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Sample records for evoke insulin exocytosis

  1. Glinide, but Not Sulfonylurea, Can Evoke Insulin Exocytosis by Repetitive Stimulation: Imaging Analysis of Insulin Exocytosis by Secretagogue-Induced Repetitive Stimulations

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    Kyota Aoyagi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the different effects between sulfonylurea (SU and glinide drugs in insulin secretion, pancreatic β-cells were repeatedly stimulated with SU (glimepiride or glinide (mitiglinide. Total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF microscopy revealed that secondary stimulation with glimepiride, but not glucose and mitiglinide, failed to evoke fusions of insulin granules although primary stimulation with glucose, glimepiride, and mitiglinide induced equivalent numbers of exocytotic responses. Glimepiride, but not glucose and mitiglinide, induced abnormally sustained [Ca2+]i elevations and reductions of docked insulin granules on the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that the effect of glinide on insulin secretory mechanisms is similar to that of glucose.

  2. Imaging exocytosis of single insulin secretory granules with TIRF microscopy.

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    Nagamatsu, Shinya; Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica

    2008-01-01

    The total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) technique is a powerful tool for visualizing the process of insulin exocytosis. This technique allows us to observe the events just beneath the plasma membrane, allowing us to explore the molecular mechanism of insulin exocytotic processes such as docking and fusion. In this review, we describe the method of TIRF for visualizing insulin exocytosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

  3. Syntaxin 2 Acts as Inhibitory SNARE for Insulin Granule Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Xie, Li; Kang, Youhou; Dolai, Subhankar; Bondo Hansen, Jakob; Qin, Tairan; Xie, Huanli; Liang, Tao; Rubin, Deborah C; Osborne, Lucy; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2017-04-01

    Of the four syntaxins specialized for exocytosis, syntaxin (Syn)-2 is the least understood. In this study, we used Syn-2/epimorphin knockout mice to examine the role of Syn-2 in insulin secretory granule (SG) exocytosis. Unexpectedly, Syn-2 knockout mice exhibited paradoxical superior glucose homeostasis resulting from an enhanced insulin secretion. This was confirmed in vitro by pancreatic islet perifusion showing an amplified biphasic glucose-stimulated insulin secretion arising from an increase in size of the readily releasable pool of insulin SGs and enhanced SG pool refilling. The increase in insulin exocytosis was attributed mainly to an enhanced recruitment of the larger pool of newcomer SGs that undergoes no residence time on plasma membrane before fusion and, to a lesser extent, also the predocked SGs. Consistently, Syn-2 depletion resulted in a stimulation-induced increase in abundance of exocytotic complexes we previously demonstrated as mediating the fusion of newcomer SGs (Syn-3/VAMP8/SNAP25/Munc18b) and predocked SGs (Syn-1A/VAMP2/SNAP25/Muncn18a). This work is the first to show in mammals that Syn-2 could function as an inhibitory SNARE protein that, when relieved, could promote exocytosis in pancreatic islet β-cells. Thus, Syn-2 may serve as a potential target to treat diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. G-protein coupled receptor-evoked glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes: role of prostaglandins.

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    Cali, Corrado; Lopatar, Jan; Petrelli, Francesco; Pucci, Luca; Bezzi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are highly secretory cells, participating in rapid brain communication by releasing glutamate. Recent evidences have suggested that this process is largely mediated by Ca(2+)-dependent regulated exocytosis of VGLUT-positive vesicles. Here by taking advantage of VGLUT1-pHluorin and TIRF illumination, we characterized mechanisms of glutamate exocytosis evoked by endogenous transmitters (glutamate and ATP), which are known to stimulate Ca(2+) elevations in astrocytes. At first we characterized the VGLUT1-pHluorin expressing vesicles and found that VGLUT1-positive vesicles were a specific population of small synaptic-like microvesicles containing glutamate but which do not express VGLUT2. Endogenous mediators evoked a burst of exocytosis through activation of G-protein coupled receptors. Subsequent glutamate exocytosis was reduced by about 80% upon pharmacological blockade of the prostaglandin-forming enzyme, cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, receptor stimulation was accompanied by extracellular release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Interestingly, administration of exogenous PGE2 produced per se rapid, store-dependent burst exocytosis of glutamatergic vesicles in astrocytes. Finally, when PGE2-neutralizing antibody was added to cell medium, transmitter-evoked exocytosis was again significantly reduced (by about 50%). Overall these data indicate that cyclooxygenase products are responsible for a major component of glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes and that large part of such component is sustained by autocrine/paracrine action of PGE2.

  5. G-Protein Coupled Receptor-Evoked Glutamate Exocytosis from Astrocytes: Role of Prostaglandins

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    Corrado Cali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are highly secretory cells, participating in rapid brain communication by releasing glutamate. Recent evidences have suggested that this process is largely mediated by Ca2+-dependent regulated exocytosis of VGLUT-positive vesicles. Here by taking advantage of VGLUT1-pHluorin and TIRF illumination, we characterized mechanisms of glutamate exocytosis evoked by endogenous transmitters (glutamate and ATP, which are known to stimulate Ca2+ elevations in astrocytes. At first we characterized the VGLUT1-pHluorin expressing vesicles and found that VGLUT1-positive vesicles were a specific population of small synaptic-like microvesicles containing glutamate but which do not express VGLUT2. Endogenous mediators evoked a burst of exocytosis through activation of G-protein coupled receptors. Subsequent glutamate exocytosis was reduced by about 80% upon pharmacological blockade of the prostaglandin-forming enzyme, cyclooxygenase. On the other hand, receptor stimulation was accompanied by extracellular release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Interestingly, administration of exogenous PGE2 produced per se rapid, store-dependent burst exocytosis of glutamatergic vesicles in astrocytes. Finally, when PGE2-neutralizing antibody was added to cell medium, transmitter-evoked exocytosis was again significantly reduced (by about 50%. Overall these data indicate that cyclooxygenase products are responsible for a major component of glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes and that large part of such component is sustained by autocrine/paracrine action of PGE2.

  6. Rab35 protein regulates evoked exocytosis of endothelial Weibel–Palade bodies

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    Biesemann, Anja; Gorontzi, Alexandra; Barr, Francis; Gerke, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Weibel–Palade bodies (WPB) are secretory organelles of endothelial cells that undergo evoked exocytosis following intracellular Ca2+ or cAMP elevation, thereby supplying the vasculature with factors controlling hemostasis. Several cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins, including the Rab family members Rab3, Rab15, and Rab27a, have been implicated in regulating the acute exocytosis of WPB. Here, we carried out a genome-wide screen to identify Rab pathways affecting WPB exocytosis. Overexpression of a specific subset of Rab GTPase–activating proteins (RabGAPs) inhibited histamine-evoked, Ca2+-dependent WPB exocytosis, presumably by inactivating the target Rab GTPases. Among these RabGAPs, we concentrated on TBC1D10A and showed that the inhibitory effect depends on its GAP activity. We confirmed that Rab35 was a target Rab of TBC1D10A in human endothelial cells; Rab35 interacted with TBC1D10A, and expression of the GAP-insensitive Rab35(Q67A) mutant rescued the inhibitory effect of TBC1D10A overexpression on WPB exocytosis. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab35 and expression of a dominant-negative Rab35 mutant both inhibited histamine-evoked secretion of the WPB cargos von Willebrand factor and P-selectin. Pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified the ArfGAP with coiled-coil, Ank repeat, and pleckstrin homology domain–containing protein ACAP2 as an Rab35 effector in endothelial cells, and depletion as well as overexpression approaches revealed that ACAP2 acts as a negative regulator of WPB exocytosis. Interestingly, a known ACAP2 target, the small GTPase Arf6, supported histamine-evoked WPB exocytosis, as shown by knockdown and overexpression of a dominant-negative Arf6 mutant. Our data identify Rab35 as a novel regulator of WPB exocytosis, most likely acting through the downstream effectors ACAP2 and Arf6. PMID:28566286

  7. Imidazoline NNC77-0074 stimulates Ca2+-evoked exocytosis in INS-1E cells by a phospholipase A2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Hervør L; Nørby, Peder L; Høy, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the novel imidazoline compound (+)-2-(2-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-thiopene-2-yl-ethyl)-pyridine (NNC77-0074) increases insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells by stimulation of Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis. Using capacitance measurements, we now show...... that NNC77-0074 stimulates exocytosis in clonal INS-1E cells. NNC77-0074-stimulated exocytosis was antagonised by the cytoplasmic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) inhibitors ACA and AACOCF(3) and in cells treated with antisense oligonucleotide against cPLA(2)alpha. NNC77-0074-evoked insulin secretion...... was likewise inhibited by ACA, AACOCF(3), and cPLA(2)alpha antisense oligonucleotide treatment. In pancreatic islets NNC77-0074 stimulated PLA(2) activity. We propose that cPLA(2)alpha plays an important role in the regulation of NNC77-0074-evoked exocytosis in insulin secreting beta-cells....

  8. On Depolarization-Evoked Exocytosis as a Function of Calcium Entry: Possibilities and Pitfalls

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    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2011-01-01

    Secretion from many endocrine cells is a result of calcium-regulated exocytosis due to Ca2+ influx. Using the patch-clamp technique, voltage pulses can be applied to the cells to open Ca2+ channels, resulting in a measurable Ca2+ current, and evoke exocytosis, which can be seen as an increase in membrane capacitance. A common tool for evaluating the relation between Ca2+ influx and exocytosis is to plot the increase in capacitance (ΔCm) as a function of the integral of the measured Ca2+ current (Q). When depolarizations of different lengths are imposed, the rate of exocytosis is typically higher for shorter than for longer pulses, which has been suggested to result from depletion of a granule pool or from Ca2+ current inactivation. It is here demonstrated that ΔCm as a function of Q can reveal whether Ca2+ current inactivation masquerades as pool depletion. Moreover, it is shown that a convex, cooperativity-like, relation between ΔCm and Q surprisingly cannot occur as a result of cooperative effects, but can result from delays in the exocytotic process or in Ca2+ dynamics. An overview of expected ΔCm-versus-Q relations for a range of explicit situations is given, which should help in the interpretation of data of depolarization-evoked exocytosis in endocrine cells. PMID:21843469

  9. Rab35 protein regulates evoked exocytosis of endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesemann, Anja; Gorontzi, Alexandra; Barr, Francis; Gerke, Volker

    2017-07-14

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) are secretory organelles of endothelial cells that undergo evoked exocytosis following intracellular Ca 2+ or cAMP elevation, thereby supplying the vasculature with factors controlling hemostasis. Several cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins, including the Rab family members Rab3, Rab15, and Rab27a, have been implicated in regulating the acute exocytosis of WPB. Here, we carried out a genome-wide screen to identify Rab pathways affecting WPB exocytosis. Overexpression of a specific subset of Rab GTPase-activating proteins (RabGAPs) inhibited histamine-evoked, Ca 2+ -dependent WPB exocytosis, presumably by inactivating the target Rab GTPases. Among these RabGAPs, we concentrated on TBC1D10A and showed that the inhibitory effect depends on its GAP activity. We confirmed that Rab35 was a target Rab of TBC1D10A in human endothelial cells; Rab35 interacted with TBC1D10A, and expression of the GAP-insensitive Rab35(Q67A) mutant rescued the inhibitory effect of TBC1D10A overexpression on WPB exocytosis. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab35 and expression of a dominant-negative Rab35 mutant both inhibited histamine-evoked secretion of the WPB cargos von Willebrand factor and P-selectin. Pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified the ArfGAP with coiled-coil, Ank repeat, and pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein ACAP2 as an Rab35 effector in endothelial cells, and depletion as well as overexpression approaches revealed that ACAP2 acts as a negative regulator of WPB exocytosis. Interestingly, a known ACAP2 target, the small GTPase Arf6, supported histamine-evoked WPB exocytosis, as shown by knockdown and overexpression of a dominant-negative Arf6 mutant. Our data identify Rab35 as a novel regulator of WPB exocytosis, most likely acting through the downstream effectors ACAP2 and Arf6. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Munc18-1 and Munc18-2 Proteins Modulate beta-Cell Ca2+ Sensitivity and Kinetics of Insulin Exocytosis Differently

    OpenAIRE

    Mandic, Slavena A.; Skelin, Masa; Johansson, Jenny U.; Rupnik, Marjan S.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bark, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Fast neurotransmission and slower hormone release share the same core fusion machinery consisting of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins. In evoked neurotransmission, interactions between SNAREs and the Munc18-1 protein, a member of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) protein family, are essential for exocytosis, whereas other SM proteins are dispensable. To address if the exclusivity of Munc18-1 demonstrated in neuroexocytosis also applied to fast insulin ...

  11. Estradiol inhibits depolarization-evoked exocytosis in PC12 cells via N-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, K.L.; Maxson, M.M.; Mellander, L.; Westerink, R.H.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/239425952; Ewing, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Fast neuromodulatory effects of 17-β-estradiol (E2) on cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) have been reported in many cell types, but little is known about its direct effects on vesicular neurotransmitter secretion (exocytosis). We examined the effects of E2 on depolarization-evoked

  12. DeSUMOylation Controls Insulin Exocytosis in Response to Metabolic Signals

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    Patrick E. MacDonald

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The secretion of insulin by pancreatic islet β-cells plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis and diabetes. Recent work suggests an important role for SUMOylation in the control of insulin secretion from β-cells. In this paper we discuss mechanisms whereby (deSUMOylation may control insulin release by modulating β-cell function at one or more key points; and particularly through the acute and reversible regulation of the exocytotic machinery. Furthermore, we postulate that the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 is an important mediator of insulin exocytosis in response to NADPH, a metabolic secretory signal and major determinant of β-cell redox state. Dialysis of mouse β-cells with NADPH efficiently amplifies β-cell exocytosis even when extracellular glucose is low; an effect that is lost upon knockdown of SENP1. Conversely, over-expression of SENP1 itself augments β-cell exocytosis in a redox-dependent manner. Taken together, we suggest that (deSUMOylation represents an important mechanism that acutely regulates insulin secretion and that SENP1 can act as an amplifier of insulin exocytosis.

  13. Mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of calcium-regulated insulin granule exocytosis in ß-cells from mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Cortese, Giuliana; Eliasson, Lena

    2011-01-01

    on depolarization-evoked Ca2+-currents and corresponding capacitance measurements. Using a statistical mixed-effects model, we show that the data indicate that pool depletion is negligible in response to short depolarizations in mouse ß-cells. We then review mathematical models of granule dynamics and exocytosis...... in rodent ß-cells and present a mathematical description of Ca2+-evoked exocytosis in human ß-cells, which show clear differences to their rodent counterparts. The model suggests that L- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels are involved to a similar degree in exocytosis during electrical activity in human ß-cells....

  14. Kv2.1 Clustering Contributes to Insulin Exocytosis and Rescues Human β-Cell Dysfunction.

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    Fu, Jianyang; Dai, Xiaoqing; Plummer, Gregory; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Bautista, Austin; Githaka, John M; Senior, Laura; Jensen, Mette; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Newgard, Christopher B; Touret, Nicolas; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2017-07-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated by ion channels that control excitability and Ca 2+ influx. Channels also play an increasingly appreciated role in microdomain structure. In this study, we examine the mechanism by which the voltage-dependent K + (Kv) channel Kv2.1 ( KCNB1 ) facilitates depolarization-induced exocytosis in INS 832/13 cells and β-cells from human donors with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D). We find that Kv2.1, but not Kv2.2 ( KCNB2 ), forms clusters of 6-12 tetrameric channels at the plasma membrane and facilitates insulin exocytosis. Knockdown of Kv2.1 expression reduces secretory granule targeting to the plasma membrane. Expression of the full-length channel (Kv2.1-wild-type) supports the glucose-dependent recruitment of secretory granules. However, a truncated channel (Kv2.1-ΔC318) that retains electrical function and syntaxin 1A binding, but lacks the ability to form clusters, does not enhance granule recruitment or exocytosis. Expression of KCNB1 appears reduced in T2D islets, and further knockdown of KCNB1 does not inhibit Kv current in T2D β-cells. Upregulation of Kv2.1-wild-type, but not Kv2.1-ΔC318, rescues the exocytotic phenotype in T2D β-cells and increases insulin secretion from T2D islets. Thus, the ability of Kv2.1 to directly facilitate insulin exocytosis depends on channel clustering. Loss of this structural role for the channel might contribute to impaired insulin secretion in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice {beta} cells

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    Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. {yields} DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. {yields} Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single {beta}-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  16. Zn2+ chelation by serum albumin improves hexameric Zn2+-insulin dissociation into monomers after exocytosis.

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    José A G Pertusa

    Full Text Available β-cells release hexameric Zn2+-insulin into the extracellular space, but monomeric Zn2+-free insulin appears to be the only biologically active form. The mechanisms implicated in dissociation of the hexamer remain unclear, but they seem to be Zn2+ concentration-dependent. In this study, we investigate the influence of albumin binding to Zn2+ on Zn2+-insulin dissociation into Zn2+-free insulin and its physiological, methodological and therapeutic relevance. Glucose and K+-induced insulin release were analyzed in isolated mouse islets by static incubation and perifusion experiments in the presence and absence of albumin and Zn2+ chelators. Insulin tolerance tests were performed in rats using different insulin solutions with and without Zn2+ and/or albumin. Albumin-free buffer does not alter quantification by RIA of Zn2+-free insulin but strongly affects RIA measurements of Zn2+-insulin. In contrast, accurate determination of Zn2+-insulin was obtained only when bovine serum albumin or Zn2+ chelators were present in the assay buffer solution. Albumin and Zn2+ chelators do not modify insulin release but do affect insulin determination. Preincubation with albumin or Zn2+ chelators promotes the conversion of "slow" Zn2+-insulin into "fast" insulin. Consequently, insulin diffusion from large islets is ameliorated in the presence of Zn2+ chelators. These observations support the notion that the Zn2+-binding properties of albumin improve the dissociation of Zn2+-insulin into subunits after exocytosis, which may be useful in insulin determination, insulin pharmacokinetic assays and islet transplantation.

  17. Detection of insulin granule exocytosis by an electrophysiology method with high temporal resolution reveals enlarged insulin granule pool in BIG3-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Hongyu; Gounko, Natalia V; Zhou, Zhuan; Xu, Aimin; Hong, Wanjin; Han, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    We recently identified BIG3 as a negative regulator of insulin granule biogenesis and reported increased insulin secretion in BIG3-knockout (BKO) mice. To pinpoint the site of action for BIG3, we investigated whether BIG3 regulates quantal insulin granule exocytosis. We established an assay to detect insulin granule exocytosis by recording ATP-elicited currents at high temporal resolution by patch clamp. Similarly to insulin, ATP release was increased in BKO β-cells. Although the frequency of insulin granule exocytosis was increased in BKO β-cells, quantal size or release kinetics remained unchanged. Electron microscopy studies showed that the number of insulin granules was increased by >60% in BKO β-cells. However, the number of morphologically docked granules was unaltered. The number of insulin granules having significant distances away from plasma membrane was greatly increased in BKO β-cells. Thus, BIG3 negatively regulates insulin granule exocytosis by restricting insulin granule biogenesis without the release kinetics of individual granules at the final exocytotic steps being affected. Depletion of BIG3 leads to an enlarged releasable pool of insulin granules, which accounts for increased release frequency and consequently increased insulin secretion. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Imaging of evoked dense-core-vesicle exocytosis in hippocampal neurons reveals long latencies and kiss-and-run fusion events

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    Xia, Xiaofeng; Lessmann, Volkmar; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Evoked neuropeptide secretion in the central nervous system occurs slowly, but the basis for slow release is not fully understood. Whereas exocytosis of single synaptic vesicles in neurons and of dense-core vesicles (DCVs) in endocrine cells have been directly visualized, single DCV exocytic events in neurons of the central nervous system have not been previously studied. We imaged DCV exocytosis in primary cultured hippocampal neurons using fluorescent propeptide carg...

  19. The GTPase Rab37 Participates in the Control of Insulin Exocytosis.

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    Sanda Ljubicic

    Full Text Available Rab37 belongs to a subclass of Rab GTPases regulating exocytosis, including also Rab3a and Rab27a. Proteomic studies indicate that Rab37 is associated with insulin-containing large dense core granules of pancreatic β-cells. In agreement with these observations, we detected Rab37 in extracts of β-cell lines and human pancreatic islets and confirmed by confocal microscopy the localization of the GTPase on insulin-containing secretory granules. We found that, as is the case for Rab3a and Rab27a, reduction of Rab37 levels by RNA interference leads to impairment in glucose-induced insulin secretion and to a decrease in the number of granules in close apposition to the plasma membrane. Pull-down experiments revealed that, despite similar functional effects, Rab37 does not interact with known Rab3a or Rab27a effectors and is likely to operate through a different mechanism. Exposure of insulin-secreting cells to proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids or oxidized low-density lipoproteins, mimicking physiopathological conditions that favor the development of diabetes, resulted in a decrease in Rab37 expression. Our data identify Rab37 as an additional component of the machinery governing exocytosis of β-cells and suggest that impaired expression of this GTPase may contribute to defective insulin release in pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions.

  20. Munc18b Is a Major Mediator of Insulin Exocytosis in Rat Pancreatic β-Cells

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    Lam, Patrick P.L.; Ohno, Mitsuyo; Dolai, Subhankar; He, Yu; Qin, Tairan; Liang, Tao; Zhu, Dan; Kang, Youhou; Liu, Yunfeng; Kauppi, Maria; Xie, Li; Wan, Wilson C.Y.; Bin, Na-Rhum; Sugita, Shuzo; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo; Gaisano, Herbert Y.

    2013-01-01

    Sec1/Munc18 proteins facilitate the formation of trans-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes that mediate fusion of secretory granule (SG) with plasma membrane (PM). The capacity of pancreatic β-cells to exocytose insulin becomes compromised in diabetes. β-Cells express three Munc18 isoforms of which the role of Munc18b is unknown. We found that Munc18b depletion in rat islets disabled SNARE complex formation formed by syntaxin (Syn)-2 and Syn-3. Two-photon imaging analysis revealed in Munc18b-depleted β-cells a 40% reduction in primary exocytosis (SG-PM fusion) and abrogation of almost all sequential SG-SG fusion, together accounting for a 50% reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). In contrast, gain-of-function expression of Munc18b wild-type and, more so, dominant-positive K314L/R315L mutant promoted the assembly of cognate SNARE complexes, which caused potentiation of biphasic GSIS. We found that this was attributed to a more than threefold enhancement of both primary exocytosis and sequential SG-SG fusion, including long-chain fusion (6–8 SGs) not normally (2–3 SG fusion) observed. Thus, Munc18b-mediated exocytosis may be deployed to increase secretory efficiency of SGs in deeper cytosolic layers of β-cells as well as additional primary exocytosis, which may open new avenues of therapy development for diabetes. PMID:23423569

  1. Insulin stimulates fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

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    Gibbs, E M; Lienhard, G E; Appleman, J R; Lane, M D; Frost, S C

    1986-03-25

    Fluid phase endocytosis by monolayers of 3T3-L1 adipocytes has been followed by measuring [14C]sucrose uptake, a well characterized pinocytic marker. Insulin, at a maximal stimulatory concentration, increased the pinocytic rate by 2-fold within 5 min of its addition; this activation persisted for at least 2 h. The dose-response curve for the enhancement of fluid-phase endocytosis by insulin was identical with that for the stimulation of hexose transport, as measured by the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose. The concentration of insulin eliciting half-maximal effects was 6 nM. These results suggest that activation of endocytosis and hexose uptake by insulin are triggered by the same signalling event. Insulin-activated pinocytosis was not dependent upon the increased metabolism of D-glucose that occurs in response to the hormone, since the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis occurred in the absence of 5 nM glucose. Fluid-phase exocytosis was examined by loading cells with [14C]sucrose for various times and then measuring tracer efflux. The rate of sucrose release was biphasic; a portion of the internalized sucrose was rapidly released from the cell (t1/2 approximately 5 min), whereas the remainder was released slowly (t1/2 approximately to 5 h). These results are consistent with a sequential two-compartment model in which the [14C] sucrose first enters a compartment from which about 70% of the sucrose is rapidly released back into the medium and the remaining 30% is transferred to a second compartment. Therefore, the true rate of endocytosis is much greater than the observed accumulation rates, except after short uptake times. Insulin increases the rate of sucrose efflux from both compartments as well as the rate of transfer from the first compartment to the second compartment by about 2-fold. Furthermore, insulin increased the apparent size of the first and second compartments by 1.6- and 3-fold, respectively. The lysosomotropic agent chloroquine (200 muM) had only a

  2. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

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    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion.

  3. Reduced insulin exocytosis in human pancreatic β-cells with gene variants linked to type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, Anders H; Braun, Matthias; Mahdi, Taman

    2012-01-01

    in relation to genetic risk profiles in diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Islets from donors with T2D exhibited impaired insulin secretion, which was more pronounced in lean than obese diabetic donors. We assessed the impact of 14 disease susceptibility variants on measures of glucose sensing, exocytosis...

  4. cPLA2alpha-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2alpha) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic beta-cells. cPLA2alpha...... by the Cl- channel inhibitor DIDS and in cells pretreated with ClC-3 Cl- channel antisense oligonucleotides. We propose that cPLA2alpha has an important role in controlling the rate of exocytosis in beta-cells. This effect of cPLA2alpha reflects an enhanced transgranular Cl- flux, leading to an increase...... dose dependently (EC50 = 86 nM) stimulated depolarization-evoked exocytosis by 450% without affecting the whole cell Ca2+ current or cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. The stimulatory effect involved priming of secretory granules as reflected by an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of granules...

  5. cPLA2a-evoked formation of arachidonic acid and lysophospholipids is required for exocytosis in mouse pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Kirstine; Høy, Marianne; Olsen, Hervør L.

    2003-01-01

    Using capacitance measurements, we investigated the effects of intracellularly applied recombinant human cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 ) and its lipolytic products arachidonic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in single mouse pancreatic -cells. cPLA2 dose dependently...... and in cells pretreated with ClC-3 Cl- channel antisense oligonucleotides. We propose that cPLA2 has an important role in controlling the rate of exocytosis in -cells. This effect of cPLA2 reflects an enhanced transgranular Cl- flux, leading to an increase in the number of granules available for release...... (EC50 = 86 nM) stimulated depolarization-evoked exocytosis by 450% without affecting the whole cell Ca2+ current or cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. The stimulatory effect involved priming of secretory granules as reflected by an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of granules from 70...

  6. Synaptotagmin-7 Functions to Replenish Insulin Granules for Exocytosis in Human Islet β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, Subhankar; Xie, Li; Zhu, Dan; Liang, Tao; Qin, Tairan; Xie, Huanli; Kang, Youhou; Chapman, Edwin R; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2016-07-01

    Synaptotagmin (Syt)-7, a major component of the exocytotic machinery in neurons, is also the major Syt in rodent pancreatic β-cells shown to mediate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, Syt-7's precise exocytotic actions in β-cells remain unknown. We show that Syt-7 is abundant in human β-cells. Adenovirus-short hairpin RNA knockdown (KD) of Syt-7 in human islets reduced first- and second-phase GSIS attributed to the reduction of exocytosis of predocked and newcomer insulin secretory granules (SGs). Glucose stimulation expectedly induced Syt-7 association in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with syntaxin-3 and syntaxin-1A soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes known to mediate exocytosis of newcomer and predocked SGs, respectively. However, Syt-7-KD did not disrupt SNARE complex assembly. Instead, electron microscopy analysis showed that Syt-7-KD reduced the recruitment of SGs to the plasma membrane after glucose-stimulated depletion, which could not be rescued by glucagon-like peptide 1 pretreatment. To assess the possibility that this new action of Syt-7 on SG recruitment may involve calmodulin (CaM), pretreatment of islets with CaM blocker calmidazolium showed effects very similar to those of Syt-7-KD. Syt-7 therefore plays a novel more dominant function in the replenishment of releasable SG pools in human β-cells than its previously purported role in exocytotic fusion per se. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Syntaxin-4 mediates exocytosis of pre-docked and newcomer insulin granules underlying biphasic glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in human pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Zhu, Dan; Dolai, Subhankar; Liang, Tao; Qin, Tairan; Kang, Youhou; Xie, Huanli; Huang, Ya-Chi; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2015-06-01

    Of the four exocytotic syntaxins (Syns), much is now known about the role of Syn-1A (pre-docked secretory granules [SGs]) and Syn-3 (newcomer SGs) in insulin exocytosis. Some work was reported on Syn-4's role in biphasic glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but its precise role in insulin SG exocytosis remains unclear. In this paper we examine this role in human beta cells. Endogenous function of Syn-4 in human islets was assessed by knocking down its expression with lentiviral single hairpin RNA (lenti-shRNA)-RFP. Biphasic GSIS was determined by islet perifusion assay. Single-cell analysis of exocytosis of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-positive beta cells (exhibiting near-total depletion of Syn-4) was by patch clamp capacitance measurements (Cm) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), the latter to further assess single SG behaviour. Co-immunoprecipitations were conducted on INS-1 cells to assess exocytotic complexes. Syn-4 knockdown (KD) of 77% in human islets caused a concomitant reduction in cognate Munc18c expression (46%) without affecting expression of other exocytotic proteins; this resulted in reduction of GSIS in the first phase (by 42%) and the second phase (by 40%). Cm of RFP-tagged Syn-4-KD beta cells showed severe inhibition in the readily releasable pool (by 71%) and mobilisation from reserve pools (by 63%). TIRFM showed that Syn-4-KD-induced inhibition of first-phase GSIS was attributed to reduction in exocytosis of both pre-docked and newcomer SGs (which undergo minimal residence or docking time at the plasma membrane before fusion). Second-phase inhibition was attributed to reduction in newcomer SGs. Stx-4 co-immunoprecipitated Munc18c, VAMP2 and VAMP8, suggesting that these exocytotic complexes may be involved in exocytosis of pre-docked and newcomer SGs. Syn-4 is involved in distinct molecular machineries that influence exocytosis of both pre-docked and newcomer SGs in a manner functionally redundant to Syn-1A and

  8. CFTR and Anoctamin 1 (ANO1) contribute to cAMP amplified exocytosis and insulin secretion in human and murine pancreatic beta-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene lead to the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Although patients with CF often have disturbances in glucose metabolism including impaired insulin release, no previous studies have tested the hypothesis that CFTR has a biological function in pancreatic beta-cells. Methods Experiments were performed on islets and single beta-cells from human donors and NMRI-mice. Detection of CFTR was investigated using PCR and confocal microscopy. Effects on insulin secretion were measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA). The patch-clamp technique was used to measure ion channel currents and calcium-dependent exocytosis (as changes in membrane capacitance) on single cells with high temporal resolution. Analysis of ultrastructure was done on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Results We detected the presence of CFTR and measured a small CFTR conductance in both human and mouse beta-cells. The augmentation of insulin secretion at 16.7 mM glucose by activation of CFTR by cAMP (forskolin (FSK) or GLP-1) was significantly inhibited when CFTR antagonists (GlyH-101 and/or CFTRinh-172) were added. Likewise, capacitance measurements demonstrated reduced cAMP-dependent exocytosis upon CFTR-inhibition, concomitant with a decreased number of docked insulin granules. Finally, our studies demonstrate that CFTR act upstream of the chloride channel Anoctamin 1 (ANO1; TMEM16A) in the regulation of cAMP- and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusion Our work demonstrates a novel function for CFTR as a regulator of pancreatic beta-cell insulin secretion and exocytosis, and put forward a role for CFTR as regulator of ANO1 and downstream priming of insulin granules prior to fusion and release of insulin. The pronounced regulatory effect of CFTR on insulin secretion is consistent with impaired insulin secretion in patients with CF. PMID:24885604

  9. Type II PKAs are anchored to mature insulin secretory granules in INS-1 β-cells and required for cAMP-dependent potentiation of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Sabrina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fernandez, Anne; Lamb, Ned J; Hani, El-Habib

    2016-06-01

    Specificity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway relies on an extremely sophisticated compartmentalization mechanism of the kinase within a given cell, based on high-affinity binding of PKA tetramer pools to different A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). We and others have previously shown that AKAPs-dependent PKA subcellular targeting is a requisite for optimal cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin exocytosis. We thus hypothesized that a PKA pool may directly anchor to the secretory compartment to potentiate insulin exocytosis. Here, using immunofluorescence analyses combined to subcellular fractionations and purification of insulin secretory granules (ISGs), we identified discrete subpools of type II PKAs, RIIα and RIIβ PKAs, along with the catalytic subunit, physically associated with ISGs within pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells. Ultrastructural analysis of native rodent β-cells confirmed in vivo the occurrence of PKA on dense-core ISGs. Isoform-selective disruption of binding of PKAs to AKAPs reinforced the requirement of type II PKA isoforms for cAMP potentiation of insulin exocytosis. This granular localization of PKA was of critical importance since siRNA-mediated depletion of either RIIα or RIIβ PKAs resulted in a significant reduction of cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin release. The present work provides evidence for a previously unrecognized pool of type II PKAs physically anchored to the β-cell ISGs compartment and supports a non-redundant function for type II PKAs during cAMP potentiation of exocytosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis by insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and epidermal growth factor in KB cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Y; Hoshi, M; Koyasu, S; Kadowaki, T; Kasuga, M; Yahara, I; Nishida, E; Sakai, H

    1988-09-01

    Effects of growth factors on fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis in human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells were examined by measuring horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a marker. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) promoted HRP accumulation. They also stimulated the efflux of the preloaded HRP from the cells. From these results it follows that these growth factors stimulate the influx as well as the efflux of HRP, because the accumulation rate is the sum of the influx rate and the efflux rate. The stimulation of both HRP accumulation and HRP efflux was rapidly induced within 2-4 min of the addition of growth factors and persisted for at least 60 min. The concentrations eliciting half-maximal stimulatory effects of insulin, IGF-I, and EGF were about 5 X 10(-7), 1 X 10(-9), and 5 X 10(-10) M, respectively. aIR-3 (anti-type I IGF receptor antibody) completely blocked the stimulation of HRP accumulation by IGF-I but very slightly inhibited the stimulation by insulin. The 528 IgG (anti-EGF receptor antibody) inhibited the stimulation of HRP accumulation by EGF. These results indicated that each of these growth factors stimulates the HRP accumulation mediated by the corresponding (homologous) growth factor receptors. The rapid stimulation of fluid-phase influx and efflux may constitute one of the common early cellular responses to growth factors.

  11. Spatial and temporal coordination of insulin granule exocytosis in intact human pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaça, Joana; Liang, Tao; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Nam, Hong Gil; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Insulin secretion is widely studied because it plays a central role in glucose homeostasis and diabetes. Processes from insulin granule fusion in beta cells to in vivo insulin secretion have been elucidated, but data at the cellular level do not fully account for several aspects of the macroscopic secretory pattern. Here we investigated how individual secretory events are coordinated spatially and temporally within intact human islets. We used the fluorescent probe neuropeptide Y (NPY)-pHluorin to visualise insulin granule secretion in isolated intact human islets. We found that individual beta cells respond to increases in glucose concentration by releasing insulin granules in very discrete bursts with periods consistent with in vivo pulsatile insulin secretion. In successive secretory bursts during prolonged exposure to high glucose levels, secretory events progressively localised to preferential release sites, coinciding with the transition to second phase insulin secretion. Granule secretion was very synchronised in neighbouring beta cells, forming discrete regional clusters of activity. These results reveal how individual secretory events are coordinated to produce pulsatile insulin secretion from human islets.

  12. The insulin-mediated modulation of visually evoked magnetic fields is reduced in obese subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Guthoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named "cerebral insulin resistance", is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a "cerebral insulin resistance" in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  13. Confocal Imaging of Neuropeptide Y-pHluorin: A Technique to Visualize Insulin Granule Exocytosis in Intact Murine and Human Islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhmutova, Madina; Liang, Tao; Gaisano, Herbert; Caicedo, Alejandro; Almaça, Joana

    2017-09-13

    Insulin secretion plays a central role in glucose homeostasis under normal physiological conditions as well as in disease. Current approaches to study insulin granule exocytosis either use electrophysiology or microscopy coupled to the expression of fluorescent reporters. However most of these techniques have been optimized for clonal cell lines or require dissociating pancreatic islets. In contrast, the method presented here allows for real time visualization of insulin granule exocytosis in intact pancreatic islets. In this protocol, we first describe the viral infection of isolated pancreatic islets with adenovirus that encodes a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP), pHluorin, coupled to neuropeptide Y (NPY). Second, we describe the confocal imaging of islets five days after viral infection and how to monitor the insulin granule secretion. Briefly, the infected islets are placed on a coverslip on an imaging chamber and imaged under an upright laser-scanning confocal microscope while being continuously perfused with extracellular solution containing various stimuli. Confocal images spanning 50 µm of the islet are acquired as time-lapse recordings using a fast-resonant scanner. The fusion of insulin granules with the plasma membrane can be followed over time. This procedure also allows for testing a battery of stimuli in a single experiment, is compatible with both mouse and human islets, and can be combined with various dyes for functional imaging (e.g., membrane potential or cytosolic calcium dyes).

  14. Spatiotemporal detection and analysis of exocytosis reveal fusion "hotspots" organized by the cytoskeleton in endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tianyi; Lu, Jingze; Zhang, Jinzhong; Zhang, Yongdeng; Chen, Liangyi

    2015-01-20

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope has often been used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying vesicle exocytosis. However, the spatial occurrence of the fusion events within a single cell is not frequently explored due to the lack of sensitive and accurate computer-assisted programs to analyze large image data sets. Here, we have developed an image analysis platform for the nonbiased identification of different types of vesicle fusion events with high accuracy in different cell types. By performing spatiotemporal analysis of stimulus-evoked exocytosis in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells, we statistically prove that individual vesicle fusion events are clustered at hotspots. This spatial pattern disappears upon the disruption of either the actin or the microtubule network; this disruption also severely inhibits evoked exocytosis. By demonstrating that newcomer vesicles are delivered from the cell interior to the surface membrane for exocytosis, we highlight a previously unappreciated mechanism in which the cytoskeleton-dependent transportation of secretory vesicles organizes exocytosis hotspots in endocrine cells. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  16. Unproductive exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Marko; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Vardjan, Nina; Zorec, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Regulated exocytosis is a multistage process involving a merger between the vesicle and the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of a fusion pore, a channel, through which secretions are released from the vesicle to the cell exterior. A stimulus may influence the pore by either dilating it completely (full-fusion exocytosis) or mediating a reversible closure (transient exocytosis). In neurons, these transitions are short-lived and not accessible for experimentation. However, in some neuroendocrine cells and astrocytes, initial fusion pores may reopen several hundred times, indicating their stability. Frequently, these pores are too narrow to pass luminal molecules to the extracellular space (unproductive exocytosis), but their diameter can dilate upon stimulation. To explain the stability of the initial narrow fusion pores, anisotropic membrane constituents with a non-axisymmetric shape were proposed to accumulate in the fusion pore membrane. Although the nature of these is unclear, they may consist of lipids and proteins, including SNAREs, which may facilitate and regulate the pre- and post-fusional stages of exocytosis. This review highlights models and experimental studies revealing mechanisms of fusion pore stabilization in a narrow, release unproductive state. The fusion pore is a channel that forms when the vesicle and the plasma membranes merge, and mediates the release of secretions from the vesicle lumen to the cell exterior. Frequently, these pores are too narrow to pass molecules to the extracellular space. Anisotropic membrane constituents with a non-axisymmetric shape were proposed to accumulate in the fusion pore membrane. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015). © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Picrorhiza kurroa Enhances β-Cell Mass Proliferation and Insulin Secretion in Streptozotocin Evoked β-Cell Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β-cells leads to insulin insufficiency and hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Regeneration of β-cells is one of the proposed treatment for type 1 diabetes and insulin insufficiency. Picrorhiza kurroa is a medicinal herb and is traditionally being used for the treatment of various diseases. Previous studies reported the hypoglycemic potential of P. kurroa. However, its potential role in β-cell induction in insulin secretion have not been fully investigated. Here, we characterized the hydro alcoholic extract of P. kurroa rhizome (PKRE and further studied its β-cell regeneration and induction of insulin secretion potential in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats as well as in insulin producing Rin5f cells. 1H-NMR revealed the presence of more than thirty metabolites including picroside I and II in PKRE. Further, we found that PKRE treatment (100 and 200 mg/kg dose for 30 days significantly (p ≤ 0.05 protected the pancreatic β-cells against streptozotocin (STZ evoked damage and inhibited the glucagon receptor expression (Gcgr in hepatic and renal tissues. It significantly (p ≤ 0.05 enhanced the insulin expression and aids in proliferation of insulin producing Rin5f cells with elevated insulin secretion. Furthermore it significantly (p ≤ 0.05 increased insulin mediated glucose uptake in 3T3L1 and L6 cells. On the contrary, in diabetic rats, PKRE significantly (p ≤ 0.05 decreased high blood glucose and restored the normal levels of serum biochemicals. Altogether, our results showed that PKRE displayed β-cell regeneration with enhanced insulin production and antihyperglycemic effects. PKRE also improves hepatic and renal functions against oxidative damage.

  18. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Akimoto, Yoshihiro [Department of Anatomy, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Kawakami, Hayato [Department of Anatomy, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  19. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  20. Exocytosis in non-neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Peter; Zorec, Robert; Rettig, Jens; Keating, Damien J

    2016-06-01

    Exocytosis is the process by which stored neurotransmitters and hormones are released via the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. It is a dynamic, rapid and spatially restricted process involving multiple steps including vesicle trafficking, tethering, docking, priming and fusion. For many years great steps have been undertaken in our understanding of how exocytosis occurs in different cell types, with significant focus being placed on synaptic release and neurotransmission. However, this process of exocytosis is an essential component of cell signalling throughout the body and underpins a diverse array of essential physiological pathways. Many similarities exist between different cell types with regard to key aspects of the exocytosis pathway, such as the need for Ca(2+) to trigger it or the involvement of members of the N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor protein families. However, it is also equally clear that non-neuronal cells have acquired highly specialized mechanisms to control the release of their own unique chemical messengers. This review will focus on several important non-neuronal cell types and discuss what we know about the mechanisms they use to control exocytosis and how their specialized output is relevant to the physiological role of each individual cell type. These include enteroendocrine cells, pancreatic β cells, astrocytes, lactotrophs and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Non-neuronal cells have acquired highly specialized mechanisms to control the release of unique chemical messengers, such as polarised fusion of insulin granules in pancreatic β cells targeted towards the vasculature (top). This review discusses mechanisms used in several important non-neuronal cell types to control exocytosis, and the relevance of intermediate vesicle fusion pore states (bottom) and their specialized output to the physiological role of each cell type. These include enteroendocrine cells, pancreatic β cells

  1. Exocytosis of serotonin from the neuronal soma is sustained by a serotonin and calcium-dependent feedback loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Pinzon, Carolina; Cercós, Montserrat G.; Noguez, Paula; Trueta, Citlali; De-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2014-01-01

    The soma of many neurons releases large amounts of transmitter molecules through an exocytosis process that continues for hundreds of seconds after the end of the triggering stimulus. Transmitters released in this way modulate the activity of neurons, glia and blood vessels over vast volumes of the nervous system. Here we studied how somatic exocytosis is maintained for such long periods in the absence of electrical stimulation and transmembrane Ca2+ entry. Somatic exocytosis of serotonin from dense core vesicles could be triggered by a train of 10 action potentials at 20 Hz in Retzius neurons of the leech. However, the same number of action potentials produced at 1 Hz failed to evoke any exocytosis. The 20-Hz train evoked exocytosis through a sequence of intracellular Ca2+ transients, with each transient having a different origin, timing and intracellular distribution. Upon electrical stimulation, transmembrane Ca2+ entry through L-type channels activated Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. A resulting fast Ca2+ transient evoked an early exocytosis of serotonin from sparse vesicles resting close to the plasma membrane. This Ca2+ transient also triggered the transport of distant clusters of vesicles toward the plasma membrane. Upon exocytosis, the released serotonin activated autoreceptors coupled to phospholipase C, which in turn produced an intracellular Ca2+ increase in the submembrane shell. This localized Ca2+ increase evoked new exocytosis as the vesicles in the clusters arrived gradually at the plasma membrane. In this way, the extracellular serotonin elevated the intracellular Ca2+ and this Ca2+ evoked more exocytosis. The resulting positive feedback loop maintained exocytosis for the following hundreds of seconds until the last vesicles in the clusters fused. Since somatic exocytosis displays similar kinetics in neurons releasing different types of transmitters, the data presented here contributes to understand the cellular basis of paracrine neurotransmission

  2. Brainstem auditory evoked potential, visual evoked potential and nerve conduction velocity and their relation with HbA1c and beta 2 microglobulin in children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinci, A; Deda, G; Karagöl, U; Teziç, T

    1994-01-01

    Brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER), visual evoked response (VER) and nerve conduction velocities (NCV) were studied in 18 insulin-dependent diabetic children between the ages of 3.5 and 16 years (mean 9.0 +/- 3.2 years). The results were compared with those of age-matched controls. The VER latencies of the diabetic children in the right eye and left eye were significantly prolonged when compared with the control group. NCV of n. peroneus and the latency of sensorial n. medianus were significantly impaired when compared with the control group. Although the latencies of waves III, IV and V of the right ear and the interpeak latencies of I-III, I-V, III-V of both ears were prolonged, the comparison with the control group was not significant. The beta 2 microglobulin levels of the diabetic patients were significantly higher than those of the control group. There was a positive correlation between the beta 2 microglobulin and the BAER interpeak latencies of wave III-V in both ears (r: 0.51 p sensorial) with beta 2 microglobulin (r: 0.52 p eyes separately. In our study the prolonged latencies of VER and BAER were detected in the absence of clinical abnormalities in visual and hearing systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  4. α2-Adrenergic Receptor and Isoflurane Modulation of Presynaptic Ca2+ Influx and Exocytosis in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masato; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2016-09-01

    Evidence indicates that the anesthetic-sparing effects of α2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists involve α2A-AR heteroreceptors on nonadrenergic neurons. Since volatile anesthetics inhibit neurotransmitter release by reducing synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis, the authors hypothesized that α2-AR agonists inhibit nonadrenergic SV exocytosis and thereby potentiate presynaptic inhibition of exocytosis by isoflurane. Quantitative imaging of fluorescent biosensors of action potential-evoked SV exocytosis (synaptophysin-pHluorin) and Ca influx (GCaMP6) were used to characterize presynaptic actions of the clinically used α2-AR agonists dexmedetomidine and clonidine, and their interaction with isoflurane, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Dexmedetomidine (0.1 μM, n = 10) or clonidine (0.5 μM, n = 8) inhibited action potential-evoked exocytosis (54 ± 5% and 59 ± 8% of control, respectively; P exocytosis were blocked by the subtype-nonselective α2-AR antagonist atipamezole or the α2A-AR-selective antagonist BRL 44408 but not by the α2C-AR-selective antagonist JP 1302. Dexmedetomidine inhibited exocytosis and presynaptic Ca influx without affecting Ca coupling to exocytosis, consistent with an effect upstream of Ca-exocytosis coupling. Exocytosis coupled to both N-type and P/Q-type Ca channels was inhibited by dexmedetomidine or clonidine. Dexmedetomidine potentiated inhibition of exocytosis by 0.7 mM isoflurane (to 42 ± 5%, compared to 63 ± 8% for isoflurane alone; P exocytosis is inhibited by α2A-AR activation in proportion to reduced Ca entry. These effects are additive with those of isoflurane, consistent with a role for α2A-AR presynaptic heteroreceptor inhibition of nonadrenergic synaptic transmission in the anesthetic-sparing effects of α2A-AR agonists.

  5. SUMO1 enhances cAMP-dependent exocytosis and glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao-Qing; Spigelman, Aliya F; Khan, Shara; Braun, Matthias; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E

    2014-09-01

    Post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO1) limits insulin secretion from β-cells by inhibiting insulin exocytosis and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor signalling. The secretion of glucagon from α-cells is regulated in a manner opposite to that of insulin; it is inhibited by elevated glucose and GLP-1, and increased by adrenergic signalling. We therefore sought to determine whether SUMO1 modulates mouse and human α-cell function. Action potentials (APs), ion channel function and exocytosis in single α-cells from mice and humans, identified by glucagon immunostaining, and glucagon secretion from intact islets were measured. The effects of SUMO1 on α-cell function and the respective inhibitory and stimulatory effects of exendin 4 and adrenaline were examined. Upregulation of SUMO1 increased α-cell AP duration, frequency and amplitude, in part as a result of increased Ca(2+) channel activity that led to elevated exocytosis. The ability of SUMO1 to enhance α-cell exocytosis was cAMP-dependent and resulted from an increased L-type Ca(2+) current and a shift away from exocytosis dependent on non-L-type channels, an effect that was mimicked by knockdown of the deSUMOylating enzyme sentrin/SUMO-specific protease-1 (SENP1). Finally, although SUMO1 prevented GLP-1 receptor-mediated inhibition of α-cell Na(+) channels and single-cell exocytosis, it failed to prevent the exendin 4-mediated inhibition of glucagon secretion. Consistent with its cAMP dependence, however, SUMO1 enhanced α-cell exocytosis and glucagon secretion stimulated by adrenaline. Thus, by contrast with its inhibitory role in β-cell exocytosis, SUMO1 is a positive regulator of α-cell exocytosis and glucagon secretion under conditions of elevated cAMP. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Mechanisms and Function of Dendritic Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic exocytosis is required for a broad array of neuronal functions including retrograde signaling, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and establishment of neuronal morphology. While the details of synaptic vesicle exocytosis from presynaptic terminals have been intensely studied for decades, the mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis are only now emerging. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis, and discuss how exocytosis from dendrites influences ne...

  7. Cell Biology of Ca2+-Triggered Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ triggers many forms of exocytosis in different types of eukaryotic cells, for example synaptic vesicle exocytosis in neurons, granule exocytosis in mast cells, and hormone exocytosis in endocrine cells. Work over the last two decades has shown that synaptotagmins function as the primary Ca2+-sensors for most of these forms of exocytosis, and that synaptotagmins act via Ca2+-dependent interactions with both the fusing phospholipid membranes and the membrane fusion machinery. However, some...

  8. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis.

  9. An Inhibitory Effect of Extracellular Ca2+ on Ca2+-Dependent Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeshi; Chen, Xiaowei; Sun, Lei; Guo, Ning; Zheng, Hui; Zheng, Lianghong; Ruat, Martial; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Claire Xi; Zhou, Zhuan

    2011-01-01

    Aim Neurotransmitter release is elicited by an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). The action potential triggers Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ channels which causes local changes of [Ca2+]i for vesicle release. However, any direct role of extracellular Ca2+ (besides Ca2+ influx) on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis remains elusive. Here we set out to investigate this possibility on rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and chromaffin cells, widely used models for studying vesicle exocytosis. Results Using photolysis of caged Ca2+ and caffeine-induced release of stored Ca2+, we found that extracellular Ca2+ inhibited exocytosis following moderate [Ca2+]i rises (2–3 µM). The IC50 for extracellular Ca2+ inhibition of exocytosis (ECIE) was 1.38 mM and a physiological reduction (∼30%) of extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) significantly increased the evoked exocytosis. At the single vesicle level, quantal size and release frequency were also altered by physiological [Ca2+]o. The calcimimetics Mg2+, Cd2+, G418, and neomycin all inhibited exocytosis. The extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) was not involved because specific drugs and knockdown of CaSR in DRG neurons did not affect ECIE. Conclusion/Significance As an extension of the classic Ca2+ hypothesis of synaptic release, physiological levels of extracellular Ca2+ play dual roles in evoked exocytosis by providing a source of Ca2+ influx, and by directly regulating quantal size and release probability in neuronal cells. PMID:22028769

  10. Exocytosis proteins as novel targets for diabetes prevention and/or remediation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslamy, Arianne; Thurmond, Debbie C

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, affecting an estimated 422 million adults. In the US, it is predicted that one in every three children born as of 2000 will suffer from diabetes in their lifetime. Type 2 diabetes results from combinatorial defects in pancreatic β-cell glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and in peripheral glucose uptake. Both processes, insulin secretion and glucose uptake, are mediated by exocytosis proteins, SNARE (soluble N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes, Sec1/Munc18 (SM), and double C2-domain protein B (DOC2B). Increasing evidence links deficiencies in these exocytosis proteins to diabetes in rodents and humans. Given this, emerging studies aimed at restoring and/or enhancing cellular levels of certain exocytosis proteins point to promising outcomes in maintaining functional β-cell mass and enhancing insulin sensitivity. In doing so, new evidence also shows that enhancing exocytosis protein levels may promote health span and longevity and may also harbor anti-cancer and anti-Alzheimer's disease capabilities. Herein, we present a comprehensive review of the described capabilities of certain exocytosis proteins and how these might be targeted for improving metabolic dysregulation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Characterisation of Weibel-Palade body fusion by amperometry in endothelial cells reveals fusion pore dynamics and the effect of cholesterol on exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Emma A; Conte, Ianina L; Dempster, John; Hannah, Matthew J; Carter, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Regulated secretion from endothelial cells is mediated by Weibel-Palade body (WPB) exocytosis. Plasma membrane cholesterol is implicated in regulating secretory granule exocytosis and fusion pore dynamics; however, its role in modulating WPB exocytosis is not clear. To address this we combined high-resolution electrochemical analysis of WPB fusion pore dynamics, by amperometry, with high-speed optical imaging of WPB exocytosis following cholesterol depletion or supplementation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We identified serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity in WPBs, and VMAT1 expression allowing detection of secreted 5-HT as discrete current spikes during exocytosis. A high proportion of spikes (∼75%) had pre-spike foot signals, indicating that WPB fusion proceeds via an initial narrow pore. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced pre-spike foot signal duration and increased the rate of fusion pore expansion, whereas cholesterol supplementation had broadly the reverse effect. Cholesterol depletion slowed the onset of hormone-evoked WPB exocytosis, whereas its supplementation increased the rate of WPB exocytosis and hormone-evoked proregion secretion. Our results provide the first analysis of WPB fusion pore dynamics and highlight an important role for cholesterol in the regulation of WPB exocytosis.

  12. Cell membrane structures during exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savigny, Pascale; Evans, John; McGrath, Kathryn M

    2007-08-01

    Exocytosis is a key biological process that controls the neurotransmission and release of hormones from cells. In endocrine cells, hormones are packed into secretory vesicles and released into the extracellular environment via openings in the plasma membrane, a few hundred nanometers wide, which form as a result of fusion of the membranes of the granule and cell. The complex processes and dynamics that result in the formation of the fusion pore, as well as its structure, remain scantly understood. A number of different exocytosis mechanisms have been postulated. Furthermore, the possibility exists that several mechanisms occur simultaneously. We present here an investigation of the cell membrane dynamics during exocytosis in anterior pituitary cells, especially gonadotropes, which secrete LH, a hormone central to ovulation. Gonadotrope enrichment was achieved using immunolabeled magnetic nanobeads. Three complementary imaging techniques were used to realize a fine structure study of the dynamics of the exocytosis-like sites occurring during secretion. Living pituitary and gonadotrope-enriched cells were imaged with atomic force microscopy, as well as cells that had been fixed to obtain better resolution. Atomic force microscopy, along with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, studies of these cells revealed that there are at least two different site configurations: simple single fusion pores and a complex association of pores consisting of a simple primary site combined with secondary attachments.

