WorldWideScience

Sample records for evolution study quest

  1. Comparative studies of inner and outer divertor discharges and a fueling study in QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O., E-mail: omitarai@ktmail.tokai-u.jp [Kumamoto Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Higashi-ku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Nakamura, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Onchi, T.; Idei, H.; Fujisawa, A.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nakashima, H.; Kawasaki, S. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga 816-8580 Japan (Japan); Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, S.; Takahashi, T. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tsutsui, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Inst. Tech, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Central solenoid has a small flux in QUEST. • Large plasma current is obtained when the position is shifted to the inboard side. • Two types of divertor operation are compared. • Novel merging fueling methods are proposed. • Coaxial helicity injection (CHI) fueling was examined in QUEST divertor configuration. - Abstract: As QUEST has a small central solenoid (CS), a larger Ohmic discharge current has been obtained when the plasma shifts to the inboard side. This tendency restricts a divertor operation to the smaller plasma current regime. As the inner divertor coil has a smaller mutual inductance, it would be expected that its utilization seems to be better for easier plasma current ramp-up for a divertor operation. In this work, we made comparative studies on the plasma current ramp-up for two divertor coils. It is found that while the inner divertor coil with smaller mutual inductance needs a larger coil current, the outer divertor coil with larger mutual inductance needs a smaller coil current for divertor operation. Thus we have found that the plasma current ramp-up characteristics are almost similar for both configurations. We also propose a new fueling method for spherical tokamak (ST) using the coaxial helicity injection (CHI). The main plasma current would be generated at first, and then the CHI plasma current is created between bottom two electrode plates and merged into the main plasma current for fueling.

  2. CANDELS: A Cosmic Quest for Distant Galaxies Offering Live Views of Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, David C.; CANDELS

    2017-06-01

    For decades, the study of distant galaxies has been pushing the frontiers of extra-galactic research, with observations from the best suite of telescopes and instruments and with theory from the most advanced computer simulations. This talk will focus on observations taken within the CANDELS fields to reveal the richness and complexity of this still-growing field. CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey) itself is the largest project ever taken by Hubble and is composed of optical and near-infrared images of five tiny regions of sky containing over 200,000 distant galaxies. All these regions, two of which are GOODS North and South, were already outstanding in possessing years of prior surveys taken by many teams worldwide and have continued to attract more and better spectra and panchromatic images from Keck, Hubble, Chandra, Spitzer, and other telescopes ranging from X-ray to radio. Combined together, the rich data within the CANDELS fields offer live views of galaxy evolution from “Cosmic Dawn” when the first infant galaxies and cosmic black holes were born, through “Cosmic Noon” during the peak of galaxy and black hole growth, and then to “Cosmic Afternoon” when star formation and black hole activities, morphologies, motions, and contents settled to those of our Milky Way and its zoo of cousins today. The talk will highlight some interesting discoveries from the last two periods and close with new mysteries challenging our field in the 21st century and future prospects for solving them.

  3. Observational studies and the difficult quest for causality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsitch, Marc; Jha, Ayan; Simonsen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    be answered once the vaccine is in use, from observational studies. However, such studies are inherently at risk for bias. Using a causal framework and illustrating with examples, we review newer approaches to detecting and avoiding confounding and selection bias in three major classes of observational study...... design: cohort, case-control and ecological studies. Studies of influenza VE, especially in seniors, are an excellent demonstration of the challenges of detecting and reducing such bias, and so we use influenza VE as a running example. We take a fresh look at the time-trend studies often dismissed...... as 'ecological'. Such designs are the only observational study design that can measure the overall effect of a vaccination programme [indirect (herd) as well as direct effects], and are in fact already an important part of the evidence base for several vaccines currently in use. Despite the great strides towards...

  4. LSP Studies As a Quest For Meso-Level Regularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    the suggested type of analysis. I proceed to present Knowledge Communication as theoretical-methodological framework of such analyses, followed by a presentation of the differences between a micro, a macro and a meso level approach to studying specialized communication. In the last part of the paper, I...

  5. WEB-QUESTS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDYING AND TEACHING AS A VALUABLE RESOURCE AND EFFECTIVE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Pererva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper is a study of innovative methods of learning and teaching English with the help of Internet resources and students motivation to seek the necessary information at homework. Methodology. The main principle of the Web-Quest as a type of English language teaching is to motivate students. For example, by participation in the Web-Quest students, who were unsure of their knowledge, become more confident. Having clear goals and objectives, using computer skills, motivated young people more actively acts as a confident user of English. Findings. According to the technology of We-Quests students were asked to create one or more projects directly related to the successful execution of the work. It is a significant result of all the hard work of students, and it is the subject of evaluation. Evaluation is an essential component of Web-Quest or any other project, and from this point of view, the criteria should be clear and accessible to students from the very beginning. These instructions can and should be changed in order to differentiate and provide an oral presentation and written work. Originality. Basically, Web-Quests are mini-projects in which a higher percentage of the material obtained from the Internet. They can be created by teachers or students, depending on the type of training work. The author detailed the increase of possibilities in the search of Internet projects with other creative types of student work. They may include: review of the literature, essay writing, discussion of read works and other. Practical value. The paper confirmed that the roles and tasks, reflecting the real world, invites to cooperate, stimulate and train the thinking process at a higher level. That is why the use of Web-Quests can improve the language skills of the educational process (reading for information extraction, detailed reading, negotiations, oral and written communication, and other.

  6. The quest for blue supergiants: binary merger models for the evolution of the progenitor of SN 1987A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, A.; Heger, A.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of a detailed, systematic stellar evolution study of binary mergers for blue supergiant (BSG) progenitors of Type II supernovae. In particular, these are the first evolutionary models that can simultaneously reproduce nearly all observational aspects of the progenitor of SN 1987A, $\\text{Sk}-69\\,^{\\circ}202$, such as its position in the HR diagram, the enrichment of helium and nitrogen in the triple-ring nebula, and its lifetime before its explosion. The merger model, based on the one proposed by Podsiadlowski 1992 et al. and Podsiadlowski 2007 et al., consists of a main sequence secondary star that dissolves completely in the common envelope of the primary red supergiant at the end of their merger. We empirically explore a large initial parameter space, such as primary masses ($15\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$, $16\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$, and $17\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$), secondary masses ($2\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$, $3\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$, ..., $8\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}$) and different depths up to which the secondary penetrates the He core of the primary during the merger. The evolution of the merged star is continued until just before iron-core collapse and the surface properties of the 84 pre-supernova models ($16\\,\\text{M}_{\\odot}-23\\,\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$) computed have been made available in this work. Within the parameter space studied, the majority of the pre-supernova models are compact, hot BSGs with effective temperature $>12\\,\\text{kK}$ and radii of $30\\,\\text{R}_{\\odot}-70\\,\\mathrm{R}_{\\odot}$ of which six match nearly all the observational properties of $\\text{Sk}-69\\,^{\\circ}202$.

  7. The evolution of process-based hydrologic models: historical challenges and the collective quest for physical realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Clark

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The diversity in hydrologic models has historically led to great controversy on the correct approach to process-based hydrologic modeling, with debates centered on the adequacy of process parameterizations, data limitations and uncertainty, and computational constraints on model analysis. In this paper, we revisit key modeling challenges on requirements to (1 define suitable model equations, (2 define adequate model parameters, and (3 cope with limitations in computing power. We outline the historical modeling challenges, provide examples of modeling advances that address these challenges, and define outstanding research needs. We illustrate how modeling advances have been made by groups using models of different type and complexity, and we argue for the need to more effectively use our diversity of modeling approaches in order to advance our collective quest for physically realistic hydrologic models.

  8. A Model Space Mission to probe Einstein's Equivalence Principle - The STE-QUEST Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heske, Astrid; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gehler, Martin

    Understanding General Relativity at all scales requires, in particular, understanding gravity at quantum level. To attempt this, tests of the most prominent aspect of General Relativity, the Einstein Equivalence Principle, can be performed with the next generation of atomic quantum sensors to significantly improved accuracy. To exploit the ultimate limits of atomic sensors a dedicated space platform is needed; the advantages space offers are, among others, unperturbed free-fall conditions, longer interaction times per measurement and large variations in velocity and gravitational field. In the frame of the third medium class launch opportunity of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 programme a study was conducted - STE-QUEST (Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence principle Test), one of the candidates for a medium class mission - and the feasibility of such a mission assessed. The spacecraft would carry two instruments probing the different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle: begin{enumerate} A dual species ( (87) Rb and (85) Rb) atom interferometer to probe the universality of propagation of matter waves. A high-performance time and frequency link dedicated to comparison of atomic clocks on ground. The specific primary science objectives for STE-QUEST are: begin{enumerate} Universality of propagation of matter waves test begin{itemize} Test of the universality of free fall of matter waves to an uncertainty of the Eötvös ratio lower than 2*10 (-15) . Gravitational redshift tests begin{itemize} Sun gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 2*10 (-6) , with an ultimate goal of 5*10 (-7) . Moon gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional uncertainty of 4*10 (-4) , with an ultimate goal of 9*10 (-5) . Such a measurement has never been attempted before. The availability of an atomic clock on-board the spacecraft (optional) would additionally allow testing the Earth gravitational red-shift measurement to a fractional

  9. The quest of pain education leaders in Canada and the United States: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Eloise C J; Watt-Watson, Judy; McGillion, Michael; Huizinga, Anne

    2016-11-01

    To determine key factors that stimulate and drive the ongoing interests of leaders in the field of pain to continue to work for change and to explore how they use their own experiences in their teaching. The assessment and management of acute and chronic pain remains a challenge and the pain education of pre-licensure/undergraduate health professionals (e.g. nurses, physicians, etc.) continues to be suboptimal. Understanding the motivations of pain leaders may provide insights to facilitate the future development of pain clinicians. A Narrative enquiry. A purposeful sample of 17 Canadian and USA leaders in pain education participated. Data were collected between September 2012-January 2013 using recorded semi-structured telephone interviews. Transcripts were coded to provide storied experiences (themes). Six themes were identified as a stimulus for pain leaders: An early pain experience, mentorship and circumstances, a personal shift in understanding, catalysts (institutional or political), recognition of barriers and a determination to improve. Their work towards change appeared to be motivated by their pain 'quest' where leaders embraced their personal experiences of pain, a need for social action and individual change. Educational approaches for health professionals usually focus on the importance of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be competent in pain care. To inspire and educate young health professionals about pain management we suggest the development of future pain leaders may require a different approach that recognizes personal stories of pain, includes a local pain champion and incorporates a model of mentorship. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Diversity of Babesia and Rickettsia species in questing Ixodes ricinus: a longitudinal study in urban, pasture, and natural habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overzier, Evelyn; Pfister, Kurt; Thiel, Claudia; Herb, Ingrid; Mahling, Monia; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2013-08-01

    In a previous study, our group investigated the Babesia spp. prevalence in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks from nine city parks in South Germany in the years 2009 and 2010. We showed predominant prevalence of B. venatorum (in previous literature also known as Babesia sp. EU1), especially in those parks in a more natural condition and with occurrence of large wild animals, such as roe deer. To obtain longitudinal data and to broaden the knowledge about this pathogen, further investigations were carried out in 2011 and 2012 in four of those city parks. Two additional habitat types were chosen for comparison of prevalence data and species analysis focusing on occurrence of potential reservoir hosts. A total of 10,303 questing I. ricinus were collected in four city parks, a pasture, and a natural area in Bavaria, and a representative number of samples were investigated for prevalence of DNA of Babesia spp. (n=4381) and Rickettsia spp. (n=2186) by PCR. In the natural and pasture area, a significantly higher Babesia spp. prevalence compared to the urban area was detected. The natural area revealed sequences of B. microti, B. venatorum, and B. capreoli. In the pasture and urban habitat, predominantly B. venatorum was found, whereas B. capreoli was less frequent and only one B. microti-infected tick was found. All B. microti sequences were 100% identical to the zoonotic Jena/Germany strain. For Rickettsia spp., the significantly highest prevalence was also detected in the natural and pasture areas, whereas lower prevalence was found in the urban area. Sequence analysis revealed R. helvetica (98%) and R. monacensis (2%). Prevalence rates and occurrence of Babesia spp. and Rickettsia spp. differed in urban, pasture and natural sites, most likely depending on the habitat structure (natural or cultivated) and therefore on the appearance and availability of reservoir hosts like roe deer or small mammals.

  11. Symptoms and Distress in Children With Advanced Cancer: Prospective Patient-Reported Outcomes From the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Joanne; Orellana, Liliana; Ullrich, Christina; Cook, E Francis; Kang, Tammy I; Rosenberg, Abby; Geyer, Russ; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica

    2015-06-10

    Thousands of children are living with advanced cancer; yet patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have rarely been used to describe their experiences. We aimed to describe symptom distress in 104 children age 2 years or older with advanced cancer enrolled onto the Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology (PediQUEST) Study (multisite clinical trial evaluating an electronic PRO system). Symptom data were collected using age- and respondent-adapted versions of the PediQUEST Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (PQ-MSAS) at most once per week. Clinical and treatment data were obtained from medical records. Individual symptom scores were dichotomized into high/low distress. Determinants of PQ-MSAS scores were explored using linear mixed-effects models. During 9 months of follow-up, PQ-MSAS was administered 920 times: 459 times in teens (99% self-report), 249 times in children ages 7 to 12 years (96% child/parent report), and 212 times in those ages 2 to 6 years (parent reports). Common symptoms included pain (48%), fatigue (46%), drowsiness (39%), and irritability (37%); most scores indicated high distress. Among the 73 PQ-MSAS surveys administered in the last 12 weeks of life, pain was highly prevalent (62%; 58% with high distress). Being female, having a brain tumor, experiencing recent disease progression, and receiving moderate- or high-intensity cancer-directed therapy in the prior 10 days were associated with worse PQ-MSAS scores. In the final 12 weeks of life, receiving mild cancer-directed therapy was associated with improved psychological PQ-MSAS scores. Children with advanced cancer experience high symptom distress. Strategies to promote intensive symptom management are indicated, especially with disease progression or administration of intensive treatments. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Stellar Evolution and Social Evolution: A Study in Parallel Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Robert L.

    From the beginning of anthropology, social evolution has been one of its major interests. However, in recent years the study of this process has languished. Accordingly, those anthropologists who still consider social evolution to be of central importance to their discipline, and who continue to pursue it, find their endeavor bolstered when parallel instances of evolutionary reconstructions can be demonstrated in other fields. Stellar evolution has long been a prime interest to astronomers, and their progress in deciphering its course has been truly remarkable. In examining astronomers' reconstructions of stellar evolution, I have been struck by a number of similarities between ways stars and societies have evolved. The parallels actually begin with the method used by both disciplines, namely, the comparative method. In astronomy, the method involves plotting stars on a Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram, and interpreting, diachonically, the pattern made by essentially synchronic data used for plotting. The comparative method is particularly appropriate when one is studying a process that cannot be observed over its full range in the life of any single individual, be it a star or a society. Parallels also occur in that stars and societies have each followed distinctive stages in their evolution. These stages are, in both cases, sometimes unlinear and sometimes multilinear. Moreover, the distinction drawn by anthropologists between a pristine and a secondary state (which depends on whether state so represented is the first such occurrence in an area, or was a later development derivative from earlier states) finds its astronomical parallel in the relationship existing between Population II and Population I stars. These and other similarities between stellar and social evolution will be cited and discussed.

  13. Implementing WebQuest Based Instruction on Newton's Second Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Muhammed Sait; Sharma, Manjula; Johnston, Ian; Sharma, Mia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how WebQuests can be used in physics classes for teaching specific concepts. The study had three stages. The first stage was to develop a WebQuest on Newton's second law. The second stage involved developing a lesson plan to implement the WebQuest in class. In the final stage, the WebQuest was…

  14. Geographical distribution and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies in questing Ixodes ricinus from Romania: a countrywide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Zsuzsa; Mihalca, Andrei D; Dumitrache, Mirabela O; Gherman, Călin M; Magdaş, Cristian; Mircean, Viorica; Oltean, Miruna; Domşa, Cristian; Matei, Ioana A; Mărcuţan, Daniel I; Sándor, Attila D; D'Amico, Gianluca; Paştiu, Anamaria; Györke, Adriana; Gavrea, Raluca; Marosi, Béla; Ionică, Angela; Burkhardt, Etelka; Toriay, Hortenzia; Cozma, Vasile

    2013-09-01

    The paper reports the prevalence and geographical distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and its genospecies in 12,221 questing Ixodes ricinus ticks collected at 183 locations from all the 41 counties of Romania. The unfed ticks were examined for the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. by PCR targeting the intergenic spacer 5S-23S. Reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis were performed for identification of B. burgdorferi genospecies. The overall prevalence of infection was 1.4%, with an average local prevalence between 0.75% and 18.8%. B. burgdorferi s.l. was found in ticks of 55 of the 183 localities. The overall prevalence B. burgdorferi s.l. in ticks in the infected localities was 3.8%. The total infection prevalence was higher in female ticks than in other developmental stages. Three Borrelia genospecies were detected. The most widely distributed genospecies was B. afzelii, followed by B. garinii and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.). The study is the first countrywide study and the first report of B. burgdorferi s.s. in Romania. The distribution maps show that higher prevalences were recorded in hilly areas, but Lyme borreliosis spirochetes were also present in forested lowlands, albeit with a lower prevalence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Kids' Quest: Vision Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Check Up Tourette Questions I Have Vision Impairment Quest Vision Fact Check Up Vision Questions I ... Tweet Share Compartir What should you know? Vision impairment means that a person’s eyesight cannot be corrected ...

  16. Sea Hero Quest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Sea Hero Quest has been developed to help fight dementia. The mobile game is a collaboration between Alzheimer's Research UK and scientists from University College London and the University of East Anglia.

  17. Ritual orders and ritologiques: a terminological quest for some neglected fields of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stausberg

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic presented in this paper lies at the crossroads between ritual studies and ritual theory. In order to get an idea of the field of study, it may be useful to distinguish between the following general approaches to the study of ritual. To begin with, ritual theory in the strict sense, i.e. with explanatory ambitions etc., tends to focus on RITUAL as such: what IT is, what IT does, how IT works ("functions", and why IT is as it is.Softer varieties of ritual theory, e.g. approaches that wish to foster a better "understanding" of what goes on when rituals are being performed, may focus on RITUALS in a semi-empirical and semi-theoretical fashion. As a matter of fact, to a large extent ritual "theory" seems to be the result of theoretical reflections on matters of empirical research. Apart from that, we find studies of this and that phenomenon (e.g. time, space, violence, aesthetics, media, etc. in relation to rituals ("ritual and time", "ritual and space", etc.. Then, of course, we have a good dose of studies on different "types", "classes", or "groups" of rituals. Most popular, (in the absence of any statistical evidence, are studies of "sacrifice", "rites of passage", and "initiations", with "healing rituals" and "pilgrimages" as ever more successful runner-ups. Correspondingly, there is a number of studies about any variety of any class of rituals among the so-and-so people ("initiation among the NN". Moreover, there are plenty of books about the rituals of this and that religion or people — in colonial times often published under such titles as "The customs and ceremonies of the NN". Last but not least, there is an overwhelming amount of studies devoted to the presentation or analysis of single rituals.

  18. Quest of thermoelectricity in topological insulators: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Kulwinder; Kumar, Ranjan

    2017-10-01

    In this Paper, we have studied the structural, electronic and thermoelectric properties of LuAuPb and YAuPb compound respectively with frame work of density functional theory and Boltzmann equations. Our calculations show that both these compounds are gapless materials. Under strain, electronic and thermoelectric properties of these compounds are also studied. Under 5% strain, the maximum energy band gap opens up in LuAuPb compound. The thermoelectric properties of these compounds are studied between temperature range of 100-1000 K. Thermoelectric properties of these compound as a function of temperature are studied for the first time in this work. Seebeck measurements indicate that both these compounds are n-type in nature. The calculated electrical conductivity of these compounds under 5% strain increases with increase in temperature. The trends of electrical conductivity confirms that these compounds are semiconductor in nature. As temperature increases the electronic thermal conductivity of these compounds also increase. The maximum figure of merit is achieved for LuAuPb compound which is equal to 0.4.

  19. Designing a Place Called School: A Case Study of the Public School Quest to Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Salen

    Full Text Available This case study will delve into the organization and engagement models developed to bring game-like learning to the New York City public school sector. It will explore design’s capacity to transform artificial systems, in this case a public school operating within the context of the US Department of Education (DOE. The case explores the role played by Mission Lab, a design studio embedded in the school and staffed by game designers and learning specialists. It then goes on to look at the school’s grade format (6–12 and its non-selective enrollment policy. Each defined a key aspect of the school model, from its innovative approach to collaboration, to it emphasis on continuity and diversity.

  20. Quality of Life in Children With Advanced Cancer: A Report From the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Orellana, Liliana; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, J Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Dussel, Veronica; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-08-01

    Modifiable factors of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are poorly described among children with advanced cancer. Symptom distress may be an important factor for intervention. We aimed to describe patient-reported HRQOL and its relationship to symptom distress. Prospective, longitudinal data from the multicenter Pediatric Quality of Life and Symptoms Technology study included primarily patient-reported symptom distress and HRQOL, measured at most weekly with the Memorial Symptoms Assessment Scale and Pediatric Quality of Life inventory, respectively. Associations were evaluated using linear mixed-effects models adjusting for sex, age, cancer type, intervention arm, treatment intensity, and time since disease progression. Of 104 enrolled patients, 49% were female, 89% were white, and median age was 12.6 years. Nine hundred and twenty surveys were completed over nine months of follow-up (84% by patients). The median total Pediatric Quality of Life score was 74 (interquartile range 63-87) and was "poor/fair" (e.g., cancer type, time since progression, treatment intensity, sex, nor age was associated with HRQOL scores in multivariable models. Among 25 children completing surveys during the last 12 weeks of life, 11 distressing symptoms were associated with reductions in HRQOL. Symptom distress is strongly associated with HRQOL. Future research should determine whether alleviating distressing symptoms improves HRQOL in children with advanced cancer. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quest for learning: A study of teachers' perceptions of the Satellite Education and Environmental Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Kathryn A.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of teachers who participated in the Satellite Education and Environmental Research (SEER) Program Water Project, a curriculum design course developed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The distance education course was a complex intervention which used the Nebraska Mathematics and Science Initiative's Model Program criteria for inquiry-based curriculum. Teachers formed communities of inquiry, experienced scientific inquiry processes, integrated different disciplines to create new thematic science curricula, and were encouraged to employ innovative pedagogical practices. National Science Education Standards and Nebraska Mathematics and Science Frameworks were consulted to develop important science process skills and concepts. Multicultural science education was addressed through investigation of local water issues. Teachers were encouraged to form community partnerships, supported with testing materials for conducting scientific research, and expected to use computer technology. Grounded theory was used to examine interviews of 26 participants for their perceptions of the effects of the intervention on their teaching strategies. The self-reports were triangulated through the external evaluation report, classroom artifacts, and a limited number of observations of classroom and field activities. Open coding was used to categorize the interview responses and to propose relationships among them. The central phenomenon that emerged from the axial and select coding was the changed focus: teaching science more thematically. Three theoretical propositions were posed to guide further inquiry: (1) teachers need opportunities and resources to experience science as an authentic, tenable, and realistic process if they are to develop curriculum and focus classroom activities on scientific inquiry; (2) autonomous learning communities must be fostered at downlink sites if distance learning experiences are to affect

  2. Earth Regime Network Evolution Study (ERNESt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  3. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  4. An Evaluation of a Nutrition WebQuest: The Malaysian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wui, Lee Sheh; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to develop and evaluate a WebQuest instruction on Nutrition using WebQuest template, known as NutriQuest. NutriQuest was developed to improve Form 2 students' understanding of fundamental nutrition concepts and its application in daily life, to improve critical and creative thinking skills and to enhance…

  5. A Lifelong Quantum Quest

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. A Lifelong Quantum Quest. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 29-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/01/0029-0038. Keywords.

  6. Effect of transient antiretroviral treatment during acute HIV infection: comparison of the Quest trial results with CASCADE natural history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Fiona C; Porter, Kholoud; Kaldor, John; Law, Matthew; Kinloch-de Loes, Sabine; Phillips, Andrew N

    2007-01-01

    The benefit of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (CART) during acute HIV infection is uncertain. We used the seroconverter database CASCADE to provide a historical comparison for the Quest trial, in which 79 subjects with acute HIV infection received CART for an average of 2.6 years, and 17.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.9-27.6) fulfilled the primary endpoint of VL transient CART in acute infection might result in a modest increase in the probability of low VL subsequently. However, several factors mitigate this conclusion. First, this historical comparison might be subject to other unmeasured confounders. Second, a comparison of median VL at the same time point was not significant (4.02 copies/ml and 4.20 copies/ml in Quest and CASCADE, respectively; P=0.55). Finally, additional analysis suggested that the observed difference in low VL at year three would be consistent with an immediate effect of CART only - a delay of usual VL decline without additional benefit. A small but significant proportion of seroconverters have low VL without ART. Transient CART in acute infection might increase the probability of low VL after treatment discontinuation, but such an effect is likely to be modest, and might represent a delay of natural history rather than a long-term therapeutic benefit.

  7. Development and Validation of WebQuests in Teaching Epics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Candy Santos Lasaten

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the Research Development (R&D methodology, the study aimed to develop and validate WebQuests which can be used in literature subjects, particularly in the tertiary level to address the need of literature teachers for pedagogy in the teaching of epic s. The development of the Web Quests was anchored on the Theory of Constructivism. Two groups of experts validated the Web Quests – the literature experts and the ICT experts. The Content Validation Checklist, used by the literature experts, was utilized t o evaluate the content of the Web Quests. Meanwhile, the Rubric for Evaluating Web Quests, used by the ICT experts, was utilized to evaluate the design characteristics of the Web Quests. Computed weighted means using range interval of point scores were emp loyed to treat the data gathered from the evaluation conducted by both group of experts. The Web Quests developed contain five major parts which include: 1 introduction; 2 task; 3 process; 4 evaluation; and 5 conclusion. Based on the findings, the con tent of the Web Quests developed are valid in terms of objectives, activities and instructional characteristics. Likewise, the design characteristics of the Web Quests are excellent in terms of introductions, tasks, processes, resources, evaluations, concl usions and overall designs. Thus, the Web Quests developed are acceptable and can be utilized as instructional materials by literature teachers in the teaching of epics.

  8. QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Roger Che-Rung [National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan; Chiesa, Simone [ORNL; Varney, Christopher N [ORNL; Khatami, Ehsan [Georgetown University; Bai, Zhaojun [University of California, Davis; D' Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Jarrell, Mark [Louisiana State University; Maier, Thomas A [ORNL; Savrasov, Sergey [ORNL; Scalettar, Richard [University of California, Davis; Tomko, Karen [Ohio Supercomputer Center

    2010-01-01

    QUEST is a part of the SciDAC project on next generation multi-scale quantum simulation software for strongly correlated materials. It is a Fortran 90/95 package that implements the determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) method for simulation of magnetic, superconducting, and metal-insulator transitions in model Hamiltonians. In this paper, we show how QUEST is capable of treating lattices of unprecedentedly large sizes and how this can be fruitful in the study of the physics of trapped fermionic system, in the development of more efficient solvers for Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) and as a tool to test and, in the future, improve diagrammatic approaches such as the Parquet approximation. We will also present a range of synergistic activities on the development of stable and robust numerical algorithms and hybrid granularity parallelization scheme that combines algorithmic and implementation techniques to high-performance DQMC simulation. The work reported here is a key step forward in achieving the goals of our SciDAC project.

  9. Effects of Online Instructional Conversation on English as a Foreign Language Learners' WebQuest Writing Performance: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haesong

    2013-01-01

    WebQuests, or inquiry-oriented activities in which learners interact with Web-based information (Dodge, 1995, 1996, 2007), have recently been gaining popularity in education in general and in language education in particular. While it has the advantage of fostering higher-level thinking through authentic assignments, a WebQuest can be challenging…

  10. WebQuests as Language-Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a review of the literature that examines WebQuests as tools for second-language acquisition and foreign language-learning processes to guide teachers in their teaching activities and researchers in further research on the issue. The study first introduces the theoretical background behind WebQuest use in the mentioned…

  11. Work disability remains a major problem in rheumatoid arthritis in the 2000s: data from 32 countries in the QUEST-RA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Pincus, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    of biologic agents offers potential for reduced work disability rates, but the conclusions are based on surrogate disease activity measures derived from studies primarily from Western countries. METHODS: The Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA) multinational database of 8......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Work disability is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), associated not only with traditional disease activity variables, but also more significantly with demographic, functional, occupational, and societal variables. Recent reports suggest that the use......,039 patients in 86 sites in 32 countries, 16 with high gross domestic product (GDP) (>24K US dollars (USD) per capita) and 16 low-GDP countries (disability status at onset and over the course of RA and clinical status of patients who continued working or had stopped working...

  12. QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perre, M.

    1991-01-01

    TNO Physics and Electronics laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Limburg and the Research Institute for Knowledge Systems, worked on a technology project named 'QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems' [FEL90]. QUEST was carried out under commision of the Dutch Ministry of Defence. A strong

  13. QUEST for sustainable CPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2014-01-01

    in the local learning communities we have seen a positive trend from the first to the last course-module, but with great variation between schools. Factors potentially supporting sustainable development seem to be about (1) continuingly scaffolding teachers’ collaborative inquiries by organizing activities......Continuous Professional Development (CPD) can be crucial for reforming science teaching, but more knowledge is needed about how to support sustainability of the effects. The Danish QUEST project is a large scale, long-term collaborative CPD project designed according to widely agreed criteria...... phase. The findings are discussed looking forward to the institutionalization phase identifying factors potentially supporting sustainable development pertaining to local science teachers developing a shared focus on student learning in science, and perceived individual and collective efficacy...

  14. Determinants of quality of life after stroke in China: the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke care and Treatment) study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delcourt, Candice; Hackett, Maree; Wu, Yanfeng; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Heeley, Emma; Wong, Lawrence; Sun, Jian; Li, Qiang; Wei, Jade Wei; Liu, Ming; Li, Zhengyi; Wu, Li; Cheng, Yan; Huang, Qifang; Xu, En; Yang, Qidong; Lu, Chuanzhen; Anderson, Craig S

    2011-01-01

    Limited information exists on the long-term consequences of stroke in China. We aimed to describe the profile and determinants of health-related quality of life among 12-month survivors of stroke. The ChinaQUEST...

  15. How informed is declared altruism in clinical trials? A qualitative interview study of patient decision-making about the QUEST trials (Quality of Life after Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidad, Natalie; MacDonald, Lindsay; Winters, Zoë E; Edwards, Sarah J L; Emson, Marie; Griffin, Clare L; Bliss, Judith; Horne, Rob

    2016-09-02

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) often fail to recruit sufficient participants, despite altruism being cited as their motivation. Previous investigations of factors influencing participation decisions have been methodologically limited. This study evaluated how women weigh up different motivations after initially expressing altruism, and explored their understanding of a trial and its alternatives. The trial was the 'Quality of Life after Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction' (QUEST) trial. Thirty-nine women participated in qualitative interviews 1 month post-surgery. Twenty-seven women (10 trial decliners and 17 acceptors) who spontaneously mentioned 'altruism' were selected for thematic analysis. Verbatim transcripts were coded independently by two researchers. Participants' motivations to accept or decline randomisation were cross-referenced with their understanding of the QUEST trials and the process of randomisation. The seven emerging themes were: (1) altruism expressed by acceptors and decliners; (2) overriding personal needs in decliners; (3) pure altruism in acceptors; (4) 'hypothetical altruism' amongst acceptors; (5) weak altruism amongst acceptors; (6) conditional altruism amongst acceptors; and (7) sense of duty to participate. Poor understanding of the trial rationale and its implications was also evident. Altruism was a motivating factor for participation in the QUEST randomised controlled trials where the main outcomes comprised quality of life and allocated treatments comprised established surgical procedures. Women's decisions were influenced by their understanding of the trial. Both acceptors and decliners of the trial expressed 'altruism', but most acceptors lacked an obvious treatment preference, hoped for personal benefits regarding a treatment allocation, or did not articulate complete understanding of the trial. QUEST A, ISRCTN38846532 ; Date assigned 6 January 2010. QUEST B, ISRCTN92581226 ; Date assigned 6 January 2010.

  16. A Quest for Increased Interactivity in the Print Instructional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Quest for Increased Interactivity in the Print Instructional Resources of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) Institutions in Africa: Writing the Study Units of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) Print Course Materials.

  17. Questing for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: a multicentric and multiethnic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, Enrico; Cristell, Nicole; Cianflone, Domenico; Vermi, Anna-Chiara; Marenzi, Giancarlo; De Metrio, Monica; Uren, Neal G; Hu, Dayi; Ravasi, Timothy; Maseri, Attilio; Cannistraci, Carlo V

    2013-05-10

    Four monocentric studies reported that circadian rhythms can affect left ventricular infarct size after ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). To further validate the circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI in a multicentric and multiethnic population. We analyzed a prospective cohort of subjects with first STEMI from the First Acute Myocardial Infarction study that enrolled 1099 patients (ischemic time <6 hours) in Italy, Scotland, and China. We confirmed a circadian variation of STEMI incidence with an increased morning incidence (from 6:00 am till noon). We investigated the presence of circadian dependence of infarct size plotting the peak creatine kinase against time onset of ischemia. In addition, we studied the patients from the 3 countries separately, including 624 Italians; all patients were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We adopted several levels of analysis with different inclusion criteria consistent with previous studies. In all the analyses, we did not find a clear-cut circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI. Although the circadian dependence of infarct size supported by previous studies poses an intriguing hypothesis, we were unable to converge toward their conclusions in a multicentric and multiethnic setting. Parameters that vary as a function of latitude could potentially obscure the circadian variations observed in monocentric studies. We believe that, to assess whether circadian rhythms can affect the infarct size, future study design should not only include larger samples but also aim to untangle the molecular time-dynamic mechanisms underlying such a relation.

  18. From a WebQuest to a ReadingQuest: learners' reactions in an EFL extensive reading class

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Ana Cláudia; Amorim Carvalho, Ana Amélia

    2007-01-01

    Most students don’t like reading in a foreign language. They find it a difficult task, mainly due to the high number of unknown words they encounter when reading a text. They consider reading classes boring and uninteresting and as a result our students are poor readers. Concerned with this situation, we conducted a study on the impact of a learning environment based on the WebQuest, a ReadingQuest, and on student engagement in an extensive reading task. The results show that the ReadingQuest...

  19. Questing for circadian dependence in ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction: A multicentric and multiethnic study

    KAUST Repository

    Ammirati, Enrico

    2013-05-09

    Rationale: Four monocentric studies reported that circadian rhythms can affect left ventricular infarct size after ST-segment-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objective: To further validate the circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI in a multicentric and multiethnic population. Methods and Results: We analyzed a prospective cohort of subjects with first STEMI from the First Acute Myocardial Infarction study that enrolled 1099 patients (ischemic time <6 hours) in Italy, Scotland, and China. We confirmed a circadian variation of STEMI incidence with an increased morning incidence (from 6:00 am till noon). We investigated the presence of circadian dependence of infarct size plotting the peak creatine kinase against time onset of ischemia. In addition, we studied the patients from the 3 countries separately, including 624 Italians; all patients were treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. We adopted several levels of analysis with different inclusion criteria consistent with previous studies. In all the analyses, we did not find a clear-cut circadian dependence of infarct size after STEMI. Conclusions: Although the circadian dependence of infarct size supported by previous studies poses an intriguing hypothesis, we were unable to converge toward their conclusions in a multicentric and multiethnic setting. Parameters that vary as a function of latitude could potentially obscure the circadian variations observed in monocentric studies. We believe that, to assess whether circadian rhythms can affect the infarct size, future study design should not only include larger samples but also aim to untangle the molecular time-dynamic mechanisms underlying such a relation. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The Congress for Cultural Freedom, "Minerva," and the Quest for Instituting "Science Studies" in the Age of Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Congress for Cultural Freedom is remembered as a paramount example of the "cultural cold wars." In this paper, I discuss the ways in which this powerful transnational organization sought to promote "science studies" as a distinct--and politically relevant--area of expertise, and part of the CCF broader agenda to offer a renewed framework for…

  1. Evolution of the organization for tropical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Leslie J

    2002-06-01

    The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS)/Organización para Estudios Tropicales (OET) has evolved in many ways since its founding in 1963 as a non-profit consortium offering graduate courses and facilitating research in tropical ecology in Costa Rica. By 2002, its international membership included about 65 institutions, including four from Costa Rica. It had developed three Costa Rican field stations (La Selva, Las Cruces, and Palo Verde) with excellent facilities for teaching and research, and it was constructing a new Costa Rican office at the University of Costa Rica. Combinations of internal and external pressures influenced OTS to develop in new directions in the 1980s and 1990s. It became more diversified and more concerned with applied science in its traditional areas of graduate education and research facilitation. The Organization also evolved into new niches: more applied biology, professional education, environmental education and policy, conservation efforts, and an expanded geographic distribution to other Latin American countries. OTS was composed of changing combinations of people (Boards, members, staff) with evolving and competing priorities for limited financial resources. External environmental changes also shaped OTS's evolution. New problems of increased tropical deforestation, the emergence of the biodiversity "crisis" and conservation biology, global climate change, and calls for sustainable development affected OTS constituents and funding priorities of governments and foundations. Both internal and external pressures have in some cases demanded for OTS to improve its relationship with: Costa Rican biologists and their institutions, the Costa Rican government, and Costa Ricans living around the three OTS field stations.

  2. The quest for 'diagnostically lossless' medical image compression: a comparative study of objective quality metrics for compressed medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik-Urbaniak, Ilona; Brunet, Dominique; Wang, Jiheng; Koff, David; Smolarski-Koff, Nadine; Vrscay, Edward R.; Wallace, Bill; Wang, Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Our study, involving a collaboration with radiologists (DK,NSK) as well as a leading international developer of medical imaging software (AGFA), is primarily concerned with improved methods of assessing the diagnostic quality of compressed medical images and the investigation of compression artifacts resulting from JPEG and JPEG2000. In this work, we compare the performances of the Structural Similarity quality measure (SSIM), MSE/PSNR, compression ratio CR and JPEG quality factor Q, based on experimental data collected in two experiments involving radiologists. An ROC and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analysis indicates that compression ratio is not always a good indicator of visual quality. Moreover, SSIM demonstrates the best performance, i.e., it provides the closest match to the radiologists' assessments. We also show that a weighted Youden index1 and curve tting method can provide SSIM and MSE thresholds for acceptable compression ratios.

  3. The Quest for Comparability: Studying the Invariance of the Teachers' Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES) Measure across Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Ronny; Jansen, Malte; Nilsen, Trude; Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Marsh, Herbert W

    2016-01-01

    Teachers' self-efficacy is an important motivational construct that is positively related to a variety of outcomes for both the teachers and their students. This study addresses challenges associated with the commonly used 'Teachers' Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES)' measure across countries and provides a synergism between substantive research on teachers' self-efficacy and the novel methodological approach of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM). These challenges include adequately representing the conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy in a measurement model (cross-loadings) and comparing means and factor structures across countries (measurement invariance). On the basis of the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 data set comprising 32 countries (N = 164,687), we investigate the effects of cross-loadings in the TSES measurement model on the results of measurement invariance testing and the estimation of relations to external constructs (i.e., working experience, job satisfaction). To further test the robustness of our results, we replicate the 32-countries analyses for three selected sub-groups of countries (i.e., Nordic, East and South-East Asian, and Anglo-Saxon country clusters). For each of the TALIS 2013 participating countries, we found that the factor structure of the self-efficacy measure is better represented by ESEM than by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models that do not allow for cross-loadings. For both ESEM and CFA, only metric invariance could be achieved. Nevertheless, invariance levels beyond metric invariance are better achieved with ESEM within selected country clusters. Moreover, the existence of cross-loadings did not affect the relations between the dimensions of teachers' self-efficacy and external constructs. Overall, this study shows that a conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy exists and can be well-represented by ESEM. We further argue for the cross

  4. The Quest for Comparability: Studying the Invariance of the Teachers' Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES Measure across Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Scherer

    Full Text Available Teachers' self-efficacy is an important motivational construct that is positively related to a variety of outcomes for both the teachers and their students. This study addresses challenges associated with the commonly used 'Teachers' Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES' measure across countries and provides a synergism between substantive research on teachers' self-efficacy and the novel methodological approach of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM. These challenges include adequately representing the conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy in a measurement model (cross-loadings and comparing means and factor structures across countries (measurement invariance. On the basis of the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS 2013 data set comprising 32 countries (N = 164,687, we investigate the effects of cross-loadings in the TSES measurement model on the results of measurement invariance testing and the estimation of relations to external constructs (i.e., working experience, job satisfaction. To further test the robustness of our results, we replicate the 32-countries analyses for three selected sub-groups of countries (i.e., Nordic, East and South-East Asian, and Anglo-Saxon country clusters. For each of the TALIS 2013 participating countries, we found that the factor structure of the self-efficacy measure is better represented by ESEM than by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA models that do not allow for cross-loadings. For both ESEM and CFA, only metric invariance could be achieved. Nevertheless, invariance levels beyond metric invariance are better achieved with ESEM within selected country clusters. Moreover, the existence of cross-loadings did not affect the relations between the dimensions of teachers' self-efficacy and external constructs. Overall, this study shows that a conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy exists and can be well-represented by ESEM. We further argue for the cross

  5. The Quest for Comparability: Studying the Invariance of the Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES) Measure across Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Ronny; Jansen, Malte; Nilsen, Trude; Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers’ self-efficacy is an important motivational construct that is positively related to a variety of outcomes for both the teachers and their students. This study addresses challenges associated with the commonly used ‘Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy (TSES)’ measure across countries and provides a synergism between substantive research on teachers’ self-efficacy and the novel methodological approach of exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM). These challenges include adequately representing the conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy in a measurement model (cross-loadings) and comparing means and factor structures across countries (measurement invariance). On the basis of the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 data set comprising 32 countries (N = 164,687), we investigate the effects of cross-loadings in the TSES measurement model on the results of measurement invariance testing and the estimation of relations to external constructs (i.e., working experience, job satisfaction). To further test the robustness of our results, we replicate the 32-countries analyses for three selected sub-groups of countries (i.e., Nordic, East and South-East Asian, and Anglo-Saxon country clusters). For each of the TALIS 2013 participating countries, we found that the factor structure of the self-efficacy measure is better represented by ESEM than by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models that do not allow for cross-loadings. For both ESEM and CFA, only metric invariance could be achieved. Nevertheless, invariance levels beyond metric invariance are better achieved with ESEM within selected country clusters. Moreover, the existence of cross-loadings did not affect the relations between the dimensions of teachers’ self-efficacy and external constructs. Overall, this study shows that a conceptual overlap between the facets of self-efficacy exists and can be well-represented by ESEM. We further argue for the cross

  6. Case Studies of Physics Graduates' Personal Theories of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ke-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an interview case study with two physics doctoral students designed to explore their conceptions about the theory of evolution. Analysis of interview transcripts reveals that both students mistakenly constructed a "theory of evolution by environmentally driven adaptation" instead of the commonly accepted "theory…

  7. FoodQuest for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Linda C.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the WebQuest framework developed to help students investigate the topic of nutrition. Highlights include food labels; the Food Guide Pyramid; three levels of inquiry related to nutrition and ingredients in foods; how food choices affect health; historical background of food and food companies; and online grocery shopping. (LRW)

  8. Interacting Science through Web Quests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Ahmet; Karakus, Melek Altiparmak

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of WebQuests on elementary students' science achievement, attitude towards science and attitude towards web supported education in teaching 7th grade subjects (Ecosystems, Solar System). With regard to this research, "Science Achievement Test," "Attitude towards Science Scale"…

  9. Corner Office: ProQuest's Marty Kahn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkoff, Francine; Oder, Norman

    2009-01-01

    In a scant three years at ProQuest, Marty Kahn, CEO, has moved a company coming out of a financial morass back onto solid ground. He came on board after the purchase of ProQuest Information and Learning by the (mostly) privately owned Cambridge Information Group in late 2006 and the merger of ProQuest and CSA to form ProQuest CSA. (It's now just…

  10. Quest for Orthologs Entails Quest for Tree of Life: In Search of the Gene Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, Brigitte; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Rees, Jonathan A; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Muffato, Matthieu; Yilmaz, Pelin; Xenarios, Ioannis; Bork, Peer; Lewis, Suzanna E; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-07-01

    Quest for Orthologs (QfO) is a community effort with the goal to improve and benchmark orthology predictions. As quality assessment assumes prior knowledge on species phylogenies, we investigated the congruency between existing species trees by comparing the relationships of 147 QfO reference organisms from six Tree of Life (ToL)/species tree projects: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) taxonomy, Opentree of Life, the sequenced species/species ToL, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) database, and trees published by Ciccarelli et al. (Ciccarelli FD, et al. 2006. Toward automatic reconstruction of a highly resolved tree of life. Science 311:1283-1287) and by Huerta-Cepas et al. (Huerta-Cepas J, Marcet-Houben M, Gabaldon T. 2014. A nested phylogenetic reconstruction approach provides scalable resolution in the eukaryotic Tree Of Life. PeerJ PrePrints 2:223) Our study reveals that each species tree suggests a different phylogeny: 87 of the 146 (60%) possible splits of a dichotomous and rooted tree are congruent, while all other splits are incongruent in at least one of the species trees. Topological differences are observed not only at deep speciation events, but also within younger clades, such as Hominidae, Rodentia, Laurasiatheria, or rosids. The evolutionary relationships of 27 archaea and bacteria are highly inconsistent. By assessing 458,108 gene trees from 65 genomes, we show that consistent species topologies are more often supported by gene phylogenies than contradicting ones. The largest concordant species tree includes 77 of the QfO reference organisms at the most. Results are summarized in the form of a consensus ToL (http://swisstree.vital-it.ch/species_tree) that can serve different benchmarking purposes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Evolution of the Organization for Tropical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie J Burlingame

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS/Organización para Estudios Tropicales (OET has evolved in many ways since its founding in 1963 as a non-profit consortium offering graduate courses and facilitating research in tropical ecology in Costa Rica. By 2002, its international membership included about 65 institutions, including four from Costa Rica. It had developed three Costa Rican field stations (La Selva, Las Cruces, and Palo Verde with excellent facilities for teaching and research, and it was constructing a new Costa Rican office at the University of Costa Rica. Combinations of internal and external pressures influenced OTS to develop in new directions in the 1980s and 1990s. It became more diversified and more concerned with applied science in its traditional areas of graduate education and research facilitation. The Organization also evolved into new niches: more applied biology, professional education, environmental education and policy, conservation efforts, and an expanded geographic distribution to other Latin American countries. OTS was composed of changing combinations of people (Boards, members, staff with evolving and competing priorities for limited financial resources. External environmental changes also shaped OTS’s evolution. New problems of increased tropical deforestation, the emergence of the biodiversity "crisis" and conservation biology, global climate change, and calls for sustainable development affected OTS constituents and funding priorities of governments and foundations. Both internal and external pressures have in some cases demanded for OTS to improve its relationship with: Costa Rican biologists and their institutions, the Costa Rican government, and Costa Ricans living around the three OTS field stationsLa Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS/Organización para Estudios Tropicales (OET ha evolucionado en diversos campos desde su fundación en 1963 como un consorcio sin fines de lucro que ofrece cursos de

  12. A identidade capixaba em questão: uma análise psicossocial The capixaba's identity in question: a psychosocial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldemir Luiz Garcia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se o desenvolvimento de um estudo abarcando as representações sociais de professores sobre o folclore, verificando-se as conexões destas com a construção da identidade social. A pesquisa abarcou 32 docentes do ensino fundamental da rede pública municipal de Vitória. A coleta de dados realizou-se por meio de um questionário semi-estruturado que versou sobre temas relativos à problemática folclore capixaba e identidade. As questões estruturadas tiveram suas respostas tabuladas com o intuito de fornecerem dados quantitativos, já as respostas livres foram organizadas tendo em vista a construção de um corpus representacional que permitisse a aplicação de uma análise temática de conteúdo. Os resultados indicaram que os sujeitos associam o folclore à cultura espontânea e o caracterizam como o principal indicador de uma identidade social local (capixaba, que se constrói por meio da comunicação social, cotidianamente e constitui-se das tradições culturais em geral, tanto materiais quanto imateriais.Searched the development of a study on the social representations of teachers about the folklore, verifying the connections of these with the construction of the social identity. The research comprise 32 teachers of the basic education of the public municipal net of Vitória The collection of data was carried through by a half-structuralized questionnaire that turned on the problematic of folklore and identity. The structuralized questions had its answers tabulated with intention to supply quantitative information, already the free answers had been organized in view of the construction of a corpus that allowed the application of a thematic analysis of content. The results had indicated that teachers associate the folklore to the spontaneous culture and they characterize it as the main pointer of a local social identity (capixaba, that is constructed by means of the social communication, daily, and consists of the cultural

  13. Religious quest orientation: Rising against fundamentalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeshma Haji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Quest, or a journey-oriented approach to religion, is one dimension of religiosity that has been consistently related to positive outgroup attitudes. The present research assessed the extent to which individual differences in quest religiosity moderated the effects of a religiosity prime on attitudes toward an outgroup religion. Christian identifying participants (N = 55 completed a scale measure of quest religiosity. They then read a vignette that primed quest religiosity or religious fundamentalism. Attitudes toward Muslims and Jews were assessed with evaluation thermometers. Quest religiosity interacted with the prime such that those high in quest appeared to react against the fundamentalism prime by expressing particularly positive outgroup attitudes. Trait quest religiosity appears to buffer against situational factors that are typically associated with negative outgroup attitudes. In addition, implications for research on intergroup relations of religious groups are discussed.

  14. A questão do método nos estudos literários = The issue of method in the literary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza, Roberto Acízelo de

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo parte de uma definição geral de método na atividade científica, para depois concentrar-se na fisionomia específica de que se reveste o conceito no campo dos estudos literários. Defende a tese de que, embora um tanto secundarizada na agenda atual dos estudos literários, a questão do método é incontornável no processo da pesquisa, sendo pois indispensável que se lhe conceda atenção reflexiva

  15. Schulische und nicht-schulische Prädiktoren für die Studienplatzzusage an der Universität Witten / Herdecke - Ergebnisse einer QUEST-Analyse [Academic and non-academic predictors for acceptance to medical studies at Witten/Herdecke University - findings of a QUEST-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann, Marzellus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: Changes within the German Higher Education Framework act increasingly attract notice to the fact that the debate on different methods of selecting students lies in the responsibility of german medical schools. For more than 20 years the University of Witten/Herdecke has adhered to its own concept and procedure relating to its choice of students. Since 2005 this application procedure consists of a written and an oral application phase (assessment center. Within this study a retrospective classification of all applicants in the year 2005 was conducted, with the objective of finding academic and non-academic predictors for acceptance at Witten/Herdecke. Methods: All 172 applicants of the assessment center received a questionnaire asking for: age, gender, high school graduation mark, type of school, main school subjects, intended career, attendance at open house, parent graduation and profession. All duly completed questionnaires were classified according to the QUEST model from the viewpoint of acceptance versus refusal to medical studies at Witten/Herdecke. Outcomes: The QUEST model classifies the items of the questionnaire in sequence of declining power and in coherence to the targeted variable (acceptance. Affiliated with an increased probability of acceptance were: high school mark = 1.3, Steiner and Montessori schools, absence at open house, intended career as researcher and natural/social sciences and languages as main school subjects. Predictor sensitivity was 0.53, specificity reached 0.92. The positive predictive value accounted for 0.77, whereas the negative predictive value was 0.83. Conclusions: The high school graduation mark shows to be of high significance for the admission process at the University of Witten/Herdecke. Furthermore factors such as type of school, intended career and main school subjects play a major role. The high negative predictive value points out that the QUEST analysis is not suitable for

  16. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  17. Empirical approaches to the study of language evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-02-01

    The study of language evolution, and human cognitive evolution more generally, has often been ridiculed as unscientific, but in fact it differs little from many other disciplines that investigate past events, such as geology or cosmology. Well-crafted models of language evolution make numerous testable hypotheses, and if the principles of strong inference (simultaneous testing of multiple plausible hypotheses) are adopted, there is an increasing amount of relevant data allowing empirical evaluation of such models. The articles in this special issue provide a concise overview of current models of language evolution, emphasizing the testable predictions that they make, along with overviews of the many sources of data available to test them (emphasizing comparative, neural, and genetic data). The key challenge facing the study of language evolution is not a lack of data, but rather a weak commitment to hypothesis-testing approaches and strong inference, exacerbated by the broad and highly interdisciplinary nature of the relevant data. This introduction offers an overview of the field, and a summary of what needed to evolve to provide our species with language-ready brains. It then briefly discusses different contemporary models of language evolution, followed by an overview of different sources of data to test these models. I conclude with my own multistage model of how different components of language could have evolved.

  18. The Quest for Educational Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A. Tobin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A review of the book “The Global Fourth Way: The Quest for Educational Excellence.” By Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2012. ISBN: 978-1412987868 Individual chapters in The Global Fourth Way center on examples of high performance in Finland, Singapore, Alberta (Canada, Ontario (Canada, England, and California (US. Each captures the essence of educational models, practices, and issues in the region at large, before focusing on specific cases that support key values in their proposal.

  19. Quest Learning and Assessment, UT Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gerald; McDonald, Patsy; Hostetler, Rhonda

    2010-03-01

    Quest Learning & Assessment is an innovative web-based tool for instructors and students of math and science. Quest was created at The University of Texas at Austin to address educational challenges at one of the biggest universities in the country. It now serves a primary role in classes taught within UT's College of Natural Sciences. Quest covers subjects ranging from mathematics, chemistry, biology, physics, computer science and statistics. For instructors, Quest offers an easy way to create homework assignments, quizzes and exams with its extensive knowledge base. Since most questions have built-in variations Quest can create custom assignments for each student, which are automatically graded. Once solutions are available, students can read detailed explanations to questions and understand why their answer was correct or incorrect. Quest has graded over 30 million student responses and is now available to all education institutions.

  20. Social Studies Curricula in Turkey: Historical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Social studies course is a pivotal course offered in the first three years of students' primary education. Since the foundation of the Turkish Republic to the present, there have been changes in the curricula of the social studies course in accordance with the needs and expectations of the related period in Turkish Republic history. Whether these…

  1. Evolution: a study in bad taste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Stephen

    2005-10-11

    Bitter tastes are among the most salient of life's experiences--who can forget one's first encounter with dandelion milk or a stout beer? Studies of the genes underlying these tastes are providing new perspectives on human origins and health.

  2. A retrospective study of the orthopoxvirus molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babkin, Igor V; Babkina, Irina N

    2012-12-01

    The data on the structure of conserved genes of the Old and New World orthopoxviruses and unclassified Yoka poxvirus were used for a Bayesian dating of their independent evolution. This reconstruction estimates the time when an orthopoxvirus ancestor was transferred to the North American continent as approximately 50 thousand years ago (TYA) and allows for relation of this time interval with the global climate changes (with one of the short-term warmings during the Last Ice Age). The onset of the Yoka poxvirus evolution was assessed as approximately 90TYA. Availability of a large number of genome sequences of various cowpox virus strains provided for a comprehensive analysis of the orthopoxvirus evolutionary history. Such a study is especially topical in view of the postulated role of this virus in the evolution of various orthopoxviruses, namely, as an progenitor virus. The computations have demonstrated that the orthopoxviruses diverged from the ancestor virus to form the extant species about 10TYA, while the forbear of horsepox virus separated about 3TYA. An independent evolution of taterapox, camelpox, and variola viruses commenced approximately 3.5TYA. Study of the geographic distribution areas of the hosts of these three orthopoxviruses suggests the hypothesis on the region of their origin. It is likely that these viruses first emerged in Africa, in the region of the Horn of Africa, and that the introduction of camels to East Africa induced their divergent evolution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mayr, mathematics and the study of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crow James F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1959 Ernst Mayr challenged the relevance of mathematical models to evolutionary studies and was answered by JBS Haldane in a witty and convincing essay. Fifty years on, I conclude that the importance of mathematics has in fact increased and will continue to do so.

