenance. The process provenance contains information about the workflow execution and the associated algorithm invocations. The data provenance captures metadata about the derivation history of the data product, including algorithms used and input data sources transformed to generate it. As part of an ongoing NASA funded project, Karma is being integrated into the AMSR-E SIPS data production streams. Metadata gathered by the tool will be presented to the data consumers as provenance graphs, which are useful in validating the workflows and determining the quality of the data product. This presentation will discuss design and implementation issues faced while incorporating a provenance tool into a structured data production flow. Prototype results will also be presented in this talk.

  16. Defining the "proven technology" technical criterion in the reactor technology assessment for Malaysia's nuclear power program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Nuraslinda; Kahar, Wan Shakirah Wan Abdul; Manan, Jamal Abdul Nasir Abd

    2015-04-01

    Developing countries that are considering the deployment of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the near future need to perform reactor technology assessment (RTA) in order to select the most suitable reactor design. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reported in the Common User Considerations (CUC) document that "proven technology" is one of the most important technical criteria for newcomer countries in performing the RTA. The qualitative description of five desired features for "proven technology" is relatively broad and only provides a general guideline to its characterization. This paper proposes a methodology to define the "proven technology" term according to a specific country's requirements using a three-stage evaluation process. The first evaluation stage screens the available technologies in the market against a predefined minimum Technology Readiness Level (TRL) derived as a condition based on national needs and policy objectives. The result is a list of technology options, which are then assessed in the second evaluation stage against quantitative definitions of CUC desired features for proven technology. The potential technology candidates produced from this evaluation is further narrowed down to obtain a list of proven technology candidates by assessing them against selected risk criteria and the established maximum allowable total score using a scoring matrix. The outcome of this methodology is the proven technology candidates selected using an accurate definition of "proven technology" that fulfills the policy objectives, national needs and risk, and country-specific CUC desired features of the country that performs this assessment. A simplified assessment for Malaysia is carried out to demonstrate and suggest the use of the proposed methodology. In this exercise, ABWR, AP1000, APR1400 and EPR designs assumed the top-ranks of proven technology candidates according to Malaysia's definition of "proven technology".

  17. Trinity Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Shannon M

    2010-06-01

    Trinity Evolution Cryopreserved Cell Viable Bone Matrix is a minimally manipulated, human cellular, and tissue-based allograft containing adult mesenchymal stem cells, osteoprogenitor cells, and a demineralized cortical component. The cancellous bone used to produce Trinity Evolution is derived from freshly recovered donor tissue by Food and Drug Administration-registered facilities and processed under aseptic conditions. Preclinical in vivo and in vitro testing as well as strict donor screening has demonstrated the safety of Trinity Evolution as well as its osteoinductive and osteogenic potential contained within a natural osteoconductive matrix.

  18. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  19. Ontology development for provenance tracing in National Climate Assessment of the US Global Change Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linyun; Ma, Xiaogang; Zheng, Jin; Goldstein, Justin; Duggan, Brian; West, Patrick; Aulenbach, Steve; Tilmes, Curt; Fox, Peter

    2014-05-01

    This poster will show how we used a case-driven iterative methodology to develop an ontology to represent the content structure and the associated provenance information in a National Climate Assessment (NCA) report of the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). We applied the W3C PROV-O ontology to implement a formal representation of provenance. We argue that the use case-driven, iterative development process and the application of a formal provenance ontology help efficiently incorporate domain knowledge from earth and environmental scientists in a well-structured model interoperable in the context of the Web of Data.

  20. Diverging drought resistance of Scots pine provenances revealed by infrared thermography and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming and more frequent and severe drought events will alter the adaptedness and fitness of tree species. Especially, Scots pine forests have been affected above average by die-off events during the last decades. Assisted migration of adapted provenances might help alleviating impacts by recent climate change and successfully regenerating forests. However, the identification of suitable provenances based on established ecophysiological methods is time consuming, sometimes invasive, and data on provenance-specific mortality are lacking. We studied the performance, stress and survival of potted Scots pine seedlings from 12 European provenances grown in a greenhouse experiment with multiple drought and warming treatments. In this paper, we will present results of drought stress impacts monitored with four different thermal indices derived from infrared thermography imaging as well as an ample mortality study. Percent soil water deficit (PSWD) was shown to be the main driver of drought stress response in all thermal indices. In spite of wet and dry reference surfaces, however, fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly in terms of air temperature and humidity, altered the measured stress response. In linear mixed-effects models, besides PSWD and meteorological covariates, the factors provenance and provenance - PSWD interactions were included. The explanatory power of the models (R2) ranged between 0.51 to 0.83 and thus, provenance-specific responses to strong and moderate drought and subsequent recovery were revealed. However, obvious differences in the response magnitude of provenances to drought were difficult to explicitly link to general features such Mediterranean - continental type or climate at the provenances' origin. We conclude that seedlings' drought resistance may be linked to summer precipitation and their experienced stress levels are a.o. dependent on their above ground dimensions under given water supply. In respect to mortality, previous

