WorldWideScience

Sample records for evidence-based practice project

  1. Navigating Evidence-Based Practice Projects: The Faculty Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan D; Quinn-Lee, Lisa; Gallegos, Cara; Sortedahl, Charlotte K

    : An innovative way to facilitate evidence-based practice (EBP) learning and to get evidence into practice is through academic-clinical agency projects involving faculty, undergraduate students, and agency staff. The central role of the faculty is key to successful academic-clinical agency partnerships. Faculty navigate the often difficult process of focusing students and engaging busy staff through initiating, maintaining, and evaluating projects. Students learn valuable EBP skills, staff become engaged in EBP, and the projects are rated highly by agency administrators.

  2. Strategies to promote evidence-based practice in pediatric physical therapy: a formative evaluation pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe; Stern, Perri; Marchetti, Gregory; Provident, Ingrid

    2009-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has been perceived as one that bases its practice largely on anecdotal evidence and that uses treatment techniques for which there is little scientific support. Physical therapists have been urged to increase evidence-based practice behaviors as a means to address this perception and to enhance the translation of knowledge from research evidence into clinical practice. However, little attention has been paid to the best ways in which to support clinicians' efforts toward improving evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to identify, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at enhancing the ability of 5 pediatric physical therapists to integrate scientific research evidence into clinical decision making. This study was a formative evaluation pilot project. The participants in this study collaborated with the first author to identify and implement strategies and outcomes aimed at enhancing their ability to use research evidence during clinical decision making. Outcome data were analyzed with qualitative methods. The participants were able to implement several, but not all, of the strategies and made modest self-reported improvements in evidence-based practice behaviors, such as reading journal articles and completing database searches. They identified several barriers, including a lack of time, other influences on clinical decision making, and a lack of incentives for evidence-based practice activities. The pediatric physical therapists who took part in this project had positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice and made modest improvements in this area. It is critical for the profession to continue to investigate optimal strategies to aid practicing clinicians in applying research evidence to clinical decision making.

  3. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...... making that is established in research as well as an optimization of every link in documentation and search processes. EBP is based on the philosophical doctrine of empiricism and, therefore, it is subject to the criticism that has been raised against empiricism. The main criticism of EBP...... is that practitioners lose their autonomy, that the understanding of theory and of underlying mechanisms is weakened, and that the concept of evidence is too narrow in the empiricist tradition. In this article, it is suggested that we should speak of “research-based practice” rather than EBP, because this term is open...

  4. Project management office in health care: a key strategy to support evidence-based practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Bonneville-Roussy, Arielle; Richer, Marie-Claire; Aubry, Monique; Vezina, Michel; Deme, Mariama

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the contribution of a Transition Support Office (TSO) in a health care center in Canada to supporting changes in practice based on evidence and organizational performance in the early phase of a major organizational change. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 11 members of the TSO and 13 managers and clinicians from an ambulatory sector in the organization who received support from the TSO. The main themes addressed in the interviews were the description of the TSO, the context of implementation, and the impact. Using the Competing Value Framework by Quinn and Rohrbaugh [Public Product Rev. 1981;5(2):122-140], results revealed that the TSO is a source of expertise that facilitates innovation and implementation of change. It provides material support and human expertise for evidence-based projects. As a single organizational entity responsible for managing change, it gives a sense of cohesiveness. It also facilitates communication among human resources of the entire organization. The TSO is seen as an expertise provider that promotes competency development, training, and evidence-based practices. The impact of a TSO on change in practices and organizational performance in a health care system is discussed.

  5. Rescue dose orders as an alternative to range orders: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cassia

    2015-06-01

    Relief of pain is a fundamental aspect of optimal patient care. However, pain management in the inpatient setting is often constrained by concerns related to regulatory oversight, particularly with regard to the use of opioid dose range orders. These concerns can inadvertently result in the development of policies and practices that can negatively impact the health care team's ability to deliver optimal and individualized pain management. An evidence-based practice project was undertaken to address concerns about regulatory oversight of pain management processes by changing the way pain was managed in a large academic hospital setting. A novel pain management approach using rescue dose medications was established as an alternative to opioid dose range orders. The use of the rescue dose protocol was successfully implemented. Outcomes included an overall reduction in the administration of inappropriate intravenous opioids and opioid-acetaminophen combination medications, with a subsequent increase in single-entity first-line opioid analgesics. Rescue dose protocols may offer an alternative to opioid dose range orders as a means of effectively managing pain. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Project Focusing on Superintendents' Knowledge of Evidence-Based Practices of Structuring Time for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniger, Jason T.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a problem based learning project focusing on superintendents' knowledge of evidence-based practices of structuring time for student learning. Current research findings offer evidence that structuring time for student learning is an important factor in student achievement. School district superintendents are challenged with…

  7. Implementation of evidence-based practices for children in four countries: a project of the World Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Kelleher, Kelly; Murray, Laura K; Jensen, Peter S

    2006-03-01

    The present study examined implementation issues in adopting cognitive-behavioral therapies in routine clinical settings in four countries reflecting diverse cultures, languages, settings, and traditions. A Director's Systems Survey was administered prior to program implementation and one year later. Therapist ratings on attitudes about evidence-based practices and satisfaction were also gathered. All sites reported successful adoption of the program, although significant variations existed in fiscal support, family involvement, prior experience with cognitive-behavioral therapies, and plans for sustainability. Therapists' ratings indicated overall satisfaction with the implementation of the project. Findings from the Director's Systems Survey pointed to five factors facilitating implementation: 1) early adoption and guidance by innovative leaders (i.e., the Directors); 2) attention to the "fit" between the intervention model and local practices; 3) attention to front-end implementation processes (e.g., cultural adaptation, translation, training, fiscal issues); 4) attention to back-end processes early in the project (e.g., sustainability); and 5) establishing strong relationships with multiple stakeholders within the program setting. The implementation issues here mirror those identified in other studies of evidence-based practices uptake. Some of the obstacles to implementation of evidence-based practices may be generic, whereas issues such as the impact of political/economic instability, availability of translated materials, constitute unique stressors that differentially affect implementation efforts within specific countries.

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice.......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may......, and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical...

  9. Improving Competence and Confidence With Evidence-Based Practice Among Nurses: Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Kim M; Cvach, Maria; White, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an integral part of quality patient care, reduction in practice variation, and increased nursing autonomy. Yet, EBP is not a consistent standard in many organizations. Although many barriers to EBP have been cited, this project focused on poor knowledge of the EBP process and a lack of available EBP mentors or experts. A bundled set of educational interventions to improve the EBP confidence and self-efficacy of nurses was developed and implemented. Comparison of pre/post data showed improvement in all categories and questions. Committee members expressed greater confidence with the process and comfort level with leading EBP projects following the intervention. The educational bundle used in this project can serve as a model for others looking to develop competent EBP mentors within their organization.

  10. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting: a participatory action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen-Storms, Jolanda H H M; Moser, Albine; van der Loo, Sandra; Beurskens, Anna J H M; Bours, Gerrie J J W

    2015-01-01

    To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting. Evidence-based practice has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated into daily practice and its implementation is complex. Participatory action research. The main participants were nurses working in a lung unit of a rural hospital. A multi-method process of data collection was used during the observing, reflecting, planning and acting phases. Data were continuously gathered during a 24-month period from 2010 to 2012, and analysed using an interpretive constant comparative approach. Patients were consulted to incorporate their perspective. A best-practice mode of working was prevalent on the ward. The main barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice were that nurses had little knowledge of evidence-based practice and a rather negative attitude towards it, and that their English reading proficiency was poor. The main facilitators were that nurses wanted to deliver high-quality care and were enthusiastic and open to innovation. Implementation strategies included a tailored interactive outreach training and the development and implementation of an evidence-based discharge protocol. The academic model of evidence-based practice was adapted. Nurses worked according to the evidence-based practice discharge protocol but barely recorded their activities. Nurses favourably evaluated the participatory action research process. Action research provides an opportunity to empower nurses and to tailor evidence-based practice to the practice context. Applying and implementing evidence-based practice is difficult for front-line nurses with limited evidence-based practice competencies. Adaptation of the academic model of evidence-based practice to a more pragmatic approach seems necessary to introduce evidence-based practice into clinical practice. The use of scientific evidence can be facilitated by using pre-appraised evidence. For clinical practice

  11. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting : a participatory action research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandra van der Loo; Gerrie Bours; Anna Beurskens; Albine Moser; Jolanda Friesen-Storms

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in a clinical nursing setting. Background: EBP has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated in daily practice and its implementation is complex. Design: Participatory action

  12. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-10

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional development (CPD) courses that train clinical trainers to teach EBM through on-the-job training by demonstration of applied EBM real time in clinical practice. We developed such a course to encourage clinically relevant teaching of EBM in post-graduate education in various clinical environments. We devised an e-learning course targeting trainers with EBM knowledge to impart educational methods needed to teach application of EBM teaching in commonly used clinical settings. The curriculum development group comprised experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions in seven European countries. The e-learning sessions were designed to allow participants (teachers) to undertake the course in the workplace during short breaks within clinical activities. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. The curriculum defined specific learning objectives for teaching EBM by exploiting educational opportunities in six different clinical settings. The e-modules incorporated video clips that demonstrate practical and effective methods of EBM teaching in everyday clinical practice. The course encouraged focussed teaching activities embedded within a trainer's personal learning plan and documentation in a CPD portfolio for reflection. This curriculum will help senior clinicians to identify and make the best use of available opportunities in everyday practice in clinical situations to teach various steps of EBM and demonstrate their

  13. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Horvath, Andrea R.; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However,

  15. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  16. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  17. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Martin; Summerskill, William; Glasziou, Paul; Cartabellotta, Antonino; Martin, Janet; Hopayian, Kevork; Porzsolt, Franz; Burls, Amanda; Osborne, James

    2005-01-05

    A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP) exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC"). Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  18. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  19. Pilot projects in Evidence Based Policy Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, H.S.I.; Ker Rault, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In Evidence Based Policy Making, pilot projects have been recognized as important tools to develop ‘evidence’ of policy innovations. This paper presents a theoretical and empirical study of three water management pilot projects in the Rhine basin to deepen understanding of how they can contri-bute

  20. Use of evidence-based practices in pregnancy and childbirth: South East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Laopaiboon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The burden of mortality and morbidity related to pregnancy and childbirth remains concentrated in developing countries. SEA-ORCHID (South East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health In Developing countries is evaluating whether a multifaceted intervention to strengthen capacity for research synthesis, evidence-based care and knowledge implementation improves adoption of best clinical practice recommendations leading to better health for mothers and babies. In this study we assessed current practices in perinatal health care in four South East Asian countries and determined whether they were aligned with best practice recommendations.We completed an audit of 9550 medical records of women and their 9665 infants at nine hospitals; two in each of Indonesia, Malaysia and The Philippines, and three in Thailand between January-December 2005. We compared actual clinical practices with best practice recommendations selected from the Cochrane Library and the World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library. Evidence-based components of the active management of the third stage of labour and appropriately treating eclampsia with magnesium sulphate were universally practiced in all hospitals. Appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis for caesarean section, a beneficial form of care, was practiced in less than 5% of cases in most hospitals. Use of the unnecessary practices of enema in labour ranged from 1% to 61% and rates of episiotomy for vaginal birth ranged from 31% to 95%. Other appropriate practices were commonly performed to varying degrees between countries and also between hospitals within the same country.Whilst some perinatal health care practices audited were consistent with best available evidence, several were not. We conclude that recording of clinical practices should be an essential step to improve quality of care. Based on these findings, the SEA-ORCHID project team has been developing and implementing interventions aimed at increasing

  1. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  2. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  3. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    , and discusses autism spectrum disorders and EBP. The chapter concludes that, based on last sixty years of the development of music therapy as a recognized and relevant intervention, there is no doubt that the honeymoon period is over, and EBP is here to stay. Despite examples of attrition in music therapy......This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  4. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  5. Evidence Based Practice: Science? Or Art? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP is a strategy to bridge research and practice. Generally EBLIP is seen as a movement to encourage and give practitioners the means to incorporate research into their practice, where it previously may have been lacking. The widely accepted definition of EBLIP (Booth, 2000 stresses three aspects that contribute to a practice that is evidence based: 1 "the best available evidence;" 2 "moderated by user needs and preferences;" 3 "applied to improve the quality of professional judgements." The area that the EBLIP movement has focused on is how to create and understand the best available research evidence. CE courses, critical appraisal checklists, and many articles have been written to address a need for librarian education in this area, and it seems that strides have been made.But very little in the EBLIP literature talks about how we make professional judgements, or moderate evidence based on our user needs and preferences. Likewise, how do we make good evidence based decisions when our evidence base is weak. These things seem to be elements we just take for granted or can’t translate into words. It is in keeping with tacit knowledge that librarians just seem to have or acquire skills with education and on the job experience. Tacit knowledge is "knowledge that is not easily articulated, and frequently involves knowledge of how to do things. We can infer its existence only by observing behaviour and determining that this sort of knowledge is a precondition for effective performance" (Patel, Arocha, & Kaufman, 1999, p.78. It is something that is difficult to translate into an article or guideline for how we work. I think of this area as the "art" of evidence based practice. And the art is crucial to being an evidence based practitioner.Science = systematized knowledge, explicit research, methodological examination, investigation, dataArt = professional knowledge of your craft, intuition

  6. Innovations in mental health services implementation: a report on state-level data from the U.S. Evidence-Based Practices Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnabosco Jennifer L

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Evidence-Based Practice (EBP Project has been investigating the implementation of evidence-based mental health practices (Assertive Community Treatment, Family Psychoeducation, Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment, Illness Management and Recovery, and Supported Employment in state public mental health systems in the United States since 2001. To date, Project findings have yielded valuable insights into implementation strategy characteristics and effectiveness. This paper reports results of an effort to identify and classify state-level implementation activities and strategies employed across the eight states participating in the Project. Methods Content analysis and Greenhalgh et al's (2004 definition of innovation were used to identify and classify state-level activities employed during three phases of EBP implementation: Pre-Implementation, Initial Implementation and Sustainability Planning. Activities were coded from site visit reports created from documents and notes from key informant interviews conducted during two periods, Fall 2002 – Spring 2003, and Spring 2004. Frequency counts and rank-order analyses were used to examine patterns of implementation activities and strategies employed across the three phases of implementation. Results One hundred and six discreet implementation activities and strategies were identified as innovative and were classified into five categories: 1 state infrastructure building and commitment, 2 stakeholder relationship building and communications, 3 financing, 4 continuous quality management, and 5 service delivery practices and training. Implementation activities from different categories were employed at different phases of implementation. Conclusion Insights into effective strategies for implementing EBPs in mental health and other health sectors require qualitative and quantitative research that seeks to: a empirically test the effects of tools and methods used to implement EBPs

  7. An evidence-based approach to the prevention and initial management of skin tears within the aged community setting: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechey, Rebekah; Priest, Laura; Peters, Micah; Moloney, Clint

    2015-06-12

    Maintaining skin integrity in a community setting is an ongoing issue, as research suggests that the prevalence of skin tears within the community is greater than that in an institutional setting. While skin tear prevention and management principles in these settings are similar to those in an acute care setting, consideration of the environmental and psychological factors of the client is pivotal to prevention in a community setting. Evidence suggests that home environment assessment, education for clients and care givers, and being proactive in improving activities of daily living in a community setting can significantly reduce the risk of sustaining skin tears. The aim of this implementation project was to assess and review current skin tear prevention and management practices within the community setting, and from this, to implement an evidence-based approach in the education of clients and staff on the prevention of skin tears. As well. the project aims to implement evidence-based principles to guide clinical practice in relation to the initial management of skin tears, and to determine strategies to overcome barriers and non-compliance. The project utilized the Joanna Brigg's Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System audit tool for promoting changes in the community health setting. The implementation of this particular project is based in a region within Anglicare Southern Queensland. A small team was established and a baseline audit carried out. From this, multiple strategies were implemented to address non-compliance which included education resources for clients and caregivers, staff education sessions, and creating skin integrity kits to enable staff members to tend to skin tears, and from this a follow-up audit undertaken. Baseline audit results were slightly varied, from good to low compliance. From this, the need for staff and client education was highlighted. There were many improvements in the audit criteria following client and

  8. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center.

  9. Evidence Based Practice: Valuable and Successful Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While research is needed and necessary, promoting the value of evidence-based practice (EBP), quality improvement (QI) and project evaluation (PE) initiatives could rapidly and economically further the development of nursing and midwifery disciplines globally, perhaps especially in resource constrained settings.

  10. Evidence-Based Special Education in the Context of Scarce Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are supported as generally effective for populations of learners by bodies of high-quality and experimental research and, when aligned with stakeholder values and practical needs, should be prioritized for implementation. However, evidence-based practices are not currently available for all learner types in all…

  11. Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change.

  12. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  13. Personalizing Research: Special Educators' Awareness of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckert, Mary; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence-based practices are considered critical to student success, a research-to-practice gap exists. This qualitative study examined practicing special education teachers' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practices. Special education teachers were interviewed and their classroom practices examined. Major themes emerged and…

  14. Collaborating across services to advance evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah J; Richard, Maggie L; Ceniceros, Xochitl; Blaize, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Military medical treatment facilities offer a unique environment in which to develop a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP). Distinctive issues arise in the context of changed patient care demographics because of a war-injured population. These issues offer an opportunity to enhance the quality of care through the use and adaptation of research findings in this special nursing environment. In addition, the colocation of two military medical centers offers the prospect of collaborative efforts to create a regional culture for nursing EBP. The purposes of this study were to describe the processes of a collaborative project to train nurses in EBP and to share resources in developing and implementing evidence-based clinical nursing guidelines in two large military medical centers in the Northeastern United States and to discuss the collective efforts of nurse researchers, leadership, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses in each hospital to facilitate the EBP process. A description of the organizational structure and the climate for EBP of each facility is provided followed by discussion of training efforts and the inculcation of an organizational culture for EBP. Contextual barriers and facilitators were encountered throughout the project. The two nurse researchers leading the projects were able to overcome the barriers and capitalize on opportunities to promote EBP. Three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were developed at each facility and are currently in various stages of implementation. Despite the barriers, EBP continues to be at the forefront of military nursing practice in the U.S. National Capital Region. Clear communication and regular meetings were essential to the success of the collaborative project within and between the two military hospitals. Military-specific barriers to EBP included high team attrition and turnover because of the war mission and the usual high staff turnover at military hospitals. Military facilitators included a

  15. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Some Practical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Cook, Lysandra; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    A major tenet of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act is the identification and use of evidence-based practices, or those instructional techniques shown by research as most likely to improve student outcomes meaningfully. However, much confusion exists regarding the meaning and potential…

  16. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities for im...