  4. Observing and Simulating Galaxy Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Pardos

    , but 50% smaller _CO factors, with the latter decreasing towards the center of each model galaxy. In a second study, SÍGAME is adapted to model the fine-structure line of singly ionized carbon, [CII] at 158 _m, the most powerful emission line of neutral ISM. Applying SÍGAME to the same type of galaxies......It remains a quest for modern astronomy to answer what main mechanisms set the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies. Massive galaxies present a good starting point for such a quest due to their relatively easy detection at every redshift. Since stars form out of cold and dense gas, a comprehensive...... model for galaxy evolution should explain any observed connection between SFR and the amount and properties of the molecular gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). In proposed models of that kind, an active galactic nucleus (AGN) phase is often invoked as the cause for the decrease or cease of star...

  5. Space Station evolution study oxygen loop closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. G.; Delong, D.

    1993-01-01

    In the current Space Station Freedom (SSF) Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC), physical scars for closing the oxygen loop by the addition of oxygen generation and carbon dioxide reduction hardware are not included. During station restructuring, the capability for oxygen loop closure was deferred to the B-modules. As such, the ability to close the oxygen loop in the U.S. Laboratory module (LAB A) and the Habitation A module (HAB A) is contingent on the presence of the B modules. To base oxygen loop closure of SSF on the funding of the B-modules may not be desirable. Therefore, this study was requested to evaluate the necessary hooks and scars in the A-modules to facilitate closure of the oxygen loop at or subsequent to PMC. The study defines the scars for oxygen loop closure with impacts to cost, weight and volume and assesses the effects of byproduct venting. In addition, the recommended scenarios for closure with regard to topology and packaging are presented.

  6. ProQuest Agriculture Journals 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Perpustakaan USU

    2006-01-01

    Proquest agriculture ProQuest adalah database (pangkalan data) jurnal elektronik yang berpusat di Ann Arbor USA, menyediakan sumber informasi ilmiah bagi peneliti dan mahasiswa dalam berbagai disiplin ilmu. Perpustakaan Universitas Sumatera Utara (USU) melanggan ProQuest sejak tahun 2003 hingga saat ini, oleh Perpustakaan USU

  7. Quest for Continual Growth Takes Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdey, Mary M.; Hashey, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the quest for continual growth has taken its root at Vestal Central School district. Located at the heart of upstate New York, educators at Vestal Central School district have created a spirit of "kaizen," a Japanese word meaning the relentless quest for continual improvement and higher-quality…

  8. Using Activity Theory to Understand Intergenerational Play: The Case of Family Quest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Sinem; Barab, Sasha A.; Downton, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    We implemented a five-week family program called "Family Quest" where parents and children ages 9 to 13 played Quest Atlantis, a multiuser 3D educational computer game, at a local after-school club for 90-minute sessions. We used activity theory as a conceptual and an analytical framework to study the nature of intergenerational play, the…

  9. ZooQuest: A mobile game-based learning application for fifth graders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, G.; Sandberg, J.A.C.; Maris, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined ZooQuest, a mobile game that supported fifth graders in the process of learning English as a second language. ZooQuest embedded the Mobile English Learning (MEL) application and was compared to MEL as a stand-alone application. Two groups were compared in a quasi-experimental

  10. A Quest for New Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Christine Hartmann

    The discovery of a Higgs like boson in 2012 closed many chapters within particle physics, providing a completion of the standard model field content. As a result of this event, many new chapters have opened. These take the shape of unresolved issues within the standard model, as well as physics......, which the standard model can not incorporate. Such open questions and insufficiencies of the standard model provide exciting hints of new physics, which can not be ignored. The quest for new physics has merely begun. The second run of the particle accelerator at CERN, LHC, is expected to provide...... interesting new data in the very near future. Such data requires careful treatment, also from a theoretical perspective. New physics could manifest itself through the discovery of new particles. On the other hand, with new physics possibly being out of reach for present and future experiments, it could...

  11. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals great predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society, and may provide a useful basis for policy-making. PMID:25671617

  12. Studying the Formation, Evolution, and Habitability of the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, M.; Waite, J. H. Jr.; Brockwell, T.; McKinnon, W.; Wyrick, D.; Mousis, O.; Magee, B.

    2013-01-01

    Highly sensitive, high-mass resolution mass spectrometry is an important in situ tool for the study of solar system bodies. In this talk we detail the science objectives, develop the rationale for the measurement requirements, and describe potential instrument/mission methodologies for studying the formation, evolution, and habitability of the Galilean satellites. We emphasize our studies of Ganymede and Europa as described in our instrument proposals for the recently selected JUICE mission and the proposed Europa Clipper mission.

  13. Studying the Formation, Evolution, and Habitability of the Galilean Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, M. A.; Waite, J. H.; Brockwell, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Mousis, O.; Magee, B.

    2013-12-01

    Highly sensitive, high-mass resolution mass spectrometry is an important in situ tool for the study of solar system bodies. In this talk we detail the science objectives, develop the rationale for the measurement requirements, and describe potential instrument/mission methodologies for studying the formation, evolution, and habitability of the Galilean satellites. We emphasize our studies of Ganymede and Europa as described in our instrument proposals for the recently selected JUICE mission and the proposed Europa Clipper mission.

  14. QUEST FOR TEACHING EXPERIMENTAL SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samrajya LAKSHMI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Andhra Pradesh, India, chemical experimenting in under graduate college labs by students is neglected because most of the intermediate (10+1 and 10+2 students concentrate on writing competitive exams like EAMCET (Engineering and Medical Common Entrance Test, IIT JEE (Indian Institute of Technology Joint Entrance Test, AIEEE (All India Engineering Entrance Examination, AFMS (Armed Forces Medical Services, AIMS (All India Institute of Medical Science. The students spend most of their time in preparing for competitive exams, practicing bits, and writing many model exams. Even Parents, staff, and management are also motivated and allow the students towards preparation for competitive exams because of the increase in number of engineering seats and demand of medical seats. Ultimately, the quality and quantity of students who join the B.Sc. (Bachelor of Science has been decreasing day by day. Even after joining the B.Sc., the students are motivated towards immediate white collared job oriented courses like M.C.A (Master of Computer Applications and M.B.A (Master Business Administration and spending their time for preparing for competitive exams for those courses. Only a few students are interested to join Post graduation in chemistry and try to learn experimental skills in chemistry laboratory. However, the motivated students towards undergraduate chemistry will be demotivated towards it due to lack of fundamentals in chemistry (in 10+2 level, which are essential for better job market. Ultimately, the students are in confusion and neglect learning the skills in doing experiments in chemistry lab. The present paper focuses on the thorough quest of one such teacher who strives for his own professional development. He has developed his own method of guiding the students for their improvement of skills in doing experiments in lab. The teacher explored solutions to his problems or problems of students by sorting out the critical incidents from his own

  15. Paleobiologic Studies of the Antiquity and Precambrian Evolution of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. William

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a final technical report on Paleobiologic Studies of the Antiquity and Precambrian Evolution of Life from 1 January 1990 - 30 September 1997. The topics include: 1) Major Research Accomplishments Supported By NAGW-2147 (Research Results Communicated in Edited Books, Research Results Communicated in Journal Articles and Book Chapters, and References Cited); and 2) Published Contributions Supported by NAGW-2147 (Edited Books, Journal Articles and Book Chapters, Book-Related Items, Miscellaneous Publications, Abstracts, and In Press).

  16. ProQuest Science Journals 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Perpustakaan USU

    2006-01-01

    Proquest science ProQuest adalah database (pangkalan data) jurnal elektronik yang berpusat di Ann Arbor USA, menyediakan sumber informasi ilmiah bagi peneliti dan mahasiswa dalam berbagai disiplin ilmu, oleh Perpustakaan USU

  17. The WebQuest: constructing creative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Julie; Townsend-Rocchiccioli, Judith; Trimm, Donna; Jacobs, Mike

    2010-10-01

    An exciting expansion of online educational opportunities is occurring in nursing. The use of a WebQuest as an inquiry-based learning activity can offer considerable opportunity for nurses to learn how to analyze and synthesize critical information. A WebQuest, as a constructivist, inquiry-oriented strategy, requires learners to use higher levels of thinking as a means to analyze and apply complex information, providing an exciting online teaching and learning strategy. A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all of the information learners work with comes from the web. This article provides an overview of the WebQuest as a teaching strategy and provides examples of its use. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Experiences of International PhD Students in Denmark as Quest Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksimovic, Tijana; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how the metaphor of quest can be used to conceptualise PhD experience and be employed in PhD supervision practice. As part of a small-scale study of the PhD experience of international students in Denmark, whose numbers have significantly increased lately, we conducted...... narrative interviews with 9 doctoral students. They were asked to select and describe up to 5 photographs that represent what they will remember their PhDs by. These narratives were first analysed inductively and then deductively organised using the quest metaphor. The findings indicate that the quest...

  19. Follow-up study of Evolution-drum chipper; Evolution-energiapuuhakkurin kaeyttoeselvitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahti, P. [Kotimaiset Energiat Ky, Kangashaekki (Finland); Vesisenaho, T. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Fuel Production

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this project was to test and further develop a new type of a drum chipper. It was assumed that this Evolution-chipper would be able to produce fuel chips without long splinters and would also be reliable and effective in chipping work at road-side landings. In this project the fuel chip quality and productivity of the chipper were found out. The follow-up study started in October 1995 and ended in the end of 1996. According to the follow-up study the mechanical availability of the chipper was 83 % during a period of one year. Because of the rather low level of fuel chip utilisation in Finland the work sites are located far from each other. Therefore the moving between working sites take as much as 1/5 of the total working hours. The chipper is easy to operate and the differences in the productivity between operators are modest. The chipping productivity varies mainly depending on the raw material. The average productivity was 45,8 m{sup 3} (loose) per gross effective hour during the follow-up period. The internal screening system of the chipper diminishes the amount of long splinters effectively. Other chipping parameters (such as rotating speed) affected the chip quality only a little. (orig.)

  20. Author-Supplied Metadata for Music Composition Dissertations in ProQuest

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belford, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes 910 records in ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (PQDT) for doctoral dissertations in music composition completed 2004-2013, representing PhD, DMA, and DA documents from sixty-six institutions in the United States...

  1. An anthropometric approach to the study of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vark, G N

    1987-01-01

    The study of human evolution has always been a major issue in physical anthropology. Since computers became available this study became a new dimension in that it became feasible to apply advanced mathematical multivariate methods which make use of morphometric data. However, looking back on what has been achieved so far with these methods, it must be admitted that the results obtained are often unsatisfactory. This has led to a certain lack of acceptance of these methods. In the present paper it is argued that very useful results may be obtained by applying more sophisticated multivariate methods which are specifically designed for the anthropological problems at issue. Three examples are given. The first deals with the controversy between "Creationism" on the one hand and "Evolutionism" on the other. Our results strongly support the Evolutionists' point of view. The second example deals with the reconstruction of human phylogeny. An investigation is discussed which has led to a startling new hypothesis concerning the evolution of man. The last example concerns a preliminary investigation of trends in human sexual dimorphism. The results obtained so far seem to support the opinion expressed by other workers that tendencies exist in our modern society which lead to changes in the present dimorphism.

  2. A Genetic Study of Wild Populations and Evolution A Genetic Study of Wild Populations and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovanitz William

    1944-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the scientific basis of heredity within the last two decades and the verification of the principal conclusions in many different plants and animals has made possible the application of analytical methods in the study of variations in wild populations. As with the physical and chemical sciences, genetics has been enabled to make use of mathematics to compound (often theoretically out of simple units, the genes, the complexity known as an organism, much in the same way as a chemist compounds molecules with atoms and the physicist compounds atoms with protons and electrons. The determination of the scientific basis of heredity within the last two decades and the verification of the principal conclusions in many different plants and animals has made possible the application of analytical methods in the study of variations in wild populations. As with the physical and chemical sciences, genetics has been enabled to make use of mathematics to compound (often theoretically out of simple units, the genes, the complexity known as an organism, much in the same way as a chemist compounds molecules with atoms and the physicist compounds atoms with protons and electrons.

  3. A Observational and Theoretical Study of Squall Line Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Erik Nels

    By utilizing a number of Doppler radar observations of ten squall lines, a certain class of squall lines is documented that is quasi-two-dimensional and has a solid leading edge at some time during the life cycle. It is found that the kinematic structure of these systems can be described as being due to a sloping zone of negative horizontal vorticity which extends across the entire squall line. Further, the evolution of these systems can be characterized by the sloping of this vorticity zone from erect to more horizontal orientations. The existence of the vorticity zone appears to be due to buoyancy gradients extending across the system. The primary difference between the systems studied is the rate at which tilting occurs. Motivated by the observations, a new theory is developed for squall line evolution. The theory allows for an environment with two layers characterized by differing shear values, and the squall line is characterized by a sloping region with a specified average vorticity. Using a circulation tendency approach, the rate of change of squall line slope is predicted based on environmental shear and cold pool strength. The predictions of the theory compare well with observations, and previously published theoretical and modelling results.

  4. STUDY ON THE EVOLUTION OF MYOGLOBIN COMPOUNDS AFTER SLAUGHTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Manea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the molecular system involved in the color of the meat during the muscle rigor and agening wasanalyzed comparative in different kind of muscles from pork and beef meat collected from animals of different ages andspecies. This work hints to study the influence of some agents on pigments content in meat, during the muscle rigor andageing. Along this paper hinted to prove the importance of some parameters such as: the species, the age and the typeof muscle and the color of the meat. For study it has been used meat of two species (porcines and bovines and treetypes of muscle (trapez cervical, obliquus extern and longissimus dorsi. To highlight the influence of the age and thebreed of the animal on the color of its meat, the pigments concentration was calculated. It has been determined that thefull aged bovines’meat tissue has an increased content of pigments.

  5. Local-scale spatio-temporal distribution of questing Ixodes ricinus L. (Acari: Ixodidae)-A case study from a riparian urban forest in Wrocław, SW Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Dorota; Stefańska-Krzaczek, Ewa; Szymanowski, Mariusz; Szczepańska, Anna

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the distribution of questing Ixodes ricinus ticks in suburban forest intensively visited by people. The local-scale observations conducted during a 4-year study at 99 plots (of 100m2 each) located throughout the entire area of a riparian urban forest, showed a high variation in the density of ticks from year to year. Although I. ricinus is generally permanent in the study area, spatial distribution of sample plots harbouring I. ricinus is variable, i.e. mainly random for adults and larvae, and random or clustered for nymphs. Among the most common plant species in the herb layer, there were not any species which had a statistically significant and constant impact on the occurrence of any of the development stages of I. ricinus. Also relations between the density of tick development stages and vegetation variables, including cover of the herb layer, total species number, species number of the herb layer, and percentage coverage of particular species, as well as ecological indices for light, soil moisture, reaction, and nutrients, did not show any constant and predictable pattern in subsequent years of the study. Only tree and shrub layers were found as variables positively affecting the density of ticks. Although small, suburban forests can be considered as tick-borne risk areas, it is impossible to determine in details areas of tick-borne risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. How Can We Study the Evolution of Animal Minds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchoix, Maxime; Chaine, Alexis S.

    2016-01-01

    During the last 50 years, comparative cognition and neurosciences have improved our understanding of animal minds while evolutionary ecology has revealed how selection acts on traits through evolutionary time. We describe how cognition can be subject to natural selection like any other biological trait and how this evolutionary approach can be used to understand the evolution of animal cognition. We recount how comparative and fitness methods have been used to understand the evolution of cognition and outline how these approaches could extend our understanding of cognition. The fitness approach, in particular, offers unprecedented opportunities to study the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in cognition within species and could allow us to investigate both proximate (i.e., neural and developmental) and ultimate (i.e., ecological and evolutionary) underpinnings of animal cognition together. We highlight recent studies that have successfully shown that cognitive traits can be under selection, in particular by linking individual variation in cognition to fitness. To bridge the gap between cognitive variation and fitness consequences and to better understand why and how selection can occur on cognition, we end this review by proposing a more integrative approach to study contemporary selection on cognitive traits combining socio-ecological data, minimally invasive neuroscience methods and measurement of ecologically relevant behaviors linked to fitness. Our overall goal in this review is to build a bridge between cognitive neuroscientists and evolutionary biologists, illustrate how their research could be complementary, and encourage evolutionary ecologists to include explicit attention to cognitive processes in their studies of behavior. PMID:27014163

  7. Rapid Estimation of Gustatory Sensitivity Thresholds with SIAM and QUEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Höchenberger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive methods provide quick and reliable estimates of sensory sensitivity. Yet, these procedures are typically developed for and applied to the non-chemical senses only, i.e., to vision, audition, and somatosensation. The relatively long inter-stimulus-intervals in gustatory studies, which are required to minimize adaptation and habituation, call for time-efficient threshold estimations. We therefore tested the suitability of two adaptive yes-no methods based on SIAM and QUEST for rapid estimation of taste sensitivity by comparing test-retest reliability for sucrose, citric acid, sodium chloride, and quinine hydrochloride thresholds. We show that taste thresholds can be obtained in a time efficient manner with both methods (within only 6.5 min on average using QUEST and ~9.5 min using SIAM. QUEST yielded higher test-retest correlations than SIAM in three of the four tastants. Either method allows for taste threshold estimation with low strain on participants, rendering them particularly advantageous for use in subjects with limited attentional or mnemonic capacities, and for time-constrained applications during cohort studies or in the testing of patients and children.

  8. Anaplasma phagocytophilum in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks in southwestern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Jani J; Penttinen, Ritva; Klemola, Tero; Vesterinen, Eero J; Hänninen, Jari

    2016-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is the causative agent of an emerging tick-borne disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis. While the bacterium has been reported from questing ticks in neighboring Sweden, Norway and Russia, the few surveys regarding questing ticks in Finland have thus far been negative. In the current study, the prevalence of A. phagocytophilum in Ixodes ricinus populations was evaluated in several study localities around southwestern Finland during 2013-2014. Some of these populations were previously screened and found negative for A. phagocytophilum in 2000. A total of 3158 I. ricinus collected by blanket dragging were screened for Anaplasma spp. using qPCR. Anaplasma were detected in 9.2% of adult ticks (n = 87) and 3.1% of nymphs (n = 979). All larval samples were negative for infection. All Anaplasma-positive samples were identified as A. phagocytophilum by sequencing. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of the pathogen from questing ticks in Finland. Furthermore, the pathogen was detected from several localities found negative during the previous screening 13 years earlier.

  9. Ontogenesis of the Utopian Quest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Reminick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from the ethnographic record and data from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, psychology, gerontology, philosophy, and evolutionary theory, suggests a way of life that creates new possibilities for the human condition and the environment we inhabit. That environment is one of a grounded environment that respects the laws and principles of evolution and survival in community. In contrast to the ideal characteristics of people and environment it is useful to compare this on a theoretical level with those conditions that have created unhappiness, conflict, and violence at all levels of social and cultural complexity. Specifically, we find that the universal personal qualities of spirituality, the ideal characteristics of the healer, recent research findings on happiness, and the conditions of longevity, here labeled orthogeriatrics, all dovetail and reinforce each other creating a synergy of high human potential. An evolutionary perspective on these various qualities suggests an orientation and direction for citizens of the human species to consider in their contributions to a new world order; a utopia that grows from within the heart and spirit of each human being.

  10. Teaching Evolution: A Heuristic Study of Personal and Cultural Dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Darwinian evolution is a robustly supported scientific theory. Yet creationists continue to challenge its teaching in American public schools. Biology teachers in all 50 states are responsible for teaching science content standards that include evolution. As products of their backgrounds and affiliations teachers bring personal attitudes and…

  11. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    SERIES │ ARTICLE. Keywords. Wind energy, horizontal and ver- tical axis turbines, Betz law, offshore wind parks. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies. 3. Wind Technologies. Sheela K Ramasesha. Sheela K Ramasesha is currently working on renewable energy technologies with primary focus on photovoltaics at.

  12. RESPONSIBLE JOURNALISM AND THE QUEST FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-02

    Oct 2, 2016 ... The publication of Responsible Journalism and Quest for Professional Standards in Ghana could not have been timely. ... journalists and media organisations in news production and dissemination. This is the .... data from the continent and reflect the unique conditions of the continent, the author could have ...

  13. The Quest for Fairness in Language Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The search for fairness in language testing is distinct from other areas of educational measurement as the object of measurement, that is, language, is part of the identity of the test takers. So, a host of issues enter the scene when one starts to reflect on how to assess people's language abilities. As the quest for fairness in language testing…

  14. Jupiter Quest: A Path to Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollman, Kelly A.; Rodgers, Mark H.; Mauller, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    To experience the world of professional science, students must have access to the scientific community and be allowed to become real scientists. A partnership involving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Lewis Center for Educational Research has produced Jupiter Quest, an engaging curriculum…

  15. The quest for intensified steam cracking process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, M.W.M.; Verheijen, P.J.T.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented on the quest for an intensified steam cracking process. The main focus is to improve the efficiency of the steam cracking process. The first part of the investigation is to examine which of the current available processes is close to the ideal steam cracking

  16. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies - Wind Technologies. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 756-770 ... Keywords. Wind energy; horizontal and vertical axis turbines; Betz law; offshore wind parks.

  17. Vison Quest: Rites of Adolescent Passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiland, Laurence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes northern Michigan's Pine River Camp Vision Quest four-day solo wilderness experience for 13- , 14- , and 15-year-olds based on Indian ceremonies to personalize and demarcate in a spiritual manner the questor's entrance into society as a fully responsible and mature adult. Reports experiences of 17 campers. (NEC)

  18. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies - Solar Energy Technologies. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 5 May 2013 pp 440-457. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  20. Fully self-consistent thermal evolution studies of rotating neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo; Schramm, Stefan; Weber, Fridolin

    2017-07-01

    In this work we study the thermal evolution of rotating, axis-symmetric neutron stars, which are subjected to structural and compositional changes during spin-down. Our aim is to go beyond standard thermal evolution calculations where neutron stars are considered spherically-symmetric and with a static, "frozen-in" composition. Building on previous work, we carry out fully self-consistent thermal evolution calculations where the neutron star has an axis-symmetric, time-dependent structure. Such an approach allows us to consider, during the thermal evolution, changes of the star's geometry as well as its microscopic particle population. As a proof-of-concept, we study the thermal evolution of a neutron star subjected to magnetic braking spin-down. We show that the spin-evolution, combined with the accompanying structural and compositional changes lead to a substantially distinct thermal evolution scenario.

  1. Cabomba as a model for studies of early angiosperm evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialette-Guiraud, Aurelie C. M.; Alaux, Michael; Legeai, Fabrice; Finet, Cedric; Chambrier, Pierre; Brown, Spencer C.; Chauvet, Aurelie; Magdalena, Carlos; Rudall, Paula J.; Scutt, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The angiosperms, or flowering plants, diversified in the Cretaceous to dominate almost all terrestrial environments. Molecular phylogenetic studies indicate that the orders Amborellales, Nymphaeales and Austrobaileyales, collectively termed the ANA grade, diverged as separate lineages from a remaining angiosperm clade at a very early stage in flowering plant evolution. By comparing these early diverging lineages, it is possible to infer the possible morphology and ecology of the last common ancestor of the extant angiosperms, and this analysis can now be extended to try to deduce the developmental mechanisms that were present in early flowering plants. However, not all species in the ANA grade form convenient molecular-genetic models. Scope The present study reviews the genus Cabomba (Nymphaeales), which shows a range of features that make it potentially useful as a genetic model. We focus on characters that have probably been conserved since the last common ancestor of the extant flowering plants. To facilitate the use of Cabomba as a molecular model, we describe methods for its cultivation to flowering in the laboratory, a novel Cabomba flower expressed sequence tag database, a well-adapted in situ hybridization protocol and a measurement of the nuclear genome size of C. caroliniana. We discuss the features required for species to become tractable models, and discuss the relative merits of Cabomba and other ANA-grade angiosperms in molecular-genetic studies aimed at understanding the origin of the flowering plants. PMID:21486926

  2. Time-Domain Studies as a Probe of Stellar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam Andrew

    This dissertation focuses on the use of time-domain techniques to discover and characterize these rare astrophysical gems, while also addressing some gaps in our understanding of the earliest and latest stages of stellar evolution. The observational studies presented herein can be grouped into three parts: (i) the study of stellar death (supernovae); (ii) the study of stellar birth; and (iii) the use of modern machine-learning algorithms to discover and classify variable sources. I present observations of supernova (SN) 2006gy, the most luminous SN ever at the time of discovery, and the even-more luminous SN 2008es. Together, these two supernovae (SNe) demonstrate that core-collapse SNe can be significantly more luminous than thermonuclear type Ia SNe, and that there are multiple channels for producing these brilliant core-collapse explosions. For SN 2006gy I show that the progenitor star experienced violent, eruptive mass loss on multiple occasions during the centuries prior to explosion, a scenario that was completely unexpected within the cannon of massive-star evolution theory. I also present observations of SN 2008iy, one of the most unusual SNe ever discovered. Typical SNe take ≲3 weeks to reach peak luminosity; SN 2008iy exhibited a slow and steady rise for ˜400 days before reaching maximum brightness. The best explanation for such behavior is that the progenitor of SN 2008iy experienced an episodic phase of mass loss ˜100 yr prior to explosion. The three SNe detailed in this dissertation have altered our understanding of massive-star mass loss, namely, these SNe provide distinct evidence that post-main sequence mass loss, for at least some massive stars, occurs in sporatic fits, rather than being steady. They also demonstrate that core collapse is not restricted to the red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet stages of stellar evolution as theory predicted. Instead, some massive stars explode while in a luminous blue variable-like state. I also present

  3. Do law students stand apart from other university students in their quest for mental health: A comparative study on wellbeing and associated behaviours in law and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skead, Natalie K; Rogers, Shane L

    2015-01-01

    We are not producing a product, but a well-balanced person.(1) It is well-documented that law students experience higher levels of psychological distress than members of the general population and university students in other professional disciplines. In 2014, we published our findings on an empirical study identifying the correlations between law student wellbeing and student behaviour both at and away from law school. The results of the study informed the development of an evidence-based 'behavioural toolkit' to assist law students and law schools in making informed choices and decisions that promote and even improve the mental health of students. The study we undertook was not, however, limited to law students. It extended to collecting quantitative data on psychological distress and associated behaviours in psychology students. This article reports on the comparative findings of the study and provides a comparative basis for understanding the contextual influences on the wellbeing of law students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Quest for Continuous Improvement: A Qualitative Study on Diffusion of Outcomes Assessment among Career and Technical Education Faculty Members at Rocky Mountain States Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The following qualitative multicase study presents an examination of outcomes assessment adoption as it relates to Career and Technical Education faculty at community colleges and outlines recommendations for postsecondary education administration as they introduce innovations to faculty members. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  5. Feasibility of Conducting a Palliative Care Randomized Controlled Trial in Children With Advanced Cancer: Assessment of the PediQUEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Soto, Natalie; Chen, Kun; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, Jeffrey R; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric palliative care randomized controlled trials (PPC-RCTs) are uncommon. To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a PPC-RCT in pediatric cancer patients. This was a cohort study embedded in the Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology Study (NCT01838564). This multicenter PPC-RCT evaluated an electronic patient-reported outcomes system. Children aged two years and older, with advanced cancer, and potentially eligible for the study were included. Outcomes included: pre-inclusion attrition (patients not approached, refusals); post-inclusion attrition (drop-out, elimination, death, and intermittent attrition (IA; missing surveys) over nine months of follow-up); child/teenager self-report rates; and, reasons to enroll/participate. Over five years, of the 339 identified patients, 231 were eligible (in 22, we could not verify eligibility); 84 eligible patients were not approached and 43 declined participation. Patients not approached were more likely to die or have brain tumors. We enrolled 104 patients. Average enrollment rate was one patient per site per month; shortening follow-up from nine to three months (with optional re-enrollment) increased recruitment by 20%. A total of 87 patients completed the study (24 died) and 17 dropped out. Median IA was 41% in the first 20 weeks of follow-up and more than 60% in the eight weeks preceding death. Child/teenager self-report was 94%. Helping others, low burden procedures, incentives, and staff attitude were frequent reasons to enroll/participate. A PPC-RCT in children with advanced cancer was feasible, post-inclusion retention adequate; many families participated for altruistic reasons. Strategies that may further PPC-RCT feasibility include: increasing target population through large multicenter studies, approaching sicker patients, preventing exclusion of certain patient groups, and improving data collection at end of life. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

  6. Structural Evolution of Household Energy Consumption: A China Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy production and consumption is one of the issues for the sustainable development strategy in China. As China’s economic development paradigm shifts, household energy consumption (HEC has become a focus of achieving national goals of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction. The information entropy model and LMDI model were employed in this study in order to analyse the structural evolution of HEC, as well as its associated critical factors. The results indicate that the information entropy of HEC increased gradually, and coal will be reduced by clean energies, such as natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas. The information entropy tends to stabilize and converge due to rapid urbanization. Therefore, from the perspective of environmental protection and natural resource conservation, the structure of household energy consumption will be optimized. This study revealed that residents’ income level is one of the most critical factors for the increase of energy consumption, while the energy intensity is the only driving force for the reduction of HEC. The accumulated contribution of these two factors to the HEC is 240.53% and −161.75%, respectively. It is imperative to improve the energy efficiency in the residential sector. Recommendations are provided to improve the energy efficiency-related technologies, as well as the standards for the sustainable energy strategy.

  7. Phylogenetic Study of the Evolution of PEP-Carboxykinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjukta Aich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK is the key enzyme to initiate the gluconeogenic pathway in vertebrates, yeast, plants and most bacteria. Nucleotide specificity divided all PCKs into two groups. All the eukaryotic mammalian and most archaeal PCKs are GTP-specifi c. Bacterial and fungal PCKs can be ATP-or GTP-specific but all plant PCKs are ATPspecific. Amino acid sequence alignment of PCK enzymes shows that the nucleotide binding sites are somewhat conserved within each class with few exceptions that do not have any clear ATP- or GTP-specific binding motif. Although the active site residues are mostly conserved in all PCKs, not much significant sequence homology persists between ATP- and GTPdependent PCK enzymes. There is only one planctomycetes PCK enzyme (from Cadidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis that shows sequence homology with both ATP-and GTP-dependent PCKs. Phylogenetic studies have been performed to understand the evolutionary relationship of various PCKs from different sources. Based on this study a flowchart of the evolution of PCK has been proposed.

  8. The New Computer Hacker’s Quest and Contest with the Experienced Hackers: A Qualitative Study applying Pierre Bourdieu’s Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nycyk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hacker forums are places for new hackers, newbies, to find information on hacking practices and to become part of a community. This study contributes to understanding ways newbies try to become accepted experienced computer hackers. Using Pierre Bourdieu’s Field Theory and its concepts, 500 threads from a forum were analyzed to see how newbies attempt to gain a place in the hacking field amongst experienced hackers. Thematic analysis methods were used to demonstrate how the forum’s field, and...

  9. Actors and Their Use of Avatars as Personal Mediators: An empirical study of avatar-based sense-makings and communication practices in the virtual worlds of EverQuest and Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisse Siggaard Jensen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past five years, millions of actors have found it meaningful to move in and settle down in the Metaverse, for example, as an adventurous shaman in an advanced role-playing game such as EverQuest or as a businesswoman in the social world of Second Life. In this article, the main question therefore is: how do the actors and gamers of the two types of virtual worlds make sense of their avatars and the worlds when they act and communicate using their avatars as personal mediators? Participatory observations inspired by virtual ethnography and in-depth video-interviews were conducted to answer this question. The analysis of the substantial amount of empirical data draws on the concepts of intermediaries and mediators from actor-network theory (Latour, 1991, 1998, 2005, Sense-Making methodology (Dervin et al., 2003, social psychology (Yee, 2006, and experimental economics (Bloomfield & Rennekamp, 2008. It is shown how the actors create a personal story and history of their avatar that transforms them into the mediators of being in the virtual world, and also how the avatars act as the mediators that transform the actors themselves. To identify, understand, and keep track of the many transformations of meaning, Nick Yee’s motivation factors (relationships, immersion, achievement, escapism and manipulation have proven helpful also to the analysis of a social world like Second Life. In future studies, it is recommended that we study further the sense-makings of motivation factors such as creativity and experimentation.

  10. Babesia species in questing Ixodes ricinus, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Maria E; Andersson, Martin O

    2016-02-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging tick-transmitted zoonosis in large parts of the world. In Sweden, the occurrence and diversity of Babesia species is largely unknown. In order to estimate the exposure to Babesia from infected ticks, we collected questing Ixodes ricinus from several sites across southern Sweden during two consecutive field seasons and investigated the occurrence of Babesia species. We report for the first time the occurrence of the zoonotic species Babesia venatorum in Swedish ticks, with a prevalence of 1%. We also detected B. microti (prevalence 3.2%) and B. divergens (prevalence 0.2%). The incidence of Babesia in questing ticks is substantially lower than that of several other tick-borne diseases in Sweden. Nevertheless, babesiosis should not be neglected as a possible diagnosis following tick bites in humans and animals in Sweden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. QUEST Hierarchy for Hyperspectral Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Ryer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualia exploitation of sensor technology (QUEST motivated architecture using algorithm fusion and adaptive feedback loops for face recognition for hyperspectral imagery (HSI is presented. QUEST seeks to develop a general purpose computational intelligence system that captures the beneficial engineering aspects of qualia-based solutions. Qualia-based approaches are constructed from subjective representations and have the ability to detect, distinguish, and characterize entities in the environment Adaptive feedback loops are implemented that enhance performance by reducing candidate subjects in the gallery and by injecting additional probe images during the matching process. The architecture presented provides a framework for exploring more advanced integration strategies beyond those presented. Algorithmic results and performance improvements are presented as spatial, spectral, and temporal effects are utilized; additionally, a Matlab-based graphical user interface (GUI is developed to aid processing, track performance, and to display results.

  12. QuEST: Robust Quantum Gadgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    of novel and robust perturbation theory gadgets , the construction of scalable stabilizer Hamiltonians, and methods for achieving the fault-tolerant... theory gadgets 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 1 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Aram Harrow a...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0170 QuEST: Robust Quantum Gadgets Aram Harrow University of Washington Computer Science & Engineering Box 352350 Seattle, WA

  13. Amphibian and Avian Karyotype Evolution: Insights from Lampbrush Chromosome Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotina, Anna; Dedukh, Dmitry; Krasikova, Alla

    2017-11-08

    Amphibian and bird karyotypes typically have a complex organization, which makes them difficult for standard cytogenetic analysis. That is, amphibian chromosomes are generally large, enriched with repetitive elements, and characterized by the absence of informative banding patterns. The majority of avian karyotypes comprise a small number of relatively large macrochromosomes and numerous tiny morphologically undistinguishable microchromosomes. A good progress in investigation of amphibian and avian chromosome evolution became possible with the usage of giant lampbrush chromosomes typical for growing oocytes. Due to the giant size, peculiarities of organization and enrichment with cytological markers, lampbrush chromosomes can serve as an opportune model for comprehensive high-resolution cytogenetic and cytological investigations. Here, we review the main findings on chromosome evolution in amphibians and birds that were obtained using lampbrush chromosomes. In particular, we discuss the data on evolutionary chromosomal rearrangements, accumulation of polymorphisms, evolution of sex chromosomes as well as chromosomal changes during clonal reproduction of interspecies hybrids.

  14. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Lisa Anne

    2012-01-01

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called "the modern synthesis of evolution." Building primarily on the work of historians Vassiliki Smocovitis and John L. Rudolph, I used the archival papers and...

  15. Exponential bound in the quest for absolute zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanatos, Dionisis

    2017-10-01

    In most studies for the quantification of the third law of thermodynamics, the minimum temperature which can be achieved with a long but finite-time process scales as a negative power of the process duration. In this article, we use our recent complete solution for the optimal control problem of the quantum parametric oscillator to show that the minimum temperature which can be obtained in this system scales exponentially with the available time. The present work is expected to motivate further research in the active quest for absolute zero.

  16. A comparative study of the molecular evolution of signalling pathway ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... George Washington University, 333 Lisner Hall, 2023 G St. NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA; Institute for Neuroscience, George Washington University, 636 Ross Hall, 2300 I St. NW, Washington DC 20037, USA; Department of Biology, Genome Evolution Laboratory, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Maynooth, ...

  17. A comparative study of the molecular evolution of signalling pathway ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-05

    Aug 5, 2013 ... 2Institute for Neuroscience, George Washington University, 636 Ross Hall, 2300 I St. NW, Washington DC 20037, USA. 3Department of Biology, Genome Evolution ..... of paralogues for each sensory modality across all phyla organized by sensory modality. (C–E) Graphs plotting correlation of the concor-.

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structural evolution of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolution of different phases in protein solution leading to crystallization, denaturation and gelation. The protein solution under ... which regulate and control the functionality and stability of these molecules. Pro- teins in aqueous solution are .... by the protein–surfactant complex [10]. The fractal dimension of the complex de-.

  19. Studies of the structure and evolution of the intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Timothy Brian

    The intracluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters is influenced by multiple processes, such as mergers and radiative cooling. In this dissertation we examine how these processes affect the structure and formation history of the ICM via both detailed individual cluster study and by study of bulk properties in large cluster data sets. This work provides important constraints on the evolution of the ICM, and in particular on the effects of mergers and cool core formation on ICM structure. We use high-resolution X-ray data to identify merger features in the cluster A2319, and propose a dynamical model for the merger. Remarkably, the bulk properties of this merging cluster are not significantly perturbed relative to the values predicted by scaling relations. This question of merger effects on bulk properties is pursued further in a study of 45 nearby clusters. We show that cool core-related phenomena, and not mergers, are the primary source of scatter in scaling relations among bulk properties. This surprising result, with greater scatter in the cool core population than in non-cool core clusters, may support cluster formation scenarios in which the presence of a cool core is primarily determined by factors beyond simply the time since the last major merger. We show that the central X-ray surface brightness can be used to significantly decrease the scatter in sealing relations by acting as a proxy for cool core "strength", a finding beneficial for duster cosmology surveys that use X-ray luminosity as a proxy for mass. Finally, we examine how scaling relations evolve with redshift using a 70 cluster sample over the redshift range 0.18 z < 1.24. We show that X-ray luminosity and ICM mass evolve more slowly toward higher redshifts than is predicted by self-similar models of cluster formation. Effects of core structure are again apparent in this work, as scaling relations constructed from core subtracted quantities evolve differently from those using non-core subtracted

  20. Science for Survival: The Modern Synthesis of Evolution and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lisa Anne

    2012-01-01

    In this historical dissertation, I examined the process of curriculum development in the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) in the United States during the period 1959-1963. The presentation of evolution in the high school texts was based on a more robust form of Darwinian evolution which developed during the 1930s and 1940s called…

  1. Quando nós somos o outro: questões teórico-metodológicas sobre os estudos comparados When we are the other. Theoretical-methodological questions about comparative studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ciavatta Franco

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Refletir sobre os problemas postos pela comparação e sobre estudos que a utilizam é o objetivo deste trabalho. O texto é parte de uma pesquisa comparativa sobre políticas de formação profissional de trabalhadores em três países, México, Brasil e itália. Do ponto de vista metodológico, não iniciamos a reflexão pelas semelhanças, mas pelas diferenças. A utilização do método histórico permite buscar as diferenças entre os países a partir dos processos históricos mais amplos (compreender a história como processo, e reconstruí-las como parte de uma determinada realidade complexa, aberta às transformações (utilizar a história como método. A discussão dos estudos comparados tem diversas vertentes de análise. Neste trabalho procuramos compreender algumas questões que emergem do uso da comparação na antropologia, na história, na sociologia e na ciência política. Por último, apresentamos uma visão metodológica comparativa sobre o tema das políticas de formação profissional.The objetive of this work is to reflect upon both the problemspresented when exercising comparison and the studies supported by its application. The text is part of a comparative research on workers education policies in three countries, Mexico, Brazil and Italy. Talking about methodological approach, we didn't start such reflection by the similarities, but by the diferences. The utilization of the historical method make possible to seek the differences among countries, starting from widerange historical processes (to understand history as a process, and to reconstruct them as part of a specific and complex reality, opened to transformations (to use history as a method. The discussion of comparative studies has several forms of analysis. In this work we seek to understand some questions that emerges from the comparison in anthropology, history, sociology and political science. Finally, we present one comparative methodological view on the

  2. Jung's quest for the "Aurora consurgens"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, Aksel

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the year 1929 when Jung published ‘A European commentary’ to Richard Wilhelm's German translation of the Taoist text The Secret of the Golden Flower. This shows that Jung had already started on the track of European alchemy by following up Conrad Waldkirch's preface in Artis...... Auriferae (1593); and it raises the question of whether this could be the possible missing link to Jung's subsequent research in Alchemy and Hermetic Philosophy in the years to come. It is argued that here was the beginning of Jung's quest for the Aurora consurgens, the publication of which concludes...

  3. ImmuneQuest: Assessment of a Video Game as a Supplement to an Undergraduate Immunology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L. Raimondi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of immunology, particularly in this day and age, is an integral aspect of the training of future biologists, especially health professionals. Unfortunately, many students lose interest in or lack true comprehension of immunology due to the jargon of the field, preventing them from gaining a true conceptual understanding that is essential to all biological learning. To that end, a new video game, ImmuneQuest, has been developed that allows undergraduate students to “be” cells in the immune system, finding and attacking pathogens, while answering questions to earn additional abilities. The ultimate goal of ImmuneQuest is to allow students to understand how the major cells in the immune system work together to fight disease, rather than focusing on them as separate entities as is more commonly done in lecture material. This work provides the first assessment of ImmuneQuest in an upper-level immunology course. Students had significant gains in learning of information presented in ImmuneQuest compared with information discussed in lecture only. Furthermore, while students found the game “frustrating” at times, they agreed that the game aided their learning and recommended it for future courses. Taken together, these results suggest that ImmuneQuest appears to be a useful tool to supplement lecture material and increase student learning and comprehension.

  4. Loess studies in central United States: Evolution of concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmer, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    Few words in the realm of earth science have caused more debate than "loess". It is a common term that was first used as a name of a silt deposit before it was defined in a scientific sense. Because this "loose" deposit is easily distinguished from other more coherent deposits, it was recognized as a matter of practical concern and later became the object of much scientific scrutiny. Loess was first recognized along the Rhine Valley in Germany in the 1830s and was first noted in the United States in 1846 along the lower Mississippi River where it later became the center of attention. The use of the name eventually spread around the world, but its use has not been consistently applied. Over the years some interpretations and stratigraphic correlations have been validated, but others have been hotly contested on conceptual grounds and semantic issues. The concept of loess evolved into a complex issue as loess and loess-like deposits were discovered in different parts of the US. The evolution of concepts in the central US developed in four indefinite stages: the eras of (1) discovery and development of hypotheses, (2) conditional acceptance of the eolian origin of loess, (3) "bandwagon" popularity of loess research, and (4) analytical inquiry on the nature of loess. Toward the end of the first era around 1900, the popular opinion on the meaning of the term loess shifted from a lithological sense of loose silt to a lithogenetic sense of eolian silt. However, the dual use of the term fostered a lingering skepticism during the second era that ended in 1944 with an explosion of interest that lasted for more than a decade. In 1944, R.J. Russell proposed and H.N. Fisk defended a new non-eolian, property-based, concept of loess. The eolian advocates reacted with surprise and enthusiasm. Each side used constrained arguments to show their view of the problem, but did not examine the fundamental problem, which was not in the proofs of their hypothesis, but in the definition of

  5. Case studies in teaching evolution: The intersection of dilemmas in practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rachel

    Despite recent science education reform documents citing evolution as a core concept to be taught in grades K-12, research shows problems with how it is currently taught. Evolution is often avoided, teachers minimize its importance within biology, infuse misconceptions, and/or interject non-scientific ideologies into lessons. My research focused on how teachers in two geographically and culturally distinct school districts in the southwestern U.S. negotiate dilemmas during an evolution unit. One school district was rural and had a large population of Mormon students, while the other district was urban, with a large majority Mexican/Mexican-American students. Using a case study approach, I observed three biology teachers during their evolution lessons, interviewed them throughout the unit, co-planned lessons with them, and collected artifacts from this unit, including anonymous student work. I also included data from four genetics lessons for each teacher to determine if the issues that arose during the evolution unit were a result of the general practice of the teacher, or if they were unique to evolution. Findings showed teachers' backgrounds and comfort levels with evolution, in addition to their perceptions of community context, affected how they negotiated pedagogical, conceptual, political, and cultural dilemmas. This study's findings will inform in-service teachers' future practice and professional development tools to aid with their teaching---this may include methods to negotiate some of the political (e.g. state standards) or cultural (e.g. religious resistance) issues inherent to teaching evolution.

  6. Oxygen evolution studies on perovskite films in alkaline media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, V.; Comninellis, Ch. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Mueller, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Thin films of La{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3} perovskite were deposited on nickel plates by thermal decomposition of the metal nitrates. The electrochemical activity of the films for oxygen evolution in KOH solutions (0.1-1 M) was investigated. The reaction order with respect to OH{sup -} ion was found to be around 0.7. The results correlate fairly well with a mechanism in which breaking of the intermediate metal-peroxide bond at the Co ion is the rate-determining step. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  7. The ALHAMBRA Survey: For a systematic Study of Cosmic Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Moles, Mariano; Alfaro, Emilio; Benítez, Narciso; Broadhurst, Tom; Castander, Francisco J.; Cepa, Jordi; Cerviño, Miguel; Fernández-Soto, Alberto; Delgado, Rosa M. González; Infante, Leopoldo; Aguerri, Alfonso López; Márquez, Isabel; Martínez, Vicent J.; Masegosa, Josefa; del Olmo, Ascensión

    2005-01-01

    ALHAMBRA is a project to gather data to sample a fraction of the Universe with enough precision to follow the evolution of its content and properties with z, a kind of Cosmic Tomography. It is defined as a 4 square degrees photometric survey with 20 contiguous, equal width, medium band filters covering from 3500 to 9700 A, plus the JHKs NIR bands. It was optimized to get (for a fixed observing time) the maximum number of objects with accurate classification and redshift and to be sensitive to...

  8. TERMS OF TRADE EVOLUTION, CAUSES AND EFFECTS: CASE STUDY ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrea Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Terms of trade are meant to show the ratio by which a country is different in the level and dynamics of revenues from the exchange made by different categories of products on the external markets. The level of recorded revenues from the commercialization of products and services varies from country to country, and there is rarely a mutually beneficial exchange situation from these operations. Trade efficiency analysis lies in the determination of the terms of trade. In the current paper, international developments are analyzed based on net terms of trade index used by UNCTAD. Statistical data are provided by the World Bank, where export and import price index and the volume of imports and exports by countries were considered. The classification of the countries has been done according to the geographical orientation and based on the purchasing power parity, thus creating two tables, the first table highlighting seven regions, and the second table with seven categories of states including OPEC and non-OPEC members. The terms of trade evolution are influenced by certain important factors in the production process of goods and services. Some of these factors are mentioned: labour productivity; changes in commodity prices; yet, only the last factor is examined in this paper. Based on World Bank commodity price data, the evolution of major energy inputs such as crude oil, gas, coal, and major industrial raw materials such as aluminium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, zinc, silver, gold, platinum and iron was analysed and interpreted. For Romania, the data on terms of trade evolution shows a dramatic situation. If terms of trade development presented a cyclical evolution, the economy as a whole would send an optimistic message. In contrast, the data presented in the following paper will show that our country has registered continuous depreciation of the terms of trade ratio, with a direct impact on external trade balance deficits, a rising external debt

  9. Anaplasma phagocytophilum in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Ioana Adriana; Kalmár, Zsuzsa; Magdaş, Cristian; Magdaş, Virginia; Toriay, Hortenzia; Dumitrache, Mirabela Oana; Ionică, Angela Monica; D'Amico, Gianluca; Sándor, Attila D; Mărcuţan, Daniel Ioan; Domşa, Cristian; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Granulocytic anaplasmosis is a common vector-borne disease of humans and animals with natural transmission cycle that involves tick vectors, among which Ixodes ricinus is the most important. The present paper reports the prevalence and geographical distribution of A. phagocytophilum in 10,438 questing Ixodes ricinus ticks collected at 113 locations from 40 counties of Romania. The unfed ticks were examined for the presence of A. phagocytophilum by PCR targeting a portion of ankA gene. The overall prevalence of infection was 3.42%, with local prevalences ranging between 0.29% and 22.45%, with an average prevalence of 5.39% in the infected localities. The infection with A. phagocytophilum was detected in 72 out of 113 localities and in 34 out of 40 counties. The highest prevalence was recorded in females followed by males and nymphs. The results and the distribution model have shown a large distribution of A. phagocytophilum, covering Romania's entire territory. This study is the first large scale survey of the presence of A. phagocytophilum in questing I. ricinus ticks from Romania. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical study of the evolution of vortices in a linearly stratified fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Van Heijst, G.J.F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). J.M. Burgers Centre fro Fluid Dynamics; Verzicco, R. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Meccanica e Aeronautica

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents a numerical study in which the evolution of vortices in a Stafford fluid is compared to the evolution of two-dimensional vortices. The influence of the Reynolds number and the Froude number are investigated, for the evolution of axisymmetric vortices, for their azimuthal instability and for the subsequent formation of tripoles. It is found that due to radial diffusion axisymmetric vortices with various initial vorticity profiles all evolve towards the same profile. This evolution reduces the growth of azimuthal instabilities which may lead to the formation of a tripole. For vortices in a stratified fluid the effect of the ambient stratification on the evolution of the vortices is investigated. It is found that a process of vortex stretching, which becomes more pronounced for increasing Froude numbers, leads to a weaker tripole formation.

  11. Historical evolution of oil painting media: A rheological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Ducouret, Guylaine; Lequeux, François; Moutard-Martin, Thierry; Walter, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Rheology is the science of flow, which is a phenomenon found in every painting operation, such as decorative paintings or protective coatings. In this article, the principles of rheology as applied to paintings and coatings are recalled in a first part and the rheological criteria required in the paint industry presented. Indeed, different flow behaviours leads to different finishes. The same procedure and techniques as in industry can be employed to explain some evolutions in oil painting aspects over the centuries. The first recipes for oil painting indicate the use of treated oil, resins and spirits. This article deals with the evolution of the composition of these systems as media for oil painting, according to rheological clues. During the Renaissance period, the media used were Newtonian or slightly shear thinning and allowed one a perfect levelling. Then techniques changed, paints became more opaque with less addition of oil/resin media, and brushstrokes appeared visible. Some preparations containing lead, oil and mastic resin, whose flow behaviour is closed to those required in industry, may have appeared during the 17th century and are still used and sold today. To cite this article: L. de Viguerie et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  12. CosmoQuest: Galvanizing a Dynamic, Inclusive Professional Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, W. H.; Buxner, S.; Bracey, G.; Noel-Storr, J.; Gay, P.; Graff, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility offers experiences to audiences around the nation and globally through pioneering citizen science. An endeavor between universities, research institutes, and NASA centers, CosmoQuest brings together scientists, educators, researchers, programmers—and individuals of all ages—to explore and make sense of our solar system and beyond. Scaffolded by an educational framework that inspires 21stCentury learners, CosmoQuest engages people—you, me!—in analyzing and interpreting real NASA data, inspiring questions and defining problems. Linda Darling-Hammond calls for professional development to be: "focused on the learning and teaching of specific curriculum content [i.e. NGSS disciplinary core ideas]; organized around real problems of practice [i.e. NGSS science and engineering practices] …; [and] connected to teachers' collaborative work in professional learning community...." (2012). In light of that, what can CosmoQuest offer NASA STEM education as a virtual research facility? CosmoQuest engages scientists with learners, and learners with science. As a virual research facility, its focal point must be its online platform. CosmoQuest empowers and expands community through a variety of social channels, including science and education-focused hangouts, podcasts, virtual star parties, and social media. In addition to creating standards-aligned materials, CosmoQuest channels are a hub for excellent resources throughout NASA and the larger astronomical community. In support of CosmoQuest citizen science opportunities, the process and outcomes of CosmoQuest initiatives will be leveraged and shared. Thus, CosmoQuest will be present and alive in the awareness of its growing community. Finally, to make CosmoQuest truly relevant, partnerships between scientists and educators are encouraged and facilitated, and "just-in-time" opportunities to support constituents exploring emerging NASA STEM education and new NASA data will be

  13. Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt): Introducing the Space Mobile Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  14. Formation and evolution mechanism of regional haze: a case study in the megacity Beijing, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, X. G; Li, J; Qu, Y; Han, T; Hou, L; Gu, J; Chen, C; Yang, Y; Liu, X; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Tian, H; Hu, M

    2013-01-01

      The main objective of this study is to investigate the formation and evolution mechanism of the regional haze in megacity Beijing by analyzing the process of a severe haze that occurred 20-27 September 2011...

  15. The quest for extraterrestrial life: what about the viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale Warren

    2013-01-01

    Recently, viruses have been recognized as the most numerous entities and the primary drivers of evolution on Earth. Historically, viruses have been mostly ignored in the field of astrobiology due to the view that they are not alive in the classical sense and if encountered would not present risk due to their host-specific nature. What we currently know of viruses is that we are most likely to encounter them on other life-bearing planets; that while some are exquisitely host-specific, many viruses can utilize hundreds of different host species; that viruses are known to exist in our planet's most extreme environments; and that while many do not survive long outside their hosts, some can survive for extended periods, especially in the cold. In our quest for extraterrestrial life, we should be looking for viruses; and while any encountered may pose no risk, the possibility of an encounter with a virus capable of accessing multiple cell types exists, and any prospective contact with such an organism should be treated accordingly.

  16. The quest for extraterrestrial life: what about the viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale Warren

    2013-08-01

    Recently, viruses have been recognized as the most numerous entities and the primary drivers of evolution on Earth. Historically, viruses have been mostly ignored in the field of astrobiology due to the view that they are not alive in the classical sense and if encountered would not present risk due to their host-specific nature. What we currently know of viruses is that we are most likely to encounter them on other life-bearing planets; that while some are exquisitely host-specific, many viruses can utilize hundreds of different host species; that viruses are known to exist in our planet's most extreme environments; and that while many do not survive long outside their hosts, some can survive for extended periods, especially in the cold. In our quest for extraterrestrial life, we should be looking for viruses; and while any encountered may pose no risk, the possibility of an encounter with a virus capable of accessing multiple cell types exists, and any prospective contact with such an organism should be treated accordingly.