  13. How Do RIM-BPs Link Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels to Evoked Neurotransmitter Release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-09-23

    Coupling between voltage-gated Ca(2+) influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis is essential for rapid evoked neurotransmission. Acuna et al. show that the knockout of RIM-BPs, which are key structural components of this coupling, decreases the reliability of evoked neurotransmitter release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synaptotagmin-7 is a principal Ca2+ sensor for Ca2+ -induced glucagon exocytosis in pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wei, Shun-Hui; Hoang, Dong Nhut

    2009-01-01

    secretion from beta-cells, even though insulin and glucagon together regulate blood glucose levels. To address these issues, we analysed the role of synaptotagmins in Ca(2+)-triggered glucagon exocytosis. Surprisingly, we find that deletion of a single synaptotagmin isoform, synaptotagmin-7, nearly...

  15. Analysis of synaptic-like microvesicle exocytosis of B-cells using a live imaging technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Bergeron

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β-cells play central roles in blood glucose homeostasis. Beside insulin, these cells release neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules stored in synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs. We monitored SLMV exocytosis by transfecting a synaptophysin-pHluorin construct and by visualizing the cells by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. SLMV fusion was elicited by 20 mM glucose and by depolarizing K(+ concentrations with kinetics comparable to insulin secretion. SLMV exocytosis was prevented by Tetanus and Botulinum-C neurotoxins indicating that the fusion machinery of these organelles includes VAMP-2/-3 and Syntaxin-1, respectively. Sequential visualization of SLMVs by TIRF and epifluorescence microscopy showed that after fusion the vesicle components are rapidly internalized and the organelles re-acidified. Analysis of single fusion episodes revealed the existence of two categories of events. While under basal conditions transient fusion events prevailed, long-lasting episodes were more frequent upon secretagogue exposure. Our observations unveiled similarities between the mechanism of exocytosis of insulin granules and SLMVs. Thus, diabetic conditions characterized by defective insulin secretion are most probably associated also with inappropriate release of molecules stored in SLMVs. The assessment of the contribution of SLMV exocytosis to the manifestation of the disease will be facilitated by the use of the imaging approach described in this study.

  16. Brief exposure to copper activates lysosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Karina; Coblenz, Jessica; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential mineral, but its toxicity necessitates existence of powerful machinery responsible for the extraction of excess Cu from the cell. Cu exposure was recently shown to induce the translocation of Cu pump ATP7B to the lysosomes followed by lysosomal exocytosis. Here we sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of Cu on lysosomal exocytosis. We found that brief exposure to Cu activates lysosomal exocytosis, which was measured as a release of the lysosomal digestive enzyme β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) into the extracellular medium and by the presence lysosomal protein LAMP1 at the plasma membrane. Such release depends on calcium (Ca) and on the lysosomal SNARE VAMP7. ATP7B knockdown using RNAi suppressed the basal lysosomal exocytosis, but did not affect the ability of Cu to activate it. ATP7B knockdown was associated with sustained oxidative stress. The removal of Ca from the extracellular medium suppressed the Cu-dependent component of the lysosomal exocytosis. We propose that Cu promotes lysosomal exocytosis by facilitating a Ca-dependent step of the lysosomal exocytosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 in exocytosis of amylase from parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuma, T; Ichida, T

    1997-06-01

    We evaluated the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in the exocytosis of amylase from parotid acinar cells. The exocytosis stimulated by isoproterenol was dose-dependently inhibited by bromoenol lactone (BEL), a potent suicide inhibitor of Ca2+-independent cytosolic PLA2. The IC50 value of BEL was approximately 7 microM. AACOCF3, a selective inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent cytosolic PLA2, did not inhibit the exocytosis at least up to 30 microM. BEL also inhibited amylase release evoked by forskolin and membrane-permeable cAMP, but it did not inhibit cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. PLA2 activity in parotid acinar cells was found to be predominantly Ca2+-independent, and was strongly inhibited by BEL, whose IC50 value was approximately 2 microM when it was applied to intact acini. Although isoproterenol scarcely enhanced [3H]arachidonic acid release from intact acinar cells, BEL dose-dependently decreased the basal arachidonic acid release to approximately one half of the control value. These results suggest that the cytosolic Ca2+-independent PLA2 activity plays a role in the membrane fusion process of exocytosis in parotid acinar cells.

  18. Exocytosis and endocytosis in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, U G; Jensen, B L; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    2000-01-01

    The cellular events related to secretion of renin are not well understood. Here we review some of the evidence that has led to the current understanding of renin secretion as a process that involves exocytosis as the predominant mode of secretion. This is based on the observation of occasional...... that the afferent arterioles lose a large number of renin granules after acute stimulation without changing the average granular volume. Current electrophysiological techniques have now permitted direct measurements of cell membrane capacitance in juxtaglomerular (JG) cells as a measure of net addition (exocytosis......) or removal (endocytosis) of membrane material. With this technique we have shown that cAMP, which is a vasodilator and stimulates renin secretion, enhances net exocytosis at low concentrations, while at higher concentrations membrane retrieval processes are also stimulated. We suggest that both exocytosis...

  19. Exocytosis from pancreatic β-cells: mathematical modelling of the exit of low-molecular-weight granule content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanovskis, Juris; Braun, Matthias; Rorsman, Patrik

    2011-02-06

    Pancreatic β-cells use Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of large dense core vesicles to release insulin. Exocytosis in β-cells has been studied biochemically, biophysically and optically. We have previously developed a biophysical method to monitor release of endogenous intragranular constituents that are co-released with insulin. This technique involves the expression of ionotropic membrane receptors in the β-cell plasma membrane and enables measurements of exocytosis of individual vesicles with sub-millisecond resolution. Like carbon fibre amperometry, this method allows fine details of the release process, like the expansion of the fusion pore (the narrow connection between the granule lumen and the extracellular space), to be monitored. Here, we discuss experimental data obtained with this method within the framework of a simple mathematical model that describes the release of low-molecular constituents during exocytosis of the insulin granules. Our findings suggest that the fusion pore functions as a molecular sieve, allowing differential release of low- and high-molecular-weight granule constituents.

  20. Exocytosis at the ribbon synapse of retinal bipolar cells studied in patches of presynaptic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Artur; Cooke, Anne; Lagnado, Leon

    2003-04-01

    The distribution of exocytic sites and ion channels in the synaptic terminal of retinal bipolar cells was investigated by measuring capacitance and conductance changes in cell-attached patches of presynaptic membrane. Patch depolarization evoked capacitance and conductance increases that were inhibited by blocking Ca(2+) influx or loading the terminal with EGTA. The increase in capacitance declined as the depolarization approached the reversal potential for Ca(2+), indicating that it was a result of Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis. The conductance increase was caused by K(Ca) channels that were also activated by Ca(2+) influx. Two observations indicated that sites of exocytosis and endocytosis colocalized with clusters of Ca(2+) channels and K(Ca) channels; the initial rate of exocytosis was correlated with the activation of K(Ca) channels, and exocytosis did not occur in the 41% of patches lacking this conductance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that there were approximately 16 vesicles docked to the plasma membrane at each active zone marked by a ribbon, but vesicles were also attached to the rest of the membrane at a density of 1.5/microm(2). The density of ribbons was 0.10 +/- 0.02/microm(2), predicting that approximately 43% of cell-attached patches would lack an active zone. The density of Ca(2+) channel clusters assayed by capacitance and conductance responses was therefore similar to the density of ribbons. These results are consistent with the idea that Ca(2+) channel clusters were colocalized with ribbons but do not exclude the possibility that calcium channels also occurred at other sites. The wide distribution of vesicles docked to the plasma membrane suggests that exocytosis might also be triggered by the spread of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) channel clusters.

  1. RFX6 Regulates Insulin Secretion by Modulating Ca2+ Homeostasis in Human β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development and function of pancreatic β cells involve the regulated activity of specific transcription factors. RFX6 is a transcription factor essential for mouse β cell differentiation that is mutated in monogenic forms of neonatal diabetes. However, the expression and functional roles of RFX6 in human β cells, especially in pathophysiological conditions, are poorly explored. We demonstrate the presence of RFX6 in adult human pancreatic endocrine cells. Using the recently developed human β cell line EndoC-βH2, we show that RFX6 regulates insulin gene transcription, insulin content, and secretion. Knockdown of RFX6 causes downregulation of Ca2+-channel genes resulting in the reduction in L-type Ca2+-channel activity that leads to suppression of depolarization-evoked insulin exocytosis. We also describe a previously unreported homozygous missense RFX6 mutation (p.V506G that is associated with neonatal diabetes, which lacks the capacity to activate the insulin promoter and to increase Ca2+-channel expression. Our data therefore provide insights for understanding certain forms of neonatal diabetes.

  2. Septin dynamics are essential for exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Capri, Joe; Marcus, Elizabeth A; Whitelegge, Julian P; Khuzakhmetova, Venera; Bukharaeva, Ellya; Deiss-Yehiely, Nimrod; Dada, Laura A; Sachs, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ester; Vagin, Olga

    2015-02-27

    Septins are a family of 14 cytoskeletal proteins that dynamically form hetero-oligomers and organize membrane microdomains for protein complexes. The previously reported interactions with SNARE proteins suggested the involvement of septins in exocytosis. However, the contradictory results of up- or down-regulation of septin-5 in various cells and mouse models or septin-4 in mice suggested either an inhibitory or a stimulatory role for these septins in exocytosis. The involvement of the ubiquitously expressed septin-2 or general septin polymerization in exocytosis has not been explored to date. Here, by nano-LC with tandem MS and immunoblot analyses of the septin-2 interactome in mouse brain, we identified not only SNARE proteins but also Munc-18-1 (stabilizes assembled SNARE complexes), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (disassembles SNARE complexes after each membrane fusion event), and the chaperones Hsc70 and synucleins (maintain functional conformation of SNARE proteins after complex disassembly). Importantly, α-soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), the adaptor protein that mediates NSF binding to the SNARE complex, did not interact with septin-2, indicating that septins undergo reorganization during each exocytosis cycle. Partial depletion of septin-2 by siRNA or impairment of septin dynamics by forchlorfenuron inhibited constitutive and stimulated exocytosis of secreted and transmembrane proteins in various cell types. Forchlorfenuron impaired the interaction between SNAP-25 and its chaperone Hsc70, decreasing SNAP-25 levels in cultured neuroendocrine cells, and inhibited both spontaneous and stimulated acetylcholine secretion in mouse motor neurons. The results demonstrate a stimulatory role of septin-2 and the dynamic reorganization of septin oligomers in exocytosis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Septin Dynamics Are Essential for Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Capri, Joe; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Khuzakhmetova, Venera; Bukharaeva, Ellya; Deiss-Yehiely, Nimrod; Dada, Laura A.; Sachs, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ester; Vagin, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Septins are a family of 14 cytoskeletal proteins that dynamically form hetero-oligomers and organize membrane microdomains for protein complexes. The previously reported interactions with SNARE proteins suggested the involvement of septins in exocytosis. However, the contradictory results of up- or down-regulation of septin-5 in various cells and mouse models or septin-4 in mice suggested either an inhibitory or a stimulatory role for these septins in exocytosis. The involvement of the ubiquitously expressed septin-2 or general septin polymerization in exocytosis has not been explored to date. Here, by nano-LC with tandem MS and immunoblot analyses of the septin-2 interactome in mouse brain, we identified not only SNARE proteins but also Munc-18-1 (stabilizes assembled SNARE complexes), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) (disassembles SNARE complexes after each membrane fusion event), and the chaperones Hsc70 and synucleins (maintain functional conformation of SNARE proteins after complex disassembly). Importantly, α-soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), the adaptor protein that mediates NSF binding to the SNARE complex, did not interact with septin-2, indicating that septins undergo reorganization during each exocytosis cycle. Partial depletion of septin-2 by siRNA or impairment of septin dynamics by forchlorfenuron inhibited constitutive and stimulated exocytosis of secreted and transmembrane proteins in various cell types. Forchlorfenuron impaired the interaction between SNAP-25 and its chaperone Hsc70, decreasing SNAP-25 levels in cultured neuroendocrine cells, and inhibited both spontaneous and stimulated acetylcholine secretion in mouse motor neurons. The results demonstrate a stimulatory role of septin-2 and the dynamic reorganization of septin oligomers in exocytosis. PMID:25575596

  4. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Joel P; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C; Hoppa, Michael B; Ryan, Timothy A; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2015-09-22

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx without significantly altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca(2+)]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]e). Lowering external Ca(2+) to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca(2+) entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca(2+) entry without significant direct effects on Ca(2+)-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca(2+) influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system.

  5. Fatty acids add grease to exocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Rickman and Davletov suggest a novel mechanism for biological lipids to regulate synaptic transmission in the brain. Physiologically relevant concentrations of arachidonic acid help to dissociate a protein complex involved in exocytosis. ©2005 Elsevier Ltd All

  6. Lysosomal exocytosis and lipid storage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad Ali; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments in mammalian cells that are primarily responsible for the breakdown of endocytic and autophagic substrates such as membranes, proteins, and lipids into their basic building blocks. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of metabolic disorders caused by genetic mutations in lysosomal hydrolases required for catabolic degradation, mutations in lysosomal membrane proteins important for catabolite export or membrane trafficking, or mutations in nonlysosomal proteins indirectly affecting these lysosomal functions. A hallmark feature of LSDs is the primary and secondary excessive accumulation of undigested lipids in the lysosome, which causes lysosomal dysfunction and cell death, and subsequently pathological symptoms in various tissues and organs. There are more than 60 types of LSDs, but an effective therapeutic strategy is still lacking for most of them. Several recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that induction of lysosomal exocytosis could effectively reduce the accumulation of the storage materials. Meanwhile, the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanisms for lysosomal exocytosis are beginning to be revealed. In this paper, we first discuss these recent developments with the focus on the functional interactions between lipid storage and lysosomal exocytosis. We then discuss whether lysosomal exocytosis can be manipulated to correct lysosomal and cellular dysfunction caused by excessive lipid storage, providing a potentially general therapeutic approach for LSDs. PMID:24668941

  7. Sulfatide Preserves Insulin Crystals Not by Being Integrated in the Lattice but by Stabilizing Their Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschard, Karsten; Bracey, Austin W.; McElroy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    mechanisms underlying the integral role for sulfatide in stabilizing insulin crystals prior to exocytosis. Methods. We cocrystallized human insulin in the presence of sulfatide and solved the structure by molecular replacement. Results. The crystal structure of insulin crystallized in the presence...

  8. Synaptotagmin-7 phosphorylation mediates GLP-1-dependent potentiation of insulin secretion from β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Bingbing; Wei, Shunhui; Petersen, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from β-cells by increasing intracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+) then binds to synaptotagmin-7 as a major Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis, triggering secretory granule fusion and insulin secretion. In type-2 diabetes, insulin secretion is impaired; this impairment...... of synaptotagmin-7 at serine-103, which enhances glucose- and Ca(2+)-stimulated insulin secretion and accounts for the improvement of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1. A phospho-mimetic synaptotagmin-7 mutant enhances Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis, whereas a phospho-inactive synaptotagmin-7 mutant disrupts GLP-1...... potentiation of insulin secretion. Our findings thus suggest that synaptotagmin-7 is directly activated by GLP-1 signaling and may serve as a drug target for boosting insulin secretion. Moreover, our data reveal, to our knowledge, the first physiological modulation of Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis by direct...

  9. Ca(2+) clearance by plasmalemmal NCLX, Li(+)-permeable Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, is required for the sustained exocytosis in rat insulinoma INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Eun; Ryu, Shin-Young; Park, Sun-Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Suk-Ho; Ho, Won-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers are key players for Ca(2+) clearance in pancreatic β-cells, but their molecular determinants and roles in insulin secretion are not fully understood. In the present study, we newly discovered that the Li(+)-permeable Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (NCLX), which were known as mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, contributed to the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) movement across the plasma membrane in rat INS-1 insulinoma cells. Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange activity by NCLX was comparable to that by the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, NCX. We also confirmed the presence of NCLX proteins on the plasma membrane using immunocytochemistry and cell surface biotinylation experiments. We further investigated the role of NCLX on exocytosis function by measuring the capacitance increase in response to repetitive depolarization. Small interfering (si)RNA-mediated downregulation of NCLX did not affect the initial exocytosis, but significantly suppressed sustained exocytosis and recovery of exocytosis. XIP (NCX inhibitory peptide) or Na(+) replacement for inhibiting Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) clearance also selectively suppressed sustained exocytosis. Consistent with the idea that sustained exocytosis requires ATP-dependent vesicle recruitment, mitochondrial function, assessed by mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), was impaired by siNCLX or XIP. However, depolarization-induced exocytosis was hardly affected by changes in intracellular Na(+) concentration, suggesting a negligible contribution of mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Taken together, our data indicate that Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-mediated Ca(2+) clearance mediated by NCLX and NCX is crucial for optimizing mitochondrial function, which in turn contributes to vesicle recruitment for sustained exocytosis in pancreatic β-cells.

  10. Measuring Exocytosis Rate Using Corrected Fluorescence Recovery After Photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nan; Yan, An; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2016-05-01

    Exocytosis plays crucial roles in regulating the distribution and function of plasma membrane (PM) and extracellular matrix proteins. However, measuring the exocytosis rate of a specific protein by conventional methods is very difficult because of exocytosis-independent trafficking such as endocytosis, which also affects membrane protein distribution. Here, we describe a novel method, corrected fluorescence recovery after photoconversion, in which exocytosis-dependent and -independent trafficking events are measured simultaneously to accurately determine exocytosis rate. In this method, the protein-of-interest is tagged with Dendra2, a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein. Following the photoconversion of PM-localized Dendra2, both the recovery of the green signal and the changes in the photoconverted red signal are measured, and the rate of exocytosis is calculated from the changing rates of these two signals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kinetics of human sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, C M; Pavarotti, M A; Zanetti, M N; Zoppino, F C M; De Blas, G A; Mayorga, L S

    2015-03-01

    The acrosome reaction is a unique event in the lifespan of sperm characterized by the exocytosis of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal membrane and the plasma membrane. This unique regulated exocytosis is mediated by essentially the same membrane fusion machinery present in neuroendocrine cells. However, whereas secretion in neuroendocrine cells occurs in less than a second, the acrosome reaction is normally assessed after several minutes of incubation with inducers. In this report, we measured the kinetics of human sperm exocytosis triggered by two stimuli (calcium ionophore and progesterone) by using electron microscopy and three different approaches based on the incorporation of fluorescent Pisum sativum agglutinin into the acrosome upon opening of fusion pores connecting the extracellular medium with the acrosomal lumen. The results with the different methods are consistent with a slow kinetics (t½ = 14 min). We also manipulated the system to measure different steps of the process. We observed that cytosolic calcium increased with a relatively fast kinetics (t½ = 0.1 min). In contrast, the swelling of the acrosomal granule that precedes exocytosis was a slow process (t½ = 13 min). When swelling was completed, the fusion pore opening was fast (t½ = 0.2 min). The results indicate that acrosomal swelling is the slowest step and it determines the kinetics of the acrosome reaction. After the swelling is completed, the efflux of calcium from intracellular stores triggers fusion pores opening and the release of hybrid vesicles in seconds. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Calcium modulation of exocytosis-linked plasma membrane potential oscillations in INS-1 832/13 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mulder, Hindrik; Nicholls, David G

    2015-10-01

    In the presence of high glucose or pyruvate, INS-1 832/13 insulinoma cells undergo stochastic oscillations in plasma membrane potential (Δψp) leading to associated fluctuations in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). Oscillations are not driven by upstream metabolic fluctuations, but rather by autonomous ionic mechanisms, the details of which are unclear. We have investigated the nature of the oscillator, with simultaneous fluorescence monitoring of Δψp, [Ca(2+)]c and exocytosis at single-cell resolution, combined with analysis of the occurrence, frequency and amplitude of Δψp oscillations. Oscillations were closely coupled to exocytosis, indicated by coincident synaptopHluorin fluorescence enhancement. L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitors enhanced Δψp and [Ca(2+)]c oscillation frequency in the presence of pyruvate, but abolished the sustained [Ca(2+)]c response following KCl depolarization. The L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor isradipine did not inhibit oscillation-linked exocytosis. The T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited Δψp and [Ca(2+)]c oscillations, implying that T-type Ca(2+) channels trigger oscillations and consequent exocytosis. Since distinct ion channels operate in oscillating and non-oscillating cells, quantitative analysis of Δψp and [Ca(2+)]c oscillations in a β-cell population may help to improve our understanding of the link between metabolism and insulin secretion. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca 2+ . We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exocytosis and Endocytosis: Modes, Functions, and Coupling Mechanisms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-Gang; Hamid, Edaeni; Shin, Wonchul; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle exocytosis releases content to mediate many biological events, including synaptic transmission essential for brain functions. Following exocytosis, endocytosis is initiated to retrieve exocytosed vesicles within seconds to minutes. Decades of studies in secretory cells reveal three exocytosis modes coupled to three endocytosis modes: (a) full-collapse fusion, in which vesicles collapse into the plasma membrane, followed by classical endocytosis involving membrane invagination and vesicle reformation; (b) kiss-and-run, in which the fusion pore opens and closes; and (c) compound exocytosis, which involves exocytosis of giant vesicles formed via vesicle-vesicle fusion, followed by bulk endocytosis that retrieves giant vesicles. Here we review these exo- and endocytosis modes and their roles in regulating quantal size and synaptic strength, generating synaptic plasticity, maintaining exocytosis, and clearing release sites for vesicle replenishment. Furthermore, we highlight recent progress in understanding how vesicle endocytosis is initiated and is thus coupled to exocytosis. The emerging model is that calcium influx via voltage-dependent calcium channels at the calcium microdomain triggers endocytosis and controls endocytosis rate; calmodulin and synaptotagmin are the calcium sensors; and the exocytosis machinery, including SNARE proteins (synaptobrevin, SNAP25, and syntaxin), is needed to coinitiate endocytosis, likely to control the amount of endocytosis. PMID:24274740

  15. Exocytosis and endocytosis: modes, functions, and coupling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-Gang; Hamid, Edaeni; Shin, Wonchul; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle exocytosis releases content to mediate many biological events, including synaptic transmission essential for brain functions. Following exocytosis, endocytosis is initiated to retrieve exocytosed vesicles within seconds to minutes. Decades of studies in secretory cells reveal three exocytosis modes coupled to three endocytosis modes: (a) full-collapse fusion, in which vesicles collapse into the plasma membrane, followed by classical endocytosis involving membrane invagination and vesicle reformation; (b) kiss-and-run, in which the fusion pore opens and closes; and (c) compound exocytosis, which involves exocytosis of giant vesicles formed via vesicle-vesicle fusion, followed by bulk endocytosis that retrieves giant vesicles. Here we review these exo- and endocytosis modes and their roles in regulating quantal size and synaptic strength, generating synaptic plasticity, maintaining exocytosis, and clearing release sites for vesicle replenishment. Furthermore, we highlight recent progress in understanding how vesicle endocytosis is initiated and is thus coupled to exocytosis. The emerging model is that calcium influx via voltage-dependent calcium channels at the calcium microdomain triggers endocytosis and controls endocytosis rate; calmodulin and synaptotagmin are the calcium sensors; and the exocytosis machinery, including SNARE proteins (synaptobrevin, SNAP25, and syntaxin), is needed to coinitiate endocytosis, likely to control the amount of endocytosis.

  16. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  17. Enhanced assay of endothelial exocytosis using extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoMonaco, Michael B; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2014-05-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The first step in vascular inflammation is endothelial exocytosis, in which endothelial granules fuse with the plasma membrane, releasing prothrombotic and proinflammatory messenger molecules. The development of cell culture models to study endothelial exocytosis has been challenging because the factors that modulate exocytosis in vitro are not well understood. Here we report a method for studying endothelial exocytosis that optimizes extracellular matrix components, cell density, and duration of culture. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells plated on collagen I-coated plates and cultured in the confluent state for 7-12 days in low-serum medium showed robust secretion of von Willebrand factor when stimulated with various agonists. This exocytosis assay is rapid and applicable to high-throughput screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SNAP23 Regulates Endothelial Exocytosis of von Willebrand Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiuyu Martin; Zhu, Qiuyu; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial exocytosis regulates vascular thrombosis and inflammation. The trafficking and release of endothelial vesicles is mediated by SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment protein REceptors) molecules, but the exact identity of endothelial SNAREs has been unclear. Three SNARE molecules form a ternary complex, including isoforms of the syntaxin (STX), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), and synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP) families. We now identify SNAP23 as the predominant endothelial SNAP isoform that mediates endothelial exocytosis of von Willebrand Factor (VWF). SNAP23 was localized to the plasma membrane. Knockdown of SNAP23 decreased endothelial exocytosis, suggesting it is important for endothelial exocytosis. SNAP23 interacted with the endothelial exocytic machinery, and formed complexes with other known endothelial SNARE molecules. Taken together, these data suggest that SNAP23 is a key component of the endothelial SNARE machinery that mediates endothelial exocytosis.

  19. Role of Actin Cytoskeleton During Mammalian Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romarowski, Ana; Luque, Guillermina M; La Spina, Florenza A; Krapf, Dario; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm require to undergo an exocytotic process called acrosomal exocytosis in order to be able to fuse with the oocyte. This ability is acquired during the course of sperm capacitation. This review is focused on one aspect related to this acquisition: the role of the actin cytoskeleton. Evidence from different laboratories indicates that actin polymerization occurs during capacitation, and the detection of several actin-related proteins suggests that the cytoskeleton is involved in important sperm functions. In other mammalian cells, the cortical actin network acts as a dominant negative clamp which blocks constitutive exocytosis but, at the same time, is necessary to prepare the cell to undergo regulated exocytosis. Thus, F-actin stabilizes structures generated by exocytosis and supports the physiological progression of this process. Is this also the case in mammalian sperm? This review summarizes what is currently known about actin and its related proteins in the male gamete, with particular emphasis on their role in acrosomal exocytosis.

  20. Neuraminidase 1 is a Negative Regulator of Lysosomal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogalingam, Gouri; Bonten, Erik J.; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Hu, Huimin; Moshiach, Simon; Connell, Samuel A.; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysosomal exocytosis is a Ca2+-regulated mechanism that involves proteins responsible for cytoskeletal attachment and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. However, whether luminal lysosomal enzymes contribute to this process remains unknown. Here we show that neuraminidase Neu1 negatively regulates lysosomal exocytosis in hematopoietic cells by processing the sialic acids on the lysosomal membrane protein Lamp-1. In macrophages from Neu1-deficient mice, a model of the disease sialidosis, and in patients’ fibroblasts, oversialylated Lamp-1 enhances lysosomal exocytosis. Silencing of Lamp-1 reverts this phenotype by interfering with the docking of lysosomes at the plasma membrane. In Neu1-/- mice the excessive exocytosis of serine proteases in the bone niche leads to inactivation of extracellular serpins, premature degradation of VCAM-1, and loss of bone marrow retention. Our findings uncover an unexpected mechanism influencing lysosomal exocytosis and argue that exacerbations of this process form the basis for certain genetic diseases. PMID:18606142

  1. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J.; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exhibit Regulated Exocytosis in Response to Chemerin and IGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dinesh Kumar

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play important roles in tissue repair and cancer progression. Our recent work suggests that some mesenchymal cells, notably myofibroblasts exhibit regulated exocytosis resembling that seen in neuroendocrine cells. We now report that MSCs also exhibit regulated exocytosis. Both a G-protein coupled receptor agonist, chemerin, and a receptor tyrosine kinase stimulant, IGF-II, evoked rapid increases in secretion of a marker protein, TGFβig-h3. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, also rapidly increased secretion of TGFβig-h3 while inhibitors of translation (cycloheximide or secretory protein transport (brefeldin A had no effect, indicating secretion from preformed secretory vesicles. Inhibitors of the chemerin and IGF receptors specifically reduced the secretory response. Confocal microscopy of MSCs loaded with Fluo-4 revealed chemerin and IGF-II triggered intracellular Ca2+ oscillations requiring extracellular calcium. Immunocytochemistry showed co-localisation of TGFβig-h3 and MMP-2 to secretory vesicles, and transmission electron-microscopy showed dense-core secretory vesicles in proximity to the Golgi apparatus. Proteomic studies on the MSC secretome identified 64 proteins including TGFβig-h3 and MMP-2 that exhibited increased secretion in response to IGF-II treatment for 30min and western blot of selected proteins confirmed these data. Gene ontology analysis of proteins exhibiting regulated secretion indicated functions primarily associated with cell adhesion and in bioassays chemerin increased adhesion of MSCs and adhesion, proliferation and migration of myofibroblasts. Thus, MSCs exhibit regulated exocytosis that is compatible with an early role in tissue remodelling.

  3. Measuring exocytosis in neurons using FM labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jamila; Murthy, Venkatesh

    2006-11-30

    The ability to measure the kinetics of vesicle release can help provide insight into some of the basics of neurotransmission. Here we used real-time imaging of vesicles labeled with FM dye to monitor the rate of presynaptic vesicle release. FM4-64 is a red fluorescent amphiphilic styryl dye that embeds into the membranes of synaptic vesicles as endocytosis is stimulated. Lipophilic interactions cause the dye to greatly increase in fluorescence, thus emitting a bright signal when associated with vesicles and a nominal one when in the extracellular fluid. After a wash step is used to help remove external dye within the plasma membrane, the remaining FM is concentrated within the vesicles and is then expelled when exocytosis is induced by another round of electrical stimulation. The rate of vesicles release is measured from the resulting decrease in fluorescence. Since FM dye can be applied external and transiently, it is a useful tool for determining rates of exocytosis in neuronal cultures, especially when comparing the rates between transfected synapses and neighboring control boutons.

  4. A Central Small Amino Acid in the VAMP2 Transmembrane Domain Regulates the Fusion Pore in Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastoy, Benoît; Scotti, Pier A; Milochau, Alexandra; Fezoua-Boubegtiten, Zahia; Rodas, Jorge; Megret, Rémi; Desbat, Bernard; Laguerre, Michel; Castano, Sabine; Perrais, David; Rorsman, Patrik; Oda, Reiko; Lang, Jochen

    2017-06-06

    Exocytosis depends on cytosolic domains of SNARE proteins but the function of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) in membrane fusion remains controversial. The TMD of the SNARE protein synaptobrevin2/VAMP2 contains two highly conserved small amino acids, G100 and C103, in its central portion. Substituting G100 and/or C103 with the β-branched amino acid valine impairs the structural flexibility of the TMD in terms of α-helix/β-sheet transitions in model membranes (measured by infrared reflection-absorption or evanescent wave spectroscopy) during increase in protein/lipid ratios, a parameter expected to be altered by recruitment of SNAREs at fusion sites. This structural change is accompanied by reduced membrane fluidity (measured by infrared ellipsometry). The G100V/C103V mutation nearly abolishes depolarization-evoked exocytosis (measured by membrane capacitance) and hormone secretion (measured biochemically). Single-vesicle optical (by TIRF microscopy) and biophysical measurements of ATP release indicate that G100V/C103V retards initial fusion-pore opening, hinders its expansion and leads to premature closure in most instances. We conclude that the TMD of VAMP2 plays a critical role in membrane fusion and that the structural mobility provided by the central small amino acids is crucial for exocytosis by influencing the molecular re-arrangements of the lipid membrane that are necessary for fusion pore opening and expansion.

  5. The interaction between chromogranin A and catecholamines governs exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Natalia; Estevez-Herrera, Judith; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, Jose D

    2014-11-01

    Chromogranins (Cgs) are acidic proteins that have been described in the large, dense core vesicles (LDCVs) of adrenal chromaffin cells and that have been shown to promote LDCV formation, even in nonsecretory cells. Catecholamines (CAs) are adsorbed by Cgs in vitro, and the absence of Cgs modifies the storage and exocytosis of CAs in chromaffin cells. In this study, we set out to assess the role of CgA in the accumulation and exocytosis of CAs in cells when the levels of CgA and CA are manipulated. We overexpressed CgA in nonsecretory HEK293 cells and in secretory PC12 cells, to study the formation, movement, and exocytosis of newly formed granules by evanescent wave microscopy. We analyzed the association of Cgs/CA by HPLC and amperometry and their role in the accumulation and exocytosis of amines, both under resting conditions and after l-DOPA overloading. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that CgA expression in a nonsecretory cell line facilitates the storage and exocytosis of CA. In addition, CgA overexpression causes a doubling of the accumulation of CA, although it slows down exocytosis in PC12 cells. We propose a model to explain how the CgA/CA complex governs the accumulation and exocytosis of secreted amines. © FASEB.

  6. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide

    if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles...... to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  7. Imaging Exocytosis with Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenisek, David; Perrais, David

    2007-10-01

    INTRODUCTIONAlthough electrophysiological techniques such as membrane capacitance measurements, electrochemical detection, and post-synaptic recordings are powerful ways of studying exocytosis, information concerning any steps prior to vesicle fusion must be inferred indirectly. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is a powerful technique for studying events that, like exocytosis, occur near a cell surface. The technique allows selective imaging of fluorescent molecules that are closest to a high refractive index substance such as glass. In this protocol, TIRFM is used to investigate the steps leading up to vesicle fusion in both retinal bipolar neurons and chromaffin cells by directly imaging synaptic vesicles and dense core granules prior to and including exocytosis.

  8. Autophagy Proteins in Phagocyte Endocytosis and Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Münz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy was initially described as a catabolic pathway that recycles nutrients of cytoplasmic constituents after lysosomal degradation during starvation. Since the immune system monitors products of lysosomal degradation via major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II restricted antigen presentation, autophagy was found to process intracellular antigens for display on MHC class II molecules. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that the molecular machinery of autophagy serves phagocytes in many more membrane trafficking pathways, thereby regulating immunity to infectious disease agents. In this minireview, we will summarize the recent evidence that autophagy proteins regulate phagocyte endocytosis and exocytosis for myeloid cell activation, pathogen replication, and MHC class I and II restricted antigen presentation. Selective stimulation and inhibition of the respective functional modules of the autophagy machinery might constitute valid therapeutic options in the discussed disease settings.

  9. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? Insulin Secretagogues September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Additional Resources Affordable Insulin Project FDA What are insulin secretagogues? Insulin secretagogues are one type of medicine ...

  10. Two modes of exocytosis in an artificial cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Najafinobar, Neda; Dunevall, Johan; Ewing, Andrew G.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    The details of exocytosis, the vital cell process of neuronal communication, are still under debate with two generally accepted scenarios. The first mode of release involves secretory vesicles distending into the cell membrane to release the complete vesicle contents. The second involves partial release of the vesicle content through an intermittent fusion pore, or an opened or partially distended fusion pore. Here we show that both full and partial release can be mimicked with a single large-scale cell model for exocytosis composed of material from blebbing cell plasma membrane. The apparent switching mechanism for determining the mode of release is demonstrated to be related to membrane tension that can be differentially induced during artificial exocytosis. These results suggest that the partial distension mode might correspond to an extended kiss-and-run mechanism of release from secretory cells, which has been proposed as a major pathway of exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells.

  11. Exocytosis of peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Dorota; Nitti, Simone; Millar, Timothy M.; Kanaras, Antonios G.

    2012-07-01

    We present the exocytosis profile of two types of peptide-coated nanoparticles, which have similar charge and size but different functionality. While one kind of particles appears to progressively exocytose, the other one has a more complex profile, suggesting that some of the particles are re-uptaken by the cells. Both types of particles retain their colloidal stability after exocytosis.We present the exocytosis profile of two types of peptide-coated nanoparticles, which have similar charge and size but different functionality. While one kind of particles appears to progressively exocytose, the other one has a more complex profile, suggesting that some of the particles are re-uptaken by the cells. Both types of particles retain their colloidal stability after exocytosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ICP-AES DLS and zeta potential measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31064c

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate activates Weibel-Palade body exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, Kenji; Morrell, Craig N.; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2004-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) not only regulates angiogenesis, vascular permeability and vascular tone, but it also promotes vascular inflammation. However, the molecular basis for the proinflammatory effects of S1P is not understood. We now show that S1P activates endothelial cell exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies, releasing vasoactive substances capable of causing vascular thrombosis and inflammation. S1P triggers endothelial exocytosis in part through phospholipase C-γ signal transduction...

  13. Evoked cavernous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Uğur; Soylu, Ahmet; Ozcan, Cemal; Kutlu, Ramazan; Güneş, Ali

    2002-01-01

    Corpus cavernosum electromyography has been widely done to evaluate autonomic dysfunction in patients with erectile dysfunction. We assessed the value of corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin responses for their accuracy in determining autonomic involvement in cases of erectile dysfunction. We evaluated 75 men with erectile dysfunction by corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin response tests at our neurourology laboratory. The etiology of dysfunction was vascular, neurogenic, psychogenic or mixed based on a detailed medical and sexual history, physical examination, electrophysiological and laboratory studies, penile color Doppler ultrasonography, and cavernosography and/or cavernosometry. Autonomic involvement was clinically assessed by systemic findings, such as orthostatic hypotension, impaired gastrointestinal motility, sinus dysrhythmia and secretomotor changes. A concentric electromyography needle placed in the right cavernous body was used to record corpus cavernosum electromyography and evoked cavernous activity. The right median nerve was stimulated electrically with 13 to 16 mA. to determine evoked cavernous activity and the penile sympathetic skin response. The latter response was recorded with silver disc electrodes placed on the left cavernous body. All tests were performed using an electromyography/evoked potential machine. We determined the relationships among corpus cavernosum electromyography, evoked cavernous activity and penile sympathetic skin response tests in respect to etiological factors. The 56 patients with normal corpus cavernosum electromyography activity had also evoked cavernous activity and a penile sympathetic skin response except for 1 with no penile sympathetic skin response but evoked cavernous activity. None of these patients had autonomic neuropathy. Of the 19 patients without corpus cavernosum electromyography activity 11 had

  14. Complexin I is required for mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longmei; Burkin, Heather R; Shi, Xudong; Li, Lingjun; Reim, Kerstin; Miller, David J

    2007-09-15

    Regulated exocytosis in many cells is controlled by the SNARE complex, whose core includes three proteins that promote membrane fusion. Complexins I and II are highly related cytosolic proteins that bind tightly to the assembled SNARE complex and regulate neuronal exocytosis. Like somatic cells, sperm undergo regulated exocytosis; however, sperm release a single large vesicle, the acrosome, whose release has different characteristics than neuronal exocytosis. Acrosomal release is triggered upon sperm adhesion to the mammalian egg extracellular matrix (zona pellucida) to allow penetration of the egg coat. Membrane fusion occurs at multiple points within the acrosome but how fusion is activated and the formation and progression of fusion points is synchronized is unclear. We show that complexins I and II are found in acrosome-intact mature sperm, bind to SNARE complex proteins, and are not detected in sperm after acrosomal exocytosis (acrosome reaction). Although complexin-I-deficient sperm acrosome-react in response to calcium ionophore, they do not acrosome-react in response to egg zona pellucida proteins and have reduced fertilizing ability, in vitro. Complexin II is present in the complexin-I-deficient sperm and its expression is increased in complexin-I-deficient testes. Therefore, complexin I functions in exocytosis in two related but morphologically distinct secretory processes. Sperm are unusual because they express both complexins I and II but have a unique and specific requirement for complexin I.

  15. Spatiotemporal organization of exocytosis emerges during neuronal shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Fabio L; Gomez, Shawn M; Gupton, Stephanie L

    2018-01-19

    Neurite elongation and branching in developing neurons requires plasmalemma expansion, hypothesized to occur primarily via exocytosis. We posited that exocytosis in developing neurons and nonneuronal cells would exhibit distinct spatiotemporal organization. We exploited total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to image vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-pHluorin-mediated exocytosis in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and interphase melanoma cells, and developed computer-vision software and statistical tools to uncover spatiotemporal aspects of exocytosis. Vesicle fusion behavior differed between vesicle types, cell types, developmental stages, and extracellular environments. Experiment-based mathematical calculations indicated that VAMP2-mediated vesicle fusion supplied excess material for the plasma membrane expansion that occurred early in neuronal morphogenesis, which was balanced by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Spatial statistics uncovered distinct spatiotemporal regulation of exocytosis in the soma and neurites of developing neurons that was modulated by developmental stage, exposure to the guidance cue netrin-1, and the brain-enriched ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif 9. In melanoma cells, exocytosis occurred less frequently, with distinct spatial clustering patterns. © 2018 Urbina et al.

  16. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  17. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Claudia; Oehring, Hartmut; Herrmann, Rudolf; Förster, Martin; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  18. Munc13 proteins control regulated exocytosis in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodarte, Elsa M; Ramos, Marco A; Davalos, Alfredo J; Moreira, Daniel C; Moreno, David S; Cardenas, Eduardo I; Rodarte, Alejandro I; Petrova, Youlia; Molina, Sofia; Rendon, Luis E; Sanchez, Elizabeth; Breaux, Keegan; Tortoriello, Alejandro; Manllo, John; Gonzalez, Erika A; Tuvim, Michael J; Dickey, Burton F; Burns, Alan R; Heidelberger, Ruth; Adachi, Roberto

    2017-11-15

    Mast cells (MCs) are involved in host defenses against pathogen and inflammation. Stimulated MCs release substances stored in their granules via regulated exocytosis. In other cell types, Munc13 (mammalian homolog of C. elegans uncoordinated gene 13) proteins play essential roles in regulated exocytosis. Here, we found that MCs express Munc13-2 and -4, and studied their roles using global and conditional knockout (KO) mice. In a model of systemic anaphylaxis, we found no difference between WT and Munc13-2 KO mice, but global and MC-specific Munc13-4 KO mice developed less hypothermia. This protection correlated with lower plasma histamine levels and with histological evidence of defective MC degranulation, and not with changes in MC development, distribution, numbers or morphology. In vitro assays revealed that the defective response in Munc13-4-deficient MCs was limited to regulated exocytosis, leaving other MC secretory effector responses intact. Single cell capacitance measurements in MCs from mouse mutants differing in Munc13-4 expression levels in their MCs revealed that as levels of Munc13-4 decrease, the rate of exocytosis declines first, and then the total amount of exocytosis decreases. A requirement for Munc13-2 in MC exocytosis was revealed only in the absence of Munc13-4. Electrophysiology and EM studies uncovered that the number of multigranular compound events (i.e., granule-to-granule homotypic fusion) was severely reduced in the absence of Munc13-4. We conclude that while Munc13-2 plays a minor role, Munc13-4 is essential for regulated exocytosis in MCs, and that this MC effector response is required for a full anaphylactic response. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Strobel@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Oehring, Hartmut [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Anatomy II (Germany); Herrmann, Rudolf [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Förster, Martin [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy/Immunology (Germany); Reller, Armin [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Hilger, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.hilger@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  20. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, S.M.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, J.

    2007-01-01

    A proprioceptive stimulus consisting of a weight change of a handheld load has recently been shown to elicit an evoked potential. Previously, somatosensory gamma oscillations have only been evoked by electrical stimuli. We conjectured that a natural proprioceptive stimulus also would be able...... to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...... contralateral to stimulus side and additionally an unexpected 20 Hz activity was observed slightly lateralized in the frontal central region. The gamma phase locking may be a manifestation of early somatosensory feature integration. The analyses suggest that the high frequency activity consists of two distinct...

  1. Coordinated activation of mitochondrial respiration and exocytosis mediated by PKC signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Chareyron, Isabelle; Dayon, Loïc; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Cominetti, Ornella; Pilar Giner Giménez, María; De Marchi, Umberto; Canto, Carles; Kussmann, Martin; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in pancreatic β-cell nutrient sensing by coupling their metabolism to plasma membrane excitability and insulin granule exocytosis. Whether non-nutrient secretagogues stimulate mitochondria as part of the molecular mechanism to promote insulin secretion is not known. Here, we show that PKC signaling, which is employed by many non-nutrient secretagogues, augments mitochondrial respiration in INS-1E (rat insulinoma cell line clone 1E) and human pancreatic β cells. The phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, accelerates mitochondrial respiration at both resting and stimulatory glucose concentrations. A range of inhibitors of novel PKC isoforms prevent phorbol ester-induced respiration. Respiratory response was blocked by oligomycin that demonstrated PKC-dependent acceleration of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Enhanced respiration was observed even when glycolysis was bypassed or fatty acid transport was blocked, which suggested that PKC regulates mitochondrial processes rather than upstream catabolic fluxes. A phosphoproteome study of phorbol ester-stimulated INS-1E cells maintained under resting (2.5 mM) glucose revealed a large number of phosphorylation sites that were altered during short-term activation of PKC signaling. The data set was enriched for proteins that are involved in gene expression, cytoskeleton remodeling, secretory vesicle transport, and exocytosis. Interactome analysis identified PKC, C-Raf, and ERK1/2 as the central phosphointeraction cluster. Prevention of ERK1/2 signaling by using a MEK1 inhibitor caused a marked decreased in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced mitochondrial respiration. ERK1/2 signaling module therefore links PKC activation to downstream mitochondrial activation. We conclude that non-nutrient secretagogues act, in part, via PKC and downstream ERK1/2 signaling to stimulate mitochondrial energy production to compensate for energy expenditure that is linked to β-cell activation

  2. Generation of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cyclic ADP-ribose by glucagon-like peptide-1 evokes Ca2+ signal that is essential for insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Ju; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Yim, Chang-Yeol; Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Im, Mie-Jae; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)), resulting in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The molecular mechanism(s) of the GLP-1-mediated regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) was investigated. GLP-1-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in beta-cells isolated from Cd38(+/+) and Cd38(-/-) mice. Calcium-mobilizing second messengers were identified by measuring levels of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic ADP-ribose (ADPR), using a cyclic enzymatic assay. To locate NAADP- and cyclic ADPR-producing enzyme(s), cellular organelles were separated using the sucrose gradient method. A GLP-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase showed a cooperative Ca(2+) signal, i.e., an initial [Ca(2+)](i) rise mediated by the action of NAADP that was produced in acidic organelles and a subsequent long-lasting increase of [Ca(2+)](i) by the action of cyclic ADPR that was produced in plasma membranes and secretory granules. GLP-1 sequentially stimulated production of NAADP and cyclic ADPR in the organelles through protein kinase A and cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor II. Furthermore, the results showed that NAADP production from acidic organelles governed overall Ca(2+) signals, including insulin secretion by GLP-1, and that in addition to CD38, enzymes capable of synthesizing NAADP and/or cyclic ADPR were present in beta-cells. These observations were supported by the study with Cd38(-/-) beta-cells, demonstrating production of NAADP, cyclic ADPR, and Ca(2+) signal with normal insulin secretion stimulated by GLP-1. Our findings demonstrate that the GLP-1-mediated Ca(2+) signal for insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is a cooperative action of NAADP and cyclic ADPR spatiotemporally formed by multiple enzymes.

  3. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Basics There are different types of insulin depending ... you may be experiencing a reaction. Types of Insulin Rapid-acting insulin , begins to work about 15 ...

  4. Munc13 C[subscript 2]B domain is an activity-dependent Ca[superscript 2+] regulator of synaptic exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ok-Ho; Lu, Jun; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Camacho-Perez, Marcial; Brose, Nils; Machius, Mischa; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian; Südhof, Thomas C. (Baylor); (MXPL-B); (MXPL); (UTSMC)

    2010-04-26

    Munc13 is a multidomain protein present in presynaptic active zones that mediates the priming and plasticity of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we use biophysical, biochemical and electrophysiological approaches to show that the central C{sub 2}B domain of Munc13 functions as a Ca{sup 2+} regulator of short-term synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of the C{sub 2}B domain revealed an unusual Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. This configuration confers onto the C{sub 2}B domain unique Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid-binding properties that favor phosphatidylinositolphosphates. A mutation that inactivated Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid binding to the C{sub 2}B domain did not alter neurotransmitter release evoked by isolated action potentials, but it did depress release evoked by action-potential trains. In contrast, a mutation that increased Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate binding to the C{sub 2}B domain enhanced release evoked by isolated action potentials and by action-potential trains. Our data suggest that, during repeated action potentials, Ca{sup 2+} and phosphatidylinositolphosphate binding to the Munc13 C{sub 2}B domain potentiate synaptic vesicle exocytosis, thereby offsetting synaptic depression induced by vesicle depletion.

  5. Temporal Kinetics and Quantitative Analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans Nonlytic Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukes, Sabriya A.; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  6. The proteins of exocytosis: lessons from the sperm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomes, Claudia Nora

    2015-02-01

    Exocytosis is a highly regulated process that consists of multiple functionally, kinetically and/or morphologically definable stages such as recruitment, targeting, tethering and docking of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane, priming of the fusion machinery and calcium-triggered membrane fusion. After fusion, the membrane around the secretory vesicle is incorporated into the plasma membrane and the granule releases its contents. The proteins involved in these processes belong to several highly conserved families: Rab GTPases, SNAREs (soluble NSF-attachment protein receptors), α-SNAP (α-NSF attachment protein), NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor), Munc13 and -18, complexins and synaptotagmins. In the present article, the molecules of exocytosis are reviewed, using human sperm as a model system. Sperm exocytosis is driven by isoforms of the same proteinaceous fusion machinery mentioned above, with their functions orchestrated in a hierarchically organized and unidirectional signalling cascade. In addition to the universal exocytosis regulator calcium, this cascade includes other second messengers such as diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and cAMP, as well as the enzymes that synthesize them and their target proteins. Of special interest is the cAMP-binding protein Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) due in part to its enzymatic activity towards Rap. The activation of Epac and Rap leads to a highly localized calcium signal which, together with assembly of the SNARE complex, governs the final stages of exocytosis. The source of this releasable calcium is the secretory granule itself.

  7. Drug induced exocytosis of glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; Fuller, Maria; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-10-28

    Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase, and this leads to glycogen accumulation in the autolysosomes of patient cells. Glycogen storage material is exocytosed at a basal rate in cultured Pompe cells, with one study showing up to 80% is released under specific culture conditions. Critically, exocytosis induction may reduce glycogen storage in Pompe patients, providing the basis for a therapeutic strategy whereby stored glycogen is redirected to an extracellular location and subsequently degraded by circulating amylases. The focus of the current study was to identify compounds capable of inducing rapid glycogen exocytosis in cultured Pompe cells. Here, calcimycin, lysophosphatidylcholine and α-l-iduronidase each significantly increased glycogen exocytosis compared to vehicle-treated controls. The most effective compound, calcimycin, induced exocytosis through a Ca 2+ -dependent mechanism, although was unable to release a pool of vesicular glycogen larger than the calcimycin-induced exocytic pore. There was reduced glycogen release from Pompe compared to unaffected cells, primarily due to increased granule size in Pompe cells. Drug induced exocytosis therefore shows promise as a therapeutic approach for Pompe patients but strategies are required to enhance the release of large molecular weight glycogen granules. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  9. Proprioceptive evoked gamma oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    to evoke gamma oscillations. EEG was recorded using 64 channels in 14 healthy subjects. In each of three runs a stimulus of 100 g load increment in each hand was presented in 120 trials. Data were wavelet transformed and runs collapsed. Inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) was computed as the best measure...

  10. Exocytosis and protein secretion in Trypanosoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossignol Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human African trypanosomiasis is a lethal disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The proteins secreted by T. brucei inhibit the maturation of dendritic cells and their ability to induce lymphocytic allogenic responses. To better understand the pathogenic process, we combined different approaches to characterize these secreted proteins. Results Overall, 444 proteins were identified using mass spectrometry, the largest parasite secretome described to date. Functional analysis of these proteins revealed a strong bias toward folding and degradation processes and to a lesser extent toward nucleotide metabolism. These features were shared by different strains of T. brucei, but distinguished the secretome from published T. brucei whole proteome or glycosome. In addition, several proteins had not been previously described in Trypanosoma and some constitute novel potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. Interestingly, a high proportion of these secreted proteins are known to have alternative roles once secreted. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis showed that a significant proportion of proteins in the secretome lack transit peptide and are probably not secreted through the classical sorting pathway. Membrane vesicles from secretion buffer and infested rat serum were purified on sucrose gradient and electron microscopy pictures have shown 50- to 100-nm vesicles budding from the coated plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma proteins in these microvesicles, showing that an active exocytosis might occur beyond the flagellar pocket. Conclusions This study brings out several unexpected features of the secreted proteins and opens novel perspectives concerning the survival strategy of Trypanosoma as well as possible ways to control the disease. In addition, concordant lines of evidence support the original hypothesis of the involvement of microvesicle-like bodies in the

  11. BAER - brainstem auditory evoked response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... auditory potentials; Brainstem auditory evoked potentials; Evoked response audiometry; Auditory brainstem response; ABR; BAEP ... Normal results vary. Results will depend on the person and the instruments used to perform the test.

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate optical uncaging potentiates exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Müller, Rainer; Tawfik, Bassam

    2017-01-01

    synaptotagmin-1 (the Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis) and Munc13-2 (a vesicle priming protein) as the relevant effector proteins. PI(4,5)P2 activation of exocytosis did not depend on the PI(4,5)P2-binding CAPS-proteins, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging bypasses CAPS-function. Finally, PI(4,5)P2 uncaging...... triggered the rapid fusion of a subset of readily-releasable vesicles, revealing a rapid role of PI(4,5)P2 in fusion triggering. Thus, optical uncaging of signaling lipids can uncover their rapid effects on cellular processes and identify lipid effectors....