  17. Information literacy for evidence-based practice in perianesthesia nurses: readiness for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jacqueline

    2010-04-01

    Information literacy, the recognition of information required, and the development of skills for locating, evaluating, and effectively using relevant evidence is needed for evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this study was to examine perianesthesia nurses' perception of searching skills and access to evidence sources. The design was a descriptive, exploratory survey. The sample consisted of ASPAN members (n = 64) and nonmembers (n = 64). The Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice instrument was used. Findings were that ASPAN members read more journal articles, were more proficient with computers, and used Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) more frequently than nonmembers. The three top barriers to use of research were: lack of understanding of organization or structure of electronic databases, lack of skills to critique and/or synthesize the literature, and difficulty in accessing research materials. In conclusion, education is needed for critiquing literature and understanding electronic databases and research articles to promote EBP in perianesthesia areas. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Neuropsychology 3.0: Evidence-Based Science and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift towards evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including: (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress towards these goals. PMID:21092355

  19. School Librarianship and Evidence Based Practice: Progress, Perspectives, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J. Todd

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper provides an overview of progress and developments surrounding evidence based practice in school librarianship, and seeks to provide a picture of current thinking about evidence based practice as it relates to the field. It addresses current issues and challenges facing the adoption of evidence based practice in school librarianship.Methods – The paper is based on a narrative review of a small but growing body of literature on evidence based practice in school librarianship, set within a broader perspective of evidence based education. In addition, it presents the outcomes of a collaborative process of input from 200 school libraries leaders collected at a School Library summit in 2007 specifically to address the emerging arena of evidence based practice in this field.Results – A holistic model of evidence based practice for school libraries is presented, centering on three integrated dimensions of evidence: evidence for practice, evidence in practice, and evidence of practice.Conclusion – The paper identifies key challenges ahead if evidence based school librarianship is to develop further. These include: building research credibility within the broader educational environment; the need for ongoing review and evaluation of the diverse body of research in education, librarianship and allied fields to make quality evidence available in ways that can enable practicing school librarians to build a culture of evidence based practice; development of tools, strategies, and exemplars to use to facilitate evidence based decision-making; and, ensuring that the many and diverse advances in education and librarianship become part of the practice of school librarianship.

  20. Teaching evidence based practice to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mo-Kyung; Bliquez, Rebecca

    Considering the heightened importance of evidence-based practice in healthcare settings, incorporating evidence-based practice into the nursing curriculum, especially in baccalaureate programs is essential because this is a first step to prepare students for their professional role as an RN, and the undergraduate nursing students are the ones who will spend the most time with patients at their bedside providing direct care. Teaching evidence-based practice at the undergraduate level, however, can be challenging. Creative and enjoyable teaching strategies are instrumental in order to promote students' engagement and learning about evidence-based practice. This paper describes useful strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in an undergraduate nursing research course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Addressing the deficiencies in the evidence-base for primary practice in regional Australia - sentinel practices data sourcing (SPDS) project: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijeet; Charlton, Karen E; Girdo, Lisa; Batterham, Marijka J; McDonald, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Chronic disease risk on a population level can be quantified through health surveys, either continuous or periodic. To date, information gathered from primary care interactions, using sentinel sites, has not been investigated as a potentially valuable surveillance system in Australia. A pilot study was conducted in a single General Practice in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia to assess the feasibility of accessing data obtained through a computerised chronic disease management program that has been designed for desktop application (Pen Computer Systems (PCS) Clinical Audit Tool: ™ PCS CAT). Collated patient data included information on chronic disease management and prevention, prevalence of overweight and obesity, mental health indicators, medication profiling and home medicine reviews, as well as uptake of preventive health services (immunisation and cervical cancer screening). Higher than national average estimates were found for the age-adjusted prevalence of chronic diseases such as hypertension (14.3% for sample vs 10.4%, nationally), anxiety disorders (4.4% vs 3.8%) and obesity/overweight (67.1 vs 63.4%). Preventive health assessment items were undersubscribed, ranging from 6-20% in eligible patients. This pilot study has demonstrated that the scope of data collected by patient visits to their General Practitioners, facilitated through the Medicare-funded primary health care system in Australia, offers a feasible opportunity for monitoring of chronic disease prevalence and its associated risk factors. The inclusion of a larger number of sentinel sites that are generalizable to the population being served would provide an accurate and region-specific system for the purposes of population health planning at the primary care level in order to improve the overall health of the community.

  2. Clarification and Elaboration on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Goodheart, Carol D.; Levant, Ronald F.

    2007-01-01

    Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife (see record 2007-13085-019), P. H. Hunsberger (see record 2007-13085-020), and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld (see record 2007-13085-021) regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in…

  3. Evidence-based ethics? On evidence-based practice and the "empirical turn" from normative bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Maya J

    2005-11-08

    The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the normative resolution of moral problems in a pluralistic society. While "evidence-based" is typically read in medicine and other life and social sciences as the empirically-adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means for increasing certainty, I propose that the evidence-based movement in fact gains consensus by displacing normative discourse with aggregate or statistically-derived empirical evidence as the "bottom line". Therefore, along with wavering on the fact/value distinction, evidence-based ethics threatens bioethics' normative mandate. The appeal of the evidence-based approach is that it offers a means of negotiating the demands of moral pluralism. Rather than appealing to explicit values that are likely not shared by all, "the evidence" is proposed to adjudicate between competing claims. Quantified measures are notably more "neutral" and democratic than liberal markers like "species normal functioning". Yet the positivist notion that claims stand or fall in light of the evidence is untenable; furthermore, the legacy of positivism entails the quieting of empirically non-verifiable (or at least non-falsifiable) considerations like moral claims and judgments. As a result, evidence-based ethics proposes to operate with the implicit normativity that accompanies the production and presentation of all biomedical and scientific facts unchecked. The "empirical turn" in bioethics signals a need for reconsideration of the methods used

  4. Barriers and Enablers to Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    The importance of educational practices based on evidence is well-supported in the literature, however barriers to their implementation in classrooms still exist. This paper examines the phenomenon of evidence-based practice in education highlighting enablers and barriers to their implementation with particular reference to RTLB practice.

  5. Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has…

  6. Evidence-based music therapy practice: an integral understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The American Music Therapy Association has recently put into action a plan called its Research Strategic Priority, with one of its central purposes to advance the music therapy field through research promoting Evidence-Based Practice of music therapy. The extant literature on music therapy practice, theory, and research conveys a range of very different perspectives on what may count as the "evidence" upon which practice is based. There is therefore a need to conceptualize evidence-based music therapy practice in a multifaceted, yet coherent and balanced way. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a framework based upon four distinct epistemological perspectives on evidence-based music therapy practice that together represent an integral understanding.

  7. Art Therapy, Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Art Therapy around the world is under increasing pressure to become more "evidence-based". As a result, practitioners now need to get to grips with what constitutes "evidence", how to apply research in appropriate ways and also how to contribute to the body of evidence through their own research and other related activities.\\ud \\ud Written specifically for art therapy practitioners and students, Art Therapy, Research & Evidence Based Practice traces the background to EBP, critically reviews t...

  8. Strategies for searching and managing evidence-based practice resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice requires the use of effective search strategies to locate relevant resources to guide practice change. Continuing education and staff development professionals can assist nurses to conduct effective literature searches. This article provides suggestions for strategies to aid in identifying search terms. Strategies also are recommended for refining searches by using controlled vocabulary, truncation, Boolean operators, PICOT (Population/Patient Problem, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Time) searching, and search limits. Suggestions for methods of managing resources also are identified. Using these approaches will assist in more effective literature searches and may help evidence-based practice decisions. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. What Works? Evidence-Based Practice in Education Is Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempenstall, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    There is a nascent movement towards evidence-based practice in education in Australia, evident in Federal and State education documents, if not in classrooms. Such a classroom-level outcome would require a number of conditions to be met. One of the critical requirements is that teachers be provided with knowledge and training in practices that…

  10. Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it…

  11. Evidence-based practice for information professionals a handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Examines to what extent the skills and techniques of evidence-based practice are transferable to the areas of professional practice of librarians and information professionals? Is it desirable for information professionals to integrate research findings into their day-to-day decision making?

  12. Evidence-Based Practice and Quality Improvement in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakas, Karen; Smith, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, nursing education has experienced several significant changes in response to challenges faced by healthcare organizations. Accrediting organizations have called for improved quality and safety in care, and the Institute of Medicine has identified evidence-based practice and quality improvement as 2 core competencies to include in the curricula for all healthcare professionals. However, the application of these competencies reaches far beyond the classroom setting. For nurses to possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to apply evidence-based practice and quality improvement to the real-world setting, academic-clinical institution partnerships are vital.

  13. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumza Ntshotsho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global acknowledgement of ecological restoration, as an important tool to complement conservation efforts, requires an effort to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions. Evidence-based practice is purported to promote effectiveness. A central tenet of this approach is decision making that is based on evidence, not intuition. Evidence can be generated experimentally and in practice but needs to be linked to baseline information collection, clear goals and monitoring of impact. In this paper, we report on a survey conducted to assess practitioners’ perceptions of the evidence generated in restoration practice in South Africa, as well as challenges encountered in building this evidence base. Contrary to a recent assessment of this evidence base which found weaknesses, respondents viewed it as adequate and cited few obstacles to its development. Obstacles cited were mostly associated with planning and resource availability. We suggest that the disparity between practitioners’ perceptions and observed weaknesses in the evidence base could be a challenge in advancing evidence-based restoration. We explore opportunities to overcome this disparity as well as the obstacles listed by practitioners. These opportunities involve a shift from practitioners as users of scientific knowledge and evidence, to practitioners involved in the co-production of evidence needed to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions.

  14. Evidence-based reflective teaching practice: a preceptorship course example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephsen, Jayne M

    2013-01-01

    This preceptorship course case study employed an evidence-based reflective teaching practice perspective based on a nursing process framework to develop, implement, and evaluate assignment efficacy directly related to course objectives. Journaling and article analysis had been used to assess development of role socialization, critical thinking, and self-reflective practice. These activities were found to be ineffective; new assignments were needed to address essential issues and allow for evaluation of assignment efficacy. Based upon contextual constructivism, four assignments were developed focused on learning goals, nursing skills, assumptions/biases, and role socialization.Assignment efficacy was evaluated via anonymous exploratory surveys. Student reports identified that assignments met learning outcomes. Methods for improvement in instructional practice were identified and revisions made. Participation in evidence-based reflective teaching practice can enhance reflective practice in students through appropriate assignment development, advancing the discipline of nursing education.

  15. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  16. Evidence-based Practice in libraries - Principles and discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2012-01-01

    The article examines problems concerning the introduction and future implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in libraries. It includes important conceptual distinctions and definitions, and it reviews the more controversial aspects of EBP, primarely based on experiences from Denmark. The ...

  17. The role of hypnotherapy in evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M J

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss the place of hypnotherapy in a modern medical world dominated by so-called evidence-based clinical practice. Hypnosis is an easily learned technique that is a valuable adjuvant to many medical, dental and psychological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Apprehensions of nurse managers on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carolina Camargo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the apprehensions of nurse managers in the implementation of the Evidence Based Practice in a Teaching Hospital of Triângulo Mineiro. Method: Qualitative research guided by the Theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. Five workshops were conducted per focal group (n = 18 participants, conducted by hermeneutic-dialectic interactions between August and September/2016. Textual records resulting from each workshop were analyzed by semantic categories. Results: Aspects conditioning to the implementation of the Evidence Based Practice permeate from elements related to the fragmentation of the care network to the necessary expansion of the governability of the nurse managers to put changes into practice in their sectors. Most importantly, timely access to the results of research conducted at the teaching hospital was mentioned as crucial to guide better practices. Final considerations: The approach allowed the recognition of contextual conditions for the implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice, which may coincide with similar scenarios, as well as increase the national scientific production on the subject, which is still scarce.

  19. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice From a Learning Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Per; Neher, Margit; Ellström, Per-Erik; Gardner, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    For many nurses and other health care practitioners, implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) presents two interlinked challenges: acquisition of EBP skills and adoption of evidence-based interventions and abandonment of ingrained non-evidence-based practices. The purpose of this study to describe two modes of learning and use these as lenses for analyzing the challenges of implementing EBP in health care. The article is theoretical, drawing on learning and habit theory. Adaptive learning involves a gradual shift from slower, deliberate behaviors to faster, smoother, and more efficient behaviors. Developmental learning is conceptualized as a process in the "opposite" direction, whereby more or less automatically enacted behaviors become deliberate and conscious. Achieving a more EBP depends on both adaptive and developmental learning, which involves both forming EBP-conducive habits and breaking clinical practice habits that do not contribute to realizing the goals of EBP. From a learning perspective, EBP will be best supported by means of adaptive learning that yields a habitual practice of EBP such that it becomes natural and instinctive to instigate EBP in appropriate contexts by means of seeking out, critiquing, and integrating research into everyday clinical practice as well as learning new interventions best supported by empirical evidence. However, the context must also support developmental learning that facilitates disruption of existing habits to ascertain that the execution of the EBP process or the use of evidence-based interventions in routine practice is carefully and consciously considered to arrive at the most appropriate response. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Strengthening organizations to implement evidence-based clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDeusen Lukas, Carol; Engle, Ryann L; Holmes, Sally K; Parker, Victoria A; Petzel, Robert A; Nealon Seibert, Marjorie; Shwartz, Michael; Sullivan, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    Despite recognition that implementation of evidence-based clinical practices (EBPs) usually depends on the structure and processes of the larger health care organizational context, the dynamics of implementation are not well understood. This project's aim was to deepen that understanding by implementing and evaluating an organizational model hypothesized to strengthen the ability of health care organizations to facilitate EBPs. CONCEPTUAL MODEL: The model posits that implementation of EBPs will be enhanced through the presence of three interacting components: active leadership commitment to quality, robust clinical process redesign incorporating EBPs into routine operations, and use of management structures and processes to support and align redesign. In a mixed-methods longitudinal comparative case study design, seven medical centers in one network in the Department of Veterans Affairs participated in an intervention to implement the organizational model over 3 years. The network was selected randomly from three interested in using the model. The target EBP was hand-hygiene compliance. Measures included ratings of implementation fidelity, observed hand-hygiene compliance, and factors affecting model implementation drawn from interviews. Analyses support the hypothesis that greater fidelity to the organizational model was associated with higher compliance with hand-hygiene guidelines. High-fidelity sites showed larger effect sizes for improvement in hand-hygiene compliance than lower-fidelity sites. Adherence to the organizational model was in turn affected by factors in three categories: urgency to improve, organizational environment, and improvement climate. Implementation of EBPs, particularly those that cut across multiple processes of care, is a complex process with many possibilities for failure. The results provide the basis for a refined understanding of relationships among components of the organizational model and factors in the organizational context

  1. Scaling up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation (i3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWire, Tom; McKithen, Clarissa; Carey, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    What can the Investing in Innovation (i3) grantees tell us about scaling innovative educational practices? The newly released white paper "Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation (i3)" captures the experiences of nine grantees whose projects collectively have reached over 1.2 million students across…

  2. Training Teachers to use Evidence-Based Practices for Autism: Examining Procedural Implementation fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Reed, Sarah; Lee, Ember; Reisinger, Erica M; Connell, James E; Mandell, David S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which public school teachers implemented evidence-based interventions for students with autism in the way these practices were designed. Evidence-based practices for students with autism are rarely incorporated into community settings, and little is known about the quality of implementation. An indicator of intervention quality is procedural implementation fidelity (the degree to which a treatment is implemented as prescribed). Procedural fidelity likely affects student outcomes. This project examined procedural implementation fidelity of three evidence-based practices used in a randomized trial of a comprehensive program for students with autism in partnership with a large, urban school district. Results indicate that teachers in public school special education classrooms can learn to implement evidence-based strategies; however they require extensive training, coaching, and time to reach and maintain moderate procedural implementation fidelity. Procedural fidelity over time, and across intervention strategies is examined.

  3. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application  of  evidence  and  documents.  In  this  study,  criteria  for  evidence-based  practice  in  Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM.

  4. Use of Evidence-Based Practice and Barriers to Utilize Research in Rural Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mingun

    2016-01-01

    In this study the author explores the level of use of evidence-based practice and the extent of barriers to research utilization in rural practice settings. Ninety-one social work field instructors from the rural areas of Southeast Ohio reported moderate use of evidence-based practice in their treatment process. The majority of field instructors also identified significant barriers to research utilization in practice. In addition, the use of evidence-based practice was associated with barriers to utilize research in the areas of field instructors' characteristics, organizational settings and limits, and communication. Implications include suggestions for enhancing evidence-based practice in rural settings.

  5. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  6. Evidence-based nursing: making changes in the clinical practice through the collaboration of nursing students and practicing nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elizabeth K; Hunley, Anne L; Wegner, Jamie L; Grogan, Ann; Walker, Amy; Malone, Kirsten J; LaPerriere, Michelle; Saucier, Lindsay; Girvin, Sally

    2005-11-01

    The collaboration between student nurses and practicing clinical nurses on an evidence-based project is described. This collaboration sought to answer a question pertinent to the needs of the clinical nurses, while providing the students with an excellent practical learning opportunity. The changes in both knowledge and practice resulting from this partnership are described.

  7. Leveraging Evidence-Based Practice through Partnerships Based on Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Lysandra

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is among the most influential and compelling reforms in contemporary education. Despite their potential to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities, adoption and implementation of evidence-based reforms have been disappointing, with the gap between research and practice remaining wide. Practice-based evidence…

  8. The History of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, April; Bassendowski, Sandra

    Beginning with Florence Nightingale in the 1800s and evolving again within the medical community, evidence-based practice continues to advance along with the nursing discipline. Evidence-based practice is foundational to undergraduate and graduate nursing education and is a way for the nursing discipline to minimize the theory to practice gap. This article discusses the concept of evidence-based practice from a historical perspective as it relates to nursing in the educational and practice domains. The concept evidence-based practice is defined, and the similarities and differences to evidence-based medicine are discussed. It is crucial that registered nurses be proactive in their quest for research knowledge, so the gap between theory and practice continues to close. Utilizing nursing best practice guidelines, reviewing and implementing applicable research evidence, and taking advantage of technological advances are all ways in which nursing can move forward as a well-informed discipline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-Based Chiropractic Education: Are We Equipping Graduates for Clinical Practice with Improved Patient Outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeve, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has emerged as a driving factor in current curriculum development in chiropractic education. This commentary discusses educational strategies incorporating evidence-based practices in the doctor of chiropractic curriculum and explores whether all five steps of the evidence-based process and patient outcomes from evidence-based practice are being assessed.

  10. Developing evidence-based physical therapy clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sandra L; Coulter, Colleen; Fetters, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Recommended strategies for developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are provided. The intent is that future CPGs developed with the support of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association would consistently follow similar developmental processes to yield consistent quality and presentation. Steps in the process of developing CPGs are outlined and resources are provided to assist CPG developers in carrying out their task. These recommended processes may also be useful to CPG developers representing organizations with similar structures, objectives, and resources.

  11. The professional clothing bank as evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, SueZanne Monique

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists linking interview-appropriate attire to improved employment outcomes for women. Thus, it appears that the professional clothing bank has not been investigated as evidence-based practice. To provide preliminary evidence for clothing banks, in this article the author synthesizes findings from existing research on the provision of a professional clothing bank as a means for offering interview-appropriate attire to poor women in job readiness programming. For context, job readiness programs are explored and a case study of one program operating a professional clothing bank is presented. Finally, preliminary considerations for planning and implementing clothing banks based on this literature review are given.