  17. Experimental study on modulational instability and evolution of crescent waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-long Zhou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments on the instability of steep water wave trains in water with finite water depths and infinite water depths in a wide wave basin were performed. It was found that under the coupled development of modulational instability and class-II instability, the initial two-dimensional steep wave trains evolved into three-dimensional crescent waves, followed by the occurrence of disordered water surfaces, and that the wave energy transferred to sidebands in the amplitude spectrum of the water surface elevation. The results also show that water depth has a significant effect on the growth of modulational instability and the evolution of crescent waves. The larger the water depth, the more quickly the modulational instability suppresses class-II instability.

  18. Science, Technology and the Quest for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The quest for sustainable development is seen in this article as an intrinsic part of the reconstitution of environmentally-oriented science and technology policy.......The quest for sustainable development is seen in this article as an intrinsic part of the reconstitution of environmentally-oriented science and technology policy....

  19. Quest II: reduction of co2 emissions of reefer containers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukasse, L.J.S.; Baerentz, M.B.; Kramer, de J.E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the QuestTM II (QUality and Energy in Storage and Transport) development project run by Wageningen UR Food & Biobased Research, Maersk Line and Carrier Transicold. The aim of the Quest II development project was to improve the control of refrigerated marine container

  20. Power Plants, Steam and Gas Turbines WebQuest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Carlos; Rey, Guillermo D.; Sánchez, Ángel; Cancela, Ángeles

    2012-01-01

    A WebQuest is an Internet-based and inquiry-oriented learning activity. The aim of this work is to outline the creation of a WebQuest entitled "Power Generation Plants: Steam and Gas Turbines." This is one of the topics covered in the course "Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer," which is offered in the second year of Mechanical…

  1. Sacred Uncertainty: Hope, Fear, and the Quest for Transcendence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Myth and religion have historically been driven by a quest for certainty, in the form of understanding, control, or both. This article contrasts the thinking of Ken Wilber and Chögyam Trungpa in examining the origins of this quest in the development of individual consciousness, and in assessing the central role of hope and fear ...

  2. Observational astrochemistry: The quest for interstellar molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guélin M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 160 molecular species, not counting isotopologues, have been identified in circumstellar envelopes and interstellar clouds. These species have revealed a wealth of familiar, as much as exotic molecules and in complex organic (and silicon compounds, that was fully unexpected in view of the harshness of surrounding conditions: vanishingly low densities, extreme temperatures and intense embedding UV radiation. They illustrate the diversity of astrochemistry and show robust prebiotic molecules may be. In this lecture, we review the quest for interstellar molecules and show how tributary it is from theoretical ideas and technology developments. A. A. Penzias, who discovered interstellar CO and the 2.7 K Cosmic Background radiation, used to joke that astronomical research is easy: the great questions have largely been formulated; one only has to wait until technological progress makes it possible to answer.

  3. The SeaQuest Spectrometer at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidala, C.A.; et al.

    2017-06-29

    The SeaQuest spectrometer at Fermilab was designed to detect oppositely-charged pairs of muons (dimuons) produced by interactions between a 120 GeV proton beam and liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium and solid nuclear targets. The primary physics program uses the Drell-Yan process to probe antiquark distributions in the target nucleon. The spectrometer consists of a target system, two dipole magnets and four detector stations. The upstream magnet is a closed-aperture solid iron magnet which also serves as the beam dump, while the second magnet is an open aperture magnet. Each of the detector stations consists of scintillator hodoscopes and a high-resolution tracking device. The FPGA-based trigger compares the hodoscope signals to a set of pre-programmed roads to determine if the event contains oppositely-signed, high-mass muon pairs.

  4. Temporal pattern of questing tick Ixodes ricinus density at differing elevations in the coastal region of western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qviller, Lars; Grøva, Lise; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Klingen, Ingeborg; Mysterud, Atle

    2014-04-11

    Climate change can affect the activity and distribution of species, including pathogens and parasites. The densities and distribution range of the sheep tick (Ixodes ricinus) and it's transmitted pathogens appears to be increasing. Thus, a better understanding of questing tick densities in relation to climate and weather conditions is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to test predictions regarding the temporal pattern of questing tick densities at two different elevations in Norway. We predict that questing tick densities will decrease with increasing elevations and increase with increasing temperatures, but predict that humidity levels will rarely affect ticks in this northern, coastal climate with high humidity. We described the temporal pattern of questing tick densities at ~100 and ~400 m a.s.l. along twelve transects in the coastal region of Norway. We used the cloth lure method at 14-day intervals during the snow-free season to count ticks in two consecutive years in 20 m2 plots. We linked the temporal pattern of questing tick densities to local measurements of the prevailing weather. The questing tick densities were much higher and the season was longer at ~100 compared to at ~400 m a.s.l. There was a prominent spring peak in both years and a smaller autumn peak in one year at ~100 m a.s.l.; but no marked peak at ~400 m a.s.l. Tick densities correlated positively with temperature, from low densities 15-17°C. We found no evidence for reduced questing densities during the driest conditions measured. Tick questing densities differed even locally linked to elevation (on the same hillside, a few kilometers apart). The tick densities were strongly hampered by low temperatures that limited the duration of the questing seasons, whereas the humidity appeared not to be a limiting factor under the humid conditions at our study site. We expect rising global temperatures to increase tick densities and lead to a transition from a short questing season with low

  5. Quantum Test of the Equivalence Principle: The STE-Quest Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Rasel, Ernst

    2013-05-01

    STE-QUEST aims for a test of General Relativity through testing the Universality of Free Fall with a dual species atom interferometer on a satellite. This test is based on measuring the differential acceleration of two test bodies assumed to be zero by Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EP). The Eotvos ratio derived from the differential signal will be determined with an accuracy of parts in 1e-15 beyond state-of-the art precision of 1e-13 established by lunar laser ranging and torsion balances. Quantum degenerated ensembles of 87Rb and 85Rb will act as test bodies in the dual species interferometer and would show the first quantum test of the EP. Due to the weightlessness conditions in space these test masses will be simultaneously prepared and interrogated with a free evolution time of 10 s. Within a single cycle of 20 s a shot noise limited sensitivity to accelerations of 3e-12 m/s2 is anticipated. The simultaneous interferometry is carried out in a double diffraction Mach-Zehnder geometry. Challenges in this mission lie both in suppressing noise and bias terms as well as in the accommodation to the limited resources of a satellite. In this talk the measurement principle will presented, an overview of the preliminary payload design will be given, and the estimated error budget will be discussed. STE-QUEST is a proposal for an M3 mission in the frame of the Cosmic Vision program of ESA. for the STE-QUEST consortium.

  6. The quest for synergy when developing the urban fringe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Rohr; Engberg, Lars A.

    How can planning policies related to urban fringe development and disadvantaged neighbourhoods create synergy? This question is approached and answered by various research fields and explored on various urban-planning levels, displaying case-studies related to urban regeneration, post-industrial...... and suburban development and urban fringe literature. The present paper adds to these discussions by analysing two case-studies in Denmark in which local government pursue traditional urban-growth strategies in urban-fringe development - a post-industrial harbour and a large suburb, located just outside...... the traditional city core. However, the traditional approach to growth is in both cases confronted with the presence of close-by disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Stakeholders are engaged in the difficult quest of creating synergy for both development and disadvantage by means of public investments. The paper...

  7. Study regarding the density evolution of messages and the characteristic functions associated of a LDPC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drăghici, S.; Proştean, O.; Răduca, E.; Haţiegan, C.; Hălălae, I.; Pădureanu, I.; Nedeloni, M.; (Barboni Haţiegan, L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a method with which a set of characteristic functions are associated to a LDPC code is shown and also functions that represent the evolution density of messages that go along the edges of a Tanner graph. Graphic representations of the density evolution are shown respectively the study and simulation of likelihood threshold that render asymptotic boundaries between which there are decodable codes were made using MathCad V14 software.

  8. Enhancement of Elementary School Students' Science Learning by Web-Quest Supported Science Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Hsiung, Chuang; Jeng-Fung, Hung; Quo-Cheng, Sung

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to probe into the influence of implementing Web-quest supported science writing instruction on students' science learning and science writing. The subjects were 34 students in one class of grade six in an elementary school in Taiwan. The students participated in the instruction, which lasted for eight weeks. Data collection…

  9. Use of WebQuest Design for Inservice Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskeceli-Tunc, Sinem; Oner, Diler

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether a teacher professional development module built around designing WebQuests could improve teachers' technological and pedagogical skills. The technological skills examined included Web searching and Web evaluating skills. The pedagogical skills targeted were developing a working definition for higher-order thinking…

  10. Meal-specific dietary changes from Squires Quest! II: A serious video game intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Squire's Quest! II: Saving the Kingdom of Fivealot", an online video-game, promotes fruit-vegetable (FV) consumption. An evaluation study varied type of implementation intentions used during the goal setting process (none; Action, Coping, or both Action + Coping plans). Participants who created Ac...

  11. An Influence Study of Hydrogen Evolution Characteristics on the Negative Strap Corrosion of Lead Acid Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Guobin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative strap corrosion is an important reason for the failure of valve regulated lead acid battery. This paper selected the Pb-Sb alloy material and Pb-Sn alloy material, made an investigation on the negative corrosion resistance and hydrogen evolution of these two alloy materials by scanning electron microscope analysis, metallographic analysis, chemical study and linear sweep voltammetry, and discussed the influence of lead alloy hydrogen evolution on the negative strap corrosion. The results showed that the hydrogen evolution reaction rates of the alloys had an impact on the corrosion areas with the maximum thickness of the alloys and the depth of corrosion layers. Greater hydrogen evolution reaction rate can lead to shorter distance between the corrosion area with the maximum thickness and the liquid level; whereas the greater corrosion layer thickness can bring aggravated risk of negative strap corrosion failure.

  12. The Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest): Validation in a Sample of Adults with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Simona C; Morrison, Amanda S; Goldin, Philippe R; Olino, Thomas M; Heimberg, Richard G; Gross, James J

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive distortions are thought to be central to the development and maintenance of anxiety disorders and are a widely acknowledged treatment target in cognitive-behavioral interventions. However, little research has focused on the measurement of cognitive distortions. The Cognitive Distortions Questionnaire (CD-Quest; de Oliveira, 2015), a brief, 15-item questionnaire, assesses the frequency and intensity of cognitive distortions. The CD-Quest has been shown to have sound psychometric properties in American, Australian, and Brazilian undergraduate samples and one Turkish-speaking outpatient clinical sample. The current study aimed to provide the first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the English version of the CD-Quest in a clinical sample and the first evaluation of any version of the CD-Quest in a sample of adults diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD). In a sample of treatment-seeking adults with SAD, the CD-Quest demonstrated good convergent validity, discriminant validity, known-groups validity, and treatment sensitivity. It also showed good internal consistency, and both confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses supported the previously reported unitary factor structure. Findings extend prior research indicating the reliability and validity of the CD-Quest.

  13. WebQuest experience: Pre-Service secondary maths and chemistry teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdoğan Halat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the impact of developing WebQuests on the attention, confidence, relevance and satisfaction, or motivation, of pre-service secondary mathematics and chemistry teachers in the instructional technologies and material design course. There were a total of 67 pre-service teachers, 32 pre-service secondary mathematics teachers and 35 pre-service secondary chemistry teachers involved in this study, which took place over seven weeks. The pre-service teachers in both groups designed their WebQuests suitable for the level of high-school students. The researcher used a questionnaire in the collection of the data to find the motivational level of the participants. It was given to the participants by the researcher before and after the instruction during a single class period. The paired-samples t-test, independent samples t-test and ANCOVA were used in the analysis of the quantitative data. The study showed that designing WebQuests had more effect on the attention, confidence and relevance of the pre-service chemistry teachers than of the pre-service mathematics teachers. However, in general, although developing WebQuests had positive effects on the motivational levels of both pre-service secondary maths and chemistry teachers, there were no statistically significant differences found in relation to the motivational levels of both groups.

  14. Actors and Their Use of Avatars as Personal Mediators: An empirical study of avatar-based sense-makings and communication practices in the virtual worlds of EverQuest and Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisse Siggaard Jensen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available I løbet af de seneste fem år er stadig flere aktører blevet en del af de virtuelle verdeners Metaverse. De har valgt at flytte ind som en eventyrlig shaman i et af de avancerede online masserollespil som EverQuest eller som en forretningskvinde i en social verden som Second Life. Denne artikel søger derfor svar på spørgsmålet: Hvordan tilskriver aktører og spillere mening til den valgte verden, når de bruger deres avatarer som personlige mediatorer i de to typer af virtuelle verdener EverQuest henholdsvis Second Life? Deltagende observation inspireret af virtuel etnografi og dybtgående in-situ video interviews samt case studier er blevet gennemført for at belyse spørgsmålet. Analysen af det empiriske materiale refererer til begreberne ”intermediaries” og ”mediators” fra aktør-netværksteori (Latour 1991, 1998, 2005, Sense-Making metodologi (Dervin et al., 2003, social psykologi (Yee, 2006 og eksperimentel økonomi (Bloomfield & Rennekamp, 2008. Analysen viser, hvordan aktører og avatarer i gensidige processer skaber en personlig fortælling og historie, der transformerer avatarerne til personlige mediatorer i det virtuelle, samtidig med at disse virker som mediatorer, der transformerer aktørerne selv. For at forstå disse forandringer i sense-making processer er Nick Yee’s forskning i motivationelle faktorer anvendt som analytisk reference. Det gælder for sense-making processer i begge typer, selvom Yee’s resultater primært er hentet fra forskning i de avancerede online masserollespil. Meget tyder på, at resultaterne herfra også kan anvendes i forhold til en social verden som Second Life. Anskuet fra et sense-making perspektiv er der mange sammenfald mellem de to typer.

  15. Evolution of alkaline lakes - Lake Van case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman Meyer, Felix; Viehberg, Finn; Bahroun, Sonya; Wolf, Annabel; Immenhauser, Adrian; Kwiecien, Ola

    2017-04-01

    scenario yet exist, it is only a tentative explanation. Lacey et al. 2016. Northern Mediterranean climate since the Middle Pleistocene: a 637 ka stable isotope record from Lake Ohrid (Albania/Macedonia). Biogeosciences 13 Stockhecke et al. 2014. Sedimentary evolution and environmental history of Lake Van (Turkey) over the past 600 000 years. Sedimentology

  16. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harzsch, S.; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    2010-01-01

    Harzsch, S. and Wanninger, A. 2010. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study. —Acta Zoologica (Stockholm) 91: 35–43 Although recent molecular studies indicate that Chaetognatha may be one of the earliest Bilaterian offshoots, the phylogenetic position of this ta......Harzsch, S. and Wanninger, A. 2010. Evolution of invertebrate nervous systems: the Chaetognatha as a case study. —Acta Zoologica (Stockholm) 91: 35–43 Although recent molecular studies indicate that Chaetognatha may be one of the earliest Bilaterian offshoots, the phylogenetic position...

  17. Tareas significativas y recursos en Internet. WebQuest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª del Pilar Hernández Mercedes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Una breve reflexión sobre las TIC y las modalidades de su integración en el aula, nos lleva al estudio y análisis de las WebQuest, actividades con las que se promueve el uso racionalizado de Internet, a la vez que se ponen en marcha procesos cognitivos de orden superior.Qué son, cómo son, cómo se diseñan, qué principios las alimentan... son las preguntas que irán encontrando respuesta en estas páginas.Después de haber analizado la situación en otros ámbitos educativos, nos centraremos en el impacto, desarrollo, implicaciones y posibilidades de esta estrategia didáctica en el campo de la enseñanza del español./////////In this work we will make a brief reflection on the ICT and the modalities of its integration in the classroom. This takes us to the study and analysis of WebQuests. These are activities used to promote simultaneously the rational use of Internet and the starting up high level cognitive processes.What, and how, they are, how they are built, what principles feed them … are the questions that will be finding answer in these pages.After an analyses of the situation in other educative contexts, we will focus to the impact, development, implications and possibilities of this didactic strategy in the field of the teaching of the Spanish language.

  18. Biosystematic studies on Dactylis L. l. Review of the previous studies. 1.2. Cytology, genetics, experimental studies, and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Mizianty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author presents a review of the previous studies on Dactylis L., dealing with cytology,genetics, experimental studies and evolution. Following cytotypes of Dactylis are distributed mostly in Central Europe: 16 diploids, 7 tetraploids and also 2 hexaploids in North Africa. Some aneuploids and accessory chromosomes were also found in this genus. Data dealing with karyotypes of some taxa, and geographical distribution of cytotypes are also listed. Selected problems concerning crossing within diploids as well as tetraploids and also between diploids and teraploids were presented. Some opinions regarding the evolution in the genus Dactylis were also demonstrated. In all these hypotheses the following diploids are considered to be the oldest: D. smithii Link subsp. smithii, D. g. subsp. aschersoniana (Greabn. Thell. and D. g. subsp. himalayensis Dom.

  19. Quest for ideal weight: costs and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, A K

    1999-08-01

    The quest to achieve the ideal weight comes with notable costs. Dieting carries the financial costs of professional consulting, low-calorie foods, books and materials, and diet programming. Club memberships, clothing, equipment, and time all contribute to the cost of exercise. Cosmetic surgery to achieve the desired physique carries a significant financial, and sometimes psychological, burden. Women often pursue thinner bodies despite already being at a healthy weight. This pursuit is motivated primarily to enhance appearance. The ideal body portrayed in the media has stabilized in thinness, but it is becoming increasingly tubular, i.e., taller with slimmer hips and thicker waist. This ideal is presented to adult and adolescent women in their popular magazines, and to little girls with their dolls. Exercise is promoted as an optimal means to achieve the ideal physique. Young American women tend to idealize an athletic body shape, especially with upper-body muscularity. This shape can be attained only through sustained exercise and upper-body strength training. High-level exercise may be a precursor to eating disorders. Women who exercise to excess, who are highly preoccupied with weight, and who are characterized by perfectionism and an obsessive compulsive personality are at risk for eating disorders. When body weight and shape are kept in perspective and realistic goals are set, the physical, psychological, and financial costs of achieving or maintaining a healthy weight may be minimized.

  20. A quest for the artificial leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janna Olmos, Julian David; Kargul, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    It has been estimated that the energy captured in one hour of sunlight that reaches our planet is equivalent to annual energy production by human population globally. To efficiently capture the practically inexhaustible solar energy and convert it into high energy density solar fuels provides an attractive 'green' alternative to running our present day economies on rapidly depleting fossil fuels, especially in the context of ever growing global energy demand. Natural photosynthesis represents one of the most fundamental processes that sustain life on Earth. It provides nearly all the oxygen we breathe, the food we consume and fossil fuels that we so much depend on. Imitating the reactions that occur at the early stages of photosynthesis represents the main challenge in the quest for construction of an efficient, robust, self-renewing and cost-effective 'artificial leaf'. In this review we summarize the main molecular features of the natural solar energy converters, photosystem I and photosystem II, that allow them to operate at high quantum efficiencies, and thus inspire the smart matrix design of the artificial solar-to-fuel devices. We also discuss the main challenges that face the field and overview selected recent technological advances that have tremendously accelerated the race for a fully operational artificial leaf that could serve as a viable alternative to fossil fuels for energy production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Evolutions of the Transdisciplinary of Futures Studies: Case Study of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Behroozi Lak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Futures Studies are transdiciplinary research field that explain social phenomena and change processes, and provide a broader perspective on them. Further, it develops various fields of human activity. Futures studies thematic territory is all sectors of culture, economics, politics, technology and the arts, and in the view of the changes ahead, its topics are rising. It is believed that human societies are able not to control the future, but the future is able to influence the path of history. I this study, we reviewed books and papers published in futures studies to illustrate American sutures studies movement in 1960s and 1970s. We start with World War II and Cold War. Then, organizations and future thinkers affecting futures studies would be discussed. Finally, the paradigms that have formed after World War II and the Cold War in the field of futures studies would be defined. Generally, futurists believe that so far there have been two paradigms in the evolution of futures studies and there are signs of the emergence of a new paradigm.

  2. Phenotypic integration: studying the ecology and evolution of complex phenotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pigliucci, Massimo; Preston, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    .... Studying the Plasticity of Phenotypic Integration in a Model Organism, 155 Massimo Pigliucci 8. Integrating Phenotypic Plasticity When Death Is on the Line: Insights from Predator-Prey Systems...

  3. The study of the evolution of squares in 3 periods of Safavid, Qajar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of the evolution of squares in 3 periods of Safavid, Qajar and Pahlavi with historical – evolutionary and form approach (Isfahan and Tehran styles) case study of Naqshe Jahan square in Isfahan, Ganjalikhan square in Kerman, Sabze Meydan and Toop.

  4. Evolution of the complex permittivity of biological tissue at microwaves ranges: correlation study with burn depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, Brusson; Jerome, Rossignol; Stephane, Binczak; Gabriel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the muscle tissue's complex permittivity represents a growing interest in terms of characterization in medicine and biology. The influence of a burned part on the permittivity is not very developed. In this work, an estimation of the complex permittivity of biological tissues is performed as a function of the depth of burn tissues. The sensor, an open-ended coaxial probe, is placed directly against each sample. The evolution of the complex permittivity is studied for two measurements conditions (in the air and in a physiological solution). A correlation study is attempted with the depth of burn tissue.

  5. Cultural Evolution: a case study of Indian music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relations between music, culture and the society which surrounds it, focussing on change as an evolutionary process. The classical music of North India serves as an example, but a similar approach may be applied to other branches of human culture, e.g. science.

  6. Spiritual Evolution of Bereavement Counselors: An Exploratory Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterbaugh, Dolores T.

    2008-01-01

    This article draws from a phenomenological study on the experience of being a bereavement counselor. Ten bereavement counselors shared their experiences in bereavement counseling. Spiritual and emotional aspects of bereavement counseling with grieving and dying persons are discussed as well as the spiritual effects on and growth processes of the…

  7. Lunar evolution: a combined numerical modelling and HPT experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies, some of them using data from the Apollo seismic network from the 1960's and 1970's, others using newer data, have shown that part of the lunar core may still be fluid today. Furthermore, a possible partial melt zone has been detected in the deep mantle, just above the core-mantle

  8. In silico characterization and evolution studies of alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of our study was to isolate the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) mRNA from Phoenix dactifera, and examine the molecular evolutionary history of this nuclear gene with others ADH genes from palms and other plants species. The DnADH gene has been isolated in silico by BLAST2GO from a cDNA library of date palm ...

  9. Statistical methods for studying the evolution of networks and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweinberger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Studying longitudinal network and behavior data is important for understanding social processes, because human beings are interrelated, and the relationships among human beings (human networks) on one hand and human behavior on the other hand are not independent. The complex nature of longitudinal

  10. The Quest for Equational Axiomatizations of Parallel Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Fokkink, Wan

    2005-01-01

    This essay recounts the story of the quest for equational axiomatizations of parallel composition operators in process description languages, and of similar results in the classic field of formal language theory. Some of the outstanding open problems are also mentioned......This essay recounts the story of the quest for equational axiomatizations of parallel composition operators in process description languages, and of similar results in the classic field of formal language theory. Some of the outstanding open problems are also mentioned...

  11. Your ParticleQuest, should you choose to accept it…

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The CERN-developed ParticleQuest adventure game was the focus of a special hands-on session at last month’s Mozilla Festival in London. Attended by the best and the brightest of the coding community, the festival was an opportunity for the ParticleQuest developers to throw down the gaming gauntlet…   Photon and Gluon ParticleQuest sprites. Source: André-Pierre Olivier. A team of CERN students developed the ParticleQuest game during this year’s CERN Summer Student Webfest. What started as simple derivative software of BrowserQuest – one of the first entirely browser-based games developed by the Mozilla Foundation – soon revealed new opportunities to educate players about particle physics. By changing the graphics, introducing a Particle Zoo designed by web designer André-Pierre Olivier and enhancing the game engine, the summer students were convinced that ParticleQuest could help to teach particle physics in a much more ...

  12. WebQuest y anotaciones semánticas WebQuest and semantic annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Blanco Suárez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta un sistema de búsqueda y recuperación de metadatos de actividades educativas que siguen el modelo WebQuest. Se trata de una base de datos relacional, accesible a través del web, que se complementa con un módulo que permite realizar anotaciones semánticas y cuyo objetivo es capturar y enriquecer el conocimiento acerca del uso de dichos ejercicios por parte de la comunidad de docentes que experimentan con ellos, así como documentar los recursos o sitios web de interés didáctico buscando construir un repositorio de enlaces educativos de calidad. This paper presents a system of searching and recovering educational activities that follow the Web-Quest model through the web, complemented with a module to make semantic annotations aimed at getting and enriching the knowledge on the use of these exercises by the teaching community. It also tries to document the resources or websites with didactic interest in order to build a qualified account of educational links.

  13. SOI/MDI studies of active region seismology and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, Ted D.; Title, Alan; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Scherrer, Phil; Zweibel, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    The solar oscillations investigation (SOI) will study solar active regions using both helioseismic and conventional observation techniques. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) can perform Doppler continuum and line depth imagery and can produce longitudinal magnetograms, showing either the full disk or a high resolution field of view. A dynamics program of continuous full disk Doppler observations for two months per year, campaign programs of eight hours of continuous observation per day, and a synoptic magnetic program of about 15 full disk magnetograms per day, are planned. The scientific plans, measurements and observation programs, are described.

  14. Jet evolution in Steep Spectrum Radio Quasars: a multiwavelength study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torresi Eleonora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the Fermi γ-ray satellite, it is now confirmed that Misaligned Active Galactic Nuclei (MAGN, i.e. radio galaxies and steep spectrum radio quasars, are a new class of GeV emitters. In this work we present the first γ-ray and multiwavelength study of the two steep spectrum radio quasars, i.e. 3C 207 and 3C 380, belonging to the MAGN sample. From the γ -ray variability study we estimate the physical size of the zone where high-energy photons are dissipated: for both sources this region should be very compact, not larger than 0.05 pc. As a successive step, we build multiwavelength light curves of 3C 207 and 3C 380 to search for possible simultaneous outbursts in different wavebands with the aim of localizing the compact emitting region. This is an important issue with strong impact on theoretical models: indeed, knowing where highenergy photons are dissipated (at sub-pc or pc-scale provides information on the nature of the seed photons involved in the production of the GeV radiation.

  15. Unique features of HLA-mediated HIV evolution in a Mexican cohort: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brumme Zabrina L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mounting evidence indicates that HLA-mediated HIV evolution follows highly stereotypic pathways that result in HLA-associated footprints in HIV at the population level. However, it is not known whether characteristic HLA frequency distributions in different populations have resulted in additional unique footprints. Methods The phylogenetic dependency network model was applied to assess HLA-mediated evolution in datasets of HIV pol sequences from free plasma viruses and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC-integrated proviruses in an immunogenetically unique cohort of Mexican individuals. Our data were compared with data from the IHAC cohort, a large multi-center cohort of individuals from Canada, Australia and the USA. Results Forty three different HLA-HIV codon associations representing 30 HLA-HIV codon pairs were observed in the Mexican cohort (q Conclusion Our data support universal HLA-mediated HIV evolution at the population level, resulting in detectable HLA-associated footprints in the circulating virus. However, it also strongly suggests that unique genetic backgrounds in different HIV-infected populations may influence HIV evolution in a particular direction as particular HLA-HIV codon associations are determined by specific HLA frequency distributions. Our analysis also suggests a dynamic HLA-associated evolution in HIV with fewer HLA-HIV codon associations observed in the proviral compartment, which is likely enriched in early archived HIV sequences, compared to the plasma virus compartment. These results highlight the importance of comparative HIV evolutionary studies in immunologically different populations worldwide.

  16. Fossils and living taxa agree on patterns of body mass evolution: a case study with Afrotheria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Mark N; Thomas, Gavin H

    2015-12-22

    Most of life is extinct, so incorporating some fossil evidence into analyses of macroevolution is typically seen as necessary to understand the diversification of life and patterns of morphological evolution. Here we test the effects of inclusion of fossils in a study of the body size evolution of afrotherian mammals, a clade that includes the elephants, sea cows and elephant shrews. We find that the inclusion of fossil tips has little impact on analyses of body mass evolution; from a small ancestral size (approx. 100 g), there is a shift in rate and an increase in mass leading to the larger-bodied Paenungulata and Tubulidentata, regardless of whether fossils are included or excluded from analyses. For Afrotheria, the inclusion of fossils and morphological character data affect phylogenetic topology, but these differences have little impact upon patterns of body mass evolution and these body mass evolutionary patterns are consistent with the fossil record. The largest differences between our analyses result from the evolutionary model, not the addition of fossils. For some clades, extant-only analyses may be reliable to reconstruct body mass evolution, but the addition of fossils and careful model selection is likely to increase confidence and accuracy of reconstructed macroevolutionary patterns. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Fossils and living taxa agree on patterns of body mass evolution: a case study with Afrotheria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Mark N.; Thomas, Gavin H.

    2015-01-01

    Most of life is extinct, so incorporating some fossil evidence into analyses of macroevolution is typically seen as necessary to understand the diversification of life and patterns of morphological evolution. Here we test the effects of inclusion of fossils in a study of the body size evolution of afrotherian mammals, a clade that includes the elephants, sea cows and elephant shrews. We find that the inclusion of fossil tips has little impact on analyses of body mass evolution; from a small ancestral size (approx. 100 g), there is a shift in rate and an increase in mass leading to the larger-bodied Paenungulata and Tubulidentata, regardless of whether fossils are included or excluded from analyses. For Afrotheria, the inclusion of fossils and morphological character data affect phylogenetic topology, but these differences have little impact upon patterns of body mass evolution and these body mass evolutionary patterns are consistent with the fossil record. The largest differences between our analyses result from the evolutionary model, not the addition of fossils. For some clades, extant-only analyses may be reliable to reconstruct body mass evolution, but the addition of fossils and careful model selection is likely to increase confidence and accuracy of reconstructed macroevolutionary patterns. PMID:26674947

  18. STUDY ON EVOLUTION OF RURAL TOURISM IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEAUSESCU IONUT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In Romania,the long period of transition to a market economy has determined the restructuring in all spheres of activity, triggering multiple economic-social, political and cultural implications. Thus, the city life of today involves a lot of stress, at the same time there is a high degree of urbanization and environmental pollution. These changes have affected tourism in the sense of a change in holiday destinations in favor of its assets, in the midst of nature, with favourable and deep implications in rural tourism activity. These are just a few short arguments representing the circumstances that make us realize this study on the evolutionary trends of rural tourism activity from Romania, which are described and analyzed on the basis of statistical data obtained from the Statistical pocket-book "Romanian Tourism", editions 2009-2015, published by the National Institute of Statistics.

  19. Using a robot to study the evolution of legged locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInroe, Benjamin; Astley, Henry; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-03-01

    Throughout history, many organisms have used flipper-like limbs for both aquatic and terrestrial locomotion. Modern examples include mudskippers and sea turtles; extinct examples include walkers such as the early tetrapodIchthyostega. In the transition from an aquatic to a terrestrial environment, early walkers had to adapt to the challenges of locomotion over flowable media like sand and mud. Previously, we discovered that a flipper with an elbow-like joint that could passively flex and extend toward and away from the body aided crawling on dry granular media [Mazouchova et. al. 2013], a result related to the jamming of material behind and beneath the flipper. To gain insight into how an additional degree of freedom of this joint affects flipper-based locomotors, we have built a robotic model with limb-joint morphology inspired by Ichthyostega. We add to our previous limb design a passive degree of freedom that allows for supination/pronation of the flipper about a variable insertion angle. Springs at the joints restore the flippers to equilibrium positions after interaction with the media. We study the crutching locomotion of the robot performing a symmetric gait, varying flipper-joint degrees of freedom and limb cycle frequency. This work was supported by NSF PoLS.

  20. Spinal alignment evolution with age: A prospective gait analysis study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti, Sébastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Peltier, Emilie; Viehweger, Elke; Pomero, Vincent; Authier, Guillaume; Fuentes, Stéphane; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe, using gait analysis, the development of spinal motion in the growing child. METHODS Thirty-six healthy children aged from 3 to 16 years old were included in this study for a gait analysis (9 m-walk). Various kinematic parameters were recorded and analyzed such as thoracic angle (TA), lumbar angle (LA) and sagittal vertical axis (SVA). The kinetic parameters were the net reaction moments (N.m/kg) at the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral junctions. RESULTS TA and LA curves were not statistically correlated to the age (respectively, P = 0.32 and P = 0.41). SVA increased significantly with age (P < 0.001). Moments in sagittal plane at the lumbosacral junction were statistically correlated to the age (P = 0.003), underlining the fact that sagittal mechanical constraints at the lumbosacral junction increase with age. Moments in transversal plane at the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral junctions were statistically correlated to the age (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.0006), revealing that transversal mechanical constraints decrease with age. CONCLUSION The kinetic analysis showed that during growth, a decrease of torsional constraint occurs while an increase of sagittal constraint is observed. These changes in spine biomechanics are related to the crucial role of the trunk for bipedalism acquisition, allowing stabilization despite lower limbs immaturity. With the acquisition of mature gait, the spine will mainly undergo constraints in the sagittal plane. PMID:28361018

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo study on the evolution of silicon surface roughness under hydrogen thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Junzhuan; Pan, Lijia; Yu, Linwei; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The KMC method is adopted to investigate the relationships between surface evolution and hydrogen thermal treatment conditions. • The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages at relatively low temperatures, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the time. • The optimized surface structure can be obtained by precisely adjusting thermal treatment temperatures and hydrogen pressures. - Abstract: The evolution of a two-dimensional silicon surface under hydrogen thermal treatment is studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, focusing on the dependence of the migration behaviors of surface atoms on both the temperature and hydrogen pressure. We adopt different activation energies to analyze the influence of hydrogen pressure on the evolution of surface morphology at high temperatures. The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the equilibrium time. Our results indicate that a high hydrogen pressure is conducive to obtaining optimized surfaces, as a strategy in the applications of three-dimensional devices.

  2. Evolution of a Campus Sustainability Network: A Case Study in Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Nancy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of a sustainability network at a large California public university, as an example of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines participant observation and case study techniques over a three-year period. From 2007 to 2010, the author helped found the…

  3. In situ X-ray crystallographic study of the structural evolution of colloidal crystals upon heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zozulya, A.V.; Meijer, J.M.; Shabalin, A.; Ricci, A.; Westermeier, F.; Kurta, R.P.; Lorenz, U.; Singer, A.; Yefanow, O.; Petukhov, A.V.; Sprung, M.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural evolution of colloidal crystals made of polystyrene hard spheres has been studied in situ upon incremental heating of a crystal in a temperature range below and above the glass transition temperature of polystyrene. Thin films of colloidal crystals having different particle sizes were

  4. CosmoQuest Collaborative: Galvanizing a Dynamic Professional Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Whitney; Bracey, Georgia; Buxner, Sanlyn; Gay, Pamela L.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    The CosmoQuest Collaboration offers in-depth experiences to diverse audiences around the nation and the world through pioneering citizen science in a virtual research facility. An endeavor between universities, research institutes, and NASA centers, CosmoQuest brings together scientists, educators, researchers, programmers—and citizens of all ages—to explore and make sense of our solar system and beyond. Leveraging human networks to expand NASA science, scaffolded by an educational framework that inspires lifelong learners, CosmoQuest engages citizens in analyzing and interpreting real NASA data, inspiring questions and defining problems.The QuestionLinda Darling-Hammond calls for professional development to be: "focused on the learning and teaching of specific curriculum content [i.e. NGSS disciplinary core ideas]; organized around real problems of practice [i.e. NGSS science and engineering practices] … [and] connected to teachers' collaborative work in professional learning community...." (2012) In light of that, what is the unique role CosmoQuest's virtual research facility can offer NASA STEM education?A Few AnswersThe CosmoQuest Collaboration actively engages scientists in education, and educators (and learners) in science. CosmoQuest uses social channels to empower and expand NASA's learning community through a variety of media, including science and education-focused hangouts, virtual star parties, and social media. In addition to creating its own supportive, standards-aligned materials, CosmoQuest offers a hub for excellent resources and materials throughout NASA and the larger astronomy community.In support of CosmoQuest citizen science opportunities, CQ initiatives (Learning Space, S-ROSES, IDEASS, Educator Zone) will be leveraged and shared through the CQPLN. CosmoQuest can be present and alive in the awareness its growing learning community.Finally, to make the CosmoQuest PLN truly relevant, it aims to encourage partnerships between scientists

  5. [Translation and validation of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) into Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Karla Emanuelle Cotias; Gois Júnior, Miburge Bolívar; Sá, Katia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    To translate and validate the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0) into Brazilian Portuguese. Certified translators translated and back-translated Quest. Content validity (CVI) was determined by 5 experts and, after the final version of B-Quest, a pre-test was applied to users of manual wheelchairs, walkers and crutches. The psychometric properties were tested to assure the validity of items and the reliability and stability of the scale. Data were obtained from 121 users of the above-mentioned devices. Our study showed a CVI of 91.66% and a satisfactory factor analysis referent to the two-dimensional structure of the instrument that ensured the representativeness of the items. The Cron-bach's alpha of the items device, service and total score of B-Quest were 0.862, 0.717 and 0.826, respectively. Test-retest stability conducted after a time interval of 2 months was analyzed using Spearman's correlation test, which showed high correlation (ρ >0.6) for most items. The study suggests that the B-Quest is a reliable, representative, and valid instrument to measure the satisfaction of users of assistive technology in Brazil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a WebQuest as instructional material in teaching biodiversity for grade 8 learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovia, Jerson A.; Eslit, April Rose C.; Tamse, Agnes Lera G.; Barquilla, Manuel B.

    2018-01-01

    WebQuest is an inquiry-based learning activity that allows students to learn the lesson using the information provided in the internet resources. The study aimed to develop and implement the WebQuest on Biodiversity. Primarily, this research determines the students' performances in the achievement test after WebQuest was implemented to them. Secondly, it is also to investigate on their attitudes towards Biology before and after the activity as well as the level of development of their 21st Century Skills. This research utilized Quasi-experimental Non-randomized One Group Pretest/Posttest Design. The developed WebQuest that is based from the K-12 curriculum competencies were evaluated by selected experts in the Content (2), Pedagogy (2) and ICT (2) to assess the said activity in terms of content, pedagogy and ICT effects. It was then implemented in an intact group of grade 8 students. Findings revealed that the developed WebQuest was rated "Excellent" for Content, Pedagogy and TCT effects. After utilizing the WebQuest activity on Biodiversity, students acquired more knowledge on the topic shows by the mean difference of 2.42, which is highly significant based on t-test result. The overall students' attitude towards Biology as a subject changed positively after they did the activity due to novelty effects and the WebQuest itself with the mean difference of 0.46. Moreover, results shows that the students can developed 21st century skills considering that the Likert scale survey was given only to the students after the activity. Based on the result, 97% of total responses favored to have developed Critical Thinking skills, 98% on Collaboration skills, 97% on Creativity and Innovative skills, 94% on Communication skills, 97% on Self-Decision skills, and 97% on ICT skills. The concentration of percentage of responses differed in two classes because Class A was composed of highlyselected students who underwent an entrance examination upon admission in school and Class B

  7. CosmoQuest: Building community around Citizen Science Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P.

    2015-12-01

    CosmoQuest was envisioned in 2011 with a singular goal: to create a place where people of all backgrounds can learn and do science in a virtual research community. Like a brick-and-mortar center, CosmoQuest includes facilities for doing science and for educating its members through classes, seminars, and other forms of professional development. CosmoQuest is unique with its combination of public engagement in doing science—known as "citizen science"— and its diversity of learning opportunities that enable STEM education. Our suite of activities is able maximize people's ability to learn and do science, while improving scientific literacy. Since its launch on January 1, 2012, CosmoQuest has grown to become the most trafficked astronomy citizen science site on the English-language internet. It has hosted five citizen science portals supporting NASA SMD science and is the only citizen science site to have produced peer-reviewed surface science results [Robbins, et al. 2014]. CosmoQuest, however, is more than just citizen science. It is a virtual research center for the public, and for the educators who teach in classrooms and science centers. Like with with any research center, CosmoQuest's success hinges on its ability to build a committed research community, and the challenge has been creating this community without the benefit of real-world interactions. In this talk, we overview how CosmoQuest has built a virtual community through screen-to-screen interactions using a suite of technologies that must constantly evolve as the internet evolves.

  8. WebQuest experience: Pre-Service secondary maths and chemistry teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Erdoğan Halat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of developing WebQuests on the attention, confidence, relevance and satisfaction, or motivation, of pre-service secondary mathematics and chemistry teachers in the instructional technologies and material design course. There were a total of 67 pre-service teachers, 32 pre-service secondary mathematics teachers and 35 pre-service secondary chemistry teachers involved in this study, which took place over seven weeks. The pre-service teachers in bo...

  9. Animal personalities : consequences for ecology and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Max; Weissing, Franz J.

    Personality differences are a widespread phenomenon throughout the animal kingdom. Past research has focused on the characterization of such differences and a quest for their proximate and ultimate causation. However, the consequences of these differences for ecology and evolution received much less

  10. Eyewall Evolution of Typhoons Crossing the Philippines and Taiwan: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hsuan Chou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the statistical characteristics of the eyewall evolution induced by the landfall process and terrain interaction over Luzon Island of the Philippines and Taiwan. Interesting eyewall evolution processes include the eyewall expansion during landfall, followed by contraction in some cases after re-emergence in warm ocean waters. Best track data, advanced satellite microwave imagers, high spatial and temporal ground-observed radar images and rain gauges are utilized to study this unique eyewall evolution process. An examination of the available microwave images of 23 typhoons crossing the Philippines between 2000 and 2010 shows that most typhoons experienced this kind of eyewall evolution, i.e., the radius of the eyewall for 87% of landfall typhoons increased during landfall; and, the radius of the eyewall for 57% of the cases contracted when the typhoons reentered the ocean after they crossed the Philippines. Furthermore, analyses of large-scale environmental conditions show that small vertical wind shear, high low-level relative humidity and sea surface temperature are important for the reorganization of the outer eyewall and the subsequent eyewall contraction when the typhoons reentered the ocean.

  11. Detective Work in the West Indies: Integrating Historical and Experimental Approaches to Study Island Lizard Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Losos, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary biology is a historical science, like astronomy and geology. Understanding how and why evolution has occurred requires synthesizing multiple lines of inquiry. Historical studies, such as those that estimate phylogenetic trees, can detail the pattern of evolutionary diversification, whereas studies on living species can provide insight into the processes that affect ecological interactions and evolutionary change. The evolutionary radiation of Anolis lizards in the Greater Antille...

  12. A systematic study for evolution of bacterial resistance: phenotype to genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Güvenek, Ayşegül; Guvenek, Aysegul

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a worldwide problem threatening millions of lives. Several studies showed that bacteria develop direct resistance against an antibiotic compound used throughout treatment. However, recent studies demonstrated that resistance to one antibiotic can pleiotropically lead to resistance to other antibiotics, a concept known as cross-resistance, imposing serious limitations for combating against infectious diseases. Therefore, slowing down evolution of cross-resistance i...

  13. Adaptation, niche conservatism, and convergence: comparative studies of leaf evolution in the California chaparral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, David D

    2004-05-01

    Small leaves and low specific leaf area (SLA) have long been viewed as adaptations to Mediterranean-type climates in many species of evergreen woody plants. However, paleobotanical and floristic evidence suggests that in many cases these traits originated prior to the advent of the summer-drought climate regime. In this study, molecular phylogenies and ancestral state reconstructions were used to test the hypothesis of adaptive leaf evolution in 12 lineages of evergreen shrubs in the California chaparral. Across all lineages there was a small but significant shift toward lower SLA, but there were no trends in leaf size evolution. For individual lineages, adaptive changes were detected in only three cases for SLA and in one case for leaf size. Three of these cases of evolutionary change were observed in taxa derived from cool temperate ancestors (e.g., Heteromeles). In contrast, most lineages originating from subtropical ancestors exhibited relative stasis in leaf trait evolution (e.g., Ceanothus). The absence of change suggests that ancestors of chaparral taxa had already acquired appropriate traits that contributed to their success under Mediterranean-type climates. These results illustrate how biogeographic history may influence patterns of trait evolution and adaptation and highlight the contribution of ecological sorting processes to the assembly and functional ecology of regional biotas.

  14. Study of grain structure evolution during annealing of a twin-roll-cast Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A. [IITB-Monash Research Academy, IIT Bombay (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay (India); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University (Australia); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay (India); Nie, J.F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University (Australia); Tewari, A., E-mail: asim.tewari@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Bombay (India)

    2016-04-15

    The evolution of microstructure under static annealing was studied for mid-thickness section of a twin-roll-cast (TRC) magnesium alloy. Annealing was performed at 300 °C and 500 °C for different times. Microstructural evolution was quantitatively analyzed, from optical micrographs, using grain path envelope analysis. Additional information from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used for addressing the possible mechanism(s). It was found that the TRC structure had a bimodal grain size, which was preserved even after annealing at 300 °C. However, the annealing at 500 °C led to a unimodal grain size. This difference in the grain size distribution created a contrasting behavior in the normalized standard deviations. This was primarily attributed to a competition between recovery and recrystallization, and their respective dominance at 300° and 500 °C. A deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) model was proposed. The proposed model could successfully address the experimental microstructural evolution. - Highlights: • Annealing of twin roll cast (TRC) magnesium alloy was done at temperatures of 300 °C and 500 °C. • TRC had bimodal structure. Bimodality preserved for annealing at 300 °C. Annealing at 500 °C led to unimodal structure. • Grain evolution was described based on the competition between recovery and recrystallization. • Deformation induced recrystallization recovery (DIRR) mechanistic model was developed.

  15. Body weight change during the first year of HEMODIALYSIS is influenced by the dry weight quest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chazot

    2012-06-01

    Hence weight gain during the first year of HD treatment that is a strong predictor of survival in our experience (reported in another abstract is influenced by the dry weight quest. In our practice, the systolic BP decrease is related to fluid removal and is associated with better patient survival, opposite to the reverse epidemiology concept. Further studies using bioimpedance are necessary to confirm that an optimal fluid status may improve the nutritional status in HD patients.

  16. Quests em World Of Warcraft como estrutura narrativa seriada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jônatas Kerr de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Assumindo que as quests em World of Warcraft funcionam como uma estrutura narrativa dentro do jogo, busca-se verificar se esta estrutura apresenta características que possam caracterizá-la como uma narrativa seriada. Para tal, é feita uma análise das principais características da narrativa seriada televisiva, assim como da estrutura de quests, para verificar a viabilidade de tal aproximação. Sendo a estrutura narrativa de quests em MMORPGs uma estrutura narrativa seriada, abre-se um grande leque de possibilidades, tanto para as análises teóricas dos videogames, utilizando o ferramental adaptado, como para os game designers utilizarem este referencial para acrescer detalhes aos mundos ficcionais criados.

  17. Women's attitudes to beauty, aging, and the place of cosmetic procedures: insights from the QUEST Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger-Martin, Agnès; Cohen-Letessier, Anny; Taïeb, Maryna; Azoulay, Elisabeth; du Crest, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The quest for beauty has been a constant theme in human history since the earliest civilizations. The QUEST Observatory, an online observational study, investigated how women continue the pursuit of beauty in the 21st century by examining women's perceptions of facial attractiveness and the strategies they adopt to combat the effects of time on their faces. To investigate women's attitudes toward beauty, aging, and the place of minimally invasive cosmetic procedures and anti-aging skincare. An in-depth questionnaire was developed by experts in dermatology, esthetic medicine, and social anthropology as the basis for this online, observational study. A nationally representative sample of 1000 French women aged between 25 and 70 years took part in the study. The main criteria for beauty were identified as a natural look, self-confidence, and attractive skin. A woman is considered to be at the peak of beauty in her mid-thirties just before early signs of facial aging begin to appear. Approximately 50% of women contemplate cosmetic procedures, but less than 10% go ahead. Confidence in the practitioner and good postprocedure follow-up are as influential as efficacy, safety, and cost in decisions about cosmetic procedures. The QUEST Observatory sheds valuable light on factors that affect women's choices regarding strategies for anti-aging and cosmetic procedures. These findings will help esthetic practitioners to better understand their patients and to meet their expectations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Culture and the quest for universal principles in moral reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Sonya; Singh, Purnima; Medin, Douglas

    2011-06-01

    The importance of including cultural perspectives in the study of human cognition has become apparent in recent decades, and the domain of moral reasoning is no exception. The present review focuses on moral cognition, beginning with Kohlberg's model of moral development which relies heavily on people's justifications for their judgments and then shifting to more recent theories that rely on rapid, intuitive judgments and see justifications as more or less irrelevant to moral cognition. Despite this dramatic shift, analyses of culture and moral decision-making have largely been framed as a quest for and test of universal principles of moral judgment. In this review, we discuss challenges that remain in trying to understand crosscultural variability in moral values and the processes that underlie moral cognition. We suggest that the universalist framework may lead to an underestimation of the role of culture in moral reasoning. Although the field has made great strides in incorporating more and more cultural perspectives in order to understand moral cognition, theories of moral reasoning still do not allow for substantial variation in how people might conceptualize the domain of the moral. The processes that underlie moral cognition may not be a human universal in any simple sense, because moral systems may play different roles in different cultures. We end our review with a discussion of work that remains to be done to understand cultural variation in the moral domain.

  19. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with volume overload despite the standard treatment with conventional diuretics: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (QUEST study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru; Fukunami, Masatake

    2011-12-01

    Diuretics are recommended to treat volume overload with heart failure (HF), however, they may cause serum electrolyte imbalance, limiting their use. Moreover, patients with advanced HF could poorly respond to these diuretics. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of Tolvaptan, a competitive vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist developed as a new drug to treat volume overload in HF patients. A phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in treating HF patients with volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics. One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 consecutive days. Compared with placebo, tolvaptan administered for 7 days significantly reduced body weight and improved symptoms associated with volume overload. The safety profile of tolvaptan was considered acceptable for clinical use with minimal adverse effects. Tolvaptan reduced volume overload and improved congestive symptoms associated with HF by a potent water diuresis (aquaresis).

  20. Identifying innovation in laboratory studies of cultural evolution: rates of retention and measures of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Christine A; Cornish, Hannah; Kandler, Anne

    2016-03-19

    In recent years, laboratory studies of cultural evolution have become increasingly prevalent as a means of identifying and understanding the effects of cultural transmission on the form and functionality of transmitted material. The datasets generated by these studies may provide insights into the conditions encouraging, or inhibiting, high rates of innovation, as well as the effect that this has on measures of adaptive cultural change. Here we review recent experimental studies of cultural evolution with a view to elucidating the role of innovation in generating observed trends. We first consider how tasks are presented to participants, and how the corresponding conceptualization of task success is likely to influence the degree of intent underlying any deviations from perfect reproduction. We then consider the measures of interest used by the researchers to track the changes that occur as a result of transmission, and how these are likely to be affected by differing rates of retention. We conclude that considering studies of cultural evolution from the perspective of innovation provides us with valuable insights that help to clarify important differences in research designs, which have implications for the likely effects of variation in retention rates on measures of cultural adaptation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. A study on the fractal characteristics of displacement time-series during the evolution of landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are one of the major natural disasters that are frequently occurring in southwestern China. The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between failure of landslide and fractal dimension using displacement time-series. Taking two slopes in southwestern China as examples, we estimate the fractal parameters of displacement time-series and analyze the relationship between fractal dimension and the stability of the slope during the evolution of landslides. The result shows that the fractal dimension increases when a landslide undergoes a transition from stability to failure, but decreases during the evolution from active to stable. Fractal dimension has a critical value of 1.10 in the transition between active and stable, which indicates that fractal dimension is an important nonlinear parameter in the evaluation of the stability of landslides, although more studies and in situ data are required for validation.

  2. CosmoQuest: Creative Engagement & Citizen Science Ignite Authentic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, W. H.; Noel-Storr, J.; Tweed, A.; Asplund, S.; Aiello, M. P.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Chilton, H.; Gay, P.

    2016-12-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility offers in-depth experiences to diverse audiences nationally and internationally through pioneering citizen science. An endeavor between universities, research institutes, and NASA centers, CosmoQuest brings together scientists, educators, researchers, programmers—and individuals of all ages—to explore and make sense of our solar system and beyond. CosmoQuest creates pathways for engaging diverse audiences in authentic science, encouraging scientists to engage with learners, and learners to engage with scientists. Here is a sequence of activities developed by CosmoQuest, leveraging a NASA Discovery and New Frontiers Programs activity developed for the general STEAM community, that activates STEM learning. The Spark: Igniting Curiosity Art and the Cosmic Connection uses the elements of art—shape, line, color, texture, value—to hone observation skills and inspire questions. Learners explore NASA image data from celestial bodies in our solar system—planets, asteroids, moons. They investigate their geology, analyzing features and engaging in scientific discourse rising from evidence while creating a beautiful piece of art. The Fuel: Making Connections Crater Comparisons explore authentic NASA image data sets, engrossing learners at a deeper level. With skills learned in Art and the Cosmic Connection, learners analyze specific image sets with the feedback of mission team members. The Burn: Evolving Community Become a Solar System Mapper. Investigate and analyze NASA mission image data of Mars, Mercury, the Moon and Vesta through CosmoQuest's citizen science projects. Learners make real-world connections while contributing to NASA science. Scaffolded by an educational framework that inspires 21st century learners, CosmoQuest engages people in analyzing and interpreting real NASA data, inspiring questions, defining problems, and realizing their potential to contribute to genuine scientific results. Through social channels

  3. Heterogeneous Network Evolution Studies for a Dense Urban High Rise Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Maria Laura Luque; Maternia, Michal; Vejlgaard, Benny

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the capability of Long-Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) together with WiFi 802.11ac to accommodate the traffic growths of 80x, 500x and 1000x in a high rise building scenario. It provides a guideline on the configuration of the spectrum and the best deployment options...... coverage and capacity for the future wireless service consumers, specially those located in the high rise buildings....

  4. Application of molecular techniques in the study of Staphylococcus aureus clonal evolution - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Marcos Vivoni

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important agent of healthcare-associated and community-acquired infections. A major characteristic of this microorganism is the ability to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. Several molecular techniques have been applied for the characterization of S. aureus in epidemiological studies. In the present review, we discuss the application of molecular techniques for typing S. aureus strains and describe the nomenclature and evolution of epidemic clones of this important pathogen.

  5. Action of some herbicides in photosynthesis of Scenedesmus as studied by their effects on oxygen evolution and cyclic photophosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, van J.J.S.

    1971-01-01

    The mode of action of some herbicides, viz., DCMU, simetone, and diquat, was investigated by studying their effects upon oxygen evolution and cyclic photophosphorylation in the unicellular green alga, Scenedesmus spec.