  13. PKA-independent cAMP stimulation of white adipocyte exocytosis and adipokine secretion: modulations by Ca2+ and ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Ali M; Brännmark, Cecilia; Musovic, Saliha; Olofsson, Charlotta S

    2014-12-01

    We examined the effects of cAMP, Ca(2+) and ATP on exocytosis and adipokine release in white adipocytes by a combination of membrane capacitance patch-clamp recordings and biochemical measurements of adipokine secretion. 3T3-L1 adipocyte exocytosis proceeded even in the complete absence of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i; buffered with BAPTA) provided cAMP (0.1 mm) was included in the intracellular (pipette-filling) solution. Exocytosis typically plateaued within ∼10 min, probably signifying depletion of a releasable vesicle pool. Inclusion of 3 mm ATP in combination with elevation of [Ca(2+)]i to ≥700 nm augmented the rate of cAMP-evoked exocytosis ∼2-fold and exocytosis proceeded for longer periods (≥20 min) than with cAMP alone. Exocytosis was stimulated to a similar extent upon substitution of cAMP by the Epac (exchange proteins activated by cAMP) agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP (1 mm included in the pipette solution). Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by addition of Rp-cAMPS (0.5 mm) to the cAMP-containing pipette solution was without effect. A combination of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μm) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (200 μm; forsk-IBMX) augmented adiponectin secretion measured over 30 min 3-fold and 2-fold in 3T3-L1 and human subcutaneous adipocytes, respectively. This effect was unaltered by pre-loading of cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and 2-fold amplified upon inclusion of the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1 μm) in the extracellular solution. Adiponectin release was also stimulated by the membrane-permeable Epac agonist 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM but unaffected by inclusion of the membrane-permeable PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS (200 μm). The adipokines leptin, resistin and apelin were present in low amounts in the incubation medium (1-6% of measured adiponectin). Adipsin was secreted in substantial quantities (50% of adiponectin concentration) but release of this adipokine was unaffected by forsk

  14. The SNARE Protein Syntaxin-1a Plays an Essential Role in Biphasic Exocytosis of the Incretin Hormone Glucagon-Like Peptide 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Sarah E; Stacey, Holly M; Nahaei, Yasaman; Hale, Stephen J; Hardy, Alexandre B; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M; Larraufie, Pierre; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2017-09-01

    Exocytosis of the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by the intestinal L cell is essential for the incretin effect after nutrient ingestion and is critical for the actions of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors that enhance GLP-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Two-photon microscopy revealed that exocytosis of GLP-1 is biphasic, with a first peak at 1-6 min and a second peak at 7-12 min after stimulation with forskolin. Approximately 75% of the exocytotic events were represented by compound granule fusion, and the remainder were accounted for by full fusion of single granules under basal and stimulated conditions. The core SNARE protein syntaxin-1a (syn1a) was expressed by murine ileal L cells. At the single L-cell level, first-phase forskolin-induced exocytosis was reduced to basal ( P exocytosis abolished ( P < 0.05) by syn1a knockout. L cells from intestinal-epithelial syn1a-deficient mice demonstrated a 63% reduction in forskolin-induced GLP-1 release in vitro ( P < 0.001) and a 23% reduction in oral glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion ( P < 0.05) in association with impairments in glucose-stimulated insulin release (by 60%; P < 0.01) and glucose tolerance (by 20%; P < 0.01). The findings identify an exquisite mechanism of metered secretory output that precisely regulates release of the incretin hormone GLP-1 and hence insulin secretion after a meal. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Mechanisms of constitutive and ATP-evoked ATP release in neonatal mouse olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayoz Sébastien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP is an extracellular signaling molecule with many ascribed functions in sensory systems, including the olfactory epithelium. The mechanism(s by which ATP is released in the olfactory epithelium has not been investigated. Quantitative luciferin-luciferase assays were used to monitor ATP release, and confocal imaging of the fluorescent ATP marker quinacrine was used to monitor ATP release via exocytosis in Swiss Webster mouse neonatal olfactory epithelial slices. Results Under control conditions, constitutive release of ATP occurs via exocytosis, hemichannels and ABC transporters and is inhibited by vesicular fusion inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin A and hemichannel and ABC transporter inhibitor probenecid. Constitutive ATP release is negatively regulated by the ATP breakdown product ADP through activation of P2Y receptors, likely via the cAMP/PKA pathway. In vivo studies indicate that constitutive ATP may play a role in neuronal homeostasis as inhibition of exocytosis inhibited normal proliferation in the OE. ATP-evoked ATP release is also present in mouse neonatal OE, triggered by several ionotropic P2X purinergic receptor agonists (ATP, αβMeATP and Bz-ATP and a G protein-coupled P2Y receptor agonist (UTP. Calcium imaging of P2X2-transfected HEK293 “biosensor” cells confirmed the presence of evoked ATP release. Following purinergic receptor stimulation, ATP is released via calcium-dependent exocytosis, activated P2X1,7 receptors, activated P2X7 receptors that form a complex with pannexin channels, or ABC transporters. The ATP-evoked ATP release is inhibited by the purinergic receptor inhibitor PPADS, Clostridium difficile toxin A and two inhibitors of pannexin channels: probenecid and carbenoxolone. Conclusions The constitutive release of ATP might be involved in normal cell turn-over or modulation of odorant sensitivity in physiological conditions. Given the growth-promoting effects of ATP, ATP-evoked ATP

  16. The SNAP-25 Linker as an Adaptation Toward Fast Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Mohrmann, Ralf; Wiederhold, Katrin; Walter, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of four soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domains into a complex is essential for membrane fusion. In most cases, the four SNARE-domains are encoded by separate membrane-targeted proteins. However, in the exocytotic pathway, two SNARE-domains are present in one protein, connected by a flexible linker. The significance of this arrangement is unknown. We characterized the role of the linker in SNAP-25, a neuronal SNARE, by using overexpression techniques in synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) null mouse chromaffin cells and fast electrophysiological techniques. We confirm that the palmitoylated linker-cysteines are important for membrane association. A SNAP-25 mutant without cysteines supported exocytosis, but the fusion rate was slowed down and the fusion pore duration prolonged. Using chimeric proteins between SNAP-25 and its ubiquitous homologue SNAP-23, we show that the cysteine-containing part of the linkers is interchangeable. However, a stretch of 10 hydrophobic and charged amino acids in the C-terminal half of the SNAP-25 linker is required for fast exocytosis and in its absence the calcium dependence of exocytosis is shifted toward higher concentrations. The SNAP-25 linker therefore might have evolved as an adaptation toward calcium triggering and a high rate of execution of the fusion process, those features that distinguish exocytosis from other membrane fusion pathways. PMID:18579690

  17. Complexin synchronizes primed vesicle exocytosis and regulates fusion pore dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Schwarz, Yvonne; Dutta, Soumyajit; Grabner, Chad; Moghadam, Paanteha K.; Bost, Anneka; Schirra, Claudia; Rettig, Jens; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils; Mohrmann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    ComplexinII (CpxII) and SynaptotagminI (SytI) have been implicated in regulating the function of SNARE proteins in exocytosis, but their precise mode of action and potential interplay have remained unknown. In this paper, we show that CpxII increases Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis and accelerates its secretory rates, providing two independent, but synergistic, functions to enhance synchronous secretion. Specifically, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpxII increases the pool of primed vesicles by hindering premature exocytosis at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations, whereas the N-terminal domain shortens the secretory delay and accelerates the kinetics of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by increasing the Ca2+ affinity of synchronous secretion. With its C terminus, CpxII attenuates fluctuations of the early fusion pore and slows its expansion but is functionally antagonized by SytI, enabling rapid transmitter discharge from single vesicles. Thus, our results illustrate how key features of CpxII, SytI, and their interplay transform the constitutively active SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism into a highly synchronized, Ca2+-triggered release apparatus. PMID:24687280

  18. Multiple roles for the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Milberg, Oleg; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is the main mechanism utilized by specialized secretory cells to deliver molecules to the cell surface by virtue of membranous containers (i.e. secretory vesicles). The process involves a series of highly coordinated and sequential steps, which include the biogenesis of the vesicles, their delivery to the cell periphery, their fusion with the plasma membrane and the release of their content into the extracellular space. Each of these steps is regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the involvement of actin and its associated molecules during each of the exocytic steps in vertebrates, and suggest that the overall role of the actin cytoskeleton during regulated exocytosis is linked to the architecture and the physiology of the secretory cells under examination. Specifically, in neurons, neuroendocrine, endocrine, and hematopoietic cells, which contain small secretory vesicles that undergo rapid exocytosis (on the order of milliseconds), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in pre-fusion events, where it acts primarily as a functional barrier and facilitates docking. In exocrine and other secretory cells, which contain large secretory vesicles that undergo slow exocytosis (seconds to minutes), the actin cytoskeleton plays a role in post-fusion events, where it regulates the dynamics of the fusion pore, facilitates the integration of the vesicles into the plasma membrane, provides structural support, and promotes the expulsion of large cargo molecules. PMID:22986507

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate optical uncaging potentiates exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Müller, Rainer; Tawfik, Bassam

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is essential for exocytosis. Classical ways of manipulating PI(4,5)P2 levels are slower than metabolism, making it difficult to distinguish effects of PI(4,5)P2 from those of its metabolites. We developed a membrane-permeant, photoactivatable PI(4......,5)P2, which is loaded into cells in an inactive form and activated by light, allowing sub-second increases in PI(4,5)P2 levels. By combining this compound with electrophysiological measurements in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells, we show that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging potentiates exocytosis and identify...... synaptotagmin-1 (the Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis) and Munc13-2 (a vesicle priming protein) as the relevant effector proteins. PI(4,5)P2 activation of exocytosis did not depend on the PI(4,5)P2-binding CAPS-proteins, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging bypasses CAPS-function. Finally, PI(4,5)P2 uncaging...

  20. Modulation of exocytosis by exogenous and endogenous factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Intercellular communication is initiated by the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic nerve cell, i.e. exocytosis. Therefore, the strength of the presynaptic signal is determined by the type of neurotransmitter released, the number of neurotransmittercontaining vesicles that fuse and

  1. Oncogenic Ras stimulates Eiger/TNF exocytosis to promote growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabu, Chiswili; Xu, Tian

    2014-12-01

    Oncogenic mutations in Ras deregulate cell death and proliferation to cause cancer in a significant number of patients. Although normal Ras signaling during development has been well elucidated in multiple organisms, it is less clear how oncogenic Ras exerts its effects. Furthermore, cancers with oncogenic Ras mutations are aggressive and generally resistant to targeted therapies or chemotherapy. We identified the exocytosis component Sec15 as a synthetic suppressor of oncogenic Ras in an in vivo Drosophila mosaic screen. We found that oncogenic Ras elevates exocytosis and promotes the export of the pro-apoptotic ligand Eiger (Drosophila TNF). This blocks tumor cell death and stimulates overgrowth by activating the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signal from the neighboring wild-type cells. Inhibition of Eiger/TNF exocytosis or interfering with the JNK-JAK-STAT non-autonomous proliferation signaling at various steps suppresses oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth. Our findings highlight important cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of exocytosis during oncogenic growth and provide a new class of synthetic suppressors for targeted therapy approaches. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. CAPACITANCE MEASUREMENTS OF REGULATED EXOCYTOSIS IN MOUSE TASTE CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Zorec, Robert; Kinnamon, Sue C.

    2010-01-01

    Exocytosis, consisting of the merger of vesicle and plasma membrane, is a common mechanism used by different types of nucleated cells to release their vesicular contents. Taste cells possess vesicles containing various neurotransmitters to communicate with adjacent taste cells and afferent nerve fibers. However, whether these vesicles engage in exocytosis upon a stimulus is not known. Since vesicle membrane merger with the plasma membrane is reflected in plasma membrane area fluctuations, we measured membrane capacitance (Cm), a parameter linearly related to membrane surface area. To investigate whether taste cells undergo regulated exocytosis, we used the compensated tight-seal whole-cell recording technique to monitor depolarization-induced changes in Cm in the different types of taste cells. To identify taste cell types, mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the TRPM5 promoter or from the GAD67 promoter were used to discriminate Type II and Type III taste cells, respectively. Moreover, the cell types were also identified by monitoring their voltage-current properties. The results demonstrate that only Type III taste cells show significant depolarization-induced increases in Cm, which were correlated to the voltage-activated calcium currents. The results suggest that Type III, but neither Type II nor Type I cells exhibit depolarization-induced regulated exocytosis to release transmitter and activate gustatory afferent nerve fibers. PMID:21048127

  3. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  4. Selecting and evoking innovators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    prepared for and conducted selection of and collaboration with innovators. The outcome was successful in the sense that the innovators produced excellent foundation for conceptual interaction design by creating mock-ups and explanations incarnating their preferences, attitudes and habits. By referring...... to theories of learning we try to explain how our way of working with selection and evoking of innovators has contributed to this positive result and how our approach to user-driven innovation can be regarded as a way to combine democracy and creativity in design....

  5. MARCKS Protein Is Phosphorylated and Regulates Calcium Mobilization during Human Acrosomal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Peña, Marcelo J.; Castillo Bennett, Jimena V.; Soler, Osvaldo M.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Michaut, Marcela A.

    2013-01-01

    Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED), indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis, probably by sequestering

  6. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  7. Rab2a and Rab27a cooperatively regulate the transition from granule maturation to exocytosis through the dual effector Noc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Kohichi; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    Exocytosis of secretory granules entails budding from the trans-Golgi network, sorting and maturation of cargo proteins, and trafficking and fusion to the plasma membrane. Rab27a regulates the late steps in this process, such as granule recruitment to the fusion site, whereas Rab2a functions in the early steps, such as granule biogenesis and maturation. Here, we demonstrate that these two small GTPases simultaneously bind to Noc2 (also known as RPH3AL) in a GTP-dependent manner, although Rab2a binds only after Rab27a has bound. In pancreatic β-cells, the ternary Rab2a-Noc2-Rab27a complex specifically localizes on perinuclear immature granules, whereas the binary Noc2-Rab27a complex localizes on peripheral mature granules. In contrast to the wild type, Noc2 mutants defective in binding to Rab2a or Rab27a fail to promote glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Although knockdown of any component of the ternary complex markedly inhibits insulin secretion, only knockdown of Rab2a or Noc2, and not that of Rab27a, impairs cargo processing from proinsulin to insulin. These results suggest that the dual effector, Noc2, regulates the transition from Rab2a-mediated granule biogenesis to Rab27a-mediated granule exocytosis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP is a promising test for the evaluation of the cholic descending vestibular system. This reflex depends of the integrity from the saccular macula, from the inferior vestibular nerve, the vestibular nuclei, the vestibule-spinal tract and effectors muscles. Objective: Perform a systematic review of the pertinent literature by means of database (COCHRANE, MEDLINE, LILACS, CAPES. Conclusion: The clinical application of the VEMP has expanded in the last years, as goal that this exam is used as complementary in the otoneurological evaluation currently used. But, methodological issues must be clarified. This way, this method when combined with the standard protocol, can provide a more widely evaluation from the vestibular system. The standardization of the methodology is fundamental criterion for the replicability and sensibility of the exam.

  9. VAMP8 mucin exocytosis attenuates intestinal pathogenesis by Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Cornick

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa encounters a barrage of ingested insults within the host yet under homeostasis elegantly facilitates nutrient absorption and sustenance of the commensal microbiota. An essential defence mechanism employed by the host is limiting the spatial niche various microbes may occupy as executed by the fluid mucus layer. Pathogens that violate their restricted niche within the intestinal mucosa are first expelled by robust mucus secretion from goblet cells thus by-passing the need for an immune response. Surprisingly, while many pathogens are known to exert hyper-secretion of mucus from goblet cells, the mechanisms governing this event remain elusive. In a recent report by Cornick et al (MBio 8: e01323-17, we nominate SNARE-mediated exocytosis as the putative mechanism responsible for pathogen-induced mucus secretion from goblet cells. The vesicle SNARE VAMP8 on mucin granules within goblet cells is specifically activated following infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica that is known to induce potent hyper-secretion and coordinates mucin exocytosis. This secretion event is critical in fending off a pathogen, as cells lacking VAMP8 are prone to increased E. histolytica colonization and cytolysis through apoptosis. Failing coordinated mucus exocytosis and subsequent epithelial barrier destruction, the host mounts an immune response as a last line of defence.

  10. CAPS1 RNA Editing Promotes Dense Core Vesicle Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotaro; Ohta, Toshio; Nakayama, Hisako; Doe, Nobutaka; Terao, Yuri; Oiki, Eiji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Nishikura, Kazuko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kawahara, Yukio

    2016-11-15

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) plays a distinct role in the priming step of dense core vesicle (DCV) exocytosis. CAPS1 pre-mRNA is known to undergo adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in its coding region, which results in a glutamate-to-glycine conversion at a site in its C-terminal region. However, the physiological significance of CAPS1 RNA editing remains elusive. Here, we created mutant mice in which edited CAPS1 was solely expressed. These mice were lean due to increased energy expenditure caused by physical hyperactivity. Electrophysiological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the exocytosis of DCVs was upregulated in the chromaffin cells and neurons of these mice. Furthermore, we showed that edited CAPS1 bound preferentially to the activated form of syntaxin-1A, a component of the exocytotic fusion complex. These findings suggest that RNA editing regulates DCV exocytosis in vivo, affecting physical activity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Platelet granule exocytosis: A comparison with chromaffin cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eFitch-Tewfik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid secretion of bioactive amines from chromaffin cells constitutes an important component of the fight or flight response of mammals to stress. Platelets respond to stresses within the vasculature by rapidly secreting cargo at sites of injury, inflammation, or infection. Although chromaffin cells derive from the neural crest and platelets from bone marrow megakaryocytes, both have evolved a heterogeneous assemblage of granule types and a mechanism for efficient release. This article will provide an overview of granule formation and exocytosis in platelets with an emphasis on areas in which the study of chromaffin cells has influenced that of platelets and on similarities between the two secretory systems. Commonalities include the use of transporters to concentrate bioactive amines and other cargos into granules, the role of cytoskeletal remodeling in granule exocytosis, and the use of granules to provide membrane for cytoplasmic projections. The SNAREs and SNARE accessory proteins used by each cell type will also be considered. Finally, we will discuss the newly appreciated role of dynamin family proteins in regulated fusion pore formation. This evaluation of the comparative cell biology of regulated exocytosis in platelets and chromaffin cells demonstrates a convergence of mechanisms between two disparate cell types both tasked with responding rapidly to physiological stimuli.

  12. Intracellular Trafficking Network of Protein Nanocapsules: Endocytosis, Exocytosis and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxie; Zhang, Xudong; Liu, Gan; Chang, Danfeng; Liang, Xin; Zhu, Xianbing; Tao, Wei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane vesicle system is a complex transport system that includes endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. However, the details of the intracellular trafficking pathway of nanoparticles in cells have been poorly investigated. Here, we investigate in detail the intracellular trafficking pathway of protein nanocapsules using more than 30 Rab proteins as markers of multiple trafficking vesicles in endocytosis, exocytosis and autophagy. We observed that FITC-labeled protein nanoparticles were internalized by the cells mainly through Arf6-dependent endocytosis and Rab34-mediated micropinocytosis. In addition to this classic pathway: early endosome (EEs)/late endosome (LEs) to lysosome, we identified two novel transport pathways: micropinocytosis (Rab34 positive)-LEs (Rab7 positive)-lysosome pathway and EEs-liposome (Rab18 positive)-lysosome pathway. Moreover, the cells use slow endocytosis recycling pathway (Rab11 and Rab35 positive vesicles) and GLUT4 exocytosis vesicles (Rab8 and Rab10 positive) transport the protein nanocapsules out of the cells. In addition, protein nanoparticles are observed in autophagosomes, which receive protein nanocapsules through multiple endocytosis vesicles. Using autophagy inhibitor to block these transport pathways could prevent the degradation of nanoparticles through lysosomes. Using Rab proteins as vesicle markers to investigation the detail intracellular trafficking of the protein nanocapsules, will provide new targets to interfere the cellular behaver of the nanoparticles, and improve the therapeutic effect of nanomedicine.

  13. Dynamic resolution of acrosomal exocytosis in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Claire V; Cummerson, Joanne A; White, Michael R H; Publicover, Stephen J; Johnson, Peter M

    2008-07-01

    An essential step in mammalian fertilisation is the sperm acrosome reaction (AR) - exocytosis of a single large vesicle (the acrosome) that surrounds the nucleus at the apical sperm head. The acrosomal and plasma membranes fuse, resulting in both the release of factors that might facilitate penetration of the zona pellucida (which invests the egg) and the externalisation of membrane components required for gamete fusion. Exocytosis in somatic cells is a rapid process - typically complete within milliseconds - yet acrosomal enzymes are required throughout zona penetration - a period of minutes. Here, we present the first studies of this crucial and complex event occurring in real-time in individual live sperm using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Simultaneous imaging of separate probes for acrosomal content and inner acrosomal membrane show that rapid membrane fusion, initiated at the cell apex, is followed by exceptionally slow dispersal of acrosomal content (up to 12 minutes). Cells that lose their acrosome prematurely (spontaneous AR), compromising their ability to penetrate the egg vestments, are those that are already subject to a loss of motility and viability. Cells undergoing stimulus-induced AR (progesterone or A23187) remain viable, with a proportion remaining motile (progesterone). These findings suggest that the AR is a highly adapted form of exocytosis.

  14. VAMP8 mucin exocytosis attenuates intestinal pathogenesis by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Chadee, Kris

    2017-11-27

    The intestinal mucosa encounters a barrage of ingested insults within the host yet under homeostasis elegantly facilitates nutrient absorption and sustenance of the commensal microbiota. An essential defence mechanism employed by the host is limiting the spatial niche various microbes may occupy as executed by the fluid mucus layer. Pathogens that violate their restricted niche within the intestinal mucosa are first expelled by robust mucus secretion from goblet cells thus by-passing the need for an immune response. Surprisingly, while many pathogens are known to exert hyper-secretion of mucus from goblet cells, the mechanisms governing this event remain elusive. In a recent report by Cornick et al (MBio 8: e01323-17), we nominate SNARE-mediated exocytosis as the putative mechanism responsible for pathogen-induced mucus secretion from goblet cells. The vesicle SNARE VAMP8 on mucin granules within goblet cells is specifically activated following infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica that is known to induce potent hyper-secretion and coordinates mucin exocytosis. This secretion event is critical in fending off a pathogen, as cells lacking VAMP8 are prone to increased E. histolytica colonization and cytolysis through apoptosis. Failing coordinated mucus exocytosis and subsequent epithelial barrier destruction, the host mounts an immune response as a last line of defence.

  15. Music evokes vivid autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Karlan, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Music is strongly intertwined with memories-for example, hearing a song from the past can transport you back in time, triggering the sights, sounds, and feelings of a specific event. This association between music and vivid autobiographical memory is intuitively apparent, but the idea that music is intimately tied with memories, seemingly more so than other potent memory cues (e.g., familiar faces), has not been empirically tested. Here, we compared memories evoked by music to those evoked by famous faces, predicting that music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) would be more vivid. Participants listened to 30 songs, viewed 30 faces, and reported on memories that were evoked. Memories were transcribed and coded for vividness as in Levine, B., Svoboda, E., Hay, J. F., Winocur, G., & Moscovitch, M. [2002. Aging and autobiographical memory: Dissociating episodic from semantic retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 17, 677-689]. In support of our hypothesis, MEAMs were more vivid than autobiographical memories evoked by faces. MEAMs contained a greater proportion of internal details and a greater number of perceptual details, while face-evoked memories contained a greater number of external details. Additionally, we identified sex differences in memory vividness: for both stimulus categories, women retrieved more vivid memories than men. The results show that music not only effectively evokes autobiographical memories, but that these memories are more vivid than those evoked by famous faces.

  16. Complexin Activates Exocytosis of Distinct Secretory Vesicles Controlled by Different Synaptotagmins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Peng; Yang, Xiaofei; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Complexins are SNARE-complex binding proteins essential for the Ca2+-triggered exocytosis mediated by synaptotagmin-1, -2, -7, or -9, but the possible role of complexins in other types of exocytosis controlled by other synaptotagmin isoforms remains unclear. Here we show that in mouse olfactory bulb neurons, synaptotagmin-1 localizes to synaptic vesicles and to large dense-core secretory vesicles as reported previously, whereas synaptotagmin-10 localizes to a distinct class of peptidergic secretory vesicles containing IGF-1. Both synaptotagmin-1-dependent synaptic vesicle exocytosis and synaptotagmin-10-dependent IGF-1 exocytosis were severely impaired by knockdown of complexins, demonstrating that complexin acts as a co-factor for both synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-10 despite the functional differences between these synaptotagmins. Rescue experiments revealed that only the activating but not the clamping function of complexins was required for IGF-1 exocytosis controlled by synaptotagmin-10. Thus, our data indicate that complexins are essential for activation of multiple types of Ca2+-induced exocytosis that are regulated by different synaptotagmin isoforms. These results suggest that different types of regulated exocytosis are mediated by similar synaptotagmin-dependent fusion mechanisms, that particular synaptotagmin isoforms confer specificity onto different types of regulated exocytosis, and that complexins serve as universal synaptotagmin-adaptors for all of these types of exocytosis independent of which synaptotagmin isoform is involved. PMID:23345244

  17. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  18. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Maki; Utsumi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1) adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2) although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3) negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  19. Adjective metaphors evoke negative meanings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Previous metaphor studies have paid much attention to nominal metaphors and predicative metaphors, but little attention has been given to adjective metaphors. Although some studies have focused on adjective metaphors, they only examined differences in the acceptability of various types of adjective metaphors. This paper explores the cognitive effects evoked by adjective metaphors. Three psychological experiments revealed that (1 adjective metaphors, especially those modified by color adjectives, tend to evoke negative effect; (2 although the meanings of metaphors are basically affected by the meanings of their vehicles, when a vehicle has a neutral meaning, negative meanings are evoked most frequently for adjective metaphors compared to nominal and predicative metaphors; (3 negative meanings evoked by adjective metaphors are related to poeticness, and poetic metaphors evoke negative meanings more easily than less poetic metaphors. Our research sheds new light on studies of the use of metaphor, which is one of the most basic human cognitive abilities.

  20. Exocytosis regulates trafficking of GABA and glycine heterotransporters in spinal cord glutamatergic synapses: a mechanism for the excessive heterotransporter-induced release of glutamate in experimental amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Marco; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Fedele, Ernesto; Rebosio, Claudia; Cattaneo, Luca; Benfenati, Fabio; Usai, Cesare; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2015-02-01

    The impact of synaptic vesicle endo-exocytosis on the trafficking of nerve terminal heterotransporters was studied by monitoring membrane expression and function of the GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) and of type-1/2 glycine (Gly) transporters (GlyT-1/2) at spinal cord glutamatergic synaptic boutons. Experiments were performed by inducing exocytosis in wild-type (WT) mice, in amphiphysin-I knockout (Amph-I KO) mice, which show impaired endocytosis, or in mice expressing high copy number of mutant human SOD1 with a Gly93Ala substitution (SOD1(G93A)), a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing constitutively excessive Glu exocytosis. Exposure of spinal cord synaptosomes from WT mice to a 35mM KCl pulse increased the expression of GAT-1 at glutamatergic synaptosomal membranes and enhanced the GAT-1 heterotransporter-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate ([(3)H]d-Asp) release. Similar results were obtained in the case of GlyT-1/2 heterotransporters. Preventing depolarization-induced exocytosis normalized the excessive GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-induced [(3)H]d-Asp release in WT mice. Impaired endocytosis in Amph-I KO mice increased GAT-1 membrane expression and [(3)H]GABA uptake in spinal cord synaptosomes. Also the GAT-1 heterotransporter-evoked release of [(3)H]d-Asp was augmented in Amph-I KO mice. The constitutively excessive Glu exocytosis in SOD1(G93A) mice resulted in augmented GAT-1 expression at glutamatergic synaptosomal membranes and GAT-1 or GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-mediated [(3)H]d-Asp release. Thus, endo-exocytosis regulates the trafficking of GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporters sited at spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals. As a consequence, it can be hypothesized that the excessive GAT-1 and GlyT-1/2 heterotransporter-mediated Glu release, in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) mice, is due to the heterotransporter over-expression at the nerve terminal membrane, promoted by the excessive Glu exocytosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Fuel-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Depends upon Mitochondria Activation and the Integration of Mitochondrial and Cytosolic Substrate Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Cline, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic islet β-cell is uniquely specialized to couple its metabolism and rates of insulin secretion with the levels of circulating nutrient fuels, with the mitochondrial playing a central regulatory role in this process. In the β-cell, mitochondrial activation generates an integrated signal reflecting rates of oxidativephosphorylation, Kreb's cycle flux, and anaplerosis that ultimately determines the rate of insulin exocytosis. Mitochondrial activation can be regulated by proton leak ...

  2. Frontline Science: Tumor necrosis factor-α stimulation and priming of human neutrophil granule exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, Kenneth R; Merchant, Michael L; Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Barati, Michelle T; Uriarte, Silvia M; Ward, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis plays an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses. The present study examined TNF-α stimulation or priming of exocytosis of the 4 neutrophil granule subsets. TNF-α stimulated exocytosis of secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules and primed specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis to fMLF stimulation. Both stimulation and priming of exocytosis by TNF-α were dependent on p38 MAPK activity. Bioinformatic analysis of 1115 neutrophil proteins identified by mass spectrometry as being phosphorylated by TNF-α exposure found that actin cytoskeleton regulation was a major biologic function. A role for p38 MAPK regulation of the actin cytoskeleton was confirmed experimentally. Thirteen phosphoproteins regulated secretory vesicle quantity, formation, or release, 4 of which-Raf1, myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C (PKC) substrate (MARCKS), Abelson murine leukemia interactor 1 (ABI1), and myosin VI-were targets of the p38 MAPK pathway. Pharmacologic inhibition of Raf1 reduced stimulated exocytosis of gelatinase granules and priming of specific granule exocytosis. We conclude that differential regulation of exocytosis by TNF-α involves the actin cytoskeleton and is a necessary component for priming of the 2 major neutrophil antimicrobial defense mechanisms: oxygen radical generation and release of toxic granule contents. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Targeting exocytosis: ins and outs of the modulation of quantal dopamine release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission is mediated by the vesicular release of dopamine (DA), i.e. DA exocytosis. DA exocytosis and its modulation are generally believed to affect neuronal communication, development, maintenance and survival, and contribute to extracellular DA levels in the brain. As a

  4. Guanine exchange factor RalGDS mediates exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies from endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondaij, Mariska G.; Bierings, Ruben; van Agtmaal, Ellen L.; Gijzen, Karina A.; Sellink, Erica; Kragt, Astrid; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Mertens, Koen; Hannah, Matthew J.; van Mourik, Jan A.; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; Voorberg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ral has been implicated in regulated exocytosis via its interaction with the mammalian exocyst complex. We have previously demonstrated that Ral is involved in exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). Little is known about intracellular signaling pathways that promote

  5. Exocytosis and polarity in plant cells: insights by studying cellulose synthase complexes and the exocyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ying Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis covers aspects of exocytosis, plant cell growth and cell wall formation. These processes are strongly linked as cell growth and cell wall formation occur simultaneously and exocytosis is the process that delivers cell wall components to the existing cell wall and

  6. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle R Dalenberg

    Full Text Available In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively. After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  7. Evoked emotions predict food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R; Gutjar, Swetlana; Ter Horst, Gert J; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores.

  8. Endogenous beta-cell CART regulates insulin secretion and transcription of beta-cell genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, L; Edlund, A; Esguerra, J L S; Abels, M; Zhou, Y; Ottosson-Laakso, E; Wollheim, C B; Hansson, O; Eliasson, L; Wierup, N

    2017-05-15

    Impaired beta-cell function is key to the development of type 2 diabetes. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide with insulinotropic and glucagonostatic properties. Here we studied the role of endogenous CART in beta-cell function. CART silencing in INS-1 (832/13) beta-cells reduced insulin secretion and production, ATP levels and beta-cell exocytosis. This was substantiated by reduced expression of several exocytosis genes, as well as reduced expression of genes important for insulin secretion and processing. In addition, CART silencing reduced the expression of a network of transcription factors essential for beta-cell function. Moreover, in RNAseq data from human islet donors, CARTPT expression levels correlated with insulin, exocytosis genes and key beta-cell transcription factors. Thus, endogenous beta-cell CART regulates insulin expression and secretion in INS-1 (832/13) cells, via actions on the exocytotic machinery and a network of beta-cell transcription factors. We conclude that CART is important for maintaining the beta-cell phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stretch-regulated Exocytosis/Endocytosis in Bladder Umbrella Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truschel, Steven T.; Wang, Edward; Ruiz, Wily G.; Leung, Som-Ming; Rojas, Raul; Lavelle, John; Zeidel, Mark; Stoffer, David; Apodaca, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    The epithelium of the urinary bladder must maintain a highly impermeable barrier despite large variations in urine volume during bladder filling and voiding. To study how the epithelium accommodates these volume changes, we mounted bladder tissue in modified Ussing chambers and subjected the tissue to mechanical stretch. Stretching the tissue for 5 h resulted in a 50% increase in lumenal surface area (from ∼2900 to 4300 μm2), exocytosis of a population of discoidal vesicles located in the apical cytoplasm of the superficial umbrella cells, and release of secretory proteins. Surprisingly, stretch also induced endocytosis of apical membrane and 100% of biotin-labeled membrane was internalized within 5 min after stretch. The endocytosed membrane was delivered to lysosomes and degraded by a leupeptin-sensitive pathway. Last, we show that the exocytic events were mediated, in part, by a cyclic adenosine monophosphate, protein kinase A-dependent process. Our results indicate that stretch modulates mucosal surface area by coordinating both exocytosis and endocytosis at the apical membrane of umbrella cells and provide insight into the mechanism of how mechanical forces regulate membrane traffic in nonexcitable cells. PMID:11907265

  10. Syntaxin 1B, but not syntaxin 1A, is necessary for the regulation of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and of the readily releasable pool at central synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Mishima

    Full Text Available Two syntaxin 1 (STX1 isoforms, HPC-1/STX1A and STX1B, are coexpressed in neurons and function as neuronal target membrane (t-SNAREs. However, little is known about their functional differences in synaptic transmission. STX1A null mutant mice develop normally and do not show abnormalities in fast synaptic transmission, but monoaminergic transmissions are impaired. In the present study, we found that STX1B null mutant mice died within 2 weeks of birth. To examine functional differences between STX1A and 1B, we analyzed the presynaptic properties of glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in STX1B null mutant and STX1A/1B double null mutant mice. We found that the frequency of spontaneous quantal release was lower and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked postsynaptic currents was significantly greater in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses of STX1B null neurons. Deletion of STX1B also accelerated synaptic vesicle turnover in glutamatergic synapses and decreased the size of the readily releasable pool in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. Moreover, STX1A/1B double null neurons showed reduced and asynchronous evoked synaptic vesicle release in glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. Our results suggest that although STX1A and 1B share a basic function as neuronal t-SNAREs, STX1B but not STX1A is necessary for the regulation of spontaneous and evoked synaptic vesicle exocytosis in fast transmission.

  11. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Alexey M., E-mail: fysio@rambler.ru; Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F., E-mail: guzik121192@mail.ru; Yakovleva, Anastasia A., E-mail: nastya1234qwer@mail.ru; Zefirov, Andrei L., E-mail: zefiroval@rambler.ru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  12. Thrombin stimulates insulin secretion via protease-activated receptor-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Wang, Jinling; Güney, Emre; Tang, Yunzhao; Zhang, Enming; Axelsson, Annika S; Nenonen, Hannah; Salehi, Albert S; Wollheim, Claes B; Zetterberg, Eva; Berntorp, Erik; Costa, Ivan G; Castelo, Robert; Rosengren, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    The disease mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain poorly defined. Here we aimed to explore the pathophysiology of T2D by analyzing gene co-expression networks in human islets. Using partial correlation networks we identified a group of co-expressed genes ('module') including F2RL2 that was associated with glycated hemoglobin. F2Rl2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that encodes protease-activated receptor-3 (PAR3). PAR3 is cleaved by thrombin, which exposes a 6-amino acid sequence that acts as a 'tethered ligand' to regulate cellular signaling. We have characterized the effect of PAR3 activation on insulin secretion by static insulin secretion measurements, capacitance measurements, studies of diabetic animal models and patient samples. We demonstrate that thrombin stimulates insulin secretion, an effect that was prevented by an antibody that blocks the thrombin cleavage site of PAR3. Treatment with a peptide corresponding to the PAR3 tethered ligand stimulated islet insulin secretion and single β-cell exocytosis by a mechanism that involves activation of phospholipase C and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Moreover, we observed that the expression of tissue factor, which regulates thrombin generation, was increased in human islets from T2D donors and associated with enhanced β-cell exocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate that thrombin generation potential in patients with T2D was associated with increased fasting insulin and insulinogenic index. The findings provide a previously unrecognized link between hypercoagulability and hyperinsulinemia and suggest that reducing thrombin activity or blocking PAR3 cleavage could potentially counteract the exaggerated insulin secretion that drives insulin resistance and β-cell exhaustion in T2D.

  13. Recent advances in mathematical modeling and statistical analysis of exocytosis in endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Tagliavini, Alessia; Cortese, Giuliana; Riz, Michela; Montefusco, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Most endocrine cells secrete hormones as a result of Ca 2+ -regulated exocytosis, i.e., fusion of the membranes of hormone-containing secretory granules with the cell membrane, which allows the hormone molecules to escape to the extracellular space. As in neurons, electrical activity and cell depolarization open voltage-sensitive Ca 2+ channels, and the resulting Ca 2+ influx elevate the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, which in turn causes exocytosis. Whereas the main molecular components involved in exocytosis are increasingly well understood, quantitative understanding of the dynamical aspects of exocytosis is still lacking. Due to the nontrivial spatiotemporal Ca 2+ dynamics, which depends on the particular pattern of electrical activity as well as Ca 2+ channel kinetics, exocytosis is dependent on the spatial arrangement of Ca 2+ channels and secretory granules. For example, the creation of local Ca 2+ microdomains, where the Ca 2+ concentration reaches tens of µM, are believed to be important for triggering exocytosis. Spatiotemporal simulations of buffered Ca 2+ diffusion have provided important insight into the interplay between electrical activity, Ca 2+ channel kinetics, and the location of granules and Ca 2+ channels. By confronting simulations with statistical time-to-event (or survival) regression analysis of single granule exocytosis monitored with TIRF microscopy, a direct connection between location and rate of exocytosis can be obtained at the local, single-granule level. To get insight into whole-cell secretion, simplifications of the full spatiotemporal dynamics have shown to be highly helpful. Here, we provide an overview of recent approaches and results for quantitative analysis of Ca 2+ regulated exocytosis of hormone-containing granules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Entamoeba histolytica Cysteine Proteinase 5 Evokes Mucin Exocytosis from Colonic Goblet Cells via αvβ3 Integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Cornick

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical to the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis, Entamoeba histolytica (Eh induces mucus hypersecretion and degrades the colonic mucus layer at the site of invasion. The parasite component(s responsible for hypersecretion are poorly defined, as are regulators of mucin secretion within the host. In this study, we have identified the key virulence factor in live Eh that elicits the fast release of mucin by goblets cells as cysteine protease 5 (EhCP5 whereas, modest mucus secretion occurred with secreted soluble EhCP5 and recombinant CP5. Coupling of EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin on goblet cells facilitated outside-in signaling by activating SRC family kinases (SFK and focal adhesion kinase that resulted in the activation/phosphorlyation of PI3K at the site of Eh contact and production of PIP3. PKCδ was activated at the EhCP5-αvβ3 integrin contact site that specifically regulated mucin secretion though the trafficking vesicle marker myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS. This study has identified that EhCP5 coupling with goblet cell αvβ3 receptors can initiate a signal cascade involving PI3K, PKCδ and MARCKS to drive mucin secretion from goblet cells critical in disease pathogenesis.

  15. Identification of a Munc13-sensitive step in chromaffin cell large dense-core vesicle exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, Kwun-Nok Mimi; Imig, Cordelia; Walter, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether the molecular steps of large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) docking and priming are identical to the corresponding reactions in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis. Munc13s are essential for SV docking and priming, and we systematically analyzed their role in LDCV exocytosis...... using chromaffin cells lacking individual isoforms. We show that particularly Munc13-2 plays a fundamental role in LDCV exocytosis, but in contrast to synapses lacking Munc13s, the corresponding chromaffin cells do not exhibit a vesicle docking defect. We further demonstrate that ubMunc13-2 and Munc13...

  16. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments.

  17. Unresolved Questions Concerning Mammalian Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, the study of mammalian acrosomal exocytosis has produced some major advances that challenge the long-held, general paradigms in the field. Principally, the idea that sperm must be acrosome-intact to bind to the zona pellucida of unfertilized eggs, based largely on in vitro fertilization studies of mouse oocytes denuded of the cumulus oophorus, has been overturned by experiments using state-of-the-art imaging of cumulus-intact oocytes and fertilization experiments where eggs were reinseminated by acrosome-reacted sperm recovered from the perivitelline space of zygotes. In light of these results, this minireview highlights a number of unresolved questions and emphasizes the fact that there is still much work to be done in this exciting field. Future experiments using recently advanced technologies should lead to a more complete and accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the fertilization process in mammals. PMID:24671881

  18. Midline 1 directs lytic granule exocytosis and cytotoxicity of mouse killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana; Johansen, Bo B; Braunstein, Thomas H; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Kongsbak, Martin; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Woetmann, Anders; Thomsen, Allan R; Odum, Niels; von Essen, Marina R; Geisler, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Midline 1 (MID1) is a microtubule-associated ubiquitin ligase that regulates protein phosphatase 2A activity. Loss-of-function mutations in MID1 lead to the X-linked Opitz G/BBB syndrome characterized by defective midline development during embryogenesis. Here, we show that MID1 is strongly upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs), and that it controls TCR signaling, centrosome trafficking, and exocytosis of lytic granules. In accordance, we find that the killing capacity of MID1(-/-) CTLs is impaired. Transfection of MID1 into MID1(-/-) CTLs completely rescued lytic granule exocytosis, and vice versa, knockdown of MID1 inhibited exocytosis of lytic granules in WT CTLs, cementing a central role for MID1 in the regulation of granule exocytosis. Thus, MID1 orchestrates multiple events in CTL responses, adding a novel level of regulation to CTL activation and cytotoxicity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Complexin II plays a positive role in Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by facilitating vesicle priming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Haijiang; Reim, Kerstin; Varoqueaux, Frederique

    2008-01-01

    SNARE-mediated exocytosis is a multistage process central to synaptic transmission and hormone release. Complexins (CPXs) are small proteins that bind very rapidly and with a high affinity to the SNARE core complex, where they have been proposed recently to inhibit exocytosis by clamping...... the complex and inhibiting membrane fusion. However, several other studies also suggest that CPXs are positive regulators of neurotransmitter release. Thus, whether CPXs are positive or negative regulators of exocytosis is not known, much less the stage in the vesicle life cycle at which they function. Here......, we systematically dissect the vesicle stages leading up to exocytosis using a knockout-rescue strategy in a mammalian model system. We show that adrenal chromaffin cells from CPX II knockout mice exhibit markedly diminished releasable vesicle pools (comprising the readily and slowly releasable pools...

  20. Neuropeptide Exocytosis Involving Synaptotagmin-4 and Oxytocin in Hypothalamic Programming of Body Weight and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. PMID:21315262

  1. Rac1 and Rac2 control distinct events during antigen-stimulated mast cell exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Alicia; Ndoh, Vivian N E; Lacy, Paige; Eitzen, Gary

    2014-05-01

    The release of preformed mediators from immune cells is through a process described as exocytosis. In mast cells, exocytosis is regulated by several coordinated intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we investigated the role of the hematopoietic-specific Rho GTPase, Rac2, and the ubiquitously expressed Rac1, in controlling mast cell exocytosis. These two isoforms showed equivalent levels of expression in mouse BMMCs. Although Rac1 and Rac2 share 92% sequence identity, they were not functionally redundant, as Rac2 -/- BMMCs were defective in exocytosis, even though Rac1 levels were unaffected. Antigen-stimulated WT mast cells underwent a series of morphological transitions: initial flattening, followed by actin-mediated peripheral membrane ruffling and calcium influx, which preceded exocytosis. Whereas membrane ruffling was unaffected in Rac2 -/- BMMCs, calcium influx was decreased significantly. Calcium influx was studied further by examining SOCE. In Rac2 -/- BMMCs, the activation of PLCγ1 and calcium release from intracellular stores occurred normally; however, activation of plasma membrane calcium channels was defective, shown by the lack of extracellular calcium influx and a reduction of YFP-STIM1 puncta at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we used the small molecule Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, to target Rac signaling acutely in WT BMMCs. EHT 1864 blocked exocytosis and membrane ruffling completely in conjunction with exocytosis. Our findings suggest that antigen-stimulated membrane ruffling in mast cells is a Rac1-mediated process, as this persisted in the absence of Rac2. Therefore, we define distinct modes of Rac-regulated mast cell exocytosis: Rac2-mediated calcium influx and Rac1-mediated membrane ruffling. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Scherer, Julian; Enquist, Lynn W

    2016-06-07

    Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. The alphaherpesviruses, including the important human pathogens herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are among the few viruses that have evolved to exploit the mammalian nervous system. These viruses typically cause mild recurrent herpetic or zosteriform lesions but can also cause debilitating herpes encephalitis, more frequently in very young, old, immunocompromised, or nonnatural hosts. Importantly, many of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of viral assembly and egress remain unclear. This study addresses the trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, exocytosis of light particles, and exocytosis of virions. Trafficking of glycoproteins affects immune evasion and pathogenesis and may precede virus particle assembly. The release of light

  3. Semisynthetic fluorescent pH sensors for imaging exocytosis and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Magalie; Somasundaram, Agila; Grimm, Jonathan B; Gruber, Todd D; Choquet, Daniel; Taraska, Justin W; Lavis, Luke D; Perrais, David

    2017-11-10

    The GFP-based superecliptic pHluorin (SEP) enables detection of exocytosis and endocytosis, but its performance has not been duplicated in red fluorescent protein scaffolds. Here we describe "semisynthetic" pH-sensitive protein conjugates with organic fluorophores, carbofluorescein, and Virginia Orange that match the properties of SEP. Conjugation to genetically encoded self-labeling tags or antibodies allows visualization of both exocytosis and endocytosis, constituting new bright sensors for these key steps of synaptic transmission.

  4. Semisynthetic fluorescent pH sensors for imaging exocytosis and endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Martineau, Magalie; Somasundaram, Agila; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Gruber, Todd D.; Choquet, Daniel; Taraska, Justin W.; Lavis, Luke D.; Perrais, David

    2017-01-01

    The GFP-based superecliptic pHluorin (SEP) enables detection of exocytosis and endocytosis, but its performance has not been duplicated in red fluorescent protein scaffolds. Here we describe “semisynthetic” pH-sensitive protein conjugates with organic fluorophores, carbofluorescein, and Virginia Orange that match the properties of SEP. Conjugation to genetically encoded self-labeling tags or antibodies allows visualization of both exocytosis and endocytosis, constituting new bright sensors fo...

  5. A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ngo, Hoan; Bhalla, Manmeet; Chen, Da-Yuan; Ireton, Keith

    2017-11-01

    The bacterial surface protein InlB mediates internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes into human cells through interaction with the host receptor tyrosine kinase, Met. InlB-mediated entry requires localised polymerisation of the host actin cytoskeleton. Apart from actin polymerisation, roles for other host processes in Listeria entry are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exocytosis in the human cell promotes InlB-dependent internalisation. Using a probe consisting of VAMP3 with an exofacial green fluorescent protein tag, focal exocytosis was detected during InlB-mediated entry. Exocytosis was dependent on Met tyrosine kinase activity and the GTPase RalA. Depletion of SNARE proteins by small interfering RNA demonstrated an important role for exocytosis in Listeria internalisation. Depletion of SNARE proteins failed to affect actin filaments during internalisation, suggesting that actin polymerisation and exocytosis are separable host responses. SNARE proteins were required for delivery of the human GTPase Dynamin 2, which promotes InlB-mediated entry. Our results identify exocytosis as a novel host process exploited by Listeria for infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Endocytosis is required for exocytosis and priming of respiratory burst activity in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-10-01

    Neutrophil generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced by exposure to pro-inflammatory agents in a process termed priming. Priming is depending on exocytosis of neutrophil granules and p47 phox phosphorylation-dependent translocation of cytosolic NADPH oxidase components. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was recently reported to be necessary for priming, but the mechanism linking endocytosis to priming was not identified. The present study examined the hypothesis that endocytosis regulates neutrophil priming by controlling granule exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis by isolated human neutrophils was inhibited by chlorpromazine, monodansylcadaverine, and sucrose. Exocytosis of granule subsets was measured as release of granule components by ELISA or chemiluminescence. ROS generation was measured as extracellular release of superoxide as reduction of ferrocytochrome c. p38 MAPK activation and p47 phox phosphorylation were measured by immunoblot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA with the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test. Inhibition of endocytosis prevented priming of superoxide release by TNFα and inhibited TNFα stimulation and priming of exocytosis of all four granule subsets. Inhibition of endocytosis did not reduce TNFα-stimulated p38 MAPK activation or p47 phox phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked TNFα stimulation of secretory vesicle and gelatinase granule exocytosis. Endocytosis is linked to priming of respiratory burst activity through ROS-mediated control of granule exocytosis.

  7. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Swetlana Gutjar; Gert J Ter Horst; Kees de Graaf; Renken, Remco J.; Gerry Jager

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well ...

  8. EVOKED CAVERNOUS ACTIVITY: NEUROANATOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Vicars, Brenda; Yang, Claire C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited 7 males with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction and 6 males who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS subjects, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into t...

  9. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involves changes in diet and lifestyle. The American Diabetes Association recommends losing excess weight, getting regular amounts of moderate intensity physical activity, and increasing dietary fiber to lower blood insulin levels and increase the ...

  10. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to come strictly from animal sources (cow and pig pancreas cells). Most insulin used today is synthetic, ... developing type 2 diabetes , hypertension , hyperlipidemia , and/or heart disease several years down the road. Abdominal obesity, ...

  11. Ca2+-independent and Ca2+/GTP-binding protein-controlled exocytosis in a plant cell

    OpenAIRE

    Homann, Ulrike; Tester, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Exocytosis allows the release of secretory products and the delivery of new membrane material to the plasma membrane. So far, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism and its control in plant cells. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to monitor changes in membrane capacitance to study exocytosis in barley aleurone protoplasts. To investigate the involvement of Ca2+ and GTP-binding proteins in exocytosis, protoplasts were dialyzed with very low (

  12. Model of evoked rabbit phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ping Jiang; French, Lesley C; Ohno, Tsunehisa; Zealear, David L; Rousseau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for eliciting phonation in an in vivo rabbit preparation using low-frequency, bipolar pulsed stimulation of the cricothyroid muscles with airflow delivered to the glottis. Ten New Zealand White breeder rabbits weighing 3 to 5 kg were used in this study. The cricothyroid muscles were isolated bilaterally, and separate pairs of anode-cathode hooked-wire electrodes were inserted into each muscle. A Grass S-88 stimulator and 2 constant-current PSIU6 isolation units were used to deliver bipolar square wave pulses to each cricothyroid muscle, with airflow delivered to the glottis through a cuffed endotracheal tube. Phonation was evoked with a 50-Hz, 4-mA stimulus train of 1-ms pulses delivered to each cricothyroid muscle. The pulse trains were on for 2 seconds and were repeated every 5 seconds over a period of 180 minutes. Airflow was delivered at 143 cm3/s, producing phonation measuring 71 to 85 dB sound pressure level. Evoked phonation is feasible in rabbits by use of bipolar stimulation of the cricothyroid muscles with airflow delivered to the glottis. The in vivo rabbit preparation described may provide a useful small animal option for studies of evoked phonation. From the level and consistency of the adduction observed, we hypothesize that current spreading to the underlying adductor muscles and nerves resulted in neural pathway involvement beyond discrete activation of the cricothyroid muscle, providing sufficient approximation of the vocal folds for phonation.

  13. New Electrochemical Methods for Studying Nanoparticle Electrocatalysis and Neuronal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jonathan T.

    This dissertation presents the construction and application of micro and nanoscale electrodes for electroanalytical analysis. The studies presented herein encompass two main areas: electrochemical catalysis, and studies of the dynamics of single cell exocytosis. The first portion of this dissertation engages the use of Pt nanoelectrodes to study the stability and electrocatalytic properties of materials. A single nanoparticle electrode (SNPE) was fabricated by immobilizing a single Au nanoparticle on a Pt disk nanoelectrode via an amine-terminated silane cross linker. In this manner we were able to effectively study the electrochemistry and electrocatalytic activity of single Au nanoparticles and found that the electrocatalytic activity is dependent on nanoparticle size. This study can further the understanding of the structure-function relationship in nanoparticle based electrocatalysis. Further work was conducted to probe the stability of Pt nanoelectrodes under conditions of potential cycling. Pt based catalysts are known to deteriorate under such conditions due to losses in electrochemical surface area and Pt dissolution. By using Pt disk nanoelectrodes we were able to study Pt dissolution via steady-state voltammetry. We observed an enhanced dissolution rate and higher charge density on nanoelectrodes than that previously found on macro scale electrodes. The goal of the second portion of this dissertation is to develop new analytical methods to study the dynamics of exocytosis from single cells. The secretion of neurotransmitters plays a key role in neuronal communication, and our studies highlight how bipolar electrochemistry can be employed to enhance detection of neurotransmitters from single cells. First, we developed a theory to quantitatively characterize the voltammetric behavior of bipolar carbon fiber microelectrodes and secondly applied those principles to single cell detection. We showed that by simply adding an additional redox mediator to the back

  14. Absence of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Adipocytes Causes Systemic Insulin Resistance and Impairs Glucose Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Vijayakumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower adipose-ChREBP and de novo lipogenesis (DNL are associated with insulin resistance in humans. Here, we generated adipose-specific ChREBP knockout (AdChREBP KO mice with negligible sucrose-induced DNL in adipose tissue (AT. Chow-fed AdChREBP KO mice are insulin resistant with impaired insulin action in the liver, muscle, and AT and increased AT inflammation. HFD-fed AdChREBP KO mice are also more insulin resistant than controls. Surprisingly, adipocytes lacking ChREBP display a cell-autonomous reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport that is mediated by impaired Glut4 translocation and exocytosis, not lower Glut4 levels. AdChREBP KO mice have lower levels of palmitic acid esters of hydroxy stearic acids (PAHSAs in serum, and AT. 9-PAHSA supplementation completely rescues their insulin resistance and AT inflammation. 9-PAHSA also normalizes impaired glucose transport and Glut4 exocytosis in ChREBP KO adipocytes. Thus, loss of adipose-ChREBP is sufficient to cause insulin resistance, potentially by regulating AT glucose transport and flux through specific lipogenic pathways.

  15. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  16. Recycling endosomes undergo rapid closure of a fusion pore on exocytosis in neuronal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullié, Damien; Choquet, Daniel; Perrais, David

    2014-08-13

    Exocytosis of recycling endosomes (REs) represents the last step of receptor and membrane recycling, a fundamental process involved in many aspects of cell physiology. In neurons, it is involved in the control of cell polarity and synaptic plasticity and is locally and tightly regulated. However, its molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. We have imaged single exocytosis events of REs in rat hippocampal neurons in culture transfected with three types of receptors tagged with the pH-sensitive GFP mutant superecliptic phluorin. We found that exocytosis events are grouped into two categories: (1) short burst events in which receptors diffuse into the plasma membrane in a few seconds; and (2) long display events in which receptors remain visible and clustered after exocytosis for many seconds. Display events are much rarer in non-neuronal cells, such as fibroblasts and astrocytes. Using two-color imaging and fast extracellular solution changes, we show that display events correspond to the rapid opening and closing of a fusion pore (or "kiss-and-run") with a median opening time of 2.6 s, which restricts the diffusion of multiple receptor types and bound cargo. Moreover, the RE marker Rab11 remains enriched after display exocytosis events and controls the mode of RE exocytosis. Finally, a given RE can undergo multiple rounds of display exocytosis. The last step of recycling can thus be controlled in neurons for the selective delivery of receptors at the cell surface. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411106-13$15.00/0.