  12. Lessons Learned From a System-wide Evidence-Based Practice Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is described as incorporating scientific evidence, clinical expertise and the patient’s values and preferences into the...The purpose of the 59 MDW EBP program implementation project is to determine the organization’s cultural readiness for enterprise-wide implementation of EBP by identifying EBP beliefs and behaviors of the nursing staff.

  13. Continuing to challenge practice to be evidence based.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; Rauen, Carol; Jones, Kimmith; Fisk, Anna C

    2015-04-01

    Practice habits continue in clinical practice despite the availability of research and other forms of evidence that should be used to guide critical care practice interventions. This article is based on a presentation at the 2014 National Teaching Institute of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The article is part of a series of articles that challenge critical care nurses to examine the evidence guiding nursing practice interventions. Four common practice interventions are reviewed: (1) weight-based medication administration, (2) chest tube patency maintenance, (3) daily interruption of sedation, and (4) use of chest physiotherapy in children. For weight-based administration of medication, the patient's actual weight should be measured, rather than using an estimate. The therapeutic effectiveness and dosages of medications used in obese patients must be critically evaluated. Maintaining patency of chest tubes does not require stripping and milking, which probably do more harm than good. Daily interruption of sedation and judicious use of sedatives are appropriate in most patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Traditional chest physiotherapy does not help children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, or asthma and does not prevent atelectasis after extubation. Critical care nurses are challenged to evaluate their individual practice and to adopt current evidence-based practice interventions into their daily practice. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Penelope

    2017-01-12

    Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL), fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions : Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  15. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  16. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Fall Prevention for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschke, Cheryl; Butcher, Howard K

    2017-11-01

    Falls are a major cause of injury and death annually for millions of individuals 65 and older. Older adults are at risk for falls for a variety of reasons regardless of where they live. Falls are defined as any sudden drop from one surface to a lower surface. The purpose of this fall prevention evidence-based practice guideline is to describe strategies that can identify individuals at risk for falls. A 10-step protocol including screening for falls, comprehensive fall assessment, gait and balance screening when necessary, and an individualized fall intervention program addressing specific fall risks is presented. Reassessing fall risk and fall prevention programs will ensure a proactive approach to reducing falls in the aging population. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(11), 15-21.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Evidence-based therapy relationships: research conclusions and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    In this closing article of the special issue, we present the conclusions and recommendations of the interdivisional task force on evidence-based therapy relationships. The work was based on a series of meta-analyses conducted on the effectiveness of various relationship elements and methods of treatment adaptation. A panel of experts concluded that several relationship elements were demonstrably effective (alliance in individual psychotherapy, alliance in youth psychotherapy, alliance in family therapy, cohesion in group therapy, empathy, collecting client feedback) while others were probably effective (goal consensus, collaboration, positive regard). Three other relationship elements (congruence/genuineness, repairing alliance ruptures, and managing countertransference) were deemed promising but had insufficient evidence to conclude that they were effective. Multiple recommendations for practice, training, research, and policy are advanced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Developing evidence-based librarianship: practical steps for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Ellen; Koufogiannakis, Denise

    2002-06-01

    Evidence-based librarianship (EBL) is a relatively new concept for librarians. This paper lays out a practical framework for the implementation of EBL. A new way of thinking about research in librarianship is introduced using the well-built question process and the assignment of librarian research questions to one of six domains specific to librarianship. As a profession, librarianship tends to reflect more qualitative, social sciences/humanities in its research methods and study types which tend to be less rigorous and more prone to bias. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) do not have to be placed at the top of an evidence 'hierarchy' for librarianship. Instead, a more encompassing model reflecting librarianship as a whole and the kind of research likely to be done by librarians is proposed. 'Evidence' from a number of disciplines including health sciences, business and education can be utilized by librarians and applied to their practice. However, access to and availability of librarianship literature needs to be further studied. While using other disciplines (e.g. EBHC) as a model for EBL has been explored in the literature, the authors develop models unique to librarianship. While research has always been a minor focus in the profession, moving research into practice is becoming more important and librarians need to consider the issues surrounding research in order to move EBL forward.

  19. Motivational Interviewing: An Evidence-Based Practice for Improving Student Practice Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Melinda; Pierce, Paloma; Barnett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method to assist clients in resolving their ambivalence regarding change. With a school emphasis on evidence-based practice and learning outcomes, a social work department implemented a semester-long course on MI. The purpose of this study was to determine baseline skills and…

  20. Using Research Findings to Design an Evidence-Based Practice Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Helen K; Noonan, Lois; Jenkins, Deborah Poskus; Bernardo, Lisa Marie

    2017-04-01

    Evidence from a system-wide research study highlighted strengths and weaknesses in evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation, beliefs, and organizational readiness. To address this evidence, a curriculum was developed within the context of the shared governance and EBP models for nursing practice. The curriculum, Evidence-Based Practice: Clinical Applications in Professional Nursing Practice, consists of five modules that provide the knowledge, skills, and abilities relative to each step of EBP. The learning approach incorporates classroom- and unit-based education, facilitated by EBP curriculum mentors. Each module is rolled out quarterly for a 15-month curriculum cycle. Outcome data include pre- and post-learning assessments, in addition to EBP projects. This seamless approach to nursing education, based on research findings and established shared governance and EBP models, can be undertaken by community hospital systems. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2017;48(4):184-189. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Review of the centre for evidence-based veterinary medicine's "using an evidence-based approach in your practice" course

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, LA; Hall, EJ

    2017-01-01

    The practice of evidence–based veterinary nursing is a day one skill expected of veterinary nurses, and veterinary nursing educators are required to prepare student veterinary nurses to meet this competency. This article reviewed the Centre for Evidence – based Veterinary Medicine's course "Using an evidence – based approach in your practice" from the perspective of two Veterinary nursing educators. This four month blended learning course covered the importance of evidence based medicine (EBV...

  2. Leadership in evidence-based practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenpfader, Ursula; Carlfjord, Siw; Nilsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to systematically review published empirical research on leadership as a determinant for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) and to investigate leadership conceptualization and operationalization in this field. A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. Relevant electronic bibliographic databases and reference lists of pertinent review articles were searched. To be included, a study had to involve empirical research and refer to both leadership and EBP in health care. Study quality was assessed with a structured instrument based on study design. A total of 17 studies were included. Leadership was mostly viewed as a modifier for implementation success, acting through leadership support. Yet, there was definitional imprecision as well as conceptual inconsistency, and studies seemed to inadequately address situational and contextual factors. Although referring to an organizational factor, the concept was mostly analysed at the individual or group level. The concept of leadership in implementation science seems to be not fully developed. It is unclear whether attempts to tap the concept of leadership in available instruments truly capture and measure the full range of the diverse leadership elements at various levels. Research in implementation science would benefit from a better integration of research findings from other disciplinary fields. Once a more mature concept has been established, researchers in implementation science could proceed to further elaborate operationalization and measurement. Although the relevance of leadership in implementation science has been acknowledged, the conceptual base of leadership in this field has received only limited attention.

  3. State of Evidence-Based Practice in Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dawn M; Stephens, Phillip

    2018-03-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves using the best evidence available to guide patient care. The use of EBP improves patient outcomes and the quality of care delivered. Studies have investigated how EBP is taught in other health professions but not in physician assistant (PA) programs. The purpose of this study was to explore how PA programs teach this subject matter. After permission was obtained, a survey was adapted from a similar study completed in medical schools. Requests were emailed to 186 accredited PA programs with available contact information. These data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The text responses were reviewed and summarized to describe how EBP was taught in the programs surveyed. Eighty-four responses were received from the 186 PA programs contacted with the survey request, giving a 45.2% return. Approximately 95% of respondents reported having formal EBP training in their curriculum. Respondents reported formal EBP training through a variety of educational activities, with time spent on these activities ranging from 4 hours to 550 hours. Barriers to implementation of an EBP curriculum were reported by 27% of respondents, with the most common barrier being lack of time. Most PA programs that responded have formal EBP training in the curriculum. There is little standardization regarding the methods used and time spent in these activities. The Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant may be able to assist in overcoming the reported barriers and improving standardization by implementing a specific EBP accreditation standard.

  4. Brief report: Creating a culture of evidence-based practice and nursing research in a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Kristen L; Brandt, Patricia; Brytus, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and nursing research are fundamental to the profession of nursing. However, enculturating these processes into daily nursing practice presents challenges. In an effort to identify these challenges specific to our organization's nursing division, the Barriers to Nursing Research survey was distributed to staff nurses (n=239) to assess barriers in utilizing evidence-based practice and research in their daily practice. Based on these findings, our Evidence-Based Practice/Research Council developed a dissemination plan to be implemented over a 1 year time period that provided staff resources to implement evidence-based practice and nursing research. Upon completion of the year long implementation period, the same Barriers to Nursing Research survey was redistributed to staff (n=157). Pre and post survey results were compared for significance. Outcomes included an increase in projects, nurse driven research, and national presentations and publications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Evidence-Based Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Timothy A; Detrich, Ronnie; Wilczynski, Susan M; Spencer, Trina D; Lewis, Teri; Wolfe, Katie

    2014-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of professional decision-making in which practitioners integrate the best available evidence with client values/context and clinical expertise in order to provide services for their clients. This framework provides behavior analysts with a structure for pervasive use of the best available evidence in the complex settings in which they work. This structure recognizes the need for clear and explicit understanding of the strength of evidence supporting intervention options, the important contextual factors including client values that contribute to decision making, and the key role of clinical expertise in the conceptualization, intervention, and evaluation of cases. Opening the discussion of EBP in this journal, Smith (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) raised several key issues related to EBP and applied behavior analysis (ABA). The purpose of this paper is to respond to Smith's arguments and extend the discussion of the relevant issues. Although we support many of Smith's (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) points, we contend that Smith's definition of EBP is significantly narrower than definitions that are used in professions with long histories of EBP and that this narrowness conflicts with the principles that drive applied behavior analytic practice. We offer a definition and framework for EBP that aligns with the foundations of ABA and is consistent with well-established definitions of EBP in medicine, psychology, and other professions. In addition to supporting the systematic use of research evidence in behavior analytic decision making, this definition can promote clear communication about treatment decisions across disciplines and with important outside institutions such as insurance companies and granting agencies.

  6. Council for Exceptional Children: Standards for Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the "Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)" presents Standards for Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education. The statement presents an approach for categorizing the evidence base of practices in special education. The quality indicators and the criteria for categorizing the evidence base of special education…

  7. Evidence-based practice models for organizational change: overview and practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin E; Diedrick, Lee

    2013-05-01

    To provide an overview, summary of key features and evaluation of usefulness of six evidence-based practice models frequently discussed in the literature. The variety of evidence-based practice models and frameworks, complex terminology and organizational culture challenges nurses in selecting the model that best fits their practice setting. The authors: (1) initially identified models described in a predominant nursing text; (2) searched the literature through CINAHL from 1998 to current year, using combinations of 'evidence', 'evidence-based practice', 'models', 'nursing' and 'research'; (3) refined the list of selected models based on the initial literature review; and (4) conducted a second search of the literature on the selected models for all available years to locate both historical and recent articles on their use in nursing practice. Authors described model key features and provided an evaluation of model usefulness based on specific criteria, which focused on facilitating the evidence-based practice process and guiding practice change. The evaluation of model usefulness can be used to determine the best fit of the models to the practice setting. The Johns Hopkins Model and the Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice Star Model emphasize the processes of finding and evaluating evidence that is likely to appeal to nursing educators. Organizations may prefer the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services Framework, Advancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration, or Iowa models for their emphasis on team decision-making. An evidence-based practice model that is clear to the clinician and fits the organization will guide a systematic approach to evidence review and practice change. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. [Evidence-based practice competence in undergraduate Nursing Degree students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Molina-Salas, Yolanda; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) learning has become a key issue for nurses. An EPB subject was included in the 4(th) year in the new syllabus of the Nursing Degree at University of Murcia (UM). To know the competence level in EBP of undergraduate nursing students at UM and compare the results between all four years. Observational descriptive study with a cross-sectional approach. undergraduate nursing students from all four years at Nursing Degree at the Faculty of Social and Healthcare Science at UM in the year 2013-14. EBP evaluation of competence of the nursing students consisted of attitude, skills and knowledge on EBP. A validated questionnaire, the EBP-COQ, was used. The scale range is 1 point «lowest level» to 5 points «higher level».The SPSS 21.0 program has been used to carry out descriptive and bivariate analyses. 144 students were included, 76.4% was female, and the median age was 23 years, 84.7% attended more than 75% class hours. The mean differences in the questionnaire between first and fourth years were 0.58 points in attitude, 0.60 in skills, 1.6 in knowledge and 0.83 in global competence in EBP. Significant differences in mean scores between the fourth and the remaining years in the global competence in EBP were observed, as well as in the three dimensions (p <0.05). The undergraduate-nursing students studied here have acquired an appropriate competence level in EBP, with a gradual increase by year. The biggest increase was in the fourth year students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Teaching evidence-based practice: developing a curriculum model to foster evidence-based practice in undergraduate student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, Stefano; Carpanoni, Marika; Turroni, Elena Casadei; Camellini, Riccarda; Mecugni, Daniela

    2013-09-01

    For the nature of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and its relevance to nursing, the skills that it requires should be a component in the basic Nursing degree courses. For this reason, the EBP process should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students' independence and ability to self-learning. the aim of this study is to describe the perception that newly graduated nurses have relative to the benefits of the skills learned during the laboratory's three-year EBP in consideration of the construction of the thesis, the research of evidence and usefulness of the EBP process for the development of their professional career. A descriptive study with a sample of 300 newly graduated nurses from the Degree Course in Nursing of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, venue of Reggio Emilia. The data collection instrument was an anonymous questionnaire. It was possible to answer through a 10 Likert scale. The sample considers effective the research of evidence carried out (mean 6, SD 2), related to the problems of patients (mean 7, SD 2); the sample considered the skills acquired during the laboratory's three-year EBP to be useful for career development (mean 7, SD 2). the decision to include the laboratory's three-year EBP in the curriculum of the Nursing degree promotes the development of skills relating to the use of the EBP process, competence that in the literature is indicated as one of the core competencies that all health professionals should develop and maintain throughout their professional career. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Getting Started with Evidence-Based and Promising Practices. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Within a system, change affects stakeholders differently. Consequently, when making changes in the mental health system, mental health agencies should expect varied reactions from staff, community members, consumers, and families. Since misunderstandings can stymie efforts to implement evidence-based and promising practices, it is important to…

  11. Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) permits the highest quality of care in meeting the multifaceted needs of clients using the best available evidence from research findings, expert ideas from specialists in the various health care sectors and feedback from clients. However, in many instances, various challenges need to be ...

  12. evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-10-13

    Oct 13, 2014 ... Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) permits the highest quality of care in meeting the multifaceted needs of clients using the best available evidence from research findings, expert ideas from specialists in the various health care sectors and feedback from clients. However, in many instances, various challenges ...

  13. Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of evidence based medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the awareness and attitude of hospital resident doctors towards evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their related educational needs. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on a randomly selected sample of 141 hospital resident ...

  14. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is an approach to oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinically relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences.

  15. Facilitating Lewin's change model with collaborative evaluation in promoting evidence based practices of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Julianne; Gray-Miceli, Deanna L; Metcalf, Judith A; Paolini, Charlotte A; Napier, Anne H; Coogle, Constance L; Owens, Myra G

    2014-12-01

    Evidence based practices (EBPs) in clinical settings interact with and adapt to host organizational characteristics. The contextual factors themselves, surrounding health professions' practices, also adapt as practices become sustained. The authors assert the need for better planning models toward these contextual factors, the influence of which undergird a well-documented science to practice gap in literature on EBPs. The mechanism for EBP planners to anticipate contextual effects as programs Unfreeze their host settings, create Movement, and become Refrozen (Lewin, 1951) is present in Lewin's 3-step change model. Planning for contextual change appears equally important as planning for the actual practice outcomes among providers and patients. Two case studies from a Geriatric Education Center network will illustrate the synthesis of Lewin's three steps with collaborative evaluation principles. The use of the model may become an important tool for continuing education evaluators or organizations beginning a journey toward EBP demonstration projects in clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  17. Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation in Doctor of Nursing Practice Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Joanne K

    2017-10-01

    Doctors of Nursing Practice focus on leadership in evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is influenced by one's beliefs in and implementation of EBP. Little is known to date about the EBP beliefs and implementation of Doctor of Nursing Practice students and outcomes of Doctor of Nursing Practice education. Guided by the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model, the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs (EBPB) and Implementation (EBPI) tools were used to assess the impact of EBP as a program pillar, curricular thread, and content area on EBPB and EBPI of Doctor of Nursing Practice-Family Nurse Practitioner students. Five cohorts who completed the same curriculum were studied. Fifty-four of the 89 students across the five cohorts began and completed the study. Paired t-test for group effects showed statistical significance from pre- to post-measure in students overall EBPB, t = 4.4 (52), p students who are educated to be EBP leaders must have a curriculum that supports them in the knowledge and skill-set needed to translate evidence into practice. The ARCC Model can guide faculty in EBP curriculum development. EBPB and EBPI are valid and reliable measures to assess for gains across a curriculum. Through educational outcomes, educators can assess desired student outcomes for EBP across a curriculum and can build an evidence base for ongoing curriculum development. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Part 2 Application to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elise; McLeod, Sharynne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides both a tutorial and a clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can conduct evidence-based practice (EBP) when working with children with speech sound disorders (SSDs). It is a companion paper to the narrative review of 134 intervention studies for children who have an SSD (Baker & McLeod, 2011).…

  19. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  20. What phytotherapy needs: Evidence-based guidelines for better clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colalto, Cristiano

    2018-03-01

    In recent decades, the pharmacological properties of numerous medicinal plants and opportunities in phytotherapy have been explored through research projects, reviews, and monographs. These studies confirm that medicinal plants offer new approaches to tackling diseases. However, improvement of phytotherapy in clinical practice relies on a number of critical factors. In particular, the studies are very heterogeneous, and results and their interpretation by healthcare workers vary greatly, so preventing consistency in clinical practice. There is therefore a lost opportunity to improve phytotherapy practice, because the work being done and the related systematic reviews cannot act as a body of data on which to base clear clinical recommendations. Approaches such as the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation or the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network methodology could easily help standardise the use of phytotherapy in clinical practice. In this context, evidence-based phytotherapy guidelines could offer new healthcare approaches to the treatment of diseases. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Severe pre-eclampsia. An evidence-based practice proposal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Pérez-Caballero, P; Verdeguer-Ribes, S; Vila-Montañés, M

    2013-01-01

    There are several treatment proposals for the obstetric patient with pre-eclampsia, but there is limited evidence on the adequacy of standard treatment. International healthcare organisations recommend that hospitals or anaesthesia departments have written guidelines, protocols or recommendations for dealing with common or severe situations. We propose evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of pre-eclampsia. A literature review was performed using several sources, bibliography databases, recommendations made by specialist societies, and reviews. Four anaesthesiologists reviewed the references selected, in order to design clinical questions (these were obtained from recent pre-eclampsia review articles). Consensus of at least 3 out of 4 experts was required. The Oxford criteria for evidence were chosen to classify the scientific articles, and the Jadad score was applied to the final articles selected. A total of 50 clinical questions were designed and answered. These were classified into: general questions, influence of the type of delivery, pre-anaesthesia evaluation, peripartum treatment (including analgesia and anaesthesia), eclampsia, post-delivery period, and intensive care and transport. Most of the responses showed low scientific evidence. Evidence-based recommendations for severe pre-eclampsia treatment were provided with special emphasis on the anaesthesiologist point of view. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. CEC's Standards for Classifying the Evidence Base of Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Buysse, Virginia; Klingner, Janette; Landrum, Timothy J.; McWilliam, R. A.; Tankersley, Melody; Test, David W.