    Oxygen evolution was measured with the aid of the WARBURG

  6. Without the Light of Evolution: A Case Study of Resistance and Avoidance in Learning to Teach High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Douglas B.; Perry-Ryder, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of Michael, a prospective high school biology teacher, to explore the implications of teacher resistance and avoidance to the topic of evolution. This case is drawn from a year-long qualitative research study that examined Michael's process of learning to teach high school biology and describes how his avoidance of evolution in…

  7. A system for studying evolution of life-like virtual organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranova Natalya N

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fitness landscapes, the dependences of fitness on the genotype, are of critical importance for the evolution of living beings. Unfortunately, fitness landscapes that are relevant to the evolution of complex biological functions are very poorly known. As a result, the existing theory of evolution is mostly based on postulated fitness landscapes, which diminishes its usefulness. Attempts to deduce fitness landscapes from models of actual biological processes led, so far, to only limited success. Results We present a model system for studying the evolution of biological function, which makes it possible to attribute fitness to genotypes in a natural way. The system mimics a very simple cell and takes into account the basic properties of gene regulation and enzyme kinetics. A virtual cell contains only two small molecules, an organic nutrient A and an energy carrier X, and proteins of five types – two transcription factors, two enzymes, and a membrane transporter. The metabolism of the cell consists of importing A from the environment and utilizing it in order to produce X and an unspecified end product. The genome may carry an arbitrary number of genes, each one encoding a protein of one of the five types. Both major mutations that affect whole genes and minor mutations that affect individual characteristics of genes are possible. Fitness is determined by the ability of the cell to maintain homeostasis when its environment changes. The system has been implemented as a computer program, and several numerical experiments have been performed on it. Evolution of the virtual cells usually involves a rapid initial increase of fitness, which eventually slows down, until a fitness plateau is reached. The origin of a wide variety of genetic networks is routinely observed in independent experiments performed under the same conditions. These networks can have different, including very high, levels of complexity and often include large

  8. Response to a comment on Cullen K "From Squires Quest! II: A serious video game intervention": Methodological issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to comments about our article, "Meal-specific dietary changes from Squires Quest! II: a serious video game intervention," we concur that studies on video game interventions are important. A future study with a control group receiving no video game intervention and the collection of poten...

  9. Resolving phylogenetic incongruence to articulate homology and phenotypic evolution: a case study from Nematoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Erik J; Baldwin, James G

    2010-05-07

    Modern morphology-based systematics, including questions of incongruence with molecular data, emphasizes analysis over similarity criteria to assess homology. Yet detailed examination of a few key characters, using new tools and processes such as computerized, three-dimensional ultrastructural reconstruction of cell complexes, can resolve apparent incongruence by re-examining primary homologies. In nematodes of Tylenchomorpha, a parasitic feeding phenotype is thus reconciled with immediate free-living outgroups. Closer inspection of morphology reveals phenotypes congruent with molecular-based phylogeny and points to a new locus of homology in mouthparts. In nematode models, the study of individually homologous cells reveals a conserved modality of evolution among dissimilar feeding apparati adapted to divergent lifestyles. Conservatism of cellular components, consistent with that of other body systems, allows meaningful comparative morphology in difficult groups of microscopic organisms. The advent of phylogenomics is synergistic with morphology in systematics, providing an honest test of homology in the evolution of phenotype.

  10. The Experimental Study of Bacterial Evolution and Its Implications for the Modern Synthesis of Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A

    2017-10-04

    Since the 1940s, microbiologists, biochemists and population geneticists have experimented with the genetic mechanisms of microorganisms in order to investigate evolutionary processes. These evolutionary studies of bacteria and other microorganisms gained some recognition from the standard-bearers of the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology, especially Theodosius Dobzhansky and Ledyard Stebbins. A further period of post-synthesis bacterial evolutionary research occurred between the 1950s and 1980s. These experimental analyses focused on the evolution of population and genetic structure, the adaptive gain of new functions, and the evolutionary consequences of competition dynamics. This large body of research aimed to make evolutionary theory testable and predictive, by giving it mechanistic underpinnings. Although evolutionary microbiologists promoted bacterial experiments as methodologically advantageous and a source of general insight into evolution, they also acknowledged the biological differences of bacteria. My historical overview concludes with reflections on what bacterial evolutionary research achieved in this period, and its implications for the still-developing modern synthesis.

  11. Study on the Plastic Bottle Recycling Based on Evolution Tree for Technical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuedong Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technical system theory of evolution tree was used in the study of the plastic bottle recycling, and established the evolutionary line of plastic bottle recycling on the basis of the analysis of plastic bottle recycling recovery evolution tree, and summed up a new smart plastic bottle recycling program. The new recovery recovers and smashes the plastic bottles through technical system, and communicates with users through automatically reward system and rewards the latter. The experimental prototype test results show: post treated fragments of plastic bottles are small, which are convenient to transport and take advantage of; the operation of recovery is easy, and the interface of man-machine interaction is friendly which is easy to expand functions.

  12. Evolution and non-equilibrium physics: A study of the Tangled Nature Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nikolaj; Sibani, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We argue that the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which replicate, mutate and die constitutes a non-equilibrium physical process akin to aging in complex materials. Specifically, our study uses extensive computer simulations of the Tangled Nature Model (TNM) of biological evolution to show that punctuated equilibria successively generated by the model's dynamics have increasing entropy and are separated by increasing entropic barriers. We further show that these states are organized in a hierarchy and that limiting the values of possible interactions to a finite interval leads to stationary fluctuations within a component of the latter. A coarse-grained description based on the temporal statistics of quakes, the events leading from one component of the hierarchy to the next, accounts for the logarithmic growth of the population and the decaying rate of change of macroscopic variables. Finally, we question the role of fitness in large-scale evolution models and speculate on the possible evolutionary role of rejuvenation and memory effects.

  13. Prevalence and diversity of Babesia spp. in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks from Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ixodes ricinus ticks transmit Babesia species to vertebrate hosts. Using molecular tools we were able to detect the presence of this piroplasmid in its vector. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and identity of Babesia species in questing ticks collected in various areas of Norway. Methods DNA from questing l. ricinus ticks were examined with a realtime PCR for the presence of Babesia. Positive samples of tick DNA were identified to species using PCR, and sequence analysis. Results From a total of 1908 questing l. ricinus ticks, 17 (0.9%) indicated the presence of Babesia spp. after realtime-PCR screening. Ixodes ricinus harbouring Babesia spp. was detected in 9 out of 22 localities. Further molecular analyses of DNA from these positive ticks indicate the presence of Babesia venatorum, B. divergens, B. capreoli and a currently undescribed Babesia in Norwegian ticks. The most prevalent was B. venatorum found in 71% of the positive ticks. Conclusions A total of 17 out of 1908 (0.9%) ticks were positive for Babesia. Our data confirm that there are several Babesia species in ticks in Norway. Babesia venatorum was the most prevalent. This species has a zoonotic potential and may cause human babesiosis following a tick bite. PMID:22862883

  14. Prevalence and diversity of Babesia spp. in questing Ixodes ricinus ticks from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øines Øivind

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ixodes ricinus ticks transmit Babesia species to vertebrate hosts. Using molecular tools we were able to detect the presence of this piroplasmid in its vector. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and identity of Babesia species in questing ticks collected in various areas of Norway. Methods DNA from questing l. ricinus ticks were examined with a realtime PCR for the presence of Babesia. Positive samples of tick DNA were identified to species using PCR, and sequence analysis. Results From a total of 1908 questing l. ricinus ticks, 17 (0.9% indicated the presence of Babesia spp. after realtime-PCR screening. Ixodes ricinus harbouring Babesia spp. was detected in 9 out of 22 localities. Further molecular analyses of DNA from these positive ticks indicate the presence of Babesia venatorum, B. divergens, B. capreoli and a currently undescribed Babesia in Norwegian ticks. The most prevalent was B. venatorum found in 71% of the positive ticks. Conclusions A total of 17 out of 1908 (0.9% ticks were positive for Babesia. Our data confirm that there are several Babesia species in ticks in Norway. Babesia venatorum was the most prevalent. This species has a zoonotic potential and may cause human babesiosis following a tick bite.

  15. Accounting for phylogenetic uncertainty in comparative studies of evolution and adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Mark; Lutzoni, Francois

    We describe the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to two fundamental problems in evolutionary biology. Evolutionary biologists frequently wish to investigate the evolution of traits across a range of species. This is known as a comparative study. Comparative studies require constructing a phylogeny of the species and then investigating the evolutionary transitions in the trait on that phylogeny. A difficulty with this approach is that phylogenies themselves are sel dom known with certainty and different phylogenies can give different answers to the comparative hypotheses. MCMC methods make it possible to avoid both of these problems by constructing a random sample of phylogenies from the universe of possible phylogenetic trees for a given data set. Once this sample is obtained the comparative hypotheses can be investigated separately in each tree in the MCMC sample. Given the statistical properties of the sample of trees - trees are sampled in proportion to the probab ility under a model of evolution - the combined results across trees can be interpreted as being independent of the underlying phylogeny. Thus, investigators can test comparative hypotheses without the real concern that results are valid only for the particular tree used in the investigation. We illustrate these ideas with an example from the evolution of lichen formation in fungi.

  16. On-chip dynamic stress control for cancer cell evolution study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert

    2010-03-01

    The growth and spreading of cancer in host organisms is an evolutionary process. Cells accumulate mutations that help them adapt to changing environments and to obtain survival fitness. However, all cancer--promoting mutations do not occur at once. Cancer cells face selective environmental pressures that drive their evolution in stages. In traditional cancer studies, environmental stress is usually homogenous in space and difficult to change in time. Here, we propose a microfluidic chip employing embedded dynamic traps to generate dynamic heterogeneous microenvironments for cancer cells in evolution studies. Based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flexible diaphragms, these traps are able to enclose and shield cancer cells or expose them to external environmental stress. Digital controls for each trap determine the nutrition, antibiotics, CO2/O2 conditions, and temperatures to which trapped cells are subjected. Thus, the stress applied to cells can be varied in intensity and duration in each trap independently. The chip can also output cells from specific traps for sequencing and other biological analysis. Hence our design simultaneously monitors and analyzes cell evolution behaviors under dynamic stresses.

  17. Mapping "StrengthsQuest" Themes to Holland's Vocational Personality Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Andrew D.; Evans, Karen; Gitin, Elena; Eads, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 1,747 students attending undergraduate classes in legal education at an online university completed the "StrengthsQuest" assessment as part of a larger investigation; of this number, 117 students also completed the "Kuder Career Search". Exploratory factor analysis (principal components followed varimax rotation) of…

  18. Introduction Public Sector Reforms and the Quest for Democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seriane.camara

    Introduction. Public Sector Reforms and the Quest for. Democratic Developmentalism in Africa. Omano Edigheji*. Abstract. Developmentalism has been one of the main justifications for public sector reforms. In what concerns Africa, this, in part, has been based on the assumption that public sector reforms, which will make ...

  19. Quest begins to unmask dark matter - and perhaps supersymmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "...physicists of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search today (November 12) announced the launch of a quest that could lead to solving two mysteries that may turn out to be one and the same: the identity of the dark matter that pervades the universe, and the existence of supersymmetric particles predicted by particle physics theory" (1 page).

  20. Ethical Issues and Nigeria's Quest for Development | Gberevbie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, there are some basic procedures to follow in doing business and in the handling of government activities before development can take place; and the Nigerian society is not an exception. With the use of secondary data, the paper examines ethical issues and Nigeria's quest for development. It observed the lack of ...

  1. Skills for Drug-Free Living Curriculum Guide. Future Quest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Bridget M.; And Others

    The Future Quest curriculum is a functional curriculum to teach drug abuse prevention skills to youth with mild disabilities. The curriculum is a one-semester instructional program of lesson plans that incorporate research-based effective teaching practices and are specifically designed to meet the needs of students with learning and behavior…

  2. The Story behind "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrell A.; Ward, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    The National Council of Teachers of English awarded the coveted nonfiction prize to "Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea." Written by Sy Montgomery, with photographs by Nic Bishop, the book was further honored as a Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Honor recipient by the Association for…

  3. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies-Background

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Challenges in the Quest for Clean Energies - Background. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 206-217. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Quest for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tpuser

    2011-11-19

    Nov 19, 2011 ... November 19, 2011. Quest for New Physics at the LHC. S. Banerjee 5. CMS as Higgs Finder. LEP. Natural Width -0.01. 1 10. 100 GeV. At the LHC search for the SM Higgs boson provides a good benchmark for the performance of a detector. Transparency from the early 90's ...

  5. Human Values and the Quest for Sustainable Ideology in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper draws attention to the correlation between human values and sustainable ideology. The aim here is to highlight the indispensability and centrality of human values to any meaningful search for an enduring ideology in African states. To this end, the paper argues that the quest for sustainable ideology in Africa can ...

  6. Quest for new materials: Inorganic chemistry plays a crucial role

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jcsc/121/03/0235-0256. Keywords. Materials for technology; role of inorganic chemistry; acidity/basicity; oxidation/reduction; crystal field theory; Jahn-Teller distortions; mixed valence; metal-metal ... There is an endless quest for new materials to meet the demands of advancing technology.

  7. Striking a Balance: The Quest for Effective Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In the quest for engaging, effective literacy instruction, the author argues that elementary reading instruction should balance systematic skills instruction with rich children's literacy experiences and opportunities to learn how to read and write. He posits that engaging and effective primary grades classrooms are very positive places where…

  8. How fast is fisheries-induced evolution? Quantitative analysis of modelling and empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audzijonyte, Asta; Kuparinen, Anna; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    A number of theoretical models, experimental studies and time-series studies of wild fish have explored the presence and magnitude of fisheries-induced evolution (FIE). While most studies agree that FIE is likely to be happening in many fished stocks, there are disagreements about its rates and implications for stock viability. To address these disagreements in a quantitative manner, we conducted a meta-analysis of FIE rates reported in theoretical and empirical studies. We discovered that rates of phenotypic change observed in wild fish are about four times higher than the evolutionary rates reported in modelling studies, but correlation between the rate of change and instantaneous fishing mortality (F) was very similar in the two types of studies. Mixed-model analyses showed that in the modelling studies traits associated with reproductive investment and growth evolved slower than rates related to maturation. In empirical observations age-at-maturation was changing faster than other life-history traits. We also found that, despite different assumption and modelling approaches, rates of evolution for a given F value reported in 10 of 13 modelling studies were not significantly different. PMID:23789026

  9. Modelling metabolic evolution on phenotypic fitness landscapes: a case study on C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, David

    2015-12-01

    How did the complex metabolic systems we observe today evolve through adaptive evolution? The fitness landscape is the theoretical framework to answer this question. Since experimental data on natural fitness landscapes is scarce, computational models are a valuable tool to predict landscape topologies and evolutionary trajectories. Careful assumptions about the genetic and phenotypic features of the system under study can simplify the design of such models significantly. The analysis of C4 photosynthesis evolution provides an example for accurate predictions based on the phenotypic fitness landscape of a complex metabolic trait. The C4 pathway evolved multiple times from the ancestral C3 pathway and models predict a smooth 'Mount Fuji' landscape accordingly. The modelled phenotypic landscape implies evolutionary trajectories that agree with data on modern intermediate species, indicating that evolution can be predicted based on the phenotypic fitness landscape. Future directions will have to include structural changes of metabolic fitness landscape structure with changing environments. This will not only answer important evolutionary questions about reversibility of metabolic traits, but also suggest strategies to increase crop yields by engineering the C4 pathway into C3 plants. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. The role of homoploid hybridization in evolution: a century of studies synthesizing genetics and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimowski, Sarah B; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-08-01

    While homoploid hybridization was viewed as maladaptive by zoologists, the possibility that it might play a creative role in evolution was explored and debated by botanists during the evolutionary synthesis. Owing to his synthetic work on the ecological and genetic factors influencing the occurrence and effects of hybridization, G. Ledyard Stebbins' contributions to this debate were particularly influential. We revisit Stebbins' views on the frequency of hybridization, the evolution of hybrid sterility, and the evolutionary importance of transgressive segregation, introgression, and homoploid hybrid speciation in the context of contemporary evidence. Floristic surveys indicate that ∼10% of plant species hybridize, suggesting that natural hybridization is not as ubiquitous as Stebbins argued. There is stronger support for his contention that chromosomal sterility is of greater importance in plants than in animals and that selection drives the evolution of hybrid sterility. Stebbins' assertions concerning the frequent occurrence of transgressive segregation and introgressive hybridization have been confirmed by contemporary work, but few studies directly link these phenomena to adaptive evolution or speciation. Stebbins proposed a mechanism by which chromosomal rearrangements partially isolate hybrid lineages and parental species, which spurred the development of the recombinational model of homoploid speciation. While this model has been confirmed empirically, the establishment of reproductively independent hybrid lineages is typically associated with the development of both intrinsic and extrinsic reproductive barriers. We conclude by reflecting on outcomes of hybridization not considered by Stebbins and on possible future research that may extend our understanding of the evolutionary role of hybridization beyond Stebbins' legacy. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  11. Study of deformations evolution in near-surface layers of adhesive joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, Artem; Kopanitsa, Dmitry; Abzaev, Yuri; Klopotov, Anatoly; Koshko, Bogdan; Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the study of the evolution in situ of distribution of local deformations in near-surface layers in pads made of carbon lamellas under strain deformation. The specimens were produced from two face-to-face docked steel pads 120×40×4 mm and two carbon lamellas FibARM Lamel 120×40×1,2 mm joint using the adhesion `FibARM Resin Laminate+". The strain tests were performed using the "INSTRON 3386" test bed with a maximum tension of 100 kN (10,19 ts). Optical measurement system VIC-3D was used to identify the evolution of deformations distribution in the near-surface layers. The VIC-3D system allowed obtaining the images that reflect the evolution of distribution of relative deformations iso-fields under different loads. In situ experimental research was conducted focused on strain deformations in specimens made of a layered composite: metal/adhesive/carbon lamella. A crack in the specimen was modeled, which allowed determining that with a growth of the overall deformation there develops an evolution of special structural elements from chaotic (along the whole lamella area) to localized ones with higher deformation values in the crack region. It was established that at higher levels of overall deformation in the crack region on the carbon lamella surface, the maximum deformation region with one extremum is divided by a narrow line of low deformation into two parts along the joint of steel plates. A limit deformation is identified.

  12. A Historical Analysis of the Quest for the Origins of Aging Macula Disorder, the Tissues Involved, and Its Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Although ocular tissues involved in aging macula disorder (AMD) were already known in 300 BC, the last type of photoreceptors was discovered only 10 years ago. The earliest descriptions of AMD appeared around 1850. It took over 150 years, till a clearer concept of AMD was formulated and even longer to grasp its pathophysiology. The uncertainty of researchers about the pathogenesis of AMD over the last century is reflected in its changing terminology. The evolution of this terminology is provided in a table to afford the reader a better insight into explanations proposed by researchers during this quest. PMID:27812291

  13. Final Report: Quantification of Uncertainty in Extreme Scale Computations (QUEST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, Patrick [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Bigoni, Daniele [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Parno, Matthew [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-06-09

    QUEST (\\url{www.quest-scidac.org}) is a SciDAC Institute that is focused on uncertainty quantification (UQ) in large-scale scientific computations. Our goals are to (1) advance the state of the art in UQ mathematics, algorithms, and software; and (2) provide modeling, algorithmic, and general UQ expertise, together with software tools, to other SciDAC projects, thereby enabling and guiding a broad range of UQ activities in their respective contexts. QUEST is a collaboration among six institutions (Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of Southern California, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Texas at Austin, and Duke University) with a history of joint UQ research. Our vision encompasses all aspects of UQ in leadership-class computing. This includes the well-founded setup of UQ problems; characterization of the input space given available data/information; local and global sensitivity analysis; adaptive dimensionality and order reduction; forward and inverse propagation of uncertainty; handling of application code failures, missing data, and hardware/software fault tolerance; and model inadequacy, comparison, validation, selection, and averaging. The nature of the UQ problem requires the seamless combination of data, models, and information across this landscape in a manner that provides a self-consistent quantification of requisite uncertainties in predictions from computational models. Accordingly, our UQ methods and tools span an interdisciplinary space across applied math, information theory, and statistics. The MIT QUEST effort centers on statistical inference and methods for surrogate or reduced-order modeling. MIT personnel have been responsible for the development of adaptive sampling methods, methods for approximating computationally intensive models, and software for both forward uncertainty propagation and statistical inverse problems. A key software product of the MIT QUEST effort is the MIT

  14. Integrating a WebQuest in the Primary School Curriculum Using Anchored Instruction: Effect on Learning Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.C.J.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a literature review, a means for integrating WebQuests in day-to-day school activities is introduced using principles of Anchored Instruction. Following these ideas in an effect study, including 109 children in 4th, 5th and 6th grade, significant learning gains were found, with a large

  15. Fostering the Memoir Writing Skills as a Creative Non-Fiction Genre Using a WebQuest Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Rania Kamal Muhammad; Abdel-Haq, Eman Muhammad; El-Deeb, Mervat Abou-Bakr; Ali, Mahsoub Abdel-Sadeq

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at developing the memoir writing skills as a creative non-fiction genre of second year distinguished governmental language preparatory school pupils using the a WebQuest model. Fifty participants from second year at Hassan Abu-Bakr Distinguished Governmental Language School at Al-Qanater Al-Khairia(Qalubia Governorate) were…

  16. The quest for molecular regulation underlying unisexual flower development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rómulo eSobral

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the making of a unisexual flower has been a long-standing quest in plant biology. Plants with male and female flowers can be divided mainly into two categories: dioecious and monoecious, and both sexual systems co-exist in nature in ca of 10% of the angiosperms. The establishment of male and female traits has been extensively described in a hermaphroditic flower and requires the interplay of networks, directly and indirectly related to the floral organ identity genes including hormonal regulators, transcription factors, microRNAs, and chromatin-modifying proteins. Recent transcriptomic studies have been uncovering the molecular processes underlying the establishment of unisexual flowers and there are many parallelisms between monoecious, dioecious and hermaphroditic individuals. Here, we review the paper entitled Comparative transcriptomic analysis of male and female flowers of monoecious Quercus suber published in 2014 in the Frontiers of Plant Science (volume 5 | Article 599 and discussed it in the context of recent studies with other dioecious and monoecious plants that utilized high-throughput platforms to obtain transcriptomic profiles of male and female unisexual flowers. In some unisexual flowers, the developmental programs that control organ initiation fail and male or female organs do not form, whereas in other species, organ initiation and development occur but they abort or arrest during different species-specific stages of differentiation. Therefore, a direct comparison of the pathways responsible for the establishment of unisexual flowers in different species are likely to reveal conserved modules of gene regulatory hubs involved in stamen or carpel development, as well as differences that reflect the different stages of development in which male and/or female organ arrest or loss-of-function occurs.

  17. A Quest for Equity? Measuring the Effect of QuestBridge on Economic Diversity at Selective Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furquim, Fernando; Glasener, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    In response to growing income stratification in higher education, President Obama convened a White House Summit in 2014 where over 100 selective institutions committed to increasing the number of low-income students on their campus. One way colleges proposed to do so is through partnerships with college access organizations like QuestBridge, a…

  18. Impact of WebQuest Learning Environment on Academic Achievement and Attitudes of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Arif ÖZERBAŞ

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study is to find out whether a learning environment created by using WebQuest method has any effect on seventh-grader students’ academic achievement on Mathematics and their level of attitude. The study was conducted on N=51 seventh grader students at a Primary School in Ankara. This study employed experimental design with pre and posttest control group. At the beginning of the study, “the Scale for academic achievement” and “The Attitude scale” were applied as pretest. The subjec...

  19. Morphosedimentary evolution of carbonate sandy beaches at decadal scale : case study in Reunion Island , Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabot, Marie-Myriam; Pennober, Gwenaelle; Suanez, Serge; Troadec, Roland; Delacourt, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Global change introduce a lot of uncertainties concerning future trajectory of beaches by directly or indirectly modifying major driving factors. An improved understanding of the past shoreline evolution may help for anticipate future coastline response. However, in tropical environment, studies concerning carbonate beaches dynamics are scarce compared to open sandy beaches. Consequently, coral reef protected beaches morphological adjustment is still poorly understood and long-term evolution rate are poorly quantified in these specific environment. In this context, La Reunion Island, insular department of France located in Indian Ocean, constitute a favoured laboratory. This high volcanic island possesses 25 km of carbonate beaches which experience hydrodynamic forcing specific from tropical environment: cyclonic swell during summer and long period swell during winter. Because of degraded coral reef health and high anthropogenic pressure, 50% of the beaches are in erosion since 1970s. Beach survey has been conducted since 1990s by scientist and are now encompassed as pilot site within a French observatory network which guarantee long-term survey with high resolution observational techniques. Thus, La Reunion Island is one of the rare carbonate beach to be surveyed since 20 years. This study aims to examined and quantify beach response at decadal scale on carbonate sandy beaches of Reunion Island. The study focus on 12 km of beaches from Cap Champagne to the Passe de Trois-Bassins. The analyze of 15 beach profile data originated from historical and DGPS beach topographic data confirm long term trend to erosion. Sediment lost varies between 0.5 and 2 m3.yr-1 since 1998. However longshore current have led to accretion of some part of beach compartment with rate of 0.7 to 1.6 m3.yr-1. Wave climate was examined from in-situ measurement over 15 years and show that extreme waves associated with tropical cyclones and long period swell play a major role in beach dynamics

  20. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    This draft of a book on Schumpeter is distributed for commenting. It is a stylised intellectual biography that focus on the emergence and extension of the Schumpeterian vision and analysis of economic and social evolution. The draft provides novel interpretations of Schumpeter's six major books. He...... originally developed his evolutionary research programme in Wesen from 1908 by studying the inherent limitations of Neoclassical Economics. He presented core results on economic evolution and sketched an extension evolutionary analysis to all social sciences in Entwicklung from 1912. He made a partial...... reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...

  1. Recombinant Ranaviruses for Studying Evolution of Host–Pathogen Interactions in Ectothermic Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Robert

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ranaviruses (Iridoviridae are large DNA viruses that are causing emerging infectious diseases at an alarming rate in both wild and captive cold blood vertebrate species all over the world. Although the general biology of these viruses that presents some similarities with poxvirus is characterized, many aspects of their replication cycles, host cell interactions and evolution still remain largely unclear, especially in vivo. Over several years, strategies to generate site-specific ranavirus recombinant, either expressing fluorescent reporter genes or deficient for particular viral genes, have been developed. We review here these strategies, the main ranavirus recombinants characterized and their usefulness for in vitro and in vivo studies.

  2. Internal quality evolution of a large test system – an industrial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács Attila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our empirical observations related to the evolution of a large automated test system. The system observed is used in the industry as a test tool for complex telecommunication systems, itself consisting of more than one million lines of source code. This study evaluates how different changes during the development have changed the number of observed Code Smells in the test system. We have monitored the development of the test scripts and measured the code quality characteristics over a five years period.

  3. Reflection seismic studies in the macrotidal Gulf of Kachchh, India: Evidence of physiographic evolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Vora, K.H.

    energy environment (EvANs, 1982), are also observed. They have higher wave height and wavelength (average wavelength of about 130 m and height 4 m) in the eastern end than in the interior of the creeks (average wavelength and height are about 50 and 3... Research, Vol. 10. No. 4, pp. 385-396. 1990. 0278-4343/90 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. (~) 1990 Pergamon Press plc NOTE Reflection seismic studies in the macrotidal Gulf of Kachchh, India: evidence of physiographic evolution O. S. CHAUHAN...

  4. Formation and evolution mechanism of regional haze: a case study in the megacity Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. G. Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the formation and evolution mechanism of the regional haze in megacity Beijing by analyzing the process of a severe haze that occurred 20–27 September 2011. Mass concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles as well as aerosol optical properties were concurrently measured at the Beijing urban atmospheric environment monitoring station. Gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO-NO2-NOx, O3, CO and meteorological parameters (wind speed, wind direction, and relative humidity were simultaneously monitored. Meanwhile, aerosol spatial distribution and the height of planetary boundary layer (PBL were retrieved from the signal of satellite and LIDAR (light detection and ranging. Concentrations of NO, NO2, SO2, O3, and CO observed during 23–27 September had exceeded the national ambient air quality standards for residents. The mass concentration of PM2.5 gradually accumulated during the measurement and reached at 220 μg m−3 on 26 September, and the corresponding atmospheric visibility was only 1.1 km. The daily averaged AOD in Beijing increased from ~ 0.16 at λ = 500 nm on 22 September and reached ~ 3.5 on 26 September. The key factors that affected the formation and evolution of this haze episode were stable anti-cyclone synoptic conditions at the surface, decreasing of the height of PBL, heavy pollution emissions from urban area, number and size evolution of aerosols, and hygroscopic growth for aerosol scattering. This case study may provide valuable information for the public to recognize the formation mechanism of the regional haze event over the megacity, which is also useful for the government to adopt scientific approach to forecast and eliminate the occurrence of regional haze in China.

  5. Acoustic evolution in crickets: need for phylogenetic study and a reappraisal of signal effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Desutter-Grandcolas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cricket stridulums and calls are highly stereotyped, except those with greatly modified tegmina and/or vena-tion, or ''unusual'' frequency, duration and/or intensity. This acoustic diversity remained unsuspected until recently, and current models of acoustic evolution in crickets erroneously consider this clade homogeneous for acoustic features. The few phylogenetic studies analyzing acoustic evolution in crickets demonstrated that acoustic behavior could be particularly labile in some clades. The ensuing pattern for cricket evolution is consequently extremely complex. We argue that: (1 phylogeny should always be considered when analyzing acoustic evolution, whatever characters are considered (signals, stridulums or behaviors. Consequently, future studies should be devoted to entire clades, and not consider isolated taxa; character and character state definitions should allow significant reconstructions of character evolutionary transformations; and homologies should be carefully defined for all characters, including behavior. (2 The factors responsible for song effectiveness should be reconsidered and hypotheses on their potential influence on signal evolution tested jointly by phylogenies (for example, to assess correlated transformations of acoustic and ecological features, and population studies (for example, to correlate call range and population structure, or test the predation risk associated with a signal structure. Better understanding these points should help clarifying acoustic evolution in crickets.Os aparelhos estridulatórios e os chamados dos grilos são altamente estereotipados, exceto aqueles com áreas e/ou venação tegminais fortemente modificadas ou com freqüência, duração e/ou intensidade fora do ''normal''. Esta diversidade acústica ficou insuspeita até recentemente, e os modelos correntes de evolução acústica em grilos consideram erroneamente este clado como homogêneo para as características acústicas. Os

  6. STUDIES REGARDING THE COLOR EVOLUTION DURING MATURATION OF CABERNET SAUVIGNON AND PINOT NOIR WINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa Vişan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available During maturation of red wines their chromatic characteristics change due to degradation reactions of anthocyanin pigments and polymers formation. It was studied the polyphenolic composition of young red wines Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir and its evolution during wines maturation. The wines were obtained in the Ceptura vine center, from the harvest year of 2015. The polyphenolic composition of wines was judged by the content in polyphenols, tannins and anthocyanins. A wine tannin structure was analyzed by their concentration in condensed tannins, astringent tannins and tannin-polysaccharide complex. Analyzes have been carried out in the wine by UV-VIS spectrometry techniques. Total content of polyphenols have been determined by spectrophotometric technique (DO280. Tannins have been determined by the Ribereau-Gayon method (1996, tannin structure after Glories method (1978; anthocyanins were determined by the discoloration technique with SO2. The study on color of red wines analyzed during their evolution referred to the study of chromatic parameters, the content of anthocyanin monomers and polymers (Glories method. Our results showed a decrease of the percent of anthocyanin monomers accompanied by an increase the percent of polymers, in both wines, during their maturation.

  7. Mitochondrial genomes of parasitic arthropods: implications for studies of population genetics and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, R; Barker, S C

    2007-02-01

    Over 39000 species of arthropods parasitize humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Despite their medical, veterinary and economic importance, most aspects of the population genetics and evolution of the vast majority of parasitic arthropods are poorly understood. Mitochondrial genomes are a rich source of markers for studies of population genetics and evolution. These markers include (1) nucleotide sequences of each of the 37 mitochondrial genes and non-coding regions; (2) concatenated nucleotide sequences of 2 or more genes; and (3) genomic features, such as gene duplications, gene rearrangements, and changes in gene content and secondary structures of RNAs. To date, the mitochondrial genomes of over 700 species of multi-cellular animals have been sequenced entirely, however, only 24 of these species are parasitic arthropods. Of the mitochondrial genome markers, only the nucleotide sequences of 4 mitochondrial genes, cox1, cob, rrnS and rrnL, have been well explored in population genetic and evolutionary studies of parasitic arthropods whereas the sequences of the other 33 genes, and various genomic features have not. We review current knowledge of the mitochondrial genomes of parasitic arthropods, summarize applications of mitochondrial genes and genomic features in population genetic and evolutionary studies, and highlight prospects for future research.

  8. A non-perturbative study of the evolution of cosmic magnetised sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, I Delgado; Piccinelli, G; Sussman, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    We undertake a hydrodynamical study of a magnetised cosmic fluid between the end of the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch. We assume this fluid to be the source of a Bianchi I model and to be a mixture of tightly coupled primordial radiation, neutrinos, baryons, electrons and positrons, together with a gas of already decoupled dark matter WIMPS and an already existing magnetic field. The interaction of this field with the tightly coupled gas mixture is described by suitable equations of state that are appropriate for the particle species of the mixture. Comparison of our results with those of previous studies based on an FLRW framework reveals that the effects of the anisotropy of the magnetic field on the evolution of the main thermodynamical variables are negligible, thus validating these studies, though subtle differences are found in the evolution of the magnetic field itself. For larger field intensities we find quantitative and qualitative differences from the FLRW based an...

  9. The evolution of human influenza A viruses from 1999 to 2006: A complete genome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomsgaard Anders

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the complete genome constellation of seasonal influenza A viruses from different countries is valuable for monitoring and understanding of the evolution and migration of strains. Few complete genome sequences of influenza A viruses from Europe are publicly available at the present time and there have been few longitudinal genome studies of human influenza A viruses. We have studied the evolution of circulating human H3N2, H1N1 and H1N2 influenza A viruses from 1999 to 2006, we analysed 234 Danish human influenza A viruses and characterised 24 complete genomes. Results H3N2 was the prevalent strain in Denmark during the study period, but H1N1 dominated the 2000–2001 season. H1N2 viruses were first observed in Denmark in 2002–2003. After years of little genetic change in the H1N1 viruses the 2005–2006 season presented H1N1 of greater variability than before. This indicates that H1N1 viruses are evolving and that H1N1 soon is likely to be the prevalent strain again. Generally, the influenza A haemagglutinin (HA of H3N2 viruses formed seasonal phylogenetic clusters. Different lineages co-circulating within the same season were also observed. The evolution has been stochastic, influenced by small "jumps" in genetic distance rather than constant drift, especially with the introduction of the Fujian-like viruses in 2002–2003. Also evolutionary stasis-periods were observed which might indicate well fit viruses. The evolution of H3N2 viruses have also been influenced by gene reassortments between lineages from different seasons. None of the influenza genes were influenced by strong positive selection pressure. The antigenic site B in H3N2 HA was the preferred site for genetic change during the study period probably because the site A has been masked by glycosylations. Substitutions at CTL-epitopes in the genes coding for the neuraminidase (NA, polymerase acidic protein (PA, matrix protein 1 (M1, non

  10. The influence of habitat on the evolution of plants: a case study across Saxifragales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Casas, Rafael Rubio; Mort, Mark E; Soltis, Douglas E

    2016-12-01

    Organismal evolution tends to be closely associated with ecological conditions. However, the extent to which this association constrains adaptation or diversification into new habitats remains unclear. We studied habitat evolution in the hyper-diverse angiosperm clade Saxifragales. We used species-level phylogenies for approx. 950 species to analyse the evolution of habitat shifts as well as their influence on plant diversification. We combined habitat characterization based on floristic assignments and state-of-the art phylogenetic comparative methods to estimate within- and across-habitat diversification patterns. Our analyses showed that Saxifragales diversified into multiple habitats from a forest-inhabiting ancestor and that this diversification is governed by relatively rare habitat shifts. Lineages are likely to stay within inferred ancestral ecological conditions. Adaptation to some habitat types (e.g. aquatic, desert) may be canalizing events that lineages do not escape. Although associations between increased diversification rates and shifts in habitat preferences are occasionally observed, extreme macroevolutionary rates are closely associated with specific habitats. Lineages occurring in shrubland, and especially tundra and rock cliffs, exhibit comparatively high diversification, whereas forest, grassland, desert and aquatic habitats are associated with low diversification. The likelihood of occupation of new habitats appears to be asymmetric. Shifts to aquatic and desert habitats may be canalizing events. Other habitats, such as tundra, might act as evolutionary sources, while forests provide the only habitat seemingly colonized easily by lineages originating elsewhere. However, habitat shifts are very rare, and any major environmental alteration is expected to have dramatic evolutionary consequences. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  11. Questões de origem sobre o gosto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Damião

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta questões de origem na formação da estética no século XVIII. Essas questões dizem respeito ao gosto ou constituição do juízo estético com base na experiência que reúne a sensibilidade e o intelecto. O “gosto mental”, no entanto, parte de uma discussão no âmbito da moral e se relaciona estreitamente com a epistemologia do empirismo nascente. O propósito deste artigo é recuperar elementos dessa discussão para fomentar uma recuperação do sentido de estética como percepção.

  12. Quantification of Uncertainty in Extreme Scale Computations (QUEST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Roger [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-04-18

    QUEST was a SciDAC Institute comprising Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of Southern California, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Texas at Austin, and Duke University. The mission of QUEST is to: (1) develop a broad class of uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods/tools, and (2) provide UQ expertise and software to other SciDAC projects, thereby enabling/guiding their UQ activities. The USC effort centered on the development of reduced models and efficient algorithms for implementing various components of the UQ pipeline. USC personnel were responsible for the development of adaptive bases, adaptive quadrature, and reduced models to be used in estimation and inference.

  13. O surgimento das questões de risco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Borraz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta um modelo geral que explica o surgimento, a avaliação e o tratamento das questões do risco. Esse modelo salienta a natureza política e controversa do processo e foca-se na noção de incerteza como uma característica fundamental de qualquer questão de risco. O artigo sugere, ainda, algumas razões sociológicas de preocupação, que podem auxiliar na compreensão dos motivos subjacentes às controvérsias sobre o risco e seus impactos políticos.

  14. Qualifying in-service education of Science Teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions for effe......The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...... research has focus on design: How can a professional development program for science teachers be designed to embrace recent research-developed criteria for success, while at the same time adapt to local challenges and needs at the participating schools? Initial and preliminary – and rather encouraging...

  15. Qualifying in-service education of science teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions for effe......The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...... research has focus on design: How can a professional development program for science teachers be designed to embrace recent research-developed criteria for success, while at the same time adapt to local challenges and needs at the participating schools? Initial and preliminary – and rather encouraging...

  16. Study on Law of Groundwater Evolution under Natural and Artificial Forcing with Case study of Haihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jinjun; Gan, Hong; Wang, Lin; Bi, Xue; Du, Sisi

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of groundwater is one of the key problems of water cycle study. It is a result of joint effect of natural condition and human activities, but until now the driving forces of groundwater system evolution were not fully understood due to the complexity of groundwater system structures and the uncertainty of affecting factors. Geology, precipitation and human activity are the main factors affecting the groundwater system evolution and interact each other, but the influence of such three factors on groundwater system are not clarified clearly on a macroscopic scale. The precipitation changes the volume of water recharge and the groundwater pumping effect the discharge of groundwater. Another important factor influencing balance of groundwater storage is the underlaying that affects the renewablility of groundwater. The underlaying is decided mainly by geological attributes but also influenced by human activited. The macroscopic environment of groundwater evolves under the natural and anthropic factors. This paper study the general law of groundwater evolution among the factors based on the case study in Haihe River Basin, a typical area with dramatic groundwater change under natural precipitation attenuation and gradually increase of water suuply. Haihe River Basin is located in north-China, covers an area of 320,041 km2 with over 40% plain areas. The plain area of Haihe Basin is densely populated with many large and medium-sized cities, including metropolis of Beijing and Tianjin, and concentrated irrigated areas, playing important roles in China's economy and food production. It is the unique basin where groundwater occupies majority of total water supply in China. Long-term groundwater over-exploitation causes a series of ecological and environmental problems that threats the sustainable development. In this paper, the historical process of groundwater balance in Haihe Basin is divided into three phases by decrease of rainfall and increase of water

  17. A contribution to the study of plant development evolution based on gene co-expression networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Romero-Campero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic eukaryotes are among the most successful organisms on Earth due to their unparalleled efficiency at capturing light energy and fixing carbon dioxide to produce organic molecules. A conserved and efficient network of light-dependent regulatory modules could be at the bases of this success. This regulatory system conferred early advantages to phototrophic eukaryotes that allowed for specialization, complex developmental processes and modern plant characteristics. We have studied light-dependent gene regulatory modules from algae to plants employing integrative-omics approaches based on gene co-expression networks. Our study reveals some remarkably conserved ways in which eukaryotic phototrophs deal with day length and light signaling. Here we describe how a family of Arabidopsis transcription factors involved in photoperiod response has evolved from a single algal gene according to the innovation, amplification and divergence theory of gene evolution by duplication. These modifications of the gene co-expression networks from the ancient unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to the modern brassica Arabidopsis thaliana may hint on the evolution and specialization of plants and other organisms.

  18. Sunlight-promoted photocatalytic hydrogen gas evolution from water-suspended cellulose: a systematic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltini, Andrea; Sturini, Michela; Dondi, Daniele; Annovazzi, Enrico; Maraschi, Federica; Caratto, Valentina; Profumo, Antonella; Buttafava, Armando

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a systematic study of cellulose (CLS) as a sacrificial biomass for photocatalytic H2 evolution from water. The idea is indeed to couple a largely available and not expensive biomass, and water, with a renewable energy like solar radiation. An aqueous CLS suspension irradiated either at 366 nm (UV-A) or under sunlight in the presence of Pt/TiO2 behaves as a H2 evolving system. The effects of irradiation time, catalyst and CLS concentrations, pH and water salinity are studied. Addition of CLS to the sample significantly improved H2 evolution from water splitting, with yields up to ten fold higher than those observed in neat water. The mechanism of the photocatalytic process relies on the TiO2-mediated CLS hydrolysis, under irradiation. The polysaccharide depolymerisation generates water-soluble species and intermediates, among them 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was identified. These intermediates are readily oxidized following the glucose photoreforming, thus enhancing water hydrogen ion reduction to give gas-phase H2. The formation of "colored" by-products from HMF self-polymerization involves a sort of "in situ dye sensitization" that allows an effective photoreaction even under solar light. The procedure is evaluated and successfully extended on cellulosic biomasses, i.e. rice husk and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) stems, not previously investigated for this application.

  19. Study of Modern Human Evolution via Comparative Analysis with the Neanderthal Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Musaddeque; Liang, Ping

    2013-12-01

    Many other human species appeared in evolution in the last 6 million years that have not been able to survive to modern times and are broadly known as archaic humans, as opposed to the extant modern humans. It has always been considered fascinating to compare the modern human genome with that of archaic humans to identify modern human-specific sequence variants and figure out those that made modern humans different from their predecessors or cousin species. Neanderthals are the latest humans to become extinct, and many factors made them the best representatives of archaic humans. Even though a number of comparisons have been made sporadically between Neanderthals and modern humans, mostly following a candidate gene approach, the major breakthrough took place with the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome. The initial genome-wide comparison, based on the first draft of the Neanderthal genome, has generated some interesting inferences regarding variations in functional elements that are not shared by the two species and the debated admixture question. However, there are certain other genetic elements that were not included or included at a smaller scale in those studies, and they should be compared comprehensively to better understand the molecular make-up of modern humans and their phenotypic characteristics. Besides briefly discussing the important outcomes of the comparative analyses made so far between modern humans and Neanderthals, we propose that future comparative studies may include retrotransposons, pseudogenes, and conserved non-coding regions, all of which might have played significant roles during the evolution of modern humans.

  20. The floral morphospace--a modern comparative approach to study angiosperm evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Marion; Jabbour, Florian; Gerber, Sylvain; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Sauquet, Hervé; von Balthazar, Maria; Staedler, Yannick; Crane, Peter R; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Morphospaces are mathematical representations used for studying the evolution of morphological diversity and for the evaluation of evolved shapes among theoretically possible ones. Although widely used in zoology, they--with few exceptions--have been disregarded in plant science and in particular in the study of broad-scale patterns of floral structure and evolution. Here we provide basic information on the morphospace approach; we review earlier morphospace applications in plant science; and as a practical example, we construct and analyze a floral morphospace. Morphospaces are usually visualized with the help of ordination methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) or nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). The results of these analyses are then coupled with disparity indices that describe the spread of taxa in the space. We discuss these methods and apply modern statistical tools to the first and only angiosperm-wide floral morphospace published by Stebbins in 1951. Despite the incompleteness of Stebbins’ original dataset, our analyses highlight major, angiosperm-wide trends in the diversity of flower morphology and thereby demonstrate the power of this previously neglected approach in plant science.

  1. Experimental study and empirical prediction of fuel flow parameters under air evolution conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanina, E. E.; Kitanin, E. L.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Kravtsov, P. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Stepanov, S. G.; Zherebzov, V. L.

    2017-11-01

    Air evolution in kerosene under the effect of gravity flow with various hydraulic resistances in the pipeline was studied experimentally. The study was conducted at pressure ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 bar and temperature varying between -20°C and +20°C. Through these experiments, the oversaturation limit beyond which dissolved air starts evolving intensively from the fuel was established and the correlations for the calculation of pressure losses and air evolution on local loss elements were obtained. A method of calculating two-phase flow behaviour in a titled pipeline segment with very low mass flow quality and fairly high volume flow quality was developed. The complete set of empirical correlations obtained by experimental analysis was implemented in the engineering code. The software simulation results were repeatedly verified against our experimental findings and Airbus test data to show that the two-phase flow simulation agrees quite well with the experimental results obtained in the complex branched pipelines.

  2. Structural and magnetic properties evolution study method using a single ribbon-shaped sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Javier A.

    2017-06-01

    A new type of study is presented for magnetic and structural characterization of amorphous or nanocrystalline metallic alloys in ribbon or wire-shaped samples. A single sample is subjecting to successive steps of flash isocurrent heat treatments with increasing duration in time, followed by a rapid cooling, while magneto-electric properties evolution are scanned in situ at room temperature. When one set of isocurrent heat treatments is finished, the annealing current is increased and a new set of isocurrent treatments starts. The properties studied were the saturation magnetization and the coercive field at 50 Hz, magnetic permeability at 100 kHz and electrical resistance from where we also obtained the crystalline fraction. The method was applied on two samples of Finemet-like alloys and the results were analyzed from the perspective of current literature. With the present method it is possible to obtain a general and meticulous understanding of the structural and magnetic evolution of the samples tested, with a considerable saving of time and samples.

  3. Evolution of a microbial nitrilase gene family: a comparative and environmental genomics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eads Jonathan R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completed genomes and environmental genomic sequences are bringing a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of gene families, microbial metabolism and community eco-physiology. Here, we used comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses in conjunction with enzymatic data to probe the evolution and functions of a microbial nitrilase gene family. Nitrilases are relatively rare in bacterial genomes, their biological function being unclear. Results We examined the genetic neighborhood of the different subfamily genes and discovered conserved gene clusters or operons associated with specific nitrilase clades. The inferred evolutionary transitions that separate nitrilases which belong to different gene clusters correlated with changes in their enzymatic properties. We present evidence that Darwinian adaptation acted during one of those transitions and identified sites in the enzyme that may have been under positive selection. Conclusion Changes in the observed biochemical properties of the nitrilases associated with the different gene clusters are consistent with a hypothesis that those enzymes have been recruited to a novel metabolic pathway following gene duplication and neofunctionalization. These results demonstrate the benefits of combining environmental genomic sampling and completed genomes data with evolutionary and biochemical analyses in the study of gene families. They also open new directions for studying the functions of nitrilases and the genes they are associated with.

  4. A study of evolution of residual stress in single crystal silicon electrode using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, M.; Singh, Raj N.

    2017-08-01

    Silicon is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries. However, lithiation of silicon generates stress that is known to be the primary reason for the failure of the anode. This study explored the existence of residual stress in single crystalline silicon electrodes after full de-lithiation, i.e., under no mechanical or electrical load. The magnitude of residual stress and its evolution with the number of lithiation-delithiation cycles is measured by Raman spectroscopy and a simple mechanics based approach. It is shown that the residual stress is tensile in nature and increased from 69 ± 11 MPa after the 1st cycle to ˜291 ± 56 MPa after 50 cycles of lithiation and de-lithiation. Concurrently, microstructural studies were performed to demonstrate the consequence of the evolution of residual stress on failure by the fracture of the silicon anode. These results provide understanding on the progressive failure mechanism of single crystalline-based silicon electrodes upon lithiation-delithiation.

  5. Molecular Evolution of the Infrared Sensory Gene TRPA1 in Snakes and Implications for Functional Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ke; Zhang, Peng

    2011-01-01

    TRPA1 is a calcium ion channel protein recently identified as the infrared receptor in pit organ-containing snakes. Therefore, understanding the molecular evolution of TRPA1 may help to illuminate the origin of “heat vision” in snakes and reveal the molecular mechanism of infrared sensitivity for TRPA1. To this end, we sequenced the infrared sensory gene TRPA1 in 24 snake species, representing nine snake families and multiple non-snake outgroups. We found that TRPA1 is under strong positive selection in the pit-bearing snakes studied, but not in other non-pit snakes and non-snake vertebrates. As a comparison, TRPV1, a gene closely related to TRPA1, was found to be under strong purifying selection in all the species studied, with no difference in the strength of selection between pit-bearing snakes and non-pit snakes. This finding demonstrates that the adaptive evolution of TRPA1 specifically occurred within the pit-bearing snakes and may be related to the functional modification for detecting infrared radiation. In addition, by comparing the TRPA1 protein sequences, we identified 11 amino acid sites that were diverged in pit-bearing snakes but conserved in non-pit snakes and other vertebrates, 21 sites that were diverged only within pit-vipers but conserved in the remaining snakes. These specific amino acid substitutions may be potentially functional important for infrared sensing. PMID:22163322

  6. Institutionalised Marginality, Social Conflicts and the Quest for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institutionalised Marginality, Social Conflicts and the Quest for National Unity in an African Nation-State: A Theoretical Exploration. Philip Ogo Ujomu. Abstract. No Abstract Available Africa Development/Afrique et développement Vol.XXVIII, Nos 3&4, 2003: 22-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ad.v28i2.22175 · AJOL African ...

  7. QuEST: Qualifying Environmentally Sustainable Technologies. Volume 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    QuEST is a publication of the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM). This issue contains brief articles on: Risk Identification and Mitigation, Material Management and Substitution Efforts--Hexavalent Chrome-free Coatings and Low volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Coatings, Lead-Free Electronics, Corn-Based Depainting Media; Alternative Energy Efforts Hydrogen Sensors and Solar Air Conditioning. Other TEERM Efforts include: Energy and Water Management and Remediation Technology Collaboration.

  8. Different populations of blacklegged tick nymphs exhibit differences in questing behavior that have implications for human lyme disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsnoe, Isis M; Hickling, Graham J; Ginsberg, Howard S; McElreath, Richard; Tsao, Jean I

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavior can have profound effects on pathogen transmission and disease incidence. We studied the questing (= host-seeking) behavior of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) nymphs, which are the primary vectors of Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Lyme disease is common in northern but not in southern regions, and prior ecological studies have found that standard methods used to collect host-seeking nymphs in northern regions are unsuccessful in the south. This led us to hypothesize that there are behavior differences between northern and southern nymphs that alter how readily they are collected, and how likely they are to transmit the etiological agent of Lyme disease to humans. To examine this question, we compared the questing behavior of I. scapularis nymphs originating from one northern (Lyme disease endemic) and two southern (non-endemic) US regions at field sites in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Florida. Laboratory-raised uninfected nymphs were monitored in circular 0.2 m2 arenas containing wooden dowels (mimicking stems of understory vegetation) for 10 (2011) and 19 (2012) weeks. The probability of observing nymphs questing on these stems (2011), and on stems, on top of leaf litter, and on arena walls (2012) was much greater for northern than for southern origin ticks in both years and at all field sites (19.5 times greater in 2011; 3.6-11.6 times greater in 2012). Our findings suggest that southern origin I. scapularis nymphs rarely emerge from the leaf litter, and consequently are unlikely to contact passing humans. We propose that this difference in questing behavior accounts for observed geographic differences in the efficacy of the standard sampling techniques used to collect questing nymphs. These findings also support our hypothesis that very low Lyme disease incidence in southern states is, in part, a consequence of the type of host-seeking behavior exhibited by southern populations of the key Lyme disease vector.

  9. Different populations of blacklegged tick nymphs exhibit differences in questing behavior that have implications for human lyme disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsnoe, Isis M.; Hickling, Graham J.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; McElreath, Richard; Tsao, Jean I.

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavior can have profound effects on pathogen transmission and disease incidence. We studied the questing (= host-seeking) behavior of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) nymphs, which are the primary vectors of Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Lyme disease is common in northern but not in southern regions, and prior ecological studies have found that standard methods used to collect host-seeking nymphs in northern regions are unsuccessful in the south. This led us to hypothesize that there are behavior differences between northern and southern nymphs that alter how readily they are collected, and how likely they are to transmit the etiological agent of Lyme disease to humans. To examine this question, we compared the questing behavior of I. scapularis nymphs originating from one northern (Lyme disease endemic) and two southern (non-endemic) US regions at field sites in Wisconsin, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Florida. Laboratory-raised uninfected nymphs were monitored in circular 0.2 m2 arenas containing wooden dowels (mimicking stems of understory vegetation) for 10 (2011) and 19 (2012) weeks. The probability of observing nymphs questing on these stems (2011), and on stems, on top of leaf litter, and on arena walls (2012) was much greater for northern than for southern origin ticks in both years and at all field sites (19.5 times greater in 2011; 3.6-11.6 times greater in 2012). Our findings suggest that southern origin I. scapularis nymphs rarely emerge from the leaf litter, and consequently are unlikely to contact passing humans. We propose that this difference in questing behavior accounts for observed geographic differences in the efficacy of the standard sampling techniques used to collect questing nymphs. These findings also support our hypothesis that very low Lyme disease incidence in southern states is, in part, a consequence of the type of host-seeking behavior exhibited by southern populations of the key Lyme disease vector.

  10. Temporal evolution of ischemic lesions in nonhuman primates: a diffusion and perfusion MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    Full Text Available Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion MRI were used to examine the spatiotemporal evolution of stroke lesions in adult macaques with ischemic occlusion.Permanent MCA occlusion was induced with silk sutures through an interventional approach via the femoral artery in adult rhesus monkeys (n = 8, 10-21 years old. The stroke lesions were examined with high-resolution DWI and perfusion MRI, and T2-weighted imaging (T2W on a clinical 3T scanner at 1-6, 48, and 96 hours post occlusion and validated with H&E staining.The stroke infarct evolved via a natural logarithmic pattern with the mean infarct growth rate = 1.38 ± 1.32 ml per logarithmic time scale (hours (n = 7 in the hyperacute phase (1-6 hours. The mean infarct volume after 6 hours post occlusion was 3.6±2.8 ml (n = 7, by DWI and increased to 3.9±2.9 ml (n = 5, by T2W after 48 hours, and to 4.7±2.2ml (n = 3, by T2W after 96 hours post occlusion. The infarct volumes predicted by the natural logarithmic function were correlated significantly with the T2W-derived lesion volumes (n = 5, r = 0.92, p = 0.01 at 48 hours post occlusion. The final infarct volumes derived from T2W were correlated significantly with those from H&E staining (r = 0.999, p < 0.0001, n = 4. In addition, the diffusion-perfusion mismatch was visible generally at 6 hours but nearly diminished at 48 hours post occlusion.The infarct evolution follows a natural logarithmic pattern in the hyperacute phase of stroke. The logarithmic pattern of evolution could last up to 48 hours after stroke onset and may be used to predict the infarct volume growth during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The nonhuman primate model, MRI protocols, and post data processing strategy may provide an excellent platform for characterizing the evolution of acute stroke lesion in mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions of stroke disease.