  17. Cellular Mechanisms of Alpha Herpesvirus Egress: Live Cell Fluorescence Microscopy of Pseudorabies Virus Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress. PMID:25474634

  18. Visualization of exocytosis during sea urchin egg fertilization using confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, M

    1995-06-01

    A Ca2+ wave at fertilization triggers cortical granule exocytosis in sea urchin eggs. New methods for visualizing exocytosis of individual cortical granules were developed using fluorescent probes and confocal microscopy. Electron microscopy previously provided evidence that cortical granule exocytosis results in the formation of long-lived depressions in the cell surface. Fluorescent dextran or ovalbumin in the sea water seemed to label these depressions and appeared by confocal microscopy as disks. FM 1-43, a water-soluble fluorescent dye which labels membranes in contact with the sea water, seemed to label the membrane of these depressions and appeared as rings. In double-labeling experiments, the disk and ring labeling by the two types of fluorescent dyes were coincident to within 0.5 second. The fluorescent labeling is coincident with the disappearance of cortical granules by transmitted light microscopy, demonstrating that the labeling corresponds to cortical granule exocytosis. Fluorescent labeling was simultaneous with an expansion of the space occupied by the cortical granule, and labeling by the fluorescent dextran was found to take 0.1-0.2 second. These results are consistent with, and reinforce the previous electron microscopic evidence for, long-lived depressions formed by exocytosis; in addition, the new methods provide new ways to investigate cortical granule exocytosis in living eggs. The fluorescence labeling methods were used with the Ca2+ indicator Ca Green-dextran to test if Ca2+ and cortical granule exocytosis are closely related spatially and temporally. In any given region of the cortex, Ca2+ increased relatively slowly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Hogue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress.

  20. Pore opening dynamics in the exocytosis of serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Cercos, Montserrat G.; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Salinas Hernandez, Israel; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; de-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2015-03-01

    The current view of the exocytosis of transmitter molecules is that it starts with the formation of a fusion pore that connects the intravesicular and the extracellular spaces, and is completed by the release of the rest of the transmitter contained in the vesicle upon the full fusion and collapse of the vesicle with the plasma membrane. However, under certain circumstances, a rapid closure of the pore before the full vesicle fusion produces only a partial release of the transmitter. Here we show that whole release of the transmitter occurs through fusion pores that remain opened for tens of milliseconds without vesicle collapse. This was demonstrated through amperometric measurements of serotonin release from electrodense vesicles in the axon of leech Retzius neurons and mathematical modelling. By modeling transmitter release with a diffusion equation subjected to boundary conditions that are defined by the experiment, we showed that those pores with a fast half rise time constant remained opened and allowed the full quantum release without vesicle collapse, whereas pores with a slow rise time constant closed rapidly, thus producing partial release. We conclude that a full transmitter release may occur through the fusion pore in the absence of vesicle collapse. This work was founded by a DGAPA-UNAM grants IN200914 and IN118410 CONACYT GRANT 130031, and CONACyT doctoral fellowships.

  1. Imaging exocytosis in retinal bipolar cells with TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselevitch, Christina; Zenisek, David

    2009-06-09

    Total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a technique that allows the study of events happening at the cell membrane, by selective imaging of fluorescent molecules that are closest to a high refractive index substance such as glass. In this article, we apply this technique to image exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in retinal bipolar cells isolated from the goldfish retina. These neurons are very suitable for this kind of study due to their large axon terminals. By simultaneously patch clamping the bipolar cells, it is possible to investigate the relationship between pre-synaptic voltage and synaptic release. Synaptic vesicles inside the bipolar cell terminals are loaded with a fluorescent dye (FM 1-43) by co-puffing the dye and a ringer solution containing a high K(+) concentration onto the synaptic terminals. This depolarizes the cells and stimulates endocytosis and consequent dye uptake into the glutamatergic vesicles. After washing the excess dye away for around 30 minutes, cells are ready for being patch clamped and imaged simultaneously with a 488 nm laser. The patch pipette solution contains a rhodamine-based peptide that binds selectively to the synaptic ribbon protein RIBEYE, thereby labeling ribbons specifically when terminals are imaged with a 561 nm laser. This allows the precise localization of active zones and the separation of synaptic from extra-synaptic events.

  2. Identification of Neutrophil Exocytosis Inhibitors (Nexinhibs), Small Molecule Inhibitors of Neutrophil Exocytosis and Inflammation: DRUGGABILITY OF THE SMALL GTPase Rab27a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; He, Jing; Brown, Steven J; Zhang, Jinzhong; Abgaryan, Lusine; Biris, Nikolaos; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Rosen, Hugh; Catz, Sergio D

    2016-12-09

    Neutrophils constitute the first line of cellular defense in response to bacterial and fungal infections and rely on granular proteins to kill microorganisms, but uncontrolled secretion of neutrophil cargos is injurious to the host and should be closely regulated. Thus, increased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins, including myeloperoxidase and elastase, are associated with tissue damage and are hallmarks of systemic inflammation. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput screening approach to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between the small GTPase Rab27a and its effector JFC1, two central regulators of neutrophil exocytosis. Using this assay, we have identified small molecule inhibitors of Rab27a-JFC1 binding that were also active in cell-based neutrophil-specific exocytosis assays, demonstrating the druggability of Rab GTPases and their effectors. These compounds, named Nexinhibs (neutrophil exocytosis inhibitors), inhibit exocytosis of azurophilic granules in human neutrophils without affecting other important innate immune responses, including phagocytosis and neutrophil extracellular trap production. Furthermore, the compounds are reversible and potent inhibitors of the extracellular production of superoxide anion by preventing the up-regulation of the granule membrane-associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase at the plasma membrane. Nexinhibs also inhibit the up-regulation of activation signature molecules, including the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. Importantly, by using a mouse model of endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation, we show that these inhibitors have significant activity in vivo manifested by decreased plasma levels of neutrophil secretory proteins and significantly decreased tissue infiltration by inflammatory neutrophils. Altogether, our data present the first neutrophil exocytosis-specific inhibitor with in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, supporting its potential use as an inhibitor of systemic

  3. The primed SNARE–complexin–synaptotagmin complex for neuronal exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Austin L.; Wu, Dick; Zhao, Minglei; Südhof, Thomas C.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2017-08-16

    Synaptotagmin, complexin, and neuronal SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins mediate evoked synchronous neurotransmitter release, but the molecular mechanisms mediating the cooperation between these molecules remain unclear. Here we determine crystal structures of the primed pre-fusion SNARE–complexin–synaptotagmin-1 complex. These structures reveal an unexpected tripartite interface between synaptotagmin-1 and both the SNARE complex and complexin. Simultaneously, a second synaptotagmin-1 molecule interacts with the other side of the SNARE complex via the previously identified primary interface. Mutations that disrupt either interface in solution also severely impair evoked synchronous release in neurons, suggesting that both interfaces are essential for the primed pre-fusion state. Ca2+ binding to the synaptotagmin-1 molecules unlocks the complex, allows full zippering of the SNARE complex, and triggers membrane fusion. The tripartite SNARE–complexin–synaptotagmin-1 complex at a synaptic vesicle docking site has to be unlocked for triggered fusion to start, explaining the cooperation between complexin and synaptotagmin-1 in synchronizing evoked release on the sub-millisecond timescale.

  4. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the abdomen just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes glucose from the ... occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body doesn’t use insulin ...

  5. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, ... body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose ...

  6. Injured astrocytes are repaired by Synaptotagmin XI-regulated lysosome exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreetama, S C; Takano, T; Nedergaard, M; Simon, S M; Jaiswal, J K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes are known to facilitate repair following brain injury; however, little is known about how injured astrocytes repair themselves. Repair of cell membrane injury requires Ca(2+)-triggered vesicle exocytosis. In astrocytes, lysosomes are the main Ca(2+)-regulated exocytic vesicles. Here we show that astrocyte cell membrane injury results in a large and rapid calcium increase. This triggers robust lysosome exocytosis where the fusing lysosomes release all luminal contents and merge fully with the plasma membrane. In contrast to this, receptor stimulation produces a small sustained calcium increase, which is associated with partial release of the lysosomal luminal content, and the lysosome membrane does not merge into the plasma membrane. In most cells, lysosomes express the synaptotagmin (Syt) isoform Syt VII; however, this isoform is not present on astrocyte lysosomes and exogenous expression of Syt VII on lysosome inhibits their exocytosis. Deletion of one of the most abundant Syt isoform in astrocyte--Syt XI--suppresses astrocyte lysosome exocytosis. This identifies lysosome as Syt XI-regulated exocytic vesicle in astrocytes. Further, inhibition of lysosome exocytosis (by Syt XI depletion or Syt VII expression) prevents repair of injured astrocytes. These results identify the lysosomes and Syt XI as the sub-cellular and molecular regulators, respectively of astrocyte cell membrane repair.

  7. Developmental refinement of hair cell synapses tightens the coupling of Ca2+ influx to exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Aaron B; Rutherford, Mark A; Gabrielaitis, Mantas; Pangršič, Tina; Göttfert, Fabian; Frank, Thomas; Michanski, Susann; Hell, Stefan; Wolf, Fred; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) develop from pre-sensory pacemaker to sound transducer. Here, we report that this involves changes in structure and function of the ribbon synapses between IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) around hearing onset in mice. As synapses matured they changed from holding several small presynaptic active zones (AZs) and apposed postsynaptic densities (PSDs) to one large AZ/PSD complex per SGN bouton. After the onset of hearing (i) IHCs had fewer and larger ribbons; (ii) CaV1.3 channels formed stripe-like clusters rather than the smaller and round clusters at immature AZs; (iii) extrasynaptic CaV1.3-channels were selectively reduced, (iv) the intrinsic Ca2+ dependence of fast exocytosis probed by Ca2+ uncaging remained unchanged but (v) the apparent Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis linearized, when assessed by progressive dihydropyridine block of Ca2+ influx. Biophysical modeling of exocytosis at mature and immature AZ topographies suggests that Ca2+ influx through an individual channel dominates the [Ca2+] driving exocytosis at each mature release site. We conclude that IHC synapses undergo major developmental refinements, resulting in tighter spatial coupling between Ca2+ influx and exocytosis. PMID:24442635

  8. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-04-15

    Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. A toxin from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer that blocks calcium channels coupled to exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guatimosim, C; Romano-Silva, M A; Cruz, J S; Beirão, P S L; Kalapothakis, E; Moraes-Santos, T; Cordeiro, M N; Diniz, C R; Gomez, M V; Prado, M A M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the pharmacological action of a toxin from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, Tx3-3, on the function of calcium channels that control exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Tx3-3, in confirmation of previous work, diminished the intracellular calcium increase induced by membrane depolarization with KCl (25 mM) in rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The toxin was very potent (IC50 0.9 nM) at inhibiting calcium channels that regulate calcium entry in synaptosomes. In addition, Tx3-3 blocked the exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, as measured with the fluorescent dye FM1-43. Using ω-toxins that interact selectively with distinct neuronal calcium channels, we investigated whether the target of Tx3-3 overlaps with known channels that mediate exocytosis. The results indicate that the main population of voltage-sensitive calcium channels altered by Tx3-3 can also be inhibited by ω-agatoxin IVA, an antagonist of P/Q calcium channels. ω-conotoxin GVIA, which inhibits N type calcium channels did not decrease significantly the entry of calcium or exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in depolarized synaptosomes. It is concluded that Tx3-3 potently inhibits ω-agatoxin IVA-sensitive calcium channels, which are involved in controlling exocytosis in rat brain cortical synaptosomes. PMID:9351520

  10. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway.

  11. Achieving Presence through Evoked Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Jayesh S.; Schmidt, Colin; Richir, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The sense of “Presence” (evolving from “telepresence”) has always been associated with virtual reality research and is still an exceptionally mystifying constituent. Now the study of presence clearly spans over various disciplines associated with cognition. This paper attempts to put forth a concept that argues that it’s an experience of an “Evoked Reality (ER)” (illusion of reality) that triggers an “Evoked Presence (EP)” (sense of presence) in our minds. A Three Pole Reality Model is proposed to explain this phenomenon. The poles range from Dream Reality to Simulated Reality with Primary (Physical) Reality at the center. To demonstrate the relationship between ER and EP, a Reality-Presence Map is developed. We believe that this concept of ER and the proposed model may have significant applications in the study of presence, and in exploring the possibilities of not just virtual reality but also what we call “reality.” PMID:23550234

  12. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  13. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...

  14. A quantitative study of exocytosis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Wu, Qiuxia; Sui, Keke; Chen, Xin-Xin; Fang, Jie; Hu, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the first 24 h after removing TiO2NPs, from the culture medium, about 35.0%, 34.6% and 41.7% of NP1 (50 nm), NP2 (30 nm) and NTs (nanotubes, 100 nm × 4-6 nm) were released (exocytosed) from cells, respectively. The release decreased over time, and became negligible at 72 h. Exocytosis did not happen during cell division. In addition, our results suggested that both endocytosis and exocytosis of TiO2NPs were energy-dependent processes, and NPs uptake by cells was influenced by serum proteins. Furthermore, we achieved primary dynamic confocal imaging of the exocytosis, allowing tracking of TiO2 NPs from NSCs. These findings may benefit studies on nanotoxicology and nanomedicine of TiO2 NPs.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely studied and applied in biomedicine and other fields. It is important to know the basic process of interaction between NPs and cells in terms of cellular endocytosis and exocytosis. However, little attention has been paid to the cellular exocytosis of NPs. Herein, using a multi-step cellular subculture method, we ascertain quantitatively the endocytosis and exocytosis of widely used TiO2 NPs using the neural stem cells (NSC) as a cellular model and ICP-AES as an analytic measure. Irrespective of the type and dose of TiO2 NPs, approximately 30% of the total TiO2 NPs entered NSCs after 48 h incubation. In the

  15. Detection of Lysosomal Exocytosis by Surface Exposure of Lamp1 Luminal Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Norma W

    2017-01-01

    Elevation in the cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration triggers exocytosis of lysosomes in many cell types. This chapter describes a method to detect lysosomal exocytosis in mammalian cells, which takes advantage of the presence of an abundant glycoprotein, Lamp1, on the membrane of lysosomes. Lamp1 is a transmembrane protein with a large, heavily glycosylated region that faces the lumen of lysosomes. When lysosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, epitopes present on the luminal domain of Lamp1 are exposed on the cell surface. The Lamp1 luminal epitopes can then be detected on the surface of live, unfixed cells using highly specific monoclonal antibodies and fluorescence microscopy. The main advantage of this method is its sensitivity, and the fact that it provides spatial information on lysosomal exocytosis at the single cell level.

  16. Inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase promotes exocytosis of renin from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten; Friis, Ulla Glenert; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin in regulation of renin release, we assayed exocytosis using whole-cell patch clamp of single juxtaglomerular cells in culture. The calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA), significantly increased juxtaglomerular...... cell membrane capacitance, an index of cell surface area and an established measure of exocytosis in single-cell assays. This effect was mimicked by intracellular delivery of a calcineurin inhibitory peptide, the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), or the calmodulin inhibitor W-13...... after CsA treatment of the A-alpha knockout, while renin mRNA was suppressed. We conclude that calcineurin and calcium/calmodulin suppress exocytosis of renin from juxtaglomerular cells independent of PKA....

  17. RIM, Munc13, and Rab3A Interplay in Acrosomal Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Oscar D.; Zanetti, M. Natalia; Mayorga, Luis S.; Michaut, Marcela A.

    2012-01-01

    Exocytosis is a highly regulated, multistage process consisting of multiple functionally definable stages, including recruitment, targeting, tethering, priming, and docking of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane, followed by calcium-triggered membrane fusion. The acrosome reaction of spermatozoa is a complex, calcium-dependent regulated exocytosis. Fusion at multiple sites between the outer acrosomal membrane and the cell membrane causes the release of the acrosomal contents and the loss of the membranes surrounding the acrosome. Not much is known about the molecules that mediate membrane docking in this particular fusion model. In neurons, the formation of the ternary RIM/Munc13/Rab3A complex has been suggested as a critical component of synaptic vesicles docking. Previously, we demonstrated that Rab3A localizes to the acrosomal region in human sperm, stimulates acrosomal exocytosis, and participates in an early stage during membrane fusion. Here, we report that RIM and Munc13 are also present in human sperm and localize to the acrosomal region. Like Rab3A, RIM and Munc13 participate in a prefusion step before the efflux of intra-acrosomal calcium. By means of a functional assay using antibodies and recombinant proteins, we show that RIM, Munc13 and Rab3A interplay during acrosomal exocytosis. Finally, we report by electron transmission microscopy that sequestering RIM and Rab3A alters the docking of the acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane during calcium-activated acrosomal exocytosis. Our results suggest that the RIM/Munc13/Rab3 A complex participates in acrosomal exocytosis and that RIM and Rab3A have a central role in membrane docking. PMID:22248876

  18. Steering neuronal growth cones by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojima, Takuro; Itofusa, Rurika; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-21

    Extracellular molecular cues guide migrating growth cones along specific routes during development of axon tracts. Such processes rely on asymmetric elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations across the growth cone that mediates its attractive or repulsive turning toward or away from the side with Ca(2+) elevation, respectively. Downstream of these Ca(2+) signals, localized activation of membrane trafficking steers the growth cone bidirectionally, with endocytosis driving repulsion and exocytosis causing attraction. However, it remains unclear how Ca(2+) can differentially regulate these opposite membrane-trafficking events. Here, we show that growth cone turning depends on localized imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis and identify Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways mediating such imbalance. In embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons, repulsive Ca(2+) signals promote clathrin-mediated endocytosis through a 90 kDa splice variant of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase type-1γ (PIPKIγ90). In contrast, attractive Ca(2+) signals facilitate exocytosis but suppress endocytosis via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) that can inactivate PIPKIγ90. Blocking CaMKII or Cdk5 leads to balanced activation of both exocytosis and endocytosis that causes straight growth cone migration even in the presence of guidance signals, whereas experimentally perturbing the balance restores the growth cone's turning response. Remarkably, the direction of this resumed turning depends on relative activities of exocytosis and endocytosis, but not on the type of guidance signals. Our results suggest that navigating growth cones can be redirected by shifting the imbalance between exocytosis and endocytosis, highlighting the importance of membrane-trafficking imbalance for axon guidance and, possibly, for polarized cell migration in general. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347165-14$15.00/0.

  19. Rab27a regulates GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Johnson, Jennifer Linda; Catz, Sergio D

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil secretory proteins are mediators of systemic inflammation in infection, trauma, and cancer. In response to specific inflammatory mediators, neutrophil granules are mobilized and cargo proteins released to modulate the microenvironment of inflammatory sites and tumors. In particular, GM-CSF, a cytokine secreted by several immune, nonimmune, and tumor cells, regulates neutrophil priming and exocytosis. Whereas a comprehensive understanding of this process is necessary to design appropriate anti-inflammatory therapies, the molecular effectors regulating GM-CSF-dependent priming of neutrophil exocytosis are currently unknown. With the use of neutrophils deficient in the small GTPase Rab27a or its effector Munc13-4, we show that although both of these secretory factors control matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) exocytosis in response to GM-CSF, their involvement in exocytosis after GM-CSF priming is very different. Whereas GM-CSF priming-induced exocytosis is abolished in the absence of Rab27a for all secondary stimuli tested, including TLR7, TLR9, and formyl peptide receptor 1 (Fpr1) ligands, cells lacking Munc13-4 showed a significant exocytic response to GM-CSF priming. The mobilization of CD11b was independent of both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in GM-CSF-primed cells unless the cells were stimulated with nucleic acid-sensing TLR ligand, thus highlighting a role for both Rab27a and Munc13-4 in endocytic TLR maturation. Finally, the observation that the absence of Rab27a expression impairs the exocytosis of MMP-9 and MPO under both primed and unprimed conditions suggests that Rab27a is a possible target for intervention in inflammatory processes in which GM-CSF-dependent neutrophil priming is involved. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Genetically controlled fusion, exocytosis and fission of artificial vesicles-a roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; de Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    were shown to fuse if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium (Nomura et al. 2004). In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we...... enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different...

  1. RIM, Munc13, and Rab3A interplay in acrosomal exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Oscar D.; Zanetti, M. Natalia [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Instituto de Histologia y Embriologia, IHEM (CONICET-UNCuyo), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (Argentina); Laboratorio de Biologia Reproductiva, Instituto de Histologia y Embriologia, IHEM (CONICET-UNCuyo), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (Argentina); Mayorga, Luis S. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Instituto de Histologia y Embriologia, IHEM (CONICET-UNCuyo), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (Argentina); Michaut, Marcela A., E-mail: mmichaut@fcm.uncu.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Biologia Reproductiva, Instituto de Histologia y Embriologia, IHEM (CONICET-UNCuyo), Facultad de Ciencias Medicas (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (5500) (Argentina)

    2012-03-10

    Exocytosis is a highly regulated, multistage process consisting of multiple functionally definable stages, including recruitment, targeting, tethering, priming, and docking of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane, followed by calcium-triggered membrane fusion. The acrosome reaction of spermatozoa is a complex, calcium-dependent regulated exocytosis. Fusion at multiple sites between the outer acrosomal membrane and the cell membrane causes the release of the acrosomal contents and the loss of the membranes surrounding the acrosome. Not much is known about the molecules that mediate membrane docking in this particular fusion model. In neurons, the formation of the ternary RIM/Munc13/Rab3A complex has been suggested as a critical component of synaptic vesicles docking. Previously, we demonstrated that Rab3A localizes to the acrosomal region in human sperm, stimulates acrosomal exocytosis, and participates in an early stage during membrane fusion. Here, we report that RIM and Munc13 are also present in human sperm and localize to the acrosomal region. Like Rab3A, RIM and Munc13 participate in a prefusion step before the efflux of intra-acrosomal calcium. By means of a functional assay using antibodies and recombinant proteins, we show that RIM, Munc13 and Rab3A interplay during acrosomal exocytosis. Finally, we report by electron transmission microscopy that sequestering RIM and Rab3A alters the docking of the acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane during calcium-activated acrosomal exocytosis. Our results suggest that the RIM/Munc13/Rab3 A complex participates in acrosomal exocytosis and that RIM and Rab3A have central roles in membrane docking. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIM and Munc13 are present in human sperm and localize to the acrosomal region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIM and Munc13 are necessary for acrosomal exocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIM and Munc13 participate before the acrosomal calcium efflux. Black

  2. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  3. The Insuline Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido Carrasco, Elizabeth; Servicio de Endocrinología, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Insulin analogues are a new pharmaceutical family, designed to overcome deficiencies that still exist with the rDNA insulin. There are rapid-acting insulin analogues such as lispro insulin and insulin aspart. They avoid postprandial and nocturnal hypoglycemia. There are also intermediate-acting insulin analogues like NPL and Mix 25 (a mixture between NPL and lispro), which join the neutral protamine insulin length of action and the fast onset of the rapid-acting analogue lispro. Finally, ther...

  4. Effect of Cerophyl growth medium on exocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciotta, D M; Satir, B H

    1985-10-01

    Culturing the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila in Cerophyl has provided an opportunity for studying the assembly and/or synthesis of the intramembrane particle array, the rosette, which marks the site of exocytosis in these cells. Cultures grown in this medium cease cell division after only 12h and enter 'stationary phase' earlier (12h of growth) relative to growth in standard medium (proteose peptone). In addition, the cell changes from the normally observed pear-shaped body to a thinner more ellipsoid form. Despite the initial similarities to starving cells, several differences are observed in the Cerophyl-grown cells. One is that cell size remains constant for at least 72h in contrast to starved cells. Secondly, in spite of this block in cell division, results from freeze-fracture replicas of the cell membrane of these cells show that they continue to assemble rosettes, the number of which increases approximately six times, from 0.34 rosette/microgram2 to 2.1 rosettes/microgram2. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (6h exposure), during growth in Cerophyl shows that 70% of rosettes can be assembled, despite the blockage of translation, by using pre-existing component(s) from a pool. The remaining 30% must involve de novo synthesis of one or more components; this percentage can be increased with longer exposure to the drug. Thirdly, an apparent increase in the number of mucocysts is observed by thin-section electron microscopy. At first (12-24h) only docked mucocysts seem to accumulate in the cell. However, by 36h a considerable increase seems to have taken place, particularly in the number of mucocysts located in the cytoplasm. In the cycloheximide-treated cells this increase in mucocysts begins to be blocked after 6h of exposure to the drug. These observations are in agreement with the results obtained from the freeze-fracture data on the concomitant increase in number of rosettes. This system therefore offers the first possibility of

  5. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Ayumi, E-mail: akanno@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Asahara, Shun-ichiro, E-mail: asahara@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Masuda, Katsuhisa, E-mail: katsuhisa.m.0707@gmail.com [Division of Medical Chemistry, Department of Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Matsuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokazu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki, E-mail: koyanagi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Seino, Susumu, E-mail: seino@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular and Metabolic Medicine, Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Ogawa, Wataru, E-mail: ogawa@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kido, Yoshiaki, E-mail: kido@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Medical Chemistry, Department of Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets.

  6. Tracking Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent conformational transitions in syntaxin 1A during exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Barak-Broner, Noa; Berlin, Shai; Oron, Yoram; Chikvashvili, Dodo; Lotan, Ilana

    2013-07-01

    A key issue for understanding exocytosis is elucidating the various protein interactions and the associated conformational transitions underlying soluble N-ethylmeleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein assembly. To monitor dynamic changes in syntaxin 1A (Syx) conformation along exocytosis, we constructed a novel fluorescent Syx-based probe that can be efficiently incorporated within endogenous SNARE complexes, support exocytosis, and report shifts in Syx between 'closed' and 'open' conformations by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. Using this probe we resolve two distinct Syx conformational transitions during membrane depolarization-induced exocytosis in PC12 cells: a partial 'opening' in the absence of Ca(2+) entry and an additional 'opening' upon Ca(2+) entry. The Ca(2+)-dependent transition is abolished upon neutralization of the basic charges in the juxtamembrane regions of Syx, which also impairs exocytosis. These novel findings provide evidence of two conformational transitions in Syx during exocytosis, which have not been reported before: one transition directly induced by depolarization and an additional transition that involves the juxtamembrane region of Syx. The superior sensitivity of our probe also enabled detection of subtle Syx conformational changes upon interaction with VAMP2, which were absolutely dependent on the basic charges of the juxtamembrane region. Hence, our results further suggest that the Ca(2+)-dependent transition in Syx involves zippering between the membrane-proximal juxtamembrane regions of Syx and VAMP2 and support the recently implied existence of this zippering in the final phase of SNARE assembly to catalyze exocytosis.

  7. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  8. Vesicle trafficking dynamics and visualization of zones of exocytosis and endocytosis in tobacco pollen tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonia, L.; Munnik, T.

    2008-01-01

    Pollen tubes are one of the fastest growing eukaryotic cells. Rapid anisotropic growth is supported by highly active exocytosis and endocytosis at the plasma membrane, but the subcellular localization of these sites is unknown. To understand molecular processes involved in pollen tube growth, it is

  9. Lipids Affect the Cryptococcus neoformans-Macrophage Interaction and Promote Nonlytic Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Sabrina J; Fu, Man Shun; Coppens, Isabelle; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    Many microbes exploit host cellular lipid droplets during the host-microbe interaction, but this phenomenon has not been extensively studied for fungal pathogens. In this study, we analyzed the role of lipid droplets during the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with macrophages in the presence and the absence of exogenous lipids, in particular, oleate. The addition of oleic acid increased the frequency of lipid droplets in both C. neoformans and macrophages . C. neoformans responded to oleic acid supplementation by faster growth inside and outside macrophages. Fungal cells were able to harvest lipids from macrophage lipid droplets. Supplementation of C. neoformans and macrophages with oleic acid significantly increased the rate of nonlytic exocytosis while having no effect on lytic exocytosis. The process for lipid modulation of nonlytic exocytosis was associated with actin changes in macrophages. In summary, C. neoformans harvests lipids from macrophages, and the C. neoformans -macrophage interaction is modulated by exogenous lipids, providing a new tool for studying nonlytic exocytosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. A central role for phosphatidic acid as a lipid mediator of regulated exocytosis in apicomplexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Hayley E; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Lipids are commonly known for the structural roles they play, however, the specific contribution of different lipid classes to wide-ranging signalling pathways is progressively being unravelled. Signalling lipids and their associated effector proteins are emerging as significant contributors to a vast array of effector functions within cells, including essential processes such as membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis. Many phospholipids have signalling capacity, however, this review will focus on phosphatidic acid (PA) and the enzymes implicated in its production from diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC): DGK and PLD respectively. PA is a negatively charged, cone-shaped lipid identified as a key mediator in specific membrane fusion and vesicle exocytosis events in a variety of mammalian cells, and has recently been implicated in specialised secretory organelle exocytosis in apicomplexan parasites. This review summarises the recent work implicating a role for PA regulation in exocytosis in various cell types. We will discuss how these signalling events are linked to pathogenesis in the phylum Apicomplexa. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. A Simple Microscopy Assay to Teach the Processes of Phagocytosis and Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ross; Gray, Andrew; Fite, Jessica L.; Jordan, Renee; Stark, Sarah; Naylor, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis and exocytosis are two cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. While it is easy to understand the purpose of these processes, it can be extremely difficult for students to comprehend the actual mechanisms. As membrane dynamics play a significant role in many cellular processes ranging from cell signaling to cell division to…

  12. PI(4,5)P2-binding effector proteins for vesicle exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2014-01-01

    PI(4,5)P2 participates directly in priming and possibly fusion steps of Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis. High concentration nanodomains of PI(4,5)P2 reside on the plasma membrane of neuroendocrine cells. A subset of vesicles that co-localize with PI(4,5)P2 domains appear to undergo preferential exocytosis in stimulated cells. PI(4,5)P2 directly regulates vesicle exocytosis by recruiting and activating PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins that regulate SNARE protein function including CAPS, Munc13-1/2, synaptotagmin-1, and other C2 domain-containing proteins. These PI(4,5)P2 effector proteins are coincidence detectors that engage in multiple interactions at vesicle exocytic sites. The SNARE protein syntaxin-1 also binds to PI(4,5)P2, which promotes clustering, but an activating role for PI(4,5)P2 in syntaxin-1 function remains to be fully characterized. Similar principles underlie polarized constitutive vesicle fusion mediated in part by the PI(4,5)P2-binding subunits of the exocyst complex (Sec3, Exo70). Overall, focal vesicle exocytosis occurs at sites landmarked by PI(4,5)P2, which serves to recruit and/or activate multifunctional PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins. PMID:25280637

  13. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Lysosomal Exocytosis in Astrocytes and Contributes to Astrocyte-mediated Tat Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; He, Johnny J

    2016-10-21

    Tat interaction with astrocytes has been shown to be important for Tat neurotoxicity and HIV/neuroAIDS. We have recently shown that Tat expression leads to increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression and aggregation and activation of unfolded protein response/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity. However, the exact molecular mechanism of astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity is not defined. In this study, we showed that neurotoxic factors other than Tat protein itself were present in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed significantly elevated lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes and plasma membrane-associated proteins in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. We confirmed that Tat expression and infection of pseudotyped HIV.GFP led to increased lysosomal exocytosis from mouse astrocytes and human astrocytes. We found that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was tightly coupled to astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. In addition, we demonstrated that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was astrocyte-specific and required GFAP expression and was mediated by ER stress. Taken together, these results show for the first time that Tat promotes lysosomal exocytosis in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity through GFAP activation and ER stress induction in astrocytes and suggest a common cascade through which aberrant astrocytosis/GFAP up-regulation potentiates neurotoxicity and contributes to neurodegenerative diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. The small chemical vacuolin-1 inhibits Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis but not cell resealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerny, J; Feng, Y; Yu, A; Miyake, K; Borgonovo, B; Klumperman, J; Meldolesi, J; McNeil, PL; Kirchhausen, T

    Resealing after wounding, the process of repair following plasma membrane damage, requires exocytosis. Vacuolins are molecules that induce rapid formation of large, swollen structures derived from endosomes and lysosomes by homotypic fusion combined with uncontrolled fusion of the inner and limiting

  15. PI(4,5)P₂-binding effector proteins for vesicle exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas F J

    2015-06-01

    PI(4,5)P₂participates directly in priming and possibly in fusion steps of Ca²⁺-triggered vesicle exocytosis. High concentration nanodomains of PI(4,5)P₂reside on the plasma membrane of neuroendocrine cells. A subset of vesicles that co-localize with PI(4,5)P₂ domains appear to undergo preferential exocytosis in stimulated cells. PI(4,5)P₂directly regulates vesicle exocytosis by recruiting and activating PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins that regulate SNARE protein function including CAPS, Munc13-1/2, synaptotagmin-1, and other C2 domain-containing proteins. These PI(4,5)P₂effector proteins are coincidence detectors that engage in multiple interactions at vesicle exocytic sites. The SNARE protein syntaxin-1 also binds to PI(4,5)P₂, which promotes clustering, but an activating role for PI(4,5)P₂in syntaxin-1 function remains to be fully characterized. Similar principles underlie polarized constitutive vesicle fusion mediated in part by the PI(4,5)P₂-binding subunits of the exocyst complex (Sec3, Exo70). Overall, focal vesicle exocytosis occurs at sites landmarked by PI(4,5)P2, which serves to recruit and/or activate multifunctional PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phosphoinositides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid stimulates hepatocellular exocytosis and mobilizes extracellular Ca++ mechanisms defective in cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; NATHANSON, M. H.; Isales, C. M.; Boyer, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    To assess the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on bile excretory function, we examined whether TUDCA modulates vesicular exocytosis in the isolated perfused liver of normal rats in the presence of high (1.9 mM) or low (0.19 mM) extracellular Ca++ and in cholestatic rats 24 h after bile

  17. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Lysosomal Exocytosis in Astrocytes and Contributes to Astrocyte-mediated Tat Neurotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Tat interaction with astrocytes has been shown to be important for Tat neurotoxicity and HIV/neuroAIDS. We have recently shown that Tat expression leads to increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression and aggregation and activation of unfolded protein response/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity. However, the exact molecular mechanism of astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity is not defined. In this study, we showed that neurotoxic factors other than Tat protein itself were present in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed significantly elevated lysosomal hydrolytic enzymes and plasma membrane-associated proteins in the supernatant of Tat-expressing astrocytes. We confirmed that Tat expression and infection of pseudotyped HIV.GFP led to increased lysosomal exocytosis from mouse astrocytes and human astrocytes. We found that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was tightly coupled to astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. In addition, we demonstrated that Tat-induced lysosomal exocytosis was astrocyte-specific and required GFAP expression and was mediated by ER stress. Taken together, these results show for the first time that Tat promotes lysosomal exocytosis in astrocytes and causes neurotoxicity through GFAP activation and ER stress induction in astrocytes and suggest a common cascade through which aberrant astrocytosis/GFAP up-regulation potentiates neurotoxicity and contributes to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27609518

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Alexey M; Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F; Yakovleva, Anastasia A; Zefirov, Andrei L

    2015-01-02

    Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Munc18-1 Controls SNARE Protein Complex Assembly during Human Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Zanetti, M. Natalia; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2012-01-01

    The spermatozoon is a very specialized cell capable of carrying out a limited set of functions with high efficiency. Sperm are then excellent model cells to dissect fundamental processes such as regulated exocytosis. The secretion of the single dense-core granule of mammalian spermatozoa relies on the same highly conserved molecules and goes through the same stages as exocytosis in other types of cells. In this study, we describe the presence of Munc18-1 in human sperm and show that this protein has an essential role in acrosomal exocytosis. We observed that inactivation of endogenous Munc18-1 with a specific antibody precluded the stabilization of trans-SNARE complexes and inhibited acrosomal exocytosis. Addition of recombinant Munc18-1 blocked secretion by sequestering monomeric syntaxin, an effect that was rescued by α-soluble NSF attachment protein. By electron microscopy, we observed that both the anti-Munc18-1 antibody and recombinant Munc18-1 inhibited the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results indicate that Munc18-1 plays a key role in the dynamics of trans-SNARE complex assembly and/or stabilization, a process that is necessary for the docking of the outer acrosomal membrane to the plasma membrane and subsequent fusion pore opening. PMID:23091057

  20. Intracellular trafficking and exocytosis of a multi-component siRNA nanocomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ravi S; Jain, Akshay; Zhao, Zhen; Cheng, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Despite the importance of siRNA delivery systems, understanding of their intracellular fate remains elusive. We recently developed a multi-component siRNA nanocomplex to deliver siRNA to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The objective of this study is to study post-internalization trafficking of this siRNA nanocomplex and its multiple components like siRNA, protamine, and streptavidin, in HSCs. After internalization, the nanocomplex entrapped in early endosomes undergoes three possible routes including endosomal escape, exocytosis, and entrapment in lysosomes. Significant amount of siRNA dissociates from the nanocomplex to exert silencing activity. After escaping from endosomes, protamine dissociates from the nanocomplex and stays inside the cytoplasm. Golgi complex plays an important role in exocytosis of the nanocomplex. We also demonstrate that exocytosis is one of the major reasons accounting for the transient silencing activity of nonviral siRNA delivery. Incorporation of exocytosis inhibitors in nonviral siRNA delivery systems may extend the silencing activity of siRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Secretory granules are recaptured largely intact after stimulated exocytosis in cultured endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraska, Justin W; Perrais, David; Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nagamatsu, Shinya; Almers, Wolfhard

    2003-02-18

    Classical cell biology teaches that exocytosis causes the membrane of exocytic vesicles to disperse into the cell surface and that a cell must later retrieve by molecular sorting whatever membrane components it wishes to keep inside. We have tested whether this view applies to secretory granules in intact PC-12 cells. Three granule proteins were labeled with fluorescent proteins in different colors, and two-color evanescent-field microscopy was used to view single granules during and after exocytosis. Whereas neuro-peptide Y was lost from granules in seconds, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and the membrane protein phogrin remained at the granule site for over 1 min, thus providing markers for postexocytic granules. When tPA was imaged simultaneously with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) as a cytosolic marker, the volume occupied by the granule appeared as a dark spot where it excluded CFP. The spot remained even after tPA reported exocytosis, indicating that granules failed to flatten into the cell surface. Phogrin was labeled with GFP at its luminal end and used to sense the pH in granules. When exocytosis caused the acidic granule interior to neutralize, GFP-phogrin at first brightened and later dimmed again as the interior separated from the extracellular space and reacidified. Reacidification and dimming could be reversed by application of NH(4)Cl. We conclude that most granules reseal in <10 s after releasing cargo, and that these empty or partially empty granules are recaptured otherwise intact.

  2. Phosphorylation of SNAP-23 regulates its dynamic membrane association during mast cell exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Pieu; Puri, Niti

    2017-09-15

    Upon allergen challenge, mast cells (MCs) respond by releasing pre-stored mediators from their secretory granules by the transient mechanism of porosome-mediated cell secretion. The target SNARE SNAP-23 has been shown to be important for MC exocytosis, and our previous studies revealed the presence of one basal (Thr 102 ) and two induced (Ser 95 and Ser 120 ) phosphorylation sites in its linker region. To study the role of SNAP-23 phosphorylation in the regulation of exocytosis, green fluorescence protein-tagged wild-type SNAP-23 (GFP-SNAP-23) and its phosphorylation mutants were transfected into rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) MCs. Studies on GFP-SNAP-23 transfected MCs revealed some dynamic changes in SNAP-23 membrane association. SNAP-23 was associated with plasma membrane in resting MCs, however, on activation a portion of it translocated to cytosol and internal membranes. These internal locations were secretory granule membranes. This dynamic change in the membrane association of SNAP-23 in MCs may be important for mediating internal granule-granule fusions in compound exocytosis. Further studies with SNAP-23 phosphorylation mutants revealed an important role for the phosphorylation at Thr 102 in its initial membrane association, and of induced phosphorylation at Ser 95 and Ser 120 in its internal membrane association, during MC exocytosis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Survey of Red Fluorescence Proteins as Markers for Secretory Granule Exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R Gandasi

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins (FPs have proven to be valuable tools for high-resolution imaging studies of vesicle transport processes, including exo- and endocytosis. Since the pH of the vesicle lumen changes between acidic and neutral during these events, pH-sensitive FPs with near neutral pKa, such as pHluorin, are particularly useful. FPs with pKa>6 are readily available in the green spectrum, while red-emitting pH-sensitive FPs are rare and often not well characterized as reporters of exo- or endocytosis. Here we tested a panel of ten orange/red and two green FPs in fusions with neuropeptide Y (NPY for use as secreted vesicle marker and reporter of dense core granule exocytosis and release. We report relative brightness, bleaching rate, targeting accuracy, sensitivity to vesicle pH, and their performance in detecting exocytosis in live cells. Tandem dimer (td-mOrange2 was identified as well-targeted, bright, slowly bleaching and pH-sensitive FP that performed similar to EGFP. Single exocytosis events were readily observed, which allowed measurements of fusion pore lifetime and the dynamics of the exocytosis protein syntaxin at the release site during membrane fusion and cargo release.

  4. Characterization of endocytosis and exocytosis of cationic nanoparticles in airway epithelium cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombu, Christophe Youta; Kroubi, Maya; Zibouche, Rima; Matran, Regis; Betbeder, Didier, E-mail: dbetbeder@aol.com [EA 4483, IFR 114, Laboratoire de Physiologie, Faculte de Medecine Pole Recherche, Universite de Lille 2, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex (France)

    2010-09-03

    A major challenge of drug delivery using colloids via the airway is to understand the mechanism implied in their interactions with epithelial cells. The purpose of this work was to characterize the process of endocytosis and exocytosis of cationic nanoparticles (NPs) made of maltodextrin which were developed as a delivery system for antigens in vaccine applications. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that these NP are rapidly endocytosed after as little as 3 min incubation, and that the endocytosis was also faster than NP binding since most of the NPs were found in the middle of the cells around the nuclei. A saturation limit was observed after a 40 min incubation, probably due to an equilibrium becoming established between endocytosis and exocytosis. Endocytosis was dramatically reduced at 4 deg. C compared with 37 deg. C, or by NaN{sub 3} treatment, both results suggesting an energy dependent process. Protamine pretreatment of the cells inhibited NPs uptake and we found that clathrin pathway is implied in their endocytosis. Cholesterol depletion increased NP uptake by 300% and this phenomenon was explained by the fact that cholesterol depletion totally blocked NP exocytosis. These results suggest that these cationic NPs interact with anionic sites, are quickly endocytosed via the clathrin pathway and that their exocytosis is cholesterol dependent, and are similar to those obtained in other studies with viruses such as influenza.

  5. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, C.; Brown, M.Q.; van de Ven, W.; Zhang, Z.M.; Wu, B.; Young, M.C.; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, D.; Harrison, R.; Pan, S.Q.; Luo, N.; Huang, Y.M.M.; Ghang, Y.J.; Ung, N.; Li, R.X.; Isley, J.; Morikis, D.; Song, J.K.; Guo, W.; Hooley, R.J.; Chang, C.E.A.; Yang, Z.B.; Žárský, Viktor; Muday, G.K.; Hicks, G.R.; Raikhel, N.V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2016), E41-E50 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : endosidin2 * exocytosis * exocyst Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.661, year: 2016

  6. A simple microscopy assay to teach the processes of phagocytosis and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ross; Gray, Andrew; Fite, Jessica L; Jordan, Renée; Stark, Sarah; Naylor, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis and exocytosis are two cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. While it is easy to understand the purpose of these processes, it can be extremely difficult for students to comprehend the actual mechanisms. As membrane dynamics play a significant role in many cellular processes ranging from cell signaling to cell division to organelle renewal and maintenance, we felt that we needed to do a better job of teaching these types of processes. Thus, we developed a classroom-based protocol to simultaneously study phagocytosis and exocytosis in Tetrahymena pyriformis. In this paper, we present our results demonstrating that our undergraduate classroom experiment delivers results comparable with those acquired in a professional research laboratory. In addition, students performing the experiment do learn the mechanisms of phagocytosis and exocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate a mathematical exercise to help the students apply their data to the cell. Ultimately, this assay sets the stage for future inquiry-based experiments, in which the students develop their own experimental questions and delve deeper into the mechanisms of phagocytosis and exocytosis.

  7. Single cell amperometry reveals curcuminoids modulate the release of neurotransmitters during exocytosis from PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchan; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-11-15

    We used single cell amperometry to examine whether curcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), substances that are suggested to affect learning and memory, can modulate monoamine release from PC12 cells. Our results indicate both curcumin and BDMC need long-term treatment (72 h in this study) to influence exocytosis effectively. By analyzing the parameters calculated from single exocytosis events, it can be concluded that curcumin and BDMC affect exocytosis through different mechanisms. Curcumin accelerates the event dynamics with no significant change of the monoamine amount released from single exocytotic events, whereas BDMC attenuates the amount from single exocytotic event with no significant change of the event dynamics. This comparison of the effect of curcumin and BDMC on exocytosis at the single cell level brings insight into their different mechanisms, which might lead to different biological actions. The effect of curcumin and BDMC on the opening and closing of the exocytotic fusion pore were also investigated. These results might be helpful for understanding the improvement of learning and memory and the anti-depression properties of curcuminoids.

  8. Caffeine intake improves fructose-induced hypertension and insulin resistance by enhancing central insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tung-Chen; Liu, Chun-Peng; Cheng, Wen-Han; Chen, Bo-Rong; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Ho, Wen-Yu; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Liou, Jau-Cheng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2014-03-01

    Recent clinical studies found that fructose intake leads to insulin resistance and hypertension. Fructose consumption promotes protein fructosylation and formation of superoxide. In a previous study, we revealed that inhibition of superoxide production in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) reduces blood pressure. Caffeine displays significant antioxidant ability in protecting membranes against oxidative damage and can lower the risk of insulin resistance. However, the mechanism through which caffeine improves fructose-induced insulin resistance is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine consumption can abolish superoxide generation to enhance insulin signaling in the NTS, thereby reducing blood pressure in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Treatment with caffeine for 4 weeks decreased blood pressure, serum fasting glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and triglyceride levels and increased the serum direct high-density lipoprotein level in fructose-fed rats but not in control rats. Caffeine treatment resulted in the recovery of fructose-induced decrease in nitric oxide production in the NTS. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses further showed that caffeine reduced the fructose-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1(S307)) and reversed Akt(S473) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Similarly, caffeine was able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease insulin levels in the NTS evoked by fructose. Caffeine intake also reduced the production of superoxide and expression of receptor of advanced glycation end product in the NTS. These results suggest that caffeine may enhance insulin receptor substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling to decrease blood pressure by abolishing superoxide production in the NTS.

  9. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  10. Evoked cavernous activity: neuroanatomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Vicars, B; Yang, C C

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the autonomic innervation of the penis by using evoked cavernous activity (ECA). We recruited seven men with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) and sexual dysfunction, and six men who were scheduled to have pelvic surgery (PS), specifically non-nerve-sparing radical cystoprostatectomy. In the PS patients, ECA was performed both pre- and postoperatively. The left median nerve was electrically stimulated and ECA was recorded with two concentric electromyography needles placed into the right and left cavernous bodies. We simultaneously recorded hand and foot sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) as controls. In the SCI group, all but one patient had reproducible hand SSRs. None of these patients had ECA or foot SSRs. All the PS patients had reproducible ECA and SSRs, both preoperatively and postoperatively. There was no difference in the latency and amplitude measurements of ECA and SSRs in the postoperative compared with that of the pre-operative period (P>0.05). In conclusion, ECA is absent in men with SCI above the sympathetic outflow to the genitalia. In men, after radical pelvic surgery, ECA is preserved, indicating the preservation of sympathetic fibers.

  11. CAPS and Munc13 utilize distinct PIP2-linked mechanisms to promote vesicle exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabachinski, Greg; Yamaga, Masaki; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Bruinsma, Stephen; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides provide compartment-specific signals for membrane trafficking. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis, but whether vesicles fuse into PIP2-rich membrane domains in live cells and whether PIP2 is metabolized during Ca2+-triggered fusion were unknown. Ca2+-dependent activator protein in secretion 1 (CAPS-1; CADPS/UNC31) and ubMunc13-2 (UNC13B) are PIP2-binding proteins required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine PC12 cells. These proteins are likely effectors for PIP2, but their localization during exocytosis had not been determined. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live cells, we identify PIP2-rich membrane domains at sites of vesicle fusion. CAPS is found to reside on vesicles but depends on plasma membrane PIP2 for its activity. Munc13 is cytoplasmic, but Ca2+-dependent translocation to PIP2-rich plasma membrane domains is required for its activity. The results reveal that vesicle fusion into PIP2-rich membrane domains is facilitated by sequential PIP2-dependent activation of CAPS and PIP2-dependent recruitment of Munc13. PIP2 hydrolysis only occurs under strong Ca2+ influx conditions sufficient to activate phospholipase Cη2 (PLCη2). Such conditions reduce CAPS activity and enhance Munc13 activity, establishing PLCη2 as a Ca2+-dependent modulator of exocytosis. These studies provide a direct view of the spatial distribution of PIP2 linked to vesicle exocytosis via regulation of lipid-dependent protein effectors CAPS and Munc13. PMID:24356451

  12. ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) Machinery Is Essential for Acrosomal Exocytosis in Human Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocognoni, Cristian A; Berberián, María Victoria; Mayorga, Luis S

    2015-11-01

    The sperm acrosome reaction is a unique, regulated exocytosis characterized by the secretion of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal and plasma membranes. In previous reports, we have shown that inward invaginations of the acrosomal membrane delineate ring-shaped membrane microdomains that contact the plasma membrane. We have postulated that the opening and expansion of fusion pores along these rings trigger acrosomal exocytosis. The invaginations of the acrosomal membrane topologically resemble the deformations of the endosomal membrane leading to the assembly of luminal vesicles in multivesicular bodies. In fact, intra-acrosomal vesicles are also formed during acrosomal exocytosis. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) participates in the organization of membrane microdomains that are invaginated and released as intraluminal vesicles in endosomes. We report here that members of ESCRT I (TSG101), ESCRT III (CHMP4), and the AAA ATPase VPS4 are present in the acrosomal region of the human sperm. Perturbing the function of these factors with antibodies or recombinant proteins inhibited acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized cells. A similar effect was observed with a dominant-negative mutant of VPS4A cross-linked to a cell-penetrating peptide in nonpermeabilized sperm stimulated with a calcium ionophore. When the function of ESCRTs was inhibited, acrosomes showed abnormal deformation of the acrosomal membrane, and SNARE proteins that participate in acrosomal exocytosis failed to be stabilized in neurotoxin-resistant complexes. However, the growing of membrane invaginations was not blocked, and numerous intra-acrosomal vesicles were observed. These observations indicate that ESCRT-mediated processes are essential for acrosomal secretion, implicating these multifunctional complexes in an exocytic event crucial for sperm-egg fusion. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  13. Rapid exocytosis and endocytosis in nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S F; Jackson, M B

    1996-07-15

    1. Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis and endocytosis were studied by measuring the membrane capacitance of voltage-clamped peptidergic nerve terminals in slices prepared from the rat posterior pituitary. 2. Depolarizing pulses produced rapid increases in capacitance. These increases varied in parallel with Ca2+ current as voltage was varied. Elimination of Ca2+ current blocked depolarization-induced capacitance changes. 3. Depolarization-induced capacitance changes increased with pulse duration. Capacitance changes also increased with integrated Ca2+ influx, but saturated at high levels of Ca2+ entry. This saturation allowed us to estimate a pool size of 190 vesicles, assuming each vesicle has a capacitance of 1 fF. Vesicles from this pool fused with a time constant of 0.43 s. The capacitance change increased with the first power of integrated Ca2+ influx. 4. Experiments with briefer pulses revealed a rapid component of exocytosis comprising a pool of forty vesicles that fuse with a time constant of 14 ms. This rapid process may reflect a final Ca(2+)-regulated triggering step, which is distinct from the slower kinetic step revealed by longer duration pulses. The slower step may reflect a priming of vesicles prior to exocytosis. 5. Depolarization-induced capacitance increases in most cases were followed by a rapid decay in capacitance, reflecting membrane reuptake tightly coupled to exocytosis. A variable amount of rapid endocytosis followed depolarization-induced capacitance increases. The time constant for rapid endocytosis to baseline was 0.44 s. Excess endocytosis was occasionally observed, with capacitance decaying below the pre-stimulus baseline with a time constant of 2.1 s. 6. Rapid endocytosis was slower after pulses that produced greater increases in intracellular Ca2+, consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular Ca2+ inhibits rapid endocytosis. 7. Exocytosis follows depolarization with no detectable delay, indicating that Ca2+ triggers neuropeptide

  14. rab3 mediates cortical granule exocytosis in the sea urchin egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, S; Wessel, G M

    1998-11-15

    Egg activation at fertilization in the sea urchin results in the exocytosis of approximately 15,000 cortical granules that are docked at the plasma membrane. Previously, we reported that several integral membrane proteins modeled in the SNARE hypothesis, synaptotagmin, VAMP, and syntaxin, in addition to a small GTPase of the ras superfamily, rab3, were present on cortical granules (Conner, S., Leaf, D., and Wessel, G., Mol. Reprod. Dev. 48, 1-13, 1997). Here we report that rab3 is associated with cortical granules throughout oogenesis, during cortical granule translocation, and while docked at the egg plasma membrane. Following cortical granule exocytosis, however, rab3 reassociates with a different population of vesicles, at least some of which are of endocytic origin. Because of its selective association with cortical granules in eggs and oocytes, we hypothesize that rab3 functions in cortical granule exocytosis. To test this hypothesis, we used a strategy of interfering with rab3 function by peptide competition with its effector domain, a conserved region within specific rab types. We first identified the effector domain sequence in Lytechinus variegatus eggs and find the sequence 94% identical to the effector domain of rab3 in Stronglocentrotus purpuratus. Then, with synthetic peptides to different regions of the rab3 protein, we find that cortical granule exocytosis is inhibited in eggs injected with effector domain peptides, but not with peptides from the hypervariable region or with a scrambled effector peptide. Additionally, effector-peptide-injected eggs injected with IP3 are blocked in their ability to exocytose cortical granules, suggesting that the inhibition is directly on the membrane fusion event and not the result of interference with the signal transduction mechanism leading to calcium release. We interpret these results to mean that rab3 functions in the regulation of cortical granule exocytosis following vesicle docking. Copyright 1998 Academic

  15. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... with IR independent of weight gain. In conclusion, the data presented in the current thesis, supported by a thorough review of available literature, advocate that 1) Inflammation is a triggering event fueling IR; 2) Commensal microbes can, when mistreated, aggravate IR and glucose intolerance; and 3) Diet...

  16. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  17. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    de Luca, Carl; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the Metabolic syndrome. In this review, we focus on the interconnection between obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause insulin resistance in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver by inhibiting insulin signal transduction. The sources of cytokines in insulin resistant states are the insulin target tissue themselves, primarily fat and liver, but t...