  1. Diamond Provenance Through Shape, Colour, Surface Features and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J.

    2002-05-01

    information may also be combined with the observational methods normally used to characterise diamonds during typical sorting procedures prior to sale. These procedures have well-defined and very specific categories such as gem/near gem, sawable/makeable and are linked particularly to diamond colour. By combining the geological techniques with that of diamond value, a very powerful means of defining diamond to a particular source, may be created. For the purpose of identifying conflict diamonds, such observational evidence may prove very useful. Identification would become more difficult if parcels are small or mixed in some way. A major drawback, however, both to the observational approach outline above and to any analytical techniques, is that there are no database of conflict diamonds against which to set the results.

  2. [Investigation of Evolution Rules of Phlegm and Blood Stasis Syndrome in Hyperlipidemia and Ath- erosclerosis by NMR-based Metabolic Profiling and Metabonomic Approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qi; You, Yun; Zhou, Ming-xue; Wang, Li-hua; Chen, He-bing; Yan, Xian-zhong; Liu, Xian-zhong; Liu, Wei-hong

    2015-07-01

    To explore evolution rules of phlegm and blood stasis syndrome ( PBSS) in hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis (AS) using NMR-based metabolic profiling and metabonomic approaches based on formulas corresponding to syndrome. Totally 150 SD rats were divided into the normal group, the model group, the Erchen Decoction (ED) group, the Xuefu Zhuyu Decoction (XZD) group, the Lipitor group, 30 in each group. The hyperlipidemia and AS rat model was duplicated by suturing carotid artery, injecting vitamin D3, and feeding with high fat diet. ED and XZD were used as drug probes. Blood samples were withdrawn at week 2, 4, and 8 after modeling. Blood lipids, blood rheology, histopathology and metabolomics were detected and analyzed. Results Results of blood lipids and pathology showed hyperlipidemia and early AS rat models were successfully established. At week 2 after modeling, levels of total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) significantly increased, which reached the peak at week 4 and maintained at higher levels at week 8. ED exerted obvious effect in improving TC and LDL-C levels of early models, while XZD could greatly improve levels of TC and LDL-C of late models. Rheological results showed at week 2, there was no significant difference in whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, or hematocrit between the model group and the normal group (P > 0.05). At week 4 partial hemorheological indicators (such as plasma viscosity) were abnormal. Till week 8 whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and hematocrit were significantly abnormal (P <0. 05, P < 0.01). As time went by, whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and hematocrit showed gradual increasing tendency in the ED group, while they showed gradual decreasing tendency in the XZD group. Results of metabonomics showed significant difference in spectra of metabolites between the normal group and the model group. As modeling time was prolonged, contents of acetyl glucoprotein and glucose in the

  3. Isotope provenance of Eastern Himalayan rivers draining to the south into India, Nepal and Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemignani, Lorenzo; Wijbrans, Jan; Najman, Yani; van der Beek, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The two syntaxis of the Himalaya (Eastern and western) are exhuming anomalously fast compared to the rest of Himalaya , and various hypothesis and models have been proposed to explain this, including coupled tectonic-erosion model of (Tectonic Aneurism)1-2 and ductile extrusion of weak lower crust from beneath Tibet by 'channel flow' 3 . The Namche Barwa metamorphic massif constitutes the eastern syntaxis of the belt and has experienced a complex history of uplift and deformation both influenced by intense fluvial erosion associated with the Yarlung-Tzangpo. Therefore, the Himalayas represent a unique natural laboratory where the interactions between the tectonics, erosion, climate and drainage evolution can be investigated. The purpose of the work is to understand in collaboration with other PhD students and European researchers collaborating in the iTECC Marie Curie Initial training Network the importance of processes involving the complex links and feedbacks between climate, tectonics and erosion. In this multi-disciplinary and multi-technique study the mains goals will be to assess the timing of rapid exhumation, to determine provenance source area exhumation of the syntaxis in relation to the big river capture event that has implicates the Yarlung-Tsangpo by the Brahmaputra, and the effect of the dilution of the syntaxis signal 's downstream. During the work the 40Ar/39Ar dating of single-grain detrital micas technique will be used to analyze smaller and younger grains using newly developed high sensitivity multi-collection noble gas mass spectrometry. Detrital zircon fission-track is perform to provides robust cooling age time of the sources terrains. Input from eastern syntaxis has been identified in the Brahmaputra sedimentary record by the appearance of very young grains (from 10 Ma to 6 Ma)4. To compare and to increase the previously collected data, fifteen samples from the Yarlung-Brahmaputra River system and from tributaries draining the Himalaya, the