    2015-01-01

    As an initial step toward improving the outcomes of learners with disabilities, special educators have formulated guidelines for identifying evidence-based practices. We describe the Council of Exceptional Children's new set of standards for identifying evidence-based practices in special education and how they (a) were systematically vetted by…

  3. Shared decision making in chronic care in the context of evidence based practice in nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen-Storms, J.H.; Bours, G.J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Beurskens, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the decision-making environment of evidence-based practice, the following three sources of information must be integrated: research evidence of the intervention, clinical expertise, and the patient's values. In reality, evidence-based practice usually focuses on research evidence (which may be

  4. Shared decision making in chronic care in the context of evidence based practice in nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T van der Weijden; AJ Beurskens; GJ Bours; JH Friesen-Storms

    2015-01-01

    In the decision-making environment of evidence-based practice, the following three sources of information must be integrated: research evidence of the intervention, clinical expertise, and the patient’s values. In reality, evidence-based practice usually focuses on research evidence (which may be

  5. Transformational and Transactional Leadership: Association With Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Leadership in organizations is important in shaping workers’ perceptions, responses to organizational change, and acceptance of innovations, such as evidence-based practices. Transformational leadership inspires and motivates followers, whereas transactional leadership is based more on reinforcement and exchanges. Studies have shown that in youth and family service organizations, mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting an evidence-based practice are associated with organizational context and individual provider differences. The purpose of this study was to expand these findings by examining the association between leadership and mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice. Methods Participants were 303 public-sector mental health service clinicians and case managers from 49 programs who were providing mental health services to children, adolescents, and their families. Data were gathered on providers’ characteristics, attitudes toward evidence-based practices, and perceptions of their supervisors’ leadership behaviors. Zero-order correlations and multilevel regression analyses were conducted that controlled for effects of service providers’ characteristics. Results Both transformational and transactional leadership were positively associated with providers’ having more positive attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice, and transformational leadership was negatively associated with providers’ perception of difference between the providers’ current practice and evidence-based practice. Conclusions Mental health service organizations may benefit from improving transformational and transactional supervisory leadership skills in preparation for implementing evidence-based practices. PMID:16870968

  6. Sustainability of Evidence-Based Acute Pain Management Practices for Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Xie, Xian-Jin; Herr, Keela A; Titler, Marita G

    2017-11-01

    Little is known regarding sustainability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) following implementation. This article reports sustainability of evidence-based acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults following testing of a multifaceted Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) implementation intervention. A cluster randomized trial with follow-up period was conducted in 12 Midwest U.S. hospitals (six experimental, six comparison). Use of evidence-based acute pain management practices and mean pain intensity were analyzed using generalized estimating equations across two time points (following implementation and 18 months later) to determine sustainability of TRIP intervention effects. Summative Index scores and six of seven practices were sustained. Experimental and comparison group differences for mean pain intensity over 72 hours following admission were sustained. Results revealed most evidence-based acute pain management practices were sustained for 18 months following implementation. Further work is needed to identify factors affecting sustainability of EBPs to guide development and testing of sustainability strategies.

  7. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Lessons Learned from A System-Wide Evidence-Based Practice Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    military nurses that provide a higher quality and safer care for our warfighters and their families. Key words: evidence-based practice, EBP, EBP...Practice Program Implementation presented at/published to 2017 Triservice Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Dissemination Course, Ellicott...S9 MOW CRD Graduate Health Sciences Education (GHSE) (SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research

  9. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  10. Relationship of Evidence-Based Practice and Treatments: A Survey of Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeo, Michelle A.; Moore, G. Kurt; Lichtenstein, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) are "interventions" that have been proven effective through rigorous research methodologies. Evidence-based practice (EBP), however, refers to a "decision-making process" that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics. This study examined community mental health service…

  11. Evidence-Based Practices in the Field of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An International Consensus Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Gomez, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    As evidence-based practices become increasingly advocated for and used in the human services field it is important to integrate issues raised by three perspectives on evidence: empirical-analytical, phenomenological-existential, and post-structural. This article presents and discusses an evidence-based conceptual model and measurement framework…

  12. Evidence Based Practice: Valuable and Successful Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in clinical setting to provide quality healthcare. (95% Yes). * to become aware that I have to apply evidence to change current practice for better patient health- care outcomes (92% Yes). * to equip me with knowledge to use evidence to improve patient care outcomes (88% Yes). Figure 1. Second year nursing and midwifery.

  13. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available . A central tenet of this approach is decision making that is based on evidence, not intuition. Evidence can be generated experimentally and in practice but needs to be linked to baseline information collection, clear goals and monitoring of impact...

  14. Presenting evidence-based health information for people with multiple sclerosis: the IN-DEEP project protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie; Filippini, Graziella; Synnot, Anneliese; Summers, Michael; Beecher, Deirdre; Colombo, Cinzia; Mosconi, Paola; Battaglia, Mario A; Shapland, Sue; Osborne, Richard H; Hawkins, Melanie

    2012-03-16

    Increasingly, evidence-based health information, in particular evidence from systematic reviews, is being made available to lay audiences, in addition to health professionals. Research efforts have focused on different formats for the lay presentation of health information. However, there is a paucity of data on how patients integrate evidence-based health information with other factors such as their preferences for information and experiences with information-seeking. The aim of this project is to explore how people with multiple sclerosis (MS) integrate health information with their needs, experiences, preferences and values and how these factors can be incorporated into an online resource of evidence-based health information provision for people with MS and their families. This project is an Australian-Italian collaboration between researchers, MS societies and people with MS. Using a four-stage mixed methods design, a model will be developed for presenting evidence-based health information on the Internet for people with MS and their families. This evidence-based health information will draw upon systematic reviews of MS interventions from The Cochrane Library. Each stage of the project will build on the last. After conducting focus groups with people with MS and their family members (Stage 1), we will develop a model for summarising and presenting Cochrane MS reviews that is integrated with supporting information to aid understanding and decision making. This will be reviewed and finalised with people with MS, family members, health professionals and MS Society staff (Stage 2), before being uploaded to the Internet and evaluated (Stages 3 and 4). This project aims to produce accessible and meaningful evidence-based health information about MS for use in the varied decision making and management situations people encounter in everyday life. It is expected that the findings will be relevant to broader efforts to provide evidence-based health information for

  15. Use of three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices by registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2009-12-01

    To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, nursing practice should be based on the best evidence available. For over 20 years, results of studies regarding nurses' use of evidence-based practices, including postoperative pain assessment practices, have shown that nurses use the practices inconsistently. The present cross-sectional survey study was conducted to: 1) determine the extent to which registered nurses caring for postoperative patients experiencing pain used three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices; and 2) identify relationships among the level of adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices and selected characteristics of registered nurses. Data were collected from a convenience sample of all nurses caring for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals where 443 surveys (46.9%) were returned. Respondents were aware of, but not using, three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices consistently. Registered nurses who used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems or read one or two professional journals regularly were more likely to have adopted the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Registered nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, including professional nursing journals. Innovative approaches to promote the application of research to education and practice settings are needed. It is important to identify opinion leaders, because opinion leaders are an important resource in overcoming the barriers so that adoption of pain of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices can proceed. Additional research is needed to identify what variables effect the adoption of evidence-based practices and identify interventions to improve the level of adoption.

  16. Is evidence-based medicine about democratizing medical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorgård, Keld

    2014-01-01

    -based medicine (EBM), which has challenged the entire strategy of medical treatment from the point of view of a self-critical, anti-authoritarian and hereby also (it has been claimed) a more democratic medical practice. Previously, the challenges arose out of the patient rights perspective. EBM, by contrast......The authoritarian standpoint in medicine has been under challenge by various groups and researchers since the 1980s. The challenges have been ethical, political and medical, with patient movements at the forefront. Over the past decade, however, a deep challenge has been posed by evidence...

  17. Using Medical Student Quality Improvement Projects to Promote Evidence-Based Care in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Michael W; Bean, Eric W; Miller, Andrew C; Templer, Suzanne J; Mackenzie, Richard S; Richardson, David M; Bresnan, Kristin A; Greenberg, Marna R

    2018-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) initiative for Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency includes as an element of Entrustable Professional Activity 13 to "identify system failures and contribute to a culture of safety and improvement." We set out to determine the feasibility of using medical students' action learning projects (ALPs) to expedite implementation of evidence-based pathways for three common patient diagnoses in the emergency department (ED) setting (Atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary embolism). These prospective quality improvement (QI) initiatives were performed over six months in three Northeastern PA hospitals. Emergency physician mentors were recruited to facilitate a QI experience for third-year medical students for each project. Six students were assigned to each mentor and given class time and network infrastructure support (information technology, consultant experts in lean management) to work on their projects. Students had access to background network data that revealed potential for improvement in disposition (home) for patients. Under the leadership of their mentors, students accomplished standard QI processes such as performing the background literature search and assessing key stakeholders' positions that were involved in the respective patient's care. Students effectively developed flow diagrams, computer aids for clinicians and educational programs, and participated in recruiting champions for the new practice standard. They met with other departmental clinicians to determine barriers to implementation and used this feedback to help set specific parameters to make clinicians more comfortable with the changes in practice that were recommended. All three clinical practice guidelines were initiated at consummation of the students' projects. After implementation, 86% (38/44) of queried ED providers felt comfortable with medical students being a part of future ED QI

  18. Theories of learning: models of good practice for evidence-based information skills teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Hannah

    2010-12-01

    This feature considers models of teaching and learning and how these can be used to support evidence based practice. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  19. Reconsidering evidence-based practice in prosthetic rehabilitation : a shared enterprise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Twillert, S.; Geertzen, J.; Hemminga, T.; Postema, K.; Lettinga, A.

    Background: A divide is experienced between producers and users of evidence in prosthetic rehabilitation. Objective: To discuss the complexity inherent in establishing evidence-based practice in a prosthetic rehabilitation team illustrated by the case of prosthetic prescription for elderly

  20. From evidence-based to evidence-reflected practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    “Knowledge” is of the utmost significance for professional practice and learning. Today, though, the established knowledge base is changing in all areas of the labour market (Alvesson, 2004). Work and society are dominated by commitment to demands for high levels of demonstrable accountability...... of the supremacy of this kind of knowledge, and traditional monopolies of knowledge are challenged (Gabbay & May, 2010). In the literature, there is an on-going debate about professional knowledge enacted in diverse settings. This debate presents a wide range of epistemological terminologies and typologies, which...... that the wide range of terminologies and typologies creates “an epistemological mess” that causes confusion and ruins effective communication and understanding among practitioners, educators and researchers (e.g. Titchen & Ersser, 2001). Taking a Wittgensteinian approach, my paper will argue that ending...

  1. Medication Safety During Pregnancy: Improving Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Susan M; Miller, Richard K; Chambers, Christina; Cooper, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 90% of women in the United States have taken medications during pregnancy. Medication exposures during pregnancy can result in adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes including birth defects, fetal loss, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity, and longer-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Advising pregnant women about the safety of medication use during pregnancy is complicated by a lack of data necessary to engage the woman in an informed discussion. Routinely, health care providers turn to the package insert, yet this information can be incomplete and can be based entirely on animal studies. Often, adequate safety data are not available. In a busy clinical setting, health care providers need to be able to quickly locate the most up-to-date information in order to counsel pregnant women concerned about medication exposure. Deciding where to locate the best available information is difficult, particularly when the needed information does not exist. Pregnancy registries are initiated to obtain more data about the safety of specific medication exposures during pregnancy; however, these studies are slow to produce meaningful information, and when they do, the information may not be readily available in a published form. Health care providers have valuable data in their everyday practice that can expand the knowledge base about medication safety during pregnancy. This review aims to discuss the limitations of the package insert regarding medication safety during pregnancy, highlight additional resources available to health care providers to inform practice, and communicate the importance of pregnancy registries for expanding knowledge about medication safety during pregnancy. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  2. Building Capacity for Evidence-Based Practice: Understanding How Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) Source Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Leah; Neumeier, Melanie

    2018-03-23

    In Canada, all nurses are required to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) as an entry-to-practice competency; however, there is little research that examines Licensed Practical Nurses' (LPNs') information seeking behaviors or preferred sources of knowledge to conduct EBP. Due to the differences in education and roles of LPNs and Registered Nurses (RNs), it is both necessary and important to gain an understanding of how LPNs utilize evidence in their unique nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate how LPNs source knowledge for their nursing practice. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of LPNs from Alberta, Canada asked participants to rank sources of knowledge that inform their practice. Responses were correlated with age and years of practice. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there were significant mean differences between average scores and place of employment. LPN participants used similar sources of knowledge as RNs. The top source of knowledge for both RNs and LPNs was the information they learn about each individual client and the least utilized sources of knowledge were articles published in nursing, medical, and research journals, tradition, and popular media. This finding is consistent with previous studies on RNs that found nurses do not often access current research evidence to inform their practice. Since relatively few LPNs access nursing and research journals, it is important to tailor EBP education information to the workplace context. Future avenues of research might explore the potential of using in-services and webinars to disseminate information and skills training on EBP to the LPNs, as this was a popular source of practice knowledge. © 2018 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  3. Can evidence-based medicine change toilet-training practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    To assess the evidence showing that a specific method of toilet training (TT) is more effective than others, as any method of TT recommended by a physician faces obstacles because parents rarely request advice on TT from physicians, and TT practices vary tremendously across cultures and socioeconomic levels. Reports on the natural course of urinary incontinence in children and different methods of TT, published in English between 1946 and 2012, were reviewed. Specifically investigated were historical recommendations on TT, the prevalence of urinary incontinence during childhood, the outcome of TT methods, and the effect of culture and socioeconomic status on the choice of TT method and timing. TT now occurs at later ages than it did previously. This progression reflects changing ideas about normal childhood physiology and psychology. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in European countries progressively decreased in children aged between 6-7 years and 16-17 years old. TT methods change with increasing socioeconomic levels to 'child-centred' techniques applied at older ages, but the prevalence of urinary incontinence after 'parent-centred' techniques of TT at younger ages has not been studied. There is currently no evidence that a specific timing or method of TT is more effective or prevents voiding dysfunction. Follow-up studies of urinary continence in children toilet trained at 6-12 months of age might provide evidence for whether a given method or timing of TT is beneficial to prevent voiding dysfunction. The recommendations of physicians might be more readily adopted if they fit culturally accepted ideas of good parenting techniques.

  4. Staff practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice before and after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollon, Deene; Fields, Willa; Gallo, Ana-Maria; Wagener, Rebecca; Soucy, Jacqui; Gustafson, Brandi; Kim, Son Chae

    2012-09-01

    Today's clinicians have different levels of knowledge and skill related to evidence-based practice, depending on their educational background, level of experience, and interest. This multidisciplinary study assessed nurses' baseline and posteducation practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice. A descriptive pre- and postsurvey design study evaluated clinical staff's practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice with the Clinical Effectiveness and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. A total of 327 participants (24%) completed the presurvey and 282 (20%) completed the postsurvey. No statistically significant changes were found in practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills after the online education. In the multivariate analysis, online education was not a significant predictor of practice, attitudes, or knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice; graduate educational degree, formal evidence-based practice classes, and registered nurse status were statistically significant positive predictors. Administering self-learning online modules may not be the most effective method for expanding evidence-based practice abilities and knowledge/skills of nurses. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. 191: PEER TUTORING FOR EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE FOR STUDENTS OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Negar Taleschian; Yaaghoubian, Barmak; Pashazadeh, Fariba; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Iranian Student Center for Evidence Based Medicine (ISCEBM) has been pioneer in using innovative and creative teaching methods to deliver and spread the concepts of evidence Based Practice (EBP). Many studies found peer tutoring as an effective method to train tutees. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience of students participating in the peer assisted learning workshops of this center on EBP and methodology of research. Methods ISCEBM held the second series of workshops on Evidence Based Practice and methodology of evidence based research. These workshops were held weekly for two months (June–July 2016) for undergraduate medical sciences students from different fields. The education was based on peer assisted learning using interactive group discussion methods and problem based learning. Tutors were selected from students of ISCEBM who were expert in this field moreover, each session was held under the supervision of a specialist who completed and corrected the speech of student tutors. A checklist containing questions about each trait of workshop using 5-point Likert scale and an open question about their ideas, were shared via web based electronic questionnaire. Results Thirty participants who regularly participated in the workshops responded to the questionnaire. 46.2% believed peer education to be very effective in training concepts in a more understandable way rather than conventional teaching method. 92.3% found problem based learning very effective or effective. 84.6% believed continuous and weekly courses are more effective than intensive courses in one or two days. And 100% of responders were willing to participate in the next series of workshops. Participants indicated that peer tutoring “increased their self-confidence”, “helped them to comment freely”, “made them glad to see someone who understands them” and “made the lesson more attractive”. Conclusion Peer tutoring was a successful experience in

  6. Evidence-based practice: a deconstruction and postmodern critique: book review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter

    2005-03-01

    This paper discusses the significance of postmodernism for healthcare practice, specifically the discourse known as 'evidence-based practice'. It considers two texts, both of which present postmodern analyses of contemporary issues. One text presents a deconstruction of evidence-based practice in an attempt to reveal its 'true' nature, which is portrayed as one that does not respect research paradigms other than the randomised controlled trial, merely pays lip service to expertise and fails to connect with the real nature of clinical practice. The second text considers the accusation that absolute relativism implied by postmodern approaches may permit an 'anything goes' mentality and provide succour to those advocating unacceptable practices. A 'defence' of postmodernism in relation to the accusation that it encourages holocaust denial is used to consider further the nature and limitations of postmodern critiques of evidence-based practice. This review concludes that postmodernism fundamentally challenges the apparent 'objectivity' of evidence-based practice but it does not challenge the fundamental rules for acquiring and testing evidence. Rather it is the selection of questions to be asked and answered by evidence-based practice/practitioners that is the true limitation. This is the ground upon which fruitful argument can be had about the significance of evidence without undermining the requirement that there be evidence and standards to judge such evidence.

  7. Importance of nursing leadership in advancing evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Wanda G

    Our patients depend on us to do the best on their behalf. If we do not take accountability for our practice, continually examining what is the best way to deliver care, we are limiting our role to technical skills and not fully actualizing our professional role. [Evidence-based practice] is essential to practicing safely as nurses (p. 53).1.