  18. Evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Komantsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the neurophysiological study in which 95 children with viral encephalitis and 30 children with meningitis (age from 2 up to 17 years undergo evoked potentials investigation. Some specific features of evoked potentials in neuroinfections have been shown to correlate with the course of disease and the age of the patients. We give a description of a logistic model of predicting outcomes in such patients by complex diagnostic method. We have found that evoked potentials may be successfully implemented in correcting the therapeutic strategies. Study of evoked potentials in neuroinfections in children can define the severity and extent of lesions and help to identify subclinical dysfunction and monitor the recovery processes under the therapy.

  19. Visual Evoked Potentials in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Boston Children's Hospital recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice and in 34 girls with Rett syndrome (RTT.

  20. A subcellular model of glucose-stimulated pancreatic insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Corradin, Alberto; Toffolo, Gianna M; Cobelli, Claudio

    2008-10-13

    When glucose is raised from a basal to stimulating level, the pancreatic islets respond with a typical biphasic insulin secretion pattern. Moreover, the pancreas is able to recognize the rate of change of the glucose concentration. We present a relatively simple model of insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, yet founded on solid physiological grounds and capable of reproducing a series of secretion patterns from perfused pancreases as well as from stimulated islets. The model includes the notion of distinct pools of granules as well as mechanisms such as mobilization, priming, exocytosis and kiss-and-run. Based on experimental data, we suggest that the individual beta-cells activate at different glucose concentrations. The model reproduces most of the data it was tested against very well, and can therefore serve as a general model of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Simulations predict that the effect of an increased frequency of kiss-and-run exocytotic events is a reduction in insulin secretion without modification of the qualitative pattern. Our model also appears to be the first physiology-based one to reproduce the staircase experiment, which underlies 'derivative control', i.e. the pancreatic capacity of measuring the rate of change of the glucose concentration.

  1. Deconstructing complexin function in activating and clamping Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by comparing knockout and knockdown phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Cao, Peng; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-12-17

    Complexin, a presynaptic protein that avidly binds to assembled SNARE complexes, is widely acknowledged to activate Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. In addition, studies of invertebrate complexin mutants and of mouse neurons with a double knockdown (DKD) of complexin-1 and -2 suggested that complexin maintains the readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles and clamps spontaneous exocytosis. In contrast, studies of mouse neurons with a double knockout (DKO) of complexin-1 and -2, largely carried out in hippocampal autapses, did not detect changes in the RRP size or in spontaneous exocytosis. To clarify complexin function, we here directly compared in two different preparations, cultured cortical and olfactory bulb neurons, the phenotypes of complexin DKD and DKO neurons. We find that complexin-deficient DKD and DKO neurons invariably exhibit a ~50% decrease in vesicle priming. Moreover, the DKD consistently increased spontaneous exocytosis, but the DKO did so in cortical but not olfactory bulb neurons. Furthermore, the complexin DKD but not the complexin DKO caused a compensatory increase in complexin-3 and -4 mRNA levels; overexpression of complexin-3 but not complexin-1 increased spontaneous exocytosis. Complexin-3 but not complexin-1 contains a C-terminal lipid anchor attaching it to the plasma membrane; addition of a similar lipid anchor to complexin-1 converted complexin-1 from a clamp into an activator of spontaneous exocytosis. Viewed together, our data suggest that complexin generally functions in priming and Ca(2+) triggering of exocytosis, and additionally contributes to the control of spontaneous exocytosis dependent on the developmental history of a neuron and on the subcellular localization of the complexin.

  2. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  3. Rab3A, a possible marker of cortical granules, participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Oscar Daniel; Cappa, Andrea Isabel; de Paola, Matilde; Zanetti, María Natalia; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Fissore, Rafael A; Mayorga, Luis S; Michaut, Marcela A

    2016-09-10

    Fusion of cortical granules with the oocyte plasma membrane is the most significant event to prevent polyspermy. This particular exocytosis, also known as cortical reaction, is regulated by calcium and its molecular mechanism is still not known. Rab3A, a member of the small GTP-binding protein superfamily, has been implicated in calcium-dependent exocytosis and is not yet clear whether Rab3A participates in cortical granules exocytosis. Here, we examine the involvement of Rab3A in the physiology of cortical granules, particularly, in their distribution during oocyte maturation and activation, and their participation in membrane fusion during cortical granule exocytosis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed that Rab3A and cortical granules have a similar migration pattern during oocyte maturation, and that Rab3A is no longer detected after cortical granule exocytosis. These results suggested that Rab3A might be a marker of cortical granules. Overexpression of EGFP-Rab3A colocalized with cortical granules with a Pearson correlation coefficient of +0.967, indicating that Rab3A and cortical granules have almost a perfect colocalization in the egg cortical region. Using a functional assay, we demonstrated that microinjection of recombinant, prenylated and active GST-Rab3A triggered cortical granule exocytosis, indicating that Rab3A has an active role in this secretory pathway. To confirm this active role, we inhibited the function of endogenous Rab3A by microinjecting a polyclonal antibody raised against Rab3A prior to parthenogenetic activation. Our results showed that Rab3A antibody microinjection abolished cortical granule exocytosis in parthenogenetically activated oocytes. Altogether, our findings confirm that Rab3A might function as a marker of cortical granules and participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrative function of adrenaline receptors for glucagon-like peptide-1 exocytosis in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kazuki; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Adrenaline reacts with three types of adrenergic receptors, α1, α2 and β-adrenergic receptors (ARs), inducing many physiological events including exocytosis. Although adrenaline has been shown to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism by which adrenaline regulates GLP-1 secretion remains unknown. Here we show by live cell imaging that all types of adrenergic receptors are stimulated by adrenaline in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag cells and are involved in GLP-1 exocytosis. We performed RT-PCR analysis and found that α1B-, α2A-, α2B-, and β1-ARs were expressed in GLUTag cells. Application of adrenaline induced a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP concentration ([Ca(2+)]i and [cAMP]i, respectively), and GLP-1 exocytosis in GLUTag cells. Blockade of α1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase and exocytosis but not [cAMP]i increase, while blockade of β1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis but not [Ca(2+)]i increase. Furthermore, overexpression of α2A-AR suppressed the adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis. These results suggest that the fine-turning of GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells is established by the balance between α1-, α2-, and β-ARs activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MID2 can substitute for MID1 and control exocytosis of lytic granules in cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana; Levring, Trine B; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    We have recently shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase midline 1 (MID1) is upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL), where it controls exocytosis of lytic granules and the killing capacity. Accordingly, CTL from MID1 knock-out (MID1(-/-)) mice have a 25-30% reduction in exocytosis of lytic granules and cytotoxicity compared to CTL from wild-type (WT) mice. We wondered why the MID1 gene knock-out did not affect exocytosis and cytotoxicity more severely and speculated whether MID2, a close homologue of MID1, might partially compensate for the loss of MID1 in MID1(-/-) CTL. Here, we showed that MID2, like MID1, is upregulated in activated murine T cells. Furthermore, MID1(-/-) CTL upregulated MID2 two-twenty-fold stronger than CTL from WT mice, suggesting that MID2 might compensate for MID1. In agreement, transfection of MID2 into MID1(-/-) CTL completely rescued exocytosis of lytic granules in MID1(-/-) CTL, and vice versa, knock-down of MID2 inhibited exocytosis of lytic granules in both WT and MID1(-/-) CTL, demonstrating that both MID1 and MID2 play a central role in the regulation of granule exocytosis and that functional redundancy exists between MID1 and MID2 in CTL. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Evidence for lysosomal exocytosis and release of aggrecan-degrading hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Bastow

    2012-02-01

    The abundant proteoglycan, aggrecan, is resorbed from growth plate cartilage during endochondral bone ossification, yet mice with genetically-ablated aggrecan-degrading activity have no defects in bone formation. To account for this apparent anomaly, we propose that lysosomal hydrolases degrade extracellular, hyaluronan-bound aggrecan aggregates in growth plate cartilage, and that lysosomal hydrolases are released from hypertrophic chondrocytes into growth plate cartilage via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. In this study we confirm that hypertrophic chondrocytes release hydrolases via lysosomal exocytosis in vitro and we show in vivo evidence for lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes during skeletal development. We show that lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 is detected at the cell surface following in vitro treatment of epiphyseal chondrocytes with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Furthermore, we show that in addition to the lysosomal exocytosis markers, cathepsin D and β-hexosaminidase, ionomycin induces release of aggrecan- and hyaluronan-degrading activity from cultured epiphyseal chondrocytes. We identify VAMP-8 and VAMP7 as v-SNARE proteins with potential roles in lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes, based on their colocalisation with LAMP1 at the cell surface in secondary ossification centers in mouse tibiae. We propose that resorbing growth plate cartilage involves release of destructive hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, via lysosomal exocytosis.

  7. [Adverse reactions to insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñana, J J; Montoro, F J; Hernández, M D; Basomba, A

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of allergic reactions to insuline has decreased during the last few years. Probably this is due to the use of the newly-developed recombinant human insuline. At present, adverse reactions to insuline occur in 5-10% of patients on therapy with insuline. Adverse reactions may be local (more frequent) or systemic (rare). Insuline resistance consists in a different type of immunological reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to insuline is based on clinical history and cutaneous and serological tests. Treatment depends upon the severity of the reaction. When insuline is indispensable despite a previous allergic reaction, a desensitization protocol may be implemented.

  8. Amperometric post spike feet reveal most exocytosis is via extended kiss-and-run fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellander, Lisa J.; Trouillon, Raphaël; Svensson, Maria I.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    2012-11-01

    The basis for communication between nerve cells lies in the process of exocytosis, the fusion of neurotransmitter filled vesicles with the cell membrane resulting in release of the signaling molecules. Even though much is known about this process, the extent that the vesicles are emptied upon fusion is a topic that is being debated. We have analyzed amperometric peaks corresponding to release at PC12 cells and find stable plateau currents during the decay of peaks, indicating closing of the vesicle after incomplete release of its content. Using lipid incubations to alter the amount of transmitter released we were able to estimate the initial vesicular content, and from that, the fraction of release. We propose a process for most exocytosis events where the vesicle partially opens to release transmitter and then closes directly again, leaving the possibility for regulation of transmission within events.

  9. Captivating New Roles of F-Actin Cortex in Exocytosis and Bulk Endocytosis in Neurosecretory Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Frédéric A; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2016-09-01

    The cortical actin network is a tight array of filaments located beneath the plasma membrane. In neurosecretory cells, secretory vesicles are recruited on this network via a small insert isoform of myosin VI in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Upon secretagogue stimulation, myosin II mediates a relaxation of the actin network leading to synchronous translocation of bound or caged vesicles to the plasma membrane where they undergo exocytosis. F-actin is also recruited to secretory sites, where structural changes are detected immediately preceding and following exocytic events. Here we examine the mechanism underpinning the astonishing multifunctionality of this network in the various stages of vesicular exocytosis and compensatory bulk endocytosis. We propose a theoretical framework incorporating critical roles of the actin network in coupling these processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exocytosis for endosymbiosis: membrane trafficking pathways for development of symbiotic membrane compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Maria J; Ivanov, Sergey

    2017-08-01

    During endosymbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi or rhizobial bacteria, the microbial symbionts are housed within membrane-bound compartments in root cortex or nodule cells respectively. Their development involves polarized deposition of membrane around the symbionts as they enter the cells and the membranes show functional specialization, including transporters that mediate nutrient transfer between host and symbiont. The cellular changes associated with development of these compartments point to membrane deposition via exocytosis and over the past few years, researchers have uncovered several proteins within the exocytotic pathway that are required for development of endosymbiotic membrane compartments. The emerging theme is that unique membrane trafficking homologs or splice variants have evolved to enable exocytosis during endosymbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DMSO Chemically Alters Cell Membranes to Slow Exocytosis and Increase the Fraction of Partial Transmitter Released.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Soodabeh; Najafinobar, Neda; Dunevall, Johan; Lovric, Jelena; Ewing, Andrew G

    2017-10-05

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is frequently used as a solvent in biological studies and as a vehicle for drug therapy; but the side effects of DMSO, especially on the cell environment, are not well understood, and controls with DMSO are not neutral at higher concentrations. Herein, electrochemical measurement techniques are applied to show that DMSO increases exocytotic neurotransmitter release, while leaving vesicular contents unchanged. In addition, the kinetics of release from DMSO-treated cells are faster than that of untreated ones. The results suggest that DMSO has a significant influence on the chemistry of the cell membrane, leading to alteration of exocytosis. A speculative chemical mechanism of the effect on the fusion pore during exocytosis is presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Linking cortical microtubule attachment and exocytosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Noordstra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process whereby secreted molecules are packaged into vesicles that move along cytoskeletal filaments and fuse with the plasma membrane. To function optimally, cells are strongly dependent on precisely controlled delivery of exocytotic cargo. In mammalian cells, microtubules serve as major tracks for vesicle transport by motor proteins, and thus microtubule organization is important for targeted delivery of secretory carriers. Over the years, multiple microtubule-associated and cortical proteins have been discovered that facilitate the interaction between the microtubule plus ends and the cell cortex. In this review, we focus on mammalian protein complexes that have been shown to participate in both cortical microtubule capture and exocytosis, thereby regulating the spatial organization of secretion. These complexes include microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, scaffolding factors, actin-binding proteins, and components of vesicle docking machinery, which together allow efficient coordination of cargo transport and release.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms for the Coupling of Endocytosis to Exocytosis in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenli; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Chai, Zuying; Kang, Xinjiang; Wang, Changhe

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal communication and brain function mainly depend on the fundamental biological events of neurotransmission, including the exocytosis of presynaptic vesicles (SVs) for neurotransmitter release and the subsequent endocytosis for SV retrieval. Neurotransmitters are released through the Ca2+- and SNARE-dependent fusion of SVs with the presynaptic plasma membrane. Following exocytosis, endocytosis occurs immediately to retrieve SV membrane and fusion machinery for local recycling and thus maintain the homeostasis of synaptic structure and sustained neurotransmission. Apart from the general endocytic machinery, recent studies have also revealed the involvement of SNARE proteins (synaptobrevin, SNAP25 and syntaxin), synaptophysin, Ca2+/calmodulin, and members of the synaptotagmin protein family (Syt1, Syt4, Syt7 and Syt11) in the balance and tight coupling of exo-endocytosis in neurons. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding how these neuron-specific adaptors coordinate to ensure precise and efficient endocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:28348516

  14. Hypotonicity-induced Renin exocytosis from juxtaglomerular cells requires aquaporin-1 and cyclooxygenase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Madsen, Kirsten; Svenningsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism by which extracellular hypotonicity stimulates release of renin from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is unknown. We hypothesized that osmotically induced renin release depends on water movement through aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channels and subsequent prostanoid formation. We recorded...... membrane capacitance (C(m)) by whole-cell patch clamp in single JG cells as an index of exocytosis. Hypotonicity increased C(m) significantly and enhanced outward current. Indomethacin, PLA(2) inhibition, and an antagonist of prostaglandin transport impaired the C(m) and current responses to hypotonicity....... Hypotonicity also increased exocytosis as determined by a decrease in single JG cell quinacrine fluorescence in an indomethacin-sensitive manner. In single JG cells from COX-2(-/ -) and AQP1(-/ -) mice, hypotonicity increased neither C(m) nor outward current, but 0.1-muM PGE(2) increased both in these cells...

  15. Cytosolic Ca2+, exocytosis, and endocytosis in single melanotrophs of the rat pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Surprenant, A; Almers, W

    1990-11-01

    We have monitored cytosolic [Ca2+] with fura-2 and exocytosis by measuring the membrane capacitance, and we have studied the influence of cytosolic [Ca2+] on secretion in single endocrine cells. As in neurons, cytosolic Ca2+ is sufficient to trigger exocytosis. The rate of secretion grows with the fourth or fifth power of cytosolic [Ca2+], and paired stimuli reveal facilitation. Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels can stimulate secretion 1000-fold over the basal levels measured biochemically. Unlike neurons, however, melanotrophs continue to secrete for seconds afer a depolarizing pulse, while they extrude or sequester the Ca2+ that has entered through Ca2+ channels. Following episodes of secretion, pituitary cells can retrieve membrane with half-times around 30 s at 32 degrees C, even in the absence of cytosolic K+.

  16. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  17. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  18. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of LIMK1 and Cofilin is essential for mouse sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romarowski, Ana; Battistone, María A; La Spina, Florenza A; Puga Molina, Lis del C; Luque, Guillermina M; Vitale, Alejandra M; Cuasnicu, Patricia S; Visconti, Pablo E; Krapf, Darío; Buffone, Mariano G

    2015-09-15

    Mammalian sperm must acquire their fertilizing ability after a series of biochemical modifications in the female reproductive tract collectively called capacitation to undergo acrosomal exocytosis, a process that is essential for fertilization. Actin dynamics play a central role in controlling the process of exocytosis in somatic cells as well as in sperm from several mammalian species. In somatic cells, small GTPases of the Rho family are widely known as master regulators of actin dynamics. However, the role of these proteins in sperm has not been studied in detail. In the present work we characterized the participation of small GTPases of the Rho family in the signaling pathway that leads to actin polymerization during mouse sperm capacitation. We observed that most of the proteins of this signaling cascade and their effector proteins are expressed in mouse sperm. The activation of the signaling pathways of cAMP/PKA, RhoA/C and Rac1 is essential for LIMK1 activation by phosphorylation on Threonine 508. Serine 3 of Cofilin is phosphorylated by LIMK1 during capacitation in a transiently manner. Inhibition of LIMK1 by specific inhibitors (BMS-3) resulted in lower levels of actin polymerization during capacitation and a dramatic decrease in the percentage of sperm that undergo acrosomal exocytosis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the master regulators of actin dynamics in somatic cells are present and active in mouse sperm. Combining the results of our present study with other results from the literature, we have proposed a working model regarding how LIMK1 and Cofilin control acrosomal exocytosis in mouse sperm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny Zhou, Huanjiao; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhang, Haifeng; Tang, Wenwen; Ji, Weidong; He, Yun; Liang, Xiaoling; Wang, Zongren; Yuan, Qianying; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Toomre, Derek; Fuh, Germaine; Yan, Minghong; Kluger, Martin S; Wu, Dianqing; Min, Wang

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins. Here, in investigating the role of endothelial cell exocytosis in CCM disease progression, we found that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B- and vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3)-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 deficiency in endothelial cells augments the exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, which is associated with destabilized endothelial cell junctions, enlarged lumen formation and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociation. UNC13B deficiency, which blunts ANGPT2 secretion from endothelial cells, or treatment with an ANGPT2-neutralizing antibody normalizes the defects in the brain and retina caused by endothelial-cell-specific CCM3 deficiency, including the disruption of endothelial cell junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation. Thus, enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of CCM disease, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating this devastating pathology.

  20. Exocyst SEC3 and Phosphoinositides Define Sites of Exocytosis in Pollen Tube Initiation and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Daria; Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, Přemysl; Potocký, Martin; Trpkošová, Pavlína; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Vukašinović, Nemanja; Sternberg, Hasana; Yalovsky, Shaul; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-10-01

    Polarized exocytosis is critical for pollen tube growth, but its localization and function are still under debate. The exocyst vesicle-tethering complex functions in polarized exocytosis. Here, we show that a sec3a exocyst subunit null mutant cannot be transmitted through the male gametophyte due to a defect in pollen tube growth. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SEC3a fusion protein is functional and accumulates at or proximal to the pollen tube tip plasma membrane. Partial complementation of sec3a resulted in the development of pollen with multiple tips, indicating that SEC3 is required to determine the site of pollen germination pore formation. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that SEC3a and SEC8 were highly dynamic and that SEC3a localization on the apical plasma membrane predicts the direction of growth. At the tip, polar SEC3a domains coincided with cell wall deposition. Labeling of GFP-SEC3a-expressing pollen with the endocytic marker FM4-64 revealed the presence of subdomains on the apical membrane characterized by extensive exocytosis. In steady-state growing tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes, SEC3a displayed amino-terminal Pleckstrin homology-like domain (SEC3a-N)-dependent subapical membrane localization. In agreement, SEC3a-N interacted with phosphoinositides in vitro and colocalized with a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) marker in pollen tubes. Correspondingly, molecular dynamics simulations indicated that SEC3a-N associates with the membrane by interacting with PIP 2 However, the interaction with PIP 2 is not required for polar localization and the function of SEC3a in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Taken together, our findings indicate that SEC3a is a critical determinant of polar exocytosis during tip growth and suggest differential regulation of the exocytotic machinery depending on pollen tube growth modes. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Lipid-anchored Synaptobrevin Provides Little or No Support for Exocytosis or Liposome Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Gaffaney, Jon D; Chapman, Edwin R; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-02-05

    SNARE proteins catalyze many forms of biological membrane fusion, including Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. Although fusion mediated by SNAREs generally involves proteins anchored to each fusing membrane by a transmembrane domain (TMD), the role of TMDs remains unclear, and previous studies diverge on whether SNAREs can drive fusion without a TMD. This issue is important because it relates to the question of the structure and composition of the initial fusion pore, as well as the question of whether SNAREs mediate fusion solely by creating close proximity between two membranes versus a more active role in transmitting force to the membrane to deform and reorganize lipid bilayer structure. To test the role of membrane attachment, we generated four variants of the synaptic v-SNARE synaptobrevin-2 (syb2) anchored to the membrane by lipid instead of protein. These constructs were tested for functional efficacy in three different systems as follows: Ca(2+)-triggered dense core vesicle exocytosis, spontaneous synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and Ca(2+)-synaptotagmin-enhanced SNARE-mediated liposome fusion. Lipid-anchoring motifs harboring one or two lipid acylation sites completely failed to support fusion in any of these assays. Only the lipid-anchoring motif from cysteine string protein-α, which harbors many lipid acylation sites, provided support for fusion but at levels well below that achieved with wild type syb2. Thus, lipid-anchored syb2 provides little or no support for exocytosis, and anchoring syb2 to a membrane by a TMD greatly improves its function. The low activity seen with syb2-cysteine string protein-α may reflect a slower alternative mode of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Lysosomal exocytosis in response to subtle membrane damage following nanosecond pulse exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; Roth, Caleb C.; Bernhard, Joshua A.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsEP, ion permeable nanopores ( 2nm) created by longer micro and millisecond duration pulses. Macroscopic damage to a plasma membrane by a micropipette has been shown to cause internal vesicles (lysosomes) to undergo exocytosis to repair membrane damage, a calcium mediated process called lysosomal exocytosis. Formation of large pores in the plasma membrane by electrical pulses has been shown to elicit lysosomal exocytosis in a variety of cell types. Our research objective is to determine whether lysosomal exocytosis will occur in response to nanopores formed by exposure to nsEP. In this paper we used propidium iodide (PI) and Calcium Green-1 AM ester (CaGr) to differentiate between large and small pores formed in CHO-K1 cells following exposure to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm. This information was compared to changes in membrane organization observed by increases in FM1-43 fluorescence, both in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer. In addition, we monitored the real time migration of lysosomes within the cell using Cellular Lights assay to tag LAMP-1, a lysosomal membrane protein. Both 1 and 20 pulses elicited a large influx of extracellular calcium, while little PI uptake was observed following a single pulse exposure. Statistically significant increases in FM1-43 fluorescence were seen in samples containing calcium suggesting that calcium-triggered membrane repair may be occurring. Lastly, density of lysosomes within cells, specifically around the nucleus, appeared to change rapidly upon nsEP stimulation suggesting lysosomal migration.

  3. Exocytosis of ATP from astrocytes modulates phasic and tonic inhibition in the neocortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana Lalo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication between neuronal and glial cells is important for many brain functions. Astrocytes can modulate synaptic strength via Ca(2+-stimulated release of various gliotransmitters, including glutamate and ATP. A physiological role of ATP release from astrocytes was suggested by its contribution to glial Ca(2+-waves and purinergic modulation of neuronal activity and sleep homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying release of gliotransmitters remain uncertain, and exocytosis is the most intriguing and debated pathway. We investigated release of ATP from acutely dissociated cortical astrocytes using "sniff-cell" approach and demonstrated that release is vesicular in nature and can be triggered by elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ via metabotropic and ionotropic receptors or direct UV-uncaging. The exocytosis of ATP from neocortical astrocytes occurred in the millisecond time scale contrasting with much slower nonvesicular release of gliotransmitters via Best1 and TREK-1 channels, reported recently in hippocampus. Furthermore, we discovered that elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+ in cortical astrocytes triggered the release of ATP that directly activated quantal purinergic currents in the pyramidal neurons. The glia-driven burst of purinergic currents in neurons was followed by significant attenuation of both synaptic and tonic inhibition. The Ca(2+-entry through the neuronal P2X purinoreceptors led to phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of GABAA receptors. The negative purinergic modulation of postsynaptic GABA receptors was accompanied by small presynaptic enhancement of GABA release. Glia-driven purinergic modulation of inhibitory transmission was not observed in neurons when astrocytes expressed dn-SNARE to impair exocytosis. The astrocyte-driven purinergic currents and glia-driven modulation of GABA receptors were significantly reduced in the P2X4 KO mice. Our data provide a key evidence to support the physiological importance of exocytosis of

  4. SNAREs: Could They be the Answer to an Energy Landscape Riddle in Exocytosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Liu; Vladimir Parpura

    2010-01-01

    During exocytosis, chemical transmitters stored in secretory vesicles can be released upon fusion of these intracellular organelles to the plasma membrane. In this process, SNARE proteins that form a ternary core complex play a central role. This complex could provide the means for generation/storage of energy necessary for driving the fusion of vesicular and plasma membranes. Recently, the amount of energy for (dis)assembly of the ternary complex has been measured using various experimental ...

  5. Calcium Cooperativity of Exocytosis as a Measure of Ca2+ Channel Domain Overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev, Victor; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The number of Ca2+ channels contributing to the exocytosis of a single neurotransmitter vesicle in a presynaptic terminal has been a question of significant interest and debate, and is important for a full understanding of localized Ca2+ signaling in general, and synaptic physiology in particular. This is usually estimated by measuring the sensitivity of the neurotransmitter release rate to changes in the synaptic Ca2+ current, which is varied using appropriate voltage-clamp protocols or via ...

  6. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not bee...... weight gain was preserved. The results demonstrate that GDH is essential for the full development of the secretory response in beta-cells. However, maximal secretory capacity is not required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in normo-caloric conditions.......Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been...... tested yet in animal models. Here, we generated transgenic mice, named betaGlud1(-/-), with ss-cell-specific GDH deletion. Our results show that GDH plays an essential role in the full development of the insulin secretory response. In situ pancreatic perfusion revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin...

  7. Characterization of music-evoked autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr; Tomic, Stefan T; Rakowski, Sonja K

    2007-11-01

    Despite music's prominence in Western society and its importance to individuals in their daily lives, very little is known about the memories and emotions that are often evoked when hearing a piece of music from one's past. We examined the content of music-evoked autobiographical memories (MEAMs) using a novel approach for selecting stimuli from a large corpus of popular music, in both laboratory and online settings. A set of questionnaires probed the cognitive and affective properties of the evoked memories. On average, 30% of the song presentations evoked autobiographical memories, and the majority of songs also evoked various emotions, primarily positive, that were felt strongly. The third most common emotion was nostalgia. Analyses of written memory reports found both general and specific levels of autobiographical knowledge to be represented, and several social and situational contexts for memory formation were common across many memories. The findings indicate that excerpts of popular music serve as potent stimuli for studying the structure of autobiographical memories.

  8. Rab3A, a possible marker of cortical granules, participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Oscar Daniel; Cappa, Andrea Isabel; Paola, Matilde de; Zanetti, María Natalia [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Fukuda, Mitsunori [Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fissore, Rafael A. [Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 661 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Mayorga, Luis S. [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Michaut, Marcela A., E-mail: mmichaut@gmail.com [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Argentina)

    2016-09-10

    Fusion of cortical granules with the oocyte plasma membrane is the most significant event to prevent polyspermy. This particular exocytosis, also known as cortical reaction, is regulated by calcium and its molecular mechanism is still not known. Rab3A, a member of the small GTP-binding protein superfamily, has been implicated in calcium-dependent exocytosis and is not yet clear whether Rab3A participates in cortical granules exocytosis. Here, we examine the involvement of Rab3A in the physiology of cortical granules, particularly, in their distribution during oocyte maturation and activation, and their participation in membrane fusion during cortical granule exocytosis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed that Rab3A and cortical granules have a similar migration pattern during oocyte maturation, and that Rab3A is no longer detected after cortical granule exocytosis. These results suggested that Rab3A might be a marker of cortical granules. Overexpression of EGFP-Rab3A colocalized with cortical granules with a Pearson correlation coefficient of +0.967, indicating that Rab3A and cortical granules have almost a perfect colocalization in the egg cortical region. Using a functional assay, we demonstrated that microinjection of recombinant, prenylated and active GST-Rab3A triggered cortical granule exocytosis, indicating that Rab3A has an active role in this secretory pathway. To confirm this active role, we inhibited the function of endogenous Rab3A by microinjecting a polyclonal antibody raised against Rab3A prior to parthenogenetic activation. Our results showed that Rab3A antibody microinjection abolished cortical granule exocytosis in parthenogenetically activated oocytes. Altogether, our findings confirm that Rab3A might function as a marker of cortical granules and participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs. - Highlights: • Rab3A has a similar migration pattern to cortical granules in mouse oocytes. • Rab3A can be a marker of

  9. Cholesterol Alters the Dynamics of Release in Protein Independent Cell Models for Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafinobar, Neda; Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Dunevall, Johan; Angerer, Tina B.; Fletcher, John S.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-09-01

    Neurons communicate via an essential process called exocytosis. Cholesterol, an abundant lipid in both secretory vesicles and cell plasma membrane can affect this process. In this study, amperometric recordings of vesicular dopamine release from two different artificial cell models created from a giant unilamellar liposome and a bleb cell plasma membrane, show that with higher membrane cholesterol the kinetics for vesicular release are decelerated in a concentration dependent manner. This reduction in exocytotic speed was consistent for two observed modes of exocytosis, full and partial release. Partial release events, which only occurred in the bleb cell model due to the higher tension in the system, exhibited amperometric spikes with three distinct shapes. In addition to the classic transient, some spikes displayed a current ramp or plateau following the maximum peak current. These post spike features represent neurotransmitter release from a dilated pore before constriction and show that enhancing membrane rigidity via cholesterol adds resistance to a dilated pore to re-close. This implies that the cholesterol dependent biophysical properties of the membrane directly affect the exocytosis kinetics and that membrane tension along with membrane rigidity can influence the fusion pore dynamics and stabilization which is central to regulation of neurochemical release.

  10. Endosidin2 targets conserved exocyst complex subunit EXO70 to inhibit exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Brown, Michelle Q; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Wu, Bin; Young, Michael C; Synek, Lukáš; Borchardt, Dan; Harrison, Reed; Pan, Songqin; Luo, Nan; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Ghang, Yoo-Jin; Ung, Nolan; Li, Ruixi; Isley, Jonathan; Morikis, Dimitrios; Song, Jikui; Guo, Wei; Hooley, Richard J; Chang, Chia-En A; Yang, Zhenbiao; Zarsky, Viktor; Muday, Gloria K; Hicks, Glenn R; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2016-01-05

    The exocyst complex regulates the last steps of exocytosis, which is essential to organisms across kingdoms. In humans, its dysfunction is correlated with several significant diseases, such as diabetes and cancer progression. Investigation of the dynamic regulation of the evolutionarily conserved exocyst-related processes using mutants in genetically tractable organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana is limited by the lethality or the severity of phenotypes. We discovered that the small molecule Endosidin2 (ES2) binds to the EXO70 (exocyst component of 70 kDa) subunit of the exocyst complex, resulting in inhibition of exocytosis and endosomal recycling in both plant and human cells and enhancement of plant vacuolar trafficking. An EXO70 protein with a C-terminal truncation results in dominant ES2 resistance, uncovering possible distinct regulatory roles for the N terminus of the protein. This study not only provides a valuable tool in studying exocytosis regulation but also offers a potentially new target for drugs aimed at addressing human disease.

  11. Defective goblet cell exocytosis contributes to murine cystic fibrosis–associated intestinal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Walker, Nancy M.; Ootani, Akifumi; Strubberg, Ashlee M.; Clarke, Lane L.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) intestinal disease is associated with the pathological manifestation mucoviscidosis, which is the secretion of tenacious, viscid mucus that plugs ducts and glands of epithelial-lined organs. Goblet cells are the principal cell type involved in exocytosis of mucin granules; however, little is known about the exocytotic process of goblet cells in the CF intestine. Using intestinal organoids from a CF mouse model, we determined that CF goblet cells have altered exocytotic dynamics, which involved intrathecal granule swelling that was abruptly followed by incomplete release of partially decondensated mucus. Some CF goblet cells exhibited an ectopic granule location and distorted cellular morphology, a phenotype that is consistent with retrograde intracellular granule movement during exocytosis. Increasing the luminal concentration of bicarbonate, which mimics CF transmembrane conductance regulator–mediated anion secretion, increased spontaneous degranulation in WT goblet cells and improved exocytotic dynamics in CF goblet cells; however, there was still an apparent incoordination between granule decondensation and exocytosis in the CF goblet cells. Compared with those within WT goblet cells, mucin granules within CF goblet cells had an alkaline pH, which may adversely affect the polyionic composition of the mucins. Together, these findings indicate that goblet cell dysfunction is an epithelial-autonomous defect in the CF intestine that likely contributes to the pathology of mucoviscidosis and the intestinal manifestations of obstruction and inflammation. PMID:25642775

  12. Homocysteine augments BK channel activity and decreases exocytosis of secretory granules in rat GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaifullina, Aisylu S; Yakovlev, Aleksey V; Mustafina, Alsu N; Weiger, Thomas M; Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of L-homocysteine (Hcy) on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and on exocytosis of secretory granules in GH3 rat pituitary-derived cells. A major finding of our study indicates that short-term application of Hcy increased the open probability of oxidized BK channels in inside-out recordings. Whole-cell recordings show that extracellular Hcy also augmented BK currents during long-term application. Furthermore, Hcy decreased the exocytosis of secretory granules. This decrease was partially prevented by the BK channel inhibitor paxilline and fully prevented by N-acetylcysteine, a reactive oxygen species scavenger. Taken together, our data show that elevation of cellular Hcy level induces oxidative stress, increases BK channel activity, and decreases exocytosis of secretory granules. These findings may provide insight into some of the developmental impairments and neurotoxicity associated with Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), a disease arising due to abnormally elevated levels of Hcy in the plasma. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Wilson disease protein ATP7B utilizes lysosomal exocytosis to maintain copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Elena V; Concilli, Mafalda; Iacobacci, Simona; Chesi, Giancarlo; Pastore, Nunzia; Piccolo, Pasquale; Paladino, Simona; Baldantoni, Daniela; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Pucci, Piero; Tarallo, Antonietta; Parenti, Giancarlo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea; Polishchuk, Roman S

    2014-06-23

    Copper is an essential yet toxic metal and its overload causes Wilson disease, a disorder due to mutations in copper transporter ATP7B. To remove excess copper into the bile, ATP7B traffics toward canalicular area of hepatocytes. However, the trafficking mechanisms of ATP7B remain elusive. Here, we show that, in response to elevated copper, ATP7B moves from the Golgi to lysosomes and imports metal into their lumen. ATP7B enables lysosomes to undergo exocytosis through the interaction with p62 subunit of dynactin that allows lysosome translocation toward the canalicular pole of hepatocytes. Activation of lysosomal exocytosis stimulates copper clearance from the hepatocytes and rescues the most frequent Wilson-disease-causing ATP7B mutant to the appropriate functional site. Our findings indicate that lysosomes serve as an important intermediate in ATP7B trafficking, whereas lysosomal exocytosis operates as an integral process in copper excretion and hence can be targeted for therapeutic approaches to combat Wilson disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recapture after exocytosis causes differential retention of protein in granules of bovine chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Kleppe, Ingo C; Taraska, Justin W; Almers, Wolfhard

    2004-10-15

    After exocytosis, chromaffin granules release essentially all their catecholamines in small fractions of a second, but it is unknown how fast they release stored peptides and proteins. Here we compare the exocytic release of fluorescently labelled neuropeptide Y (NPY) and tissue plasminogen activator from single granules. Exocytosis was tracked by measuring the membrane capacitance, and single granules in live cells were imaged by evanescent field microscopy. Neuropeptide Y left most granules in small fractions of a second, while tissue plasminogen activator remained in open granules for minutes. Taking advantage of the dependence on pH of the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein, we used rhythmic external acidification to determine whether and when granules re-sealed. One-third of them re-sealed within 100 s and retained significant levels of tissue plasminogen activator. Re-sealing accounts for only a fraction of the endocytosis monitored in capacitance measurements. When external [Ca2+] was raised, even neuropeptide Y remained in open granules until they re-sealed. It is concluded that a significant fraction of chromaffin granules re-seal after exocytosis, and retain those proteins that leave granules slowly. We suggest that granules vary the stoichiometry of release by varying both granule re-sealing and the association of proteins with the granule matrix.

  15. Complexin regulates the closure of the fusion pore during regulated vesicle exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Deborah A; Graham, Margaret E; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2002-05-24

    Membrane fusion during exocytosis and throughout the cell is believed to involve members of the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors) family of proteins. The assembly of these proteins into a four-helix bundle may be part of the driving force for bilayer fusion. Regulated exocytosis in neurons and related cell types is specialized to be fast and Ca(2+)-dependent suggesting the involvement of other regulatory proteins specific for regulated exocytosis. Among these are the complexins, two closely related proteins that bind only to the assembled SNARE complex. We have investigated the function of complexin by analysis of single vesicle release events in adrenal chromaffin cells using carbon fiber amperometry. These cells express complexin II, and overexpression of this protein modified the kinetics of vesicle release events so that their time course was shortened. This effect depended on complexin interaction with the SNARE complex as introduction of a mutation of Arg-59, a residue that interacts with synaptobrevin in the SNARE complex, abolished its effects. The data are consistent with a function for complexin in stabilizing an intermediate of the SNARE complex to allow kiss-and-run recycling of the exocytosed vesicle.

  16. Amphipaths Differentially Modulate Membrane Surface Deformation in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells During Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuro Kazama

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Salicylate and chlorpromazine exert differential effects on the chemokine release from mast cells. Since these drugs are amphiphilic and preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membranes, they would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Methods: Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of salicylate and chlorpromazine on the membrane capacitance (Cm during exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on plasma membrane deformation of the cells. Results: Salicylate dramatically accelerated the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm immediately after its application, whereas chlorpromazine significantly suppressed the increase. Treatment with salicylate increased the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, while treatment with chlorpromazine completely washed it out, indicating that both drugs induced membrane surface deformation in mast cells. Conclusion: This study demonstrated for the first time that membrane amphipaths, such as salicylate and chlorpromazine, may oppositely modulate the process of exocytosis in mast cells, as detected by the changes in the Cm. The plasma membrane deformation induced by the drugs was thought to be responsible for their differential effects.

  17. Calcium cooperativity of exocytosis as a measure of Ca²+ channel domain overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Victor; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2011-06-29

    The number of Ca(2+) channels contributing to the exocytosis of a single neurotransmitter vesicle in a presynaptic terminal has been a question of significant interest and debate, and is important for a full understanding of localized Ca(2+) signaling in general, and synaptic physiology in particular. This is usually estimated by measuring the sensitivity of the neurotransmitter release rate to changes in the synaptic Ca(2+) current, which is varied using appropriate voltage-clamp protocols or via pharmacological Ca(2+) channel block under the condition of constant single-channel Ca(2+) current. The slope of the resulting log-log plot of transmitter release rate versus presynaptic Ca(2+) current is termed Ca(2+)current cooperativity of exocytosis, and provides indirect information about the underlying presynaptic morphology. In this review, we discuss the relationship between the Ca(2+) current cooperativity and the average number of Ca(2+) channels participating in the exocytosis of a single vesicle, termed the Ca(2+)channel cooperativity. We relate these quantities to the morphology of the presynaptic active zone. We also review experimental studies of Ca(2+) current cooperativity and its modulation during development in different classes of synapses. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Calcium Cooperativity of Exocytosis as a Measure of Ca2+ Channel Domain Overlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Victor; Bertram, Richard; Sherman, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The number of Ca2+ channels contributing to the exocytosis of a single neurotransmitter vesicle in a presynaptic terminal has been a question of significant interest and debate, and is important for a full understanding of localized Ca2+ signaling in general, and synaptic physiology in particular. This is usually estimated by measuring the sensitivity of the neurotransmitter release rate to changes in the synaptic Ca2+ current, which is varied using appropriate voltage-clamp protocols or via pharmacological Ca2+ channel block under the condition of constant single-channel Ca2+ current. The slope of the resulting log-log plot of transmitter release rate versus presynaptic Ca2+ current is termed Ca2+ current cooperativity of exocytosis, and provides indirect information about the underlying presynaptic morphology. In this review, we discuss the relationship between the Ca2+ current cooperativity and the average number of Ca2+ channels participating in the exocytosis of a single vesicle, termed the Ca2+ channel cooperativity. We relate these quantities to the morphology of the presynaptic active zone. We also review experimental studies of Ca2+ current cooperativity and its modulation during development in different classes of synapses. PMID:21621748

  19. Calcium dependence of the rate of exocytosis in a synaptic terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberger, R; Heinemann, C; Neher, E; Matthews, G

    1994-10-06

    Rapid calcium-dependent exocytosis underlies neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals. Despite the fundamental importance of this process, neither the relationship between presynaptic intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) and rate of exocytosis, nor the maximal rate of secretion is known quantitatively. To provide this information, we have used flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ to elevate [Ca2+]i rapidly and uniformly in synaptic terminals, while measuring membrane capacitance as an index of exocytosis and monitoring [Ca2+]i with a Ca(2+)-indicator dye. When [Ca2+]i was abruptly increased to > 10 microM, capacitance rose at a rate that increased steeply with [Ca2+]i. The steepness suggested that at least four calcium ions must bind to activate synaptic vesicle fusion. Half-saturation was at 194 microM, and the maximal rate constant was 2,000-3,000 s-1. A given synaptic vesicle can exocytose with high probability within a few hundred microseconds, if [Ca2+]i rises above 100 microM. These properties provide for the extremely rapid signalling required for neuronal communication.

  20. Identification of a Munc13-sensitive step in chromaffin cell large dense-core vesicle exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Kwun Nok M; Imig, Cordelia; Walter, Alexander M; Pinheiro, Paulo S; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens; Sørensen, Jakob B; Cooper, Benjamin H; Brose, Nils; Wojcik, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether the molecular steps of large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) docking and priming are identical to the corresponding reactions in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis. Munc13s are essential for SV docking and priming, and we systematically analyzed their role in LDCV exocytosis using chromaffin cells lacking individual isoforms. We show that particularly Munc13-2 plays a fundamental role in LDCV exocytosis, but in contrast to synapses lacking Munc13s, the corresponding chromaffin cells do not exhibit a vesicle docking defect. We further demonstrate that ubMunc13-2 and Munc13-1 confer Ca2+-dependent LDCV priming with similar affinities, but distinct kinetics. Using a mathematical model, we identify an early LDCV priming step that is strongly dependent upon Munc13s. Our data demonstrate that the molecular steps of SV and LDCV priming are very similar while SV and LDCV docking mechanisms are distinct. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10635.001 PMID:26575293

  1. Imaging of Kiss-and-Run Exocytosis of Surface Receptors in Neuronal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eRoman-Vendrell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Transmembrane proteins are continuously shuttled from the endosomal compartment to the neuronal plasma membrane by highly regulated and complex trafficking steps. These events are involved in many homeostatic and physiological processes such as neuronal growth, signaling, learning and memory among others. We have previously shown that endosomal exocytosis of the B2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR and the GluR1-containing AMPA receptor to the neuronal plasma membrane is mediated by two different types of vesicular fusion. Transient events in which receptors are delivered to the plasma membrane in a single kinetic step, and persistent events in which receptors remain clustered at the insertion site for a variable period of time before delivery to the cell surface. Here, by comparing the exocytosis of multiple receptors in dissociated hippocampal and striatal cultures, we show that persistent events are a general mechanism of vesicular delivery. Persistent events were only observed after 10 days in vitro, and their frequency increased with use of the calcium ionophore A23187 and with depolarization induced by KCl. Finally, we determined that vesicles producing persistent events remain at the plasma membrane, closing and reopening their fusion pore for a consecutive release of cargo in a mechanism reminiscent of synaptic kiss-and-run. These results indicate that the delivery of transmembrane receptors to the cell surface can be dynamically regulated by kiss-and-run exocytosis.

  2. An ancient Sec10-formin fusion provides insights into actin-mediated regulation of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gisbergen, Peter A C; Wu, Shu-Zon; Chang, Mingqin; Pattavina, Kelli A; Bartlett, Madelaine E; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2018-01-26

    Exocytosis, facilitated by the exocyst, is fundamentally important for remodeling cell walls and membranes. Here, we analyzed For1F, a novel gene that encodes a fusion of an exocyst subunit (Sec10) and an actin nucleation factor (formin). We showed that the fusion occurred early in moss evolution and has been retained for more than 170 million years. In Physcomitrella patens, For1F is essential, and the expressed protein is a fusion of Sec10 and formin. Reduction of For1F or actin filaments inhibits exocytosis, and For1F dynamically associates with Sec6, another exocyst subunit, in an actin-dependent manner. Complementation experiments demonstrate that constitutive expression of either half of the gene or the paralogous Sec10b rescues loss of For1F, suggesting that fusion of the two domains is not essential, consistent with findings in yeast, where formin and the exocyst are linked noncovalently. Although not essential, the fusion may have had selective advantages and provides a unique opportunity to probe actin regulation of exocytosis. © 2018 van Gisbergen et al.

  3. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  4. Crucial Role of P2X7Receptor in Regulating Exocytosis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuejing; Wan, Bin; Yang, Yu; Ren, Xiaomin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Exocytosis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) determines therapeutic efficiency and toxicity of nanoproducts but its underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, it is found that the exocytosis mechanism of SWCNTs is mediated mainly through the activation of P2X 7 receptor (P2X 7 R), an ATP-gated membrane receptor highly expressed in macrophages. Inhibition of P2X 7 R signaling by either a specific inhibitor (oxidized ATP) or small interfering RNA targeting P2X 7 R largely prevents the exocytosis of SWCNTs from Raw264.7 cells, resulting in significant accumulation of SWCNTs within cells. In contrast, activation of P2X 7 R with ATP promotes exocytosis of SWCNTs. Specifically, it is elucidated that internalized SWCNTs are accumulated in lysosomes and induce transitional release of ATP into extracellular space, which further activates P2X 7 R, leading to the influx of calcium ions, phosphorylation of protein kinase C, ERK1/2, p38, and JNK, as well as alkalization of lysosomes. SWCNTs exposure also induces microtubules reorganization that facilitates the secretion of SWCNTs-containing lysosomes. It is also found that P2X 7 R simultaneously mediates secretion of IL-1β from Raw264.7 cells during the process of SWCNTs exocytosis. The combined data reveals that P2X 7 R-mediated pathway is the predominant molecular mechanism for exocytosis of SWCNTs in Raw264.7 cells. Moreover, SWCNT-induced inflammation is closely coupled with the exocytosis of SWCNTs through P2X 7 R. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  6. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  7. Development of genetically engineered human intestinal cells for regulated insulin secretion using rAAV-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shiue-Cheng; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2003-04-04

    Cell-based therapies for treating insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) can provide a more physiologic regulation of blood glucose levels in a less invasive fashion than daily insulin injections. Promising cells include intestinal enteroendocrine cells genetically engineered to secrete insulin in response to physiologic stimuli; responsiveness occurs at the exocytosis level to regulate the acute release of recombinant insulin. In this work, we established a human cellular model to demonstrate that meat hydrolysate can simultaneously stimulate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an enteroendocrine cell-derived incretin hormone) and recombinant insulin secretion from the engineered human NCI-H716 intestinal cell line. Cells were genetically modified using the recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated insulin gene transfer. Recombinant cells were then differentiated to display endocrine features, in particular the formation of granule-like compartments. A fusion protein of insulin and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) was designed to reveal the compartments of localization of the fusion protein and assess its co-localization with endogenous GLP-1. Our work provides a unique human cellular model for regulated insulin release through genetic engineering of GLP-1-secreting intestinal cells, which is expected to be useful for cell-based therapies of IDD.

  8. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  9. Transient Evoked aotacoustic emissions otologically normal adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUTH

    Objective: To examine the effects of aging on the existence of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in normal adult. Material and methods 40 ... wax or any middle ear pathology which might affect the recording at TEOAEs. After that, ... related to decreased hearing sensitivity and are independent of aging, Previous studies.

  10. Neural correlates of evoked phantom limb sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, J; Diers, M; Milde, C; Frobel, C; Kleinböhl, D; Flor, H

    2017-05-01

    Previous work showed the existence of changes in the topographic organization within the somatosensory cortex (SI) in amputees with phantom limb pain, however, the link between nonpainful phantom sensations such as cramping or tingling or the percept of the limb and cortical changes is less clear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a highly selective group of limb amputees who experienced inducible and reproducible nonpainful phantom sensations. A standardized procedure was used to locate body sites eliciting phantom sensations in each amputee. Selected body sites that could systematically evoke phantom sensations were stimulated using electrical pulses in order to induce phasic phantom sensations. Homologous body parts were also stimulated in a group of matched controls. Activations related to evoked phantom sensations were found bilaterally in SI and the intraparietal sulci (IPS), which significantly correlated with the intensity of evoked phantom sensations. In addition, we found differences in intra- and interhemispheric interaction between amputees and controls during evoked phantom sensations. We assume that phantom sensations might be associated with a functional decoupling between bilateral SI and IPS, possibly resulting from transcallosal reorganization mechanisms following amputation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Amperometric measurements at cells support a role for dynamin in the dilation of the fusion pore during exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillon, Raphaël; Ewing, Andrew G

    2013-07-22

    Dynamin is a GTPase mechanochemical enzyme involved in the late steps of endocytosis, where it separates the endocytotic vesicle from the cell membrane. However, recent reports have emphasized its role in exocytosis. In this case, dynamin may contribute to the control of the exocytotic pore, thus suggesting a direct control on the efflux of neurotransmitters. Dynasore, a selective inhibitor of the GTPase activity of dynamin, was used to investigate the role of dynamin in exocytosis. Exocytosis was analyzed by amperometry, thus revealing that dynasore inhibits exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of the exocytotic peaks shows that the inhibition of the GTPase activity of dynamin leads to shorter, smaller events. This observation, together with the rapid effect of dynasore, suggests that the blocking of the GTPase induces the formation of a more narrow and short-lived fusion pore. These results suggest that the GTPase properties of dynamin are involved in the duration and kinetics of exocytotic release. Interestingly, and in strong contrast with its role in endocytosis, the mechanochemical properties of dynamin appear to contribute to the dilation and stability of the pore during exocytosis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Phosphorylation of syntaxin-3 at Thr 14 negatively regulates exocytosis in RBL-2H3 mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Satoshi; Shibata, Tetsuhiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Amano, Toshiro; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Hirashima, Naohide; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins interact with each other, forming a SNARE complex that induces exocytosis in mast cells. Previously, we reported that syntaxin-3, a SNARE protein, regulates mast cell exocytosis and is constantly phosphorylated. In this study, we tried to identify the amino acid residue that is phosphorylated in mast cells, and to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of exocytosis by phosphorylation in syntaxin-3. We found that Thr 14 of syntaxin-3 was a phosphorylation site in mast cells. In addition, the overexpression of a constitutively dephosphorylated syntaxin-3 (T14A) mutant enhanced mast cell exocytosis. We also showed that the phosphomimetic mutation of syntaxin-3 at Thr 14 (T14E) induced structural changes in syntaxin-3, and this mutation inhibited binding of syntaxin-3 to Munc18-2. These results suggest that phosphorylated syntaxin-3 at Thr 14 negatively regulates mast cell exocytosis by impairing the interaction between syntaxin-3 and Munc18-2. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. Exocytosis of Neutrophil Granule Subsets and Activation of Prolyl Isomerase 1 are required for Respiratory Burst Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeish, Kenneth R.; Uriarte, Silvia M.; Tandon, Shweta; Creed, Timothy M.; Le, Junyi; Ward, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that priming the neutrophil respiratory burst requires both granule exocytosis and activation of the prolyl isomerase, Pin1. Fusion proteins containing the TAT cell permeability sequence and either the SNARE domain of syntaxin-4 or the N-terminal SNARE domain of SNAP-23 were used to examine the role of granule subsets in TNF-mediated respiratory burst priming using human neutrophils. Concentration-inhibition curves for exocytosis of individual granule subsets and for priming of fMLF-stimulated superoxide release and phagocytosis-stimulated H2O2 production were generated. Maximal inhibition of priming ranged from 72% to 88%. Linear regression lines for inhibition of priming versus inhibition of exocytosis did not differ from the line of identity for secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules, while the slopes or the y-intercepts were different from the line of identity for specific and azurophilic granules. Inhibition of Pin1 reduced priming by 56%, while exocytosis of secretory vesicles and specific granules was not affected. These findings indicate that exocytosis of secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules and activation of Pin1 are independent events required for TNF-mediated priming of neutrophil respiratory burst. PMID:23363774

  14. Carbon fiber ultramicrodic electrode electrodeposited with over-oxidized polypyrrole for amperometric detection of vesicular exocytosis from pheochromocytoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-06

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM(-1)·µm(-2) using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  15. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells’ communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE, which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM−1·µm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax and the released charge (Q of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  16. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 μm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 μA·μM−1·μm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ∼562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research. PMID:25569759

  17. Suicide by Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165701.html Suicide by Insulin? Self-harm and suicidal behavior may ... higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes ...

  18. Insulin C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  19. High-mix insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use.

  20. Insulin pump (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  1. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    defined. The proposed new classification for insulin management will be comprehensive, simple, and catchy. Currently available terms were included. This classification may offer the opportunity to compare therapeutic strategies without the currently existing confusion on the insulin regimen....

  2. CAPS-1 requires its C2, PH, MHD1 and DCV domains for dense core vesicle exocytosis in mammalian CNS neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Linda; Kooistra, Robbelien; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    CAPS (calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion) are multi-domain proteins involved in regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles (SVs) and dense core vesicles (DCVs). Here, we assessed the contribution of different CAPS-1 domains to its subcellular localization and DCV exocytosis by

  3. Development of an Enhanced Phenotypic Screen of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Lytic Granule Exocytosis Suitable for Use with Synthetic Compound and Natural Product Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziyan; deMayo, James A; West, Ashley M; Balunas, Marcy J; Zweifach, Adam

    2016-07-01

    We previously developed an assay of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte lytic granule exocytosis based on externalization of LAMP-1/CD107A using nonphysiological stimuli to generate maximal levels of exocytosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with anti-CD3 antibodies to stimulate cells. Light scatter let us distinguish cells that contacted beads from cells that had not, allowing comparison of signaling events and exocytosis from stimulated and unstimulated cells in one sample. Bead stimulation resulted in submaximal exocytosis, making it possible to detect compounds that either augment or inhibit lytic granule exocytosis. Coupled with the assay's ability to distinguish responses in cells that have and have not contacted a stimulatory bead, it is possible to detect three kinds of compounds: inhibitors, stimulators, which cause exocytosis, and augmenters, which enhance receptor-stimulated exocytosis. To validate the assay, we screened a set of synthetic compounds identified using our previous assay and a library of 320 extracts prepared from tunicate-associated bacteria. One of the extracts augmented exocytosis threefold. Activity-guided fractionation and structure elucidation revealed that this compound is the known PKC activator teleocidin A-1. We conclude that our modified assay is suitable for screening synthetic compound plates and natural product collections, and will be useful for identifying immunologically active small molecules. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  4. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... albuminuria. This finding suggests that reduced insulin sensitivity either is simply related to or might causally contribute to the initial pathogenesis of albuminuria....