  11. Temporal evolution of mechanical properties of skeletal tissue regeneration in rabbits. An experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Mokoko, Didier; Chabrand, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Various mathematical models represent the effects of local mechanical environment on the regulation of skeletal regeneration. Their relevance relies on an accurate description of the evolving mechanical properties of the regenerating tissue. The object of this study was to develop an experimental model which made it possible to characterize the temporal evolution of the structural and mechanical properties during unloaded enchondral osteogenesis in the New Zealand rabbit, a standard animal model for studies of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. A 25mm segment of tibial diaphysis was removed sub-periosteally from rabbits. The defect was repaired by the preserved periosteum. An external fixator was applied to prevent mechanical loading during osteogenesis. The regenerated skeletal tissues were studied by CT scan, histology and mechanical tests. The traction tests between 7 to 21 days post-surgery were done on formaldehyde-fixated tissue allowing to obtain force/displacement curves. The viscoelastic properties of ...

  12. Power Plants, Steam and Gas Turbines WebQuest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ulloa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A WebQuest is an Internet-based and inquiry-oriented learning activity. The aim of this work is to outline the creation of a WebQuest entitled “Power Generation Plants: Steam and Gas Turbines.” This is one of the topics covered in the course “Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer,” which is offered in the second year of Mechanical Engineering at the Defense University Center at the Naval Academy in Vigo, Spain. While participating in the activity, students will be divided into groups of no more than 10 for seminars. The groups will create PowerPoint presentations that include all of the analyzed aspects. The topics to be discussed during the workshop on power plant turbines are the: (1 principles of operation; (2 processes involved; (3 advantages and disadvantages; (4 efficiency; (5 combined cycle; and (6 transversal competences, such as teamwork, oral and written presentations, and analysis and synthesis of information. This paper presents the use of Google Sites as a guide to the WebQuest so that students can access all information online, including instructions, summaries, resources, and information on qualifications.

  13. ThinkQuest to help Internet people Think Young!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The ThinkQuest Internet Challenge Awards are given to young teams of web site designers. This year, the award ceremony was hosted by CERN on 19 March.   Young visitors to CERN are not unusual. But those you may have seen around the Laboratory last Monday were here for a special event - the ThinkQuest Internet Challenge Awards. This is an international program for students from 12 to 19 working in teams, across different schools and cultures, to design exciting, interactive, and educational web sites. At stake in the competition was over $1 million in scholarships and awards. Martine Brunschwig Graf (top left), Geneva State Councillor responsible for public education, at the ThinkQuest award ceremony at CERN where some 70 young finalists were assembled. For this year's Award Ceremony, the 70 finalists were CERN's guests on Monday after spending three days in Geneva. Ranging in age from 14 to 19 years and representing over 20 countries, the finalists were welcomed to the awards day by CERN Director G...

  14. CosmoQuest: Making the public your students and collaborators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela; Buxner, Sanlyn; Grier, Jennifer; Richardson, Matthew; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    CosmoQuest is a second generation citizen science project that makes it possible for NASA Subject Matter Experts to engage the public as both learners and collaborators in research. Engaging the public in publishable science is termed “Citizen Science.” This is a powerful technique for accomplishing research projects and tasks that require many minds and eyes to complete. While some projects may use undergraduates for help, others simply have too many images or too much data for a small population to sort through. CosmoQuest is a platform that enables scientists to take advantage of already existing science tools to engage the public in their research and to acquire the data analysis they need. Citizen scientists, like students, need their experience properly scaffolded to their understanding, and they require mentoring and training to succeed.This presentation focuses on methods for focusing research projects for successful citizen science engagement, and determining what scaffolding must be built to support citizen education and engagement.This presentation will help you understand how to transform your research project into a successful citizen science engagement. We will also present a flowchart to help you define: what is required, how to focus on what science does and doesn’t work, and what support your project requires. The content presented will allow you to successfully implement a project within the CosmoQuest facility, and determine what educational support you should provide or request aid to provide.

  15. Homophobia: The Quest for a Valid Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumby, Malcolm E.

    1976-01-01

    Using a modified version of Smith's "homophobic scale," this study examines attitudinal differences between 60 homosexual and 60 heterosexual Caucasian, middle-class males. Although homosexual subjects evidenced a consistent liberal attitude toward sexual behavior in general, many heterosexuals indicated a strong margin of attitudinal…

  16. Quest for business intelligence in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Graaff, Joe; Cameron, Austin

    2013-02-01

    In an era of reform, providers are examining more forward-thinking business intelligence strategies, according to a recent study. Enterprise business intelligence tool sets offer a breadth of design and functionality that often are capable of serving the enterprise. One limitation of broader tool sets is that they may lack needed application-specific functionality or prebuilt healthcare content for a specific department.

  17. Richard Eberhart: A Quest for Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. J. Karthikeyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A short history of the life of Richard Eberhart becomes essential for us to understand the magnetic personality of a poet who believed in his younger generation. The secret of his continued popularity rests on his unique strong individuality, romantic mould, spasmodic vigour, his social commitment, simplicity of expression and a deep concern for mankind. The present study is a modest attempt in this direction and proposes to examine the predominant features of Richard Eberhart’s poetry.

  18. Autism: the quest for the genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Nuala H; Lamb, Janine A

    2007-09-03

    Autism, at its most extreme, is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, and recent studies have indicated that autism spectrum disorders are considerably more common than previously supposed. However, although one of the most heritable neuropsychiatric syndromes, autism has so far eluded attempts to discover its genetic origins in the majority of cases. Several whole-genome scans for autism-susceptibility loci have identified specific chromosomal regions, but the results have been inconclusive and fine mapping and association studies have failed to identify the underlying genes. Recent advances in knowledge from the Human Genome and HapMap Projects, and progress in technology and bioinformatic resources, have aided study design and made data generation more efficient and cost-effective. Broadening horizons about the landscape of structural genetic variation and the field of epigenetics are indicating new possible mechanisms underlying autism aetiology, while endophenotypes are being used in an attempt to break down the complexity of the syndrome and refine genetic data. Although the genetic variants underlying idiopathic autism have proven elusive so far, the future for this field looks promising.

  19. On the mechanism of hydrogen evolution catalysis by proteins: A case study with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doneux, Th., E-mail: tdoneux@ulb.ac.b [Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, CP 255, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Ostatna, Veronika [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Palecek, Emil, E-mail: palecek@ibp.cz [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > Proteins catalyse hydrogen evolution at mercury electrodes. > The adsorbed protein is the mediator and the buffer proton donor is the substrate. > The characteristics of the catalytic peak are connected to the protein properties. - Abstract: The catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by proteins has been known for decades but was only recently found to be useful for electroanalytical purposes. The mechanism of the catalytic process is investigated at hanging mercury drop electrodes by cyclic voltammetry, with bovine serum albumin as a model system. It is shown that the catalyst is the protein in the adsorbed state. The influence of various parameters such as the accumulation time, scan rate or buffer concentration is studied, and interpreted in the framework of a surface catalytic mechanism. Under the experimental conditions used in the work, a 'total catalysis' phenomenon takes place, the rate of HER being limited by the diffusion of the proton donor. The adequacy of the existing models is discussed, leading to a call for the development of more refined models.

  20. Big cats as a model system for the study of the evolution of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Currently, carnivores, and felids in particular, are vastly underrepresented in cognitive literature, despite being an ideal model system for tests of social and ecological intelligence hypotheses. Within Felidae, big cats (Panthera) are uniquely suited to studies investigating the evolutionary links between social, ecological, and cognitive complexity. Intelligence likely did not evolve in a unitary way but instead evolved as the result of mutually reinforcing feedback loops within the physical and social environments. The domain-specific social intelligence hypothesis proposes that social complexity drives only the evolution of cognitive abilities adapted only to social domains. The domain-general hypothesis proposes that the unique demands of social life serve as a bootstrap for the evolution of superior general cognition. Big cats are one of the few systems in which we can directly address conflicting predictions of the domain-general and domain-specific hypothesis by comparing cognition among closely related species that face roughly equivalent ecological complexity but vary considerably in social complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New frontiers in the study of human cultural and genetic evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T; Richerson, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    In this review, we discuss the dynamic linkages between culture and the genetic evolution of the human species. We begin by briefly describing the framework of gene-culture coevolutionary (or dual-inheritance) models for human evolutionary change. Until recently, the literature on gene-culture coevolution was composed primarily of mathematical models and formalized theory describing the complex dynamics underlying human behavior, adaptation, and technological evolution, but had little empirical support concerning genetics. The rapid progress in the fields of molecular genetics and genomics, however, is now providing the kinds of data needed to produce rich empirical support for gene-culture coevolutionary models. We briefly outline how theoretical and methodological progress in genome sciences has provided ways for the strength of selection on genes to be evaluated, and then outline how evidence of selection on several key genes can be directly linked to human cultural practices. We then describe some exciting new directions in the empirical study of gene-culture coevolution, and conclude with a discussion of the role of gene-culture evolutionary models in the future integration of medical, biological, and social sciences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Of Domestic and Wild Guinea Pigs: Studies in Sociophysiology, Domestication, and Social Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachser, Norbert

    Among mammals a majority of each individual's daily expectations, motivations, and behaviors are directed to encounters with conspecifics. Therefore the knowledge of the genesis, control, and consequences of social interactions is crucial for understanding their social life. We present here our research on the sociophysiology, domestication, and social evolution of wild (Cavia aperea and Galea musteloides) and domestic (Cavia aperea f. porcellus) guinea pigs, which summarizes general rules for many group-living mammals. It is shown that social interactions have consequences not only for the individuals' reproductive success but also for their degrees of stress and welfare. The way in which individuals interact is controlled not only by the present environment but also by the previous social experiences which they have gathered during their behavioral development. Furthermore, the study of ontogeny does not begin at birth, because prenatal social factors acting on pregnant females can also affect the way in which the offspring will interact when adult. In addition, to understand the genesis of interactions between domesticated animals implies knowledge of the behavioral and physiological changes which occurred during the process of domestication. Finally, understanding the social interactions among individuals of the wild ancestor of the domesticated form requires knowledge of how their behavior patterns were brought about by natural selection during the process of social evolution.

  3. Evolution of the Asian monsoon from the Cretaceous to the modern - a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Dan; Farnsworth, Alex; Loptson, Claire; Markwick, Paul

    2014-05-01

    It has long been suggested that palaeogeography could have an important role in the modulation of the Asian monsoon. In particular, orogenesis associated with the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau has been associated with the intensification of the Asian monsoon through the Neogene, a paradigm which has some support from both data and modelling studies. Here we go further by considering the evolution of the Asian monsoon over a much longer time period than ususally considered, namely, the early Cretaceous right through to the modern day. Through a series of more than 30 climate model simulations spanning 150 million years, we investigate how changing palaeogeography (continental distribution, mountain height, and bathymetry) has affected monsoon evolution. The palaeogeographies are provided by Getech Plc, and we use the HadCM3L climate model, developed by the UK Met Office. All simulations are run for more than 500 years from an identical initial state. We show that a monsoon system has existed in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean since the early Cretaceous, but that intense precipitation only began to penetrate onto the east Asian continent in the late Paleogene and early Eocene. As well as focussing on the Asian (or proto-Asian for the earliest Cretaceous) monsoon, we present the results in a global context.

  4. Underutilized resources for studying the evolution of invasive species during their introduction, establishment, and lag phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Travis D; Burt, Jennifer W; Espeland, Erin K; Gilchrist, George W; Jamieson, Mary A; Lindström, Leena; Roderick, George K; Swope, Sarah; Szűcs, Marianna; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2010-01-01

    The early phases of biological invasions are poorly understood. In particular, during the introduction, establishment, and possible lag phases, it is unclear to what extent evolution must take place for an introduced species to transition from established to expanding. In this study, we highlight three disparate data sources that can provide insights into evolutionary processes associated with invasion success: biological control organisms, horticultural introductions, and natural history collections. All three data sources potentially provide introduction dates, information about source populations, and genetic and morphological samples at different time points along the invasion trajectory that can be used to investigate preadaptation and evolution during the invasion process, including immediately after introduction and before invasive expansion. For all three data sources, we explore where the data are held, their quality, and their accessibility. We argue that these sources could find widespread use with a few additional pieces of data, such as voucher specimens collected at certain critical time points during biocontrol agent quarantine, rearing, and release and also for horticultural imports, neither of which are currently done consistently. In addition, public access to collected information must become available on centralized databases to increase its utility in ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:25567920

  5. The effect of web quest and team-based learning on students’ self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOHREH BADIYEPEYMAIE JAHROMI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, the authors aimed to examine the effects of cooperative learning methods using Web Quest and team-based learning on students’ self-direction, self-regulation, and academic achievement. Methods: This is a comparative study of students taking a course in mental health and psychiatric disorders. In two consecutive years, a group of students were trained using the Web Quest approach as a teaching strategy (n=38, while the other group was taught using team-based learning (n=39. Data gathering was based on Guglielmino’s self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS and Buford’s self-regulation questionnaire. The data were analyzed by descriptive test using M (IQR, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and the Mann–Whitney U-test in SPSS software, version 13. p<0.05 was considered as the significance level. Results: The results of the Mann–Whitney U test showed that the participants’ self- directed (self-management and self-regulated learning differed between the two groups (p=0.04 and p=0.01, respectively. Wilcoxon test revealed that self-directed learning indices (self-control and self-management were differed between the two strategies before and after the intervention. However, the scores related to learning (students’ final scores were higher in the WebQuest approach than in team-based learning. Conclusion: By employing modern educational approaches, students are not only more successful in their studies but also acquire the necessary professional skills for future performance. Further research to compare the effects of new methods of teaching is required.

  6. Behavioral asymmetries in ticks - Lateralized questing of Ixodes ricinus to a mechatronic apparatus delivering host-borne cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Romano, Donato; Rocchigiani, Guido; Caselli, Alice; Mancianti, Francesca; Canale, Angelo; Stefanini, Cesare

    2018-02-01

    Ticks are considered among the most dangerous arthropod vectors of disease agents to both humans and animals worldwide. Lateralization contributes to biological fitness in many animals, conferring important functional advantages, therefore studying its role in tick perception would critically improve our knowledge about their host-seeking behavior. In this research, we evaluated if Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Ixodiidae) ticks have a preference in using the right or the left foreleg to climb on a host. We developed a mechatronic device moving a tuft of fox skin with fur as host-mimicking combination of cues. This engineered approach allows to display a realistic combination of both visual and olfactory host-borne stimuli, which is prolonged over the time and standardized for each replicate. In the first experiment, the mechatronic apparatus delivered host-borne cues frontally, to evaluate the leg preference during questing as response to a symmetrical stimulus. In the second experiment, host-borne cues were provided laterally, in an equal proportion to the left and to the right of the tick, to investigate if the host direction affected the questing behavior. In both experiments, the large majority of the tested ticks showed individual-level left-biased questing acts, if compared to the ticks showing right-biased ones. Furthermore, population-level left-biased questing responses were observed post-exposure to host-mimicking cues provided frontally or laterally to the tick. Overall, this is the first report on behavioral asymmetries in ticks of medical and veterinary importance. Moreover, the mechatronic apparatus developed in this research can be exploited to evaluate the impact of repellents on tick questing in highly reproducible standardized conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In quest of a new humanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    a troubled relationship to the comprehension of lived experience, notions of agency and politics. This paper aims to explore how a practice-oriented re-reading of phenomenology can contribute to a ‘new humanism’ after anti-/posthumanism. The paper starts from a research study on ‘The Stranger, the city...... and the nation’, which I have recently completed with my colleague Lasse Koefoed. The purpose is to embed the subsequent philosophical discussions in their consequences for the empirical analysis of social life. The re-reading of phenomenology revolves around three issues: thinking the body as a phenomenal...

  8. A QUEST FOR LITERATURE IN ELT COURSEBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Gümüşok

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The mission of literature in ELT has undergone a change for the last century. Once both a vehicle and an aim for teaching foreign language, literature now seems to remain out of center. Although it has various benefits for language learners, it reaches language classes only when the teacher is willing to make use of it, which is suggested by the studies conducted on teaching literature (Ross, 1991; Timuçin, 2001; Wang, 2009. Following the language teacher, coursebooks are the second primary input source in a classroom. In other words, if a teacher is reluctant to use literary texts in the lesson, the coursebook is the only provider for literature to be benefited. Therefore, this study aims at exploring to what extent literary texts and literary elements are used in ELT coursebooks. ELT coursebooks used in the preparatory schools of state universities in Ankara were analyzed for literary texts and elements. In addition, two ELT coursebook series which were published in the last 20 years and are not used anymore were analyzed in order to see whether ELT coursebooks differ with regard to the quantity of literary texts and elements in the last 20 years. In total, 22 coursebooks from different levels were analyzed. The finding reveals that ELT coursebooks contain bits and pieces of literature and there has been decrease in the number of literary texts in the currently used coursebooks.

  9. Using music to study the evolution of cognitive mechanisms relevant to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aniruddh D

    2017-02-01

    This article argues that music can be used in cross-species research to study the evolution of cognitive mechanisms relevant to spoken language. This is because music and language share certain cognitive processing mechanisms and because music offers specific advantages for cross-species research. Music has relatively simple building blocks (tones without semantic properties), yet these building blocks are combined into rich hierarchical structures that engage complex cognitive processing. I illustrate this point with regard to the processing of musical harmonic structure. Because the processing of musical harmonic structure has been shown to interact with linguistic syntactic processing in humans, it is of interest to know if other species can acquire implicit knowledge of harmonic structure through extended exposure to music during development (vs. through explicit training). I suggest that domestic dogs would be a good species to study in addressing this question.

  10. Studies on the Ecology, Biogeography and Evolution of Palms (Arecaceae) with Focus on the Americas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.

    and evolutionary processes. These topics fall into four categories: (i) Previous empirical evidence on the factors influencing palm species distributions, community composition, and species richness was summarised in a hierarchical scale framework. The effects of different components of the abiotic environment......The palm family (Arecaceae) increasingly serves as a model system to study the ecology and evolution of tropical ecosystems. This volume covers a wide range of topics in the areas of palm community ecology, macroecology, biogeography, and phylogeny, with a focus on the bridge between ecological......, biotic interactions, and dispersal are integrally dependent on spatiotemporal scale. Historical, including evolutionary factors are clearly important for palm distributions and diversity. (ii) Broad-scale patterns of palm species richness and phylogenetic turnover were studied across the Americas...

  11. Evolution of reverse logistics studies performed in the brazilian context: a bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmily Caroline Cabral da Fonseca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The postmodern society consumes in search of welfare. Therefore, an enormous amount of natural resources is consumed and consequently a large quantity of materials is discarded as waste. In this context, in order to try to minimize the environmental impacts, the Law 12.305/10 was approved, which established the National Policy for Solid Waste (PNRS. This policy comprises the objective of promoting the environmentally appropriated disposal of solid waste, assigning great importance to the recycling process and the shared responsibility for product lifecycle, which encouraged the creation and maintenance of recycling cooperatives of materials and Reverse Logistic (RL practices. The RL has been highlighted since it seeks for holistic solutions for environmental problems. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the evolution of Brazilian RL studies through a Bibliometric Analysis which comprehended articles published between 2010 and 2014. The growth in the number of publications that discuss the referred topics was substantiated.

  12. The Russian Quest for Ontological Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Gejl

    ’. By supplementing the existing theories of geopolitics and regime security with the conceptual lens of ontological security, my interpretivist case study demonstrates why Russia, despite great risk and material costs, decided to militarily intervene and traces how Russian senses of ‘national Self’ were...... fundamentally reconstructed during intervention. I find that the anxiety arising from a future scenario of an already weak post-Soviet ‘Russian Self’ gradually being engulfed by a confident ‘Western Self’ played a significant role in Russia’s decision to occupy Slatina airbase. My analysis paradoxically shows...... how Russia’s material security decreased while its sense of ontological security increased. Thus, the intensified Russo-Western antagonism following intervention opened a ‘window of opportunity’ for Russian elite to reconstruct a more self-confident sense of ‘Russian Self’. The paper contributes...

  13. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes it possi......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  14. SAUL BELLOW’S QUEST HERO – HENDERSON THE RAIN KING

    OpenAIRE

    Venkataramana Balaga

    2014-01-01

    Endless striving for ‗human redemption‘ seems to be the underlying motif of Saul Bellow‘s novels, and most of his protagonists are in search of enhanced meaning in their life. Critics have called Henderson the Rain King a ―quest-romance‖ that takes the protagonist to Africa, a place that Bellow had not yet visited. This study makes an attempt of how the gigantic, blustering, crazed, and comic Henderson testifies to Bellow‘s remarkable creative diversity. Henderson itself is a t...

  15. Late-Pleistocene evolution of the continental shelf of central Israel, a case study from Hadera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtienberg, Gilad; Dix, Justin; Waldmann, Nicolas; Makovsky, Yizhaq; Golan, Arik; Sivan, Dorit

    2016-05-01

    Sea-level fluctuations are a dominant mechanism that control coastal environmental changes through time. This is especially the case for the successive regressions and transgressions over the last interglacial cycle, which have shaped the deposition, preservation and erosion patterns of unconsolidated sediments currently submerged on continental shelves. The current study focuses on creating an integrated marine and terrestrial geophysical and litho-stratigraphic framework of the coastal zone of Hadera, north-central Israel. This research presents a case study, investigating the changing sedimentological units in the study area. Analysis suggest these represent various coastal environments and were deposited during times of lower than present sea level and during the later stages of the Holocene transgression. A multi-disciplinary approach was applied by compiling existing elevation raster grids, bathymetric charts, one hundred lithological borehole data-sets, and a 110 km-long sub-bottom geophysical survey. Based on seismic stratigraphic analysis, observed geometries, and reflective appearances, six bounding surfaces and seven seismic units were identified and characterized. These seismic units have been correlated with the available borehole data to produce a chronologically constrained lithostratigraphy for the area. This approach allowed us to propose a relationship between the lithological units and sea-level change and thus enable the reconstruction of Hadera coastal evolution over the last 100 ka. This reconstruction suggests that the stratigraphy is dominated by lowstand aeolian and fluvial terrestrial environments, subsequently transgressed during the Holocene. The results of this study provide a valuable framework for future national strategic shallow-water infrastructure construction and also for the possible locations of past human settlements in relation to coastal evolution through time.

  16. The Quest for the Most Spherical Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Obreschkow, Danail; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Kobel, Philippe; de Bosset, Aurele; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    We describe a recently realized experiment producing the most spherical cavitation bubbles today. The bubbles grow inside a liquid from a point-plasma generated by a nanosecond laser pulse. Unlike in previous studies, the laser is focussed by a parabolic mirror, resulting in a plasma of unprecedented symmetry. The ensuing bubbles are sufficiently spherical that the hydrostatic pressure gradient caused by gravity becomes the dominant source of asymmetry in the collapse and rebound of the cavitation bubbles. To avoid this natural source of asymmetry, the whole experiment is therefore performed in microgravity conditions (ESA, 53rd and 56th parabolic flight campaign). Cavitation bubbles were observed in microgravity (~0g), where their collapse and rebound remain spherical, and in normal gravity (1g) to hyper-gravity (1.8g), where a gravity-driven jet appears. Here, we describe the experimental setup and technical results, and overview the science data. A selection of high-quality shadowgraphy movies and time-res...

  17. The T1-T2 study: evolution of aerosol properties downwind of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, J. C.; Barnard, J. C.; Arnott, W. P.; Cary, R.; Coulter, R.; Fast, J. D.; Kassianov, E. I.; Kleinman, L.; Laulainen, N. S.; Martin, T.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Pekour, M. S.; Shaw, W. J.; Smith, D. F.; Springston, S. R.; Yu, X.-Y.

    2007-03-01

    As part of a major atmospheric chemistry and aerosol field program carried out in March 2006, a study was conducted in the area to the north and northeast of Mexico City to investigate the evolution of aerosols and their associated optical properties in the first few hours after their emission. The focus of the T1-T2 aerosol study was to investigate changes in the specific absorption αABS (absorption per unit mass, with unit of m2 g-1) of black carbon as it aged and became coated with compounds such as sulfate and organic carbon, evolving from an external to an internal mixture. Such evolution has been reported in previous studies. The T1 site was located just to the north of the Mexico City metropolitan area; the T2 site was situated approximately 35 km farther to the northeast. Nephelometers, particle soot absorption photometers, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers, and organic and elemental carbon analyzers were used to measure the optical properties of the aerosols and the carbon concentrations at each of the sites. Radar wind profilers and radiosonde systems helped to characterize the meteorology and to identify periods when transport from Mexico City over T1 and T2 occurred. Organic and elemental carbon concentrations at T1 showed diurnal cycles reflecting the nocturnal and early morning buildup from nearby sources, while concentrations at T2 appeared to be more affected by transport from Mexico City. Specific absorption during transport periods was lower than during other times, consistent with the likelihood of fresher emissions being found when the winds blew from Mexico City over T1 and T2. The specific absorption at T2 was larger than at T1, which is also consistent with the expectation of more aged particles with encapsulated black carbon being found at the more distant location. In situ measurements of single scattering albedo with an aircraft and a ground station showed general agreement with column-averaged values derived from rotating shadowband

  18. Multidisciplinary studies of the diversity and evolution in river-weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    The moss-like river-weeds or Podostemaceae offer a special opportunity to study the diversity and evolution of plants that are adapted to extreme environments. This paper reviews multidisciplinary studies on this subject. Based on field work in the four continents, we discovered many species and several genera that are new components of biodiversity, and revealed the Podostemaceae floras of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia. The historical biogeography of the family, i.e., the change in distribution in space and time, is characterized by a few dispersals between continents, followed by diversification within each continent. Local species may be derived from parts of separated populations of parental species, which consequently are paraphyletic. The remarkable morphological adaptations of Podostemaceae include the development of the horizontal axis in plant body, with which the plants adhere to rock surfaces under violent current. The vertical axis is reduced or lost and the horizontal axis develops in the embryo and seedling. We also found saltational organ-level variation, such as presence or absence of shoot, shoot apical meristem, root, and root cap; the form of shoot and root; the mode of root branching and leaf production; and the number of cotyledons. Morphological evolution may not be always adaptive to the habitats, which are rocks periodically submerged across the distribution range. Analyses of shoot regulatory gene expression found that, in contrast to the expression pattern in primitive species with ordinary shoots, which is comparable with Arabidopsis, the unique pattern in derived species may result in 'fuzzy' morphology of the shoot and leaf. Finally, problems for future study are pointed out.

  19. Passing NASA's Planet Quest Baton from Kepler to TESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J.

    Kepler vaulted into the heavens on March 7, 2009, initiating NASAs search for Earth- size planets orbiting Sun-like stars in the habitable zone, where liquid water could exist on a rocky planetary surface. In the 4 years since Kepler began science operations, a flood of photometric data on upwards of 190,000 stars of unprecedented precision and continuity has provoked a watershed of 134+ confirmed or validated planets, 3200+ planetary candidates (most sub-Neptune in size and many compara- ble to or smaller than Earth), and a resounding revolution in asteroseismology and astrophysics. The most recent discoveries include Kepler-62 with 5 planets total of which 2 are in the habitable zone with radii of 1.4 and 1.7 Re. The focus of the mission is shifting towards how to rapidly vet the 18,000+ threshold crossing events produced with each transiting planet search, and towards those studies that will allow us to understand what the data are saying about the prevalence of planets in the solar neighborhood and throughout the galaxy. This talk will provide an overview of the science results from the Kepler Mission and the work ahead to derive the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars from the treasure trove of Kepler data. NASAs quest for exoplanets continues with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satel- lite (TESS) mission, slated for launch in May 2017 by NASAs Explorer Program. TESS will conduct an all-sky transit survey to identify the 1000 best small exoplanets in the solar neighborhood for follow up observations and characterization. TESSs targets will include all F, G, K dwarfs from +4 to +12 magnitude and all M dwarfs known within ˜200 light-years. 500,000 target stars will be observed over two years with ˜500 square degrees observed continuously for a year in each hemisphere in the James Webb Space Telescopes continuously viewable zones. Since the typical TESS target star is 5 magnitudes brighter than Kepler’s and 10 times

  20. Using the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor to Study Cluster Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Neal A.; O'Steen, Richard; Yen, Steffi; Kuntz, K. D.; Hammer, Derek

    2012-02-01

    We explore the application of XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) ultraviolet (UV) data to study galaxy evolution. Our sample is constructed as the intersection of all Abell clusters with z indicative of differences in star formation history. This is particularly true for UVW1 data, as the relative abundance of data collected using this filter and its depth make it an attractive choice. Available tools that use stellar synthesis libraries to fit the UV and optical photometric data may also be used, thereby better describing star formation history within the past billion years and providing estimates of total stellar mass that include contributions from young stars. Finally, color-color diagrams that include XMM-OM UV data appear useful to the photometric identification of both extragalactic and stellar sources.

  1. Nickel-aluminum diffusion: A study of evolution of microstructure and phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; Kjartansdóttir, Cecilía Kristín; Burrows, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Microstructural and phase evolution of an aluminum deposit on nickel, after heat treatment at 883 K, is studied by means of various microscopy techniques, i.e. energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, backscattered electron imaging, electron backscatter diffraction, ion channeling contrast imaging...... and scanning transmission electron microscopy. AlNi3 crystallites are observed on the aluminum grain boundaries after only 3 min of heat treatment indicating that nickel and nickel rich phases are the initially diffusing and forming species. Heat treatment for 120 min or longer results in the formation of Al3......Ni2 and a porous Al3Ni2/γ-Al2O3 structure at the surface. The Al3Ni2 layer is composed of two different grain morphologies, indicating the position of a Kirkendall plane, and hence, there is a high diffusion rate of aluminum in this phase....

  2. Study of the temperature evolution of defect agglomerates in neutron irradiated molybdenum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario. Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica. Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    Small angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature, differential thermal analysis, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in low rate neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum, at room temperature, for checking the evolution of the defects agglomerates in the temperature interval between room temperature and 1200 K. The onset of vacancies mobility was found to happen in temperatures within the stage III of recovery. At around 550 K, the agglomerates of vacancies achieve the largest size, as determined from the Guinier approximation for spherical particles. In addition, the decrease of the vacancy concentration together with the dissolution of the agglomerates at temperatures higher than around 920 K was observed, which produce the release of internal stresses in the structure.

  3. Study of Gutenberg-Richter coefficients considering time evolution for different mexican seismic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales Velazquez, Carlos; Angulo Brown, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we propose a division of the Mexican Pacific coast and we study the time evolution of the Gutenberg-Richter coefficients ("a" and "b" values) along the 2006-2016 period by means of the sliding time window method. We observed that the sequences of a and b values obtained, are positively correlated as it must be, because otherwise it would represent a seismic dynamics incompatible with a self-organized critical system "the earth crust". Furthermore, we analyze the variation of the modal value "a/b" showing be a better estimator of seismic activity that only a or b parameters. Finally, we perform size window variation analysis to keep constant the seismic energy released by N-events into the time window.

  4. Studies on one-dimensional polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures and the morphological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Qunhui [IPST at GT and School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0620 (United States)], E-mail: Qunhui.Sun@ipst.gatech.edu; Park, Myung-Chul; Deng Yulin [IPST at GT and School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0620 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    In this context, we studied the morphologies and morphology evolution of one-dimensional polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures during a wet chemical oxidation process via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis methods. The results showed that the one-dimensional nanostructures of PANI followed a nucleation, agglomeration or self-growing processes, sequentially. Two distinctive morphologies were observed. One was that cylindrical nanotubes derived, most probably, from the self growing of the as-formed bubble-like ribbons. Another one, in comparison, was rectangular nanotubing structures stemmed from, apparently, a self-guided agglomerating or aggregating process of the as-formed primary nanoparticles, as confirmed unambiguously by both SEM and TEM observations. While the diameters of either individual or hyperbranched PANI nanotubes having a smooth surface were in the range of 250-1500 nm, the size of the rectangular nanotubings was ca. 600 nm.

  5. A reliability study on tin based lead free micro joint including intermetallic and void evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyissa, Frezer Assefa

    In microelectronics soldering to Cu pad lead to formation of two intermetallic structures in the solder -pad interface. The growth of these layers is accompanied by microscopic voids that usually cause reliability concern in the industry. Therefore it is important to understand factors that contribute for the growth of IMC using various combination of reflow time, Sn thickness and aging temperature. Systematic study was conducted on Cu-Sn system to investigate the formation and growth of intermetallic compound (IMC) as well as voiding evolution for different solder thicknesses. The growth of the Cu6Sn5 IMC layer was found to be increasing as the Sn thicknesses increase after reflow while the Cu3Sn layer were decreasing under same conditions. Also after reflow and aging more voiding were shown to occur in the thin solder than thicker one.

  6. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L H; Lou, H B; Wang, X D; Debela, T T; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Wang, S Y; Wang, C Z; Jiang, J Z

    2014-04-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al2Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al2Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of < 0,4,4,0 >, < 0,3, 6,0 > and < 0,4,4,2 > with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF2-type Al2Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al2Au alloy. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. STUDY ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE HOP MARKET IN ROMANIA DURING THE PERIOD 2007-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina - Adriana CHIURCIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the evolution of hop market during the period 2007-2014 in Romania. It is based on the statistical data provided by the National Institute of Statistics and by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The indicators used for processing the data are the following: the total production, the cultivated areas of hop and the quantity of hop imported and exported. From the analysis of the results obtained we can observe a decrease of 69.51% in 2012 from the total production in comparison with 2007. In the last years of the period in study, from 2012 to 2014, it increased by 104.4%. However the inland production is insufficient for the local beer industry. Romania has to import vast amounts of hops to ensure the brewers requirements across the country.

  8. Tracking genomic cancer evolution for precision medicine: the lung TRACERx study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Jamal-Hanjani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of intratumour genetic and functional heterogeneity is increasingly recognised as a driver of cancer progression and survival outcome. Understanding how tumour clonal heterogeneity impacts upon therapeutic outcome, however, is still an area of unmet clinical and scientific need. TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy [Rx], a prospective study of patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, aims to define the evolutionary trajectories of lung cancer in both space and time through multiregion and longitudinal tumour sampling and genetic analysis. By following cancers from diagnosis to relapse, tracking the evolutionary trajectories of tumours in relation to therapeutic interventions, and determining the impact of clonal heterogeneity on clinical outcomes, TRACERx may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for NSCLC and may also serve as a model applicable to other cancer types.

  9. Study Regarding the Evolution with Age of Ultrasound Prostate Dimensions in German Shepherd Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Korodi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution with age of the prostatic dimensions in German shepherd dogs. For the veterinarians, these results could help to recognize more easily a pathological state of the German shepherd dog’s prostate, only by an ultrasound examination. After examining 22 German shepherd dogs, for dogs of 2 to 5 years old, we obtained a mean prostatic volume of 16.239 cmc, for dogs between 6 and 10 years old the mean prostatic volume was 37.712 cmc and for dogs older than 10 years, the mean prostatic volume was 40.327 cmc. In conclusion, regarding the results, it can be affirmed that in German shepherd dogs, prostate dimensions are increasing with age.

  10. Study of Modern Human Evolution via Comparative Analysis with the Neanderthal Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Musaddeque

    2013-01-01

    Many other human species appeared in evolution in the last 6 million years that have not been able to survive to modern times and are broadly known as archaic humans, as opposed to the extant modern humans. It has always been considered fascinating to compare the modern human genome with that of archaic humans to identify modern human-specific sequence variants and figure out those that made modern humans different from their predecessors or cousin species. Neanderthals are the latest humans to become extinct, and many factors made them the best representatives of archaic humans. Even though a number of comparisons have been made sporadically between Neanderthals and modern humans, mostly following a candidate gene approach, the major breakthrough took place with the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome. The initial genome-wide comparison, based on the first draft of the Neanderthal genome, has generated some interesting inferences regarding variations in functional elements that are not shared by the two species and the debated admixture question. However, there are certain other genetic elements that were not included or included at a smaller scale in those studies, and they should be compared comprehensively to better understand the molecular make-up of modern humans and their phenotypic characteristics. Besides briefly discussing the important outcomes of the comparative analyses made so far between modern humans and Neanderthals, we propose that future comparative studies may include retrotransposons, pseudogenes, and conserved non-coding regions, all of which might have played significant roles during the evolution of modern humans. PMID:24465235

  11. Study of Modern Human Evolution via Comparative Analysis with the Neanderthal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaddeque Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many other human species appeared in evolution in the last 6 million years that have not been able to survive to modern times and are broadly known as archaic humans, as opposed to the extant modern humans. It has always been considered fascinating to compare the modern human genome with that of archaic humans to identify modern human-specific sequence variants and figure out those that made modern humans different from their predecessors or cousin species. Neanderthals are the latest humans to become extinct, and many factors made them the best representatives of archaic humans. Even though a number of comparisons have been made sporadically between Neanderthals and modern humans, mostly following a candidate gene approach, the major breakthrough took place with the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome. The initial genome-wide comparison, based on the first draft of the Neanderthal genome, has generated some interesting inferences regarding variations in functional elements that are not shared by the two species and the debated admixture question. However, there are certain other genetic elements that were not included or included at a smaller scale in those studies, and they should be compared comprehensively to better understand the molecular make-up of modern humans and their phenotypic characteristics. Besides briefly discussing the important outcomes of the comparative analyses made so far between modern humans and Neanderthals, we propose that future comparative studies may include retrotransposons, pseudogenes, and conserved non-coding regions, all of which might have played significant roles during the evolution of modern humans.

  12. Study on Controlling Factors of Formation and Evolution of Earth Forest in Yuanmou Area, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Penghui; Zhang, Shitao

    2017-12-01

    Earth forest is a kind of unique landscape. The earth forest whose formation, development and evolution is affected by many factors. This paper deeply analyses the causes and characteristics of the formation and evolution of earth forest from four aspect of tectonic movement, composition and structure, climate and human activities.

  13. The evolution of dwarf shrubs in alpine environments: a case study of Alchemilla in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Berit; Kandziora, Martha; Pirie, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Alpine and arctic environments worldwide, including high mountains, are dominated by short-stature woody plants (dwarf shrubs). This conspicuous life form asserts considerable influence on local environmental conditions above the treeline, creating its own microhabitat. This study reconstructs the evolution of dwarf shrubs in Alchemilla in the African tropical alpine environment, where they represent one of the largest clades and are among the most common and abundant plants. Different phylogenetic inference methods were used with plastid and nuclear DNA sequence markers, molecular dating (BEAST and RelTime), analyses of diversification rate shifts (MEDUSA and BAMM) and ancestral character and area reconstructions (Mesquite). It is inferred that African Alchemilla species originated following long-distance dispersal to tropical East Africa, but that the evolution of dwarf shrubs occurred in Ethiopia and in tropical East Africa independently. Establishing a timeframe is challenging given inconsistencies in age estimates, but it seems likely that they originated in the Pleistocene, or at the earliest in the late Miocene. The adaptation to alpine-like environments in the form of dwarf shrubs has apparently not led to enhanced diversification rates. Ancestral reconstructions indicate reversals in Alchemilla from plants with a woody base to entirely herbaceous forms, a transition that is rarely reported in angiosperms. Alchemilla is a clear example of in situ tropical alpine speciation. The dwarf shrub life form typical of African Alchemilla has evolved twice independently, further indicating its selective advantage in these harsh environments. However, it has not influenced diversification, which, although recent, was not rapid. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The evolution of dwarf shrubs in alpine environments: a case study of Alchemilla in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Berit; Kandziora, Martha; Pirie, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Alpine and arctic environments worldwide, including high mountains, are dominated by short-stature woody plants (dwarf shrubs). This conspicuous life form asserts considerable influence on local environmental conditions above the treeline, creating its own microhabitat. This study reconstructs the evolution of dwarf shrubs in Alchemilla in the African tropical alpine environment, where they represent one of the largest clades and are among the most common and abundant plants. Methods Different phylogenetic inference methods were used with plastid and nuclear DNA sequence markers, molecular dating (BEAST and RelTime), analyses of diversification rate shifts (MEDUSA and BAMM) and ancestral character and area reconstructions (Mesquite). Key Results It is inferred that African Alchemilla species originated following long-distance dispersal to tropical East Africa, but that the evolution of dwarf shrubs occurred in Ethiopia and in tropical East Africa independently. Establishing a timeframe is challenging given inconsistencies in age estimates, but it seems likely that they originated in the Pleistocene, or at the earliest in the late Miocene. The adaptation to alpine-like environments in the form of dwarf shrubs has apparently not led to enhanced diversification rates. Ancestral reconstructions indicate reversals in Alchemilla from plants with a woody base to entirely herbaceous forms, a transition that is rarely reported in angiosperms. Conclusions Alchemilla is a clear example of in situ tropical alpine speciation. The dwarf shrub life form typical of African Alchemilla has evolved twice independently, further indicating its selective advantage in these harsh environments. However, it has not influenced diversification, which, although recent, was not rapid. PMID:26520565

  15. Smog chamber study on the evolution of fume from residential coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Domestic coal stoves are widely used in countryside and greenbelt residents in China for heating and cooking, and emit considerable pollutants to the atmosphere because of no treatment of their exhaust, which can result in deteriorating local air quality. In this study, a dynamic smog chamber was used to investigate the real-time emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants during the combustion process and a static smog chamber was used to investigate the fume evolution under simulate light irradiation. The real-time emissions revealed that the total hydrocarbon (THC) and CO increased sharply after ignition, and then quickly decreased, indicating volatilization of hydrocarbons with low molecular weight and incomplete combustion at the beginning stage of combustion made great contribution to these pollutants. There was evident shoulder peak around 10 min combustion for both THC and CO, revealing the emissions from vitrinite combustion. Additionally, another broad emission peak of CO after 30 min was also observed, which was ascribed to the incomplete combustion of the inertinite. Compared with THC and CO, there was only one emission peak for NOx, SO2 and particular matters at the beginning stage of combustion. The fume evolution with static chamber simulation indicated that evident consumption of SO2 and NOx as well as new particle formation were observed. The consumption rates for SO2 and NOx were about 3.44% hr(-1) and 3.68% hr(-1), the new particle formation of nuclei particles grew at a rate of 16.03 nm/hr during the first reaction hour, and the increase of the diameter of accumulation mode particles was evident. The addition of isoprene to the diluted mixture of the fume could promote 03 and secondary particle formation.

  16. Insights from the past: incorporating long-term landscape evolution in studies of land degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Vazquez, Cruz; Lang, Carol; Kabora, Tabitha; Thornton-Barnett, Senna; Richer, Suzi; Gallello, Gianni; Stump, Daryl

    2017-04-01

    Modern approaches for assessing land degradation encompass multidisciplinary studies that have allowed a more realistic understanding of the causes and consequences of land degradation. This incipient perspective includes an increasingly important role of the studies of the past, including human history, to understand modern ecosystems and landscapes. Indeed, the current promotion of indigenous resource-use strategies as models of sustainable development was initially prompted by historical studies. However, systematic studies on whether or not indigenous management practices led to land degradation, and therefore their benefits or constraints for sustained use of natural resources, are not truly known. We argue that a joint approach combining the characterization of current soil properties with the archaeological study of traditional agricultural systems can provide insights on their sustainability. Archaeological excavation enables discerning the order in which sediments are deposited and the sequence in which structures are built. This provides data on coincident cultural and ecological change, and a long-term perspective on how agro-ecological systems operated in pre-modern states and the ways in which they resemble or differ from modern contexts. Simultaneously, these changes would have left a physical, chemical and isotopic imprint in soils that can be detected and interpreted to contribute to the production of a "usable past" (Stump, 2013). The premise is: since ancient agricultural sites may provide information on agronomic conditions after centuries to millennia of use, they can help in understanding the ways in which agroecosystems have survived, failed or adapted in the past. This will contribute to a better holistic understanding of social-ecological systems evolution by including a temporal perspective, and to a more nuanced assessment of land degradation and sustainable use. To illustrate this we present the outcome of our research at two traditional

  17. CosmoQuest: Better Citizen Science Through Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P. L.; Lehan, C.; Bracey, G.; Yamani, A.; Francis, M.; Durrell, P.; Spivey, C.; Noel-Storr, J.; Buxner, S.; Cobb, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In the modern era, NASA SMD missions and facilities are producing data at a rate too great for the science community to maximally utilize. While software can help, what is really needed is additional eyes, hands, and minds - help we can find in the form of citizen scientist volunteers. The CosmoQuest virtual research facility has demonstrated through published research results that classroom students and the public can, with proper training and support from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), fill roles more traditionally filled by university students. The research question behind CosmoQuest's creation was simple: if students and the public are provided a properly scaffolded experience that mirrors that of researchers, will they come and perform as well as our students? and can they rise up to be research collaborators? In creating CosmoQuest, we started with a core of citizen science portals, educational materials for both students and life-long learners, and collaboration areas. These three primary focuses mirror the research, courses, and collaboration spaces that form the foundation of a university department. We then went on to add the features that make a center stand out - we added seminars in the form of Google Hangouts on Air, planetarium content through our Science on the Half Sphere program, and even the chance to vicariously attend conferences through live blogging by our team members. With this design for a virtual research facility, the answer to our foundational question has been a resounding yes; the public can aid us in doing science provided they are properly trained. To meet the needs of our population we have developed four areas of engagement: research, education, media, and community.

  18. Supporting Student-Teacher Researchers’ Quest for Their Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Castillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with teacher identity development of students enrolled in the teacher training program. The authors, who advocate inquiry-based teaching practices, propose reflective and organizational strategies to support these. In order to gain insights into the experiences and values of student-teacher-researchers (STRs here on to shape a professional teaching identity, a pre-service teacher and a professor in a second language (L2 program joined efforts to share their reflections on the process of inquiry and on the quest to find a voice when conducting and reporting their inquiry.

  19. QuEST: Qualifying Environmentally Sustainable Technologies, Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2010-01-01

    This edition of the QuEST newsletter contains brief articles that discuss the NASA Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) program, and the importance of collaboration, efforts in materials management and substitution for coatings for launch structures, Low volatile organic compound (VOC) Coatings Field Testing, Non-Chrome Coating Systems, Life Cycle Corrosion Testing, Lead-Free Electronics Testing and Corn Based Depainting and efforts in Pollution Control in the area of Hypergolic Propellant Destruction Evaluation, efforts in development of alternative energy in particular Hydrogen Sensors, Energy and Water Management, and efforts in remediation in the removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) contamination

  20. End of story? Quest, narrative and enactment in computer games

    OpenAIRE

    Løvlie, Anders Sundnes

    2005-01-01

    In a recently published article (1) Espen Aarseth claims that all those computer games that have been described as ‘narrative games’ could better be described as ‘quest games’. Unless a valid counter-example can be found, he suggests that the long and heated debate between ludologists and narratologists about wether or not games are narratives has been settled in favour of the ludologists. My claim is that the computer game "Max Payne" (2) is the counter-example Aarseth is asking for. One cen...

  1. Combining an Evolution-guided Clustering Algorithm and Haplotype-based LRT in Family Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Su-Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the international HapMap project, many studies have been conducted to investigate the association between complex diseases and haplotype variants. Such haplotype-based association studies, however, often face two difficulties; one is the large number of haplotype configurations in the chromosome region under study, and the other is the ambiguity in haplotype phase when only genotype data are observed. The latter complexity may be handled based on an EM algorithm with family data incorporated, whereas the former can be more problematic, especially when haplotypes of rare frequencies are involved. Here based on family data we propose to cluster long haplotypes of linked SNPs in a biological sense, so that the number of haplotypes can be reduced and the power of statistical tests of association can be increased. Results In this paper we employ family genotype data and combine a clustering scheme with a likelihood ratio statistic to test the association between quantitative phenotypes and haplotype variants. Haplotypes are first grouped based on their evolutionary closeness to establish a set containing core haplotypes. Then, we construct for each family the transmission and non-transmission phase in terms of these core haplotypes, taking into account simultaneously the phase ambiguity as weights. The likelihood ratio test (LRT is next conducted with these weighted and clustered haplotypes to test for association with disease. This combination of evolution-guided haplotype clustering and weighted assignment in LRT is able, via its core-coding system, to incorporate into analysis both haplotype phase ambiguity and transmission uncertainty. Simulation studies show that this proposed procedure is more informative and powerful than three family-based association tests, FAMHAP, FBAT, and an LRT with a group consisting exclusively of rare haplotypes. Conclusions The proposed procedure takes into account the

  2. Combining an evolution-guided clustering algorithm and haplotype-based LRT in family association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hsien; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Huang, Su-Yun; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate

    2011-05-19

    With the completion of the international HapMap project, many studies have been conducted to investigate the association between complex diseases and haplotype variants. Such haplotype-based association studies, however, often face two difficulties; one is the large number of haplotype configurations in the chromosome region under study, and the other is the ambiguity in haplotype phase when only genotype data are observed. The latter complexity may be handled based on an EM algorithm with family data incorporated, whereas the former can be more problematic, especially when haplotypes of rare frequencies are involved. Here based on family data we propose to cluster long haplotypes of linked SNPs in a biological sense, so that the number of haplotypes can be reduced and the power of statistical tests of association can be increased. In this paper we employ family genotype data and combine a clustering scheme with a likelihood ratio statistic to test the association between quantitative phenotypes and haplotype variants. Haplotypes are first grouped based on their evolutionary closeness to establish a set containing core haplotypes. Then, we construct for each family the transmission and non-transmission phase in terms of these core haplotypes, taking into account simultaneously the phase ambiguity as weights. The likelihood ratio test (LRT) is next conducted with these weighted and clustered haplotypes to test for association with disease. This combination of evolution-guided haplotype clustering and weighted assignment in LRT is able, via its core-coding system, to incorporate into analysis both haplotype phase ambiguity and transmission uncertainty. Simulation studies show that this proposed procedure is more informative and powerful than three family-based association tests, FAMHAP, FBAT, and an LRT with a group consisting exclusively of rare haplotypes. The proposed procedure takes into account the uncertainty in phase determination and in transmission, utilizes

  3. Soil evolution in spruce forest ecosystems: role and influence of humus studied by morphological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chersich S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the role and the mutual influences of humus and soil in alpine spruce forest ecosystems we studied and classified 7 soil - humic profiles on the 4 main forestry dynamics: open canopy, regeneration, young stand, tree stage. We studied the role of humification process in the pedologic process involving soils and vegetations studing humic and soil horizons. Study sites are located at an altitude of 1740 m a.s.l near Pellizzano (TN, and facing to the North. The parent soil material is predominantly composed of morenic sediments, probably from Cevedale glacier lying on a substrate of tonalite from Presanella (Adamello Tertiary pluton. The soil temperature regime is frigid, while the moisture regime is udic. The characteristics observed in field were correlated with classical chemical and physical soil analyses (MIPAF 2000. In order to discriminate the dominant soil forming process, the soils were described and classified in each site according to the World Reference Base (FAO-ISRIC-ISSS 1998. Humus was described and classified using the morphological-genetic approach (Jabiol et al. 1995. The main humus forms are acid and they are for the greater part Dysmoder on PODZOLS. The main pedogenetic processes is the podzolization, locally there are also hydromorphic processes. We associate a definite humus form with a pedological process at a particular step of the forest evolution. We concluded thath the soil study for a correct pedological interpretation must take count of the characteristics of the humic epipedon.

  4. Clinical features and evolution of oral cancer: A study of 274 cases in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandizzi, Daniel; Gandolfo, Mariana; Velazco, María Lucia; Cabrini, Rómulo Luis; Lanfranchi, Hector Eduardo

    2008-09-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma has a low survival rate, 34 to 66% five-year survival after initial diagnosis, due to late diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical features and evolution of oral cancer in the University of Buenos Aires. 274 patients with primary oral carcinoma, over the 1992-2000 period were included in the study. The survival rate of this population was 80% at 12 months, 60% at 24 months, 46% at 36 months, 40% at 48 months, and 39% at 60 months (5 years). The tumor localizations with worse prognosis were floor of mouth and tongue, with survival rates of 19% and 27% respectively. Sixty-five percent of the oral carcinomas evaluated were diagnosed at advanced stages (III and IV). The patients under study exhibited the lowest survival rate described for oral cancer (34% five-year survival after initial diagnosis). The population included in this study can be considered representative of the Argentine population. This bad prognosis would be mainly due to the large number of oral cancer cases that were diagnosed at advanced stages.

  5. The Evolutions of Interest and Beliefs about Arabic as a Foreign Language: A Case Study on Three Western Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Hazem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to investigate the evolutions of interest and beliefs about Arabic as a foreign language among three Western faculty members at an education college in United Arab Emirates. The study used four data resources which were: interviews, field notes, reflective journals and an information form. After four months of…

  6. Tendencies of Comprehension and Acceptance of Theory of Evolution: A Study Involving Students from the Faculties of Education and Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Kadir; Ercan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify the views of students from the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Theology from the University of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam regarding their comprehension and acceptance of the theory of evolution. A survey model was used involving a quantitative research design. The working group of the study was composed of…

  7. Measuring child exposure to violence and mental health reactions in epidemiological studies: challenges and current issues Criança, violência e saúde: desafios e questões atuais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Seixas Duarte

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines challenges and current issues involved in measuring exposure to different types of violence which are associated mental health problems in children and adolescents. Standardized measures suitable for epidemiological studies, selected based on their relevance in the current literature, are briefly described and commented. The assessment of child's exposure to violence may focus on a specific event (e.g., kidnapping, a specific context (e.g., war or even of a certain type of exposure (e.g., intrafamilial physical violence. The assessment of child mental health after exposure to violence has traditionally focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD - most frequently measured through non-diagnostic scales. However, other mental health reactions may be present and screening as well as diagnostic instruments which may be used to assess these reactions are also described. Two issues of emerging importance - the assessment of impairment and of traumatic grief in children - are also presented. Availability of culturally appropriate instruments is a crucial step towards proper identification of child mental health problems after exposure to violence.Este artigo examina os desafios e perspectivas atuais envolvidos na mensuração da exposição a diferentes tipos de violência e problemas de saúde mental em crianças e adolescentes. Instrumentos padronizados apropriados para estudos epidemiológicos, selecionados com base em sua relevância na literatura, são brevemente descritos e comentados. A avaliação de exposição à violência em crianças pode dizer respeito a um evento específico (como sequestro ou um contexto específico (como guerra ou mesmo um determinado tipo de exposição (como violência física intrafamiliar. A avaliação da saúde mental infantil após a exposição à violência tradicionalmente concentrou-se na avaliação do transtorno de estresse pós-traumático (TEPT - freqüentemente avaliado atrav

  8. The Quest for Success and Power in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Novel The Beautiful and Damned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Eddin Sadeq

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating the concepts of success and power, as depicted by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Beautiful and Damned (2009. Cultural change motivates individuals to work harder to achieve success, which in turn makes them influential. The study reveals that the concepts of success and power are controversial, as their means vary from one theorist to another.  Waldo Emerson, for example, believes that success is connected to happiness.  He, therefore, lists down features that characterize successful people. To succeed, one must learn to follow their desires, an argument that is expounded by the ideology of the American Dream.  Friedrich Nietzsche, however, explains that individuals are motivated to lead due to the fact that power brings about the superman. To achieve the status of the superman, Nietzsche believes that individuals develop the will to power and are able to influence others (Nietzsche, 1968. Fitzgerald, on the other hand, makes it clear that power leads to liberty. The novel provides a deep analysis of the quest for power and success. The main characters are Gloria, Joseph, and Anthony who helps to demonstrate the quest for success and power. Richard Caramel is also a character whose role explains the pursuit of true happiness. He is depicted as powerful because he influences the society through his writings. He has a strong determination to be a writer, which motivates him to work hard and to seek further success.