  8. Comparison of manual versus automated data collection method for an evidence-based nursing practice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M D; Jordan, T R; Welle, T

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and improve the use of automated data collection procedures for nursing research and quality assurance. A descriptive, correlational study analyzed 44 orthopedic surgical patients who were part of an evidence-based practice (EBP) project examining post-operative oxygen therapy at a Midwestern hospital. The automation work attempted to replicate a manually-collected data set from the EBP project. Automation was successful in replicating data collection for study data elements that were available in the clinical data repository. The automation procedures identified 32 "false negative" patients who met the inclusion criteria described in the EBP project but were not selected during the manual data collection. Automating data collection for certain data elements, such as oxygen saturation, proved challenging because of workflow and practice variations and the reliance on disparate sources for data abstraction. Automation also revealed instances of human error including computational and transcription errors as well as incomplete selection of eligible patients. Automated data collection for analysis of nursing-specific phenomenon is potentially superior to manual data collection methods. Creation of automated reports and analysis may require initial up-front investment with collaboration between clinicians, researchers and information technology specialists who can manage the ambiguities and challenges of research and quality assurance work in healthcare.

  9. Practical Biostatistics A Friendly Step-by-Step Approach for Evidence-based Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Suchmacher, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to apply the best available evidence gained from the scientific method to medical decision making. It is a practice that uses statistical analysis of scientific methods and outcomes to drive further experimentation and diagnosis. The profusion of evidence-based medicine in medical practice and clinical research has produced a need for life scientists and clinical researchers to assimilate biostatistics into their work to meet efficacy and practical standards. Practical Biostatistics provides researchers, medical professionals, and students with a friendly, practica

  10. Chiropractic Attitudes and Utilization of Evidence-Based Practice: The Use of the EBASE Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Leach, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    To examine the attitudes and utilization of evidence-based practice by chiropractors. Utilizing a descriptive survey implemented as an online questionnaire, we examined chiropractors׳ perception, skills, and level of training, their engagement in, the barriers and facilitators to, and possible interventions to evidence-based practice. A total of 162 of 500 chiropractors completed the survey, providing a response rate of 32.4%. The majority of respondents were 30-39 years old, female, and worked in solo practice. A high proportion agreed/strongly agreed that evidence-based practice was necessary in the practice of chiropractic. Most respondents considered themselves to have above-average skills in locating professional literature, identifying answerable clinical questions, and identifying knowledge gaps in practice. However, many indicated receiving either no training or minimal education for conducting clinical research and systematic reviews and meta-analyses Most respondents had read or reviewed one to five professional articles and/or clinical research reports pertinent to their practice in the preceding month. Identified minor to moderate barriers to evidence-based practice were lack of time and lack of clinical evidence. Activities "very useful" in participating in evidence-based practice were access to free online databases and the ability to download full-text journal articles. The responders of our survey embraced and considered themselves skillful in evidence-based practice. They utilized a number of resources to practice in such a manner and were not deterred by identified barriers. We support continued research in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Research and Education of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice; A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Zareh Gavgani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Evidence based librarianship (EBL was defined as “use of best available evidence from qualitative and quantitative research results and rational experience and decisions acquired from the daily practice of library”. However there are controversies about if the nature of EBL deals with library services or professional practice and if it needs a formal education or informal continuing education is enough? To shed light on this ambiguity, the aim of this study was to find out the state-of-the-art of education of EBL in the world. Material and Methods: The study utilized library and documentation methods to investigate the academic education of EBL through review of the available literature and websites. Results: The findings of the study revealed that evidence based librarianship does have formal curriculum for academic education in post graduate levels (post master and master. It also revealed that “Evidence Based Approach” (EBA and “Evidence Based Medicine” (EBM were also similar courses that are offered in Master and PhD levels. Conclusion: Based on the history and revolution of EBA, it is time to develop formal curriculum and field of study for Evidence Based Information Practice. This study suggests establishment of the academic field of Evidence Based and Information Science to overcome the problems and limitations that library science faces in practice.

  12. Prior conditions influencing nurses' decisions to adopt evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Cathy L

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, postoperative pain relief has been shown to be inadequate. To provide optimal postoperative pain relief, it is imperative for nurses to use evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. This correlational descriptive study was conducted to identify factors, termed prior conditions, that influenced nurses' decisions to adopt three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. A convenience sample of nurses who cared for adult postoperative patients in two Midwestern hospitals were surveyed, and 443 (46.9%) nurses responded. The previous practice and innovativeness of nurses were supportive of adoption of the three practices. Nurses felt that patients received adequate pain relief, which is unsupportive of adoption of the three practices because there is no impetus to change. Nurses who perceived the prior conditions as being supportive of adoption of pain management practices used multiple sources to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, and those who read professional nursing journals were more likely to have adopted the three practices and were more innovative. The number of sources used to identify solutions to clinical practice problems, previous practices, and innovativeness were predictive of nurses' adoption of the three evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Nurses need to be encouraged to use multiple sources, including professional nursing journals, to identify solutions to clinical practice problems. Innovative nurses may be considered to be opinion leaders and need to be identified to promote the adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices. Further exploration of the large unexplained variance in adoption of evidence-based postoperative pain assessment practices is needed. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Teaching evidence-based practice in the hospital and the library: two different groups, one course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Lindsay; Ballance, Darra

    2013-01-01

    Key roles in teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) are of interest to many hospital and academic librarians. This article describes how three academic librarians, in collaboration with the academic medical center's EBP Nursing Council, developed a seminar consisting of three credit hours of instruction in the basics of evidence-based practice. The seminar consists of three core elements: basic principles of EBP and finding literature, clinical experience and integration of knowledge into the hospital setting, and patient education and participation. Emphasis is placed upon analysis of the literature, institutional models of practice change, and the importance of patient roles in guideline development.

  14. Program evaluation of neuroscience competency programs to implement evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Staci Sue; McLennon, Susan M; Ebright, Patricia R; Murray, Laura L; Bakas, Tamilyn

    2017-02-01

    Program evaluation is essential to help determine the success of an evidence-based practice program and assist with translating these processes across settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 2 competency programs that sought to improve neurocritical care nurses' knowledge of and adherence to evidence-based stroke and spinal cord injury guidelines. These programs consisted of 3 specific implementation strategies, including local opinion leaders, printed educational materials, and educational outreach. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews with 10 neurocritical care nurses was used. Semi-structured interview questions examined the nurses' perceptions of the competency programs and the implementation strategies used; themes were identified through first-level coding. The transcripts were deductively analyzed and categorized using a predetermined implementation outcomes framework, including the concepts of acceptability, appropriateness, adoption, and sustainability. Nurses reported that the 3 implementation strategies used for the competency programs were acceptable and appropriate. Further, the nurses perceived that the evidence-based practices reviewed during the programs were being adopted into practice and provided suggestions for sustaining improvements in nursing knowledge of and adherence to these evidence-based practices. Findings from this study support the success of the Stroke and Spinal Cord Injury Competency Programs, as well as the usefulness of the 3 implementation strategies used. This study provides insight for improvements for subsequent studies focused on implementing evidence-based practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Systematic Review of Cyberbullying Interventions for Youth and Parents With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Elizabeth; Kelly, Stephanie; Militello, Lisa K

    2018-02-01

    Cyberbullying is a new risk factor for the well-being of pediatric populations. Consequences of cyberbullying include both physical and mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, and somatic concerns. Adolescents who have been victims of cyberbullying and developed secondary symptoms are often recommended to visit a healthcare provider to obtain effective, evidence-based treatment. To date, no interventions exist in the healthcare setting for adolescents who are victims of cyberbullying. The purpose of this project is to review interventional studies on cyberbullying that have components for adolescents who have been involved with cyberbullying and their parents and to provide recommendations on effective intervention components with the goal of guiding clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted using the Institute of Medicine guidelines. A comprehensive electronic literature search was completed targeting interventions of cyberbullying in any setting. No date limits were used. Literature was searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Education Information Resource Center (ERIC), and PsycINFO databases. The following search terms were applied "cyberbullying" + "intervention" or "treatment" or "therapy" or "program." Only articles with a pediatric population were selected for review. Seventeen cyberbullying intervention programs in 23 articles were found to meet the search criteria. The most frequently used intervention components included education on cyberbullying for the adolescent, coping skills, empathy training, communication and social skills, and digital citizenship. Parent education on cyberbullying was also found to be important and was included in programs with significant outcomes. As youth present to healthcare providers with symptoms related to cyberbullying, effective interventions are needed to guide evidence-based practice. This review

  16. Research Practice Partnerships: A Strategy for Promoting Evidence-Based Decision-Making in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Laura; Mazzeo, Christopher; Connolly, Faith

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the United States, an emphasis on evidence-based decision-making in education has received renewed interest with the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act. However, how best, in practice, to support the use of evidence in educational decision-making remains unclear. Research Practice Partnerships (RPPs) are a popular…

  17. Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education and Cultural Adaptations: Challenges and Implications for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Lam, Yeana

    2017-01-01

    Many issues arise in the discussion of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement and implementation science in special education and specific educational practices for students with severe disabilities. Yet cultural adaptations of EBPs, which have emerged as an area of research in other fields, are being left out as a focus of EBP discourse. The…

  18. Measuring Collaboration and Communication to Increase Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices: The Cultural Exchange Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Garcia, Antonio; Aarons, Gregory; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Fuentes, Dahlia; Holloway, Ian; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    The Cultural Exchange Inventory (CEI) is a 15-item instrument designed to measure the process (7 items) and outcomes (8 items) of exchanges of knowledge, attitudes and practices between members of different organisations collaborating in implementing evidence-based practice. We conducted principal axis factor analyses and parallel analyses of data…

  19. Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and…

  20. Action Research: A Personal Epiphany and Journey with Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    The author reveals in this article that her action research journey in the land of evidence-based practice was not her own idea. She writes that she was lured by the profession's finest scholars who advocated for reflective dispositions for practitioners to improve their practice and demonstrate the school librarian's critical role in teaching and…

  1. Identifying Evidence-Based Practices for Behavior: Analysis of Studies Reviewed by the What Works Clearinghouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRoy, Adam Scott

    2017-01-01

    Prior concerns have been raised about the ability of schools to access evidence-based practices, however, these practices are instrumental for addressing behavior concerns. This is particularly true at the secondary level, where students are more likely to be disproportionately identified for school removal. This review investigates studies of…

  2. The Uses of Qualitative Research: Powerful Methods to Inform Evidence-Based Practice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2017-01-01

    This article offers a rationale for the contributions of qualitative research to evidence-based practice in special education. In it, I make the argument that qualitative research encompasses the ability to study significant problems of practice, engage with practitioners in the conduct of research studies, learn and change processes during a…

  3. Videoconferencing of a national program for residents on evidence-based practice: early performance evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medium of videoconferencing for the delivery of a course for radiology residents in practice-based learning (PBL), including evidence-based practice, at centers geographically separated from the principal teaching site.

  4. Evidence-based practice for pain management for cancer patients in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mona; Kim, Hee Sun; Chung, Su Kyoung; Ahn, Mee Jung; Yoo, Jae Yong; Park, Ok Sun; Woo, So Rah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sun Ah; Oh, Eui Geum

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement an evidence utilization project using an audit and feedback approach to improve cancer pain management. A three-phased audit and feedback approach was used. A 46-bed oncology nursing unit in the university's cancer centre was selected as a research site. Nursing records extracted from 137 patients (65 for the baseline assessment and 72 for the follow-up audit) were used to examine nurse compliance with four audit criteria derived from best practice guidelines related to the assessment and management of pain. We observed a significant improvement in compliance from baseline to follow-up for the following criteria: documenting the side effects of opioids (2-83%), use of a formalized pain assessment tool (22-75%), and providing education for pain assessment and management to patients and caregivers (0-47%). The audit and feedback method was applicable to the implementation of clinical practice guidelines for cancer pain management. Leadership from both administrative personnel and staff nurses working together contributes to the spread of an evidence-based practice culture in clinical settings. As it was conducted in a single oncology nursing unit and was implemented over a short period of time, the results should be carefully interpreted. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. FACTORS AFFECTING IMPLEMENTATION OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AMONG PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN MOI TEACHING REFFERAL HOSPITAL KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Wanjiru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of the concept of Evidenced Based Practice into clinical decision-making and practicehas outstanding benefits both to clinicians and the patient. However, the utilization of this concept has not been copiously utilized in most health facilities by the physiotherapists in Kenya. Therefore, the objectives for this study was to determine the level of awareness of evidence based practice among Physiotherapist, establish the availability of resource for Evidence Based Practice and to assess the challenges encountered by physiotherapist in engaging in evidence based practice at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Methods: All physiotherapists working in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (42 took part in a cross-sectional descriptive survey. Questionnaires were used for data collection and analyzed by SPSS version 22. Results: there was high level of awareness on Evidence Based Practice (95 % and confidence in EBP (72.5 %. However, lack of information resources, poor skills to implement EBP, poor organization support 90%, insufficient authority to induct change in the practice setting 85%, inadequate facilities 74% and lack of time were identified as the major challenges in implementation of EBP Conclusion: Strategies should be developed to provide PTs with EBP resources, such as access to databases or links to guidelines, and continuous education regarding specific topics. Professional organizations and Associations should aim at changing the current practice to ensure full utilization of EBP.

  6. A systematic literature review of evidence-based clinical practice for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Ana; Salamon, Valérie; Peixoto, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical practice is challenging in all fields, but poses special barriers in the field of rare diseases. The present paper summarises the main barriers faced by clinical research in rare diseases, and highlights opportunities for improvement. METHODS: Systematic....... CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based clinical practice for rare diseases should start by collecting clinical data in databases and registries; defining measurable patient-centred outcomes; and selecting appropriate study designs adapted to small study populations. Rare diseases constitute one of the most paradigmatic...... fields in which multi-stakeholder engagement, especially from patients, is needed for success. Clinical research infrastructures and expertise networks offer opportunities for establishing evidence-based clinical practice within rare diseases....

  7. Integrating evidence-based practice into RN-to-BSN clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eui Geum; Kim, Sunah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sue; Cho, Eun Yong; Yoo, Ji-Soo; Kim, Hee Soon; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Mi Ae; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    This study examines the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into clinical practicum on EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization among Korean RN-to-BSN students. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-one students were recruited from a school of nursing in Korea. Evidence-based practice clinical practicum was composed of two consecutive programs during one semester. Lectures, individual mentoring on EBP practicum, small group, and wrap-up conferences were provided. Outcomes of EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization were analyzed using paired t tests for 74 final participants. Evidence-based practice efficacy scores increased significantly (p effectiveness of EBP education among RN-to-BSN students. These results may help health educators develop effective educational strategies to integrate EBP concepts into a clinical practicum. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Use of Web 2.0 Technologies in K-12 and Higher Education: The Search for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice in education entails making pedagogical decisions that are informed by relevant empirical research evidence. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss evidence-based pedagogical approaches related to the use of Web 2.0 technologies in both K-12 and higher education settings. The use of such evidence-based practice would…

  9. Evidence-based practice for nurse practitioner students: a competency-based teaching framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, Deborah; Cullen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become increasingly important in nursing. It has become a dominant philosophy in teaching research courses and it brings a new definition to the translation of science. As more has become known about EBP, it has continued to grow in its importance and significance. EBP is the foundation to many doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in both the advanced practice nursing and organizational foci. The purpose of this article is to define evidence-based practice competencies for advanced practice nurses, especially nurse practitioners. A corresponding teaching framework is presented. Additionally, competencies related to the DNP with aggregate systems and organizational foci are suggested. Practical experiences emanating from working within the NP competency development and framework are highlighted and described. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-Based Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, practice and perceived barriers among nurses in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Ammouri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ practices, attitudes, knowledge/skills and perceived barriers in relation to evidence-based practice (EBP in Oman. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between February and November 2012. A self-reported 24-item questionnaire was used to measure EBP practices, attitudes and knowledge/skills among a convenience sample of 600 nurses working in four governmental hospitals in Muscat, Oman. Responses were scored on a one to seven rating scale. Barriers to EBP were measured on a five-point Likert scale using two subscales. Descriptive statistics and general linear regression were used to analyse the data. Results: A total of 414 nurses were included in the study. The greatest barriers to developing EBP among nurses were insufficient time for research (3.51 ± 0.97 and insufficient resources to change practices (3.64 ± 0.99. Nurses with more years of experience reported increased use of EBP (P <0.01, more positive attitudes towards EBP (P <0.001 and fewer barriers to research (P <0.01. Significant positive correlations were found between years of experience and practice (r = 0.16 and attitudes (r = 0.20. Nurses with a baccalaureate degree reported fewer barriers to research than those qualified at a diploma level (P <0.001. Nurses who perceived more barriers to research reported less use of EBP (P <0.001, less positive attitudes towards EBP (P <0.001 and limited EBP knowledge/skills (P <0.001. Conclusion: These findings provide a basis for enhancing nursing practices, knowledge and skills. Continuing education for nurses and minimising barriers is crucial to increasing the use of EBP in Oman.

  11. The Zero Suicide Model: Applying Evidence-Based Suicide Prevention Practices to Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Brodsky

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is reaching epidemic proportions, with over 44,000 deaths by suicide in the US, and 800,000 worldwide in 2015. This, despite research and development of evidence-based interventions that target suicidal behavior directly. Suicide prevention efforts need a comprehensive approach, and research must lead to effective implementation across public and mental health systems. A 10-year systematic review of evidence-based findings in suicide prevention summarized the areas necessary for translating research into practice. These include risk assessment, means restriction, evidence-based treatments, population screening combined with chain of care, monitoring, and follow-up. In this article, we review how suicide prevention research informs implementation in clinical settings where those most at risk present for care. Evidence-based and best practices address the fluctuating nature of suicide risk, which requires ongoing risk assessment, direct intervention and monitoring. In the US, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention has put forth the Zero Suicide (ZS Model, a framework to coordinate a multilevel approach to implementing evidence-based practices. We present the Assess, Intervene and Monitor for Suicide Prevention model (AIM-SP as a guide for implementation of ZS evidence-based and best practices in clinical settings. Ten basic steps for clinical management model will be described and illustrated through case vignette. These steps are designed to be easily incorporated into standard clinical practice to enhance suicide risk assessment, brief interventions to increase safety and teach coping strategies and to improve ongoing contact and monitoring of high-risk individuals during transitions in care and high risk periods.

  12. Implementation of an evidence-based education practice change for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Denise; Johnston, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    As oncology care continues to move toward delivery in the outpatient setting, oncology nurses must find ways to effectively educate patients about diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management. A cancer diagnosis induces high levels of anxiety, often affecting a patient's ability to retain information about his or her disease, treatment, and symptom management. Based on results from the ONS Foundation-supported Breast Cancer Care Quality Measures Set and Breast Cancer Survivorship Quality Measures Set, a community-based, multisite cancer center located in the midwestern United States embarked on a quality project in patient education. The purpose of this article is to describe a quality project that evolved from a review of the patient education process for patients with cancer in three medical oncology clinics to a pilot of a new model for patient education. The pilot identified gaps, developed and implemented evidence-based improvement strategies, and planned for evaluation of process and patient outcomes of this practice change. A pilot study to assess processes and workflows associated with a one-hour separate patient education visit was designed and initiated. Patients and oncology nurses have expressed satisfaction with standardized patient education. Although processes and workflows continue to be evaluated, a proposal was developed, submitted, and accepted by the institutional review board to evaluate patient-centered outcomes.