  5. Carcinogenicity of insulin analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Sebastiaan Johannes ter

    2015-01-01

    There is epidemiological evidence that the use of some insulin analogues by diabetic patients is correlated with an increased cancer risk. In vitro exposure experiments revealed that insulin glargine (LANTUS) was the only commercial insulin analogue with an increased mitogenic potential. In the

  6. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  7. Visually Evoked Spiking Evolves While Spontaneous Ongoing Dynamics Persist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor K; Darokhan, Ziauddin

    2016-01-01

    attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix). The functional advantage of this organization...

  8. Glucose enhances collectrin protein expression in insulin-producing MIN6 {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saisho, Kenji; Fukuhara, Atsunori [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Yasuda, Tomoko [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Sato, Yoshifumi; Fukui, Kenji; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Imagawa, Akihisa [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Hatta, Mitsutoki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Shimomura, Iichiro [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Yamagata, Kazuya, E-mail: k-yamaga@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2009-11-06

    Collectrin is a novel target gene of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1{alpha} in pancreatic {beta}-cells and controls insulin exocytosis. Although glucose is known to stimulate the expression of genes of the insulin secretory pathway, there is no information on how glucose regulates collectrin expression. We investigated the effects of glucose on the expression of collectrin in MIN6 {beta}-cell line. Glucose, in a dose-dependent manner, increased collectrin protein levels without changing collectrin mRNA levels and protein stability, indicating that glucose stimulation of collectrin protein expression is primarily mediated at a translational level. Although mannose and pyruvate also increased collectrin protein expression level, neither 2-deoxyglucose, mitochondrial fuels leucine and glutamate, sulphonylurea nor Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers, mimicked the effects of glucose. These data indicate the involvement of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates, distal to pyruvate, in the regulation of collectrin protein expression in {beta}-cells.

  9. Novel synthetic sulfoglycolipid IG20 facilitates exocytosis in chromaffin cells through the regulation of sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Castrillo, Andrea; Punzón, Eva; de Pascual, Ricardo; Maroto, Marcos; Padín, Juan Fernando; García-Álvarez, Isabel; Nanclares, Carmen; Ruiz-Pascual, Lucía; Gandía, Luis; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; García, Antonio G

    2015-12-01

    In search of druggable synthetic lipids that function as potential modulators of synaptic transmission and plasticity, we synthesized sulfoglycolipid IG20, which stimulates neuritic outgrowth. Here, we have explored its effects on ion channels and exocytosis in bovine chromaffin cells. IG20 augmented the rate of basal catecholamine release. Such effect did not depend on Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular stores; rather, IG20-elicited secretion entirely dependent on Ca(2+) entry through L-subtype voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. Those channels were recruited by cell depolarization mediated by IG20 likely through its ability to enhance the recruitment of Na(+) channels at more hyperpolarizing potentials. Confocal imaging with fluorescent derivative IG20-NBD revealed its rapid incorporation and confinement into the plasmalemma, supporting the idea that IG20 effects are exerted through a plasmalemmal-delimited mechanism. Thus, synthetic IG20 seems to mimic several physiological effects of endogenous lipids such as regulation of ion channels, Ca(2+) signaling, and exocytosis. Therefore, sulfoglycolipid IG20 may become a pharmacological tool for investigating the role of the lipid environment on neuronal excitability, ion channels, neurotransmitter release, synaptic efficacy, and neuronal plasticity. It may also inspire the synthesis of druggable sulfoglycolipids aimed at increasing synaptic plasticity and efficacy in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain-spinal cord injury. The novel synthetic sulfoglycolipid IG20 mimics several physiological effects of endogenous lipids such as regulation of ion channels, Ca(2+) signaling, and exocytosis. This profile may eventually drive enhanced synaptic plasticity and efficacy. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. β-Hydroxybutyrate supports synaptic vesicle cycling but reduces endocytosis and exocytosis in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Waseem, Tatyana V; Hébert, Audrey; Pellerin, Luc; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2016-02-01

    The ketogenic diet is used as a prophylactic treatment for different types of brain diseases, such as epilepsy or Alzheimer's disease. In such a diet, carbohydrates are replaced by fats in everyday food, resulting in an elevation of blood-borne ketone bodies levels. Despite clinical applications of this treatment, the molecular mechanisms by which the ketogenic diet exerts its beneficial effects are still uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effect of replacing glucose by the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate as the main energy substrate on synaptic vesicle recycling in rat brain synaptosomes. First, we observed that exposing presynaptic terminals to nonglycolytic energy substrates instead of glucose did not alter the plasma membrane potential. Next, we found that synaptosomes were able to maintain the synaptic vesicle cycle monitored with the fluorescent dye acridine orange when glucose was replaced by β-hydroxybutyrate. However, in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, synaptic vesicle recycling was modified with reduced endocytosis. Replacing glucose by pyruvate also led to a reduced endocytosis. Addition of β-hydroxybutyrate to glucose-containing incubation medium was without effect. Reduced endocytosis in presence of β-hydroxybutyrate as sole energy substrate was confirmed using the fluorescent dye FM2-10. Also we found that replacement of glucose by ketone bodies leads to inhibition of exocytosis, monitored by FM2-10. However this reduction was smaller than the effect on endocytosis under the same conditions. Using both acridine orange in synaptosomes and the genetically encoded sensor synaptopHluorin in cortical neurons, we observed that replacing glucose by β-hydroxybutyrate did not modify the pH gradient of synaptic vesicles. In conclusion, the nonglycolytic energy substrates β-hydroxybutyrate and pyruvate are able to support synaptic vesicle recycling. However, they both reduce endocytosis. Reduction of both endocytosis and exocytosis together with

  11. Imaging exocytosis of ATP-containing vesicles with TIRF microscopy in lung epithelial A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopova, Irina; Tatur, Sabina; Grygorczyk, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafał; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2012-03-01

    Nucleotide release constitutes the first step of the purinergic signaling cascade, but its underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In alveolar A549 cells much of the experimental data is consistent with Ca(2+)-regulated vesicular exocytosis, but definitive evidence for such a release mechanism is missing, and alternative pathways have been proposed. In this study, we examined ATP secretion from A549 cells by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize ATP-loaded vesicles and their fusion with the plasma membrane. A549 cells were labeled with quinacrine or Bodipy-ATP, fluorescent markers of intracellular ATP storage sites, and time-lapse imaging of vesicles present in the evanescent field was undertaken. Under basal conditions, individual vesicles showed occasional quasi-instantaneous loss of fluorescence, as expected from spontaneous vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane and dispersal of its fluorescent cargo. Hypo-osmotic stress stimulation (osmolality reduction from 316 to 160 mOsm) resulted in a transient, several-fold increment of exocytotic event frequency. Lowering the temperature from 37°C to 20°C dramatically diminished the fraction of vesicles that underwent exocytosis during the 2-min stimulation, from ~40% to ≤1%, respectively. Parallel ATP efflux experiments with luciferase bioluminescence assay revealed that pharmacological interference with vesicular transport (brefeldin, monensin), or disruption of the cytoskeleton (nocodazole, cytochalasin), significantly suppressed ATP release (by up to ~80%), whereas it was completely blocked by N-ethylmaleimide. Collectively, our data demonstrate that regulated exocytosis of ATP-loaded vesicles likely constitutes a major pathway of hypotonic stress-induced ATP secretion from A549 cells.

  12. Surfactant secretion in LRRK2 knock-out rats: changes in lamellar body morphology and rate of exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pika Miklavc

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of various diseases including Parkinson disease, morbus Crohn, leprosy and cancer. LRRK2 is suggested to be involved in a number of cell biological processes such as vesicular trafficking, transcription, autophagy and lysosomal pathways. Recent histological studies of lungs of LRRK2 knock-out (LRRK2 -/- mice revealed significantly enlarged lamellar bodies (LBs in alveolar type II (ATII epithelial cells. LBs are large, lysosome-related storage organelles for pulmonary surfactant, which is released into the alveolar lumen upon LB exocytosis. In this study we used high-resolution, subcellular live-cell imaging assays to investigate whether similar morphological changes can be observed in primary ATII cells from LRRK2 -/- rats and whether such changes result in altered LB exocytosis. Similarly to the report in mice, ATII cells from LRRK2 -/- rats contained significantly enlarged LBs resulting in a >50% increase in LB volume. Stimulation of ATII cells with ATP elicited LB exocytosis in a significantly increased proportion of cells from LRRK2 -/- animals. LRRK2 -/- cells also displayed increased intracellular Ca(2+ release upon ATP treatment and significant triggering of LB exocytosis. These findings are in line with the strong Ca(2+-dependence of LB fusion activity and suggest that LRRK2 -/- affects exocytic response in ATII cells via modulating intracellular Ca(2+ signaling. Post-fusion regulation of surfactant secretion was unaltered. Actin coating of fused vesicles and subsequent vesicle compression to promote surfactant expulsion were comparable in cells from LRRK2 -/- and wt animals. Surprisingly, surfactant (phospholipid release from LRRK2 -/- cells was reduced following stimulation of LB exocytosis possibly due to impaired LB maturation and surfactant loading of LBs. In summary our results suggest that LRRK2 -/- affects LB size, modulates intracellular Ca(2

  13. DSCR1/RCAN1 regulates vesicle exocytosis and fusion pore kinetics: implications for Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Damien J; Dubach, Daphne; Zanin, Mark P; Yu, Yong; Martin, Katherine; Zhao, Yu-Feng; Chen, Chen; Porta, Sílvia; Arbonés, Maria L; Mittaz, Laureane; Pritchard, Melanie A

    2008-04-01

    Genes located on chromosome 21, over-expressed in Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and which regulate vesicle trafficking, are strong candidates for involvement in AD neuropathology. Regulator of calcineurin activity 1 (RCAN1) is one such gene. We have generated mutant mice in which RCAN1 is either over-expressed (RCAN1(ox)) or ablated (Rcan1-/-) and examined whether exocytosis from chromaffin cells, a classic cellular model of neuronal exocytosis, is altered using carbon fibre amperometry. We find that Rcan1 regulates the number of vesicles undergoing exocytosis and the speed at which the vesicle fusion pore opens and closes. Cells from both Rcan1-/- and RCAN1(ox) mice display reduced levels of exocytosis. Changes in single-vesicle fusion kinetics are also evident resulting in the less catecholamine released per vesicle with increasing Rcan1 expression. Acute calcineurin inhibition did not replicate the effect of RCAN1 overexpression. These changes are not due to alterations in Ca2+ entry or the readily releasable vesicle pool size. Thus, we illustrate a novel regulator of vesicle exocytosis, Rcan1, which influences both exocytotic rate and vesicle fusion kinetics. If Rcan1 functions similarly in neurons then overexpression of this protein, as occurs in DS and AD brains, will reduce both the number of synaptic vesicles undergoing exocytosis and the amount of neurotransmitter released per fusion event. This has direct implications for the pathogenesis of these diseases as sufficient levels of neurotransmission are required for synaptic maintenance and the prevention of neurodegeneration and vesicle trafficking defects are the earliest hallmark of AD neuropathology.

  14. Surfactant secretion in LRRK2 knock-out rats: changes in lamellar body morphology and rate of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklavc, Pika; Ehinger, Konstantin; Thompson, Kristin E; Hobi, Nina; Shimshek, Derya R; Frick, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of various diseases including Parkinson disease, morbus Crohn, leprosy and cancer. LRRK2 is suggested to be involved in a number of cell biological processes such as vesicular trafficking, transcription, autophagy and lysosomal pathways. Recent histological studies of lungs of LRRK2 knock-out (LRRK2 -/-) mice revealed significantly enlarged lamellar bodies (LBs) in alveolar type II (ATII) epithelial cells. LBs are large, lysosome-related storage organelles for pulmonary surfactant, which is released into the alveolar lumen upon LB exocytosis. In this study we used high-resolution, subcellular live-cell imaging assays to investigate whether similar morphological changes can be observed in primary ATII cells from LRRK2 -/- rats and whether such changes result in altered LB exocytosis. Similarly to the report in mice, ATII cells from LRRK2 -/- rats contained significantly enlarged LBs resulting in a >50% increase in LB volume. Stimulation of ATII cells with ATP elicited LB exocytosis in a significantly increased proportion of cells from LRRK2 -/- animals. LRRK2 -/- cells also displayed increased intracellular Ca(2+) release upon ATP treatment and significant triggering of LB exocytosis. These findings are in line with the strong Ca(2+)-dependence of LB fusion activity and suggest that LRRK2 -/- affects exocytic response in ATII cells via modulating intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Post-fusion regulation of surfactant secretion was unaltered. Actin coating of fused vesicles and subsequent vesicle compression to promote surfactant expulsion were comparable in cells from LRRK2 -/- and wt animals. Surprisingly, surfactant (phospholipid) release from LRRK2 -/- cells was reduced following stimulation of LB exocytosis possibly due to impaired LB maturation and surfactant loading of LBs. In summary our results suggest that LRRK2 -/- affects LB size, modulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and

  15. Wiener kernel analysis of a noise-evoked otoacoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, P; Maat, A; Wit, H P

    1997-01-01

    In one specimen of the frog species, Rana esculenta, the following were measured: (1) a spontaneous otoacoustic emission; (2) a click-evoked otoacoustic emissions; and (3) a noise evoked otoacoustic emission. From the noise evoked emission response, a first-and a second-order Wiener kernel and the

  16. α-SNAP Prevents Docking of the Acrosome during Sperm Exocytosis because It Sequesters Monomeric Syntaxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Bustos, Matías A.; Zanetti, María N.; Ruete, María C.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2011-01-01

    α-SNAP has an essential role in membrane fusion that consists of bridging cis SNARE complexes to NSF. α-SNAP stimulates NSF, which releases itself, α-SNAP, and individual SNAREs that subsequently re-engage in the trans arrays indispensable for fusion. α-SNAP also binds monomeric syntaxin and NSF disengages the α-SNAP/syntaxin dimer. Here, we examine why recombinant α-SNAP blocks secretion in permeabilized human sperm despite the fact that the endogenous protein is essential for membrane fusion. The only mammalian organism with a genetically modified α-SNAP is the hyh mouse strain, which bears a M105I point mutation; males are subfertile due to defective sperm exocytosis. We report here that recombinant α-SNAP-M105I has greater affinity for the cytosolic portion of immunoprecipitated syntaxin than the wild type protein and in consequence NSF is less efficient in releasing the mutant. α-SNAP-M105I is a more potent sperm exocytosis blocker than the wild type and requires higher concentrations of NSF to rescue its effect. Unlike other fusion scenarios where SNAREs are subjected to an assembly/disassembly cycle, the fusion machinery in sperm is tuned so that SNAREs progress uni-directionally from a cis configuration in resting cells to monomeric and subsequently trans arrays in cells challenged with exocytosis inducers. By means of functional and indirect immunofluorescense assays, we show that recombinant α-SNAPs — wild type and M105I — inhibit exocytosis because they bind monomeric syntaxin and prevent this SNARE from assembling with its cognates in trans. Sequestration of free syntaxin impedes docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The N-terminal deletion mutant α-SNAP-(160–295), unable to bind syntaxin, affects neither docking nor secretion. The implications of this study are twofold: our findings explain the fertility defect of hyh mice and indicate that assembly of SNAREs in trans complexes is

  17. Increased Neutrophil Secretion Induced by NLRP3 Mutation Links the Inflammasome to Azurophilic Granule Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Haimovich, Ariela; McGeough, Matthew D; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hoffman, Hal M; Catz, Sergio D

    2017-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the NLRP3 gene in patients with cryopyrin associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) lead to hyper-responsive inflammasome function. CAPS is a systemic auto-inflammatory syndrome characterized by the activation of the innate immune system induced by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, but the involvement of selective innate immune cells in this process is not fully understood. Neutrophil secretion and the toxic components of their granules are mediators of inflammation associated with several human diseases and inflammatory conditions. Here, using the Nlrp3A350V inducible mouse model (MWS CreT) that recapitulates human patients with the A352V mutation in NLRP3 observed in the Muckle-Wells sub-phenotype of CAPS, we studied the relationship between hyper-activation of the inflammasome and neutrophil exocytosis. Using a flow cytometry approach, we show that Nlrp3A350V (MWS) neutrophils express normal basal levels of CD11b at the plasma membrane and that the upregulation of CD11b from secretory vesicles in response to several plasma membrane or endocytic agonist including the bacterial-derived mimetic peptide formyl-Leu-Met-Phe (fMLF) and the unmethylated oligonucleotide CpG is normal in MWS neutrophils. Significant but modest CD11b upregulation in MWS neutrophils compared to wild type was only observed in response to GM-CSF and CpG. The same pattern was observed for the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) from gelatinase granules in that MMP-9 secretion in MWS neutrophils was not different from that observed in wild-type neutrophils except when stimulated with GM-CSF and CpG. In contrast, azurophilic granule secretion, whose cargoes constitute the most toxic secretory and pro-inflammatory factors of the neutrophil, was markedly dysregulated in MWS neutrophils under both basal and stimulated conditions. This could not be attributed to paracrine effects of secretory cytokines because IL-1β secretion by neutrophils was undetectable under

  18. PI3K regulates endocytosis after insulin secretion by mediating signaling crosstalk between Arf6 and Rab27a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ando, Tomomi; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Takei, Masahiro; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Matsunaga, Kohichi; Ishizaki, Ray; Izumi, Tetsuro; Niki, Ichiro; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    In secretory cells, endocytosis is coupled to exocytosis to enable proper secretion. Although endocytosis is crucial to maintain cellular homeostasis before and after secretion, knowledge about secretagogue-induced endocytosis in secretory cells is still limited. Here, we searched for proteins that interacted with the Rab27a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) EPI64 (also known as TBC1D10A) and identified the Arf6 guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) ARNO (also known as CYTH2) in pancreatic β-cells. We found that the insulin secretagogue glucose promotes phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), thereby recruiting ARNO to the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Peripheral ARNO promotes clathrin assembly through its GEF activity for Arf6 and regulates the early stage of endocytosis. We also found that peripheral ARNO recruits EPI64 to the same area and that the interaction requires glucose-induced endocytosis in pancreatic β-cells. Given that GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate exocytosis and the late stage of endocytosis, our results indicate that the glucose-induced activation of PI3K plays a pivotal role in exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, and that ARNO and EPI64 regulate endocytosis at distinct stages. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Metformin and insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded.

  20. [Insulin resistance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Joanna; Witek, Przemysław; Pańkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to insulin. The hallmark of insulin resistance is decreased tissue glucose uptake despite normal or elevated insulin concentration. There has been an upward trend in the incidence of insulin resistance in developed countries, although in pediatric population it is difficult to assess. Both genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the etiology of insulin resistance, namely increased diet caloricity and decreased physical activity. Gradually, this leads to adipose tissue build-up. The role of visceral adipose tissue is of particular importance, mainly due to its significant endocrine activity, leading to adverse metabolic effects. The most important consequences of insulin resistance in children include increased incidence of type 2 diabetes, atherogenic dyslipidemia and arterial hypertension, which lead to increased cardiovascular risk. Children with insulin resistance can develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and sleep apnea syndrome. In case of female pediatric patients a higher incidence of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is observed. Furthermore, the authors reviewed opinions on risk factors for insulin resistance, as well as direct and indirect insulin resistance assessment methods. The article presents the principles of primary and secondary prevention of insulin resistance in children, with particular allowance for dietary recommendations and recommendations to increase physical activity, and, in selected cases, current guidelines on pharmacological treatment.

  1. Synaptobrevin N-terminally bound to syntaxin-SNAP-25 defines the primed vesicle state in regulated exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Wiederhold, Katrin; Bruns, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Rapid neurotransmitter release depends on the ability to arrest the SNAP receptor (SNARE)-dependent exocytosis pathway at an intermediate "cocked" state, from which fusion can be triggered by Ca(2+). It is not clear whether this state includes assembly of synaptobrevin (the vesicle membrane SNARE......) to the syntaxin-SNAP-25 (target membrane SNAREs) acceptor complex or whether the reaction is arrested upstream of that step. In this study, by a combination of in vitro biophysical measurements and time-resolved exocytosis measurements in adrenal chromaffin cells, we find that mutations of the N...

  2. Thought-evoking approaches in engineering problems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In creating the value-added product in not distant future, it is necessary and inevitable to establish a holistic and though-evoking approach to the engineering problem, which should be at least associated with the inter-disciplinary knowledge and thought processes across the whole engineering spheres. It is furthermore desirable to integrate it with trans-disciplinary aspects ranging from manufacturing culture, through liberal-arts engineering, and industrial sociology.   The thought-evoking approach can be exemplified and typified by representative engineering problems: unveiling essential features in ‘Tangential Force Ratio and Interface Pressure’, prototype development for ‘Bio-mimetic Needle’ and application of ‘Water-jet Machining to Artificial Hip Joint’, product innovation in ‘Heat Sink for Computer’, application of ‘Graph Theory’ to similarity evaluation of production systems, leverage among reciprocity attributes in ‘Industrial and Engineering Designs for Machine Enclosure’,...

  3. Music-Evoked Emotions-Current Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt

    2017-01-01

    The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG), event-related brain potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), skin conductance response (SCR), finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection) can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields.

  4. INSULIN THERAPY TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Živić

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The insulin classification regarding the duration of its effect gradually be-comes outdated; it is necessary to speak first about the insulin therapy regimes. The intensified insulin therapy regarding the type of multiple daily insulin injections be-comes an indisputable standard. The progress in the "protein engineering" with the formation of a wide spectrum of insulin analogues provides for moving forward to-wards modern diabetology and the concept of strict individualization of the insulin therapy. The experience becomes a pattern in creating two existing formulas of the insulin "short" analogues, namely HUMALAG with the replacement of the proline and lysinane places with those of 28 and 29, and NOVORAPID with aspartic acid at the 28th place in the B chain. The most recent long-effect analogues are created by amino acid changes with the glycine residual at the position A21 and two ariginines added to the positions B31 and B32 - insulin "glargin" - LANTUS. The development of short and long effect analogues imposed the logical need for formulating "new" fixed insulin combination's as well. New combination's are made of two kinds of ac-tual insulin, namely, the fast-effect analogues of the aspart type or lystroinsulin and protamine-retarded preparations - neutral protamine - lystroinsulin. Three kinds of combinations are made.

  5. ADF/Cofilin Controls Synaptic Actin Dynamics and Regulates Synaptic Vesicle Mobilization and Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael; Zimmermann, Anika-Maria; Görlich, Andreas; Gurniak, Christine B; Sassoè-Pognetto, Marco; Friauf, Eckhard; Witke, Walter; Rust, Marco B

    2015-09-01

    Actin is a regulator of synaptic vesicle mobilization and exocytosis, but little is known about the mechanisms that regulate actin at presynaptic terminals. Genetic data on LIMK1, a negative regulator of actin-depolymerizing proteins of the ADF/cofilin family, suggest a role for ADF/cofilin in presynaptic function. However, synapse physiology is fully preserved upon genetic ablation of ADF in mice, and n-cofilin mutant mice display defects in postsynaptic plasticity, but not in presynaptic function. One explanation for this phenomenon is overlapping functions of ADF and n-cofilin in presynaptic physiology. Here, we tested this hypothesis and genetically removed ADF together with n-cofilin from synapses. In double mutants for ADF and n-cofilin, synaptic actin dynamics was impaired and more severely affected than in single mutants. The resulting cytoskeletal defects heavily affected the organization, mobilization, and exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. Our data for the first time identify overlapping functions for ADF and n-cofilin in presynaptic physiology and vesicle trafficking. We conclude that n-cofilin is a limiting factor in postsynaptic plasticity, a function which cannot be substituted by ADF. On the presynaptic side, the presence of either ADF or n-cofilin is sufficient to control actin remodeling during vesicle release. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles in macrophages: intracellular uptake, exocytosis, and intercellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li Qun; Wang, Ting Yu; Webster, Thomas J; Duan, Hua-Jian; Qiu, Jing Ying; Zhao, Zi Ming; Yin, Xiao Xing; Zheng, Chun Li

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable nanomaterials have been widely used in numerous medical fields. To further improve such efforts, this study focused on the intracellular disposition of chitosan nanoparticles (CsNPs) in macrophages, a primary cell of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). Such interactions with the MPS determine the nanoparticle retention time in the body and consequently play a significant role in their own clinical safety. In this study, various dye-labeled CsNPs (about 250 nm) were prepared, and a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) was selected as a model macrophage. The results showed two mechanisms of macrophage incorporation of CsNPs, ie, a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway (the primary) and phagocytosis. Following internalization, the particles partly dissociated in the cells, indicating cellular digestion of the nanoparticles. It was proved that, after intracellular uptake, a large proportion of CsNPs were exocytosed within 24 h; this excretion induced a decrease in fluorescence intensity in cells by 69%, with the remaining particles possessing difficulty being cleared. Exocytosis could be inhibited by both wortmannin and vacuolin-1, indicating that CsNP uptake was mediated by lysosomal and multivesicular body pathways, and after exocytosis, the reuptake of CsNPs by neighboring cells was verified by further experiments. This study, thus, elucidated the fate of CsNPs in macrophages as well as identified cellular disposition mechanisms, providing the basis for how CsNPs are recognized by the MPS; such information is crucial to numerous medical applications of CsNPs.

  7. High-resolution membrane capacitance measurements for the study of exocytosis and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rituper, Boštjan; Guček, Alenka; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Flašker, Ajda; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2013-06-01

    In order to understand exocytosis and endocytosis, it is necessary to study these processes directly. An elegant way to do this is by measuring plasma membrane capacitance (C(m)), a parameter proportional to cell surface area, the fluctuations of which are due to fusion and fission of secretory and other vesicles. Here we describe protocols that enable high-resolution C(m) measurements in macroscopic and microscopic modes. Macroscopic mode, performed in whole-cell configuration, is used for measuring bulk C(m) changes in the entire membrane area, and it enables the introduction of exocytosis stimulators or inhibitors into the cytosol through the patch pipette. Microscopic mode, performed in cell-attached configuration, enables measurements of C(m) with attofarad resolution and allows characterization of fusion pore properties. Although we usually apply these protocols to primary pituitary cells and astrocytes, they can be adapted and used for other cell types. After initial hardware setup and culture preparation, several C(m) measurements can be performed daily.

  8. Synaptotagmin I is involved in the regulation of cortical granule exocytosis in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguia, Mariana; Conner, Sean; Berg, Linnea; Wessel, Gary M

    2006-07-01

    Cortical granules are stimulus-dependent secretory vesicles found in the egg cortex of most vertebrates and many invertebrates. Upon fertilization, an increase in intracellular calcium levels triggers cortical granules to exocytose enzymes and structural proteins that permanently modify the extracellular surface of the egg to prevent polyspermy. Synaptotagmin is postulated to be a calcium sensor important for stimulus-dependent secretion and to test this hypothesis for cortical granule exocytosis, we identified the ortholog in two sea urchin species that is present selectively on cortical granules. Characterization by RT-PCR, in-situ RNA hybridization, Western blot and immunolocalization shows that synaptotagmin I is expressed in a manner consistent with it having a role during cortical granule secretion. We specifically tested synaptotagmin function during cortical granule exocytosis using a microinjected antibody raised against the entire cytoplasmic domain of sea urchin synaptotagmin I. The results show that synaptotagmin I is essential for normal cortical granule dynamics at fertilization in the sea urchin egg. Identification of this same protein in other developmental stages also shown here will be important for interpreting stimulus-dependent secretory events for signaling throughout embryogenesis.

  9. Minimal requirements for exocytosis. A study using PC 12 cells permeabilized with staphylococcal alpha-toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Bhakdi, S.; Gratzl, M.

    1985-10-15

    The membrane-permeabilizing effects of streptolysin O, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, and digitonin on cultured rat pheochromocytoma cells were studied. All three agents perturbed the plasma membrane, causing release of intracellular YWRb and uptake of trypan blue. In addition, streptolysin O and digitonin also damaged the membranes of secretory vesicles, including a parallel release of dopamine. In contrast, the effects of alpha-toxin appeared to be strictly confined to the plasma membrane, and no dopamine release was observed with this agent. The exocytotic machinery, however, remained intact and could be triggered by subsequent introduction of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ into the medium. Dopamine release was entirely Ca2+ specific and occurred independent of the presence or absence of other cations or anions including K+ glutamate, K+ acetate, or Na+ chloride. Ca2+-induced exocytosis did not require the presence of Mg2+-ATP in the medium. The process was insensitive to pH alterations in the range pH 6.6-7.2, and appeared optimal at an osmolarity of 300 mosm/kg. Toxin permeabilization seems to be an excellent method for studying the minimal requirements for exocytosis.

  10. The dissociation of exocytosis and respiratory stimulation in leucocytes by ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabucchi, G; Romeo, D

    1976-01-01

    By exploiting the unique characteristics of three ionophores, experimental conditions were found which permit the dissociation of respiratory stimulation from secretion in polymorphonuclear leucocytes. A marked stimulation of respiration was produced by ionophore X537A, which binds and transports both alkali-earth and alkali cations. The stimulatory activity of this ionophore was the same at either high or low Na+/K+ ratios in the medium and was virtually unaffected by extracellular Ca2+. A slight stimulation of oxygen consumption was also caused by the K+-selective ionophore valinomycin and by ionophore A23187, which complexes and transfers bivalent cations. Ionophore X537A and valinomycin were unable to stimulate selective release of granuleassociated beta-glucuronidase and gradually increased cell fragility, as monitored by increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase. Ionophore A23187 slightly increased exocytosis of beta-glucuronidase. In a Mg2+-free medium, Ca2+, added simultaneously with ionophore A23187, greatly enhanced respiration and secretion of the granule enzyme. If Ca2+ was added a few minutes after the ionophore, exocytosis occurred, but no respiratory burst was observed. If the latter experiment was repeated in the presence of extracellular Mg2+, both secretion and respiration were stimulated. This effect was not produced by Mn2+ or Ba2+. It is proposed that Ca2+ is required for triggering selective secretion of granule enzymes from leucocytes is caused by an intracellular redistribution of cations, which may invovle Mg2+-dependent mechanisms. PMID:782449

  11. A potential link between insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation: Association of Rab10-GTP with the exocyst subunit Exoc6/6b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Peck, Grantley R. [Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Blachon, Stephanie [Hybrigenics Services SAS, 3-5 Impasse Reille, 75014 Paris (France); Lienhard, Gustav E., E-mail: gustav.e.lienhard@dartmouth.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Insulin increases glucose transport in fat and muscle cells by stimulating the exocytosis of specialized vesicles containing the glucose transporter GLUT4. This process, which is referred to as GLUT4 translocation, increases the amount of GLUT4 at the cell surface. Previous studies have provided evidence that insulin signaling increases the amount of Rab10-GTP in the GLUT4 vesicles and that GLUT4 translocation requires the exocyst, a complex that functions in the tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane, leading to exocytosis. In the present study we show that Rab10 in its GTP form binds to Exoc6 and Exoc6b, which are the two highly homologous isotypes of an exocyst subunit, that both isotypes are found in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and that knockdown of Exoc6, Exoc6b, or both inhibits GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that the association of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6/6b is a molecular link between insulin signaling and the exocytic machinery in GLUT4 translocation. - Highlights: • Insulin stimulates the fusion of vesicles containing GLUT4 with the plasma membrane. • This requires vesicular Rab10-GTP and the exocyst plasma membrane tethering complex. • We find that Rab10-GTP associates with the Exoc6 subunit of the exocyst. • We find that knockdown of Exoc6 inhibits fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the membrane. • The interaction of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6 potentially links signaling to exocytosis.

  12. [Insulin therapy and sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, A

    1997-01-01

    Physical work effects a transitory enhanced affinity of insulin to its receptor in the stressed muscles and thereby a better efficiency. Therefore, in sports lasting for 30 min and more the basal and/or bolus doses of insulin have to be reduced in order to prevent hypoglycemia. An alternative supply of additional carbohydrates prior to physical work is often not practicable. Injections of insulin into areas of the body not involved in muscular work do not give sufficient warranty against hypoglycemic reactions. A new short-acting insulin-analogue (Lispro) shows a reduced effect on blood glucose levels after 3 h as compared to regular insulin. Therefore, it could be of advantage for insulin dependent diabetics doing their exercise at this time.

  13. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  14. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... of the patient's reaction to exercise is desirable, which necessitates frequent self-monitoring of plasma glucose. It may often be necessary to diminish the insulin dose before exercise, and/or to ingest additional carbohydrate during or after exercise. In non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, exercise...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so...

  15. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  16. Thrombin-induced lysosomal exocytosis in human platelets is dependent on secondary activation by ADP and regulated by endothelial-derived substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Anna L; Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Ramström, Sofia; Lindström, Eva G; Grenegård, Magnus; Öllinger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis of lysosomal contents from platelets has been speculated to participate in clearance of thrombi and vessel wall remodelling. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis in platelets are, however, still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the pathways underlying platelet lysosomal secretion and elucidate how this process is controlled by platelet inhibitors. We found that high concentrations of thrombin induced partial lysosomal exocytosis as assessed by analysis of the activity of released N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) and by identifying the fraction of platelets exposing the lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1 on the cell surface by flow cytometry. Stimulation of thrombin receptors PAR1 or PAR4 with specific peptides was equally effective in inducing LAMP-1 surface expression. Notably, lysosomal exocytosis in response to thrombin was significantly reduced if the secondary activation by ADP was inhibited by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor, while inhibition of thromboxane A2 formation by treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was of minor importance in this regard. Moreover, the NO-releasing drug S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) or the cyclic AMP-elevating eicosanoid prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) significantly suppressed lysosomal exocytosis. We conclude that platelet inhibitors that mimic functional endothelium such as PGI2 or NO efficiently counteract lysosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, we suggest that secondary release of ADP and concomitant signaling via PAR1/4- and P2Y12 receptors is important for efficient platelet lysosomal exocytosis by thrombin.

  17. Exocytosis of Endothelial Lysosome-Related Organelles Hair-Triggers a Patchy Loss of Glycocalyx at the Onset of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Joseph A; Fan, Jie; Azar, Tala T; Yen, Wanyi; Zeng, Min; Chen, Jun; Ratliff, Brian B; Song, Jun; Tarbell, John M; Goligorsky, Michael S; Fu, Bingmei M

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory syndrome induced by bacterial infection that can lead to multiorgan failure. Endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) decorating the inner wall of blood vessels is a regulator of multiple vascular functions. Here, we tested a hypothesis that patchy degradation of ESG occurs early in sepsis and is a result of exocytosis of lysosome-related organelles. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed that exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies and secretory lysosomes occurred a few minutes after application of lipopolysaccharides to endothelial cells. Two therapeutic maneuvers, a nitric oxide intermediate, NG-hydroxy-l-arginine, and culture media conditioned by endothelial progenitor cells reduced the motility of lysosome-related organelles. Confocal and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy confirmed the patchy loss of ESG simultaneously with the exocytosis of lysosome-related organelles and Weibel-Palade bodies in cultured endothelial cells and mouse aorta. The loss of ESG was blunted by pretreatment with NG-hydroxy-l-arginine or culture media conditioned by endothelial progenitor cells. Moreover, these treatments resulted in a significant reduction in deaths of septic mice. Our data support the hypothesis assigning to stress-induced exocytosis of these organelles the role of a hair-trigger for local degradation of ESG that initiates leukocyte infiltration, increase in vascular permeability, and partially accounts for the later rates of morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lithographic Microfabrication of a 16-Electrode Array on a Probe Tip for High Spatial Resolution Electrochemical Localization of Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigström, Joakim; Dunevall, Johan; Najafinobar, Neda; Lovrić, Jelena; Wang, Jun; Ewing, Andrew G; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-02-16

    We report the lithographic microfabrication of a movable thin film microelectrode array (MEA) probe consisting of 16 platinum band electrodes placed on top of a supporting borosilicate glass substrate. These 1.2 μm wide electrodes were tightly packed and positioned parallel in two opposite rows within a 20 μm × 25 μm square area and with a distance less than 10 μm from the edge of the glass substrate. We demonstrate the ability to control and place the probe in close proximity to the surface of adherent bovine chromaffin cells and to amperometrically record single exocytosis release events with high spatiotemporal resolution. The two-dimensional position of single exocytotic events occurring in the center gap area separating the two rows of MEA band electrodes and that were codetected by electrodes in both rows was determined by analysis of the fractional detection of catecholamine released between electrodes and exploiting random walk simulations. Hence, two-dimensional electrochemical imaging recording of exocytosis release between the electrodes within this area was achieved. Similarly, by modeling the current spikes codetected by parallel adjacent band electrodes positioned in the same electrode row, a one-dimensional imaging of exocytosis with submicrometer resolution was accomplished within the area. The one- and two-dimensional electrochemical imaging using the MEA probe allowed for high spatial resolution of exocytosis activity and revealed heterogeneous release of catecholamine at the chromaffin cell surface.

  19. MID2 can substitute for MID1 and control exocytosis of lytic granules in cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase midline 1 (MID1) is upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL), where it controls exocytosis of lytic granules and the killing capacity. Accordingly, CTL from MID1 knock-out (MID1(-/-)) mice have a 25-30% reduction in exocytosis of lytic...... granules and cytotoxicity compared to CTL from wild-type (WT) mice. We wondered why the MID1 gene knock-out did not affect exocytosis and cytotoxicity more severely and speculated whether MID2, a close homologue of MID1, might partially compensate for the loss of MID1 in MID1(-/-) CTL. Here, we showed...... that MID2, like MID1, is upregulated in activated murine T cells. Furthermore, MID1(-/-) CTL upregulated MID2 two-twenty-fold stronger than CTL from WT mice, suggesting that MID2 might compensate for MID1. In agreement, transfection of MID2 into MID1(-/-) CTL completely rescued exocytosis of lytic granules...

  20. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Kabachinski, Greg; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J Michael; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-09-30

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca 2+ -triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P 2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P 2 -triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. EF-hand protein Ca2+ buffers regulate Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in sensory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangršič, Tina; Gabrielaitis, Mantas; Michanski, Susann; Schwaller, Beat; Wolf, Fred; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2015-03-03

    EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins are thought to shape the spatiotemporal properties of cellular Ca(2+) signaling and are prominently expressed in sensory hair cells in the ear. Here, we combined genetic disruption of parvalbumin-α, calbindin-D28k, and calretinin in mice with patch-clamp recording, in vivo physiology, and mathematical modeling to study their role in Ca(2+) signaling, exocytosis, and sound encoding at the synapses of inner hair cells (IHCs). IHCs lacking all three proteins showed excessive exocytosis during prolonged depolarizations, despite enhanced Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of their Ca(2+) current. Exocytosis of readily releasable vesicles remained unchanged, in accordance with the estimated tight spatial coupling of Ca(2+) channels and release sites (effective "coupling distance" of 17 nm). Substitution experiments with synthetic Ca(2+) chelators indicated the presence of endogenous Ca(2+) buffers equivalent to 1 mM synthetic Ca(2+)-binding sites, approximately half of them with kinetics as fast as 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Synaptic sound encoding was largely unaltered, suggesting that excess exocytosis occurs extrasynaptically. We conclude that EF-hand Ca(2+) buffers regulate presynaptic IHC function for metabolically efficient sound coding.

  3. Fully automated microchip system for the detection of quantal exocytosis from single and small ensembles of cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spégel, Christer; Heiskanen, Arto; Pedersen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    exocytosis from single as well as small assemblies of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The frequency of events increased considerably upon depolarization of the PC12 cell membrane using a high extracelluar concentration of potassium. The number of recorded events could be correlated with the number...

  4. Adenylyl cyclase alpha and cAMP signaling mediate Plasmodium sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis and hepatocyte infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ono

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria starts with the infection of the liver of the host by Plasmodium sporozoites, the parasite form transmitted by infected mosquitoes. Sporozoites migrate through several hepatocytes by breaching their plasma membranes before finally infecting one with the formation of an internalization vacuole. Migration through host cells induces apical regulated exocytosis in sporozoites. Here we show that apical regulated exocytosis is induced by increases in cAMP in sporozoites of rodent (P. yoelii and P. berghei and human (P. falciparum Plasmodium species. We have generated P. berghei parasites deficient in adenylyl cyclase alpha (ACalpha, a gene containing regions with high homology to adenylyl cyclases. PbACalpha-deficient sporozoites do not exocytose in response to migration through host cells and present more than 50% impaired hepatocyte infectivity in vivo. These effects are specific to ACalpha, as re-introduction of ACalpha in deficient parasites resulted in complete recovery of exocytosis and infection. Our findings indicate that ACalpha and increases in cAMP levels are required for sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis, which is involved in sporozoite infection of hepatocytes.

  5. History of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste C. Quianzon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of diabetes treatment has gone from crude extracts of insulin and accidental discovery of sulfa-like drugs in antibiotics to the development of drugs based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus. This article will review the history of the discovery and development of insulin. A companion focusing on non-insulin diabetes agents will follow in the next issue of JCHIMP.

  6. Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the association between insulin resistance and vascular disease, and this has led to wide acceptance of the clustering of hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, hypertension, and obesity as a clinical entity, the metabolic syndrome. While insulin resistance, by promoting dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities, is part of the proatherogenic milieu, it is possible that insulin resistance itself in the vascular wall does not promote atherosclerosis. Recent fi...

  7. Gap junctions and other mechanisms of cell–cell communication regulate basal insulin secretion in the pancreatic islet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, R K P; Head, W Steven; Zhang, Min; Satin, Leslie S; Piston, David W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cell–cell communication in the islet of Langerhans is important for the regulation of insulin secretion. Gap-junctions coordinate oscillations in intracellular free-calcium ([Ca2+]i) and insulin secretion in the islet following elevated glucose. Gap-junctions can also ensure that oscillatory [Ca2+]i ceases when glucose is at a basal levels. We determine the roles of gap-junctions and other cell–cell communication pathways in the suppression of insulin secretion under basal conditions. Metabolic, electrical and insulin secretion levels were measured from islets lacking gap-junction coupling following deletion of connexion36 (Cx36−/−), and these results were compared to those obtained using fully isolated β-cells. KATP loss-of-function islets provide a further experimental model to specifically study gap-junction mediated suppression of electrical activity. In isolated β-cells or Cx36−/− islets, elevations in [Ca2+]i persisted in a subset of cells even at basal glucose. Isolated β-cells showed elevated insulin secretion at basal glucose; however, insulin secretion from Cx36−/− islets was minimally altered. [Ca2+]i was further elevated under basal conditions, but insulin release still suppressed in KATP loss-of-function islets. Forced elevation of cAMP led to PKA-mediated increases in insulin secretion from islets lacking gap-junctions, but not from islets expressing Cx36 gap junctions. We conclude there is a redundancy in how cell–cell communication in the islet suppresses insulin release. Gap junctions suppress cellular heterogeneity and spontaneous [Ca2+]i signals, while other juxtacrine mechanisms, regulated by PKA and glucose, suppress more distal steps in exocytosis. Each mechanism is sufficiently robust to compensate for a loss of the other and still suppress basal insulin secretion. PMID:21930600

  8. Gap junctions and other mechanisms of cell-cell communication regulate basal insulin secretion in the pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, R K P; Head, W Steven; Zhang, Min; Satin, Leslie S; Piston, David W

    2011-11-15

    Cell-cell communication in the islet of Langerhans is important for the regulation of insulin secretion. Gap-junctions coordinate oscillations in intracellular free-calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin secretion in the islet following elevated glucose. Gap-junctions can also ensure that oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) ceases when glucose is at a basal levels. We determine the roles of gap-junctions and other cell-cell communication pathways in the suppression of insulin secretion under basal conditions. Metabolic, electrical and insulin secretion levels were measured from islets lacking gap-junction coupling following deletion of connexion36 (Cx36(-/-)), and these results were compared to those obtained using fully isolated β-cells. K(ATP) loss-of-function islets provide a further experimental model to specifically study gap-junction mediated suppression of electrical activity. In isolated β-cells or Cx36(-/-) islets, elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) persisted in a subset of cells even at basal glucose. Isolated β-cells showed elevated insulin secretion at basal glucose; however, insulin secretion from Cx36(-/-) islets was minimally altered. [Ca(2+)](i) was further elevated under basal conditions, but insulin release still suppressed in K(ATP) loss-of-function islets. Forced elevation of cAMP led to PKA-mediated increases in insulin secretion from islets lacking gap-junctions, but not from islets expressing Cx36 gap junctions. We conclude there is a redundancy in how cell-cell communication in the islet suppresses insulin release. Gap junctions suppress cellular heterogeneity and spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) signals, while other juxtacrine mechanisms, regulated by PKA and glucose, suppress more distal steps in exocytosis. Each mechanism is sufficiently robust to compensate for a loss of the other and still suppress basal insulin secretion.

  9. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  10. Music-Evoked Emotions—Current Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Eckhardt Schaefer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET, which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG, event-related brain potentials (ERP, magnetoencephalography (MEG, skin conductance response (SCR, finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields.

  11. Music-Evoked Emotions—Current Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt

    2017-01-01

    The present study is focused on a review of the current state of investigating music-evoked emotions experimentally, theoretically and with respect to their therapeutic potentials. After a concise historical overview and a schematic of the hearing mechanisms, experimental studies on music listeners and on music performers are discussed, starting with the presentation of characteristic musical stimuli and the basic features of tomographic imaging of emotional activation in the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), which offer high spatial resolution in the millimeter range. The progress in correlating activation imaging in the brain to the psychological understanding of music-evoked emotion is demonstrated and some prospects for future research are outlined. Research in psychoneuroendocrinology and molecular markers is reviewed in the context of music-evoked emotions and the results indicate that the research in this area should be intensified. An assessment of studies involving measuring techniques with high temporal resolution down to the 10 ms range, as, e.g., electroencephalography (EEG), event-related brain potentials (ERP), magnetoencephalography (MEG), skin conductance response (SCR), finger temperature, and goose bump development (piloerection) can yield information on the dynamics and kinetics of emotion. Genetic investigations reviewed suggest the heredity transmission of a predilection for music. Theoretical approaches to musical emotion are directed to a unified model for experimental neurological evidence and aesthetic judgment. Finally, the reports on musical therapy are briefly outlined. The study concludes with an outlook on emerging technologies and future research fields. PMID:29225563

  12. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Theresia Weber-Glass

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman’s (Ekman et al., 1983 basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles / bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the skin conductance response and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles / bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics.

  13. Somatosensory evoked response: application in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. M. Guerreiro

    1982-03-01

    Full Text Available One technique used for short-latency somatosensory evoked response (SER is described. SER following nerve stimulation is a unique non-invasive, clinical test used to evaluate the somatosensory pathways. It tests the physiological function of the median nerve, the brachial plexus, the C6-7 cervical roots, cervical spinal cord, the cuneate nuclei, the medial lemniscus, the thalamus, and the contralateral sensory cortex. It has been shown to be a reliable and useful clinical test partiicularly in multiple sclerosis and comatose patients. The promising technique of SER following peroneal nerve stimulation is mentioned.

  14. GTP-bound Rab3A exhibits consecutive positive and negative roles during human sperm dense-core granule exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Matías A; Roggero, Carlos M; De la Iglesia, Paola X; Mayorga, Luis S; Tomes, Claudia N

    2014-08-01

    Exocytosis of mammalian sperm dense-core secretory granule relies on the same fusion molecules as all other secretory cells; one such molecule is the small GTPase Rab3A. Here, we report an in-depth biochemical characterization of the role of Rab3A in secretion by scrutinizing the exocytotic response of streptolysin O-permeabilized human sperm to the acute application of a number of Rab3A-containing constructs and correlating the findings with those gathered with the endogenous protein. Full length, geranylgeranylated, and active Rab3A elicited human sperm exocytosis per se. With Rab3A/Rab22A chimeric proteins, we demonstrated that the carboxy-terminal domain of the Rab3A molecule was necessary and sufficient to promote exocytosis, whereas its amino-terminus prevented calcium-triggered secretion. Interestingly, full length Rab3A halted secretion when added after the docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane. This effect depended on the inability of Rab3A to hydrolyze GTP. We combined modified immunofluorescence and acrosomal staining protocols to detect membrane fusion and the activation status of endogenous Rab3 simultaneously in individual cells, and found that GTP hydrolysis on endogenous Rab3 was mandatory for fusion pores to open. Our findings contribute to establishing that Rab3 modulates regulated exocytosis differently depending on the nucleotide bound and the exocytosis stage under study. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Ca²⁺ signals promote GLUT4 exocytosis and reduce its endocytosis in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Zhu, X; Ishikura, S; Zhang, D; Gao, J; Sun, Y; Contreras-Ferrat, A; Foley, K P; Lavandero, S; Yao, Z; Bilan, P J; Klip, A; Niu, W

    2014-07-15

    Elevating cytosolic Ca(2+) stimulates glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, but how Ca(2+) affects intracellular traffic of GLUT4 is unknown. In tissue, changes in Ca(2+) leading to contraction preclude analysis of the impact of individual, Ca(2+)-derived signals. In L6 muscle cells stably expressing GLUT4myc, the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin raised cytosolic Ca(2+) and caused a gain in cell surface GLUT4myc. Extra- and intracellular Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA, BAPTA-AM) reversed this response. Ionomycin activated calcium calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), AMPK, and PKCs, but not Akt. Silencing CaMKIIδ or AMPKα1/α2 partly reduced the ionomycin-induced gain in surface GLUT4myc, as did peptidic or small molecule inhibitors of CaMKII (CN21) and AMPK (Compound C). Compared with the conventional isoenzyme PKC inhibitor Gö6976, the conventional plus novel PKC inhibitor Gö6983 lowered the ionomycin-induced gain in cell surface GLUT4myc. Ionomycin stimulated GLUT4myc exocytosis and inhibited its endocytosis in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKIIδ or AMPKα1/α2 partly reversed ionomycin-induced GLUT4myc exocytosis but did not prevent its reduced endocytosis. Compared with Gö6976, Gö6983 markedly reversed the slowing of GLUT4myc endocytosis triggered by ionomycin. In summary, rapid Ca(2+) influx into muscle cells accelerates GLUT4myc exocytosis while slowing GLUT4myc endocytosis. CaMKIIδ and AMPK stimulate GLUT4myc exocytosis, whereas novel PKCs reduce endocytosis. These results identify how Ca(2+)-activated signals selectively regulate GLUT4 exocytosis and endocytosis in muscle cells. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis by Modulating Lipid Turnover and Rab3A Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletán, Leonardo E.; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C.; Bustos, Matías A.; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:25713146

  17. The signaling module cAMP/Epac/Rap1/PLCε/IP3 mobilizes acrosomal calcium during sperm exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, Ornella; Ruete, María C; Bustos, Matías A; Quevedo, María F; Tomes, Claudia N

    2016-04-01

    Exocytosis of the sperm's single secretory granule, or acrosome, is a regulated exocytosis triggered by components of the egg's investments. In addition to external calcium, sperm exocytosis (termed the acrosome reaction) requires cAMP synthesized endogenously and calcium mobilized from the acrosome through IP3-sensitive channels. The relevant cAMP target is Epac. In the first part of this paper, we present a novel tool (the TAT-cAMP sponge) to investigate cAMP-related signaling pathways in response to progesterone as acrosome reaction trigger. The TAT-cAMP sponge consists of the cAMP-binding sites of protein kinase A regulatory subunit RIβ fused to the protein transduction domain TAT of the human immunodeficiency virus-1. The sponge permeated into sperm, sequestered endogenous cAMP, and blocked exocytosis. Progesterone increased the population of sperm with Rap1-GTP, Rab3-GTP, and Rab27-GTP in the acrosomal region; pretreatment with the TAT-cAMP sponge prevented the activation of all three GTPases. In the second part of this manuscript, we show that phospholipase Cε (PLCε) is required for the acrosome reaction downstream of Rap1 and upstream of intra-acrosomal calcium mobilization. Last, we present direct evidence that cAMP, Epac, Rap1, and PLCε are necessary for calcium mobilization from sperm's secretory granule. In summary, we describe here a pathway that connects cAMP to calcium mobilization from the acrosome during sperm exocytosis. Never before had direct evidence for each step of the cascade been put together in the same study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) promotes acrosomal exocytosis by modulating lipid turnover and Rab3A activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletán, Leonardo E; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C; Bustos, Matías A; De Blas, Gerardo A; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S; Belmonte, Silvia A

    2015-04-10

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Phospholipase C-related but Catalytically Inactive Protein (PRIP) Modulates Synaptosomal-associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25) Phosphorylation and Exocytosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Zhang, Zhao; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Hirata, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Exocytosis is one of the most fundamental cellular events. The basic mechanism of the final step, membrane fusion, is mediated by the formation of the SNARE complex, which is modulated by the phosphorylation of proteins controlled by the concerted actions of protein kinases and phosphatases. We have previously shown that a protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) anchoring protein, phospholipase C-related but catalytically inactive protein (PRIP), has an inhibitory role in regulated exocytosis. The current study investigated the involvement of PRIP in the phospho-dependent modulation of exocytosis. Dephosphorylation of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) was mainly catalyzed by PP1, and the process was modulated by wild-type PRIP but not by the mutant (F97A) lacking PP1 binding ability in in vitro studies. We then examined the role of PRIP in phospho-dependent regulation of exocytosis in cell-based studies using pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 cells, which secrete noradrenalin. Exogenous expression of PRIP accelerated the dephosphorylation process of phosphorylated SNAP-25 after forskolin or phorbol ester treatment of the cells. The phospho-states of SNAP-25 were correlated with noradrenalin secretion, which was enhanced by forskolin or phorbol ester treatment and modulated by PRIP expression in PC12 cells. Both SNAP-25 and PP1 were co-precipitated in anti-PRIP immunocomplex isolated from PC12 cells expressing PRIP. Collectively, together with our previous observation regarding the roles of PRIP in PP1 regulation, these results suggest that PRIP is involved in the regulation of the phospho-states of SNAP-25 by modulating the activity of PP1, thus regulating exocytosis. PMID:22311984

  20. Ca2+-independent and Ca2+/GTP-binding protein-controlled exocytosis in a plant cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, U; Tester, M

    1997-06-10

    Exocytosis allows the release of secretory products and the delivery of new membrane material to the plasma membrane. So far, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism and its control in plant cells. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to monitor changes in membrane capacitance to study exocytosis in barley aleurone protoplasts. To investigate the involvement of Ca2+ and GTP-binding proteins in exocytosis, protoplasts were dialyzed with very low (Ca2+ and nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotides guanosine 5'-gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gammaS]) or guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[betaS]). With less than 2 nM cytoplasmic free Ca2+, the membrane capacitance increased significantly over 20 min. This increase was not altered by GTP[gammaS] or GDP[betaS]. In contrast, dialyzing protoplasts with 1 microM free Ca2+ resulted in a large increase in membrane capacitance that was slightly reduced by GTP[gammaS] and strongly inhibited by GDP[betaS]. We conclude that two exocytotic pathways exist in barley aleurone protoplasts: one that is Ca2+-independent and whose regulation is currently not known and another that is stimulated by Ca2+ and modulated by GTP-binding proteins. We suggest that Ca2+-independent exocytosis may be involved in cell expansion in developing protoplasts. Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis may play a role in gibberellic acid-stimulated alpha-amylase secretion in barley aleurone and, more generally, may be involved in membrane resealing in response to cell damage.