  9. Two-Dimensional Depth-Averaged Beach Evolution Modeling: Case Study of the Kizilirmak River Mouth, Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baykal, Cüneyt; Ergin, Ayşen; Güler, Işikhan

    2014-01-01

    transformation model, a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical waveinduced circulation model, a sediment transport model, and a bottom evolution model. To validate and verify the numerical model, it is applied to several cases of laboratory experiments. Later, the model is applied to a shoreline change problem......This study presents an application of a two-dimensional beach evolution model to a shoreline change problem at the Kizilirmak River mouth, which has been facing severe coastal erosion problems for more than 20 years. The shoreline changes at the Kizilirmak River mouth have been thus far...... investigated by satellite images, physical model tests, and one-dimensional numerical models. The current study uses a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical beach evolution model, developed based on existing methodologies. This model is mainly composed of four main submodels: a phase-averaged spectral wave...

  10. A questão do método na psicologia

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan,Reinaldo

    2008-01-01

    Do ponto de vista da experiência do pensamento, nossa intenção é discutir a questão do método em psicologia e mostrar que não há independência entre método, questão e teoria. Em rigor, há questões metodológicas no enfrentamento do conhecimento da realidade.

  11. Accepting evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Plagányi, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Poor public perceptions and understanding of evolution are not unique to the developed and more industrialized nations of the world. International resistance to the science of evolutionary biology appears to be driven by both proponents of intelligent design and perceived incompatibilities between evolution and a diversity of religious faiths. We assessed the success of a first-year evolution course at the University of Cape Town and discovered no statistically significant change in the views of students before the evolution course and thereafter, for questions that challenged religious ideologies about creation, biodiversity, and intelligent design. Given that students only appreciably changed their views when presented with "facts," we suggest that teaching approaches that focus on providing examples of experimental evolutionary studies, and a strong emphasis on the scientific method of inquiry, are likely to achieve greater success. This study also reiterates the importance of engaging with students' prior conceptions, and makes suggestions for improving an understanding and appreciation of evolutionary biology in countries such as South Africa with an inadequate secondary science education system, and a dire lack of public engagement with issues in science.

  12. Studying Star and Planet Formation with the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) is a far- infrared/submillimeter (40-640 micrometers) spaceborne interferometry concept, studied through the NASA Vision Missions program. SPECS is envisioned as a 1-km baseline Michelson interferometer with two 4- meter collecting mirrors. To maximize science return, SPECS will have three operational modes: a photometric imaging mode, an intermediate spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 1000-3000), and a high spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 5)). The first two of these modes will provide information on all sources within a 1 arcminute field-of-view (FOV), while the the third will include sources in a small (approximately equal to 5 arcsec) FOV. With this design, SPECS will have angular resolution comparable to the Hubble Space Telescope (50 mas) and sensitivity more than two orders of magnitude better than Spitzer (5sigma in 10ks of approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 7) Jy Hz). We present here some of the results of the recently-completed Vision Mission Study for SPECS, and discuss the application of this mission to future studies of star and planet formation.

  13. Cyclic Experimental Studies on Damage Evolution Behaviors of Shale Dependent on Structural Orientations and Confining Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage process of shale is of great importance when considering the wellbore stability and reservoir stimulation during the work of shale gas recovery. As shale has typical transversely isotropic structures and may be under different stress states in the reservoir, the damage process should be studied while considering both loading directions and confining pressures. A series of cyclic uniaxial and tri-axial compressive tests have been carried out on the shale samples with different oriented weak planes and confining pressures. The dissipated strain energy and its ratio to the releasable elastic strain energy have been studied comparing with the fracturing patterns of the samples. Based on the strain energy dissipation, damage variable is defined and the damage evolution equation is built to describe the damage process of shale samples dependent on loading directions and confining pressures. The damage equation shows that the damage of the shale samples increases as a power function of the axial stress. Under higher confining pressures, the damage is limited in the early loading stage, while it increases significantly with the formation of macro shear fractures when the peak strength is approaching. The change of increasing rate is weak for the shale samples (β = 60° as the main failure pattern is slip along the weak planes. This study is helpful for understanding the damage process and failure of wellbore, as well as the stimulation effect of the shale gas reservoir.

  14. Nonlinear effects in evolution - an ab initio study: A model in which the classical theory of evolution occurs as a special case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Daryl G

    2016-07-21

    An ab initio approach was used to study the molecular-level interactions that connect gene-mutation to changes in an organism׳s phenotype. The study provides new insights into the evolutionary process and presents a simplification whereby changes in phenotypic properties may be studied in terms of the binding affinities of the chemical interactions affected by mutation, rather than by correlation to the genes. The study also reports the role that nonlinear effects play in the progression of organs, and how those effects relate to the classical theory of evolution. Results indicate that the classical theory of evolution occurs as a special case within the ab initio model - a case having two attributes. The first attribute: proteins and promoter regions are not shared among organs. The second attribute: continuous limiting behavior exists in the physical properties of organs as well as in the binding affinity of the associated chemical interactions, with respect to displacements in the chemical properties of proteins and promoter regions induced by mutation. Outside of the special case, second-order coupling contributions are significant and nonlinear effects play an important role, a result corroborated by analyses of published activity levels in binding and transactivation assays. Further, gradations in the state of perfection of an organ may be small or large depending on the type of mutation, and not necessarily closely-separated as maintained by the classical theory. Results also indicate that organs progress with varying degrees of interdependence, the likelihood of successful mutation decreases with increasing complexity of the affected chemical system, and differences between the ab initio model and the classical theory increase with increasing complexity of the organism. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL STUDIES: THE QUEST FOR NEW IDEAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Kononenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the principles of researching into text from the interdisciplinary linguistic and cultural perspective. Cognitological analysis of linguistic and extralinguistic cultural meanings reveals that there exist of specific linguistic and aesthetic formations best presented through the ‘language – culture – identity’ triad. One of the components of literary discourse is monocultural layer, which secures the continuity of national cultural tradition; researching into it, one should take into account mental and historical, psycholinguistic, sociolinguistic and other factors. Linguistic and aesthetic analysis helps to establish the system of linguistic and cultural means (metaphorization, imagery, verbal symbols, linguistic conceptualization, connotative meanings, which reveals its potential in literary texts. The lingual identity as a general notional category shows its nationally-oriented characteristics through the dichotomies of ‘addresser-addressee’ , ‘author-reader’, ‘narrator-narratee’ and is presented in the author’s idiolect.

  16. Quest for Recognition and Freedom: An Archetypal Study of Helon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oil on Water is Helon Habilla's third novel, published in 2010. It has, like his other works, attracted a handful of attention ranging from reviews, commentaries to critical essays. Much of this attention is sociologically and eco-critically oriented, in terms of the truth of environmental degradation in the Niger Delta region of ...

  17. Go on a particle quest at the first CERN webfest

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrew Purcell

    2012-01-01

    From 3 to 5 August, CERN played host to its very first webfest. Organised by the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) and the Peer 2 Peer University, the 2012 CERN Webfest saw pizza-fuelled summer students hacking their way almost non-stop through an entire weekend to produce a host of weird and wonderful innovations. As each of the teams raced against time in the hope of winning the grand prize of a trip to the Mozilla festival in London, sleep was hard for the students to come by, but fortunately great ideas were not.   Particle quest sprites. Source: André-Pierre Olivier. Projects dreamt up by the students included a browser-based dashboard for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a new CERN open-data initiative, and a virtual world for the LHC@home platform.  However, the highlight of the event was the ParticleQuest game, which was selected by a panel of judges as the weekend’s overal...

  18. The Quest for Ethnic Reclassification in Multiculturalist Taiwan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the large-scale ethnic resurgence, as observed in the quest for ethnic reclassification in Taiwan today, is not simply the result of deep-seated feelings of primordial attachment of people in a post-colonial society. As it has been described in the case of Brazil, the pheno......This paper argues that the large-scale ethnic resurgence, as observed in the quest for ethnic reclassification in Taiwan today, is not simply the result of deep-seated feelings of primordial attachment of people in a post-colonial society. As it has been described in the case of Brazil...... leverage. Another related reason is the strong elitist influence in the movements seeking ethnic reclassification. Focussing on the example of the Sakizaya, who were recognized as Taiwan’s 13th aboriginal group in 2007, I describe how the process of campaigning was dominated by elites who had a thorough...... understanding of national and international requirements and frameworks. Their visions and ensuing cultural constructions, however, did not always reflect the perspectives of the common people and therefore served as another affirmation of the “elites without people” phenomenon observed in earlier activities...

  19. CosmoQuest: Measuring Audience Needs to Obtain Better Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Bakerman, Maya; Gay, Pamela; Reiheld, Alison; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility provides a place for scientists to recruit people to aid in their science projects via citizen science. Just as students need training to be effective researchers, so do citizen scientists, but their needs are different. In this presentation, we present the results of surveys of members of the CosmoQuest community, including both citizen scientists and educators using citizen science in their classrooms. For all members of the community, we investigated the types of projects that respondents enjoyed doing, the level of difficulty they were willing to engage in, and the amount of time they spent doing citizen science projects. We also investigated what other science-related activities respondents were engaged in, other opportunities they were interested in, and what support and resources they needed to be successful in completing projects. For educators, we investigated the types of projects they wanted to engage in with their students, the ideal length of time for citizen science projects to be used in their classrooms, and the resources they needed to be able to engage students in citizen science projects effectively.

  20. O desenvolvimento regional brasileiro ainda em questão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Carleial

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo argumenta que a questão regional brasileira, instalada nos anos sessenta do século passado e, com igual período, de políticas de desenvolvimento regional não conseguiu reduzir de forma importante as desigualdades regionais, e só fortalece o padrão de divisão inter-regional definido na metade do século XX. O agravante é que a questão regional está fora das pautas política, econômica empresarial e acadêmica brasileiras. No presente ensaio, considera-se , no entanto, que o conjunto de investimentos em infraestrutura e em setores estratégicos da indústria fora do eixo Rio-São Paulo, poderiam conduzir a um adensamento das estruturas produtivas das regiões mais empobrecidas e permitir uma nova dinâmica regional que altere o atual padrão de divisão inter-regional do trabalho no Brasil. É surpreendente que não conseguimos “engatar” as regiões mais empobrecidas na dinâmica nacional apoiada pelo BNDES.

  1. A questão do autor em Bakhtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampa Olga Arán

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gostaria de refletir sobre a questão do autor em Bakhtin, objeto de numerosas abordagens ao longo de sua obra: como personagem, como ideólogo da arquitetônica, como voz mascarada, como ouvido polifônico, como interlocutor no diálogo cronotópico. Proponho percorrer essas posições a partir do vínculo entre a história intelectual do autor pensador Bakhtin e sua noção teórica de autor (autoria, a qual, embora vá adquirindo diferentes modulações, trata sempre da questão do sujeito, seu modo de existência e de consciência, da produção de diferentes formas de conhecimento de si mesmo e do mundo através de relações intersubjetivas. Com Bakhtin assistimos a um processo de transformação do sujeito civilizatório da Modernidade e sua substituição por um sujeito moral do discurso. Finalizo com uma breve comparação com o texto de Barthes sobre a morte do autor.

  2. SeaQuest/E906 Shift Alarm System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Noah

    2014-09-01

    SeaQuest, Fermilab E906, is a fixed target experiment that measures the Drell-Yan cross-section ratio of proton-proton to proton-deuterium collisions in order to extract the sea anti-quark structure of the proton. SeaQuest will extend the measurements made by E866/NuSea with greater precision at higher Bjorken-x. The continuously running experiment is always being monitored. Those on shift must keep track of all of the detector readouts in order to make sure the experiment is running correctly. As an experiment that is still in its early stages of running, an alarm system for people on shift is being created to provide warnings, such as a plot showing a detector's performance is sufficiently different to need attention. This plan involves python scripts that track live data. When the data shows a problem within the experiment, a corresponding alarm ID is sent to the MySQL database which then sets off an alarm. These alarms, which will alert the person on shift through both an audible and visual response, are important for ensuring that issues do not go unnoticed, and to help make sure the experiment is recording good data.

  3. The Quest for Ethnic Reclassification in Multiculturalist Taiwan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the large-scale ethnic resurgence, as observed in the quest for ethnic reclassification in Taiwan today, is not simply the result of deep-seated feelings of primordial attachment of people in a post-colonial society. As it has been described in the case of Brazil, the pheno......This paper argues that the large-scale ethnic resurgence, as observed in the quest for ethnic reclassification in Taiwan today, is not simply the result of deep-seated feelings of primordial attachment of people in a post-colonial society. As it has been described in the case of Brazil......, the phenomenon seems also to be supported by a national and international context that valorises indigenous identities as a means of reasserting political and territorial claims. As we have seen from various undertakings of the aboriginal and Pingpu movements, members often try to use the UN for political...... understanding of national and international requirements and frameworks. Their visions and ensuing cultural constructions, however, did not always reflect the perspectives of the common people and therefore served as another affirmation of the “elites without people” phenomenon observed in earlier activities...

  4. CosmoQuest Transient Tracker: Opensource Photometry & Astrometry software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Joseph L.; Lehan, Cory; Gay, Pamela; Richardson, Matthew; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    CosmoQuest is moving from online citizen science, to observational astronomy with the creation of Transient Trackers. This open source software is designed to identify asteroids and other transient/variable objects in image sets. Transient Tracker’s features in final form will include: astrometric and photometric solutions, identification of moving/transient objects, identification of variable objects, and lightcurve analysis. In this poster we present our initial, v0.1 release and seek community input.This software builds on the existing NIH funded ImageJ libraries. Creation of this suite of opensource image manipulation routines is lead by Wayne Rasband and is released primarily under the MIT license. In this release, we are building on these libraries to add source identification for point / point-like sources, and to do astrometry. Our materials released under the Apache 2.0 license on github (http://github.com/CosmoQuestTeam) and documentation can be found at http://cosmoquest.org/TransientTracker.

  5. CosmoQuest: A Glance at Citizen Science Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew; Grier, Jennifer; Gay, Pamela; Lehan, Cory; Buxner, Sanlyn; CosmoQuest Team

    2018-01-01

    CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility focused on engaging people - citizen scientists - from across the world in authentic research projects designed to enhance our knowledge of the cosmos around us. Using image data acquired by NASA missions, our citizen scientists are first trained to identify specific features within the data and then requested to identify those features across large datasets. Responses submitted by the citizen scientists are then stored in our database where they await for analysis and eventual publication by CosmoQuest staff and collaborating professional research scientists.While it is clear that the driving power behind our projects are the eyes and minds of our citizen scientists, it is CosmoQuest’s custom software, Citizen Science Builder (CSB), that enables citizen science to be accomplished. On the front end, CosmoQuest’s CSB software allows for the creation of web-interfaces that users can access to perform image annotation through both drawing tools and questions that can accompany images. These tools include: using geometric shapes to identify regions within an image, tracing image attributes using freeform line tools, and flagging features within images. Additionally, checkboxes, dropdowns, and free response boxes may be used to collect information. On the back end, this software is responsible for the proper storage of all data, which allows project staff to perform periodic data quality checks and track the progress of each project. In this poster we present these available tools and resources and seek potential collaborations.

  6. The Lions Quest Program in Turkey: Teachers’ Views and Classroom Practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Gol-Guven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a pilot study to explore the classroom implementation of the Lions Quest Program in Turkey. Teachers of first through eighth grades at two elementary schools who applied the program were interviewed about the program and their classroom practices while they were also observed and their classrooms were also observed. Considerable program implementation differences were found within and between the schools. Three main issues were raised in the interviews, namely that the teachers were not clear about whether social emotional learning (SEL skills should be taught to students as a separate lesson or not; they seemed to doubt whether school personnel should be responsible for SEL implementation; and although they had positive views of the implementation, they underlined that students’ social and emotional wellbeing is dependent on family background and the developing maturity of the child. In conclusion, the teachers expressed positive views about the Lions Quest Program, yet lacked strong opinions about when, where, and by whom the program needed to be included in the curriculum. Limitations, implementation challenges, and implications for SEL in the Turkish context were also identified.

  7. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Evolution from Cellular to Social Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Skjeltorp, Arne T

    2008-01-01

    Evolution is a critical challenge for many areas of science, technology and development of society. The book reviews general evolutionary facts such as origin of life and evolution of the genome and clues to evolution through simple systems. Emerging areas of science such as "systems biology" and "bio-complexity" are founded on the idea that phenomena need to be understood in the context of highly interactive processes operating at different levels and on different scales. This is where physics meets complexity in nature, and where we must begin to learn about complexity if we are to understand it. Similarly, there is an increasingly urgent need to understand and predict the evolutionary behavior of highly interacting man-made systems, in areas such as communications and transport, which permeate the modern world. The same applies to the evolution of human networks such as social, political and financial systems, where technology has tended to vastly increase both the complexity and speed of interaction, whic...

  8. AfricaArray seismological studies of the structure and evolution of the African continent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Durrheim, RJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The AfricaArray programme seeks to build geoscience capacity and conduct research that supports development in Africa. This paper reports on investigations of the structure and evolution of the African continent that have been concluded since...

  9. Agent-Based Model to Study and Quantify the Evolution Dynamics of Android Malware Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alegre-Sanahuja, Juan; Camacho, Javier; Cortés López, Juan Carlos; Santonja, Francisco-José; Villanueva Micó, Rafael Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    .... In this paper, we propose an agent-based model to quantify the Android malware infection evolution, modeling the behavior of the users and the different markets where the users may download Apps...

  10. Genetics of flower development in Ranunculales - a new, basal eudicot model order for studying flower evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damerval, Catherine; Becker, Annette

    2017-01-01

    ... to the genetic architecture of flower morphology and its evolution. These questions concern either traits only found in members of the Ranunculales or traits that have convergently evolved in other large clades of flowering plants...

  11. EVOLUTION OF THE FOREST MANAGEMENT PHILOSOPHY IN TURKEY: A CASE STUDY OF ARTVIN PLANNING UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Ahmet Yolasığmaz

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Forest management plans were firstly prepared and implemented in Turkey between 1963 and 1973. All forests in Turkey have been managed with timber oriented forest management philosophy; however, there have been some developments about inventory and silviculture techniques for approximately 40 years. Last decade, Turkey participated in Convention of Biological Diversity in Rio (1992 and included in both Pan – European and Near East Region Conventions. Nowadays, Turkish forest management philosophy has changed from timber management to ecosystem-based multiple-use forest planning with the principles of “sustainable forest management” criteria and indicators drafted in a few national and international agreements. Thus, Turkish forestry is underway in a restructuring process. This paper presents evolution of the traditional forest management philosophy in Turkey since 1963. This study was carried out in Artvin Planning Unit. Past two decade planning periods (managed under timber management approach was compared with current case study data used for forest multiple use management approach based on ecosystem in terms of distribution of age class, site class and change of volume and increment. In conclusion, former applications and techniques for adaptation of improvement must be analyzed and interpreted properly. Monetary resources and experts as well as legal, technique and scientific framework must be provided.

  12. Using the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor to Study Cluster Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Neal A.; O'Steen, Richard; Yen, Steffi; Kuntz, K. D.; Hammer, Derek

    2012-01-01

    We explore the application of XMM Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) ultraviolet (UV) data to study galaxy evolution. Our sample is constructed as the intersection of all Abell clusters with z < 0.05 and having archival XMM-OM data in either the UVM2 or UVW1 filters, plus optical and UV photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX, respectively. The 11 resulting clusters include 726 galaxies with measured redshifts, 520 of which have redshifts placing them within their parent Abell clusters. We develop procedures for manipulating the XMM-OM images and measuring galaxy photometry from them, and we confirm our results via comparison with published catalogs. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) constructed using the XMM-OM data along with SDSS optical data show promise for evolutionary studies, with good separation between red and blue sequences and real variation in the width of the red sequence that is likely indicative of differences in star formation history. This is particularly true for UVW1 data, as the relative abundance of data collected using this filter and its depth make it an attractive choice. Available tools that use stellar synthesis libraries to fit the UV and optical photometric data may also be used, thereby better describing star formation history within the past billion years and providing estimates of total stellar mass that include contributions from young stars. Finally, color-color diagrams that include XMM-OM UV data appear useful to the photometric identification of both extragalactic and stellar sources.

  13. Studying phenotypic evolution in domestic animals: a walk in the footsteps of Charles Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L

    2009-01-01

    Charles Darwin used domesticated plants and animals as proof of principle for his theory on phenotypic evolution by means of natural selection. Inspired by Darwin's work, we developed an intercross between the wild boar and domestic pigs to study the genetic basis for phenotypic changes during domestication. The difference in coat color is controlled by two major loci. Dominant white color is due to two consecutive mutations in the KIT gene: a 450-kb duplication and a splice mutation. Black spotting is caused by the combined effect of two mutations in MC1R: a missense mutation for dominant black color and a 2-bp insertion leading to a frameshift. A major discovery made using this pedigree is the identification of a single-nucleotide substitution in intron 3 of the gene for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) that is underlying a quantitative trait locus affecting muscle growth, size of the heart, and fat deposition. The mutation disrupts the interaction with a repressor and leads to threefold increased IGF2 expression in postnatal muscle. In a recent study, we have identified the IGF2 repressor, and this previously unknown protein, named ZBED6, is specific for placental mammals and derived from a domesticated DNA transposon.

  14. A comprehensive study on atomic layer deposition of molybdenum sulfide for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Do Hyun; Jin, Zhenyu; Shin, Seokhee; Lee, Wook-Seong; Min, Yo-Sep

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has emerged as an efficient method to design and prepare catalysts with atomic precision. Here, we report a comprehensive study on ALD of molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) for an electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction. By using molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dimethyldisulfide as the precursors of Mo and S, respectively, the MoSx catalysts are grown at 100 °C on porous carbon fiber papers (CFPs). The ALD process results in the growth of particle-like MoSx on the CFP due to the lack of adsorption sites, and its crystallographic structure is a mixture of amorphous and nano-crystalline phases. In order to unveil the intrinsic activity of the ALD-MoSx, the exchange current densities, Tafel slopes, and turnover frequencies of the catalysts grown under various ALD conditions have been investigated by considering the fractional surface coverage of MoSx on the CFP and catalytically-active surface area. In addition, the ALD-MoSx/CFP catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic stability due to the strong adhesion of MoSx on the CFP and the mixed phase.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has emerged as an efficient method to design and prepare catalysts with atomic precision. Here, we report a comprehensive study on ALD of molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) for an electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction. By using molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dimethyldisulfide as the precursors of Mo and S, respectively, the MoSx catalysts are grown at 100 °C on porous carbon fiber papers (CFPs). The ALD process results in the growth of particle-like MoSx on the CFP due to the lack of adsorption sites, and its crystallographic structure is a mixture of amorphous and nano-crystalline phases. In order to unveil the intrinsic activity of the ALD-MoSx, the exchange current densities, Tafel slopes, and turnover frequencies of the catalysts grown under various ALD conditions have been investigated by considering the fractional surface coverage of MoSx on the CFP and catalytically

  15. Evolution of rheologically heterogeneous salt structures: a case study from the NE Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, A. F.; Strozyk, F.; Visser, J.; Urai, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of salt structures is controlled by the low flow strength of evaporites and by the tectonic boundary conditions. The potassium-magnesium salts (K-Mg salts) carnallite and bischofite are prime examples of layers with much lower effective viscosity than halite: their low viscosity presents serious drilling hazards but also allows squeeze solution mining. In contrast, intrasalt anhydrite and carbonate layers (stringers) are much stronger than halite. These rheological contrasts within an evaporite body have an important control on the evolution of the internal structure of salt, but how this mechanical layering affects salt deformation at different scales is not well known. In this study, we use high-resolution 3-D seismic and well data to study the evolution of the Veendam and Slochteren salt pillows at the southern boundary of the Groningen High, northern Netherlands. Here the rock salt layers contain both the mechanically stronger Zechstein III Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer and the weaker K-Mg salts, thus we are able to assess the role of extreme rheological heterogeneities on salt structure growth. The internal structure of the two salt pillows shows areas in which the K-Mg salt-rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, in combination with a complexly ruptured and folded ZIII Anhydrite-Carbonate stringer. Thickness maps of supra-salt sediments and well data are used to infer the initial depositional architecture of the K-Mg salts and their deformation history. Results suggest that faulting and the generation of depressions on the top Zechstein surface above a Rotliegend graben caused the local accumulation of bittern brines and precipitation of thick K-Mg salts. During the first phase of salt flow and withdrawal from the Veendam area, under the influence of differential loading by Buntsandstein sediments, the ZIII stringer was boudinaged while the lens of Mg salts remained relatively undeformed. This was followed by a convergence stage, when the

  16. The Evolution of Israeli Civil-Military Relations: Domestic Enablers and the Quest for Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Figure 9145). Figure 9. Domestic Defense Spending (% GDP) 144 Guy Ben-Porat and Shlomo Mizrahi ...Israeli Case. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1986. Ben-Porat, Guy, and Shlomo Mizrahi . “Political Culture, Alternative Politics and Foreign Policy: The

  17. Lamarck needs Darwin: the search for purpose in the study of evolution and of history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno, Juan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lamarck´s theory of the inheritance of acquired characteristics and immediate responses to environmental challenges has offered a promise of protagonism of human beings and their fellow trvellers, the other organisms, in the evolutionary process. Darwin’s theory about evolution by natural selection does not offer this consolation and does not presuppose anything else other than gradual cahnges in the composition of natural populations. The study of ecology, ethology, neurobiology, animal culture, psichology and human history reveals that the lamarckian interpretations of change and character transmission processes always assume what they intend to explain, that is previous processes of darwinian evolution that guarantee the adaptive nature of the observed responses. The permanent search of direction and intentionality in evolutionary processes by many scientists suggests the limited acceptance of materilaistic explanations as those offered by Darwin’s theory.

    a teoría de Lamarck sobre herencia de caracteres adquiridos y sobre respuestas inmediatas a retos ambientales ha ofrecido una promesa de intencionalidad y protagonismo en el proceso evolutivo al ser humano y a los restantes organismos. La teoría de Darwin sobre evolución por selección natural no ofrece este consuelo y no presupone nada más que procesos de recambio gradual en poblaciones naturales. El estudio de la ecología, la etología, la neurobiología, la cultura animal, la psicología y la historia humana revela que las interpretaciones lamarckianas de los cambios y procesos de transmisión de caracteres presuponen siempre lo que pretenden explicar, es decir procesos previos de evolución darwiniana que garantizan la naturaleza adaptativa de las respuestas observadas. La búsqueda continua de dirección y de intención en los procesos evolutivos por muchos científicos sugiere la escasa aceptación de explicaciones materialistas como las que ofrece la teoría de

  18. AfricaArray seismological studies of the structure and evolution of the African continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrheim, Raymond; Nyblade, Andrew; Brandt, Martin; Tugume, Fred; Mulibo, Gabriel; Kgaswane, Eldridge; Mangongolo, Azangi; Manzi, Musa; El Tahir, Nada; Loots, Letticia

    2014-05-01

    The AfricaArray programme was launched in 2005 to conduct research that promotes development in Africa by building human and infrastructural capacity in support of the mineral exploration, mining, geohazard and environmental sectors. The AfricaArray "backbone" network now consists of 51 geophysical observatories in 20 sub-Saharan countries. Most stations are equipped with broadband seismometers, while 25 stations have continuous GPS sensors and 22 stations have meteorological packs. In addition, several temporary seismic arrays have been deployed to investigate the seismotectonics of the East African Rift System, the extent of the Congo craton, and the rifting of Mozambique and Madagascar. In this paper we will present results pertinent to large-scale crustal and mantle geodynamic processes that have been obtained by AfricaArray researchers. Brandt and Mulibo elucidated the relationship between the African Superplume, Superswell and the East African Rift System by studying the seismic velocity structure of the mantle. Kgaswane jointly inverted P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) and surface waves, and found that the Kalahari Craton lower crust is largely mafic, except for a few terrains such as the Kimberley. Kgaswane also produced evidence that supports a link between the eastern and western lobes of the Bushveld Complex. Mangongolo used surface wave tomography to define the south-western boundary of the Congo Craton. El Tahir used PRFs to investigate the crustal structure of the Khartoum Basin, while Tugume determined the Moho depths and Poisson's ratios of the Precambrian crust in East Africa. Manzi reprocessed 3D reflection seismic data covering part of the Witwatersrand goldfields using seismic attribute analysis methods, and has provided new constraints on the evolution of the Basin during the Neoarchean. Loots interpreted a 105 km 2D seismic reflection profile immediately to the north of the Cape Fold Belt, imaging the Karoo and Cape Supergroup rocks and the

  19. The Evolution of River–Lake and Urban Compound Systems: A Case Study in Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of urbanization takes up a lot of wetlands, profoundly changing the natural connection of surrounding river–lake systems, all the while causing serious damage to the environment of connected catchments. Urban systems and river–lake systems are not isolated and static, there is a relation between them which is constantly changing. Based on the idea of system research, the urban system is simplified into four subsystems: environment, infrastructure, social, and economic. These four components interact together, influencing the river–lake system to form a compound system. This paper aims to reflect the features and evolution laws of the compound system, by building a Collaborative Development Model to study the changing of the compound system in Wuhan, China over a 10-year period. The results show that by implementing the Donghu Lake Ecological River Network Engineering Project, the damaged river–lake system in Wuhan showed some improvement. However, in order to improve the sustainability of the compound system in Wuhan, the status of the river–lake system, social system and environment system, which are still comparatively substandard, should be constantly improved. The Collaborative Development Model could also be used in other cities and regions, to provide the basis for sustainable development.

  20. Trophic State Evolution and Nutrient Trapping Capacity in a Transboundary Subtropical Reservoir: A 25-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Davi Gasparini Fernandes; Benassi, Simone Frederigi; de Falco, Patrícia Bortoletto; do Carmo Calijuri, Maria

    2016-03-01

    Artificial reservoirs have been used for drinking water supply, other human activities, flood control and pollution abatement worldwide, providing overall benefits to downstream water quality. Most reservoirs in Brazil were built during the 1970s, but their long-term patterns of trophic status, water chemistry, and nutrient removal are still not very well characterized. We aimed to evaluate water quality time series (1985-2010) data from the riverine and lacustrine zones of the transboundary Itaipu Reservoir (Brazil/Paraguay). We examined total phosphorus and nitrogen, chlorophyll a concentrations, water transparency, and phytoplankton density to look for spatial and temporal trends and correlations with trophic state evolution and nutrient retention. There was significant temporal and spatial water quality variation ( P water quality and structure of the reservoir were mainly affected by one internal force (hydrodynamics) and one external force (upstream cascading reservoirs). Nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations tended to be lower in the lacustrine zone and decreased over the 25-year timeframe. Reservoir operational features seemed to be limiting primary production and phytoplankton development, which exhibited a maximum density of 6050 org/mL. The relatively small nutrient concentrations in the riverine zone were probably related to the effect of the cascade reservoirs upstream of Itaipu and led to relatively low removal percentages. Our study suggested that water quality problems may be more pronounced immediately after the filling phase of the artificial reservoirs, associated with the initial decomposition of drowned vegetation at the very beginning of reservoir operation.

  1. Organics Produced by Irradiation of Frozen and Liquid HCN Solutions: Implications for Chemical Evolution Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), an important precursor of organic compounds, is widely present in extraterrestrial environments. HCN is also readily synthesized in prebiotic simulation experiments. To gain insight into the radiation chemistry of one of the most important and highly versatile constituents of cometary ices, we examined the behavior of over-irradiated frozen and liquid HCN solutions under ionizing radiation. The samples were exposed to gamma radiation at a dose range from 0 up to 419 kGy. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to follow the process. The analyses confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation of liquid HCN solutions generates several organic products. Many of them are essential to life; we verified the presence of carboxylic acids (some of them members of the Krebs cycle) as well as free amino acids and urea. These are the first studies to reveal the presence of these compounds in experiments performed at low temperatures and bulk irradiation. Organic material was produced even at low temperatures and low radiation doses. This work strongly supports the presumption that, as a parent molecule, HCN played a central essential role in the process of chemical evolution on early Earth, comets, and other extraterrestrial environments.

  2. Evolution of water chemistry during Marcellus Shale gas development: A case study in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul F; Thomas He, Y

    2015-09-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) has been used with horizontal drilling to extract gas and natural gas liquids from source rock such as the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin. Horizontal drilling and HF generates large volumes of waste water known as flowback. While inorganic ion chemistry has been well characterized, and the general increase in concentration through the flowback is widely recognized, the literature contains little information relative to organic compounds and radionuclides. This study examined the chemical evolution of liquid process and waste streams (including makeup water, HF fluids, and flowback) in four Marcellus Shale gas well sites in north central West Virginia. Concentrations of organic and inorganic constituents and radioactive isotopes were measured to determine changes in waste water chemistry during shale gas development. We found that additives used in fracturing fluid may contribute to some of the constituents (e.g., Fe) found in flowback, but they appear to play a minor role. Time sequence samples collected during flowback indicated increasing concentrations of organic, inorganic and radioactive constituents. Nearly all constituents were found in much higher concentrations in flowback water than in injected HF fluids suggesting that the bulk of constituents originate in the Marcellus Shale formation rather than in the formulation of the injected HF fluids. Liquid wastes such as flowback and produced water, are largely recycled for subsequent fracturing operations. These practices limit environmental exposure to flowback. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On the evolution of a retracting straight liquid sheet edge: experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan; Mayer, Hans C.

    2011-11-01

    The evolution of the initially straight edge of a retracting liquid sheet is still a subject of debate. Theoretical and numerical studies have provided conflicting results, and experimental efforts have, to our knowledge, never been attempted owing to the difficulty in achieving a uniform edge. However, recent advances in experimental techniques, specifically those presented in detail in Poster #72 of APS-DFD 2010 (H.C. Mayer and R. Krechetnikov), have allowed us to uniformly detach a soap film from a straight edge using an impulsively heated wire frame. The detachment, retraction, and breakup of soap films (h ~ 10 μm) is analyzed using high speed photography. Owing to the Plateau border that connects the uniform film to the wire frames (wire diameter 25-250 μm) - a feature not present when rupturing films from a point - the early stages of retraction are dominated by a relatively large rim mass. We explore the phenomena at very early times (t films which may add complexity to the problem of determining what instability mechanism(s) are responsible for their breakup.

  4. Integrating Plant Evolution into the Study of Fire in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C.; Archibald, S.

    2014-12-01

    20% of the Earth's land surface burns annually representing a critical exchange of energy between the land and atmosphere via combustion. Fires range from small spreading surface fires to intense dramatic crown fire events, depending on the fuels and climate where they burn. Fire is a powerful selective force on plants: over the last 420 million years the plant traits required to tolerate fire, and in some cases to promote particular types of fire regimes have evolved. However, most Earth System studies focus on the links between climate and fire, ignoring the fact that these relationships are mediated by the fuels - by plant structure and function. We argue via multiple lines of evidence that the flammability of an ecosystem is influenced by the vegetation present, and that this vegetation is not a passive outcome of certain climate and fire properties, but is also the result of evolutionary forces, biological and biophysical feedbacks and biogeographic contingencies. Hence, understanding current patterns of fire and vegetation, as well as longer-term patterns of fire over deep time, requires a framework that can incorporate evolution and biogeography, and in particular, plant traits.

  5. Metabolism and evolution: A comparative study of reconstructed genome-level metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2008-03-01

    The availability of high-quality annotations of sequenced genomes has made it possible to generate organism-specific comprehensive maps of cellular metabolism. Currently, more than twenty such metabolic reconstructions are publicly available, with the majority focused on bacteria. A typical metabolic reconstruction for a bacterium results in a complex network containing hundreds of metabolites (nodes) and reactions (links), while some even contain more than a thousand. The constrain-based optimization approach of flux-balance analysis (FBA) is used to investigate the functional characteristics of such large-scale metabolic networks, making it possible to estimate an organism's growth behavior in a wide variety of nutrient environments, as well as its robustness to gene loss. We have recently completed the genome-level metabolic reconstruction of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, as well as the three Yersinia pestis biovars Antiqua, Mediaevalis, and Orientalis. While Y. pseudotuberculosis typically only causes fever and abdominal pain that can mimic appendicitis, the evolutionary closely related Y. pestis strains are the aetiological agents of the bubonic plague. In this presentation, I will discuss our results and conclusions from a comparative study on the evolution of metabolic function in the four Yersiniae networks using FBA and related techniques, and I will give particular focus to the interplay between metabolic network topology and evolutionary flexibility.

  6. Brazilian Post Graduation Degree Studies: Evolution and Main Challenges in the Prospective Scenarios Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto de Oliveira Moritz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to examine the evolution of post-graduation courses, as from its creation to the present day, based on the work undertaken by the Coordination of Higher Education Personnel Improvement - CAPES and the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq, identifying the most important variables in the environment and its perspectives in the environments of future scenarios. It is also noteworthy that today the country goes through a period of the greatest breadth and importance of the post-graduation courses, a sector that consolidated itself for possessing national and international high qualification. In the present study, we proceed to the bibliographical review and to the documentary examination, to rescue the history of post-graduation degree courses and their main challenges, substantiated in an analysis involving variables that leads to the future of this environment, seeking through the methodology of prospective scenarios, to establish strategies for the continuity of these best practices in the future. 

  7. The population ecology of contemporary adaptations: what empirical studies reveal about the conditions that promote adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, D N; Ghalambor, C K

    2001-01-01

    Under what conditions might organisms be capable of rapid adaptive evolution? We reviewed published studies documenting contemporary adaptations in natural populations and looked for general patterns in the population ecological causes. We found that studies of contemporary adaptation fall into two general settings: (1) colonization of new environments that established newly adapted populations, and (2) local adaptations within the context of a heterogeneous environments and metapopulation structure. Local ecological processes associated with colonizations and introductions included exposure to: (1) a novel host or food resource; (2) a new biophysical environment; (3) a new predator community; and (4) a new coexisting competitor. The new environments that were colonized often had depauperate communities, sometimes because of anthropogenic disturbance. Local adaptation in heterogeneous environments was also often associated with recent anthropogenic changes, such as insecticide and herbicide resistance, or industrial melanism. A common feature of many examples is the combination of directional selection with at least a short-term opportunity for population growth. We suggest that such opportunities for population growth may be a key factor that promotes rapid evolution, since directional selection might otherwise be expected to cause population decline and create the potential for local extinction, which is an ever-present alternative to local adaptation. We also address the large discrepancy between the rate of evolution observed in contemporary studies and the apparent rate of evolution seen in the fossil record.

  8. Natural evolution of snoring: a 5-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martikainen, K; Partinen, M; Urponen, H; Vuori, I; Laippala, P; Hasan, J

    1994-12-01

    The natural evolution of snoring was studied in a middle-aged population in Finland. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 1600 people aged 36-50 years in 1985 with a response rate of 75.2%; 53% of them completed also the 5-year-follow-up questionnaire. Clinical examinations (N = 36) and whole-night polygraphic recordings (N = 22) were made to habitual (every or almost every night) snorers and daily sleepy persons. A total of 626 persons completed the 5-year-follow-up questionnaire. The prevalence of habitual snoring among men was 28.3-43.8% and among women 6.3-18.8%, increasing with age. Sleepiness was common: doze-off at the wheel was reported by 23% of snorers and traffic accidents because of sleepiness by 4.5%. Hypertension was clearly more common (p = 0.002) among habitual snorers, but the self-reported rates of strokes and coronary heart disease were not increased in this study. None of the snorers had been investigated because of their snoring or sleepiness during the five years. In polygraphic recordings 11/22 showed an oxygen desaturation index (ODI4) more than 5/h; active treatment was started for 8 of them. The observed prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome with ODI4 > 10 was 1.1% in this study. Snorers, even with clear sleepiness, are passive in seeking help for their symptoms. Physicians should actively diagnose this treatable condition impairing the quality of life and increasing the risk of traffic accidents and vascular diseases.

  9. Evolution of schistosomiasis-induced pathology after therapy and interruption of exposure to schistosomes: a review of ultrasonographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J

    2000-10-23

    urogenital lesions led to complications many years after exposure. Contrary to hepatosplenic and urinary pathology, knowlegde on the evolution of other organic abnormalities is very limited: studies on the evolution of biliary abnormalities or intestinal pathology have not been published. Genital pathology may be induced by all Schistosoma spp. Post-therapy evolution of genital schistosomiasis is largely ignored. In some European travellers partial regression of prostatic fibrosis has been described. Schistosomal adnexitis leading to infertility and/or ectopic pregnancy has been reported occurring many years after interruption of exposure. Ultrasonography (US) has never been used to study the influence of schistosomiasis on pregnancy. Concluding, current knowlegde on the evolution of pathology after treatment and/or interruption of exposure is still fragmentary. Frequently, fibrosis reverses after therapy, but advanced pathology may persist for long. Therefore, the possibility of severe clinical complications has to be taken into account, even if the infection is inactive since many years. In interventions aimed at controlling schistosomiasis-related morbidity, evolution of pathology must be monitored by US in representative patient cohorts. Further systematic US-studies are needed not only on the evolution of hepatosplenic and urinary pathology but also on that of intestinal, biliary and genital pathology induced by schistosomiasis, as well as on the influence of schistosomiasis on the outcome of pregnancy.

  10. Historic maps and landscape evolution: a case study in the Little Hungarian Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámolyi, A.; Székely, B.; Draganits, E.; Timár, G.

    2009-04-01

    Georeferenced historic maps provide a useful tool to derive geomorphologic landscape elements largely uninfluenced by anthropogenic activity, thus allowing the study of natural changes in the landscape evolution of increasingly densely populated areas. The study area, the Little Hungarian Plain (LHP), is located at the geologically and geomorphologically highly interesting region at the transition between the mountain chains of the Eastern Alps and the Carpathians. The area, as transport route and exchange zone of goods has had its specific importance since the Neolithic times. Consequently, the environment has been subject to human influence, especially since the onset of the industrial age. Geographically the LHP lies in the vicinity of major settlement areas (Vienna, Bratislava, Sopron, Győr) and stretches from the Leithagebirge, a mountainous area in Eastern Austria, to the City of Győr in Western Hungary. The political division of the area into two separate countries occurred after World War I. Thus, historic mapping in the Habsburg Empire and later in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy that was organized and conducted before World War I allows a comprehensive overview of the study area. Map sheets of the 2nd Military Survey of the whole Monarchy were mapped in the time from 1807 to 1873 in the area of the entire Empire (Kretschmer et al., 2004). The Kingdom of Hungary, as part of the Empire was mapped in a homogenous campaign in the time from 1819 - 1869. Beside the increasing human impact the area is characterized by active surface processes. The geologic evolution of the Little Hungarian Plain is dominated by tectonic processes related to the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps and the acceleration of northward movement of the Carpathians. Subsidence is accommodated mainly along high- and low angle normal faults with a high vertical movement component. Strike-slip movements at these faults are very rare. Most of these processes have been active also in the

  11. Evolution of ANB and SN-GoGn angles during craniofacial growth: A retrospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Oyonarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the evolution of the ANB and SN-GoGn angles throughout development, in a longitudinal sample of Caucasian patients. Materials and Methods: Historical cephalometric records from North American individuals available at the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Legacy Growth Collection website were used to carry out an exploratory longitudinal study. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of orthodontically untreated males and females were included. Individuals with three or more longitudinal cephalometric records at pre- and post-pubertal stages, with at least one postpubertal radiograph available in vertebral cervical maturation stage (cervical vertebral maturation 5 or 6, were selected. Seventy-one individuals met the inclusion criteria. ANB, SNA, SNB, and SN-GoGn angles were measured. Individuals were classified according to the latest postpubertal ANB angle available and grouped by CVM. Descriptive statistics were obtained for the cephalometric variables, and differences between genders were analyzed. Results: Forty-five individuals were classified as skeletal Class I at the end of growth, 17 as Class II, and 9 as Class III. ANB values decrease as growth occurs in every group (average ANB decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 1.5°, Class II - 0.7°, and Class III - 3.1°. For SN-GoGn angle, a constant reduction was observed as skeletal maturation increased (Average SN-GoGn decrease between the stages CVM 1 and 6: Class I - 4°, Class II - 2.5°, and Class III - 4.9°. Conclusions: ANB and SN-GoGn angles decrease during growth. The magnitude varies depending on individual sagittal characteristics, Class III individuals displaying the greatest reduction, and Class II individuals the least.

  12. Evolution and prognosis of long intensive care unit stay patients suffering a deterioration: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Tejedor, Alberto; Cabré-Pericas, Lluís; Martín-Delgado, María Cruz; Leal-Micharet, Ana María; Algora-Weber, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis of a patient who deteriorates during a prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay is difficult to predict. We analyze the prognostic value of the serialized Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and other variables in the early days after a complication and to build a new predictive score. EPIPUSE (Evolución y pronóstico de los pacientes con ingreso prolongado en UCI que sufren un empeoramiento, Evolution and prognosis of long intensive care unit stay patients suffering a deterioration) study is a prospective, observational study during a 3-month recruitment period in 75 Spanish ICUs. We focused on patients admitted in the ICU for 7 days or more with complications of adverse events that involve organ dysfunction impairment. Demographics, clinical variables, and serialized SOFA after a supervening clinical deterioration were recorded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed, and a predictive model was created with the most discriminating variables. We included 589 patients who experienced 777 cases of severe complication or adverse event. The entire sample was randomly divided into 2 subsamples, one for development purposes (528 cases) and the other for validation (249 cases). The predictive model maximizing specificity is calculated by minimum SOFA + 2 * cardiovascular risk factors + 2 * history of any oncologic disease or immunosuppressive treatment + 3 * dependence for basic activities of daily living. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is 0.82. A 14-point cutoff has a positive predictive value of 100% (92.7%-100%) and negative predictive value of 51% (46.4%-55.5%) for death. EPIPUSE model can predict mortality with a specificity and positive predictive value of 99% in some groups of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using NIRISS to study the formation and evolution of stars, disks, and planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Doug I.; JWST NIRISS GTO Team

    2017-06-01

    NIRISS on JWST is a powerful instrument for the study of star, disk, and planet formation and evolution. In this talk I will highlight the Wide Field Slitless Spectroscopy (WFSS) and Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) modes of NIRISS, along with lessons learned determining optimal observing strategies and project implementation in APT. The NIRISS WFSS mode uses a grism to provide modest resolution (R ~ 150) spectra of all sources within the observed field of view. Cold low-mass objects are distinct at NIRISS wavelengths (1.5 and 2.0 microns, in this case), and can be characterized through their speactra by their temperature and surface gravity sensitive molecular absorption features. Thus, WFSS observations will be an efficient way to locate and enumerate the young brown dwarfs and rogue planets in nearby star-forming regions. Alternatively, the NIRISS AMI mode offers the highest spatial resolution available on JWST at wavelengths greater than 2.5 micron, 70 - 400 mas, and modest inner working angle contrast, dm ~ 10, for individual bright sources. A significant advantage of observing from space is that, along with the phase closure, the interferometric phase amplitudes can also be recovered allowing some reconstruction of extended emission. Observations with AMI will be made of candidate and postulated planets forming within transition disks around young stars and for somewhat older planets in known extra-solar planetary systems. The AMI mode will also be used to study the zodiacal light in a bright debris disk system and to search for binary companions of Y dwarfs.

  14. ECHO Project: a series of tools for studying and characterizing seismic sequences evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Giuseppe; De Santis, Angelo; Di Giovambattista, Rita; Cianchini, Gianfranco; Murru, Maura; Calderoni, Giovanna; Lucente, Pio Francesco; De Gori, Pasquale; Frepoli, Alberto; Signanini, Patrizio; Rainone, Mario; Vessia, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    One of the most ubiquitous problems in seismology is to discriminate between seismic sequences (a series of small-to-moderate earthquakes that culminate with a mainshock) and swarms (diffuse seismicity w/o mainshock), that can be easily done only after a certain class of earthquakes have occurred. We propose to put these phenomena under the same framework provided by the geosystemics (De Santis, 2009, 2014), where the planet Earth and its processes are seen from a holistic point of view, and the New Geophysics (Crampin et al., 2013), where fluid-saturated microcracks in almost all crustal rocks are so closely-spaced they verge on failure and hence are highly-compliant critical systems (Signanini and De Santis, 2012). In this context, nonlinear concepts typical of Chaos and Information theories are fundamental to study and characterize the various features of the series of seismic events, and, eventually, to discriminate between seismic sequences and swarms. The two theories imply the use of non-linear techniques which are innovative in seismology. The project ECHO ("Entropy and CHaOs: tools for studying and characterizing seismic sequences evolution"), a recent INGV-funded project, would aim at applying the above approaches in a more integrated way mainly to establish a suite of effective tools to disclose and characterise the principal features of the series of earthquakes which are of interest. In our view this will represent the very first step before to face the more challenging (but longer-term) problem of discriminating between the two kinds of series of seismic events. This poster will describe these kinds of preliminary activities and relative results in the framework of the project.

  15. Art Treasure Quests in Second Life: A Multi-Literacy Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokrocki, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Treasure quests in virtual worlds can help students develop multi-literacy communication skills and promote community, offering insights about art teaching and learning. As part of the new media literacy, students explore the offerings of Second Life (SL), a virtual world, as a series of quests. Multi-literacy involves communication. Through their…

  16. The Best of Two Worlds: Combining ITV and Web Quests To Strengthen Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Charmaine

    This presentation describes an English graduate seminar in Local Color and Regionalism in American Literature at Western Kentucky University that was set up as an experimental hybrid course, i.e., roughly 60% face-to-face and 40% Web course (Web quest format). The focus is on the four tasks that comprised the Web quest segment of the course: (1) a…

  17. Mendeleyev’s dream the quest for the elements

    CERN Document Server

    Strathern, Paul

    2000-01-01

    In this elegant, erudite but entertaining book, Paul Strathern, the award-winning novelist and expositor of complex ideas, unravels the dramatic history of chemistry through the quest for the elements. Framing this history is the life-story of the nineteenth-century Russian scientist Dmitri Mendeleyev, who fell asleep at his desk and awoke after conceiving the Periodic Table in a dream - the template upon which modern chemistry is founded, and the formulation of which marked chemistry's coming of age as a science. From ancient philosophy, through medieval alchemy to the splitting of the atom, this is the true story of the birth of chemistry and the role of one man's dream.

  18. The Quest for the Primary Substance of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Demetris

    2016-03-01

    What are things made of and what are the properties of matter? These are still the most fundamental and difficult questions of science. In an attempt to discover the roots of science and understand the quest for the primary substance of matter as a series of logical progressions, this presentation surveys the most important scientific theories of notable pre-Socratic natural philosophers from the sixth and fifth centuries BCE, including Pythagoras and Democritus. These pre-Socratics developed a robust program of natural inquiry that (1) will be reconstructed and (2) will be compared with modern frontiers of physical analysis. It is argued not only that their conceptual breakthroughs anticipated much of later science but that scientists of the twenty-first century are still grappling with the fundamental problems raised twenty-five hundred years ago.

  19. Quest for steroidomimetics: Amino acids derived steroidal and nonsteroidal architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagufta; Ahmad, Irshad; Panda, Gautam

    2017-06-16

    The chiral pool amino acids have been utilized for the construction of steroidal and non-steroidal architectures in the quest for steroidomimetics. Chirality derived from amino acid-based architectures provides new and easy to incorporate chiral chemical space, which is otherwise very difficult to introduce and comprised of several synthetic steps for asymmetric steroids. The different and exciting ligand-receptor interactions may arise from the use of each amino acid enantiomer that was introduced into the chiral steroidal backbone. The A and D rings of steroidal architectures can be mimicked by the phenyl group of the amino acid tyrosine. The Mitsunobu reaction, nucleophilic substitution and elimination, etc. were utilized for constructing diverse tri- and tetracyclic steroidal skeletons as well as benzofused seco-steroids from amino acids. These benzofused, amino acid-derived steroidal and nonsteroidal molecules had promising biological activity in hormonal related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. How ScienceQuest Ensures Success for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Zorfass

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Informal educational programs that reach out to minority youth in low-income urban areas need to anticipate diversity. Not only will participants exhibit a range of abilities and needs, but some, just like in any population, are likely to have learning disabilities. ScienceQuest, an informal science education program funded by the National Science Foundation, was designed to ensure that youth aged 10 to 14 with diverse abilities and needs, including learning disabilities, can successfully participate and succeed in inquiry-based learning. The program uses the I-Search curriculum as the basis of its inquiry process. Embedded in this curriculum are the following inclusive practices: youth are motivated to explore their topic; they use varied media that supports their learning styles; they are guided to process information through multiple means; and they have access to technology tools. These ongoing inclusive practices ensure that everyone successfully explores the world around them.

  1. A tempestade e a questão colonial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é pôr em questão alguns pontos basilares das assim chamadas interpretações pós-coloniais de A tempestade, de Shakespeare. Argumenta-se que, embora alguns dos tópicos tratados na peça possam ter relação com o colonialismo, ela não pode ser tomada como um texto que participa na discussão do século XVI sobre o empreendimento colonial. Um leitura adequada da peça tem, ao contrário, de levar em consideração o contexto histórico, e em particular o público dos teatros londrinos nos primeiros anos do século XVII.

  2. Psychophysics of emotion: the QUEST for emotional attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Etienne B; Sander, David; Mumenthaler, Christian; Kerzel, Dirk; Scherer, Klaus R

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the mechanisms involved in automatic processing of facial expressions, we used the QUEST procedure to measure the display durations needed to make a gender decision on emotional faces portraying fearful, happy, or neutral facial expressions. In line with predictions of appraisal theories of emotion, our results showed greater processing priority of emotional stimuli regardless of their valence. Whereas all experimental conditions led to an averaged threshold of about 50 ms, fearful and happy facial expressions led to significantly less variability in the responses than neutral faces. Results suggest that attention may have been automatically drawn by the emotion portrayed by face targets, yielding more informative perceptions and less variable responses. The temporal resolution of the perceptual system (expressed by the thresholds) and the processing priority of the stimuli (expressed by the variability in the responses) may influence subjective and objective measures of awareness, respectively.

  3. Turkey's EU Quest and Political Cleavages under AKP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahigh-Aghsan, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the extent to which the rise of political Islam (Note 1) in Turkey has triggered an intense and polarized debate about the principle eligibility of Turkey to be a full European Union (EU) member state. The Justice and Development Party’s (Adalet ve Kalkinma Partisi......-AKP) election victories in 2002 and 2007 have been considered to be a serious obstacle to Turkish EU accession. This article argues that even if the AKP government were able to meet the objective criteria of the EU acquis, European opposition to Turkish accession would persist for two main reasons: (1......) The overall political targets of political Islam in Turkey seems less compatible with the traditional Turkish EU quest than formerly (2) The Turkish political Islamic turnaround is contributing to a climate of increasing scepticism in Europe, and presents significant obstacles to EU accession. As a result...

  4. Mission Mars India's quest for the red planet

    CERN Document Server

    Lele, Ajey

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the book is to find an answer to the rationale behind the human quest for the Mars exploration. As a comprehensive assessment for this query is undertaken, it is realized that the basic question ‘Why Mars?’ seeks various responses from technological, economic and geopolitical to strategic perspectives. The book is essentially targeted to understand India’s desire to reach Mars. In the process, it also undertakes some implicit questioning of Mars programmes of various other states essentially to facilitate the setting up of the context for an assessment.   The book is divided into two parts: Part I: This covers both science and politics associated with Mars missions in global scenario and discusses the salient features of various Mars Missions undertaken by various countries. Part II: This provides details in regards to India’s Mars Mission.