  4. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed......, the complex phenomenon of a manufacturing network evolution is observed by combining the analysis of a manufacturing plant and network level. The historical trajectories of manufacturing networks that are presented in the case studies are examined in order to understand and determine the future shape...

  5. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...... originally developed his evolutionary research programme in Wesen from 1908 by studying the inherent limitations of Neoclassical Economics. He presented core results on economic evolution and sketched an extension evolutionary analysis to all social sciences in Entwicklung from 1912. He made a partial...... reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...

  6. Data Provenance Hybridization Supporting Extreme-Scale Scientific WorkflowApplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsethagen, Todd O.; Stephan, Eric G.; Raju, Bibi; Schram, Malachi; Macduff, Matt C.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Kleese-Van Dam, Kerstin; Singh, Alok; Altintas, Ilkay

    2016-11-21

    As high performance computing (HPC) infrastructures continue to grow in capability and complexity, so do the applications that they serve. HPC and distributed-area computing (DAC) (e.g. grid and cloud) users are looking increasingly toward workflow solutions to orchestrate their complex application coupling, pre- and post-processing needs To gain insight and a more quantitative understanding of a workflow’s performance our method includes not only the capture of traditional provenance information, but also the capture and integration of system environment metrics helping to give context and explanation for a workflow’s execution. In this paper, we describe IPPD’s provenance management solution (ProvEn) and its hybrid data store combining both of these data provenance perspectives.

  7. Reactions of Adansonia digitata L. provenances to long-term stress at seedling stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouda, Z. H N; Bayala, J.; Jensen, J. S.

    2015-01-01

     % of field capacity were applied over a period of 18 months. While survival was unaffected by the stress treatments, provenances and water regimes significantly affected growth parameters, and plant dry matter accumulation was significantly reduced by water stress. Provenances had growth rates of diameter......The effects of drought stress on growth parameters and dry matter partitioning of seven provenances (six from West Africa and one from East Africa) of Adansonia digitata L. were assessed in a seedling experiment in Burkina Faso. Three water regimes corresponding to 100 % (control), 75 % and 50...... and height in response to stress. The fresh weight/dry weight ratio increased with increasing stress. In response to stress, shoot/root ratios decreased at the start of the experiment, but increased at the end, compared to the control. Differences between provenances were not correlated to environmental...

  8. Long-term outcomes of Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with biopsy-proven diabetic nephropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Toyama, Tadashi; Kitajima, Shinji; Hara, Akinori; Kitagawa, Kiyoki; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Takamura, Toshinari; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the structural-functional relationships and the prognostic factors for renal events, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients with biopsy-proven diabetic nephropathy...

  9. VisTrails is an open-source scientific workflow and provenance management system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthombeni, Thabo DM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available VisTrails is an open-source scientific workflow and provenance management system that provides support for simulations, data exploration and visualization. Whereas workflows have been traditionally used to automate repetitive tasks, for applications...

  10. Nonlinear Evolution of Alfvenic Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, B.; Jayanti, V.; Vinas, A. F.; Ghosh, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Roberts, D. A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1998-01-01

    Alfven waves are a ubiquitous feature of the solar wind. One approach to studying the evolution of such waves has been to study exact solutions to approximate evolution equations. Here we compare soliton solutions of the Derivative Nonlinear Schrodinger evolution equation (DNLS) to solutions of the compressible MHD equations.

  11. Darwin and Mendel: Evolution and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzo, Nelio; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have shown that students' understanding of evolution is low and some sort of historical approach would be necessary in order to allow students to understand the theory of evolution. It is common to present Mendelian genetics to high school students prior to Biological Evolution, having in mind historical and epistemological…

  12. The Status and Evolution of Energy Supply and Use in Mexico Prior to the 2014 Energy Reform: An Input-Output Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeus Guevara

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Mexican government approved a bold energy reform that allows private energy companies to freely participate in the energy market (something prohibited during the previous eight decades. This reform is expected to significantly restructure the energy sector and boost and diversify the energy production. Moreover, changes in the energy sector and production might lead to structural changes in the rest of the economy and ultimately generate significant economic benefits for the country. Nevertheless, the fundamental role of the energy sector in this oil producing country makes the potential impacts of the reform complex to forecast. The objective of the study is to analyze the current state, evolution, and driving factors of the total primary energy use in Mexico in 2003–2012 (prior to the implementation of the reform as a precedent for future analyses of impacts of the energy reform. The results show three driving factors of the evolution of primary energy use: final non-energy demand, direct energy intensity, and economic structure. Also, it was found that the energy sector has been in a precarious situation regarding its structure and efficiency. However, this situation had a small effect on the evolution of primary energy use.