  1. Evoked potentials in pediatric cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Bhanushali

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical evoked potentials (EP provide localized data regarding brain function and may offer prognostic information and insights into the pathologic mechanisms of malariamediated cerebral injury. As part of a prospective cohort study, we obtained somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs and brainstem auditory EPs (AEPs within 24 hours of admission on 27 consecutive children admitted with cerebral malaria (CM. Children underwent follow-up for 12 months to determine if they had any long term neurologic sequelae. EPs were obtained in 27 pediatric CM admissions. Two children died. Among survivors followed an average of 514 days, 7/25 (28.0% had at least one adverse neurologic outcome. Only a single subject had absent cortical EPs on admission and this child had a good neurologic outcome. Among pediatric CM survivors, cortical EPs are generally intact and do not predict adverse neurologic outcomes. Further study is needed to determine if alterations in cortical EPs can be used to predict a fatal outcome in CM.

  2. [Personality dimensions and cerebral evoked potential].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camposano, S; Alvarez, C; Lolas, F

    1994-12-01

    Eysenck's personality theory postulates 3 orthogonal dimensions of personality: extraversion (E), neuroticism (N) and psychoticism (P), predicting conductual and physiological predispositions to suffer mental illness. Biological bases of Eysenck's personality traits have been documented electrophysiologically. Psychoticism, the latest described dimension, is controverted, since there is some evidence of common factors with the other two. In order to assess the relation between Eysenck's dimensions and sensorial reactivity and information encoding processes we studied 20 healthy young subjects (mean age 28.5 years) with flash visual cortical evoked potentials (VEP, 3 intensities, peak to peak amplitude of III, IV-V-VI, VII components), and auditory cognitive evoked potentials (odd ball paradigm, P300 latency). There was a positive correlation between N and P dimensions (Spearman, r = 0.52), between N and VEP amplitude at high intensity (r = 0.58) and a negative correlation between E and P300 latency (r = 0.58). In short we found that P is not an independent dimension, but is related to sensorial reactivity. E dimension was related to encoding processes supporting Eysenck's observations about memory and learning differences.

  3. Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials during Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Shirley; Deepeshwar, Singh; Naveen, Kalkuni Visweswaraiah; Pailoor, Subramanya

    2015-10-01

    The auditory sensory pathway has been studied in meditators, using midlatency and short latency auditory evoked potentials. The present study evaluated long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEPs) during meditation. Sixty male participants, aged between 18 and 31 years (group mean±SD, 20.5±3.8 years), were assessed in 4 mental states based on descriptions in the traditional texts. They were (a) random thinking, (b) nonmeditative focusing, (c) meditative focusing, and (d) meditation. The order of the sessions was randomly assigned. The LLAEP components studied were P1 (40-60 ms), N1 (75-115 ms), P2 (120-180 ms), and N2 (180-280 ms). For each component, the peak amplitude and peak latency were measured from the prestimulus baseline. There was significant decrease in the peak latency of the P2 component during and after meditation (Pmeditation facilitates the processing of information in the auditory association cortex, whereas the number of neurons recruited was smaller in random thinking and non-meditative focused thinking, at the level of the secondary auditory cortex, auditory association cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  4. New perspectives on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, Sally M; Kingma, Herman

    2013-02-01

    Although the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) measured from the cervical muscles (cVEMP, cervical VEMP) is well described and has documented clinical utility, its analogue recorded from the extraocular muscles (oVEMP, ocular VEMP) has been described only recently and is currently emerging as an additional test of otolith function. This review will, therefore, summarize recent developments in VEMP research with a focus on the oVEMP. Recent studies suggest that the oVEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior vestibular nerve division, whereas the cVEMP evoked by sound is thought to be an inferior vestibular nerve reflex. Correspondingly, the oVEMP correlates better with caloric and subjective visual vertical tests than sound-cVEMPs. cVEMPs are more complicated than often thought, as shown by the presence of crossed responses and conflicting results of recent vibration studies. Altered inner ear mechanics produced by the vestibular diseases superior semicircular canal dehiscence and Ménière's disease lead to changes in the preferred frequency of the oVEMP and cVEMP. The oVEMP provides complementary diagnostic information to the cVEMP and is likely to be a useful addition to the diagnostic test battery in neuro-otology.

  5. Speech Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Stuttering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Tahaei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory processing deficits have been hypothesized as an underlying mechanism for stuttering. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormal responses in subjects with persistent developmental stuttering (PDS at the higher level of the central auditory system using speech stimuli. Recently, the potential usefulness of speech evoked auditory brainstem responses in central auditory processing disorders has been emphasized. The current study used the speech evoked ABR to investigate the hypothesis that subjects with PDS have specific auditory perceptual dysfunction. Objectives. To determine whether brainstem responses to speech stimuli differ between PDS subjects and normal fluent speakers. Methods. Twenty-five subjects with PDS participated in this study. The speech-ABRs were elicited by the 5-formant synthesized syllable/da/, with duration of 40 ms. Results. There were significant group differences for the onset and offset transient peaks. Subjects with PDS had longer latencies for the onset and offset peaks relative to the control group. Conclusions. Subjects with PDS showed a deficient neural timing in the early stages of the auditory pathway consistent with temporal processing deficits and their abnormal timing may underlie to their disfluency.

  6. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  7. SNAREs: Could They be the Answer to an Energy Landscape Riddle in Exocytosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During exocytosis, chemical transmitters stored in secretory vesicles can be released upon fusion of these intracellular organelles to the plasma membrane. In this process, SNARE proteins that form a ternary core complex play a central role. This complex could provide the means for generation/storage of energy necessary for driving the fusion of vesicular and plasma membranes. Recently, the amount of energy for (disassembly of the ternary complex has been measured using various experimental approaches, including atomic force microscopy, the surface force apparatus, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The obtained measurements are in good agreement with the calculated energy required for membrane fusion achieved by theoretical modeling approaches. Whether the energy expenditure to form the ternary SNARE complex can be utilized towards membrane fusion and/or docking/tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane still remains one of the key contemporary issues in biophysics and neuroscience.

  8. SNAREs: could they be the answer to an energy landscape riddle in exocytosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2010-06-29

    During exocytosis, chemical transmitters stored in secretory vesicles can be released upon fusion of these intracellular organelles to the plasma membrane. In this process, SNARE proteins that form a ternary core complex play a central role. This complex could provide the means for generation/storage of energy necessary for driving the fusion of vesicular and plasma membranes. Recently, the amount of energy for (dis)assembly of the ternary complex has been measured using various experimental approaches, including atomic force microscopy, the surface force apparatus, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The obtained measurements are in good agreement with the calculated energy required for membrane fusion achieved by theoretical modeling approaches. Whether the energy expenditure to form the ternary SNARE complex can be utilized towards membrane fusion and/or docking/tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane still remains one of the key contemporary issues in biophysics and neuroscience.

  9. Insulin restores myocardial presynaptic sympathetic neuronal integrity in insulin-resistant diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, James T; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S; DaSilva, Jean N

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased sympathetic activity, elevated norepinephrine, impaired heart rate variability, and the added risk of cardiovascular mortality. The temporal development of sympathetic neuronal dysfunction, response to therapy, and relation to ventricular function is not well characterized. Sympathetic neuronal integrity was serially investigated in high fat diet-fed streptozotocin diabetic rats using [(11)C]meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) positron emission tomography at baseline, 8 weeks of diabetes, and after a further 8 weeks of insulin or insulin-sensitizing metformin therapy. Myocardial HED retention was reduced in diabetic rats (n = 16) compared to non-diabetics (n = 6) at 8 weeks by 52-57% (P = .01) with elevated plasma and myocardial norepinephrine levels. Echocardiography pulse-wave Doppler measurements demonstrated prolonged mitral valve deceleration and increased early-to-atrial filling velocity, consistent with diastolic dysfunction. Insulin but not metformin evoked recovery of HED retention and plasma norepinephrine (P < .05), whereas echocardiography measurements of diastolic function were not improved by either treatment. Relative expressions of norepinephrine reuptake transporter and β-adrenoceptors were lower in metformin-treated as compared to insulin-treated diabetic and non-diabetic rats. Diabetic rats exhibited depressed heart rate variability and impaired diastolic function which persisted despite insulin treatment. HED imaging provides sound estimation of sympathetic function. Effective glycemic control can recover sympathetic function in diabetic rats without the corresponding recovery of echocardiography indicators of diastolic dysfunction. HED positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in stratifying cardiovascular risk among diabetic patients and in evaluating the effect of glycemic therapy on the heart.

  10. Intraurethral stimulation evokes bladder responses via 2 distinct reflex pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woock, John P; Yoo, Paul B; Grill, Warren M

    2009-07-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that selective activation of pudendal nerve branches can evoke bladder responses through 2 distinct reflex pathways. We examined intraurethral electrical stimulation as a minimally invasive means of selectively activating these pathways in the cat. Bladder responses evoked by intraurethral electrical stimulation were measured in alpha-chloralose anesthetized male cats at different stimulation frequencies, stimulation intensities and intraurethral locations. Intraurethral electrical stimulation evoked inhibitory and excitatory bladder reflexes depending on stimulation frequency and location. Stimulation in the penile urethra 0 to 3 cm from the urethral meatus at 33 Hz evoked bladder contraction and at 10 Hz it evoked bladder relaxation. These responses were abolished after bilateral transection of the dorsal penile nerves. Stimulation in the membranous urethra 5 to 7 cm from the urethral meatus at 2, 10 and 33 Hz evoked bladder contractions. These responses were abolished after bilateral transection of the cranial sensory nerves. Following acute spinal cord transection bladder contractions were still evoked by 33 Hz stimulation in the penile urethra but not by stimulation at any frequency in the membranous urethra. Intraurethral electrical stimulation selectively evoked bladder responses by activating 2 distinct pudendal afferent pathways. Responses depended on stimulation frequency and location. Intraurethral electrical stimulation is a valid means of determining the pathways involved in bladder responses evoked by pudendal nerve stimulation.

  11. Lubiprostone targets prostanoid signaling and promotes ion transporter trafficking, mucus exocytosis, and contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Robert L; Collaco, Anne M; Ameen, Nadia A

    2012-11-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride channel activator in clinical use for the treatment of chronic constipation, but the mechanisms of action of the drug are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether lubiprostone exerts secretory effects in the intestine by membrane trafficking of ion transporters and associated machinery. Immunolabeling and quantitative fluorescence intensity were used to examine lubiprostone-induced trafficking of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), sodium/potassium-coupled chloride co-transporter 1 (NKCC1), electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate co-transporter 1 (NBCe1), down-regulated in adenoma (DRA), putative anion transporter 1 (PAT1), sodium/proton exchanger 3 (NHE3), Ca(2+) activated chloride channel 2 (ClC-2) serotonin and its transporter SERT, E prostanoid receptors EP4 and EP1, sodium/potassium ATPase (Na-K-ATPase) and protein kinase A (PKA). The effects of lubiprostone on mucus exocytosis in rat intestine and human rectosigmoid explants were also examined. Lubiprostone induced contraction of villi and proximal colonic plicae and membrane trafficking of transporters that was more pronounced in villus/surface cells compared to the crypt. Membrane trafficking was determined by: (1) increased membrane labeling for CFTR, PAT1, NKCC1, and NBCe1 and decreased membrane labeling for NHE3, DRA and ClC-2; (2) increased serotonin, SERT, EP4, EP1 and PKA labeling in enterochromaffin cells; (3) increased SERT, EP4, EP1, PKA and Na-K-ATPase in enterocytes; and (4) increased mucus exocytosis in goblet cells. These data suggest that lubiprostone can target serotonergic, EP4/PKA and EP1 signaling in surface/villus regions; stimulate membrane trafficking of CFTR/NBCe1/NKCC1 in villus epithelia and PAT1/NBCe1/NKCC1 in colonic surface epithelia; suppress NHE3/DRA trafficking and fluid absorption; and enhance mucus-mobilization and mucosal contractility.

  12. 'ZP domain' of human zona pellucida glycoprotein-1 binds to human spermatozoa and induces acrosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Anasua; Bansal, Pankaj; Gupta, Tripti; Gupta, Satish K

    2010-09-11

    The human egg coat, zona pellucida (ZP), is composed of four glycoproteins designated as zona pellucida glycoprotein-1 (ZP1), -2 (ZP2), -3 (ZP3) and -4 (ZP4) respectively. The zona proteins possess the archetypal 'ZP domain', a signature domain comprised of approximately 260 amino acid (aa) residues. In the present manuscript, attempts have been made to delineate the functional significance of the 'ZP domain' module of human ZP1, corresponding to 273-551 aa fragment of human ZP1. Baculovirus-expressed, nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography purified 'ZP domain' of human ZP1 was employed to assess its capability to bind and subsequently induce acrosomal exocytosis in capacitated human spermatozoa using tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate conjugated Pisum sativum Agglutinin in absence or presence of various pharmacological inhibitors. Binding characteristics of ZP1 'ZP domain' were assessed employing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled recombinant protein. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot characterization of the purified recombinant protein (both from cell lysate as well as culture supernatant) revealed a doublet ranging from ~35-40 kDa. FITC- labelled 'ZP domain' of ZP1 binds primarily to the acrosomal cap of the capacitated human spermatozoa. A dose dependent increase in acrosomal exocytosis was observed when capacitated sperm were incubated with recombinant 'ZP domain' of human ZP1. The acrosome reaction mediated by recombinant protein was independent of Gi protein-coupled receptor pathway, required extra cellular calcium and involved both T- and L-type voltage operated calcium channels. Results described in the present study suggest that the 'ZP domain' module of human ZP1 has functional activity and may have a role during fertilization in humans.

  13. NOX2-derived ROS-mediated surface translocation of BLT1 is essential for exocytosis in human eosinophils induced by LTB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a proinflammatory lipid mediator that elicits eosinophil exocytosis, leading to allergic inflammation. However, the detailed intracellular signaling mechanisms of eosinophil exocytosis induced by LTB4 are poorly understood. Herein, we report that NADPH oxidase (NOX)2-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated BLT1 migration to the cell surface is required for exocytosis in human eosinophils induced by LTB4. Peripheral blood eosinophils were purified and stimulated for up to 60 min with LTB4. The signaling role of NOX2-derived ROS in BLT1-dependent exocytosis in LTB4-stimulated eosinophils was investigated. Stimulating eosinophils with LTB4 induced intracellular ROS production and surface upregulation of the exocytosis marker protein CD63 via BLT1-mediated signaling. LTB4 induced p47(phox) phosphorylation and 91(phox) expression required for NOX2 activation in a BLT1-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NOX2 inhibitors, but not mitochondria inhibitor, prevented LTB4-induced ROS generation and exocytosis. At 30 min after stimulation with LTB4, BLT1 expression at the cell surface was upregulated. LTB4-triggered surface upregulation of BLT1 was also blocked by inhibition of ROS generation with NOX2 inhibitors. Moreover, stimulation for 30 min with LTB4 resulted in the interaction of BLT1 with NOX2 by immunoprecipitation. LTB4-induced ROS generation, surface upregulation of BLT1 and exocytosis was also inhibited by pretreatment with a lipid raft disruptor, protein kinase C inhibitor, or Src kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that NOX2-derived ROS-mediated BLT1 trafficking to the cell surface plays a key role in the exocytosis of human eosinophils induced by LTB4. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  15. Insulin in diabetes prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiya, V K; Maclaren, N K

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD) is a chronic immune-endocrine disease in which there is a progressive destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells, caused primarily by autoreactive T cells. Many islet cell proteins including insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and tyrosine phosphatase antigens (IA-2) are targeted by the autoimmune responses in IDD patients. Since its discovery 75 years ago, insulin has been the major player in the clinical management of hyperglycaemia in these patients. The morbidity and mortality associated with IDD derives mainly from the complications of the disease. However, routine insulin injections seldom achieve a consistent, near-normal glucose level, where multiple daily doses of the hormone involve considerable restrictions to a normal lifestyle. In terms of economics, the management of diabetes is expensive, and in the USA diabetes alone accounts for one seventh of the healthcare budget. These clinical, lifestyle and economic issues emphasize the need to investigate alternative preventative measures in IDD treatment. Recent reports suggest a pivotal role for insulin in various aspects of the immune system. In this study, insulin and B-chain were used to modulate autoimmune responses in non-obese diabetic mice, findings which have therapeutic implications in man.

  16. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  17. Visual evoked potentials in rubber factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, O P; Kumar, V

    1997-01-01

    Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP) were studied in 39 male rubber factory workers in the age range of 18-55 years and 20 control subjects (aged 18-46 years) not exposed to the rubber factory environment. Results revealed that 20 (51%) rubber factory workers had abnormal latencies of wave P1 (dominant component of pVEP) as per accepted criteria of 99% tolerance limit set for the control group (i.e. any value above mean +3 SD of control was considered abnormal). The section-wise per cent distribution of abnormalities was vulcanization (83%), tubing (75%), calendering (60%), loading (38%) and mixing (14%). This study provides electrophysiological evidence that rubber factory environments affect the conduction processes in optical pathways from their origin in the retina to striate cortex. However, this study has its limitations in not identifying the specific chemical(s) causing these changes in VEP.

  18. Bayesian analysis of MEG visual evoked responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-04-01

    The authors developed a method for analyzing neural electromagnetic data that allows probabilistic inferences to be drawn about regions of activation. The method involves the generation of a large number of possible solutions which both fir the data and prior expectations about the nature of probable solutions made explicit by a Bayesian formalism. In addition, they have introduced a model for the current distributions that produce MEG and (EEG) data that allows extended regions of activity, and can easily incorporate prior information such as anatomical constraints from MRI. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of the Bayesian approach with actual data, they analyzed MEG data from a visual evoked response experiment. They compared Bayesian analyses of MEG responses to visual stimuli in the left and right visual fields, in order to examine the sensitivity of the method to detect known features of human visual cortex organization. They also examined the changing pattern of cortical activation as a function of time.

  19. Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion. PMID:24910621

  20. RECORDING OF VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sazgar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that loud clicks evoke myogenic potentials in the tonically contracting sternocleidomastoid muscles. Studies have suggested that these potentials are of vestibular origin, especially of the saccule and inferior vestibular nerve. A pilot study was undertaken in our hospital to record vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP for the first time in Iran. Eighteen healthy volunteers (32 ears without history of otologic or vestibular disorders were subjected to the VEMP test. Twenty-one patients (26 ears with unilateral (6 patients and bilateral (5 patients high frequency sensorineural hearing loss with unknown etiology, acoustic neuroma (1 patient, Meniere’s disease (4 patients and unilateral low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint (5 patients were also enrolled in this study. VEMP response to clicks was obtained from 84.4% of ears of healthy subjects. These subjects demonstrated short latency waves to click stimuli during tonic neck flexor activation. Mean latencies of first positive (p13 and first negative (n23 potentials in healthy subjects were 12.45 ± 1.9 ms and 20.8 ± 3.5 ms, respectively. Median latencies of these two potentials were 12.1 and 19.3 ms, respectively. We could record VEMP in 5 patients with unilateral and all patients with high and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint. In the patient with acoustic neuroma VEMP was absent on the affected side. This technique may offer a new method to evaluate otolith and sacculocollic pathways in human.

  1. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    studies in β cell-specific IR knockout mice, which develop peripheral insulin resistance and diabetes, most probably due to the changes in the pattern of insulin secretion (Kulkarni et al 1999). FFA also affects downstream insulin signalling molecules. It inhibits insulin activation of IRS-1-associated PI3K activity in muscle.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354676-07$15.00/0.

  3. AMPK and insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is considered "a metabolic master-switch" in skeletal muscle reducing ATP- consuming processes whilst stimulating ATP regeneration. Within recent years, AMPK has also been proposed as a potential target to attenuate insulin resistance, although the exact...... role of AMPK is not well understood. Here we hypothesized that mice lacking a2AMPK activity in muscle would be more susceptible to develop insulin resistance associated with ageing alone or in combination with high fat diet. Young (~4 month) or old (~18 month) wild type and muscle specific a2AMPK...... kinase-dead mice on chow diet as well as old mice on 17 weeks of high fat diet were studied for whole body glucose homeostasis (OGTT, ITT and HOMA-IR), insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. We demonstrate that high fat diet in old mice results in impaired glucose homeostasis...

  4. A role for glutamate transporters in the regulation of insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runhild Gammelsaeter

    Full Text Available In the brain, glutamate is an extracellular transmitter that mediates cell-to-cell communication. Prior to synaptic release it is pumped into vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs. To inactivate glutamate receptor responses after release, glutamate is taken up into glial cells or neurons by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs. In the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, glutamate is proposed to act as an intracellular messenger, regulating insulin secretion from β-cells, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. By immunogold cytochemistry we show that insulin containing secretory granules express VGLUT3. Despite the fact that they have a VGLUT, the levels of glutamate in these granules are low, indicating the presence of a protein that can transport glutamate out of the granules. Surprisingly, in β-cells the glutamate transporter EAAT2 is located, not in the plasma membrane as it is in brain cells, but exclusively in insulin-containing secretory granules, together with VGLUT3. In EAAT2 knock out mice, the content of glutamate in secretory granules is higher than in wild type mice. These data imply a glutamate cycle in which glutamate is carried into the granules by VGLUT3 and carried out by EAAT2. Perturbing this cycle by knocking down EAAT2 expression with a small interfering RNA, or by over-expressing EAAT2 or a VGLUT in insulin granules, significantly reduced the rate of granule exocytosis. Simulations of granule energetics suggest that VGLUT3 and EAAT2 may regulate the pH and membrane potential of the granules and thereby regulate insulin secretion. These data suggest that insulin secretion from β-cells is modulated by the flux of glutamate through the secretory granules.

  5. Mathematical modeling of white adipocyte exocytosis predicts adiponectin secretion and quantifies the rates of vesicle exo- and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Lövfors, William; Komai, Ali M; Axelsson, Tom; El Hachmane, Mickaël F; Musovic, Saliha; Paul, Alexandra; Nyman, Elin; Olofsson, Charlotta S

    2017-12-08

    Adiponectin is a hormone secreted from white adipocytes and takes part in the regulation of several metabolic processes. Although the pathophysiological importance of adiponectin has been thoroughly investigated, the mechanisms controlling its release are only partly understood. We have recently shown that adiponectin is secreted via regulated exocytosis of adiponectin-containing vesicles, that adiponectin exocytosis is stimulated by cAMP-dependent mechanisms, and that Ca 2+ and ATP augment the cAMP-triggered secretion. However, much remains to be discovered regarding the molecular and cellular regulation of adiponectin release. Here, we have used mathematical modeling to extract detailed information contained within our previously obtained high-resolution patch-clamp time-resolved capacitance recordings to produce the first model of adiponectin exocytosis/secretion that combines all mechanistic knowledge deduced from electrophysiological experimental series. This model demonstrates that our previous understanding of the role of intracellular ATP in the control of adiponectin exocytosis needs to be revised to include an additional ATP-dependent step. Validation of the model by introduction of data of secreted adiponectin yielded a very close resemblance between the simulations and experimental results. Moreover, we could show that Ca 2+ -dependent adiponectin endocytosis contributes to the measured capacitance signal, and we were able to predict the contribution of endocytosis to the measured exocytotic rate under different experimental conditions. In conclusion, using mathematical modeling of published and newly generated data, we have obtained estimates of adiponectin exo- and endocytosis rates, and we have predicted adiponectin secretion. We believe that our model should have multiple applications in the study of metabolic processes and hormonal control thereof. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  7. Insulin and the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, metabolic syndrome, and asthma are all rapidly increasing globally. Substantial emerging evidence suggests that these three conditions are epidemiologically and mechanistically linked. Since the link between obesity and asthma appears to extend beyond mechanical pulmonary disadvantage...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  8. Insulin and Glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Holland, William; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In August 2016, several leaders in glucagon biology gathered for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Hagedorn Workshop in Oxford, England. A key point of discussion focused on the need for basal insulin to allow for the therapeutic benefit of glucagon blockade in the treatment...... of the discussion as a consensus was reached. Agents that antagonize glucagon may be of great benefit for the treatment of diabetes; however, sufficient levels of basal insulin are required for their therapeutic efficacy....

  9. Antibody-Mediated Insulin Resistance: When Insulin and Insulin Receptor Act as Autoantigens in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liminet, Christelle; Vouillarmet, Julien; Chikh, Karim; Disse, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with diabetes presenting a severe insulin-resistance syndrome due to the production of insulin autoantibodies by a lymphocytic lymphoma. We describe the various mechanisms leading to the production of insulin autoantibodies and insulin receptor autoantibodies and review the therapeutic possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction between MyRIP and the actin cytoskeleton regulates Weibel-Palade body trafficking and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Ianina L; Hellen, Nicola; Bierings, Ruben; Mashanov, Gregory I; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Kiskin, Nikolai I; Hannah, Matthew J; Molloy, Justin E; Carter, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Weibel-Palade body (WPB)-actin interactions are essential for the trafficking and secretion of von Willebrand factor; however, the molecular basis for this interaction remains poorly defined. Myosin Va (MyoVa or MYO5A) is recruited to WPBs by a Rab27A-MyRIP complex and is thought to be the prime mediator of actin binding, but direct MyRIP-actin interactions can also occur. To evaluate the specific contribution of MyRIP-actin and MyRIP-MyoVa binding in WPB trafficking and Ca(2+)-driven exocytosis, we used EGFP-MyRIP point mutants with disrupted MyoVa and/or actin binding and high-speed live-cell fluorescence microscopy. We now show that the ability of MyRIP to restrict WPB movement depends upon its actin-binding rather than its MyoVa-binding properties. We also show that, although the role of MyRIP in Ca(2+)-driven exocytosis requires both MyoVa- and actin-binding potential, it is the latter that plays a dominant role. In view of these results and together with the analysis of actin disruption or stabilisation experiments, we propose that the role of MyRIP in regulating WPB trafficking and exocytosis is mediated largely through its interaction with actin rather than with MyoVa. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Dopamine reduces cell surface Na+/H+exchanger-3 protein by decreasing NHE3 exocytosis and cell membrane recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming Chang; Bobulescu, I Alexandru; Quiñones, Henry; Gisler, Serge M; Moe, Orson W

    2017-10-01

    The intrarenal autocrine-paracrine dopamine (DA) system mediates a significant fraction of the natriuresis in response to a salt load. DA inhibits a number of Na + transporters to effect sodium excretion, including the proximal tubule Na + /H + exchanger-3 (NHE3). DA represent a single hormone that regulates NHE3 at multiple levels, including translation, degradation, endocytosis, and protein phosphorylation. Because cell surface NHE3 protein is determined by the balance between exocytotic insertion and endocytotic retrieval, we examined whether DA acutely affects the rate of NHE3 exocytosis in a cell culture model. DA inhibited NHE3 exocytosis at a dose-dependent manner with a half maximal around 10 -6 M. The DA effect on NHE3 exocytosis was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase A and by brefeldin A, which inhibits endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi transport. NHE3 directly interacts with the ε-subunit of coatomer protein based on yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation. Because NHE3 has been shown to be recycled back to the cell membrane after endocytosis, we measured NHE3 recycling using a biochemical reinsertion assay and showed that reinsertion of NHE3 back to the membrane is also inhibited by DA. In conclusion, among the many mechanisms by which DA reduces apical membrane NHE3 and induces proximal tubule natriuresis, one additional mechanism is inhibition of exocytotic insertion and reinsertion of NHE3 in the apical cell surface. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Interaction between MyRIP and the actin cytoskeleton regulates Weibel–Palade body trafficking and exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Ianina L.; Hellen, Nicola; Bierings, Ruben; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste; Kiskin, Nikolai I.; Hannah, Matthew J.; Molloy, Justin E.; Carter, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel–Palade body (WPB)–actin interactions are essential for the trafficking and secretion of von Willebrand factor; however, the molecular basis for this interaction remains poorly defined. Myosin Va (MyoVa or MYO5A) is recruited to WPBs by a Rab27A–MyRIP complex and is thought to be the prime mediator of actin binding, but direct MyRIP–actin interactions can also occur. To evaluate the specific contribution of MyRIP–actin and MyRIP–MyoVa binding in WPB trafficking and Ca2+-driven exocytosis, we used EGFP–MyRIP point mutants with disrupted MyoVa and/or actin binding and high-speed live-cell fluorescence microscopy. We now show that the ability of MyRIP to restrict WPB movement depends upon its actin-binding rather than its MyoVa-binding properties. We also show that, although the role of MyRIP in Ca2+-driven exocytosis requires both MyoVa- and actin-binding potential, it is the latter that plays a dominant role. In view of these results and together with the analysis of actin disruption or stabilisation experiments, we propose that the role of MyRIP in regulating WPB trafficking and exocytosis is mediated largely through its interaction with actin rather than with MyoVa. PMID:26675235

  13. A novel Netrin-1–sensitive mechanism promotes local SNARE-mediated exocytosis during axon branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Cortney C.; McClain, Leslie M.; Valtschanoff, Juli G.; Park, Charles S.; Maglione, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Developmental axon branching dramatically increases synaptic capacity and neuronal surface area. Netrin-1 promotes branching and synaptogenesis, but the mechanism by which Netrin-1 stimulates plasma membrane expansion is unknown. We demonstrate that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is a prerequisite for axon branching and identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a critical catalytic link between Netrin-1 and exocytic SNARE machinery in murine cortical neurons. TRIM9 ligase activity promotes SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion and axon branching in a Netrin-dependent manner. We identified a direct interaction between TRIM9 and the Netrin-1 receptor DCC as well as a Netrin-1–sensitive interaction between TRIM9 and the SNARE component SNAP25. The interaction with SNAP25 negatively regulates SNARE-mediated exocytosis and axon branching in the absence of Netrin-1. Deletion of TRIM9 elevated exocytosis in vitro and increased axon branching in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide a novel model for the spatial regulation of axon branching by Netrin-1, in which localized plasma membrane expansion occurs via TRIM9-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion. PMID:24778312

  14. Human native Cav1 channels in chromaffin cells: contribution to exocytosis and firing of spontaneous action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Sanz-Lázaro, Sara; Jiménez-Pompa, Amanda; García-Magro, Nuria; Carmona-Hidalgo, Beatriz; Pérez-Alvarez, Alberto; Caba-González, Jose Carlos; Tabernero, Angel; Alonso Y Gregorio, Sergio; Passas, Juan; Blázquez, Jesús; González-Enguita, Carmen; de Castro-Guerín, Cristina; Albillos, Almudena

    2017-02-05

    The present study was performed to evaluate the Ca v 1 channel subtypes expressed in human chromaffin cells and the role that these channels play in exocytosis and cell excitability. Here we show that human chromaffin cells obtained from organ donors express Ca v 1.2 and Ca v 1.3 subtypes using molecular and pharmacological techniques. Immunocytochemical data demonstrated the presence of Ca v 1.2 and Ca v 1.3 subtypes, but not Ca v 1.1 or Ca v 1.4. Electrophysiological experiments were conducted to investigate the contribution of Ca v 1 channels to the exocytotic process and cell excitability. Ca v 1 channels contribute to the exocytosis of secretory vesicles, evidenced by the block of 3μM nifedipine (36.5±2%) of membrane capacitance increment elicited by 200ms depolarizing pulses. These channels show a minor contribution to the initiation of spontaneous action potential firing, as shown by the 2.5 pA of current at the threshold potential (-34mV), which elicits 10.4mV of potential increment. In addition, we found that only 8% of human chromaffin cells exhibit spontaneous action potentials. These data offer novel information regarding human chromaffin cells and the role of human native Ca v 1 channels in exocytosis and cell excitability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. More Transparency in BioAnalysis of Exocytosis: Coupling of Electrochemistry and Fluorescence Microscopy at ITO Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular exocytosis is an essential biological mechanism used by cellular organisms to release bioactive molecules (hormones, neurotransmitters… in their environment. For instance, this is the pathway by which chromaffin cells deliver catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline, dopamine… in blood. During this process, secretory vesicles that initially stored the (biochemical messengers dock to the cell membrane. The subsequent fusion of vesicle and cell membranes induces the formation of a fusion pore that initiates the first exchanges between the intravesicular and extracellular media. Its following expansion thus favours a larger release of the vesicular content into the external medium. Several analytical methods have been developed in order to study exocytosis at the single living cell level in real time. Among those techniques, mostly based on electric or optic measurements, amperometry with a carbon-fiber ultramicroelectrode [1], used in the first part of this report, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM appear as the most powerful [2] Practically, physico-chemical properties of ultramicroelectrodes induce a high detection sensitivity and temporal resolution, thus being particularly well adapted to monitor exocytosis of electroactive molecules in real time.

  16. Quantifying exocytosis by combination of membrane capacitance measurements and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in chromaffin cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Becherer

    Full Text Available Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF-Microscopy allows the observation of individual secretory vesicles in real-time during exocytosis. In contrast to electrophysiological methods, such as membrane capacitance recording or carbon fiber amperometry, TIRF-Microscopy also enables the observation of vesicles as they reside close to the plasma membrane prior to fusion. However, TIRF-Microscopy is limited to the visualization of vesicles that are located near the membrane attached to the glass coverslip on which the cell grows. This has raised concerns as to whether exocytosis measured with TIRF-Microscopy is comparable to global secretion of the cell measured with membrane capacitance recording. Here we address this concern by combining TIRF-Microscopy and membrane capacitance recording to quantify exocytosis from adrenal chromaffin cells. We found that secretion measured with TIRF-Microscopy is representative of the overall secretion of the cells, thereby validating for the first time the TIRF method as a measure of secretion. Furthermore, the combination of these two techniques provides a new tool for investigating the molecular mechanism of synaptic transmission with combined electrophysiological and imaging techniques.

  17. Insulin Resistance: Causes And Metabolic Implications | Igharo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin is an anabolic hormone that plays key roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance is a decreased biological response to normal concentration of circulating insulin. In insulin resistance, normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin ...

  18. The interrelation between aPKC and glucose uptake in the skeletal muscle during contraction and insulin stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J M; Benite-Ribeiro, S A; Queiroz, G; Duarte, J A

    2014-12-01

    Contraction and insulin increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. While the insulin pathway, better characterized, requires activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and atypical protein kinase (aPKC), muscle contraction seems to share insulin-activated components to increase glucose uptake. This study aimed to investigate the interrelation between the pathway involved in glucose uptake evoked by insulin and muscle contraction. Isolated muscle of rats was treated with solvent (control), insulin, wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor) and the combination of insulin plus wortmannin. After treatment, muscles were electrically stimulated (contracted) or remained at rest. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) localization, glucose uptake and phospho-aPKC (aPKC activated form) were assessed. Muscle contraction and insulin increased glucose uptake in all conditions when compared with controls not stimulating an effect that was accompanied by an increase in GLUT4 and of phospho-aPKC at the muscle membrane. Contracted muscles treated with insulin did not show additive effects on glucose uptake or aPKC activity compared with the response when these stimuli were applied alone. Inhibition of PI3K blocked insulin effect on glucose uptake and aPKC but not in the contractile response. Thus, muscle contraction seems to stimulate aPKC and glucose uptake independently of PI3K. Therefore, aPKC may be a convergence point and a rate limit step in the pathway by which, insulin and contraction, increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Glut4 Is Sorted from a Rab10 GTPase-independent Constitutive Recycling Pathway into a Highly Insulin-responsive Rab10 GTPase-dependent Sequestration Pathway after Adipocyte Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N.; Romenskaia, Irina; Mastick, Cynthia Corley; Coster, Adelle C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The RabGAP AS160/TBC1D4 controls exocytosis of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter Glut4 in adipocytes. Glut4 is internalized and recycled through a highly regulated secretory pathway in these cells. Glut4 also cycles through a slow constitutive endosomal pathway distinct from the fast transferrin (Tf) receptor recycling pathway. This slow constitutive pathway is the only Glut4 cycling pathway in undifferentiated fibroblasts. The α2-macroglobulin receptor LRP1 cycles with Glut4 and the Tf receptor through all three exocytic pathways. To further characterize these pathways, the effects of knockdown of AS160 substrates on the trafficking kinetics of Glut4, LRP1, and the Tf receptor were measured in adipocytes and fibroblasts. Rab10 knockdown decreased cell surface Glut4 in insulin-stimulated adipocytes by 65%, but not in basal adipocytes or in fibroblasts. This decrease was due primarily to a 62% decrease in the rate constant of Glut4 exocytosis (kex), although Rab10 knockdown also caused a 1.4-fold increase in the rate constant of Glut4 endocytosis (ken). Rab10 knockdown in adipocytes also decreased cell surface LRP1 by 30% by decreasing kex 30–40%. There was no effect on LRP1 trafficking in fibroblasts or on Tf receptor trafficking in either cell type. These data confirm that Rab10 is an AS160 substrate that limits exocytosis through the highly insulin-responsive specialized secretory pathway in adipocytes. They further show that the slow constitutive endosomal (fibroblast) recycling pathway is Rab10-independent. Thus, Rab10 is a marker for the specialized pathway in adipocytes. Interestingly, mathematical modeling shows that Glut4 traffics predominantly through the specialized Rab10-dependent pathway both before and after insulin stimulation. PMID:26527681

  20. Sex differences in pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccioni, G; Piloni, V; Sabbatini, D; Fioravanti, P; Scarpino, O

    2014-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) of the pudendal nerve are a well-established diagnostic tool for the evaluation of pelvic floor disorders. However, the possible influence of sex differences on response latencies has not been established yet. The aim of this study was to standardize the procedures and to evaluate possible effects of gender differences on anal and penile/clitoral SEPs. The anal and dorsal penile/clitoral SEPs were recorded in 84 healthy subjects (40 males and 44 females; mean age 47.9 ± 16.6 years, range 16-81 years; mean height 168.3 ± 20.3 cm, range 155-187 cm). Pudendal SEPs were evoked with a bipolar surface electrode stimulating the clitoris or the base of the penis and the anal orifice and recorded using scalp electrodes. The latency of the first positive component (P1) was measured. The effect and possible interaction of (a) stimulation site and (b) gender on the two variables was explored by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The examination was well tolerated and a reproducible waveform of sufficient quality was obtained in all the subjects examined. In the female subjects, a mean cortical P1 latency of 37.0 ± 2.6 and 36.4 ± 3.2 ms for anal and clitoral stimulation, respectively, was found. In the male subjects, the cortical latencies were 38.0 ± 3.5 ms for the anal stimulation and 40.2 ± 3.7 ms for the penile stimulation. At MANOVA, a statistically significant main effect of stimulation site and gender as well as a significant interaction between the two variables was found. Anal and dorsal penile/clitoral SEPs represent a well-tolerated and reproducible method to assess the functional integrity of the sensory pathways in male and female subjects. Obtaining sex-specific reference data, by individual electrophysiological testing, is highly recommended because of significant latency differences between males and females, at least as far as penile/clitoral responses are concerned.

  1. Exocytosis of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virions Involves a Convergence of Endosomal and Autophagy Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Erin M; Jarosinski, Keith W; Jackson, Wallen; Carpenter, John E; Grose, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely cell-associated herpesvirus with limited egress of viral particles. The induction of autophagy in VZV-infected monolayers is easily detectable; inhibition of autophagy leads to decreased VZV glycoprotein biosynthesis and diminished viral titers. To explain how autophagic flux could exert a proviral effect on the VZV infectious cycle, we postulated that the VZV exocytosis pathway following secondary envelopment may converge with the autophagy pathway. This hypothesis depended on known similarities between VZV gE and autophagy-related (Atg) Atg9/Atg16L1 trafficking pathways. Investigations were carried out with highly purified fractions of VZV virions. When the virion fraction was tested for the presence of autophagy and endosomal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1LC3B) and Ras-like GTPase 11 (Rab11) were detected. By two-dimensional (2D) and 3D imaging after immunolabeling, both proteins also colocalized with VZV gE in a proportion of cytoplasmic vesicles. When purified VZV virions were enumerated after immunoelectron microscopy, gold beads were detected on viruses following incubation with antibodies to VZV gE (∼100%), Rab11 (50%), and LC3B (30%). Examination of numerous electron micrographs demonstrated that enveloped virions were housed in single-membraned vesicles; viral particles were not observed in autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggested that some viral particles after secondary envelopment accumulated in a heterogeneous population of single-membraned vesicular compartments, which were decorated with components from both the endocytic pathway (Rab11) and the autophagy pathway (LC3B). The latter cytoplasmic viral vesicles resembled an amphisome. VZV infection leads to increased autophagic flux, while inhibition of autophagy leads to a marked reduction in virus spread. In this investigation of the proviral role of autophagy, we found evidence for an intersection of viral

  2. Vesicle Motion during Sustained Exocytosis in Chromaffin Cells: Numerical Model Based on Amperometric Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daungruthai Jarukanont

    Full Text Available Chromaffin cells release catecholamines by exocytosis, a process that includes vesicle docking, priming and fusion. Although all these steps have been intensively studied, some aspects of their mechanisms, particularly those regarding vesicle transport to the active sites situated at the membrane, are still unclear. In this work, we show that it is possible to extract information on vesicle motion in Chromaffin cells from the combination of Langevin simulations and amperometric measurements. We developed a numerical model based on Langevin simulations of vesicle motion towards the cell membrane and on the statistical analysis of vesicle arrival times. We also performed amperometric experiments in bovine-adrenal Chromaffin cells under Ba2+ stimulation to capture neurotransmitter releases during sustained exocytosis. In the sustained phase, each amperometric peak can be related to a single release from a new vesicle arriving at the active site. The amperometric signal can then be mapped into a spike-series of release events. We normalized the spike-series resulting from the current peaks using a time-rescaling transformation, thus making signals coming from different cells comparable. We discuss why the obtained spike-series may contain information about the motion of all vesicles leading to release of catecholamines. We show that the release statistics in our experiments considerably deviate from Poisson processes. Moreover, the interspike-time probability is reasonably well described by two-parameter gamma distributions. In order to interpret this result we computed the vesicles' arrival statistics from our Langevin simulations. As expected, assuming purely diffusive vesicle motion we obtain Poisson statistics. However, if we assume that all vesicles are guided toward the membrane by an attractive harmonic potential, simulations also lead to gamma distributions of the interspike-time probability, in remarkably good agreement with experiment. We

  3. Visually evoked spiking evolves while spontaneous ongoing dynamics persist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul eHuys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the primary visual cortex spontaneously spike even when there are no visual stimuli. It is unknown whether the spiking evoked by visual stimuli is just a modification of the spontaneous ongoing cortical spiking dynamics or whether the spontaneous spiking state disappears and is replaced by evoked spiking. This study of laminar recordings of spontaneous spiking and visually evoked spiking of neurons in the ferret primary visual cortex shows that the spiking dynamics does not change: the spontaneous spiking as well as evoked spiking is controlled by a stable and persisting fixed point attractor. Its existence guarantees that evoked spiking return to the spontaneous state. However, the spontaneous ongoing spiking state and the visual evoked spiking states are qualitatively different and are separated by a threshold (separatrix. The functional advantage of this organization is that it avoids the need for a system reorganization following visual stimulation, and impedes the transition of spontaneous spiking to evoked spiking and the propagation of spontaneous spiking from layer 4 to layers 2-3.

  4. Evoked otoacoustic emissions behaviour in retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C; Cagini, C; Menduno, P; Toniassoni, I; Desantis, A; Pennacchi, A; Ricci, G; Molini, E

    1994-01-01

    The hearing function was studied in 26 patients affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and in their relatives. Sixteen patients showed bilateral normal hearing when examined with traditional audiometric methods. In these normoacusic patients evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOE) have been studied. The EOE offer a unique opportunity to measure objectively the function of outer hair cells: they record the amplitude of the energy produced by the outer hair cells of the coclea following an acoustic stimulation. The data have been statistically compared, using the Student's t-test, with those obtained in a homogeneous control-group of normal subjects. In normoacusic subjects with RP the average values of EOE intensity are statistically lower than those of normal subjects in 64 of the 127 frequency bands examined. Moreover, the distribution of the EOE in patients with retinitis pigmentosa proved to be more discontinous than that observed in the normal subjects. The EOE recorded in 14 normoacusic relatives show in some cases small anomalies but the data, on account of the limited sample group, cannot be statistically evaluated. Therefore a subclinical alteration of the Organ of Corti is found in 100% of the patients affected by RP, although they appear to be normoacusic to usual audiometric tests.

  5. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in rock musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høydal, Erik Harry; Lein Størmer, Carl Christian; Laukli, Einar; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2017-09-01

    Our focus in this study was the assessment of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) in a large group of rock musicians. A further objective was to analyse tinnitus among rock musicians as related to TEOAEs. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random. A control group was included at random for comparison. We recruited 111 musicians and a control group of 40 non-musicians. Testing was conducted by using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, TEOAEs and a questionnaire. TEOAE SNR in the half-octave frequency band centred on 4 kHz was significantly lower bilaterally in musicians than controls. This effect was strongly predicted by age and pure-tone hearing threshold levels in the 3-6 kHz range. Bilateral hearing thresholds were significantly higher at 6 kHz in musicians. Twenty percent of the musicians had permanent tinnitus. There was no association between the TEOAE parameters and permanent tinnitus. Our results suggest an incipient hearing loss at 6 kHz in rock musicians. Loss of TEOAE SNR in the 4 kHz half-octave frequency band was observed, but it was related to higher mean 3-6 kHz hearing thresholds and age. A large proportion of rock musicians have permanent tinnitus.

  6. Visual evoked potential study in slow learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Farah; Anjana, Yumnam; Vaney, Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Slow learners are individuals with low achievement and comparably low IQ scores. It may be a symptom reflecting a larger underlying problem in them. Sensory neural processing of visual information can be one of the contributory factors for their underachievement. The present study was undertaken to examine the integrity and function of visual pathway by means of Visual Evoked Potential (VEP). Pattern reversal VEP was performed on seventeen slow learners. Fifteen age and sex matched children with good school performance and normal IQ were taken as controls. There was significant prolongation of N75 component of VEP in slow learners. The latencies of P100 and N145 were also increased but could not reach the level of significance. Our findings are suggestive of the presence of a weaker VEP response in slow learners indicative of a deficit early in the visual processing. There is some abnormality in the geniculate afferents to V1 which is consistent with a defect in the magnocellular pathway at the level of Visual Area 1 or earlier.

  7. Molecular biocoding of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutvo Kuric

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lutvo KuricNovi Travnik, Kalinska, Bosnia and Herzegovina Abstract: This paper discusses cyberinformation studies of the amino acid composition of insulin, in particular the identification of scientific terminology that could describe this phenomenon, ie, the study of genetic information, as well as the relationship between the genetic language of proteins and theoretical aspects of this system and cybernetics. The results of this research show that there is a matrix code for insulin. It also shows that the coding system within the amino acid language gives detailed information, not only on the amino acid “record”, but also on its structure, configuration, and various shapes. The issue of the existence of an insulin code and coding of the individual structural elements of this protein are discussed. Answers to the following questions are sought. Does the matrix mechanism for biosynthesis of this protein function within the law of the general theory of information systems, and what is the significance of this for understanding the genetic language of insulin? What is the essence of existence and functioning of this language? Is the genetic information characterized only by biochemical principles or it is also characterized by cyberinformation principles? The potential effects of physical and chemical, as well as cybernetic and information principles, on the biochemical basis of insulin are also investigated. This paper discusses new methods for developing genetic technologies, in particular more advanced digital technology based on programming, cybernetics, and informational laws and systems, and how this new technology could be useful in medicine, bioinformatics, genetics, biochemistry, and other natural sciences.Keywords: human insulin, insulin model, biocode, genetic code, amino acids

  8. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial......Pregnancy in women with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications and perinatal mortality. Maintenance of near-normal glycemia during pregnancy can bring the prevalence of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications closer to that of the nondiabetic population. Changes...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  9. Evoked potentials and head injury. 1. Rating of evoked potential abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, H K; Belleza, T

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes a method for rating the degree of abnormality of auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potential patterns in head injury (HI) patients. Criteria for judging degree of EP abnormality are presented that allow assessment of the extent and severity of subcortical and cortical dysfunction associated with traumatic brain damage. Interrater reliability data based upon blind ratings of normal and HI patients are presented and shown to be highly significant. Tables of normative values of peak latencies and amplitudes are given and illustrations of EP patterns of different degrees of abnormality are presented.

  10. In vitro secretion of zymogens by bovine pancreatic acini and ultra-structural analysis of exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivalingam Jayaveni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish a bovine pancreatic acinar cell culture model with longer viability and functionality. The cells could be maintained in a functional state for upto 20 days with normal morphology. Cells were positive for amylase as observed by immunofluorescence staining. Acinar cells are spherical and range about 2–3 µm in diameter. The porosome formed by exocytosis and heterogenous enzyme granules of size ranging 100–300 nm were seen on the surface of cells by electron microscopy. The activity of the enzymes was high on day 15 and the activity profile of the enzymes is in the order: protease>lipase>amylase and the enzymes were identified by SDS-PAGE. Long-term culture of bovine pancreatic acini could be useful in studying the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Since the bovine genome shares about 80% identity with the human genome, the cells derived from bovine pancreas can be engineered and used as a potential xenotransplant to treat conditions like pancreatitis as the tissue source is abundantly available.

  11. HIV-1 intersection with CD4 T cell vesicle exocytosis: intercellular communication goes viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena eSoares

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In cells of the immune system the secretion of extracellular vesicles is modulated through cellular activation. In particular, T cell activation is achieved through cell-cell contacts with antigen presenting cells and the consequent formation of a specialized signaling junction called the immunological synapse. Recent works on CD4 T cells have elucidated that cognate antigen recognition by the T cell receptor (TCR engages two distinct exocytic events. The first, involves the exocytic targeting of signaling molecules at the synaptic membrane and drives the functional architecture of the immunological synapse. The second, enlists the extracellular secretion of the TCR itself, once the functional architecture of the immunological synapse is accomplished. HIV-1, a human lymphotropic virus, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms to co-opt CD4 T cell physiology. Notably, it has become apparent that HIV-1 intersects the regulated secretory system of CD4 T cells in order to bud from the plasma membrane of the infected cell and to promote bystander cell death. Here, I review the relevance of CD4 vesicle exocytosis to immune regulation and to HIV-1 pathogenesis and discuss their potential therapeutic applications.

  12. CaMKII prevents spontaneous acrosomal exocytosis in sperm through induction of actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtay, Ortal; Breitbart, Haim

    2016-07-01

    In order to interact with the egg and undergo acrosomal exocytosis or the acrosome reaction (AR), mammalian spermatozoa must undergo a series of biochemical changes in the female reproductive tract, collectively called capacitation. We showed that F-actin is formed during sperm capacitation and fast depolymerization occurs prior to the AR. We hypothesized that F-actin protects the sperm from undergoing spontaneous-AR (sAR) which decreases fertilization rate. We show that activation of the actin-severing protein gelsolin induces a significant increase in sAR. Moreover, inhibition of CaMKII or PLD during sperm capacitation, caused an increase in sAR and inhibition of F-actin formation. Spermine, which leads to PLD activation, was able to reverse the effects of CaMKII inhibition on sAR-increase and F-actin-decrease. Furthermore, the increase in sAR and the decrease in F-actin caused by the inactivation of the PLD-pathway, were reversed by activation of CaMKII using H2O2 or by inhibiting protein phosphatase 1 which enhance the phosphorylation and oxidation states of CaMKII. These results indicate that two distinct pathways lead to F-actin formation in the sperm capacitation process which prevents the occurrence of sAR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2016-06-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  15. Regulation of the Ca2+ sensitivity of exocytosis by Rab3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, L; Lledo, P M; Chameau, P; Vincent, J D; Henry, J P; Darchen, F

    1998-09-01

    Ca2+ ions trigger the release of hormones and neurotransmitters and contribute to making the secretory vesicles competent for fusion. Here, we present evidence for the involvement of the GTP-binding protein Rab3a in the sensitivity of the exocytotic process to internal [Ca2+]. The secretory activity of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was elicited by Ca2+ dialysis through a patch-clamp pipette and assayed by monitoring changes in cell membrane capacitance. Microinjection of antisense oligonucleotides directed to rab3a mRNA increased the secretory activity observed at low (0.2-4 microM) [Ca2+], but did not change the maximal activity observed at 10 microM free [Ca2+]. Moreover, after a train of depolarizing stimuli, the secretory activity of antisense-injected cells dialyzed with 10 microM [Ca2+] was increased significantly compared with that of control cells. This result suggests that the activity of either Rab3a or its partners might change upon stimulation. We conclude that Rab3a, together with its partners, participates in the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis and that its activity is modulated further in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings should provide some clues to elucidate the role of Rab3a in synaptic plasticity.

  16. The In Vivo Architecture of the Exocyst Provides Structural Basis for Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Andrea; Irastorza-Azcarate, Ibai; Specht, Tanja; Böke, Dominik; Pazos, Irene; Rivier-Cordey, Anne-Sophie; Devos, Damien P; Kaksonen, Marko; Gallego, Oriol

    2017-01-26

    The structural characterization of protein complexes in their native environment is challenging but crucial for understanding the mechanisms that mediate cellular processes. We developed an integrative approach to reconstruct the 3D architecture of protein complexes in vivo. We applied this approach to the exocyst, a hetero-octameric complex of unknown structure that is thought to tether secretory vesicles during exocytosis with a poorly understood mechanism. We engineered yeast cells to anchor the exocyst on defined landmarks and determined the position of its subunit termini at nanometer precision using fluorescence microscopy. We then integrated these positions with the structural properties of the subunits to reconstruct the exocyst together with a vesicle bound to it. The exocyst has an open hand conformation made of rod-shaped subunits that are interlaced in the core. The exocyst architecture explains how the complex can tether secretory vesicles, placing them in direct contact with the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reconstruction of aperture functions during full fusion in vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatore, Christian; Oleinick, Alexander I; Svir, Irina

    2010-01-18

    Individual vesicular exocytosis of adrenaline by dense core vesicles in chromaffin cells is considered here as a paradigm of many situations encountered in biology, nanosciences and drug delivery in which a spherical container releases in the external environment through gradual uncovering of its surface. A procedure for extracting the aperture (opening) function of a biological vesicle fusing with a cell membrane from the released molecular flux of neurotransmitter as monitored by amperometry has been devised based on semi-analytical expressions derived in a former work [C. Amatore, A. I. Oleinick, I. Svir, ChemPhysChem 2009, 10, DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900646]. This precise analysis shows that in the absence of direct information about the radius of the vesicle or about the concentration of the adrenaline cation stored by the vesicle matrix, current spikes do not contain enough information to determine the maximum aperture angle. Yet, a statistical analysis establishes that this maximum aperture angle is most probably less than a few tens of degrees, which suggests that full fusion is a very improbable event.