  13. Evaluating Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge and Beliefs Through the e-Learning EBP Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Angela; Jeffs, Debra A; Boateng, Beatrice A; Lowe, Gary R; Walden, Marlene

    2017-07-01

    This research examined evidence-based practice (EBP) knowledge and beliefs before and after a 3-month e-learning program was implemented to build EBP capacity at a large children's hospital. Ten clinicians completed the development, implementation, and evaluation of the e-learning education, comprising phase one. Revision and participation by 41 clinicians followed in phase two. Participants in both phases completed the EBP Beliefs and Implementation Scales preintervention, postintervention, and 6 months after postintervention. EBP beliefs and implementation increased immediately and 6 months after postintervention, with statistically significant increases in both phases. Participants in both phases applied knowledge by completing mentor-supported EBP projects. Although EBP beliefs and implementation scores increased and e-learning provided flexibility for clinician participation, challenges arose, resulting in lower-than-expected completion. Subsequent revisions resulted in hybrid education, integrating classroom and e-learning with project mentoring. This funded e-learning research contributes knowledge to the growing specialty of professional development. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(7):304-311. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Evaluation of best practices in the design of online evidence-based practice instructional modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Margaret J; Shurtz, Suzanne; Pepper, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The research determined to what extent best practices are being followed by freely available online modules aimed at teaching critical thinking and evidence-based practices (EBPs) in health sciences fields. In phase I, an evaluation rubric was created after reviewing the literature. Individual rubric questions were assigned point values and grouped into sections, and the sections weighted. Phase II involved searching Internet platforms to locate online EBP modules, which were screened to determine if they met predetermined criteria for inclusion. Phase III comprised a first evaluation, in which two authors assessed each module, followed by a second evaluation of the top-scoring modules by five representatives from different health sciences units. The rubric's 28 questions were categorized into 4 sections: content, design, interactivity, and usability. After retrieving 170 online modules and closely screening 91, 42 were in the first evaluation and 8 modules were in the second evaluation. Modules in the first evaluation earned, on average, 59% of available points; modules in the second earned an average of 68%. Both evaluations had a moderate level of inter-rater reliability. The rubric was effective and reliable in evaluating the modules. Most modules followed best practices for content and usability but not for design and interactivity. By systematically collecting and evaluating instructional modules, the authors found many potentially useful elements for module creation. Also, by reviewing the limitations of the evaluated modules, the authors were able to anticipate and plan ways to overcome potential issues in module design.

  15. Evaluation of best practices in the design of online evidence-based practice instructional modules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Margaret J.; Shurtz, Suzanne; Pepper, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined to what extent best practices are being followed by freely available online modules aimed at teaching critical thinking and evidence-based practices (EBPs) in health sciences fields. Methods: In phase I, an evaluation rubric was created after reviewing the literature. Individual rubric questions were assigned point values and grouped into sections, and the sections weighted. Phase II involved searching Internet platforms to locate online EBP modules, which were screened to determine if they met predetermined criteria for inclusion. Phase III comprised a first evaluation, in which two authors assessed each module, followed by a second evaluation of the top-scoring modules by five representatives from different health sciences units. Results: The rubric's 28 questions were categorized into 4 sections: content, design, interactivity, and usability. After retrieving 170 online modules and closely screening 91, 42 were in the first evaluation and 8 modules were in the second evaluation. Modules in the first evaluation earned, on average, 59% of available points; modules in the second earned an average of 68%. Both evaluations had a moderate level of inter-rater reliability. Conclusions: The rubric was effective and reliable in evaluating the modules. Most modules followed best practices for content and usability but not for design and interactivity. Implications: By systematically collecting and evaluating instructional modules, the authors found many potentially useful elements for module creation. Also, by reviewing the limitations of the evaluated modules, the authors were able to anticipate and plan ways to overcome potential issues in module design. PMID:24415917

  16. Future Directions of Evidence-Based Practice in Athletic Training: Perceived Strategies to Enhance the Use of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Wyant, Aimee L.; Hays, Danica G.; Pitney, William A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The shift to a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is a necessary step in both the optimization of patient care and the advancement of athletic trainers (ATs) as health care professionals. Whereas individuals have gained knowledge in this area, most ATs still are not practicing in an evidence-based manner. Exploring perceived strategies to enhance the use of EBP will help to determine the best approaches to assist ATs in applying EBP concepts to practice to improve patient care. Objective: To explore beneficial strategies and techniques ATs perceived would promote successful implementation of EBP within athletic training education and clinical practice. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Individual telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; athletic training experience = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. Data Collection and Analysis: One phone interview was conducted with each participant. After the interview was transcribed, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Results: Participants identified several components they perceived as essential for enhancing the use of EBP within the athletic training profession. These components included the need for more EBP resources, more processed information, focused workshops, peer discussion and mentorship, and continual repetition and exposure. Participants also indicated that ATs need to accept their professional responsibilities to foster EBP in their daily practices. Conclusions: The proper shift to a culture of EBP in athletic training will take both time and a persistent commitment by ATs to create strategies that will enhance the implementation of EBP across the profession. Researchers should focus on continuing to identify effective educational interventions for ATs

  17. Future directions of evidence-based practice in athletic training: perceived strategies to enhance the use of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E; Hankemeier, Dorice A; Wyant, Aimee L; Hays, Danica G; Pitney, William A; Van Lunen, Bonnie L

    2014-01-01

    The shift to a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is a necessary step in both the optimization of patient care and the advancement of athletic trainers (ATs) as health care professionals. Whereas individuals have gained knowledge in this area, most ATs still are not practicing in an evidence-based manner. Exploring perceived strategies to enhance the use of EBP will help to determine the best approaches to assist ATs in applying EBP concepts to practice to improve patient care. To explore beneficial strategies and techniques ATs perceived would promote successful implementation of EBP within athletic training education and clinical practice. Qualitative study. Individual telephone interviews. Twenty-five ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; athletic training experience = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. One phone interview was conducted with each participant. After the interview was transcribed, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Participants identified several components they perceived as essential for enhancing the use of EBP within the athletic training profession. These components included the need for more EBP resources, more processed information, focused workshops, peer discussion and mentorship, and continual repetition and exposure. Participants also indicated that ATs need to accept their professional responsibilities to foster EBP in their daily practices. The proper shift to a culture of EBP in athletic training will take both time and a persistent commitment by ATs to create strategies that will enhance the implementation of EBP across the profession. Researchers should focus on continuing to identify effective educational interventions for ATs and to determine successful strategies to implement EBP into didactic curricula and clinical practice. Additional focus

  18. Combining Evidence-Based Practice, Learner-Guided Education, and Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Tahnee J; Theiss, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Personal interest and investment in a topic can bring learning to life and affect real change in nursing practice. This article explains an innovative approach to combining learner-guided education and continuing education credit through a three-part approach to implementing evidence-based practice. This method can be used for nurses in any practice setting to generate learner interest and participation, while improving patient care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Evidence-based vaccination strategies in obstetrics and gynecology settings: Current practices and methods for assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Sean T.; Pyrzanowski, Jennifer; Brewer, Sarah E.; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Dempsey, Amanda F.

    2016-01-01

    Obstetrician-gynecologists have the potential to play an important role in the delivery of immunizations to women. However, despite national recommendations, immunization rates among pregnant women and adults in general remain low. Pragmatic immunization delivery trials are needed to demonstrate how best to deliver vaccines in such settings. We report the development and implementation of 2 novel methodologies for immunization delivery research and quality improvement in such settings. The first was the development and application of a 47-point Immunization Delivery Scale that formally assessed variability among practices in their engagement in a variety of evidence-based practices for improving immunization rates. The second was a covariate-constrained randomization technique – a method for achieving balance between study arms in cluster-randomized trials that is especially applicable to pragmatic trials.. To best achieve meaningful and interpretable findings, we recommend use of these or similar techniques in future immunization research and quality improvement projects in OB/GYN settings. PMID:26829978

  20. Teaching evidence-based social work in foundation practice courses: learning from pedagogical choices of allied fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Dorian E; Pohle, Cara E; Barley, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The field of social work is attuned to the need to incorporate evidence-based practice education into masters-level curriculum. One question remaining is how to integrate evidence-based practice in the foundation practice courses. Integration of evidence-based practice across the foundation-level curriculum coincides with the Council on Social Work Education's mandate that student's engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research. Through a discussion of definitions, criticisms, and pedagogy across the allied fields of medicine, nursing, and social work the authors address the current status of evidence-based practice curriculum in foundation-level education. The authors incorporate the lessons learned from allied fields and a Masters of Social Work student's analyses of their experience of evidence-based practice learning to propose an adult-learner model to improve evidence-based practice pedagogy in Social Work.

  1. Presenting evidence-based health information for people with multiple sclerosis: the IN-DEEP project protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sophie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, evidence-based health information, in particular evidence from systematic reviews, is being made available to lay audiences, in addition to health professionals. Research efforts have focused on different formats for the lay presentation of health information. However, there is a paucity of data on how patients integrate evidence-based health information with other factors such as their preferences for information and experiences with information-seeking. The aim of this project is to explore how people with multiple sclerosis (MS integrate health information with their needs, experiences, preferences and values and how these factors can be incorporated into an online resource of evidence-based health information provision for people with MS and their families. Methods This project is an Australian-Italian collaboration between researchers, MS societies and people with MS. Using a four-stage mixed methods design, a model will be developed for presenting evidence-based health information on the Internet for people with MS and their families. This evidence-based health information will draw upon systematic reviews of MS interventions from The Cochrane Library. Each stage of the project will build on the last. After conducting focus groups with people with MS and their family members (Stage 1, we will develop a model for summarising and presenting Cochrane MS reviews that is integrated with supporting information to aid understanding and decision making. This will be reviewed and finalised with people with MS, family members, health professionals and MS Society staff (Stage 2, before being uploaded to the Internet and evaluated (Stages 3 and 4. Discussion This project aims to produce accessible and meaningful evidence-based health information about MS for use in the varied decision making and management situations people encounter in everyday life. It is expected that the findings will be relevant to broader

  2. Use of the innovation-decision process teaching strategy to promote evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nola A; Brown, Janet M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the innovation-decision process teaching strategy (I-DPTS) based on the model of diffusion of innovations [Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed.). New York: Free Press]. A goal of baccalaureate nursing education is to develop competencies required for evidence-based practice. Such practice merges clinician expertise, patient preferences, and critical evaluation of the literature to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs [Melnyk, B. M. (2005). A primer on evidence-based practice. Paper presented at the Purdue School of Nursing Seventh Annual Helen R. Johnson Leadership Conference, West Lafayette, IN]. Several strategies to promote evidence-based practice have appeared in the literature. However, when they are examined in light of the innovation-decision process (Rogers, 2003), they do not address all the essential steps for adoption to occur. The I-DPTS allows students to achieve competencies necessary to overcome barriers associated with implementing best practices. This strategy was successfully implemented in a senior-level introductory nursing research class. Community representatives identified practice issues that could be addressed by student groups. After conducting a search of the literature, students analyzed the evidence, determined best practice based on the evidence, and developed a policy for implementation in clinical settings. At course end, representatives were invited to attend oral and poster presentations. Use of the I-DPTS better prepares students to implement best practice as they embark on their professional careers.

  3. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Fostering Self-Determination in Higher Education: Identifying Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzel, Elizabeth Evans

    2014-01-01

    Research on the transition of students with disabilities and their post-school outcomes continues to move the field of special education in the direction of evidence-based practices. As special education professionals work to better recognize the impact of instructional and environmental characteristics to prepare youth for their transition, so…

  5. Awareness of evidence-based practices by organizations in a publicly funded smoking cessation network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provan, K.; Beagles, J.; Mercken, L.; Leischow, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines the awareness of evidence-based practices by the public organizations that fund services in the North American Quitline Consortium (NAQC). NAQC is a large, publicly funded, goal-directed “whole network,” spanning both Canada and the United States, working to get people to quit

  6. The Role of Evidence-Based Practice in Collaborations between Academic Librarians and Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E.; Gaffney, Maureen A.; Lynn, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study describes collaborations between academic librarians and faculty in education-related disciplines involving evidence-based practice (EBP), an approach that combines the best available research with the professional's experience and expertise. The authors analyzed narratives of academic librarians and their educator partners…

  7. Classroom Simulation to Prepare Teachers to Use Evidence-Based Comprehension Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Emily; Alves, Kat D.; Dolenc, Nathan R.; Sebolt, Stephanie; Walton, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    Reading comprehension is an area of weakness for many students, including those with disabilities. Innovative technology methods may play a role in improving teacher readiness to use evidence-based comprehension practices for all students. In this experimental study, researchers examined a classroom simulation (TLE TeachLivE™) to improve…

  8. How Evidence-Based Teaching Practices Are Challenged by a Deweyan Approach to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    The claim is made in this paper that the discourse of education offers a challenge to evidence-based practices because this latter approach is embedded in the discourse of management. Although claiming the status of being "scientific", this latter development is drawn upon problematically by policy makers to provide the warrant for stipulating…

  9. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in Service-Learning: A Model for Education and Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, John D.; Smith, Bradley H.; McQuillin, Samuel D.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is strongly emphasized in many professions and should be taught as part of pre-professional training or to promote the development of enlightened citizens who utilize professional services. Service-learning (SL) classes provide an excellent opportunity to provide meaningful training in how EBP relates to education,…

  10. Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Part 1 Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elise; McLeod, Sharynne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides a comprehensive narrative review of intervention studies for children with speech sound disorders (SSD). Its companion paper (Baker & McLeod, 2011) provides a tutorial and clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can engage in evidence-based practice (EBP) for this clinical population. Method:…

  11. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  12. Evidence-based practice: a survey among pediatric nurses and pediatricians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, Jolanda M.; Knops, Anouk M.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2013-01-01

    This survey compared the attitude, awareness, and knowledge of pediatric nurses and pediatricians regarding evidence-based practice (EBP). Potential barriers were also investigated. Both nurses and pediatricians welcomed EBP (mean scores are 73.3 and 75.4 out of 100). Overall, 52% of the nurses and

  13. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  14. Replication of a Continuing Education Workshop in the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromoske, Andrea N.; Berger, Lisa K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To replicate the results of Parrish and Rubin's continuing education workshop in the evidence-based practice (EBP) process utilizing different workshop facilitators with participants in a different geographic location. Methods: We used a replicated, one-group pretest-posttest design with 3-month follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness…

  15. Examining Inclusion of Evidence-Based Practice on Social Work Training Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Traci L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Grady, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    Websites represent a visible medium for social work programs to communicate information about social work research, academics, and professional training priorities, including evidence-based practice (EBP). However, few studies have examined the content of social work program websites. This exploratory study aimed to answer the question: Are EBP…

  16. Single-Case Research Design: An Alternative Strategy for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Drue; Hawkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The trend of utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is now requiring clinicians, researchers, educators, and students to be equipped to both engage in and make judgments about research evidence. Single-case design (SCD) research may provide an alternative approach to develop such skills and inform clinical and…

  17. Evidence-Based Dental Practice: Part II. Levels And Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For questions related to diagnosis, prognosis or causation, other study designs such as longitudinal studies, cohort studies or case-control studies are more appropriate. The present article discusses the levels and quality of evidence, and basic concepts of clinical research design in evidence-based dental practice based ...

  18. Unifying and Elevating Rehabilitation Counseling through Model-Driven, Diversity-Sensitive Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fong; Tarvydas, Vilia; Blalock, Kacie; Strauser, David; Atkins, Bobbie J.

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation counseling must embrace an evidence-based practice paradigm to remain a vital and respected member of the future community of professions in rehabilitation and mental health care and to fully discharge its responsibility to assist consumers in accessing effective rehabilitation interventions and exercising truly informed choice. The…

  19. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Marcel; Reid, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently…

  20. Managerial attitudes and perceived barriers regarding evidence-based practice : An international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, Eric; Villanueva, Josh; Rousseau, Denise M.; Briner, Rob B.; Jepsen, Denise M.; Houghton, Edward; Ten Have, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) in management is still in its infancy. Several studies suggest that managers in businesses and other organizations do not consult the scientific evidence when making decisions. To facilitate its uptake, we need to better understand practitioner attitudes and perceived

  1. The Client-Centred Evidence-Based Practice of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; von Zweck, Claudia; Vallerand, Josee

    1998-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is therapy guided by the results of scientifically sound, relevant research. The Occupational Performance Process Model outlines the occupational therapy problem-solving process to assist occupational therapists in integrating information about individual clients into research findings to implement EBP. (SK)

  2. Can School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Be an Evidence-Based Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L.; Young, K. Richard; Caldarella, Paul; Christensen, Lynnette

    2008-01-01

    Researchers invested in school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) have been attempting to answer an important question: Is SWPBS an evidence-based practice (EBP; e.g., Sugai & Horner, 2007)? Given the context of educational policy, this question appears to be reasonable, as its answer could significantly influence funding and adoption of SWPBS…

  3. The Use of Single-Subject Research to Identify Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Robert H.; Carr, Edward G.; Halle, James; McGee, Gail; Odom, Samuel; Wolery, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Single-subject research plays an important role in the development of evidence-based practice in special education. The defining features of single-subject research are presented, the contributions of single-subject research for special education are reviewed, and a specific proposal is offered for using single-subject research to document…

  4. Lean methodology: an evidence-based practice approach for healthcare improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pauline M; Patterson, Claire J; OʼConnell, Mary P

    2013-12-10

    Lean methodology, an evidence-based practice approach adopted from Toyota, is grounded on the pillars of respect for people and continuous improvement. This article describes the use of Lean methodology to improve healthcare outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Nurse practitioners and other clinicians should be knowledgeable about this methodology and become leaders in Lean transformation.

  5. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  6. The Delphi Method: An Approach for Facilitating Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A.; Bulger, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The growing importance of evidence based practice in athletic training is necessitating academics and clinicians to be able to make judgments about the quality or lack of the body of research evidence and peer-reviewed standards pertaining to clinical questions. To assist in the judgment process, consensus methods, namely brainstorming,…

  7. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Current Assumptions and Future Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Campisi, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Background: The research on evidence-based practices (EBP) in special education has shifted over the last decade from identifying efficacious interventions to exploring issues that impede implementation in the classroom. Common barriers to implementation include absence of training and resources, limited collaboration between researchers and…

  8. Evidence based educational policy and practice: the case of applying the educational effectiveness knowledge base

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Evidence based educational policy and practice means, first of all, that new programs use relevant scientific knowledge for design purposes, or for critical review of initial program ideas (ex ante evaluation). Secondly, before programs are implemented on a large scale it is considered desirable to

  9. Evidence-based analysis of physical therapy in Parkinson's disease with recommendations for practice and research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Hendriks, E.J.M.; Bredero-Cohen, A.B.; Munneke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Physical therapy is often prescribed in Parkinson's disease. To facilitate the uniformity and efficacy of this intervention, we analyzed current evidence and developed practice recommendations. We carried out an evidence-based literature review. The results were supplemented with clinical expertise

  10. Evidence-based practice - an incomplete model of the relationship between theory and professional work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Helen C; Easen, Patrick R

    2004-05-01

    Current day realities of diminishing resources, reductions in spending and organizational change within health care systems have resulted in an increased emphasis on a multidisciplinary team approach to quality patient care. The movement of nursing towards more autonomous practice combined with the current trend towards 'evidence-based practice' in health care demands increased accountability in clinical decision making. This paper focuses on one aspect of nurses' clinical decision making within the demands of evidence-based practice and cardiac surgery. In this field recent advances, combined with increasing demands on health care institutions, have promoted early extubation of post-operative cardiac patients. While this remains a medical role in many institutions, an increasing number of intensive care units now consider it as a nursing role. This paper explores the realities of nurses' clinical decision making through a discussion of current practice in the extubation of patients following cardiac surgery. In addition, it considers the implications of current practice for both nurse education and the continued development of clinical nursing practice. The findings indicate that evidence-based practice appears to be an incomplete model of the relationship between theory and professional work.