  5. Jesus' father: The quest for the historical Joseph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries van Aarde

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at demonstrating the historical probability that Joseph, the father of Jesus, should be regarded as a legendary figure. It seems that the Joseph figure is modeled after the patriarch in the First Testament. Here Joseph was exalted despite of slander. He married an 'impure' virgin. He became the adversary of Judah. His sons, bornin Egypt, were seen as the forefathers of the illegitimate Samaritans. He was regarded as an ethical paradigm. He served as the ideal type for God's beloved child. The search for the historical Joseph leads to the conclusion that Jesus grew up fatherless. This conclusion has enormous consequences for the quest for the historical Jesus.

  6. Transtornos alimentares: uma questão cultural?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gonzaga

    Full Text Available A literatura especializada aponta para uma correlação entre abundância de alimentos e incidência de transtornos alimentares na população. A experiência das autoras em instituições não confirma essa correlação. Observam que muitas das pacientes atendidas, oriundas de um meio social bastante pobre, apresentam uma diferenciação cultural significativa em relação ao seu meio. Essas diferenças parecem remetê-las a questões mais profundas em que a anorexia ou a bulimia as lança. O artigo desenvolve essa temática tendo por eixos a adolescência, o corpo e o narcisismo.

  7. Russian Symbolism in its quest for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. VOLZHENINA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to the vision of the future by Russian symbolists: what they were afraid of and what they dreamed about. On the basis of rich journalism heritage of symbolism author analyzed projects of the future proposed by poets, who wrote on the subject most frequently and profoundly: D. S. Merezhkovskij , A. A. Blok, Viach. I. Ivanov, Andrei Belyi. Analysis of each individual project, conceptualized in the best way by D. S. Merezhkovskij, was carried out. Author revealed a range of problems that were conceived by symbolism in its quest for an ideal future: problem “people and intellectuals”, traditional for the Russians by the beginning of 20th century, the role of the artist and art in the future, “the forthcoming ham”, and creating a new man. A comparison of positions on different issues of the symbolists was completed in the article. It was found that the impetus and direction of symbolists’ quest for the future were awoken by their comprehension of the key contradiction of the epoch. In the article this contradiction is described with a ternary opposition “personality—mass—society”. Thus, despite differing views on some problems (e.g. cancellation of problem “people and intellectuals” by D. S. Merezhkovskij, a total understanding of contradiction “personality—mass— society” was common: the future belongs to a free person, transformed, in any event, into a new man. Also, the article discusses the fate of the elements of creative practice of the symbolists. The main conclusion of the author concerned about symbolists’ future projects is that the heritage of symbolism, devoted to the topic, wasn’t assimilated by descendants, while new methods of creative behavior, developed by the symbolists and targeted at a mass audience, have become a part of life.

  8. Study of deformation evolution during failure of rock specimens using laser-based vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, I. Yu.; Kulkov, A. S.; Makarov, P. V.; Tunda, V. A.; Krasnoveikin, V. A.; Eremin, M. O.; Bakeev, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze experimental data on the dynamic response of the marble specimen in uniaxial compression. To make it we use the methods of mathematical statistics. The lateral surface velocity evolution obtained by the laser Doppler vibrometer represents the data for analysis. The registered data were regarded as a time series that reflects deformation evolution of the specimen loaded up to failure. The revealed changes in statistical parameters were considered as precursors of failure. It is shown that before failure the deformation response is autocorrelated and reflects the states of dynamic chaos and self-organized criticality.

  9. Numerical Study of Bubble Area Evolution During Acoustic Droplet Vaporization-Enhanced HIFU Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Zhang, Aili; Xu, Lisa X; Brian Fowlkes, J

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization has the potential to shorten treatment time of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) while minimizing the possible effects of microbubbles along the propagation path. Distribution of the bubbles formed from the droplets during the treatment is the major factor shaping the therapeutic region. A numerical model was proposed to simulate the bubble area evolution during this treatment. Using a linear acoustic equation to describe the ultrasound field, a threshold range was defined that determines the amount of bubbles vaporized in the treated area. Acoustic parameters, such as sound speed, acoustic attenuation coefficient, and density, were treated as a function of the bubble size distribution and the gas void fraction, which were related to the vaporized bubbles in the medium. An effective pressure factor was proposed to account for the influence of the existing bubbles on the vaporization of the nearby droplets. The factor was obtained by fitting one experimental result and was then used to calculate bubble clouds in other experimental cases. Comparing the simulation results to these other experiments validated the model. The dynamic change of the pressure and the bubble distribution after exposure to over 20 pulses of HIFU are obtained. It is found that the bubble area grows from a grainlike shape to a "tadpole," with comparable dimensions and shape to those observed in experiments. The process was highly dynamic with the shape of the bubble area changing with successive HIFU pulses and the focal pressure. The model was further used to predict the shape of the bubble region triggered by HIFU when a bubble wall pre-exists. The results showed that the bubble wall helps prevent droplet vaporization on the distal side of the wall and forms a particularly shaped region with bubbles. This simulation model has predictive potential that could be beneficial in applications, such as cancer treatment, by parametrically studying conditions

  10. Developmental gene regulatory network evolution: insights from comparative studies in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Veronica F; Cheatle Jarvela, Alys M

    2014-03-01

    One of the central concerns of Evolutionary Developmental biology is to understand how the specification of cell types can change during evolution. In the last decade, developmental biology has progressed toward a systems level understanding of cell specification processes. In particular, the focus has been on determining the regulatory interactions of the repertoire of genes that make up gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Echinoderms provide an extraordinary model system for determining how GRNs evolve. This review highlights the comparative GRN analyses arising from the echinoderm system. This work shows that certain types of GRN subcircuits or motifs, i.e., those involving positive feedback, tend to be conserved and may provide a constraint on development. This conservation may be due to a required arrangement of transcription factor binding sites in cis regulatory modules. The review will also discuss ways in which novelty may arise, in particular through the co-option of regulatory genes and subcircuits. The development of the sea urchin larval skeleton, a novel feature that arose in echinoderms, has provided a model for study of co-option mechanisms. Finally, the types of GRNs that can permit the great diversity in the patterns of ciliary bands and their associated neurons found among these taxa are discussed. The availability of genomic resources is rapidly expanding for echinoderms, including genome sequences not only for multiple species of sea urchins but also a species of sea star, sea cucumber, and brittle star. This will enable echinoderms to become a particularly powerful system for understanding how developmental GRNs evolve. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evolution of particle breakage studied using x-ray tomography and the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Zeynep; Andò, Edward; Papanicolopulos, Stefanos-Aldo; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Ooi, Jin Y.

    2017-06-01

    Particle breakage can significantly change the fabric (size and shape of particles and contact network) of a granular material, affecting highly the material's macroscopic response. In this paper, oedometric compression tests are performed on zeolite specimens and x-ray computed micro-tomography is employed, to acquire high resolution 3D images of the specimens throughout the test. The images are processed, to describe breakage spatially and quantify it throughout the test and gain information about the mechanisms leading to particle breakage. In addition to the image processing, the discrete element method (DEM) is used to study the initiation and likelihood of particle breakage, by simulating the experimental test during the early stages of loading and using quantitative results from the images to inform and validate the DEM model. A discrete digital image correlation is used, in order to incrementally identify intact grains and simultaneously get results about the strain field within the specimen, as well as the kinematics of individual grains and fragments. In the initial stages of breakage, there is a clear boundary effect on the spatial distribution of breakage, as it is concentrated at the moving boundary (more than 90% of total breakage) and circumferentially (more than 70% of total breakage) close to the apparatus cell. The DEM model can reproduce the bulk response of the material until the point where substantial breakage governs the macroscopic response and it starts to soften. Additionally, there is an initial indication that the spatial distribution of the force network matches the localisation of breakage radially, but it does not seem to localise close to the loading platen. This analysis will enrich our understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of particle breakage.

  12. Carpeloidy in flower evolution and diversification: a comparative study in Carica papaya and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronse De Craene, Louis; Tréhin, Christophe; Morel, Patrice; Negrutiu, Ioan

    2011-06-01

    Bisexual flowers of Carica papaya range from highly regular flowers to morphs with various fusions of stamens to the ovary. Arabidopsis thaliana sup1 mutants have carpels replaced by chimeric carpel-stamen structures. Comparative analysis of stamen to carpel conversions in the two different plant systems was used to understand the stage and origin of carpeloidy when derived from stamen tissues, and consequently to understand how carpeloidy contributes to innovations in flower evolution. Floral development of bisexual flowers of Carica was studied by scanning electron microscopy and was compared with teratological sup mutants of A. thaliana. In Carica development of bisexual flowers was similar to wild (unisexual) forms up to locule initiation. Feminization ranges from fusion of stamen tissue to the gynoecium to complete carpeloidy of antepetalous stamens. In A. thaliana, partial stamen feminization occurs exclusively at the flower apex, with normal stamens forming at the periphery. Such transformations take place relatively late in development, indicating strong developmental plasticity of most stamen tissues. These results are compared with evo-devo theories on flower bisexuality, as derived from unisexual ancestors. The Arabidopsis data highlight possible early evolutionary events in the acquisition of bisexuality by a patchy transformation of stamen parts into female parts linked to a flower axis-position effect. The Carica results highlight tissue-fusion mechanisms in angiosperms leading to carpeloidy once bisexual flowers have evolved. We show two different developmental routes leading to stamen to carpel conversions by late re-specification. The process may be a fundamental aspect of flower development that is hidden in most instances by developmental homeostasis.

  13. Evolution of hepatitis B serological markers in HIV coinfected patients: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza de Castro Conde Toscano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the evolution of serological markers among HIV and hepatitis B coinfected patients, with emphasis on evaluating the reactivation or seroreversion of these markers. METHODS The study population consisted of patients met in an AIDS Outpatient Clinic in São Paulo State, Brazil. We included in the analysis all HIV-infected and who underwent at least two positive hepatitis B surface antigen serological testing during clinical follow up, with tests taken six months apart. Patients were tested with commercial kits available for hepatitis B serological markers by microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Clinical variables were collected: age, sex, CD4+ T-cell count, HIV viral load, alanine aminotransferase level, exposure to antiretroviral drugs including lamivudine and/or tenofovir. RESULTS Among 2,242 HIV positive patients, we identified 105 (4.7% patients with chronic hepatitis B. Follow up time for these patients varied from six months to 20.5 years. All patients underwent antiretroviral therapy during follow-up. Among patients with chronic hepatitis B, 58% were hepatitis B “e” antigen positive at the first assessment. Clearance of hepatitis B surface antigen occurred in 15% (16/105 of patients with chronic hepatitis B, and 50% (8/16 of these patients presented subsequent reactivation or seroreversion of hepatitis B surface antigen. Among hepatitis B “e” antigen positive patients, 57% (35/61 presented clearance of this serologic marker. During clinical follow up, 28.5% (10/35 of those who initially cleared hepatitis B “e” antigen presented seroreversion or reactivation of this marker. CONCLUSIONS Among HIV coinfected patients under antiretroviral therapy, changes of HBV serological markers were frequently observed. These results suggest that frequent monitoring of these serum markers should be recommended.

  14. Angular momentum evolution in dark matter haloes: a study of the Bolshoi and Millennium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, S.; Padilla, N.; Lagos, C. D. P.

    2017-12-01

    We use three different cosmological dark matter simulations to study how the orientation of the angular momentum (AM) vector in dark matter haloes evolve with time. We find that haloes in this kind of simulations are constantly affected by a spurious change of mass, which translates into an artificial change in the orientation of the AM. After removing the haloes affected by artificial mass change, we found that the change in the orientation of the AM vector is correlated with time. The change in its angle and direction (I.e. the angle subtended by the AM vector in two consecutive time-steps) that affect the AM vector has a dependence on the change of mass that affects a halo, the time elapsed in which the change of mass occurs and the halo mass. We create a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the change of angle and direction of the AM vector. We reproduce the angular separation of the AM vector since a lookback time of 8.5 Gyr to today (α) with an accuracy of approximately 0.05 in cos(α). We are releasing this Monte Carlo simulation together with this publication. We also create a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the change of the AM modulus. We find that haloes in denser environments display the most dramatic evolution in their AM direction, as well as haloes with a lower specific AM modulus. These relations could be used to improve the way we follow the AM vector in low-resolution simulations.

  15. The Incidence and Evolution of Parkinsonian Rigidity in Rett Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter; Barrowman, Nick

    2016-07-01

    Patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) may demonstrate parkinsonian features. Here, we report a preliminary cross-sectional and prospective evaluation of the evolution, regional distribution, and eventual incidence of rigid tone in a cohort of MECP2 mutation-positive patients. In 51 participants, muscle tone rigidity in extremity regions and neck plus hypomimia were quantified using an RTT rigidity distribution (RTTRD) score with a range of 0 to 15. RTTRD scores were correlated with age, ability to walk and speak, mutation type, and, in a small subgroup (n=9), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid levels. Participant ages ranged from 2 years and 5 months, to 54 years. Rigidity was found in 43/51 (84.3%); it appeared as early as age 3, increased in extent with age, and was present in all participants aged ≥13. Ankle region rigidity appeared first, followed by proximal legs, arms, neck, and face. Ambulatory participants (n=21) had lower RTTRD scores than nonambulatory (n=30; p=0.003). We found a trend to lower scores in participants with retained speech (n=13) versus those with none (n=38; p=0.074), and no difference in scores for those with truncating (n=25) versus missense mutations (n=22; p=0.387). RTTRD scores correlated negatively with CSF HVA levels (R=-0.83; p=0.005), but not with 5-hydroxyindole-acetic acid levels (R=-0.45; p=0.22). Although assessment of muscle tone is somewhat subjective and the RTTRD has not been validated, this study nevertheless suggests that parkinsonian rigidity in RTT is common and frequently increases in extent with age; its severity correlates directly with impaired ambulation and inversely with CSF HVA levels.

  16. Importance of the Lu-Hf isotopic system in studies of planetary chronology and chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The 176Lu-176Hf isotope method and its applications in earth sciences are discussed. Greater fractionation of Lu/Hf than Sm/Nd in planetary magmatic processes makes 176Hf 177Hf a powerful geochemical tracer. In general, proportional variations of 176Hf 177Hf exceed those of 143Nd l44Nd by factors of 1.5-3 in terrestrial and lunar materials. Lu-Hf studies therefore have a major contribution to make in understanding of terrestrial and other planetary evolution through time, and this is the principal importance of Lu-Hf. New data on basalts from oceanic islands show unequivocally that whereas considerable divergences occur in 176Hf 177Hf- 87Sr 86Sr and 143Nd l44Nd- 87Sr 86Sr diagrams, 176Hf 177Hf and 143Nd 144Nd display a single, linear isotopic variation in the suboceanic mantle. These discordant 87Sr 86Sr relationships may allow, with the acquisition of further Hf-Nd-Sr isotopic data, a distinction between processes such as mantle metasomatism, influence of seawater-altered material in the magma source, or recycling of sediments into the mantle. In order to evaluate the Hf-Nd isotopic correlation in terms of mantle fractionation history, there is a need for measurements of Hf distribution coefficients between silicate minerals and liquids, and specifically for a knowledge of Hf behavior in relation to rareearth elements. For studying ancient terrestrial Hf isotopic variations, the best quality Hf isotope data are obtained from granitoid rocks or zircons. New data show that very U-Pb discordant zircons may have upwardly-biased 176Hf 177Hf, but that at least concordant to slightly discordant zircons appear to be reliable carriers of initial 176Hf 177Hf. Until the controls on addition of radiogenic Hf to zircon are understood, combined zircon-whole rock studies are recommended. Lu-Hf has been demonstrated as a viable tool for dating of ancient terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, but because it offers little advantage over existing methods, is unlikely to find

  17. Studying the Genetics of Behavior and Evolution by Adaptation and Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jules

    1998-01-01

    Provides an exercise designed to give students an appreciation for the genetic basis of behavior. Employs the phenomenon of glucose aversion as an example of evolution by mutation and accelerated natural selection, thereby revealing one of the ways in which organisms adapt to human interference. (DDR)

  18. A computational study into the evolution of dual-route dynamics for affective processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dulk, P.; Heerebout, B.T.; Phaf, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary justification by J. E. LeDoux (1996) for his dual-route model of fear processing was analyzed computationally by applying genetic algorithms to artificial neural networks. The evolution was simulated of a neural network controlling an agent that gathered food in an artificial world

  19. Two-Dimensional MXenes as Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution: A Computational Screening Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    is assessed via the calculated standard heat of formation. We find that most of the MXenes are metallic, and we investigate their performance as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction(HER) using the free energy of hydrogen adsorption at equilibrium coverage as an activity descriptor. For a given...

  20. What have two decades of laboratory life-history evolution studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A series of laboratory selection experiments on Drosophila melanogaster over the past two decades has provided insights into the specifics of life-history tradeoffs in the species and greatly refined our understanding of how ecology and genetics interact in life-history evolution. Much of what has been learnt from these ...

  1. The evolution of a cellular manufacturing system - a longitudinal case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molleman, E.; Slomp, J.; Rolefes, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of a cellular manufacturing system in a medium-sized company over a 13-year period. The objective of this paper is to analyze the arguments that gave rise to the nearly continuous readjustment of the design of the cellular manufacturing system of this company and

  2. Studying fatigue damage evolution in uni-directional composites using x-ray computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    Understanding fatigue damage evolution in the load carrying laminates of wind turbine blade plays an important role for designing longer and lighter turbine blades which will make it possible to increase the size of wind turbines or to upgrade existing turbines for lower wind classes. Thereby...

  3. Evolution in Action, a Case Study Based Advanced Biology Class at Spelman College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi

    2009-01-01

    The Biology department at Spelman, a historically black women's college has undertaken a major curriculum revision in the last few years. A primary goal of this revision is to increase the breadth of topics in biology classes. Historically, classes in the areas of ecology and evolution have been underrepresented whereas Spelman has always offered…

  4. A Bi-centre Study of the Pattern and Evolution of readily detectable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern and evolution of obvious post-meningitic sequelae were determined in 187 post-neonatal children followed up at two tertiary centres. The pattern of sequelae was classified using previously described schemes, as well as by the number of deficits per child. One hundred and eighty-seven children were assessed ...

  5. Evolution of family medicine in Kenya (1990s to date): a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PM Chege

    1999-08-26

    Aug 26, 1999 ... of Family Medicine. The challenges include lack of teachers; starting a graduate programme in medical schools that did not have one and starting ... Keywords: academic programmes, challenges, enablers, Family Medicine evolution, Kenya .... collaborating organisations and institutions, officials of the.

  6. A Comparative Study of Differential Evolution, Particle Swarm Optimization, and Evolutionary Algorithms on Numerical Benchmark Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterstrøm, Jacob Svaneborg; Thomsen, Rene

    2004-01-01

    Several extensions to evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) have been suggested during the last decades offering improved performance on selected benchmark problems. Recently, another search heuristic termed differential evolution (DE) has shown superior performance...... outperforms the other algorithms. However, on two noisy functions, both DE and PSO were outperformed by the EA....

  7. Emerging directions in the study of the ecology and evolution of plant-animal mutualistic networks: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Goodale, Eben; Chen, Jin

    2015-03-18

    The study of mutualistic plant and animal networks is an emerging field of ecological research. We reviewed progress in this field over the past 30 years. While earlier studies mostly focused on network structure, stability, and biodiversity maintenance, recent studies have investigated the conservation implications of mutualistic networks, specifically the influence of invasive species and how networks respond to habitat loss. Current research has also focused on evolutionary questions including phylogenetic signal in networks, impact of networks on the coevolution of interacting partners, and network influences on the evolution of interacting species. We outline some directions for future research, particularly the evolution of specialization in mutualistic networks, and provide concrete recommendations for environmental managers.

  8. The Effectiveness of the "Lions Quest Program: Skills for Growing" on School Climate, Students' Behaviors, Perceptions of School, and Conflict Resolution Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol-Guven, Mine

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of the Lions Quest Program: Skills for Growing by employing a quasi-experimental design with a control group. The experimental and control group each comprises two primary schools--one public, one private. One classroom at each grade level, 1 through 4, in each school was selected by random sampling for a…

  9. ReQuest in the Secondary History Classroom: How Does the Introduction of a Purposeful Reading Technique Effect Comprehension of Text?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleaux, Jeffery; Endacot, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative, action research study sought to explore the effects of introducing the ReQuest reading comprehension technique to students who are accustomed to using a world history textbook and the initiate-respond-evaluate questioning pattern to acquire basic historical information. Data collected from a series of paired sample quiz scores…

  10. Exploring TechQuests Through Open Source and Tools That Inspire Digital Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, K.; Ouyang, Y.; Kilb, D.; Taylor, N.; Krey, B.

    2008-12-01

    "There is little doubt that K-12 students need to understand and appreciate the Earth on which they live. They can achieve this understanding only if their teachers are well prepared". Dan Barstow, Director of Center for Earth and Space Science Education at TERC. The approach of San Diego County's Cyberinfrastructure Training, Education, Advancement, and Mentoring (SD Cyber-TEAM) project is to build understandings of Earth systems for middle school teachers and students through a collaborative that has engaged the scientific community in the use of cyber-based tools and environments for learning. The SD Cyber-TEAM has used Moodle, an open source management system with social networking tools, that engage digital native students and their teachers in collaboration and sharing of ideas and research related to Earth science. Teachers participate in on-line professional dialog through chat, wikis, blogs, forums, journals and other tools and choose the tools that will best fit their classroom. The use of Moodle during the Summer Cyber Academy developed a cyber-collaboratory environment where teaching strategies were discussed, supported and actualized by participants. These experiences supported digital immigrants (teachers) in adapting teaching strategies using technologies that are most attractive and familiar to students (digital natives). A new study by the National School Boards Association and Grunwald Associates LLC indicated that "the online behaviors of U.S. teens and 'tweens shows that 96 percent of students with online access use social networking technologies, such as chatting, text messaging, blogging, and visiting online communities such as Facebook, MySpace, and Webkinz". While SD Cyber-TEAM teachers are implementing TechQuests in classrooms they use these social networking elements to capture student interest and address the needs of digital natives. Through the Moodle environment, teachers have explored a variety of learning objects called TechQuests

  11. Toward the Language-Ready Brain: Biological Evolution and Primate Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    The approach to language evolution suggested here focuses on three questions: How did the human brain evolve so that humans can develop, use, and acquire languages? How can the evolutionary quest be informed by studying brain, behavior, and social interaction in monkeys, apes, and humans? How can computational modeling advance these studies? I hypothesize that the brain is language ready in that the earliest humans had protolanguages but not languages (i.e., communication systems endowed with rich and open-ended lexicons and grammars supporting a compositional semantics), and that it took cultural evolution to yield societies (a cultural constructed niche) in which language-ready brains could become language-using brains. The mirror system hypothesis is a well-developed example of this approach, but I offer it here not as a closed theory but as an evolving framework for the development and analysis of conflicting subhypotheses in the hope of their eventual integration. I also stress that computational modeling helps us understand the evolving role of mirror neurons, not in and of themselves, but only in their interaction with systems "beyond the mirror." Because a theory of evolution needs a clear characterization of what it is that evolved, I also outline ideas for research in neurolinguistics to complement studies of the evolution of the language-ready brain. A clear challenge is to go beyond models of speech comprehension to include sign language and models of production, and to link language to visuomotor interaction with the physical and social world.

  12. The Quest for Wholeness and Individuation in Atwood's novel Surfacing: A Psycho-Feminist Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latef S. N. Berzenji

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of Margaret Atwood's novels depict women facing external and internal obstacles in their attempt to attain self-realisation as they are internally divided because of encountering the harsh realities of life, or living in a community ruled by patriarchal conventions. Many women characters, especially Atwood's protagonists, suffer from psychic split because of specific external factors and are haunted by mental and emotional traumas. This paper studies Atwood's Surfacing (1972 by examining the events that take place in the protagonist's mind as part of her long-running quest for wholeness; highlighting the mental process she undergoes to achieve such an aim. As a feminist writer, Atwood's primary aim is to explore women’s inner psyche, their conflicts and search for identification. The writer wants to highlight the terrifying gap existing between man and woman. The paper attempts to assert that self-realization is at the heart of her novel under consideration.

  13. Monitoring the morphological evolution of complex glaciers: the Planpincieux case-study (Mont Blanc - Aosta Valley)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordan, Daniele; Manconi, Andrea; Allasia, Paolo; Curtaz, Michèle; Vagliasindi, Marco; Bertolo, Davide

    2014-05-01

    The Planpincieux Glacier (PG) is located on the Italian side of the Grandes Jorasses massif, Mont Blanc, Italy. This area is historically known for the occasional activation of ice falls events from the frontal part of the glacier. The PG is a so-called "polythermal" glacier, meaning that the liquid water present at contact between ice and the bedrock in the lower part of the glacier itself plays an important role in the glacier dynamics, and ice falls might occur in a sudden and unpredictable fashion. In this scenario, the accurate analysis of the glacier morphological evolution assumes a crucial role. Starting from 2012, within the framework of the regional plan for glaciers risk detection, a research project was set up to study the Planpincieux Glacier and evaluate the potential hazard concerning the possible activation of large ice or ice-snow avalanches triggered by icefall events in that area. Dynamics of such avalanches, as well as potentially endangered areas, have been evaluated in an expertise by the SLF Institute. Therefore, the availability of both qualitative information and quantitative measurements relevant to the glacier movements represented a primary goal. After a careful evaluation of several possible technical solutions to achieve displacement monitoring also based on the results of a preliminary study managed by the ETH Zurich (prof. M. Funk), we installed an experimental monitoring station located on the opposite side of the valley, at the top of the Mt. de la Saxe, ca. 3.5 km away from the main target. The monitoring station is composed of two modules, including: (i) a surveillance module, based on a medium resolution digital camera, observing large part of the slope; (ii) a photogrammetric module, based on a high resolution digital camera equipped with a 300mm optical zoom, pointed on the Planpincieux glacier front. At this stage, our analyses focused mainly on the qualitative assessment and recognition of impulsive phenomena affecting the

  14. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE WAKE EVOLUTION OF CONTRA-ROTATING PROPELLER IN PROPELLER OPEN WATER AND SELF-PROPULSION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Jun Paik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the wake characteristics of a contra-rotating propeller (CRP were investigated using a numerical simulation. The numerical simulation was carried out with a Reynolds averaged Navier−Stokes equations solver. The numerical simulations were performed on CRPs in both propeller open water and self-propulsion conditions to investigate their wake evolution characteristics. To study the effect of the rudder on the wake in the self-propulsion condition, the numerical simulations with and without a rudder were compared. The evolution of the CRP wake was analysed through velocity and vorticity contours on one transverse plane between the forward and aft propellers and two transverse planes located downstream of the CRP. The variations of thrust and torque of the forward and aft propellers during one revolution of the CRP were compared to investigate the interaction between forward and aft propellers and the effect of a rudder.

  15. The Quest for Carbon Sequestration in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, C. C.; Akintunde, O. M.; Knapp, J. H.; Brantley, D.; Lakshmi, V.

    2016-12-01

    Eighty percent of the world's energy relies on fossil fuel and under increasingly stricter national and international regulations on greenhouse gas emissions, storage of CO2 in geologic repositories is a feasible and vital solution for near- and mid-term reduction of carbon emissions in any climate change mitigation strategy. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that about 40% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the U.S. are generated in the southeastern United States, mostly from point sources. The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute and the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of South Carolina have received $11M in Department of Energy funding to evaluate the feasibility of CO2 storage in saline formations of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) including (1) the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sandstones of the buried South Georgia Rift basin (SGR; 2009-2014), and (2) Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations along the Mid- and South Atlantic seaboard (2015-2018). ENAM is a complex and regionally extensive mature Mesozoic passive margin rift system encompassing: (1) a large volume and regional extent of related magmatism known as the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), (2) a complete stratigraphic column that records the post-rift evolution in several basins, (3) preserved lithospheric-scale pre-rift structures including Paleozoic sutures, and (4) a wide range of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies both onshore and offshore. Our analyses have included integration of 2- and 3-D seismic surveys with core samples and geophysical well logs leading to a detailed stratigraphic, structural, petrophysical, and injection simulation model showing the heterogeneity and highly complex tectonic evolution of the target reservoirs. Our study shows that (1) the SGR basin manifests distinct porosity-permeability regimes; (2) CAMP is much more limited spatially than previously thought; (3) fractured igneous rocks hold promise for CO2

  16. Exploring the Evolution of Music and Language: Social versus Sexual Selection. Evidence from an Emotional Priming Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kiker, Alexander James

    2012-01-01

    Connections between language and music have been made for over a century, and their origins are thought to be closely linked, but the selection mechanisms of the first precursors to music and language are still largely unknown, and it is debated whether they would have been either sexually or socially selected for. The present study presents the results of an emotional priming experiment in an attempt to shed light on the selection mechanisms which would have been at work on the evolution of ...

  17. Infections and Coinfections of Questing Ixodes ricinus Ticks by Emerging Zoonotic Pathogens in Western Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommano, Elena; Bertaiola, Luce; Dupasquier, Christèle

    2012-01-01

    In Europe, Ixodes ricinus is the vector of many pathogens of medical and veterinary relevance, among them Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and tick-borne encephalitis virus, which have been the subject of numerous investigations. Less is known about the occurrence of emerging tick-borne pathogens like Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp., “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis,” and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in questing ticks. In this study, questing nymph and adult I. ricinus ticks were collected at 11 sites located in Western Switzerland. A total of 1,476 ticks were analyzed individually for the simultaneous presence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato, Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp., “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis,” and A. phagocytophilum. B. burgdorferi sensu lato, Rickettsia spp., and “Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis” were detected in ticks at all sites with global prevalences of 22.5%, 10.2%, and 6.4%, respectively. Babesia- and A. phagocytophilum-infected ticks showed a more restricted geographic distribution, and their prevalences were lower (1.9% and 1.5%, respectively). Species rarely reported in Switzerland, like Borrelia spielmanii, Borrelia lusitaniae, and Rickettsia monacensis, were identified. Infections with more than one pathogenic species, involving mostly Borrelia spp. and Rickettsia helvetica, were detected in 19.6% of infected ticks. Globally, 34.2% of ticks were infected with at least one pathogen. The diversity of tick-borne pathogens detected in I. ricinus in this study and the frequency of coinfections underline the need to take them seriously into consideration when evaluating the risks of infection following a tick bite. PMID:22522688

  18. Carbon combustion supernovae - Numerical studies of the final evolution of degenerate carbon-oxygen cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, E.; Arnett, W. D.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of polytropic 1.46-solar-mass 3-Gg/cu cm (4 x 10 to the 8th)-K pure C cores is investigated theoretically by means of model computations starting from the runaway stage. The temperature in central zones is raised to the runaway temperature, and the evolution is followed in a spherical coordinate system. In models of burning without detonation, it is found that the initially spherical burning front is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, without bipolar jets or equatorial rings; that some C is not burned to Ni; and that the Ni in the 0.8-1.0 solar mass of burned fuel produced can account for observed properties of type I supernovae.

  19. Robot life: simulation and participation in the study of evolution and social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelty, Christopher M

    2018-01-03

    This paper explores the case of using robots to simulate evolution, in particular the case of Hamilton's Law. The uses of robots raises several questions that this paper seeks to address. The first concerns the role of the robots in biological research: do they simulate something (life, evolution, sociality) or do they participate in something? The second question concerns the physicality of the robots: what difference does embodiment make to the role of the robot in these experiments. Thirdly, how do life, embodiment and social behavior relate in contemporary biology and why is it possible for robots to illuminate this relation? These questions are provoked by a strange similarity that has not been noted before: between the problem of simulation in philosophy of science, and Deleuze's reading of Plato on the relationship of ideas, copies and simulacra.

  20. SANS study of the structural evolution in NIPA/SA gel on dehydration

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiyama, M; Maeda, Y; Hara, K

    2002-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures of N-isopropylacryl-amide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gels with several water contents were investigated with a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method in order to make clear their structural evolution on dehydration. The evolution of the SANS profile with a decrease in the water content in the gel could be classified into three stages. In the beginning, there was no peak in the SANS profile except for the central part, which steadily intensified. With the further water dissipation, a side peak appeared at around 0.02 A sup - sup 1 , the intensity of which increased up to a certain water content and then decreased. These results indicate that the water dissipation in the NIPA/SA gel occurs inhomogeneously. (orig.)

  1. A Study of Neutral B Meson Time Evolution Using Exclusively Reconstructed Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T

    2003-11-05

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental building blocks of the Universe and their basic interactions. The model naturally describes the time evolution of the basic particles, of which lifetime and mixing are two examples. The neutral B meson, consisting of a bottom quark and an oppositely charged down quark, enjoys a lifetime of about 1.5 ps and the special property of mixing with its antiparticle partner, the {bar B}{sup 0}. That is, due to second order weak interactions, the B{sup 0} meson can change into a {bar B}{sup 0} meson and back again as it evolves through time. The details of this behavior offer an opportunity to closely examine the Standard Model. In this dissertation, I report on a measurement of the lifetime and mixing frequency of the neutral B meson. Using the semileptonic decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, we select more than 68,000 signal and background candidates from about 23 million B{bar B} pairs collected in 1999-2000 with the BABAR detector located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The other B in the event is reconstructed inclusively. By constructing a master probability density function that describes the distribution of decay time differences in the sample, we use a maximum likelihood technique to simultaneously extract the B{sup 0} lifetime and mixing parameters with precision comparable to the year 2000 world average. The results are {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = (1.523{sub -0.023}{sup +0.024} {+-} 0.022) ps and {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.492 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.013) ps{sup -1}. The statistical correlation coefficient between {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and {Delta}m{sub d} is -0.22. I describe in detail several cutting-edge strategies this analysis uses to study these phenomena, laying important groundwork for the future. I also discuss several extensions of this work to include possible measurements of higher order parameters such as {Delta}{Lambda}{sub d}.

  2. A comparative study on the evolution of reversed size dimorphism in monogamous waders

    OpenAIRE

    Figuerola, Jordi

    1999-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in size is common in birds. Males are usually larger than females, although in some taxa reversed size dimorphism (RSD) predominates. Whilst direct dimorphism is attributed to sexual selection in males giving greater reproductive access to females, the evolutionary causes of RSD are still unclear. Four different hypotheses could explain the evolution of RSD in monogamous birds: (1) The ‘energy storing’ hypothesis suggests that larger females could accumulate more reserves at...

  3. Arthur Smith Woodward and his involvement in the study of human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, C.; De Groote, I.; Stringer, C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1884, Arthur Smith Woodward first met Charles Dawson, a solicitor and industrious amateur collector, antiquarian, geologist, archaeologist and palaeontologist. This began a long association and friendship centred on their mutual interest in palaeontology and human evolution. Dawson devised a complicated plot focused around the ancient river gravel deposits at Barkham Manor near the village of Piltdown, Sussex. In these gravels he planted stone tools and fossil mammal remains together with ...

  4. Study of the evolution of the hyperfine parameters in nanostructured Fe-Mn-Cu system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizrahi, M., E-mail: mizrahi@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Cabrera, A. F.; Desimoni, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas UNLP, Departamento de Fisica (Argentina)

    2007-09-15

    Hyperfine parameters evolution with the Cu content obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy from mechanical milled (Fe{sub 79}Mn{sub 21}){sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.00 to 0.30) are presented. Results indicate that the Cu addition favors the formation of a FCC phase with two different magnetic states at room temperature. The trend of the hyperfine parameters with Cu composition suggests the incorporation of the Cu atoms at the regular FCC lattice sites.

  5. Comparative Study on Damage Evolution during Sheet Metal Forming of Steels DP600 and DP1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münstermann, S.; Lian, J.; Pütz, F.; Könemann, M.; Brinnel, V.

    2017-09-01

    Two different dualphase steels of significantly different strength properties are compared with respect to microstructural configuration, chemical composition, mechanical properties, and ductile damage mechanisms. The investigated steel grades DP600 and DP1000 show remarkable differences in terms of martensite phase fractions, yield and ultimate tensile strength, and ductile damage evolution behaviour. In particular it turns out that steel DP600 experiences a relatively early ductile damage initiation, but only a moderate rate of damage evolution, whereas for steel DP1000, contrary behaviour is observed. This steel shows a comparably late ductile damage initiation with rapid subsequent damage evolution. This behaviour is expressed by the ratio of fracture strain over strain at damage initiation. Its origin lies in both the martensite phase fraction and the individual strength properties of the ferritic and the martensitic phases, which will provoke inhomogeneous plastic strain distributions in the materials’ microstructures. The more pronounced these differences are, the higher the local plastic strain peaks become, and the earlier ductile damage initiation happens. Nevertheless, with decreasing strength of the ferritic phase, its ability to withstand even large plastic strains without fracturing is strongly promoted, so that the fracture strain in steel DP600 can be shifted to higher values even though the material has undergone early damage initiation.

  6. Astrophysical quests for neutron capture data of unstable nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppeler, F.

    2016-11-01

    The abundances of the chemical elements heavier than iron can be attributed in about equal parts to the r and to the s process, which are taking place in supernova explosions and during the He and C burning phases of stellar evolution, respectively. So far, quantitative studies on the extremely short-lived neutron-rich nuclei constituting the ( n, γ) network of the r process are out of reach. On the contrary, the situation for the s -process is far advanced, as the reaction path of the s process from 12C to the Pb/Bi region is located within the valley of stability. Accordingly, a comprehensive database of experimental ( n, γ) cross sections has been established. While for many stable isotopes the necessary accuracy is still to be reached, reliable cross sections for the involved unstable isotopes are almost completely missing. Because of the intrinsic γ background of radioactive samples, successful time-of-flight measurements are depending on intense pulsed neutron sources. Such data are fundamental for our understanding of branchings in the s -process reaction path, which carry important model-independent information on neutron flux and temperature in the deep stellar interior.

  7. Study of boron carbide evolution under neutron irradiation; Contribution a l'etude de l'evolution du carbure de bore sous irradiation neutronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, D. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie (DMT), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand II, (CNRS), 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-07-01

    Owing to its high neutron efficiency, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) is used as a neutron absorber in control rods of nuclear plants. Its behaviour under irradiation has been extensively studied for many years. It now seems clear that brittleness of the material induced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li capture reaction is due to penny shaped helium bubbles associated to a high strain field around them. However, no model explains the behaviour of the material under neutron irradiation. In order to build such a model, this work uses different techniques: nuclear microprobe X-ray diffraction profile analysis and Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to present an evolution model of B{sub 4}C under neutron irradiation. The use of nuclear reactions produced by a nuclear microprobe such as the {sup 7}Li(p,p'{gamma}){sup 7}Li reaction, allows to measure lithium profile in B{sub 4}C pellets irradiated either in Pressurised Water Reactors or in Fast Breeder Reactors. Examining such profiles enables us to describe the migration of lithium atoms out of B{sub 4}C materials under neutron irradiation. The analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles of irradiated B{sub 4}C samples allows us to quantify the concentrations of helium bubbles as well as the strain fields around such bubbles.Furthermore Raman spectroscopy studies of different B{sub 4}C samples lead us to propose that under neutron irradiation. the CBC linear chain disappears. Such a vanishing of this CBC chain. validated by NMR analysis, may explain the penny shaped of helium bubbles inside irradiated B{sub 4}C. (author)

  8. The Colletotrichum acutatum Species Complex as a Model System to Study Evolution and Host Specialization in Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Riccardo; Talhinhas, Pedro; Pensec, Flora; Sukno, Serenella A.; Le Floch, Gaetan; Thon, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum spp. infect a wide diversity of hosts, causing plant diseases on many economically important crops worldwide. The genus contains approximately 189 species organized into at least 11 major phylogenetic lineages, also known as species complexes. The Colletotrichum acutatum species complex is a diverse yet relatively closely related group of plant pathogenic fungi within this genus. Within the species complex we find a wide diversity of important traits such as host range and host preference, mode of reproduction and differences in the strategy used to infect their hosts. Research on fungal comparative genomics have attempted to find correlations in these traits and patterns of gene family evolution but such studies typically compare fungi from different genera or even different fungal Orders. The C. acutatum species complex contains most of this diversity within a group of relatively closely related species. This Perspective article presents a review of the current knowledge on C. acutatum phylogeny, biology, and pathology. It also demonstrates the suitability of C. acutatum for the study of gene family evolution on a fine scale to uncover evolutionary events in the genome that are associated with the evolution of phenotypic characters important for host interactions. PMID:29075253

  9. The Colletotrichum acutatum Species Complex as a Model System to Study Evolution and Host Specialization in Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Baroncelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum spp. infect a wide diversity of hosts, causing plant diseases on many economically important crops worldwide. The genus contains approximately 189 species organized into at least 11 major phylogenetic lineages, also known as species complexes. The Colletotrichum acutatum species complex is a diverse yet relatively closely related group of plant pathogenic fungi within this genus. Within the species complex we find a wide diversity of important traits such as host range and host preference, mode of reproduction and differences in the strategy used to infect their hosts. Research on fungal comparative genomics have attempted to find correlations in these traits and patterns of gene family evolution but such studies typically compare fungi from different genera or even different fungal Orders. The C. acutatum species complex contains most of this diversity within a group of relatively closely related species. This Perspective article presents a review of the current knowledge on C. acutatum phylogeny, biology, and pathology. It also demonstrates the suitability of C. acutatum for the study of gene family evolution on a fine scale to uncover evolutionary events in the genome that are associated with the evolution of phenotypic characters important for host interactions.

  10. Emergence and evolution of social self-management of Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a 3-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Thomas, Cathi A; Habermann, Barbara; Martinez, Linda S Sprague; Terrin, Norma; Noubary, Farzad; Naumova, Elena N

    2014-05-02

    Parkinson's disease affects facial, vocal and trunk muscles. As symptoms progress, facial expression becomes masked, limiting the person's ability to communicate emotions and intentions to others. As people with the disease live and reside in their homes longer, the burden of caregiving is unmitigated by social and emotional rewards provided by an expressive individual. Little is known about how adults living with Parkinson's disease manage their social lives and how an inability to be emotionally expressive can affect social connections and health. Because social networks have been shown to be crucial to the overall well-being of people living with chronic diseases, research is needed on how expressive capacity affects life trajectories and health. The overall objective is to understand the emergence and evolution of the trajectories of the self-management of the social lives of people living with Parkinson's disease. The central hypothesis is that expressive capacity predicts systematic change in the pattern of social self-management and quality of life outcomes. The specific aims of this 3-year longitudinal study of 120 people with the disease and a maximum of 120 care partners are: 1) characterize social self-management trajectories over a 3-year period; 2) estimate the degree to which expressive nonverbal capacity predicts the trajectory; and 3) determine the moderating effect of gender on the association between expressive capacity and change in social self-management. Each participant will be assessed 14 times to detect rapid and non-linear changes in social participation and management of social activities; social network; and social comfort, general health and well-being. This project will provide evidence to guide the development of interventions for supporting social integration of those living with Parkinson's disease, thus leading to improved overall health. It focuses on the novel construct of social self-management and known factors

  11. The quest for more research on painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, P P; Bendszus, M; Pham, M; Jende, J; Heiland, S; Ries, S; Schumann, C; Schmelz, M; Schuh-Hofer, S; Treede, R D; Kuner, R; Oikonomou, D; Groener, J B; Kopf, S

    2017-09-20

    A 62-year-old diabetologist diagnosed himself to have diabetes type-2, with an HbA1c of 9.5. Five months after lifestyle intervention and a multi-drug approach, HbA1c was 6.3, systolic blood pressure was below 135mmHg and BMI reduced to 27. But he suffered from severe painful diabetic neuropathy. Therefore he decided to visit his friend, a famous neuroscientist at an even more famous university. He asked him several plain questions: 1. What is the natural course of painful diabetic neuropathy? 2. Why do I have, despite almost normalizing HbA1c, more problems than before? 3. Are you sure my problems are due to diabetes or should we do a nerve biopsy? 4. Are there imaging techniques helpful for the diagnosis of this diabetic complication, starting in the distal nerve endings of the foot and slowly moving ahead? 5. Can you suggest any drug, specific and effective, for relieving painful diabetic neuropathy? This review will use the experts' answers to the questions of the diabetologist, not only to give a summary of the current knowledge, but even more to highlight areas of research needed for improving the fate of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Based on the unknowns, which exceed the knowns in diabetic neuropathy, a quest for more public support of research is made. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Quest for Fusion at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartouni, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Arthur Eddington speculated in 1920 on the internal constitution of stars and described the possibility of nuclear fusion based on the then new results from special relativity and measurements of light nuclei masses. By 1929 Atkinson and Houtermans worked out the calculations for nuclear fusion in stars and initiating nuclear astrophysics. All of these sciences were pressed into service during the World War II, and the applications developed, particularly under the auspices of the Manhattan Project provided both weapons with which to wage and win that conflict, but also the possibilities to harness these applications of the nuclear processes of fission and fusion for peaceful purposes. 32 years after Eddington's speculation the United States demonstrated the application of fusion in a famous nuclear weapons test. In the following years many ideas for producing ``controlled'' fusion through inertial confinement were pursued. The invention of the laser opened up new avenues which have culminated in the National Ignition Facility, NIF. I will attempt to cover the ground between Eddington, through the Manhattan Project and provide a current status of this quest at NIF. LLNL-ABS-704367-DRAFT. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Musings on mechanism: quest for a quark theory of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rob

    2017-10-01

    The give and take between biology and physics is an important part of the history of modern science, with this partnership perhaps now more intimate than ever. In this essay, I explore the ways in which these different fields can strengthen each other through their distinct outlooks on some of the most important questions being asked about the living world. In particular, I highlight three areas where the perspective from physics might lead to deeper insights into the workings of cells. First, I consider what it means for two ostensibly unrelated problems to be the same, and how such sameness can provide unexpected insights into apparently unrelated phenomena. Second, I consider different conceptions of what constitutes a mechanistic understanding of a given phenomenon with an emphasis on nonmolecular notions of mechanism. The third idea is the importance of "toy problems" as a way of providing foundational insights into the real problems. Though my focus here is primarily on ways in which physics approaches might prove interesting in biology, I close with an example of how biology might substantially alter physics by providing a forum and the tools to uncover a fundamental understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena.-Phillips, R. Musings on mechanism: quest for a quark theory of proteins? © FASEB.

  14. EDUCATIONAL QUEST AS MEANS OF FORMING OF INFORMATION CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В И Глизбург

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Creative use of the potential of modern information and communication technologies for solving pedagogical, educational and training tasks is now an urgent problem of education. It is already impossible to isolate pupils from the modern means of communication (smartphones, tablets, etc.. The objective of a teacher to show how you can use the gadgets for educational purposes. Interest in their use as a source of useful information. Learn to evaluate and select information sources on various criteria: reliability, availability, adequacy and completeness of the information, response rate, etc. Theseand other skills to work with information are key in our rapidly changing world, and are part of the concept of information culture of the modern man. This article describes the use of educational technology of QR-codes to address these issues, as well as justification its effectiveness. The intellectual quest, which is the embodiment of the above ideas, combines the dynamism and kindness, interest and attentiveness, ability to work in a team and contribute to the common cause; aimed at the development of tolerance, inquisitiveness, activity, courtesy, accuracy, attention and thinking; as well as to broaden their horizons and the formation of information culture of schoolboys.

  15. Scholar Quest: A Residency Research Program Aligned With Faculty Goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R. Panchal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ACGME requires that residents perform scholarly activities prior to graduation, but this is difficult to complete and challenging to support. We describe a residency research program, taking advantage of environmental change aligning resident and faculty goals, to become a contributor to departmental cultural change and research development. Methods: A research program, Scholar Quest (SQ, was developed as a part of an Information Mastery program. The goal of SQ is for residents to gain understanding of scholarly activity through a mentor-directed experience in original research. This curriculum is facilitated by providing residents protected time for didactics, seed grants and statistical/staff support. We evaluated total scholarly activity and resident/faculty involvement before and after implementation (PRE-SQ; 2003-2005 and POST-SQ; 2007-2009. Results: Scholarly activity was greater POST-SQ versus PRE-SQ (123 versus 27 (p<0.05 with an incidence rate ratio (IRR=2.35. Resident and faculty involvement in scholarly activity also increased PRE-SQ to POST-SQ (22 to 98 residents; 10 to 39 faculty, p<0.05 with an IRR=2.87 and 2.69, respectively. Conclusion: Implementation of a program using department environmental change promoting a resident longitudinal research curriculum yielded increased resident and faculty scholarly involvement, as well as an increase in total scholarly activity.

  16. The kinematic evolution of the Macquarie Plate: A case study for the fragmentation of oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hakkyum; Kim, Seung-Sep; Dyment, Jérôme; Granot, Roi; Park, Sung-Hyun; Hong, Jong Kuk

    2017-11-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR), and in particular of its easternmost edge, has not been constrained by high-resolution shipboard data and therefore the kinematic details of its behavior are uncertain. Using new shipboard magnetic data obtained by R/VIB Araon and M/V L'Astrolabe along the easternmost SEIR and available archived magnetic data, we estimated the finite rotation parameters of the Macquarie-Antarctic and Australian-Antarctic motions for eight anomalies (1o, 2, 2Ay, 2Ao, 3y, 3o, 3Ay, and 3Ao). These new finite rotations indicate that the Macquarie Plate since its creation ∼6.24 million years ago behaved as an independent and rigid plate, confirming previous estimates. The change in the Australian-Antarctic spreading direction from N-S to NW-SE appears to coincide with the formation of the Macquarie Plate at ∼6.24 Ma. Analysis of the estimated plate motions indicates that the initiation and growth stages of the Macquarie Plate resemble the kinematic evolution of other microplates and continental breakup, whereby a rapid acceleration in angular velocity took place after its initial formation, followed by a slow decay, suggesting that a decrease in the resistive strength force might have played a significant role in the kinematic evolution of the microplate. The motions of the Macquarie Plate during its growth stages may have been further enhanced by the increased subducting rates along the Hjort Trench, while the Macquarie Plate has exhibited constant growth by seafloor spreading.

  17. How Beatrice Tinsley Destroyed Sandage's Quest for a Standard Candle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The goal of cosmology and most extragalactic optical astronomy during the heroic period spanning the half century from Hubble to Sandage (1920s - 1970s) was a search for two numbers, the Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter. Standard candles were needed to establish the measure of the universe. In 1968, Beatrice Tinsley, then a postdoctoral fellow in the astronomy department of the University of Texas at Austin showed that the great enterprise at Palomar of calibrating the galaxies was in need of major revision. At the 132nd AAS Meeting (June 1970, Boulder, Colorado) she presented a paper on galactic evolution on the magnitude-redshift relation. In her Abstract she boldly wrote: "My present conclusion is opposite to that reached by most cosmologists." In fact her claims caused great consternation among cosmologists. In 1972 she published eight papers on the evolution of galaxies, and the effects of that evolution for observational cosmology and the origin of structure.

  18. Study of shape evolution and electromagnetic properties in neutron-rich Zr and Sr isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R.; Devi, R.; Khosa, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The projected shell model calculations have been carried out in neutron-rich 100-108Zr and 98-102Sr isotopes. The shape evolution and electromagnetic properties have been examined in neutron-rich Zr and Sr isotopes around N = 60. The structure of yrast states, backbending phenomena, g-factors and B(E2) transition probabilities are calculated and compared with corresponding observable quantities. The present calculations predict the occurrence of coexistence of prolate-oblate shapes at 0+ state in 100,102Zr and 98,100Sr. Nuclei beyond N = 62 are predicted to have prolate deformation in the ground-state.

  19. Miss Evers' Boys (1997). Study of the spontaneous evolution of syphilis in black patients

    OpenAIRE

    Agustín del Cañizo Fernández-Roldán

    2008-01-01

    Miss Evers' Boys (1997) is a movie based on a real fact happened in the State of Alabama (United States), where it was carried out a research work that begun in 1932 and was prolonged up to 1972. It consisted on watching the evolution of syphilis in black male patients, who were not given any anti-syphilitic treatment at any moment. Once the fact was public, a great polemic on the ethics of the research with human fellows was originated and publications dealt with this case...

  20. Evolution Study of Crystal Parameter for Iron Powder Subjected to Mechanical Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan TĂUT

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In a planetary mill with balls of high energy, the experiences of milling on different time interval of iron powder were done. The iron powder with 99.9% purity was introduced in four vials, having every one on average mass of 1.750 kg, varying the number and diameter of balls. It was noticed, there is a tendency to increase accentuated the crystallographic parameter in the interval of 7.5-9 mm ball radius, it is admitted the same interval to be more efficiently on milling from point of view of evolution of crystal parameter from experimental data.

  1. Aging effect evolution during ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition: A mechanism study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuyong Feng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aging can significantly modify the dielectric, piezoelectric, and ferroelectric performance of ferroelectrics. However, little attention has been paid to the aging effect during ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transitions that is essentially correlated with real applications. In this letter, the authors report the aging effect evolution between two ferroelectric phases in an acceptor-doped piezoceramics. The results show that aging-induced double hysteresis loops were exhibited in different ferroelectric phases, but disappeared during ferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transitions, suggesting the mechanism that the intrinsic restoring force for the reversible switching of domains caused by the alignment of defect dipoles was weakened due to ferroelectric dipole reorientation.

  2. Basic processes and factors determining the evolution of collapse sinkholes: a sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Douchko; Kaufmann, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes appear as closed depressions at the surface. The origin of these karst features is related to the continuous dissolution of the soluble rock caused by a focussed sub-surface flow. Water flowing along a preferential pathway through fissures and fractures within the phreatic part of a karst aquifer is able to dissolve the rock (limestone, gypsum, anhydrite). With time, the dissolved void volume increases and part of the ceiling above the stream can become unstable, collapses, and accumulates as debris in the flow path. The debris partially blocks the flow and thus activates new pathways. Because of the low compaction of the debris (high hydraulic conductivity), the flow and the dissolution rates within this crushed zone remain high. This allows a relatively fast dissolutional and erosional removal of the crushed material and the development of new empty voids. The void volume expands upwards towards the surface until a collapse sinkhole is formed. The collapse sinkholes exhibit a large variety of shapes (cylindrical, cone-, bowl-shaped), depths (from few to few hundred meters) and diameters (meters up to hundreds of meters). Two major processes are responsible for this diversity: a) the karst evolution of the aquifer - responsible for the dissolutional and erosional removal of material; b) the mechanical evolution of the host rock and the existence of structural features, faults for example, which determine the stability and the magnitude of the subsequent collapses. In this work we demonstrate the influence of the host rock type, the hydrological and geological boundary conditions, the chemical composition of the flowing water, and the geometry and the scale of the crushed zone, on the location and the evolution of the growing sinkhole. We demonstrate the ability of the karst evolution models to explain, at least qualitatively, the growth and the morphology of the collapse sinkholes and to roughly predict their shape and location. Implementing

  3. Animal personalities: consequences for ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Max; Weissing, Franz J

    2012-08-01

    Personality differences are a widespread phenomenon throughout the animal kingdom. Past research has focused on the characterization of such differences and a quest for their proximate and ultimate causation. However, the consequences of these differences for ecology and evolution received much less attention. Here, we strive to fill this gap by providing a comprehensive inventory of the potential implications of personality differences, ranging from population growth and persistence to species interactions and community dynamics, and covering issues such as social evolution, the speed of evolution, evolvability, and speciation. The emerging picture strongly suggests that personality differences matter for ecological and evolutionary processes (and their interaction) and, thus, should be considered a key dimension of ecologically and evolutionarily relevant intraspecific variation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Groupware requirements evolution patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, D.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study is an empirical investigation of requirements evolution for groupware systems in use by means of case studies. Its goal is to contribute to the development of a theory of requirements evolution. A conceptual framework offering an integrated view of requirements as a collection of domains

  5. Evolution of Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu Chih; Chen, I Ju

    2010-01-01

    The contrast between social constructivism and cognitive constructivism are depicted in different ways in many studies. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the evolution of constructivism and put a focus on social constructivism from the perception of Vygotsky. This study provides a general idea of the evolution of constructivism for people…

  6. The Quest for Less: Activities and Resources for Teaching K-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Quest for Less provides hands-on lessons and activities, enrichment ideas, journal writing assignments, and other educational tools related to preventing and reusing waste. This document includes factsheets, activities, and teaching notes for 6-8

  7. Lexington Children`s Museum final report on EnergyQuest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    EnergyQuest is a museum-wide exhibit that familiarizes children and their families with energy sources, uses, and issues and with the impact of those issues on their lives. It was developed and built by Lexington Children`s Museum with support from the US Department of Energy, Kentucky Utilities, and the Kentucky Coal Marketing and Export Council. EnergyQuest featured six hands-on exhibit stations in each of six museum galleries. Collectively, the exhibits examine the sources, uses and conservation of energy. Each EnergyQuest exhibit reflects the content of its gallery setting. During the first year after opening EnergyQuest, a series of 48 public educational programs on energy were conducted at the Museum as part of the Museum`s ongoing schedule of demonstrations, performances, workshops and classes. In addition, teacher training was conducted.