  13. Flares in Biopsy-Proven Giant Cell Arteritis in Northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Restuccia, Giovanna; Boiardi, Luigi; Cavazza, Alberto; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Muratore, Francesco; Cimino, Luca; Aldigeri, Raffaella; Crescentini, Filippo; Pipitone, Nicol?; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the frequency, timing, and characteristics of flares in a large cohort of Italian patients with biopsy-proven giant cell arteritis (GCA) and to identify factors at diagnosis able to predict the occurrence of flares. We evaluated 157 patients with biopsy-proven transmural GCA diagnosed and followed at the Rheumatology Unit of Reggio Emilia Hospital (Italy) for whom sufficient information was available from the time of diagnosis until at least 4 years of follow-up....

  14. Peri-Gondwanan terranes in the Romanian Carpathians: A review of their spatial distribution, origin, provenance, and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Balintoni

    2014-05-01

    The late Cambrian–Ordovician terranes are defined here as Carpathian-type terranes. According to their lithostratigraphy and origin, some are of continental margin magmatic arc setting, whereas others formed in rift and back-arc environment and closed to passive continental margin settings. In a paleogeographic reconstruction, the continental margin magmatic arc terranes were first that drifted out, followed by the passive continental margin terranes with the back-arc terranes in their front. They accreted to Laurussia during the Variscan orogeny. Some of them (Sebeş-Lotru in South Carpathians and Baia de Arieş in Apuseni mountains underwent eclogite-grade metamorphism. The Danubian terranes, the Bretila terrane and the Someş terrane were intruded by Variscan granitoids.

  15. Evolution without evolution and without ambiguities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletto, C.; Vedral, V.

    2017-02-01

    In quantum theory it is possible to explain time, and dynamics, in terms of entanglement. This is the timeless approach to time, which assumes that the universe is in a stationary state, where two noninteracting subsystems, the "clock" and the "rest," are entangled. As a consequence, by choosing a suitable observable of the clock, the relative state of the rest of the universe evolves unitarily with respect to the variable labeling the clock observable's eigenstates, which is then interpreted as time. This model for an "evolution without evolution" (Page and Wootters, 1983), albeit elegant, has never been developed further, because it was criticized for generating severe ambiguities in the dynamics of the rest of the universe. In this paper we show that there are no such ambiguities; we also update the model, making it amenable to possible new applications.

  16. Software architecture evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barais, Olivier; Le Meur, Anne-Francoise; Duchien, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    architecture. Following the early aspect paradigm, Tran SAT allows the software architect to design a software architecture stepwise in terms of aspects at the design stage. It realises the evolution as the weaving of new architectural aspects into an existing software architecture.......Software architectures must frequently evolve to cope with changing requirements, and this evolution often implies integrating new concerns. Unfortunately, when the new concerns are crosscutting, existing architecture description languages provide little or no support for this kind of evolution....... The software architect must modify multiple elements of the architecture manually, which risks introducing inconsistencies. This chapter provides an overview, comparison and detailed treatment of the various state-of-the-art approaches to describing and evolving software architectures. Furthermore, we discuss...

  17. A Systems Engineering Approach to Evolution of Physics based Prognostic Health Management of Aging Solid Rocket Motor System Assets (Conference Paper with Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    performance expectations. This paper outlines the general systems engineering approach, philosophy , and payoff of creating a PHM system, and illustrates when...systems engineering approach, philosophy , and payoff of creating a PHM system, and illustrates when and why mechanistic approaches are best. The...paper concludes with a discussion of the results obtained from the process on a demonstration system. 1. INTRODUCTION Today’s environment of