  11. Evidence-based practice in Physiotherapy curricula: A survey of Indian Health Science Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Panhale, Vrushali; Bellare, Bharati; Jiandani, Mariya

    2017-07-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current evidence in clinical decision making. The physiotherapy profession has expressed a commitment to the development and use of evidence. However, very little is known about the extent to which EBP is integrated in physiotherapy curricula in India. The purpose of this study was to describe integration of EBP in Indian physiotherapy programs. An observational study was conducted where a review of curricula of all Health Science Universities (HSU) in India, offering an undergraduate (UG) and post-graduate (PG) degree program in physical therapy was conducted using a data abstraction sheet. It gathered data on inclusion of research components of EBP in the curricula, content and hours of teaching EBP, and assessment methods. Data were analyzed descriptively. Curricula of fifteen HSU offering physiotherapy programs were reviewed. Contents relevant to EBP were incorporated from the 2 nd yr to final year. Common courses included research methodology (84.61%), research project (69.23%) and clinical management subjects (57.14%). No guidelines were given about adopting EBP in clinical practice. Didactic lectures were the mode of teaching (81.81%). Preferred method for assessing research projects was viva (44.44%). Ccritical appraisal was least included in the entry level education. Contents relevant to all the five steps of EBP were included in PG curricula. Though physiotherapy programs are introducing EBP teaching at the entry level, it lacks structured systematic approach and is fragmented. There is inadequate emphasis on clinical oriented teaching of EBP and assessment methods. Moreover, there is adequate coverage of EBP content in PG curricula.

  12. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence-based practice in Physiotherapy curricula: A survey of Indian Health Science Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VRUSHALI P PANHALE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based practice (EBP is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current evidence in clinical decision making. The physiotherapy profession has expressed a commitment to the development and use of evidence. However, very little is known about the extent to which EBP is integrated in physiotherapy curricula in India. The purpose of this study was to describe integration of EBP in Indian physiotherapy programs. Methods: An observational study was conducted where a review of curricula of all Health Science Universities (HSU in India, offering an undergraduate (UG and post-graduate (PG degree program in physical therapy was conducted using a data abstraction sheet. It gathered data on inclusion of research components of EBP in the curricula, content and hours of teaching EBP, and assessment methods. Data were analyzed descriptively. Results: Curricula of fifteen HSU offering physiotherapy programs were reviewed. Contents relevant to EBP were incorporated from the 2nd yr to final year. Common courses included research methodology (84.61%, research project (69.23% and clinical management subjects (57.14%. No guidelines were given about adopting EBP in clinical practice. Didactic lectures were the mode of teaching (81.81%. Preferred method for assessing research projects was viva (44.44%. Critical appraisal was least included in the entry level education. Contents relevant to all the five steps of EBP were included in PG curricula. Conclusions: Though physiotherapy programs are introducing EBP teaching at the entry level, it lacks structured systematic approach and is fragmented. There is inadequate emphasis on clinical oriented teaching of EBP and assessment methods. Moreover, there is adequate coverage of EBP content in PG curricula.

  14. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective multinational....../12 without serious congenital anomalies and surviving to neonatal admission. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Combined use of four evidence based practices for infants born before 28 weeks' gestation using an "all or none" approach: delivery in a maternity unit with appropriate level of neonatal care; administration...... of death or severe morbidity, or both. We modelled associations using risk ratios, with propensity score weighting to account for potential confounding bias. Analyses were adjusted for clustering within delivery hospital. RESULTS: Only 58.3% (n=4275) of infants received all evidence based practices...

  15. A review of online evidence-based practice point-of-care information summary providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Liberati, Alessandro; Moschetti, Ivan; Tagliabue, Ludovica; Moja, Lorenzo

    2010-07-07

    Busy clinicians need easy access to evidence-based information to inform their clinical practice. Publishers and organizations have designed specific tools to meet doctors' needs at the point of care. The aim of this study was to describe online point-of-care summaries and evaluate their breadth, content development, and editorial policy against their claims of being "evidence-based." We searched Medline, Google, librarian association websites, and information conference proceedings from January to December 2008. We included English Web-based point-of-care summaries designed to deliver predigested, rapidly accessible, comprehensive, periodically updated, evidence-based information to clinicians. Two investigators independently extracted data on the general characteristics and content presentation of summaries. We assessed and ranked point-of-care products according to: (1) coverage (volume) of medical conditions, (2) editorial quality, and (3) evidence-based methodology. We explored how these factors were associated. We retrieved 30 eligible summaries. Of these products, 18 met our inclusion criteria and were qualitatively described, and 16 provided sufficient data for quantitative evaluation. The median volume of medical conditions covered was 80.6% (interquartile range, 68.9%-84.2%) and varied for the different products. Similarly, differences emerged for editorial policy (median 8.0, interquartile range 5.8-10.3) and evidence-based methodology scores (median 10.0, interquartile range 1.0-12.8) on a 15-point scale. None of these dimensions turned out to be significantly associated with the other dimensions (editorial quality and volume, Spearman rank correlation r = -0.001, P = .99; evidence-based methodology and volume, r = -0.19, P = .48; editorial and evidence-based methodology, r = 0.43, P =.09). Publishers are moving to develop point-of-care summary products. Some of these have better profiles than others, and there is room for improved reporting of the

  16. The Research and Education of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice; A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vahideh Zareh Gavgani

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Evidence based librarianship (EBL) was defined as “use of best available evidence from qualitative and quantitative research results and rational experience and decisions acquired from the daily practice of library”. However there are controversies about if the nature of EBL deals with library services or professional practice and if it needs a formal education or informal continuing education is enough? To shed light on this ambiguity, the aim of this study was to...

  17. Factors influencing advanced practice nurses' ability to promote evidence-based practice among frontline nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Kate; Nolan, Mike; McDonnell, Ann; Tod, Angela; Kirshbaum, Marilyn; Guillaume, Louise

    2012-02-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) have an important role in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) among frontline nurses (FLNs). Factors influencing FLNs' engagement with EBP are well documented but little is known about factors that affect APNs' ability to facilitate evidence in practice. To identify factors that influence APNs' ability to promote EBP among FLNs. A multiple case study of 23 APNs from hospital and primary care settings across seven English health authorities was undertaken. Data collection comprised interviews and observation of APNs and interviews with FLNs and other healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. Four groups of influencing factors were identified: (1) Personal attributes of APNs included knowledge and skills in EBP, clinical credibility with frontline staff and leadership style. (2) Relationships with stakeholders included APNs' interactions with FLNs and the level of support from managers and medical colleagues. (3) Aspects of the APN role included their sphere of responsibility and workload. (4) Organisational context included the organisational culture, FLNs' workload, professional networks and available resources. Educational preparation for APNs should enable them to develop expertise in EBP plus interpersonal and leadership skills to manage relational dynamics in clinical settings. APN role specifications should provide the opportunity to promote EBP. The organisational culture should be conducive to enabling EBP with managers supportive of this aspect of the APNs' role. APNs need to be supported to address the individual, interpersonal and organisational factors, which influence their ability to promote EBP. Organisational commitment at the highest level is key to APNs' ability to fulfil this aspect of their role. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Comparison of four teaching methods on Evidence-based Practice skills of postgraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ritin S; Tran, Duong Thuy; Ramjan, Lucie; Ho, Carey; Gill, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four teaching methods on the evidence-based practice knowledge and skills of postgraduate nursing students. Students enrolled in the Evidence-based Nursing (EBN) unit in Australia and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2011 received education via either the standard distance teaching method, computer laboratory teaching method, Evidence-based Practice-Digital Video Disc (EBP-DVD) teaching method or the didactic classroom teaching method. Evidence-based Practice (EBP) knowledge and skills were evaluated using student assignments that comprised validated instruments. One-way analysis of covariance was implemented to assess group differences on outcomes after controlling for the effects of age and grade point average (GPA). Data were obtained from 187 students. The crude mean score among students receiving the standard+DVD method of instruction was higher for developing a precise clinical question (8.1±0.8) and identifying the level of evidence (4.6±0.7) compared to those receiving other teaching methods. These differences were statistically significant after controlling for age and grade point average. Significant improvement in cognitive and technical EBP skills can be achieved for postgraduate nursing students by integrating a DVD as part of the EBP teaching resources. The EBP-DVD is an easy teaching method to improve student learning outcomes and ensure that external students receive equivalent and quality learning experiences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Autopsy practice in forensic pathology - Evidence-based or experience-based?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Freeman, Michael; Banner, Jytte

    2014-01-01

    Current autopsy practice in forensic pathology is to a large extent based on experience and individual customary practices as opposed to evidence and consensus based practices. As a result there is the potential for substantial variation in how knowledge is applied in each case. In the present case......-gathering and the use of check lists specific to certain injury causes are likely to result in less deviation from evidence-based practices in forensic pathology. Pre-autopsy data-gathering and check lists will help ensure a higher degree of standardization in autopsy reports thus enhancing the quality and accuracy...

  20. Evidence-based practice among speech-language pathologists: attitudes, utilization, and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipoli, Richard P; Kennedy, Marianne

    2005-08-01

    A total of 240 speech-language pathologists responded to a questionnaire examining attitudes toward and use of research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Perceived barriers to EBP were also explored. Positive attitudes toward research and EBP were reported. Attitudes were predicted by exposure to research and EBP practice during graduate training and the clinical fellowship year (CFY). Clinical experience and opinions of colleagues were used to guide decision making more frequently than research studies or clinical practice guidelines. Only exposure to research and EBP during the CFY predicted use of evidence-based resources. Respondents reported a decline in exposure to research and EBP as they moved from graduate training into the CFY. A lack of time was perceived as a barrier to EBP.

  1. Knowledge development and evidence-based practice: insights and opportunities from a postcolonial feminist perspective for transformative nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer Kirkham, Sheryl; Baumbusch, Jennifer L; Schultz, Annette S H; Anderson, Joan M

    2007-01-01

    Although not without its critics, evidence-based practice is widely espoused as supporting professional nursing practice. Engaging with the evidence-based practice discourse from a vantage point offered by the critical perspectives of postcolonial feminism, the incomplete epistemologies and limitations of the standardization characteristic of the evidences-based movement are analyzed. Critical analysis of evidence is suggested, such that it recognizes the evidence generated from multiple paradigms of inquiry, along with contextual interpretation and application of this evidence. We examine how broader interpretations of evidence might contribute to nursing knowledge development and translation for transformative professional nursing practice, and ultimately to address persistent health disparities within the complex context of healthcare delivery.

  2. Testing use of payers to facilitate evidence-based practice adoption: protocol for a cluster-randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Molfenter, Todd; Kim, Jee-Seon; Quanbeck, Andrew; Patel-Porter, Terry; Starr, Sandy; McCarty, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Background More effective methods are needed to implement evidence-based findings into practice. The Advancing Recovery Framework offers a multi-level approach to evidence-based practice implementation by aligning purchasing and regulatory policies at the payer level with organizational change strategies at the organizational level. Methods The Advancing Recovery Buprenorphine Implementation Study is a cluster-randomized controlled trial designed to increase use of the evidence-based practice...

  3. [Obstacles perceived by nurses for evidence-based practice: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Inmaculada; López-Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L

    2013-01-01

    To examine the obstacles perceived by nurses to implement an evidence-based clinical practice. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews conducted in 2010-2011 including 11 nurses purposively selected from public hospitals and community centres in Jaén and Córdoba (Spain). A content analysis was performed, using Miles and Huberman as a reference and comprising the following steps: data reduction, data presentation, and data conclusion/verification. Data saturation was reached in these categories (obstacles). The obstacles perceived by nurses to introduce an evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) were grouped into 3 major categories: obstacles related with professionals (routine-based practice, unwilling and stagnant attitudes, and lack of training in EBCP), obstacles related to the social context (reluctance from other professionals and from patients or families), and obstacles related to the organization (obsolete cultures that do not promote innovation in nursing care). This study highlights the persistence of various factors that hinder the use of research findings in clinical practice. The results underline the need to change the culture of healthcare organizations, to motivate professionals, and to break some of the resistance attitudes that hinder the implementation of evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Using the World Wide Web to Connect Research and Professional Practice: Towards Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Moody

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In most professional (applied disciplines, research findings take a long time to filter into practice, if they ever do at all. The result of this is under-utilisation of research results and sub-optimal practices. There are a number of reasons for the lack of knowledge transfer. On the "demand side", people working in professional practice have little time available to keep up with the latest research in their field. In addition, the volume of research published each year means that the average practitioner would not have time to read all the research articles in their area of interest even if they devoted all their time to it. From the "supply side", academic research is primarily focused on the production rather than distribution of knowledge. While they have highly developed mechanisms for transferring knowledge among themselves, there is little investment in the distribution of research results be-yond research communities. The World Wide Web provides a potential solution to this problem, as it provides a global information infrastructure for connecting those who produce knowledge (researchers and those who need to apply this knowledge (practitioners. This paper describes two projects which use the World Wide Web to make research results directly available to support decision making in the workplace. The first is a successful knowledge management project in a health department which provides medical staff with on-line access to the latest medical research at the point of care. The second is a project currently in progress to implement a similar system to support decision making in IS practice. Finally, we draw some general lessons about how to improve transfers of knowledge from research and practice, which could be applied in any discipline.

  5. Proposal of a holistic model to support local-level evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmasebi, Said; Villa, Luis; Nielsen, Helen; Graham-Smith, Hilary

    2010-08-03

    In response to a central drive for evidence-based practice, there have been many research support schemes, setups, and other practices concentrating on facilitating access to external research, such as the Centre for Evidence Based Healthcare Aotearoa, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Very little attention has been paid to supporting internal research in terms of local evidence and internal research capabilities. The whole evidence-based practice movement has alienated internal decision makers and, thus, very little progress has been made in the context of evidence informing local policy formation. Health and social policies are made centrally based on dubious claims and often evidence is sought after implementation. For example, on record, most health care practitioners appear to agree with the causal link between depression and mental illness (sometimes qualified with other social factors) with suicide; off the record, even some psychiatrists doubt that such a link is applicable to the population as a whole. Therefore, be it through misplaced loyalty or a lack of support for internal researchers/decision makers, local evidence informing local decision making may have been ignored in favour of external evidence. In this paper, we present a practical holistic model to support local evidence-based decision making. This approach is more relevant in light of a new approach to primary health care of "local knowledge" complementing external evidence. One possible outcome would be to network with other regional programmes around the world to share information and identify "best" practices, such as the "Stop Youth Suicide Campaign" (www.stopyouthsuicide.com).

  6. Proposal of a Holistic Model to Support Local-Level Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to a central drive for evidence-based practice, there have been many research support schemes, setups, and other practices concentrating on facilitating access to external research, such as the Centre for Evidence Based Healthcare Aotearoa, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Very little attention has been paid to supporting internal research in terms of local evidence and internal research capabilities. The whole evidence-based practice movement has alienated internal decision makers and, thus, very little progress has been made in the context of evidence informing local policy formation. Health and social policies are made centrally based on dubious claims and often evidence is sought after implementation. For example, on record, most health care practitioners appear to agree with the causal link between depression and mental illness (sometimes qualified with other social factors with suicide; off the record, even some psychiatrists doubt that such a link is applicable to the population as a whole. Therefore, be it through misplaced loyalty or a lack of support for internal researchers/decision makers, local evidence informing local decision making may have been ignored in favour of external evidence. In this paper, we present a practical holistic model to support local evidence-based decision making. This approach is more relevant in light of a new approach to primary health care of “local knowledge” complementing external evidence. One possible outcome would be to network with other regional programmes around the world to share information and identify “best” practices, such as the “Stop Youth Suicide Campaign”(www.stopyouthsuicide.com.

  7. Striving for evidence-based practice innovations through a hybrid model journal club: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marian; Ice, Suzanna; Nakashima, Cathy Y; Cox, Lynn Annette; Morse, Elizabeth C; Philip, Ginu; Vuong, Ellen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot a "hybrid" style journal club and determine whether measurable effects could be detected over 8-weeks' time on evidence-based practice ability, desire, behaviors, use, and barriers. Journal clubs have been suggested as a method to increase nurses' confidence with using research evidence to guide practice. However, it is yet unknown how nurse educators can best implement effective programs for clinicians with varying schedules, education levels, and research skills. Thirty-six participants from one large urban United States hospital (72% registered nurses) were invited to access bi-weekly interdisciplinary journal club activities. Nurse educators created curriculum focused on clinical problem solving that was offered via in-person sessions or a social media site. A pretest-posttest no control group design was used to measure impacts of those engaged in journal club activities. Data were collected using a combination of validated evidence-based practice instruments and program participation records. A two-tailed paired t test showed significant increases over 8weeks' time in evidence-based practice use (p=.002) and behaviors (p=.007). Slight preference for in-person sessions was reported, although greater participation was reflected in online activities. Mean satisfaction ratings were high; however, attrition rates suggest that more is needed to maximize clinician engagement. A hybrid method using online and in-person sessions was feasible and adaptive for varying learning styles and work schedules. Positive changes in measurements were detected among journal club participants. Instruments were identified that may be useful for trialing similar programs intended to increase evidence-based practice self-efficacy, use, behaviors, and ability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mistakes, Errors and Foul-Ups: Practice-Based Evidence for Evidence Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In human medicine, the management of care to ensure safety for the service-user constitutes an important element of the patient ‘journey.’ The name given to this discipline is patient safety. It is founded upon those elements of good medical practice which help avoid or mitigate human error.  Investigations in the U.S. first highlighted the alarming extent of medical error: Brennan et al. (1991 concluded that in the state of New York, the overall rate of adverse events was approximately 4% for hospitalised patients, which equated to over 13,000 deaths a year. Doctors looked to other safety critical industries and aviation in particular (Reason 1995, to address this phenomenon: there is now a wealth of research on the impact of various safety initiatives on measurable rates of harm. The World Health Organisation’s ‘Safe Surgery Saves Lives’ initiative - a campaign that advocates the use of a surgical checklist to standardise aspects of peri-operative care - is one example of aviation methodology successfully employed in a clinical setting (van Klei et al. 2012. The critical importance of effective communication, leadership and situational awareness has also been discussed at length in the human patient safety literature.ObjectivesVeterinary patient safety is an analogous discipline and researchers have attempted to understand more about the topic of veterinary medical error. However, the evidence-base for veterinary patient safety is sparse.  This presentation aims to summarise the evidence to date and highlight the benefits in practice of an emerging subject. MethodA search of the terms veterinary patient safety on the PubMed database from 1990 to 2016 was performed.Findings15 articles were identified as contributing to the veterinary patient safety literature.OutcomeThe available literature has addressed a number of areas. The use of checklists in a clinical setting has been proven to reduce the incidence of specific undesirable

  9. Clinical postconference pedagogy: exploring evidence-based practice with millennial-inspired "Building Blocks".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schams, Kristin A; Kuennen, Jackie K

    2012-01-01

    This article reports an innovative teaching strategy consisting of learning units whereby students come to postconference sessions prepared to share evidence-based practice (EBP) information associated with upcoming laboratory concepts, discover relationships among laboratory concepts and current nursing practice, and associate personal clinical experiences with the practice environment. This strategy, named "Building Blocks," represents one method to transform nursing education into a more active process, and also has the potential to prepare graduates who can function in a dynamic health care environment incorporating EBP.