  8. A quest for meta-learning gains in a physics serious game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, Dominique; Castaigne, Jean-Loup; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Verpoorten, D., Castaigne, J.-L., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). A quest for meta-learning gains in a physics serious game. Education and Information Technologies. Advanced online publication: 10.1007/s10639-012-9219-7

  9. Varieties of Quest and the Religious Openness Hypothesis within Religious Fundamentalist and Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Watson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the Religious Openness Hypothesis, the religious and psychological openness of American Christians is obscured by a defensive ghettoization of thought associated with a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround and can be discovered instead within a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround. A test of this claim examined Religious Fundamentalism, Biblical Foundationalism, Quest, and Multidimensional Quest Scales in 432 undergraduates. Christian Religious Reflection, Religious Schema, and Religious Orientation measures clarified these two ideological surrounds. Partial correlations controlling for Biblical Foundationalism described a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround that more strongly rejected Quest and that more generally displayed a failure to integrate faith with intellect. Partial correlations controlling for Religious Fundamentalism revealed a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround that was more open to Quest and that offered numerous demonstrations of an ability to unite faith with intellect. These data supplemented previous investigations in demonstrating that Christianity and other traditional religions have ideological resources for promoting a faithful intellect.

  10. Features of Recent Codon Evolution: A Comparative Polymorphism-Fixation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of amino-acid and codon changes can provide us important insights on protein evolution. So far, investigators have often examined mutation patterns at either interspecies fixed substitution or intraspecies nucleotide polymorphism level, but not both. Here, we performed a unique analysis of a combined set of intra-species polymorphisms and inter-species substitutions in human codons. Strong difference in mutational pattern was found at codon positions 1, 2, and 3 between the polymorphism and fixation data. Fixation had strong bias towards increasing the rarest codons but decreasing the most frequently used codons, suggesting that codon equilibrium has not been reached yet. We detected strong CpG effect on CG-containing codons and subsequent suppression by fixation. Finally, we detected the signature of purifying selection against A∣U dinucleotides at synonymous dicodon boundaries. Overall, fixation process could effectively and quickly correct the volatile changes introduced by polymorphisms so that codon changes could be gradual and directional and that codon composition could be kept relatively stable during evolution.

  11. The Intracellular Destiny of the Protein Corona: A Study on its Cellular Internalization and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Filippo; Garry, David; Monopoli, Marco P; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2016-11-22

    It has been well established that the early stages of nanoparticle-cell interactions are governed, at least in part, by the layer of proteins and other biomolecules adsorbed and slowly exchanged with the surrounding biological media (biomolecular corona). Subsequent to membrane interactions, nanoparticles are typically internalized into the cell and trafficked along defined pathways such as, in many cases, the endolysosomal pathway. Indeed, if the original corona is partially retained on the nanoparticle surface, the biomolecules in this layer may play an important role in determining subsequent cellular processing. In this work, using a combination of organelle separation and fluorescence labeling of the initial extracellular corona, we clarify its intracellular evolution as nanoparticles travel within the cell. We show that specific proteins present in the original protein corona are retained on the nanoparticles until they accumulate in lysosomes, and, once there, they are degraded. We also report on how different bare surfaces (amino and carboxyl modified) affect the details of this evolution. One overarching discovery is that the same serum proteins can exhibit different intracellular processing when carried inside cells by nanoparticles, as components of their corona, compared to what is observed when they are transported freely from the extracellular medium.

  12. Using the Neandertal genome to study the evolution of small insertions and deletions in modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapati, Manjusha; Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay

    2017-08-04

    Small insertions and deletions occur in humans at a lower rate compared to nucleotide changes, but evolve under more constraint than nucleotide changes. While the evolution of insertions and deletions have been investigated using ape outgroups, the now available genome of a Neandertal can shed light on the evolution of indels in more recent times. We used the Neandertal genome together with several primate outgroup genomes to differentiate between human insertion/deletion changes that likely occurred before the split from Neandertals and those that likely arose later. Changes that pre-date the split from Neandertals show a smaller proportion of deletions than those that occurred later. The presence of a Neandertal-shared allele in Europeans or Asians but the absence in Africans was used to detect putatively introgressed indels in Europeans and Asians. A larger proportion of these variants reside in intergenic regions compared to other modern human variants, and some variants are linked to SNPs that have been associated with traits in modern humans. Our results are in agreement with earlier results that suggested that deletions evolve under more constraint than insertions. When considering Neandertal introgressed variants, we find some evidence that negative selection affected these variants more than other variants segregating in modern humans. Among introgressed variants we also identify indels that may influence the phenotype of their carriers. In particular an introgressed deletion associated with a decrease in the time to menarche may constitute an example of a former Neandertal-specific trait contributing to modern human phenotypic diversity.

  13. Babesia spp. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in questing ticks, ticks parasitizing rodents and the parasitized rodents – Analyzing the host-pathogen-vector interface in a metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silaghi Cornelia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the host-tick-pathogen interface of Babesia spp. and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in restored areas in both questing and host-attached Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus and their small mammalian hosts. Methods Questing ticks were collected from 5 sites within the city of Leipzig, Germany, in 2009. Small mammals were trapped at 3 of the 5 sites during 2010 and 2011. DNA extracts of questing and host-attached I. ricinus and D. reticulatus and of several tissue types of small mammals (the majority bank voles and yellow-necked mice, were investigated by PCR followed by sequencing for the occurrence of DNA of Babesia spp. and by real-time PCR for A. phagocytophilum. A selected number of samples positive for A. phagocytophilum were further investigated for variants of the partial 16S rRNA gene. Co-infection with Rickettsia spp. in the questing ticks was additionally investigated. Results 4.1% of questing I. ricinus ticks, but no D. reticulatus, were positive for Babesia sp. and 8.7% of I. ricinus for A. phagocytophilum. Sequencing revealed B. microti, B. capreoli and Babesia spp. EU1 in Leipzig and sequence analysis of the partial 16S RNA gene of A. phagocytophilum revealed variants either rarely reported in human cases or associated with cervid hosts. The statistical analysis revealed significantly less ticks infected with A. phagocytophilum in a city park in Leipzig as compared to the other sampling sites. A. phagocytophilum-DNA was detected in 2 bank voles, DNA of B. microti in 1 striped field-mouse and of Babesia sp. EU1 in the skin tissue of a mole. Co-infections were detected. Conclusion Our results show the involvement of small mammals in the natural endemic cycles of tick-borne pathogens. A more thorough understanding of the interactions of ticks, pathogens and hosts is the essential basis for effective preventive control measures.

  14. QUEST2: Release 1, SA/Release 1 supporting documents deliverable set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braaten, F.D.

    1995-02-27

    This document contains deliverables which reflect the last of the System Architecture phase analysis for the Quality, Environmental, Safety Tracking System redesign (QUEST2) project. These deliverables are focused on the final insights required to start functional design of the first QUEST2 release. They include the data definitions, conversion rules, standards for design and user interface, performance criteria, and rules to be followed during the prototyping activity described in the Project Management Plan.

  15. ArrayQuest: a web resource for the analysis of DNA microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Jeremy L

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous microarray analysis programs have been created through the efforts of Open Source software development projects. Providing browser-based interfaces that allow these programs to be executed over the Internet enhances the applicability and utility of these analytic software tools. Results Here we present ArrayQuest, a web-based DNA microarray analysis process controller. Key features of ArrayQuest are that (1 it is capable of executing numerous analysis programs such as those written in R, BioPerl and C++; (2 new analysis programs can be added to ArrayQuest Methods Library at the request of users or developers; (3 input DNA microarray data can be selected from public databases (i.e., the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC DNA Microarray Database or Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO or it can be uploaded to the ArrayQuest center-point web server into a password-protected area; and (4 analysis jobs are distributed across computers configured in a backend cluster. To demonstrate the utility of ArrayQuest we have populated the methods library with methods for analysis of Affymetrix DNA microarray data. Conclusion ArrayQuest enables browser-based implementation of DNA microarray data analysis programs that can be executed on a Linux-based platform. Importantly, ArrayQuest is a platform that will facilitate the distribution and implementation of new analysis algorithms and is therefore of use to both developers of analysis applications as well as users. ArrayQuest is freely available for use at http://proteogenomics.musc.edu/arrayquest.html.

  16. Quest for Truth: Scientific Progress and Religious Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singham, Mano

    This book attempts to create a model of the nature of knowledge and its evolution. Scholarly research has been used for this purpose. Chapters include: (1) "The Nature of Knowledge"; (2) "The Nature of Scientific Progress"; (3) "Truth and Falsifiability"; (4) "The Problem with Experimental Observations"; (5) "Scientific Reductionism"; (6) "An…

  17. Adaptability and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Patrick

    2017-10-06

    The capacity of organisms to respond in their own lifetimes to new challenges in their environments probably appeared early in biological evolution. At present few studies have shown how such adaptability could influence the inherited characteristics of an organism's descendants. In part, this has been because organisms have been treated as passive in evolution. Nevertheless, their effects on biological evolution are likely to have been important and, when they occurred, accelerated the pace of evolution. Ways in which this might have happened have been suggested many times since the 1870s. I review these proposals and discuss their relevance to modern thought.

  18. Prediction: The Modern-Day Sport-Science and Sports-Medicine "Quest for the Holy Grail".

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Alan; Fanchini, Maurizio; Coutts, Aaron J

    2017-05-01

    In high-performance sport, science and medicine practitioners employ a variety of physical and psychological tests, training and match monitoring, and injury-screening tools for a variety of reasons, mainly to predict performance, identify talented individuals, and flag when an injury will occur. The ability to "predict" outcomes such as performance, talent, or injury is arguably sport science and medicine's modern-day equivalent of the "Quest for the Holy Grail." The purpose of this invited commentary is to highlight the common misinterpretation of studies investigating association to those actually analyzing prediction and to provide practitioners with simple recommendations to quickly distinguish between methods pertaining to association and those of prediction.

  19. Prospect Theory and the Risks Involved in Decision-Making: Content Analysis in ProQuest Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sady Darcy da Silva-Junior

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the objective is to perform content analysis on articles of a reliable database, dealing with the prospect theory and the risks involved in the decision making process, evaluating some criteria for the theoretical and methodological approaches that allow a joint analysis and comparative. Therefore, a search in ProQuest database was performed which resulted in 15 articles that were submitted to content analysis process, based on the evaluation of nine factors identified by researchers. Among the results highlight the critical attitude to the prospect theory, in contrast to the assertion of his representative capacity of real situations and application in various situations.

  20. Psicologia Educacional ou Escolar? Eis a questão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Rosária Barbosa

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta alguns dados oriundos da tese de doutorado sobre a história do campo de conhecimento e prática da Psicologia em sua relação com a Educação no Brasil. Este estudo foi conduzido baseado no fundamento epistêmico-filosófico do materialismo histórico dialético e na nova história, utilizando fontes bibliográficas históricas e cinco relatos orais de personagens da Psicologia Educacional e Escolar. Os depoimentos e o material das fontes escritas constituíram o corpus documental cuja organização seguiu a metodologia da história oral e historiografia plural. Foi realizada análise descritivo-analítica compreendida em duas etapas: a análise documental (fontes não orais e b construção de indicadores e núcleos de significação dos registros orais. A partir das análises, compôs-se uma periodização da história da Psicologia Educacional e Escolar brasileira por meio de marcos históricos da área. No presente artigo destaca-se a discussão acerca da conceituação e terminologias utilizadas pela Psicologia Educacional e Escolar ao longo do tempo e de como essas mudanças nas nomenclaturas da área refletem questões epistemológicas, ideológicas e políticas.

  1. A catalyst for system change: a case study of child health network formation, evolution and sustainability in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Charmaine; Ploeg, Jenny; Edwards, Nancy; Ciliska, Donna; Sword, Wendy

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine key processes and supportive and inhibiting factors involved in the development, evolution, and sustainability of a child health network in rural Canada. This study contributes to a relatively new research agenda aimed at understanding inter-organizational and cross-sectoral health networks. These networks encourage collaboration focusing on complex issues impacting health - issues that individual agencies cannot effectively address alone. This paper presents an overview of the study findings. An explanatory qualitative case study approach examined the Network's 13-year lifespan. Data sources were documents and Network members, including regional and 71 provincial senior managers from 11 child and youth service sectors. Data were collected through 34 individual interviews and a review of 127 documents. Interview data were analyzed using framework analysis methods; Prior's approach guided document analysis. Three themes related to network development, evolution and sustainability were identified: (a) Network relationships as system triggers, (b) Network-mediated system responsiveness, and (c) Network practice as political. Study findings have important implications for network organizational development, collaborative practice, interprofessional education, public policy, and public system responsiveness research. Findings suggest it is important to explicitly focus on relationships and multi-level socio-political contexts, such as supportive policy environments, in understanding health networks. The dynamic interplay among the Network members; central supportive and inhibiting factors; and micro-, meso-, and macro-organizational contexts was identified.

  2. A multi-level analysis of the relationship between environmental factors and questing Ixodes ricinus dynamics in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ticks are the most important pathogen vectors in Europe. They are known to be influenced by environmental factors, but these links are usually studied at specific temporal or spatial scales. Focusing on Ixodes ricinus in Belgium, we attempt to bridge the gap between current “single-sided” studies that focus on temporal or spatial variation only. Here, spatial and temporal patterns of ticks are modelled together. Methods A multi-level analysis of the Ixodes ricinus patterns in Belgium was performed. Joint effects of weather, habitat quality and hunting on field sampled tick abundance were examined at two levels, namely, sampling level, which is associated with temporal dynamics, and site level, which is related to spatial dynamics. Independent variables were collected from standard weather station records, game management data and remote sensing-based land cover data. Results At sampling level, only a marginally significant effect of daily relative humidity and temperature on the abundance of questing nymphs was identified. Average wind speed of seven days prior to the sampling day was found important to both questing nymphs and adults. At site level, a group of landscape-level forest fragmentation indices were highlighted for both questing nymph and adult abundance, including the nearest-neighbour distance, the shape and the aggregation level of forest patches. No cross-level effects or spatial autocorrelation were found. Conclusions Nymphal and adult ticks responded differently to environmental variables at different spatial and temporal scales. Our results can advise spatio-temporal extents of environment data collection for continuing empirical investigations and potential parameters for biological tick models. PMID:22830528

  3. Inferring large-scale patterns of niche evolution and dispersal limitation from the phylogenetic composition of assemblages: A case study on New World palms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Baker, William J.

    How fast species’ environmental tolerances can evolve is crucial for their survival prospect under climate change. Phylogenetic information can yield insights into the tempo of niche evolution. Phylogenetic community structure (PCS) complements the more widely used approach of studying niche...

  4. Temporal evolution of fault systems in the Upper Jurassic of the Central German Molasse Basin: case study Unterhaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budach, Ingmar; Moeck, Inga; Lüschen, Ewald; Wolfgramm, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of faults in foreland basins is linked to a complex basin history ranging from extension to contraction and inversion tectonics. Faults in the Upper Jurassic of the German Molasse Basin, a Cenozoic Alpine foreland basin, play a significant role for geothermal exploration and are therefore imaged, interpreted and studied by 3D seismic reflection data. Beyond this applied aspect, the analysis of these seismic data help to better understand the temporal evolution of faults and respective stress fields. In 2009, a 27 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was conducted around the Unterhaching Gt 2 well, south of Munich. The main focus of this study is an in-depth analysis of a prominent v-shaped fault block structure located at the center of the 3D seismic survey. Two methods were used to study the periodic fault activity and its relative age of the detected faults: (1) horizon flattening and (2) analysis of incremental fault throws. Slip and dilation tendency analyses were conducted afterwards to determine the stresses resolved on the faults in the current stress field. Two possible kinematic models explain the structural evolution: One model assumes a left-lateral strike slip fault in a transpressional regime resulting in a positive flower structure. The other model incorporates crossing conjugate normal faults within a transtensional regime. The interpreted successive fault formation prefers the latter model. The episodic fault activity may enhance fault zone permeability hence reservoir productivity implying that the analysis of periodically active faults represents an important part in successfully targeting geothermal wells.

  5. Study on the marine sedimentary environment evolution of the southern Laizhou Bay under the impact of port projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jie; Feng, Xiuli

    2016-06-01

    The southern Laizhou Bay is mainly composed of silt-sandy coasts with diverse landforms, and its marine hydrodynamic environment is sensitive to human activities. Marine hydrodynamic and sedimentary environments of the study area have changed under the influence of large-scale port projects in recent years. In this paper, the evolution of hydrodynamic environment, deposition rate, and geochemical characteristics were studied based on sediment grain size, element analysis and 210Pb dating of two cores, in order to analyze the influence of Weifang Port on marine environmental evolution, and provide theoretical and practical basis for protecting marine environment in developing marine resources reasonably. Results showed that sediments of the two cores were relatively coarser and mainly composed of silty sand. Sediments above 230 cm in core WF1 and 218 cm in core WF2 were deposited since 1855 when the Yellow River appeared to deposit its sediments within the modern active delta, and the average deposition rate was between 0.3 and 0.5 cm a-1. Implement of Weifang Port projects in 1997 and 2007 created great influence on the sedimentary environment evolution in the surrounding waters, and the deposition rate was significantly increased. The average annual deposition rates were 5.1 cm and 3.5 cm in WF1 and WF2 respectively between 1997 and 2007. Content of heavy metals in sediments showed no obvious change in the vertical, indicating that the heavy metals were less affected by human activity and there was no significant accumulation of such metals in the study area.

  6. Miss Evers' Boys (1997. Study of the spontaneous evolution of syphilis in black patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín del Cañizo Fernández-Roldán

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Miss Evers' Boys (1997 is a movie based on a real fact happened in the State of Alabama (United States, where it was carried out a research work that begun in 1932 and was prolonged up to 1972. It consisted on watching the evolution of syphilis in black male patients, who were not given any anti-syphilitic treatment at any moment. Once the fact was public, a great polemic on the ethics of the research with human fellows was originated and publications dealt with this case. The movie, faithful as for the bottom of the problem, it’s made as a novel about a research team’s nurse and four black participants patients.

  7. Possible role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis and clinical evolution of radicular cyst: an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, C; Galanti, C; Leonardi, R; Musumeci, G; Pannone, G; Palazzo, G; Rusu, M C

    2013-07-01

    To investigate whether the apoptotic cascade is activated through the extrinsic pathway in epithelial lining and connective tissue of radicular cysts. Fifteen radicular cysts were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin wax and processed for immunohistochemistry to evaluate the expression of polyclonal antibodies against Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), DR5 and caspase-3. Immunocomplexes were treated with the secondary antibodies and finally detected using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. Immunoreactivity was visualized by development with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test; P radicular cysts; TRAIL and DR5 immunoexpression was significantly greater (P radicular cysts, demonstrated by the immunoexpression patterns of TRAIL, DR5 and caspase-3 in lining epithelium and connective tissue, may explain their bland clinical aggressiveness and slow, benign evolution. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Agent-Based Model to Study and Quantify the Evolution Dynamics of Android Malware Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Alegre-Sanahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the number of malware Apps that the users download to their devices has risen. In this paper, we propose an agent-based model to quantify the Android malware infection evolution, modeling the behavior of the users and the different markets where the users may download Apps. The model predicts the number of infected smartphones depending on the type of malware. Additionally, we will estimate the cost that the users should afford when the malware is in their devices. We will be able to analyze which part is more critical: the users, giving indiscriminate permissions to the Apps or not protecting their devices with antivirus software, or the Android platform, due to the vulnerabilities of the Android devices that permit their rooted. We focus on the community of Valencia, Spain, although the obtained results can be extrapolated to other places where the number of Android smartphones remains fairly stable.

  9. A study on the evolution of a community population by cumulative and fractional calculus approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Buyukkılıç, F; Demirhan, D

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in our globalized world,the local and intercountry movements of population have been increased. This situation makes it important for host countries to do right predictions for the future population of their native people as well as immigrant people. The knowledge of the attained number of accumulated population is necessary for future planning, concerning to education,health, job, housing, safety requirements, etc. In this work, for updating historically well known formulas of population dynamics of a community are revisited in the framework of compound growth and fractional calculus to get more realistic relations. Within this context, for a time t, the population evolution of a society which owns two different components is calculated. Concomitant relations have been developed to provide a comparison between the native population and the immigrant population that come into existence where at each time interval a colonial population is joined. Eventually at time t, the case where the native popula...

  10. Study of possible factors of evolution in Russia in 20th century by some foreign futorological concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny T. Teslya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article features the latest developments of foreign authors, concerning Earth community evolution in order to detect key factors, defining this evolution and their possible consideration for Russia’s perspectives understanding.

  11. The evolution of vertebrate and invertebrate myelin: a theoretical computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    Multilayered, lipid-rich myelin increases nerve impulse conduction velocity, contributes to compact nervous systems, and reduces metabolic costs of neural activity. Based on the hypothesis that increased impulse conduction velocity provides a selective advantage that drives the evolution of myelin, we simulated a sequence of plausible intermediate stages of myelin evolution, each of which providing an enhancement of conduction speed. We started with the expansion of insulating glial coverage, which led first to a single layer of myelin surrounding the axon and then to multiple myelin wraps with well-organized nodes. The myelinated fiber was modeled at three levels of complexity as the hypothesized evolutionary progression became more quantitatively exacting: 1) representing the fiber as a mathematically-tractable uniform active cylinder with the effect of myelination approximated by changing its specific capacitance (C(m)); 2) representing it as a chain of simple, cable-model compartments having alternating nodal and internodal parameters subject to optimization, and 3) representing it in a double cable model with the axon and myelin sheath treated separately. Conduction velocity was optimized at each stage. To maintain optimal conduction velocities, increased myelin coverage of axonal surface must be accompanied by an increase in channel density at the evolving nodes, but along with increases in myelin thickness, a reduction in overall average channel density must occur. Leakage under the myelin sheath becomes more of a problem with smaller fiber diameters, which may help explain the tendency for myelin to occur preferentially in larger nerve fibers in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  12. Erosion, Transportation, and Deposition on Outer Solar System Satellites: Landform Evolution Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey Morgan; Howard, Alan D.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Mass movement and landform degradation reduces topographic relief by moving surface materials to a lower gravitational potential. In addition to the obvious role of gravity, abrasive mechanical erosion plays a role, often in combination with the lowering of cohesion, which allows disaggregation of the relief-forming material. The identification of specific landform types associated with mass movement and landform degradation provides information about local sediment particle size and abundance and transportation processes. Generally, mass movements can be classified in terms of the particle sizes of the transported material and the speed the material moved during transport. Most degradation on outer planet satellites appears consistent with sliding or slumping, impact erosion, and regolith evolution. Some satellites, such as Callisto and perhaps Hyperion and Iapetus, have an appearance that implies that some additional process is at work, most likely sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting. A variant on this process is thermally driven frost segregation as seen on all three icy Galilean satellites and perhaps elsewhere. Titan is unique among outer planet satellites in that Aeolian and fluvial processes also operate to erode, transport, and deposit material. We will evaluate the sequence and extent of various landform-modifying erosional and volatile redistribution processes that have shaped these icy satellites using a 3-D model that simulates the following surface and subsurface processes: 1) sublimation and re-condensation of volatiles; 2) development of refractory lag deposits; 3) disaggregation and downward sloughing of surficial material; 4) radiative heating/cooling of the surface (including reflection, emission, and shadowing by other surface elements); 5) thermal diffusion; and 6) vapor diffusion. The model will provide explicit simulations of landform development and thusly predicts the topographic and volatile evolution of the surface

  13. Past climate change and plant evolution in Western North America: a case study in Rosaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Töpel

    Full Text Available Species in the ivesioid clade of Potentilla (Rosaceae are endemic to western North America, an area that underwent widespread aridification during the global temperature decrease following the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum. Several morphological features interpreted as adaptations to drought are found in the clade, and many species occupy extremely dry habitats. Recent phylogenetic analyses have shown that the sister group of this clade is Potentilla section Rivales, a group with distinct moist habitat preferences. This has led to the hypothesis that the ivesioids (genera Ivesia, Horkelia and Horkeliella diversified in response to the late Tertiary aridification of western North America. We used phyloclimatic modeling and a fossil-calibrated dated phylogeny of the family Rosaceae to investigate the evolution of the ivesioid clade. We have combined occurrence- and climate data from extant species, and used ancestral state reconstruction to model past climate preferences. These models have been projected into paleo-climatic scenarios in order to identify areas where the ivesioids may have occurred. Our analysis suggests a split between the ivesioids and Potentilla sect. Rivales around Late Oligocene/Early Miocene (∼23 million years ago, Ma, and that the ivesioids then diversified at a time when summer drought started to appear in the region. The clade is inferred to have originated on the western slopes of the Rocky Mountains from where a westward range expansion to the Sierra Nevada and the coast of California took place between ∼12-2 Ma. Our results support the idea that climatic changes in southwestern North America have played an important role in the evolution of the local flora, by means of in situ adaptation followed by diversification.

  14. The evolution of medical informatics in China: A retrospective study and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianbo; Meng, Qun; Li, Yuefeng; Liang, Minghui; Zheng, Kai

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to China's giant health information technology (HIT) market and tremendous investments in hospital information systems the contributions of Chinese scholars in medical informatics to the global community are very limited. China would like to have a more important position in the global medical informatics community. A better understanding of the differences between medical informatics research and education in China and the discipline that emerged abroad will better inform Chinese scholars to develop right strategies to advance the field in China and help identify an appropriate means to collaborate more closely with medical informatics scholars globally. For the first time, this paper divides the evolution of medical informatics in China into four stages based on changes in the core content of research, the educational orientation and other developmental characteristics. The four stages are infancy, incubation, primary establishment and formal establishment. This paper summarizes and reviews major supporting journals and publications, as well as major organizations. Finally, we analyze the main problems that exist in the current disciplinary development in China related to medical informatics research and education and offer suggestions for future improvement. The evolution of medical informatics shows a strong and traditional concentration on medical library/bibliographic information rather than medical (hospital information or patient information) information. Misdirected-concentration, a lack of formal medical informatics trained teaching staff and mistakenly positioning medical informatics as an undergraduate discipline are some of the problems inhibiting the development of medical informatics in China. These lessons should be shared and learned for the global community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Nature of Evolution: A Study on the Philosophy of A.M. Iqbal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Bahroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The nature of human being evolution in the philosophy of AllamaMuhammad Iqbal is different from the conception of other modernphilosophers. This natural evolution basically springs from the real Love whichflourishes in the inner being of an individual.Love as described by Iqbal is not physical, sexual or biological principle.It is the inward drive of all life to attain to its full maturity and development. Itis a primal urge to live, to progress and bring out all the inner wealth andresources of being. Every phenomenon and activity that is not related to thisprimal urge and does not subserve its purposes, leads to stagnation and decay.He voices strong condemnation of scientific reason, arts and religion whenthey carve out for themselves autonomous fields of action or set themselvesup as independent forces. According to Iqbal, all specialized activity, whether itis intellectual, artistic or religious, is a differentiation of the primal urge whichhe calls Love and apart from it has no title to independent, autonomous existence.Iqbal further explains that a philosophy which does not spring from thedepth of life is so much empty trash; and thought which is not inspired by loveor the will to progress, construct, create and beautify the world is dreadening.Similarly a religion without the flame of love of the urge to advance, improveand enrich life is only lifeless ritualism. Disbelief and atheism are as good asIslam, if inflamed by love, while Islam is no better than paganism if it is devoid of Love.

  16. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03 + 0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01 + 0.04i(±0.01 compared to m = 1.49(±0.01 + 0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  17. The Nature of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of evolution, the historical change in the universe, and the change that is caused by the workings of the dynamic processes at the smallest and largest scales are studied. It is viewed that the cumulative change in the historical systems is caused by evolution, which is a type of causal relationship and evolutionary processes could be…

  18. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the ...

  19. Characteristic Evolution and Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winicour Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available I review the development of numerical evolution codes for general relativity based upon the characteristic initial value problem. Progress is traced from the early stage of 1D feasibility studies to current 3D codes that simulate binary black holes. A prime application of characteristic evolution is Cauchy-characteristic matching, which is also reviewed.

  20. Reproducibility of local environmental factors for the abundance of questing Ixodes ricinus nymphs on pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyard, Chloé; Barnouin, Jacques; Bord, Séverine; Gasqui, Patrick; Vourc'h, Gwenaël

    2011-06-01

    In ecology and epidemiology, exploratory field studies based on multivariate statistical models commonly are used to identify factors that are associated with a phenomenon. The challenge is to evaluate whether these factors are indeed correlated to the phenomenon or if the statistical significance results from fortuitous association or type 1 statistical error (probability of rejecting a null hypothesis when it is true). This is particularly the case when the phenomenon is linked to environmental factors that usually are more or less correlated to each other and when the phenomenon is itself highly variable. The abundance of Ixodes ricinus ticks, a major disease vector in Europe, is highly variable and depends on environmental conditions that define suitable habitat and host presence. Our objective was to identify reproducible factors in space and time that influenced the abundance of questing I. ricinus nymphs. We sampled questing nymphs in pastures in 4 settings, i.e. during 3 periods (2003, 2004, and 2006) in one region, and during one period (2006) in another region, both regions located in Central France. The same data collection, data selection, and model analysis using negative binomial distribution were applied independently in the 4 data sets to identify 'reproducible' factors, i.e. explanatory factors that were significant in different time periods and spaces. The 3 most reproducible factors suggested that woodland type vegetation and woodland vicinity constantly favoured nymph abundance on pastures. In addition, the presence of fruit trees was significantly associated with nymph abundance in one region. The other factors were not reproducible. The study confirmed the status of key factors for nymph abundance while avoiding having to redefine the statistical model to model the different sampling conditions. It also shows the difficulty to identify factors with general significance acting on a very variable phenomenon, based on a study made one year in one

  1. The Moon as a recorder of organic evolution in the early solar system: a lunar regolith analog study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthewman, Richard; Court, Richard W; Crawford, Ian A; Jones, Adrian P; Joy, Katherine H; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The organic record of Earth older than ∼3.8 Ga has been effectively erased. Some insight is provided to us by meteorites as well as remote and direct observations of asteroids and comets left over from the formation of the Solar System. These primitive objects provide a record of early chemical evolution and a sample of material that has been delivered to Earth's surface throughout the past 4.5 billion years. Yet an effective chronicle of organic evolution on all Solar System objects, including that on planetary surfaces, is more difficult to find. Fortunately, early Earth would not have been the only recipient of organic matter-containing objects in the early Solar System. For example, a recently proposed model suggests the possibility that volatiles, including organic material, remain archived in buried paleoregolith deposits intercalated with lava flows on the Moon. Where asteroids and comets allow the study of processes before planet formation, the lunar record could extend that chronicle to early biological evolution on the planets. In this study, we use selected free and polymeric organic materials to assess the hypothesis that organic matter can survive the effects of heating in the lunar regolith by overlying lava flows. Results indicate that the presence of lunar regolith simulant appears to promote polymerization and, therefore, preservation of organic matter. Once polymerized, the mineral-hosted newly formed organic network is relatively protected from further thermal degradation. Our findings reveal the thermal conditions under which preservation of organic matter on the Moon is viable.

  2. Parametric Study on the Evolution of Thermal Patterns and Coherent Flow Structures in the Rotated Arc Mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozge; Speetjens, Michel; Metcalfe, Guy; Clercx, Herman

    2013-11-01

    Advective-diffusive scalar transport in spatially or temporally periodic flow fields has been investigated in numerous studies, which exposed that the global transport relies on the kinematic/geometric parameters governing the advection and the ratio between the advective and diffusive time scales. These studies mainly employ numerical/analytical methods. However, experimental analysis remains outstanding. This research concerns an experimental parametric study on the evolution of the thermal patterns in a representative configuration, the Rotated Arc Mixer (RAM), and its correlation with the coherent flow structures. The RAM is an inline mixer composed of a stationary inner cylinder with systematically oriented apertures and a rotating outer cylinder inducing transverse flow at the apertures. Design of the experimental facility is based on a 2D time-periodic simplification of the 3D spatially-periodic RAM, where the cross-sectional progression is represented by the temporal evolution. The test section is a shallow circular tank with apertures on the circumference and motor-driven belts imitate the rotating outer cylinder of the RAM. Circumferential temperature is kept constant via an enclosing hot-water reservoir. The 2D flow and temperature fields are measured by 2D Particle Image Velocimetry and Infrared Thermography and analyzed.

  3. Quantitative genetics approaches to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology; a perspective from research on the evolution of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Paul L; Xie, Lingtian; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative genetic approaches are often used to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology. This paper focuses on the evolution of resistance to environmental contaminants-an important evolutionary process in ecotoxicology. Three approaches are commonly employed to study the evolution of resistance: (1) Assessing whether a contaminant-exposed population has an increased resistance relative to a control population, using either spatial or temporal comparisons. (2) Estimating a population's heritability of resistance. (3) Investigating responses in a laboratory selection experiment. All three approaches provide valuable information on the potential for contaminants to affect a population's evolutionary trajectory via natural selection. However, all three approaches have inherent limitations, including difficulty in separating the various genetic and environmental variance components, responses being dependent on specific population and testing conditions, and inability to fully capture natural conditions in the laboratory. In order to maximize insights into the long-term consequences of adaptation, it is important to not just look at resistance itself, but also at the fitness consequences and at correlated responses in characteristics other than resistance. The rapid development of molecular genetics has yielded alternatives to the "black box" approach of quantitative genetics, but the presence of different limitations and strengths in the two fields means that they should be viewed as complementary rather than exchangeable. Quantitative genetics is benefiting from the incorporation of molecular tools and remains an important field for studying evolutionary toxicology. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  4. Formation and Evolution of Target Patterns in Cahn-Hilliard Flows: An Extension of the Flux Expulsion Studies in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; P H Diamond Collaboration; Luis Chacon Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Spinodal decomposition is a second order phase transition for a binary liquid mixture to evolve from a miscible phase (e.g., water + alcohol) to two co-existing phases (e.g., water + oil). The Cahn-Hilliard model for spinodal decomposition is analogous to 2D MHD. We study the evolution of the concentration field in a single eddy in the 2D Cahn-Hilliard system to better understand scalar mixing processes in that system. This study extends investigations of the classic studies of flux expulsion in 2D MHD and homogenization of potential vorticity in 2D fluids. Simulation results show that there are three stages in the evolution: (A) formation of a ``jelly roll'' pattern, for which the concentration field is constant along spirals; (B) a change in isoconcentration contour topology; and (C) formation of a target pattern, for which the isoconcentration contours follow concentric annuli. In the final target pattern stage, the isoconcentration bands align with stream lines. The results indicate that the target pattern is a metastable state. Band merger process continues on a time scale exponentially long relative to the eddy turnover time. The band merger process resembles step merger in drift-ZF staircases. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  5. Thought Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadrikov V.D.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The thought evolution is studied by historical reconstruction method that is based on the propositions of the theory of culturalhistorical determination of the psyche development, and the data of the morphological analysis and child development, and the conception of the psyche neuroontogenesis. The grounds for advisability of protothinking are presented. The protothinking is understood as the use of objective thought in cases of awareness absence. It is shown that protothinking is a form of transition from animal thinking to human speech. The particular attention is paid to the process of the word producing and thought generation in that process. The conditions of word producing as cooccurring acoustic pattern served for though expression are discussed. It is emphasized that a word is produced by a particular person. The historical development of the language and the specificity of this development are pointed out

  6. GeoQuest an Interactive Role Playing game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco; Scamardella, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    The acquisition of knowledge and enhancing skills at actual time requires different approaches, involving students as much as possible, taking advantage of informal learning strengths and opportunities of formal learning. In this perspective, the game seems to be a perfect vehicle, not a single student's playing but a cooperative one. The GeoQuest project consists of an interactive role-playing game which involves all students using a patented system: the "teaching projector". This system allows the interaction of the class group through the use of smartphones and tablets, and it shows in real-time the game progress to the whole class. Our role-playing game is based on three routes at different degrees. The students, divided into several categories (physicist, chemists, disseminators, technicians, historians) have to follow a geological trail in order to discover the present and the past of the Earth. During the path, students have to pass some doors in teamwork; they allow assessment and represent the main sharing/disclosure moment. The doors allow to modulate the activities according to single lesson, teaching unit, module. Main Objectives: Working on PC by themselves, students could be even more alone: it needs a best fitting between ICT and cooperative learning. Role-playing helps students to reach their goals easily through cooperation; this in order to avoid the risk of loneliness of Inquiry Based Science Education, preserving entirely the educational value. Science Research now is based on field expert interaction: the role-playing game categories reflect the necessary team to get their goal. The several roles allow everyone to enhance their own skills. the "teaching projector" allows students to comment and to evaluate the groups activities and route them, providing real-time corrections to everybody. The playing categories represent all the aspects of the research areas: from scientists (physicists, chemists), to technicians, to disseminators and

  7. STUDY OF CLIMATE EVOLUTION OF THE TITU-OGREZENI IRRIGATION SYSTEM PERIMETER BY ANALYSIS OF CLIMATIC DEFICIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Zamfir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our country's climate shows great changes both in time and space. These changes are also reflected on agriculturalproductions that also sometime presents substantial differences from one year to another and from one area to another.Based on statistical analyses on large arrays of years, it results that in Romania, the dry years are in very highproportion going up to 70%.For getting to knowing requirements from water of major agricultural crops, by the study achieved mainly thenecessary dimensioning of water for irrigations using the climate deficit method has been considered.From the chronological sequence analysis of years, under the climatic deficit, the change of this in a positive way thatleads to the need for irrigations is come out. Given the set of climatic parameters, the model that approximates the bestthe evolution tendency as some parametrical equations has been studied. Since 2009, for the next 57 years the trendline of the evolution of climatic deficit is clearly increasing in the months May-August.

  8. Study on the Evolution Mechanism and Development Forecasting of China’s Power Supply Structure Clean Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The clean development of China’s power supply structure has become a crucial strategic problem for the low-carbon, green development of Chinese society. Considering the subsistent developments of optimized allocation of energy resources and efficient utilization, the urgent need to solve environmental pollution, and the continuously promoted power market-oriented reform, further study of China’s power structure clean development has certain theoretical value. Based on the data analysis, this paper analyzes the key factors that influence the evolution process of the structure with the help of system dynamics theory and carries out comprehensive assessments after the construction of the structure evaluation system. Additionally, a forecasting model of the power supply structure development based on the Vector Autoregressive Model (VAR has been put forward to forecast the future structure. Through the research of policy review and scenario analysis, the paths and directions of structure optimization are proposed. In this paper, the system dynamics, vector autoregressive model (VAR, policy mining, and scenario analysis methods are combined to systematically demonstrate the evolution of China’s power structure, and predict the future direction of development. This research may provide a methodological and practical reference for the analysis of China’s power supply structure optimization development and for theoretical studies.

  9. An observational study of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer over Cabo Frio, Brazil

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    S. H. Franchito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of coastal upwelling on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in Cabo Frio (Brazil is investigated. For this purpose, radiosounding data collected in two experiments made during the austral summer (upwelling case and austral winter (no upwelling case are analysed. The results show that during the austral summer, cold waters that crop up near the Cabo Frio coast favour the formation of an atmospheric stable layer, which persists during the upwelling episode. Due to the low SSTs, the descending branch of the sea-breeze circulation is located close to the coast, inhibiting the development of a mixed layer mainly during the day. At night, with the reduction of the land-sea thermal contrast the descending motion is weaker, allowing a vertical mixing. The stable ABL favours the formation of a low level jet, which may also contribute to the development of a nocturnal atmospheric mixed layer. During the austral winter, due to the higher SSTs observed near the coast, the ABL is less stable compared with that in the austral summer. Due to warming, a mixed layer is observed during the day. The observed vertical profiles of the zonal winds show that the easterlies at low levels are stronger in the austral summer, indicating that the upwelling modulates the sea-breeze signal, thus confirming model simulations.

  10. Sexual selection and interacting phenotypes in experimental evolution: a study of Drosophila pseudoobscura mating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupe, Leonardo D; Crudgington, Helen S; Slate, Jon; Moore, Allen J; Snook, Rhonda R

    2008-07-01

    Sexual selection requires social interactions, particularly between the sexes. When trait expression is influenced by social interactions, such traits are called interacting phenotypes and only recently have the evolutionary consequences of interacting phenotypes been considered. Here we investigated how variation in relative fitness, or the opportunity for sexual selection, affected the evolutionary trajectories of interacting phenotypes. We used experimentally evolved populations of the naturally promiscuous Drosophila pseudoobscura, in which the numbers of potential interactions between the sexes, and therefore relative fitness, were manipulated by altering natural levels of female promiscuity. We considered two different mating interactions between the sexes: mating speed and copulation duration. We investigated the evolutionary trajectories of means and (co)variances (P) and also the influence of genetic drift on the evolutionary response of these interactions. Our sexual selection treatments did not affect the means of either mating speed or copulation duration, but they did affect P. We found that the means of both traits differed among replicates within each selection treatment whereas the Ps did not. Changes as a consequence of genetic drift were excluded. Our results show that although variable potential strengths of sexual interactions influence the evolution of interacting phenotypes, the influence may be nonlinear.

  11. Evolution of magnetic phases in SmCrO3: A neutron diffraction and magnetometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Malvika; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.; Chatterji, T.; Fischer, H. E.

    2017-11-01

    The classical belief about the mechanism of spin reorientation phase transition (SRPT) and ground-state magnetic structure in SmCrO3 has become intriguing because of inconsistent bulk magnetization observations. The presence of highly neutron-absorbing Sm atom has so far evaded the determination of microscopic magnetic structure. In the present report, we have utilized very high-energy "hot neutrons" to overcome the Sm absorption and to determine the thermal evolution of magnetic configurations. Unambiguously, three distinct phases are observed: the uncompensated canted antiferromagnetic structure Γ4(Gx,Ay,Fz;FzR) occurring below the Néel temperature (TN=191 K), the collinear antiferromagnetic structure Γ1(Ax,Gy,Cz;CzR) occurring below 10 K, and a nonequilibrium configuration with cooccurring Γ1 and Γ4 phases in the neighborhood of the SRPT (10 K ≤T ≤ 40 K). In differing to the earlier predictions, we divulge the SRPT to be a discontinuous transition where chromium spins switch from the a -b crystallographic plane to the b -c crystallographic plane in a discrete manner with no allowed intermediate configuration. The canting angle of chromium ions in the a -b plane is unusually not a thermal constant, rather it is empirically discerned to follow exponential behavior. The competition between magnetocrystalline anisotropy and free energy derived by isotropic and antisymmetric exchange interactions between different pairs of magnetic ions is observed to govern the mechanism of SRPT.

  12. Evolution of fracture permeability of ultramafic rocks undergoing serpentinization at hydrothermal conditions: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farough, Aida; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    We performed flow-through laboratory experiments on five cylindrically cored samples of ultramafic rocks, in which we generated a well-mated through-going tensile fracture, to investigate evolution of fracture permeability during serpentinization. The samples were tested in a triaxial loading machine at a confining pressure of 50 MPa, pore pressure of 20 MPa, and temperature of 260°C, simulating a depth of 2 km under hydrostatic conditions. A pore pressure difference of up to 2 MPa was imposed across the ends of the sample. Fracture permeability decreased by 1–2 orders of magnitude during the 200–330 h experiments. Electron microprobe and SEM data indicated the formation of needle-shaped crystals of serpentine composition along the walls of the fracture, and chemical analyses of sampled pore fluids were consistent with dissolution of ferro-magnesian minerals. By comparing the difference between fracture permeability and matrix permeability measured on intact samples of the same rock types, we concluded that the contribution of the low matrix permeability to flow is negligible and essentially all of the flow is focused in the tensile fracture. The experimental results suggest that the fracture network in long-lived hydrothermal circulation systems can be sealed rapidly as a result of mineral precipitation, and generation of new permeability resulting from a combination of tectonic and crystallization-induced stresses is required to maintain fluid circulation.

  13. A evolução da gestão de compras em uma empresa do segmento de material escolar: estudo de caso longitudinal The purchasing management (PM evolution in a stationery products company: a longitudinal case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Senapeschi Neto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo principal apresentar e discutir, por meio de um estudo de caso longitudinal, a mudança evolutiva na forma de gestão de compras implementada por uma empresa de produtos de escrita e pintura na busca de maior alinhamento das estratégias corporativas e aumento de competitividade nos negócios. Os resultados mostraram que, referente a sete variáveis de controle da gestão de compras analisadas (estágio estratégico de desenvolvimento da função compras; objetivos a ser alcançados; forma de integração com a gestão da qualidade; forma de integração com o planejamento e controle da produção; nível de habilidade requerida dos profissionais; quantidade e especificação dos indicadores de desempenho utilizados, houve uma clara evolução buscando acompanhar o desenvolvimento teórico da área. As mudanças ocorridas na empresa em questão podem servir como referência para empresas que desejem re-estruturar sua gestão de compras, bem como contribui para a redução do gap existente entre a teoria e prática na área, mostrando um caso onde muitas das mais modernas técnicas teóricas se encontram implementadas.This work presents and analyzes, through a longitudinal case study method, a new form of purchasing management in a stationery products company. The enterprise looks for a higher organizational strategy alignment in order to guarantee its leadership. The results showed an evolution regarding all the seven variables studied: strategic level of development of the purchasing function; goals to be achieved; alignment between PM and Quality Management; alignment between PM and Production Planning and Control; ability level required of the PM workers; number and specificity of the performance indicators used by the PM area. The results can be useful to enterprises with the same characteristics or inserted in the same process of change. Also, the paper contributes to reduce the gap between theory and

  14. Genetic mechanisms involved in the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye revealed by transcriptomic and developmental studies

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    Ogura Atsushi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coleoid cephalopods (squids and octopuses have evolved a camera eye, the structure of which is very similar to that found in vertebrates and which is considered a classic example of convergent evolution. Other molluscs, however, possess mirror, pin-hole, or compound eyes, all of which differ from the camera eye in the degree of complexity of the eye structures and neurons participating in the visual circuit. Therefore, genes expressed in the cephalopod eye after divergence from the common molluscan ancestor could be involved in eye evolution through association with the acquisition of new structural components. To clarify the genetic mechanisms that contributed to the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye, we applied comprehensive transcriptomic analysis and conducted developmental validation of candidate genes involved in coleoid cephalopod eye evolution. Results We compared gene expression in the eyes of 6 molluscan (3 cephalopod and 3 non-cephalopod species and selected 5,707 genes as cephalopod camera eye-specific candidate genes on the basis of homology searches against 3 molluscan species without camera eyes. First, we confirmed the expression of these 5,707 genes in the cephalopod camera eye formation processes by developmental array analysis. Second, using molecular evolutionary (dN/dS analysis to detect positive selection in the cephalopod lineage, we identified 156 of these genes in which functions appeared to have changed after the divergence of cephalopods from the molluscan ancestor and which contributed to structural and functional diversification. Third, we selected 1,571 genes, expressed in the camera eyes of both cephalopods and vertebrates, which could have independently acquired a function related to eye development at the expression level. Finally, as experimental validation, we identified three functionally novel cephalopod camera eye genes related to optic lobe formation in cephalopods by in situ

  15. Genetic mechanisms involved in the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye revealed by transcriptomic and developmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masa-aki; Ogura, Atsushi

    2011-06-24

    Coleoid cephalopods (squids and octopuses) have evolved a camera eye, the structure of which is very similar to that found in vertebrates and which is considered a classic example of convergent evolution. Other molluscs, however, possess mirror, pin-hole, or compound eyes, all of which differ from the camera eye in the degree of complexity of the eye structures and neurons participating in the visual circuit. Therefore, genes expressed in the cephalopod eye after divergence from the common molluscan ancestor could be involved in eye evolution through association with the acquisition of new structural components. To clarify the genetic mechanisms that contributed to the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye, we applied comprehensive transcriptomic analysis and conducted developmental validation of candidate genes involved in coleoid cephalopod eye evolution. We compared gene expression in the eyes of 6 molluscan (3 cephalopod and 3 non-cephalopod) species and selected 5,707 genes as cephalopod camera eye-specific candidate genes on the basis of homology searches against 3 molluscan species without camera eyes. First, we confirmed the expression of these 5,707 genes in the cephalopod camera eye formation processes by developmental array analysis. Second, using molecular evolutionary (dN/dS) analysis to detect positive selection in the cephalopod lineage, we identified 156 of these genes in which functions appeared to have changed after the divergence of cephalopods from the molluscan ancestor and which contributed to structural and functional diversification. Third, we selected 1,571 genes, expressed in the camera eyes of both cephalopods and vertebrates, which could have independently acquired a function related to eye development at the expression level. Finally, as experimental validation, we identified three functionally novel cephalopod camera eye genes related to optic lobe formation in cephalopods by in situ hybridization analysis of embryonic pygmy squid. We

  16. A close-up view on ITS2 evolution and speciation - a case study in the Ulvophyceae (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae

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    Caisová Lenka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The second Internal Transcriber Spacer (ITS2 is a fast evolving part of the nuclear-encoded rRNA operon located between the 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. Based on crossing experiments it has been proposed that even a single Compensatory Base Change (CBC in helices 2 and 3 of the ITS2 indicates sexual incompatibility and thus separates biological species. Taxa without any CBC in these ITS2 regions were designated as a 'CBC clade'. However, in depth comparative analyses of ITS2 secondary structures, ITS2 phylogeny, the origin of CBCs, and their relationship to biological species have rarely been performed. To gain 'close-up' insights into ITS2 evolution, (1 86 sequences of ITS2 including secondary structures have been investigated in the green algal order Ulvales (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae, (2 after recording all existing substitutions, CBCs and hemi-CBCs (hCBCs were mapped upon the ITS2 phylogeny, rather than merely comparing ITS2 characters among pairs of taxa, and (3 the relation between CBCs, hCBCs, CBC clades, and the taxonomic level of organisms was investigated in detail. Results High sequence and length conservation allowed the generation of an ITS2 consensus secondary structure, and introduction of a novel numbering system of ITS2 nucleotides and base pairs. Alignments and analyses were based on this structural information, leading to the following results: (1 in the Ulvales, the presence of a CBC is not linked to any particular taxonomic level, (2 most CBC 'clades' sensu Coleman are paraphyletic, and should rather be termed CBC grades. (3 the phenetic approach of pairwise comparison of sequences can be misleading, and thus, CBCs/hCBCs must be investigated in their evolutionary context, including homoplasy events (4 CBCs and hCBCs in ITS2 helices evolved independently, and we found no evidence for a CBC that originated via a two-fold hCBC substitution. Conclusions Our case study revealed several discrepancies between ITS2

  17. A close-up view on ITS2 evolution and speciation - a case study in the Ulvophyceae (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisová, Lenka; Marin, Birger; Melkonian, Michael

    2011-09-20

    The second Internal Transcriber Spacer (ITS2) is a fast evolving part of the nuclear-encoded rRNA operon located between the 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. Based on crossing experiments it has been proposed that even a single Compensatory Base Change (CBC) in helices 2 and 3 of the ITS2 indicates sexual incompatibility and thus separates biological species. Taxa without any CBC in these ITS2 regions were designated as a 'CBC clade'. However, in depth comparative analyses of ITS2 secondary structures, ITS2 phylogeny, the origin of CBCs, and their relationship to biological species have rarely been performed. To gain 'close-up' insights into ITS2 evolution, (1) 86 sequences of ITS2 including secondary structures have been investigated in the green algal order Ulvales (Chlorophyta, Viridiplantae), (2) after recording all existing substitutions, CBCs and hemi-CBCs (hCBCs) were mapped upon the ITS2 phylogeny, rather than merely comparing ITS2 characters among pairs of taxa, and (3) the relation between CBCs, hCBCs, CBC clades, and the taxonomic level of organisms was investigated in detail. High sequence and length conservation allowed the generation of an ITS2 consensus secondary structure, and introduction of a novel numbering system of ITS2 nucleotides and base pairs. Alignments and analyses were based on this structural information, leading to the following results: (1) in the Ulvales, the presence of a CBC is not linked to any particular taxonomic level, (2) most CBC 'clades' sensu Coleman are paraphyletic, and should rather be termed CBC grades. (3) the phenetic approach of pairwise comparison of sequences can be misleading, and thus, CBCs/hCBCs must be investigated in their evolutionary context, including homoplasy events (4) CBCs and hCBCs in ITS2 helices evolved independently, and we found no evidence for a CBC that originated via a two-fold hCBC substitution. Our case study revealed several discrepancies between ITS2 evolution in the Ulvales and generally accepted

  18. Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, Jeanna

    2005-01-01

    Eighty years after the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," which tested a teacher's right to discuss the theory of evolution in the classroom, evolution--and its most recent counterview, called "intelligent design"--are in the headlines again, and just about everyone seems to have an opinion. This past July, President Bush weighed in, telling…

  19. Meal-Specific Dietary Changes From Squires Quest! II: A Serious Video Game Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen W; Liu, Yan; Thompson, Debbe I

    2016-05-01

    Squire's Quest! II: Saving the Kingdom of Fivealot, an online video game, promotes fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption. An evaluation study varied the type of implementation intentions used during the goal-setting process (none, action, coping, or both action and coping plans). Participants who created action plans reported higher FV consumption 6 months after baseline. This study assessed changes by specific meal in that study. A total of 400 fourth- and fifth-grade children completed 3 24-hour recalls at baseline and 6 months later. These were averaged to obtain FV intake. Analyses used repeated-measures ANCOVA. There was a significant group by time effect for vegetables at 6 months (P = .01); Action (P = .01) and coping (P = .04) group participants reported higher vegetable intake at dinner. There were significant increases in fruit intake at breakfast (P = .009), lunch (P = .01), and snack (P Behavior. All rights reserved.

  20. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.