  18. The theory of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Bazaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The book The Theory of Evolution: from the Space Vacuum to Neural Ensembles and Moving Forward, an edition of 100 copies, was published in Russian language, in December 2014 in Kiev. Its Russian version is here: http://en.bazaluk.com/journals.html. Introduction, Chapter 10 and Conclusion published in English for the first time. Since 2004 author have been researching in the field of theory of Evolution, Big History. The book was written on the base of analysis of more than 2000 primary sources of this research topic. The volume is 90,000 words (with Reference. The book is for a wide range of professionals, from students to professors and researchers working in the fields of: philosophical anthropology, philosophy, Big History, cosmology, biology, neuroscience and etc. In the book, the author defines the evolution as continuous and nonlinear complication of the structure of matter, the types of interaction and environments; analyzes existing in modern science and philosophy approaches to the research of the process of evolution, degree of development of the factors and causes of evolution. Unifying interdisciplinary researches of evolution in cosmology, biology, neuroscience and philosophy, the author presents his vision of the model of «Evolving Matter», which allows us to consider not only the laws of transition of space vacuum in neural ensembles but also to see our Universe as a complication, heterogeneous organization. Interdisciplinary amount of information on the theory of evolution is systematized and a new method of world perception is proposed in the book.

  19. Clay mineralogy indicates the muddy sediment provenance in the estuarine-inner shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifei; Zou, Xinqing; Liu, Qing; Wang, Chenglong; Ge, Chendong; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    The estuarine-inner shelf mud regions of the East China Sea (ECS) are valuable for studying the source-to-sink processes of fluvial sediments deposited since the Holocene. In this study, we present evidence of the provenance and environmental evolution of two cores (S5-2 and JC07) from the estuarine-inner shelf regions of the ECS over the past 100 years based on 210Pb dating, high-resolution grain size measurements and clay mineral analyses. The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblages of cores S5-2 and JC07 are dominated by illite, followed by kaolinite and chlorite, and present scarce amounts of smectite. A comparison of these clay mineral assemblages with several major sources reveals that the fine sediments on the estuarine-inner shelf of the ECS represent a mixture of provenances associated with the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, as well as smaller rivers. However, the contribution of each provenance has varied greatly over the past hundred years, as indicated by the down-core variability due to strong sediment reworking and transport on the inner shelf and the reduction of the sediment load from the Yangtze River basin. In the mud region of the Yangtze River estuary, the sediment from 1930 to 1956 was primarily derived from the Yangtze River, although the Yellow River was also an important influence. From 1956 to 2013, the Yellow River contribution decreased, whereas the Yangtze River contribution correspondingly increased. In the Zhe-Min mud region, the Yangtze River contributed more sediment than did other rivers from 1910 to 1950; however, the Yangtze River contribution gradually decreased from 1950 to 2013. Moreover, the other small rivers accounted for minor contributions, and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) played an important role in the sediment transport process in the ECS. Our results indicate that the weakening/strengthening of the EAWM and a decrease in the sediment load of the Yangtze River influenced the transport and fate of sediment

  20. Provenances and tectonic implications of Paleozoic siliciclastic rocks from the Baishuijiang Group of the southern Qinling belt, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Zongqi; Ma, Zhenhui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2017-05-01

    The Paleozoic Baishuijiang Group is exposed in the southern Qinling belt and consists of turbidite sediments. The provenances of the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks is constrained by the integration of major and trace elements and detrital zircon U-Pb dating, which can help to understand the connection between the provenance and the Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Qinling orogenic belt. The sandstones and mudstones have intermediate SiO2/Al2O3 and K2O/Na2O ratios, and high Fe2O3 + MgO contents. In comparison with average upper continental crust, they show strong negative Nb-Ta and Sr anomalies, slight depletion of Zr-Hf and Th, but moderate enrichment of Sc, Ni and Cr. These rocks show LREE enrichment, and pronounced negative Eu anomalies in chondrite-normalized REE patterns, similar to post-Archean shales. The weathering trend of the sandstones and mudstones suggests andesitic and granodioritic provenances. These sediments are geochemically similar to continental island arc sediments, and therefore were probably deposited at an active continental margin. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating of five sandstones from the Baishuijiang Group yielded ages ranging from 407 to 3000 Ma, with six peaks at ca. 425, 710, 780, 930, 1800, and 2500 Ma. The youngest age peak at 425 Ma and two zircon grains with a weighted average age of 414 Ma indicate that the maximum depositional age of the Baishuijiang Group is late Paleozoic. Our new age data thus suggest that these turbidite sediments were mainly derived from the northern Qinling belt and the northern margin of the Yangtze Block. We propose that the Paleozoic sediments were deposited in an ocean basin between the northern Qinling belt and the Yangtze Block. Combined with regional geological evidences, our results indicate that there was a paleo-ocean in the Qinling orogenic belt since Neoproterozoic era. The oceanic crust was continually subducted northward, resulting in multiple accretion events from the early Paleozoic to early