  18. Exocytosis of norepinephrine at axon varicosities and neuronal cell bodies in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiti, Zohreh; Teschemacher, Anja G

    2007-08-01

    Norepinephrine secretion from central neurons was widely assumed to occur by exocytosis, but the essential characteristics of this process remained unknown. We developed an approach to study it directly by amperometry using carbon fiber microelectrodes in organotypic rat brainstem slice cultures. Noradrenergic neurons from areas A1 and A2 were fluorescently labeled by an adenoviral vector with noradrenergic-specific promoter. Quantal events, consistent with exocytotic release of norepinephrine, were registered at noradrenergic axonal varicosities as well as at cell bodies. According to their charge integrals, events were grouped into two populations. The majority (approximately 40 fC) were compatible with full exocytotic fusion of small clear and dense core vesicles shown in previous morphometric studies. The quantal size distribution was modulated by treatment with reserpine and amitriptyline. In addition, much larger quantal events (>1 pC) occurred at predominantly axonal release sites. The time course of signals was severalfold faster than in adrenal chromaffin cells, suggesting profound differences in the release machinery between these cell types. Tetrodotoxin eliminated the majority of events, indicating that release was partially, but not entirely, action potential driven. In conclusion, central norepinephrine release has unique characteristics, distinguishing it from those of other monoaminergic cells in periphery and brain.

  19. Munc-18-1 regulates the initial release rate of exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Jeff W

    2008-02-01

    Carbon fiber amperometry is a popular method for measuring single exocytotic events; however, the functional interpretation of the data can prove hazardous. For example, changes to vesicle transmitter levels can appear to cause changes in the timing and rate of the fusion process itself. Use of an analytical technique based on differentiation revealed that an increase in dense-core granule catecholamine content by exogenous application of l-DOPA did not affect initial release rates. Changes to the timing and amplitude of amperometric spikes from l-DOPA-treated cells are, then, likely a reflection of the increased quantal size rather than any direct effect on exocytosis itself. Applying this new analysis to individual fusion events from cells expressing Munc-18-1 with various specific point mutations demonstrated that Munc-18-1 functions at a late stage involved in the determination of the initial rate of fusion. Furthermore, a mutation of the protein that inhibits its biochemical interaction with the t-SNARE syntaxin-1 in a closed conformation caused premature termination of the fusion event. Through these two late-stage functions, Munc-18-1 could act as a key protein involved in the presynaptic control of signaling strength and duration.

  20. RIM1α SUMOylation Is Required for Fast Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Girach

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid, activity-dependent quantal presynaptic release of neurotransmitter is vital for brain function. The complex process of vesicle priming, fusion, and retrieval is very precisely controlled and requires the spatiotemporal coordination of multiple protein-protein interactions. Here, we show that posttranslational modification of the active zone protein Rab3-interacting molecule 1α (RIM1α by the small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1 functions as a molecular switch to direct these interactions and is essential for fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. RIM1α SUMOylation at lysine residue K502 facilitates the clustering of CaV2.1 calcium channels and enhances the Ca2+ influx necessary for vesicular release, whereas non-SUMOylated RIM1α participates in the docking/priming of synaptic vesicles and maintenance of active zone structure. These results demonstrate that SUMOylation of RIM1α is a key determinant of rapid, synchronous neurotransmitter release, and the SUMO-mediated “switching” of RIM1α between binding proteins provides insight into the mechanisms underpinning synaptic function and dysfunction.

  1. New Insulins and New Aspects in Insulin Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Vincent C

    2015-08-01

    The major abnormality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is insulin deficiency. The methods of replacing insulin have improved throughout the decades, but hypoglycemia is still the limiting factor for many individuals with diabetes, and it prevents them from achieving ideal glycemic targets. New insulin and newer delivery systems are being developed that can improve some of the limitations of current insulins or make the delivery of insulins more acceptable for some patients. Extending the duration of action of basal insulins and shortening the peak of fast-acting insulins may have advantages for individuals with diabetes. Different delivery systems may make insulin more acceptable to patients and may have other advantages, which may aid in attaining better glycemic control. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  3. Insulin detemir versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G.; Simon, Airin C. R.; Holleman, Frits; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chronically elevated blood glucose levels are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Many diabetes patients will eventually require insulin treatment to maintain good glycaemic control. There are still uncertainties about the optimal insulin treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes, but

  4. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems.

  5. Chemical and thermal stability of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B

    2006-01-01

    To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands.......To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands....

  6. Towards a neural basis of music-evoked emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Music is capable of evoking exceptionally strong emotions and of reliably affecting the mood of individuals. Functional neuroimaging and lesion studies show that music-evoked emotions can modulate activity in virtually all limbic and paralimbic brain structures. These structures are crucially involved in the initiation, generation, detection, maintenance, regulation and termination of emotions that have survival value for the individual and the species. Therefore, at least some music-evoked emotions involve the very core of evolutionarily adaptive neuroaffective mechanisms. Because dysfunctions in these structures are related to emotional disorders, a better understanding of music-evoked emotions and their neural correlates can lead to a more systematic and effective use of music in therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Distraction Reduces Both Early and Late Electrocutaneous Stimulus Evoked Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.H.G.; Wiering, Caro H.; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Previous electroencephalography studies revealed mixed effects of sustained distraction on early negative and later positive event-related potential components evoked by electrocutaneous stimuli. In our study we further examined the influence of sustained distraction to clarify these discrepancies.

  8. Click-evoked responses in vestibular afferents in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xuehui; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Xu, Youguo; Zhou, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Sound activates not only the cochlea but also the vestibular end organs. Research on this phenomenon led to the discovery of the sound-evoked vestibular myogenic potentials recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscles...

  9. PACAP stimulates insulin secretion but inhibits insulin sensitivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipsson, K; Pacini, G; Scheurink, AJW; Ahren, B

    Although pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) stimulates insulin secretion, its net influence on glucose homeostasis in vivo has not been established. We therefore examined the action of PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and glucose disposal as

  10. Chromogranin A regulates vesicle storage and mitochondrial dynamics to influence insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollam, Joshua; Mahata, Sumana; Riopel, Matthew; Hernandez-Carretero, Angelina; Biswas, Angshuman; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K; Chi, Nai-Wen; Eiden, Lee E; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Corti, Angelo; Webster, Nicholas J G; Mahata, Sushil K

    2017-06-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a prohormone and a granulogenic factor that regulates secretory pathways in neuroendocrine tissues. In β-cells of the endocrine pancreas, CgA is a major cargo in insulin secretory vesicles. The impact of CgA deficiency on the formation and exocytosis of insulin vesicles is yet to be investigated. In addition, no literature exists on the impact of CgA on mitochondrial function in β-cells. Using three different antibodies, we demonstrate that CgA is processed to vasostatin- and catestatin-containing fragments in pancreatic islet cells. CgA deficiency in Chga-KO islets leads to compensatory overexpression of chromogranin B, secretogranin II, SNARE proteins and insulin genes, as well as increased insulin protein content. Ultrastructural studies of pancreatic islets revealed that Chga-KO β-cells contain fewer immature secretory granules than wild-type (WT) control but increased numbers of mature secretory granules and plasma membrane-docked vesicles. Compared to WT control, CgA-deficient β-cells exhibited increases in mitochondrial volume, numerical densities and fusion, as well as increased expression of nuclear encoded genes (Ndufa9, Ndufs8, Cyc1 and Atp5o). These changes in secretory vesicles and the mitochondria likely contribute to the increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion observed in Chga-KO mice. We conclude that CgA is an important regulator for coordination of mitochondrial dynamics, secretory vesicular quanta and GSIS for optimal secretory functioning of β-cells, suggesting a strong, CgA-dependent positive link between mitochondrial fusion and GSIS.

  11. High-Fat-Diet-Induced Deficits in Dopamine Terminal Function Are Reversed by Restoring Insulin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordahl, Steve C; Jones, Sara R

    2017-02-15

    Systemically released insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to insulin receptors on several neural cell types, including dopaminergic neurons. Insulin has been shown to decrease dopamine neuron firing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but potentiate release and reuptake at dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here we show that prolonged consumption of a high fat diet blocks insulin's effects in the NAc, but insulin's effects are restored by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, which supports insulin receptor signaling. Mice fed a high fat diet (60% kcals from fat) displayed significantly higher fasting blood glucose 160 mg/dL, compared to 101 mg/dL for control-diet-fed mice, and high-fat-diet-fed mice showed reduced blood glucose clearance after an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry to measure electrically evoked dopamine in brain slices containing the NAc core, high-fat-diet-fed mice exhibited slower dopamine reuptake compared to control-diet-fed mice (2.2 ± 0.1 and 2.67 ± 0.15 μM/s, respectively). Moreover, glucose clearance rate was negatively correlated with Vmax. Insulin (10 nM to 1 μM) dose dependently increased reuptake rates in control-diet-fed mice compared with in the high-fat-diet group; however, the small molecule insulin receptor sensitizing agent, TCS 401 (300 nM), restored reuptake in high-fat-diet-fed mice to control-diet levels, and a small molecule inhibitor of the insulin receptor, BMS 536924 (300 nM), attenuated reuptake, similar to high-fat-diet-fed mice. These data show that a high-fat diet impairs dopamine reuptake by attenuating insulin signaling at dopamine terminals.

  12. Insulin induces upregulation of vascular AT1 receptor gene expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickenig, G; Röling, J; Strehlow, K; Schnabel, P; Böhm, M

    1998-12-01

    An interaction of insulin with angiotensin II effects could be pathophysiologically important for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. We examined the effect of insulin on AT1 receptor gene expression in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). A 24-hour incubation with insulin (100 nmol/L) produced a 2-fold increase in AT1 receptor density on VSMCs, as assessed by radioligand binding assays. This enhanced AT1 receptor expression was caused by a time- and concentration-dependent upregulation of the AT1 receptor mRNA levels, as assessed by Northern analysis. The maximal effect was detected after a 24-hour incubation of cells with 100 nmol/L insulin (270+/-20%). AT1 receptor upregulation was caused by a stabilization of the AT1 receptor mRNA, because the AT1 receptor mRNA half-life was prolonged from 5 hours under basal conditions to 10 hours after insulin stimulation. In contrast, insulin had no influence on AT1 receptor gene transcription, as assessed by nuclear run-on assays. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was followed by an increased functional response, because angiotensin II evoked a significantly elevated intracellular release of calcium in cells that were preincubated with 100 nmol/L insulin for 24 hours. The insulin-induced AT1 receptor upregulation was dependent on tyrosine kinases, as assessed by experiments with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Furthermore, experiments using the intracellular calcium chelator bis(2-amino-5-methylphenoxy)ethane-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester suggest that intracellular calcium release may be involved in AT1 receptor regulation. Insulin-induced upregulation of the AT1 receptor by posttranscriptional mechanisms may explain the association of hyperinsulinemia with hypertension and arteriosclerosis, because activation of the AT1 receptor plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis.

  13. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Insulin is a major protein hormone secreted by the p-cells of the pancreas and is important for the control of diabetes. Insulin is usually administered to diabetic patients through subcutaneous injection. This mode of therapy has certain inherent disadvantages such as local pain, itching and insulin lipodystrophy around the ...

  14. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, ...

  15. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  16. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basis of insulin resistance could ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causation of these conditions and the design of rational therapy to ameliorate them. Here, particular attention is devoted to the initial events that follow the binding of insulin to its receptor, including changes in insulin receptor phosphorylation.

  17. Flash visual evoked potentials in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping; Guo, Shu-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xiu

    2013-03-01

    To describe the development of flash visual evoked potentials (FVEPs) in preterm infants from 1 to 18 months and to determine if the maturation of FVEPs is similar to that of term infants. Longitudinal follow-up study. Twenty very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants, 42 low birth weight (LBW) preterm infants, and 41 term infants underwent FVEP recordings and neurodevelopmental examinations at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of corrected and chronological ages. The FVEP recordings were carried out with the VikingQuest-IV neuroelectrophysiological device (VikingQuest, Nicolet, WI), and neurodevelopmental assessments were made by the Development Screen Test and Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition. At 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age, neurodevelopment was measured with the Mental Index and Developmental Quotient. At 12 and 18 months, neurodevelopment was assessed using the Mental Developmental Index and Psychomotor Developmental Index. Two FVEP values were analyzed: the P2 amplitude (peak to peak from the preceding N2 wave) and the latency of the P2 wave. There was no significant difference for age-dependent decreased pattern of FVEP P2 latency between preterm infants and the control group. This pattern consisted of a rapid decrease in the first 6 months of life, a gradual decline from 6 to 12 months of age, and a steady reduction from 12 to 18 months of age. The P2 latencies were prolonged significantly at all 6 recorded times in the VLBW group compared with the controls and showed a delay in the LBW group at 1 and 3 months of corrected age. The maturation of P2 latency in LBW infants is similar to that of the controls at 3 months of corrected age, but the maturation of P2 latency in VLBW children remained delayed when compared with the controls until 18 months of corrected age. Although the FVEP development pattern of preterm infants was similar to that of healthy full-term infants, the former had deficits in visual electrophysiologic maturation

  18. Insulin som trickster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2011-01-01

    grænser nedbrydes i en konstant penetrering af huden, når blodsukkeret måles eller insulinen indsprøjtes. Insulin analyseres som en tricksterfigur, der udøver et grænsearbejde på kroppen, leger med dens kategorier og vender forholdet mellem gift og medicin, frihed og ufrihed, kunstighed og naturlighed...

  19. Huntingtin-associated protein-1 is a synapsin I-binding protein regulating synaptic vesicle exocytosis and synapsin I trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Kimberly D; Lumsden, Amanda L; Guo, Feng; Duffield, Michael D; Chataway, Timothy; Lim, Yoon; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Keating, Damien J

    2016-09-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP1) is involved in intracellular trafficking, vesicle transport, and membrane receptor endocytosis. However, despite such diverse functions, the role of HAP1 in the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle in nerve terminals remains unclear. Here, we report that HAP1 functions in SV exocytosis, controls total SV turnover and the speed of vesicle fusion in nerve terminals and regulates glutamate release in cortical brain slices. We found that HAP1 interacts with synapsin I, an abundant neuronal phosphoprotein that associates with SVs during neurotransmitter release and regulates synaptic plasticity and neuronal development. The interaction between HAP1 with synapsin I was confirmed by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation of the endogenous proteins. Furthermore, HAP1 co-localizes with synapsin I in cortical neurons as discrete puncta. Interestingly, we find that synapsin I localization is specifically altered in Hap1(-/-) cortical neurons without an effect on the localization of other SV proteins. This effect on synapsin I localization was not because of changes in the levels of synapsin I or its phosphorylation status in Hap1(-/-) brains. Furthermore, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in transfected neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-synapsin Ia demonstrates that loss of HAP1 protein inhibits synapsin I transport. Thus, we demonstrate that HAP1 regulates SV exocytosis and may do so through binding to synapsin I. The Proposed mechanism of synapsin I transport mediated by HAP1 in neurons. HAP1 interacts with synapsin I, regulating the trafficking of synapsin I containing vesicles and/or transport packets, possibly through its engagement of microtubule motors. The absence of HAP1 reduces synapsin I transport and neuronal exocytosis. These findings provide insights into the processes of neuronal trafficking and synaptic signaling. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Insulin Resistance and Hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Shermin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The number of hypogonads is increasing day by day. It may be due to sedentary life style with increased obesity, increased tension or stressed lifestyle among all groups of populations. Visceral obesity is associated with insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and also with hypogonadism.Objective: This study was carried out to determine the proportion of insulin resistance among male subjects with hypogonadism in different age groups along with status of erectile quality among diabetics and non diabetics.Materials and method: This cross sectional study among 161 adult male subjects aged ≥ 20 to ≤ 60 years were purposively selected from Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh between May 2009 to September 2010. Glycemic status and insulin resistance (by HOMA-R were done and relevant history were documented.Results: The highest proportion (38.9% of hypogonadism was in ≥ 50 years age group whereas highest proportion (39.6% of the eugonads was in the age group of 40 to 49 years. More than half of the hypogonad subjects had weak erectile quality (54.0% which were followed by absent erectile quality in 32.7% and 13.3% subjects had normal erectile quality. Among the eugonad subjects 41.7% had normal erectile quality, 41.6% subjects had weak erectile quality and 16.7% subjects had no erectile quality. More than ninety percent of the hypogonad subjects and about 60% of the eugonad subjects had insulin resistance. The average HOMA-R was more in the subjects with hypogonadism with diabetes which was highly significant (p-value < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypogonadism is associated with insulin resistance.

  1. Phospholipase B is activated in response to sterol removal and stimulates acrosome exocytosis in murine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Atsushi; Nelson-Harrington, Jacquelyn L; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-09-27

    Despite a strict requirement for sterol removal for sperm to undergo acrosome exocytosis (AE), the mechanisms by which changes in membrane sterols are transduced into changes in sperm fertilization competence are poorly understood. We have previously shown in live murine sperm that the plasma membrane overlying the acrosome (APM) contains several types of microdomains known as membrane rafts. When characterizing the membrane raft-associated proteomes, we identified phospholipase B (PLB), a calcium-independent enzyme exhibiting multiple activities. Here, we show that sperm surface PLB is activated in response to sterol removal. Both biochemical activity assays and immunoblots of subcellular fractions of sperm incubated with the sterol acceptor 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (2-OHCD) confirmed the release of an active PLB fragment. Specific protease inhibitors prevented PLB activation, revealing a mechanistic requirement for proteolytic cleavage. Competitive inhibitors of PLB reduced the ability of sperm both to undergo AE and to fertilize oocytes in vitro, suggesting an important role in fertilization. This was reinforced by our finding that incubation either with protein concentrate released from 2-OHCD-treated sperm or with recombinant PLB peptide corresponding to the catalytic domain was able to induce AE in the absence of other stimuli. Together, these results lead us to propose a novel mechanism by which sterol removal promotes membrane fusogenicity and AE, helping confer fertilization competence. Importantly, this mechanism provides a basis for the newly emerging model of AE in which membrane fusions occur during capacitation/transit through the cumulus, prior to any physical contact between the sperm and the oocyte's zona pellucida.

  2. New developments in insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan Ghilzai, Naushad M

    2003-03-01

    A vigorous research effort has been undertaken worldwide to replace injectable insulin by a more comfortable and painless delivery method. Several routes have been explored for their suitability with respect to insulin degradation in the human body. Considerable progress has been made in achieving the common goal for a convenient and equally effective insulin delivery. This article reviews the different routes available for insulin administration and the many successful developments that have been made in recent years for improving that particular route for a much better insulin delivery.

  3. Adipokines and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that secretes various adipokines such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Recent studies have shown that these factors might provide a molecular link between increased adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity. Since hepatic insulin resistance plays the key role in the whole body insulin resistance, clarification of the regulatory processes about hepatic insulin resistance by adipokines in rodents and human would seem essential in order to understand the mechanism of type 2 diabetes and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat it. PMID:23762871

  4. A Central Small Amino Acid in the VAMP2 Transmembrane Domain Regulates the Fusion Pore in Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hastoy, B; Scotti, PA; Milochau, A; Fezoua-Boubegtiten, Z; Rodas, J; Megret, R; Desbat, B.; Laguerre, M; Castano, S; Perrais, D.; Rorsman, P.; Oda, R; Lang, J.

    2017-01-01

    Exocytosis depends on cytosolic domains of SNARE proteins but the function of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) in membrane fusion remains controversial. The TMD of the SNARE protein synaptobrevin2/VAMP2 contains two highly conserved small amino acids, G100 and C103, in its central portion. Substituting G100 and/or C103 with the β-branched amino acid valine impairs the structural flexibility of the TMD in terms of α-helix/β-sheet transitions in model membranes (measured by infrared reflection-...

  5. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  6. The paradox of music-evoked sadness: an online survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liila Taruffi

    Full Text Available This study explores listeners' experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772. The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no "real-life" implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life.

  7. The Paradox of Music-Evoked Sadness: An Online Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taruffi, Liila; Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores listeners’ experience of music-evoked sadness. Sadness is typically assumed to be undesirable and is therefore usually avoided in everyday life. Yet the question remains: Why do people seek and appreciate sadness in music? We present findings from an online survey with both Western and Eastern participants (N = 772). The survey investigates the rewarding aspects of music-evoked sadness, as well as the relative contribution of listener characteristics and situational factors to the appreciation of sad music. The survey also examines the different principles through which sadness is evoked by music, and their interaction with personality traits. Results show 4 different rewards of music-evoked sadness: reward of imagination, emotion regulation, empathy, and no “real-life” implications. Moreover, appreciation of sad music follows a mood-congruent fashion and is greater among individuals with high empathy and low emotional stability. Surprisingly, nostalgia rather than sadness is the most frequent emotion evoked by sad music. Correspondingly, memory was rated as the most important principle through which sadness is evoked. Finally, the trait empathy contributes to the evocation of sadness via contagion, appraisal, and by engaging social functions. The present findings indicate that emotional responses to sad music are multifaceted, are modulated by empathy, and are linked with a multidimensional experience of pleasure. These results were corroborated by a follow-up survey on happy music, which indicated differences between the emotional experiences resulting from listening to sad versus happy music. This is the first comprehensive survey of music-evoked sadness, revealing that listening to sad music can lead to beneficial emotional effects such as regulation of negative emotion and mood as well as consolation. Such beneficial emotional effects constitute the prime motivations for engaging with sad music in everyday life. PMID:25330315

  8. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  9. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  10. Periodontal disease decreases insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Natalia H; Shirakashi, Daisy J; Chiba, Fernando Y; Coutinho, Maria Sara de Lima; Ervolino, Edilson; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Sumida, Doris H

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether local inflammatory events, such as periodontal disease, are able to increase tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plasmatic concentration and decrease insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling in non-diabetic rats. Forty-eight male Wistar rats (2 months old) were divided into two groups, with either ligature-induced periodontal disease (LPD) or control conditions (CN). Experiments were performed in both groups 28 days after ligature placement. Plasmatic concentration of glycemia and TNF-α (n = 10) were analyzed by the glucose oxidase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method, respectively. Insulin sensitivity (n = 7) was measured using the insulin tolerance test. Insulin signal transduction (n = 7) was measured by pp185 tyrosine phosphorylation status in insulin-sensitive tissues using the Western blotting method. The LPD group showed decreased insulin sensitivity (P 0.05). TNF-α plasmatic concentration was higher in LPD rats compared to CN rats. In addition, a decrease in the pp185 tyrosine phosphorylation status was observed after insulin stimulus in both white adipose and skeletal muscle tissues of the LPD group compared with the CN group. LPD is able to cause alterations to both insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity, probably because of the elevation of TNF-α plasmatic concentration. Thus, the present results emphasize the importance of the prevention of local inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, to prevent diabetes mellitus.

  11. Macrophage adhesion on fibronectin evokes an increase in the elastic property of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Samuel T; Agra, Laís C; Santos, Cássio E A; Barreto, Emiliano; Hickmann, Jandir M; Fonseca, Eduardo J S

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between cells and microenvironments are essential to cellular functions such as survival, exocytosis and differentiation. Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) evokes a variety of biophysical changes in cellular organization, including modification of the cytoskeleton and plasma membrane. In fact, the cytoskeleton and plasma membrane are structures that mediate adherent contacts with the ECM; therefore, they are closely correlated. Considering that the mechanical properties of the cell could be affected by cell adhesion-induced changes in the cytoskeleton, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the ECM on the elastic properties of fixed macrophage cells using atomic force microscopy. The results showed that there was an increase (~50%) in the Young's modulus of macrophages adhered to an ECM-coated substrate as compared with an uncoated glass substrate. In addition, cytochalasin D-treated cells had a 1.8-fold reduction of the Young's modulus of the cells, indicating the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to the elastic properties of the cell. Our findings show that cell adhesion influences the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane, providing new information toward understanding the influence of the ECM on elastic alterations of macrophage cell membranes.

  12. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yu Chang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  13. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73−/− and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  14. Insulin and Glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Holland, William; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In August 2016, several leaders in glucagon biology gathered for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Hagedorn Workshop in Oxford, England. A key point of discussion focused on the need for basal insulin to allow for the therapeutic benefit of glucagon blockade in the treatment...... of diabetes. Among the most enlightening experimental results presented were findings from studies in which glucagon receptor-deficient mice were administered streptozotocin to destroy pancreatic β cells or had undergone diphtheria toxin-induced β cell ablation. This article summarizes key features...... of the discussion as a consensus was reached. Agents that antagonize glucagon may be of great benefit for the treatment of diabetes; however, sufficient levels of basal insulin are required for their therapeutic efficacy....

  15. [Insulin-requiring diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, M; Gross, A; Ostermann, G; Grulet, H; Pasqual, C; Dijoux, B

    1988-01-01

    The insulinorequiring diabetes is a notion which deserves a clear definition, essentially clinical, because it covers a wide range of physiopathological situations. The progressive degradation of Diabetes type II means a progressive discrepancy of insulinosecretion and above all an increase of insulinoresistance. The noxious part of chronical hyperglycemia is at present well known. The present therapeutical prospects tend to delay or limit insulinotherapy, by trying to obtain remission of insulinorequiring and some attempt to give a combined treatment associating insulin and hypoglycemic drugs.

  16. Large dense-core vesicle exocytosis from mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons is regulated by neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Anneka; Shaib, Ali H; Schwarz, Yvonne; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Becherer, Ute

    2017-03-27

    Peptidergic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons transmit sensory and nociceptive information from the periphery to the central nervous system. Their synaptic activity is profoundly affected by neuromodulatory peptides stored and released from large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs). However, the mechanism of peptide secretion from DRG neurons is poorly understood. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), we visualized individual LDCVs loaded with fluorescent neuropeptide Y (NPY) and analyzed their stimulation-dependent release. We tested several protocols and found an overall low stimulation-secretion coupling that increased after raising intracellular Ca 2+ concentration by applying a weak pre-stimulus. Interestingly, the stimulation protocol also influenced the mechanism of LDCV fusion. Depolarization of DRG neurons with a solution containing 60mM KCl triggered full fusion, kiss-and-run, and kiss-and-stay exocytosis with equal frequency. In contrast, field electrode stimulation primarily induced full fusion exocytosis. Finally, our results indicate that NPY can promote LDCV secretion. These results shed new light on the mechanism of NPY action during modulation of DRG neuron activity, an important pathway in the treatment of chronic pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synaptobrevin N-terminally bound to syntaxin–SNAP-25 defines the primed vesicle state in regulated exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Alexander M.; Wiederhold, Katrin; Bruns, Dieter; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Rapid neurotransmitter release depends on the ability to arrest the SNAP receptor (SNARE)–dependent exocytosis pathway at an intermediate “cocked” state, from which fusion can be triggered by Ca2+. It is not clear whether this state includes assembly of synaptobrevin (the vesicle membrane SNARE) to the syntaxin–SNAP-25 (target membrane SNAREs) acceptor complex or whether the reaction is arrested upstream of that step. In this study, by a combination of in vitro biophysical measurements and time-resolved exocytosis measurements in adrenal chromaffin cells, we find that mutations of the N-terminal interaction layers of the SNARE bundle inhibit assembly in vitro and vesicle priming in vivo without detectable changes in triggering speed or fusion pore properties. In contrast, mutations in the last C-terminal layer decrease triggering speed and fusion pore duration. Between the two domains, we identify a region exquisitely sensitive to mutation, possibly constituting a switch. Our data are consistent with a model in which the N terminus of the SNARE complex assembles during vesicle priming, followed by Ca2+-triggered C-terminal assembly and membrane fusion. PMID:20142423

  18. Timing of dense-core vesicle exocytosis depends on the facilitation L-type Ca channel in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhamdani, A; Zhou, Z; Artalejo, C R

    1998-08-15

    Secretion from dense-core vesicles is reputedly much slower than that from typical synaptic vesicles, possibly because of noncolocalization of Ca channels and release sites. We reinvestigated this question by measuring the kinetics of catecholamine release in chromaffin cells from calf and adult bovines. Amperometric recording from calf chromaffin cells stimulated by action potentials exhibited two latencies of secretion that depended on both the frequency of stimulation and the pathway of Ca entry. Short-latency responses (25 msec delay; "weakly coupled") were more apparent at higher frequencies (7 Hz) and were substantially reduced by toxins that blocked N- and P-type Ca channels. Ca current recordings revealed that adult bovine chromaffin cells lack facilitation channels; virtually all secretion was weakly coupled in these cells. The mean delay of the strongly coupled signal was approximately 3 msec after the peak of the action potential (at 24 degreesC), indicating that dense-core vesicles can exhibit a rate of exocytosis approaching that occurring in neurons. Although other explanations are possible, these results are consistent with the idea that facilitation Ca channels are colocalized with release sites in calf chromaffin cells. Calculations based on a model incorporating this assumption suggest that these channels must be within 13 nm of secretory sites to account for such rapid exocytosis.

  19. Amyloid-β Oligomers May Impair SNARE-Mediated Exocytosis by Direct Binding to Syntaxin 1a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoosoo Yang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is closely associated with synaptic dysfunction, and thus current treatments often aim to stimulate neurotransmission to improve cognitive impairment. Whereas the formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE complex is essential for synaptic transmission, the correlation between SNAREs and AD neuropathology is unknown. Here, we report that intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ oligomers directly inhibit SNARE-mediated exocytosis by impairing SNARE complex formation. We observe abnormal reduction of SNARE complex levels in the brains of APP/PS1 transgenic (TG mice compared to age-matched wild-types. We demonstrate that Aβ oligomers block SNARE complex assembly through the direct interaction with a target membrane (t-SNARE syntaxin 1a in vitro. Furthermore, the results of the in vitro single-vesicle content-mixing assay reveal that Aβ oligomers inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion pores. Thus, our study identifies a potential molecular mechanism by which intracellular Aβ oligomers hamper SNARE-mediated exocytosis, likely leading to AD-associated synaptic dysfunctions.

  20. Influence of various carbohydrate sources on postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA concentrations in obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A; Ueda, K; Lee, P; Oda, H; Ishioka, K; Sako, T

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate is an important source of energy, which can significantly affect postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels in cats. In healthy animals, this is not a big concern; however, in obese and diabetic animals, this is an important detail. In the present study, the impact of four different carbohydrate sources (glucose, maltose, corn starch, and trehalose) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations was investigated with four obese cats. Each of the carbohydrate sources was added to a commercial wet food diet for feeding the animals. A significant difference was observed in postprandial glucose, insulin, and NEFA area under the curve (AUC) values between each carbohydrate source in obese cats. Furthermore, glucose and maltose induced the highest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC values, whereas trehalose induced the lowest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC value amongst all carbohydrate sources, respectively, in obese cats. However, trehalose has a higher risk of inducing side effects, such as diarrhea, as compared to other carbohydrate sources. As such, different carbohydrate sources appear to have a very significant impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels in obese cats. These results might be useful when selecting a prescription diet for obese or diabetic cats. In addition, maltose appears to be capable of inducing experimentally evoked postprandial hyperglycemia in obese cats, which may serve as a good tool for use to check the impact and effectiveness of newly developed oral hypoglycemic drugs or supplements for cats in future experiments.

  1. Rosuvastatin Treatment Affects Both Basal and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion in INS-1 832/13 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Vishal A.; Elvstam, Olof; Eliasson, Lena; Wendt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a member of the statin family. Like the other statins it is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Rosuvastatin lowers the cholesterol levels by inhibiting the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) in the cholesterol producing mevalonate pathway. It has been recognized that apart from their beneficial lipid lowering effects, statins also exhibit diabetogenic properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these remain unresolved. To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on insulin secretion, we treated INS-1 832/13 cells with varying doses (20 nM to 20 μM) of rosuvastatin for 48 h. At concentrations of 2 μM and above basal insulin secretion was significantly increased. Using diazoxide we could determine that rosuvastatin did not increase basal insulin secretion by corrupting the KATP channels. Glucose-induced insulin secretion on the other hand seemed to be affected differently at different rosuvastatin concentrations. Rosuvastatin treatment (20 μM) for 24–48 h inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which lead to reduced depolarization-induced exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. At lower concentrations of rosuvastatin (≤ 2 μM) the stimulus-secretion coupling pathway was intact downstream of the KATP channels as assessed by the patch clamp technique. However, a reduction in glucose-induced insulin secretion could be observed with rosuvastatin concentrations as low as 200 nM. The inhibitory effects of rosuvastatin on glucose-induced insulin secretion could be reversed with mevalonate, but not squalene, indicating that rosuvastatin affects insulin secretion through its effects on the mevalonate pathway, but not through the reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that rosuvastatin has the potential to increase basal insulin secretion and reduce glucose-induced insulin secretion. The latter is possibly an unavoidable

  2. Human auditory evoked potentials. II - Effects of attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, T. W.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Attention directed toward auditory stimuli, in order to detect an occasional fainter 'signal' stimulus, caused a substantial increase in the N1 (83 msec) and P2 (161 msec) components of the auditory evoked potential without any change in preceding components. This evidence shows that human auditory attention is not mediated by a peripheral gating mechanism. The evoked response to the detected signal stimulus also contained a large P3 (450 msec) wave that was topographically distinct from the preceding components. This late positive wave could also be recorded in response to a detected omitted stimulus in a regular train and therefore seemed to index a stimulus-independent perceptual decision process.

  3. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  4. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  5. Disruption of the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) plays a central role in palmitic acid-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Satoko; Jiang, Shuying; Nameta, Masaaki; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kanai, Mai; Nomura, Yuta; Goda, Nobuhito

    2017-10-01

    The mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) is a specialized subdomain of ER that physically connects with mitochondria. Although disruption of inter-organellar crosstalk via the MAM impairs cellular homeostasis, its pathological significance in insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unclear. Here, we reveal the importance of reduced MAM formation in the induction of fatty acid-evoked insulin resistance in hepatocytes. Palmitic acid (PA) repressed insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in HepG2 cells within 12h. Treatment with an inhibitor of the ER stress response failed to restore PA-mediated suppression of Akt activation. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not increase in PA-treated cells. Even short-term exposure (3h) to PA reduced the calcium flux from ER to mitochondria, followed by a significant decrease in MAM contact area, suggesting that PA suppressed the functional interaction between ER and mitochondria. Forced expression of mitofusin-2, a critical component of the MAM, partially restored MAM contact area and ameliorated the PA-elicited suppression of insulin sensitivity with Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt selectively improved. These results suggest that loss of proximity between ER and mitochondria, but not perturbation of homeostasis in the two organelles individually, plays crucial roles in PA-evoked Akt inactivation in hepatic insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein kinase C delta localizes to secretory lysosomes in CD8+ CTL and directly mediates TCR signals leading to granule exocytosis-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Haydar, Tarik F; Radoja, Sasa

    2008-10-01

    Lytic granule exocytosis is the major effector function used by CD8(+) CTL in response to intracellular pathogens and tumors. Despite recent progress in the field, two important aspects of this cytotoxic mechanism remain poorly understood. First, TCR-signaling pathway(s) that selectively induces granule exocytosis in CTL has not been defined to date. Second, it is unclear how Ag receptor-induced signals are converted into mobilization of lytic granules. We recently demonstrated that protein kinase C delta (PKC delta) selectively regulates TCR-induced lytic granule polarization in mouse CD8(+) CTL. To better understand how PKC delta facilitates granule movement, here we studied dynamics of intracellular localization of PKC delta in living CD8(+) CTL. Strikingly, we found that PKC delta localizes to the secretory lysosomes and polarizes toward immunological synapse during the process of target cell killing. Also, biochemical and structure-function studies demonstrated that upon TCR ligation, PKC delta becomes rapidly phosphorylated on the activation loop and regulates granule exocytosis in a kinase-dependent manner. Altogether, our current studies provide new insights concerning the regulation of TCR-induced lytic granule exocytosis by revealing novel intracellular localization of PKC delta, providing the first example of colocalization of a kinase with secretory lysosomes in CD8(+) CTL and demonstrating that PKC delta directly transduces TCR signals leading to polarized granule secretion.

  7. Membrane Fusion Protein Annexin 7: A Common Site of Action for Calcium, Guanosine Triphosphate, Protein Kinase C and Botulinum Toxin Type C in Regulated Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    finding thus strengthens the contention that a second GTP-binding protein, namely GE (G-protein for exocytosis), is involved at a late stage in the... spastic paralysis (Simpson, 1981; Montecucco and Schiavo, 1993; 1994). Investigations into the mechanism of the secretory process have been

  8. Insulin Resistance, Hyperglycemia, and Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Tabas, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Progress in preventing atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) has been stalled by the epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Further advances in this area demand a thorough understanding of how two major features of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, impact atherosclerosis. Insulin resistance is associated with systemic CAD risk factors, but increasing evidence suggests that defective insulin signaling in atherosclerotic lesional cells also plays an important role. The role o...

  9. Mapping dynamic protein interactions to insulin secretory granule behavior with TIRF-FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Ismail, Sahar; Wu, Ray; Yizhar, Ofer; Passmore, Daniel R; Ernst, Stephen A; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2010-08-09

    Biological processes are governed by extensive networks of dynamic molecular interactions. Yet, establishing a spatial and temporal map of these interactions and their direct relationship to specific cell functions has remained a challenge. Here, we implement sensitized emission Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) stoichiometry under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We demonstrate through quantitative analysis and modeling that evanescent fields must be precisely matched between FRET excitation wavelengths to isolate dynamic interactions between bimolecular FRET pairs that are not entirely membrane-delimited. We then use TIRF-FRET to monitor the behavior of individual insulin-containing secretory granules at the plasma membrane of living cells, while simultaneously tracking the dynamic interaction between the GTPase Rab27A and its effector Slp4A, on those same granules. Notably, insulin granules that underwent exocytosis demonstrated a specific increase in Rab27A-GTP/Slp4A FRET in the 5 s before membrane fusion, which coincided temporally with an increase in granule displacement and mobility. These results demonstrate an initial spatiotemporal mapping of a dynamic protein-protein interaction on individual secretory granules that is linked to a specific granule behavior in living cells. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  11. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glu......Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin...... of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion...... present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D....

  12. Contact heat evoked potentials using simultaneous EEG and fMRI and their correlation with evoked pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atherton Duncan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS utilises rapidly delivered heat pulses with adjustable peak temperatures to stimulate the differential warm/heat thresholds of receptors expressed by Aδ and C fibres. The resulting evoked potentials can be recorded and measured, providing a useful clinical tool for the study of thermal and nociceptive pathways. Concurrent recording of contact heat evoked potentials using electroencephalogram (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has not previously been reported with CHEPS. Developing simultaneous EEG and fMRI with CHEPS is highly desirable, as it provides an opportunity to exploit the high temporal resolution of EEG and the high spatial resolution of fMRI to study the reaction of the human brain to thermal and nociceptive stimuli. Methods In this study we have recorded evoked potentials stimulated by 51°C contact heat pulses from CHEPS using EEG, under normal conditions (baseline, and during continuous and simultaneous acquisition of fMRI images in ten healthy volunteers, during two sessions. The pain evoked by CHEPS was recorded on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results Analysis of EEG data revealed that the latencies and amplitudes of evoked potentials recorded during continuous fMRI did not differ significantly from baseline recordings. fMRI results were consistent with previous thermal pain studies, and showed Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD changes in the insula, post-central gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA, middle cingulate cortex and pre-central gyrus. There was a significant positive correlation between the evoked potential amplitude (EEG and the psychophysical perception of pain on the VAS. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of recording contact heat evoked potentials with EEG during continuous and simultaneous fMRI. The combined use of the two methods can lead to identification of distinct patterns of brain

  13. SDF 1-alpha (CXCL12) triggers glutamate exocytosis from astrocytes on a millisecond time scale: imaging analysis at the single-vesicle level with TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Corrado; Marchaland, Julie; Regazzi, Romano; Bezzi, Paola

    2008-07-31

    Chemokines are small chemotactic molecules widely expressed throughout the central nervous system. A number of papers, during the past few years, have suggested that they have physiological functions in addition to their roles in neuroinflammatory diseases. In this context, the best evidence concerns the CXC-chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1alpha or CXCL12) and its receptor CXCR4, whose signalling cascade is also implicated in the glutamate release process from astrocytes. Recently, astrocytic synaptic like microvesicles (SLMVs) that express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) and are able to release glutamate by Ca2+-dependent regulated exocytosis, have been described both in tissue and in cultured astrocytes. Here, in order to elucidate whether SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 system can participate to the brain fast communication systems, we investigated whether the activation of CXCR4 receptor triggers glutamate exocytosis in astrocytes. By using total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy and the membrane-fluorescent styryl dye FM4-64, we adapted an imaging methodology recently developed to measure exocytosis and recycling in synaptic terminals, and monitored the CXCR4-mediated exocytosis of SLMVs in astrocytes. We analyzed the co-localization of VGLUT with the FM dye at single-vesicle level, and observed the kinetics of the FM dye release during single fusion events. We found that the activation of CXCR4 receptors triggered a burst of exocytosis on a millisecond time scale that involved the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. These results support the idea that astrocytes can respond to external stimuli and communicate with the neighboring cells via fast release of glutamate.

  14. Corydalis edulis Maxim. Promotes Insulin Secretion via the Activation of Protein Kinase Cs (PKCs) in Mice and Pancreatic β Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiao; Zhao, Yunfang; Lun, Qixing; Song, Yuelin; Shi, Shepo; Gu, Xiaopan; Pan, Bo; Qu, Changhai; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2017-01-16

    Corydalis edulis Maxim., a widely grown plant in China, had been proposed for the treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we found that C. edulis extract (CE) is protective against diabetes in mice. The treatment of hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice with a high dose of CE reduced serum glucose by 28.84% and serum total cholesterol by 17.34% and increased insulin release. We also found that CE significantly enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose-independent manner in hamster pancreatic β cell (HIT-T15). Further investigation revealed that CE stimulated insulin exocytosis by a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent signaling pathway and that CE selectively activated novel protein kinase Cs (nPKCs) and atypical PKCs (aPKCs) but not conventional PKCs (cPKCs) in HIT-T15 cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to identify the PKC pathway as a direct target and one of the major mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of CE. Given the good insulinotropic effect of this herbal medicine, CE is a promising agent for the development of new drugs for treating diabetes.

  15. Fuel-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Depends upon Mitochondria Activation and the Integration of Mitochondrial and Cytosolic Substrate Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Cline

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic islet β-cell is uniquely specialized to couple its metabolism and rates of insulin secretion with the levels of circulating nutrient fuels, with the mitochondrial playing a central regulatory role in this process. In the β-cell, mitochondrial activation generates an integrated signal reflecting rates of oxidativephosphorylation, Kreb's cycle flux, and anaplerosis that ultimately determines the rate of insulin exocytosis. Mitochondrial activation can be regulated by proton leak and mediated by UCP2, and by alkalinization to utilize the pH gradient to drive substrate and ion transport. Converging lines of evidence support the hypothesis that substrate cycles driven by rates of Kreb's cycle flux and by anaplerosis play an integral role in coupling responsive changes in mitochondrial metabolism with insulin secretion. The components and mechanisms that account for the integrated signal of ATP production, substrate cycling, the regulation of cellular redox state, and the production of other secondary signaling intermediates are operative in both rodent and human islet β-cells.

  16. Evoked responses to sinusoidally modulated sound in unanaesthetized dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielen, A.M.; Kamp, A.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Reneau, J.P.; Storm van Leeuwen, W.

    1. 1. Responses evoked by sinusoidally amplitude-modulated sound in unanaesthetized dogs have been recorded from inferior colliculus and from auditory cortex structures by means of chronically indwelling stainless steel wire electrodes. 2. 2. Harmonic analysis of the average responses demonstrated

  17. Pattern visual evoked responses in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, I R; Mastaglia, F L; Edis, R; Howe, J W

    1981-01-01

    Pattern visual evoked responses were studied in 13 patients from nine families with dominant herditary spastic paraplegia and in seven sporadic cases. The responses were normal in all the dominantly inherited cases but abnormal in three of the seven sporadic cases. PMID:7217977

  18. The role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Visual Evoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: To report our experience in management of patients with optic neuritis. The effects of brain magnetic resonance imaging and visual evoked potential on management were investigated. Methods: This is a four years clinical trial that included patients presenting with first attack of optic neuritis older than 16 years ...

  19. Temporal Tuning Effects in the Visually Evoked Response,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Berger (1932) also observed that these brain waves are slowed in states of depressed function such as sleep activity and that they can be blocked by...Ma4cay and Jefferys, 1973). Transient VER’s, polyphasic in form and 200-500 milliseconds in duration, are evoked by stepwise changes in one or more per

  20. Visual evoked potentials in workers with chronic solvent encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Maarten M.; Brons, Joke T.; Sallé, Herman J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. Two promising variations of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were studied in solvent-exposed workers: the effect of a low-contrast stimulus in comparison with the usually applied high contrast, and the ability of pattern-onset VEP to reveal damage to specific visual cortical areas. In

  1. The computation of evoked heart rate and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, G.; Mulder, L.J.M.; van der Veen, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    For many years psychophysiologists have been interested in stimulus related changes in heart rate and blood pressure. To represent these evoked heart rate and blood pressure patterns, heart rate and blood pressure data have to be transformed into equidistant time series. This paper presents an

  2. Single-sweep spectral analysis of contact heat evoked potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine M; Graversen, Carina; Frøkjaer, Jens B

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The cortical response to nociceptive thermal stimuli recorded as contact heat evoked potentials (CHEPs) may be altered by morphine. However, previous studies have averaged CHEPs over multiple stimuli, which are confounded by jitter between sweeps. Thus, the aim was to assess single-sweep ch...

  3. The masseteric reflex evoked by tooth and denture tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, P; Fløystrand, F; Orstavik, J

    1991-07-01

    The characteristics of the masseter reflex evoked by tapping a maxillary incisor were compared with the reflex pattern evoked by tapping a corresponding denture tooth after insertion of an immediate denture. Up to three inhibitory phases (I-1, I-2 and I-3), followed by excitation, were found on an averaged EMG. The tapping force threshold for the early inhibitory phase was lower than for the late phases. The pattern of the reflex was generally the same before and after insertion of the denture, but the threshold values increased. After insertion of the denture, the threshold for I-1 increased from 1 +/- 0.3N to 2.2 +/- 0.4N, the threshold for I-2 increased from 2.4 +/- 0.8N to 3.8 +/- 0.9N, and the threshold for I-3 increased from 5.1 +/- 0.6N to 8.3 +/- 0.9N. The latency period for I-1 also increased from 12.3 +/- 0.5 ms to 13.1 +/- 0.3 ms after insertion of the denture. After relining, the threshold for evoking I-1 decreased from 2.7 +/- 1.2N to 1.2 +/- 0.6N. It was assumed that the mechanoreceptors situated in the mucosa under the denture base could take over the functional role of the periodontal mechanoreceptors for evoking the masseter reflex during tapping, and that these afferents probably had connections to the same interneurones.

  4. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  5. The evolutionary benefit of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Soeters, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is perceived as deleterious, associated with conditions as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and critical illness. However, insulin resistance is evolutionarily well preserved and its persistence suggests that it benefits survival. Insulin resistance is important in

  6. The Role of Ion Selectivity of the Fusion Pore on Transmission and the Exocytosis of Neurotransmitters and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Joannalyn Bongar

    Healthy nervous system function depends on proper transmission. Synaptic transmission occurs by the release of transmitters from vesicles that fuse to the plasma membrane of a pre-synaptic cell. Regulated release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and hormones occurs by exocytosis, initiated by the formation of the fusion pore. The initial fusion pore has molecular dimensions with a diameter of 1-2 nm and a rapid lifetime on the millisecond time scale. It connects the vesicular lumen and extracellular space, serving as an important step for regulating the release of charged transmitters. Comprehending the molecular structure and biophysical properties of the fusion pore is essential for a mechanistic understanding of vesicle-plasma membrane fusion and transmitter release. Release of charged transmitter molecules such as glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine, or noradrenaline through a narrow fusion pore requires compensation of change in charge. Transmitter release through the fusion pore is therefore an electrodiffusion process. If the fusion pore is selective for specific ions, then its selectivity will affect the rate of transmitter release via the voltage gradient that develops across the fusion pore. The elucidation of these mechanisms can lead to a better understanding of nervous system cell biology, neural and endocrine signaling, learning, memory, motor control, sensory function and integration, and in particular synaptic transmission. This investigation can advance our understanding of neurological disorders in which noradrenergic and dopaminergic exocytosis is disturbed, leading to neurological consequences of developmental disorders, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ultimately, understanding the role of selectivity in the fusion pore and its effects on exocytosis can contribute to the development of more effective therapies. This study investigates the selectivity of the fusion pore by observing the effects of ion

  7. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  8. Comparison of clinical and evoked pain measures in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard E; Gracely, Richard H; McLean, Samuel A; Williams, David A; Giesecke, Thorsten; Petzke, Frank; Sen, Ananda; Clauw, Daniel J

    2006-07-01

    Evoked pain measures such as tender point count and dolorimetry are often used to determine tenderness in studies of fibromyalgia (FM). However, these measures frequently do not improve in clinical trials and are known to be influenced by factors other than pain such as distress and expectancy. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether evoked pain paradigms that present pressure stimuli in a random fashion (eg, Multiple Random Staircase [MRS]) would track with clinical pain improvement in patients with FM better than traditional measures. Sixty-five subjects enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of acupuncture were observed longitudinally. Clinical pain was measured on a 101-point numerical rating scale (NRS) and the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), whereas evoked pressure sensitivity was assessed via manual tender point count, dolorimetry, and MRS methods. Improvements in clinical pain and evoked pain were assessed irrespective of group assignment. Improvement was seen in clinical pain during the course of the trial as measured by both NRS (P = .032) and SF-MPQ (P = .001). The MRS was the only evoked pain measure to improve correspondingly with treatment (MRS, P = .001; tender point count and dolorimeter, P > .05). MRS change scores were correlated with changes in NRS pain ratings (P = .003); however, this association was not stronger than tender point or dolorimetry correlations with clinical pain improvement (P > .05). Pain sensitivity as assessed by random paradigms was associated with improvements in clinical FM pain. Sophisticated pain testing paradigms might be responsive to change in clinical trials. Trials in fibromyalgia often use both clinical and experimental methods of pain assessment; however, these two outcomes are often poorly correlated. We explore the relationship between changes in clinical and experimental pain within FM patients. Pressure pain testing that applies stimuli in a random order is associated with

  9. Amiodarone reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampual synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Yu; Hung, Chi Feng; Huang, Shu Kuei; Kuo, Jinn Rung; Wang, Su Jane

    2017-03-01

    Decreased brain glutamate level has emerged as a new therapeutic approach for epilepsy. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of amiodarone, an anti-arrhythmic drug with antiepileptic activity, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, amiodarone reduced 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca2+-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration elevation. Amiodarone did not affect the 4-aminopyridine-evoked depolarization of the synaptosomal membrane potential or the Na+ channel activator veratridine-evoked glutamate release, indicating that the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release is not caused by a decrease in synaptosomal excitability. The inhibitory effect of amiodarone on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was markedly decreased in synaptosomes pretreated with the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, or the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 and KT5720. However, the intracellular Ca2+-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157 had no effect on the amiodarone-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. Furthermore, amiodarone reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that amiodarone reduces Ca2+ influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, subsequently reducing the Ca2+-calmodulin/protein kinase A cascade to inhibit the evoked glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Pavel; Zakharov, Sergey; Diblík, Pavel; Pelclová, Daniela; Ridzoň, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP) examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females) was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012-2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test) were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%), 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04). The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1-9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  11. Fundectomy-evoked osteopenia in pigs is mediated by the gastric-hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Marcin R; Krupski, Witold; Sliwa, Ewa; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of gastric impairment in pigs on the axial and peripheral skeletal system properties and to test the hypothesis that fundectomy-evoked osteopenia is related to disturbed gastric-hypothalamic-pituitary axis function. Forty-day-old male piglets were subjected to experimental fundectomy (FX group, n = 6) to induce osteopenia, while sham operation was performed in the controls (SHO group, n = 6). At the age of 8 months, serum samples were collected, and the animals were sacrificed to obtain lumbar vertebrae (L1-L6) and right humerus for analysis. Using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) methods, bone mineral density and bone mineral content of the vertebrae and humerus were measured. The compression and three-point bending tests were applied to determine mechanical properties of lumbar vertebrae and humerus, respectively. Furthermore, geometric properties of humerus were assessed. Serum concentrations of ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and selected macro- and microelements were also determined. Performed fundectomy decreased body weight in pigs by 66% compared with pair-fed sham operated pigs (P pigs (P pigs, respectively (all P iron and copper in the fundectomized animals were significantly decreased by 15.5%, 45.3%, 26.7%, and 26.2%, respectively (P pigs.

  12. Intradermal Insulin Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultström, Michael; Roxhed, Niclas

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of insulinopenic diabetes mellitus is constantly increasing, and in addition, approximately a third of all hyperinsulinemic diabetic patients develop insulinopenia. Optimal glycemic control is essential to minimize the risk for diabetes-induced complications, but the majority of diabetic patients fail to achieve proper long-term glucose levels even in clinical trials, and even more so in clinical practice. Compliance with a treatment regimen is likely to be higher if the procedure is simple, painless, and discreet. Thus, insulin has been suggested for nasal, gastrointestinal, and inhalation therapy, but so far with considerable downsides in effect, side effects, or patient acceptance. The stratum corneum is the main barrier preventing convenient drug administration without the drawbacks of subcutaneous injections. Recently, devices with miniaturized needles have been developed that combine the simplicity and discretion of patch-based treatments, but with the potential of peptide and protein administration. As this review describes, initial comparisons with subcutaneous administration now suggest microneedle patches for active insulin delivery are efficient in maintaining glycemic control. Hollow microneedle technology could also prove to be efficient in systemic as well as local delivery of other macromolecular drugs, such as vaccines. PMID:24876605

  13. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  14. The cardiovascular effects of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younk, Lisa M; Lamos, Elizabeth M; Davis, Stephen N

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in diabetes mellitus. A causal link between insulin, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk has been investigated at the basic science level and studied in large clinical trials. The cardiovascular actions of insulin and its role at the level of the endothelium will be reviewed. Cardiovascular outcomes in several large diabetes trials where insulin management was prominent will be summarized. The vascular actions of insulin are complex and mediated primarily