  10. What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen; Sabatini, Linda; Amundson, Jon K

    2007-04-01

    This paper briefly surveys the trend of and controversy surrounding empirical validation in psychotherapy. Empirical validation of hypnotherapy has paralleled the practice of validation in psychotherapy and the professionalization of clinical psychology, in general. This evolution in determining what counts as evidence for bona fide clinical practice has gone from theory-driven clinical approaches in the 1960s and 1970s through critical attempts at categorization of empirically supported therapies in the 1990s on to the concept of evidence-based practice in 2006. Implications of this progression in professional psychology are discussed in the light of hypnosis's current quest for validation and empirical accreditation.

  11. Engaging Nursing Students: Integrating Evidence-Based Inquiry, Informatics, and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiffer, Melanie R

    2017-12-05

    The nursing research class requires faculty to create a spirit of inquiry while integrating technology, flexibility, and responsiveness to student needs. This article discusses new pedagogies to actively engage students in the evidence-based nursing process and the achievement of course learning outcomes. Through course exemplar, the author demonstrates a creative method to engage traditional baccalaureate nursing students in a nursing project that links evidence to improved patient outcomes.

  12. Nursing Librarians Cultivating Evidence-Based Practice Through an Asynchronous Online Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay

    2017-09-01

    In response to a request from the Nursing Shared Governance Evidence-Based Practice Council, librarians created an online evidence-based practice (EBP) continuing education course for clinical nurses. The curriculum was adapted from a previously created face-to-face course and was offered online through a learning management system. Although many nurses registered for the course, only a small sample was able to complete all modules. Feedback revealed that nurses appreciated the ease of online use, but they experienced technical barriers. Overall, nurses completing the course agreed that all learning objectives were met. An online asynchronous course for nurses is a viable option for teaching EBP, but hospital computer limitations must be taken into account to allow for participants' full immersion into the material. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(9):420-424. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Reflections from the Jury Box: Improving Evidence Based Practice through a Comparison with Our Legal System

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    Valerie Coppenrath

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An experience serving jury duty prompted reflection on the parallels between evidenced based medicine and our legal system. Findings: The steps of the legal system can be tied to each step of the practice of evidenced based medicine. Implications: Patients should be included in evidence based decisions. Pharmacists can act as resources for other providers practicing evidenced based medicine. Educators can use this analogy to teach evidence based medicine. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Commentary

  14. Evidence-based practice in Physiotherapy curricula: A survey of Indian Health Science Universities

    OpenAIRE

    P PANHALE, VRUSHALI; BELLARE, BHARATI; JIANDANI, MARIYA

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current evidence in clinical decision making. The physiotherapy profession has expressed a commitment to the development and use of evidence. However, very little is known about the extent to which EBP is integrated in physiotherapy curricula in India. The purpose of this study was to describe integration of EBP in Indian physiotherapy programs. Methods: An observational st...

  15. Optimizing nursing care by integrating theory-driven evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe, Teri Britt

    2007-01-01

    An emerging challenge for nursing leadership is how to convey the importance of both evidence-based practice (EBP) and theory-driven care in ensuring patient safety and optimizing outcomes. This article describes a specific example of a leadership strategy based on Rosswurm and Larrabee's model for change to EBP, which was effective in aligning the processes of EBP and theory-driven care.

  16. eEvidence: Information Seeking Support for Evidence-based Practice: An Implementation Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Kan, Min-Yen; Procter, Paula M.; Zubaidah, Siti; Yip, Wai Kin; Li, Goh Mien

    2010-01-01

    We propose to collect freely available articles from the web to build an evidence-based practice resource collection with up-to-date coverage, and then apply automated classification and key information extraction on the collected articles to provide means for sounder relevance judgments. We implement these features into a dual-interface system that allows users to choose between an active or passive information seeking process depending on the amount of time available. PMID:21347115

  17. Staff views on supporting evidence based practice for children with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembath, David; Sulek, Rhylee; Paynter, Jessica; Simpson, Kate; Keen, Deb

    2017-11-22

    A variety of empirically supported interventions are available for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but previous research suggests that their selection and use within an evidence-based practice (EBP) framework in clinical settings is challenging. To date, research has primarily focused on identifying individual, organisational, and contextual barriers to EBP rather than identifying collaborative solutions to these barriers through consultation with staff. The aim of our study was to explore staff views on supporting EBP in their work with children with ASD. We conducted five focus groups involving 29 professional (e.g., speech pathologists, teachers), paraprofessional (e.g., childcare workers), and managerial staff to explore their views. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Two central themes, comprising six categories, emerged to account for the participants' views. Initiative and Effort accounted for the range of creative strategies staff had developed to support their engagement in EBP. They also expressed the need for A Better Way involving organisational-wide support such as this engagement, including peer-to-peer mentoring. The findings suggest that an organisational-wide model to support engagement in EBP, with peer-to-peer mentoring at its foundation, may provide a desirable, ecologically valid, and acceptable model. Implications for Rehabilitation Clinicians and educators recognise the importance of evidence-based practice. Efforts to support evidence-based practice have focused mostly on access to research evidence. Clinicians and educators in this study were developing their own strategies based on intuition. They identified a need for organisation-wide approaches to supporting evidence-based practice. Peer-to-peer mentoring appears to be an acceptable and viable strategy.

  18. Implementing and Sustaining Evidence Based Practice Through a Nursing Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kevin; Kanaskie, Mary Louise; Knehans, Amy C; Salisbury, Sarah; Doheny, Kim K; Schirm, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The outcomes based emphasis in nursing and health care delivery requires identification of best available evidence in order to produce quality, safe, and effective patient care. Finding, critiquing, and ultimately implementing the best available evidence for practice is a formidable task for many clinical nurses. Development and implementation of a nursing journal club (NJC) became one organization's successful attempt to help clinical nurses better understand and use best available evidence in actual practice. The process and structure for the NJC evolved from an additional activity scheduled outside of work to a fully established endeavor of Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice Council (NR&EBP). The Nursing Professional Practice Model was foundational to establishing the NJC as a formal component within the NR&EBP Council shared governance structure. Efforts to embed the NJC included taking advantage of resources available at an academic medical center and incorporating them into the council structure. Successful outcomes of the NJC include a quarterly schedule, with topics selected in advance that are based on nursing department as well as organizational driven goals and initiatives. The structure and process in place has eliminated frequently mentioned deterrents to evidence based practice such as not enough time, lack of knowledge, or no immediate application to practice. Incorporating the NJC as a component of NR&EBP Council has provided clinical nurses time away from clinical care that supports scholarship for nursing practice. Committed leadership and garnering of available resources have been key factors for success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decreased rates of shoulder dystocia and brachial plexus injury via an evidence-based practice bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienas, Laura E; Hedriana, Herman L; Wiesner, Suzanne; Pelletreau, Barbara; Wilson, Machelle D; Shields, Laurence E

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate whether a standardized approach to identify pregnant women at risk for shoulder dystocia (SD) is associated with reduced incidence of SD and brachial plexus injury (BPI). Between 2011 and 2015, prospective data were collected from 29 community-based hospitals in the USA during implementation of an evidence-based practice bundle, including an admission risk assessment, required "timeout" before operative vaginal delivery (OVD), and low-fidelity SD drills. All women with singleton vertex pregnancies admitted for vaginal delivery were included. Rates of SD, BPI, OVD, and cesarean delivery were compared between a baseline period (January 2011-September 2013) and an intervention period (October 2013-June 2015), during which there was a system-wide average bundle compliance of 90%. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of SD (17.6%; P=0.028), BPI (28.6%; P=0.018), and OVD (18.0%; P<0.001) after implementation of the evidence-based practice bundle. There was a nonsignificant reduction in primary (P=0.823) and total (P=0.396) cesarean rates, but no association between SD drills and incidence of BPI. Implementation of a standard evidence-based practice bundle was found to be associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of SD and BPI. Utilization of low-fidelity drills was not associated with a reduction in BPI. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  20. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM practice. Methods Thirty-six OPs from ten countries, planning to attend an EBM course and to a large extent recruited via the European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM, participated in a cross-sectional study. Results Research and development institutes, and knowledge products and tools are used by respectively more than 72% and more than 80% of the OPs and they are rated as being important for EBM practice (more than 65 points (range 0–100. Conventional knowledge access facilities, like traditional libraries, are used often (69% but are rated as less important (46.8 points (range 0–100 compared to the use of more novel facilities, like question-and-answer facilities (25% that are rated as more important (48.9 points (range 0–100. To solve cases, OPs mostly use non evidence-based sources. However, they regard the evidence-based sources that are not often used, e.g. the Cochrane library, as important enablers for practising EBM. The main barriers are lack of time, payment for full-text articles, language barrier (most texts are in English, and lack of skills and support. Conclusion This first exploratory study shows that OPs use many knowledge infrastructure facilities and rate them as being important for their EBM practice. However, they are not used to use evidence-based sources in their practice and face many barriers that are comparable to the barriers physicians face in primary health care.

  1. The safety at home study: an evidence base for policy and practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Blais, Régis; Baker, G Ross; Harrison, Margaret B; Lang, Ariella; Macdonald, Marilyn; McShane, Julie; Killackey, Tieghan

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the policies and practices that are needed to improve the safety of home care in light of the most recent evidence about home care safety in Canada. Four areas for policy and practice change are addressed: 1) the promotion of effective communication processes in home care through cross-sector collaboration, case management and technology innovations; 2) screening for safety risk factors; 3) standardizing care processes, packaging and equipment; and 4) supporting family/caregivers and strengthening clients' ability to engage in therapeutic self-care. Evidence-based strategies for change are presented within the context of the evidence about home care safety issues. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  2. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  3. Teachers' Facility with Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Preparation Programmes and In-Service Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Laura; Quinn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, teachers' self-reported knowledge and competency ratings for the evidence-based classroom management practices were analysed. Teachers also reflected on how they learned evidence-based classroom management practices. Results suggest that teachers working in schools that implement Positive Behavioural Interventions and…

  4. Future Paradigm or False Idol: A Cautionary Tale of Evidence-Based Practice for Adventure Education and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Nevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is an approach that narrowly classifies research results by utilising a hierarchy of evidence. This process renders much available knowledge and experience redundant within its value structure. Currently a dominating ideology across medical and health fields, evidence-based practice is now being promoted in adventure…

  5. Linking research to practice: the rise of evidence-based health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2014-01-01

    The lecture explores the origins of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health sciences librarianship beginning with examples from the work of Janet Doe and past Doe lecturers. Additional sources of evidence are used to document the rise of research and EBP as integral components of our professional work. FOUR SOURCES OF EVIDENCE ARE USED TO EXAMINE THE RISE OF EBP: (1) a publication by Doe and research-related content in past Doe lectures, (2) research-related word usage in articles in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association between 1961 and 2010, (3) Medical Library Association activities, and (4) EBP as an international movement. These sources of evidence confirm the rise of EBP in health sciences librarianship. International initiatives sparked the rise of evidence-based librarianship and continue to characterize the movement. This review shows the emergence of a unique form of EBP that, although inspired by evidence-based medicine (EBM), has developed its own view of evidence and its application in library and information practice. Health sciences librarians have played a key role in initiating, nurturing, and spreading EBP in other branches of our profession. Our close association with EBM set the stage for developing our own EBP. While we relied on EBM as a model for our early efforts, we can observe the continuing evolution of our own unique approach to using, creating, and applying evidence from a variety of sources to improve the quality of health information services.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Use of Evidence-Based Practice among nurses active on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amparo Pérez-Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. to determine the evidence-based practice (EBP competence of Spanish and Latin-American nurses participating in professional forums on the Internet and estimate the influence of socio-demographic and professional factors on their competence, which was defined as knowledge of, attitude towards, and implementation of EBP. Methodology: An online survey was administered to a convenience sample of nurses active in Internet forums, comprising validated Spanish versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ and Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI and socio-demographics and professional variables. Results: 314 questionnaires were obtained (76.96%. The mean EBPQ score was 5.02 out of 7 (95%CI, 4.89-5.14. The variables associated with a higher competence in EBP were academic level, (p<03001, professional category (p=0.001, country of work (p<0.001, perception of practice environment (p=0,018 and research activities (p<0,036. Conclusions: These nurses showed a moderate level of EBP competence. They revealed a positive attitude towards EBP and achieved intermediate scores in both EBP-related skills and knowledge and their implementation. Higher academic levels and professional categories were associated with greater EBP competence. A practice environment perceived to be unfavorable has a negative influence on EBP implementation.

  7. A Comparison of Evidence-Based Practice and the ACRL Information Literacy Standards: Implications for Information Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), like information literacy, is concerned with an individual's knowledge, skills, and attitudes relating to using information. EBP is now a professional competency in fields as diverse as social work, nursing and allied health fields, and public policy. A comparison of the Association of College and Research Libraries'…

  8. Evidence-based practice implementation: The impact of public versus private sector organization type on organizational support, provider attitudes, and adoption of evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommerfeld David H

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this study is to extend research on evidence-based practice (EBP implementation by examining the impact of organizational type (public versus private and organizational support for EBP on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Both organization theory and theory of innovation uptake and individual adoption of EBP guide the approach and analyses in this study. We anticipated that private sector organizations would provide greater levels of organizational support for EBPs leading to more positive provider attitudes towards EBPs and EBP use. We also expected attitudes toward EBPs to mediate the association of organizational support and EBP use. Methods Participants were mental health service providers from 17 communities in 16 states in the United States (n = 170. Path analyses were conducted to compare three theoretical models of the impact of organization type on organizational support for EBP and of organizational support on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Results Consistent with our predictions, private agencies provided greater support for EBP implementation, and staff working for private agencies reported more positive attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Organizational support for EBP partially mediated the association of organization type on provider attitudes toward EBP. Organizational support was significantly positively associated with attitudes toward EBP and EBP use in practice. Conclusion This study offers further support for the importance of organizational context as an influence on organizational support for EBP and provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. The study demonstrates the role organizational support in provider use of EBP in practice. This study also suggests that organizational support for innovation is a malleable factor in supporting use of EBP. Greater attention should be paid to organizational influences that can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of EBPs in

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and practices toward evidence-based dentistry among dentists of Bengaluru city

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    Uma Shankarachari Rajagopalachari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In these challenging times, practice of dentistry is becoming more complex. Evidence-based dentistry (EBD strengthen the profession by identifying knowledge gaps, confidence in clinical decision making and encourage to formulate clear questions regarding the evidence needed. It closes the gap between clinical research and real-world practice and provides tools to interpret and apply research findings. Aim: This study aims to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of dentists toward the concept of EBD. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a representative sample of 300 dentists in dental colleges and private practices of Bengaluru city using a self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics was computed. The frequency for each domain of knowledge, attitude, and practice was calculated after giving weight age for each option. For statistical analysis, t-test was used. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Mean age of the dentists was 32.9 ± 8.1 years. Mean knowledge, attitude, and practice were 17.41 ± 6.45, 1.92 ± 0.75, and 17.06 ± 3.05, respectively. Majority of them relied on their own judgment as a guide to primary care practice. Very less number of dentists relied on Cochrane library as a reliable source for evidence-based practice. Conclusions: Although the dentists were generally aware of the concept of EBD very little use of this concept in clinical practice was followed quoting lack of access as a barrier. However, the reflected attitudes toward EBD were good with most of the respondents expressing an interest in having further education in this concept.

  10. Increasing the evidence base in journalology: creating an international best practice journal research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, David; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-10-10

    Biomedical journals continue to be the single most important conduit for disseminating biomedical knowledge. Unlike clinical medicine, where evidence is considered fundamental to practice, journals still operate largely in a 'black box' mode without sufficient evidence to drive their practice. We believe there is an immediate need to substantially increase the amount and quality of research by journals to ensure their practice is as evidence based as possible. To achieve this goal, we are proposing the development of an international 'best practice journal research network'. We invite journals and others to join the network. Such a network is likely to improve the quality of journals. It is also likely to address many unanswered questions in publication science, including peer review, which can provide robust and generalizable answers.

  11. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannes, Karin; Leys, Marcus; Vermeire, Etienne; Aertgeerts, Bert; Buntinx, Frank; Depoorter, Anne-Marie

    2005-09-09

    Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners) to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice), commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations) and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community). Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  12. The stages of implementation completion for evidence-based practice: protocol for a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Lisa

    2014-04-05

    This protocol describes the 'development of outcome measures and suitable methodologies for dissemination and implementation approaches,' a priority for implementation research. Although many evidence-based practices (EBPs) have been developed, large knowledge gaps remain regarding how to routinely move EBPs into usual care. The lack of understanding of 'what it takes' to install EBPs has costly public health consequences, including a lack of availability of the most beneficial services, wasted efforts and resources on failed implementation attempts, and the potential for engendering reluctance to try implementing new EBPs after failed attempts.The Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC) is an eight-stage tool of implementation process and milestones, with stages spanning three implementation phases (pre-implementation, implementation, sustainability). Items delineate the date that a site completes implementation activities, yielding an assessment of duration (time to complete a stage), proportion (of stage activities completed), and a general measure of how far a site moved in the implementation process. We propose to extend the SIC to EBPs operating in child service sectors (juvenile justice, schools, substance use, child welfare). Both successful and failed implementation attempts will be scrutinized using a mixed methods design. Stage costs will be measured and examined. Both retrospective data (from previous site implementation efforts) and prospective data (from newly adopting sites) will be analyzed. The influence of pre-implementation on implementation and sustainability outcomes will be examined (Aim 1). Mixed methods procedures will focus on increasing understanding of the process of implementation failure in an effort to determine if the SIC can provide early detection of sites that are unlikely to succeed (Aim 2). Study activities will include cost mapping of SIC stages and an examination of the relationship between implementation costs and

  13. Professional values and competencies as explanatory factors for the use of evidence-based practice in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skela-Savič, Brigita; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Pesjak, Katja

    2017-08-01

    To establish the connection between values, competencies, selected job characteristics and evidence-based practice use. Nurses rarely apply evidence-based practice in everyday work. A recent body of research has looked at various variables explaining the use of evidence-based practice, but not values and competencies. A cross-sectional, non-experimental quantitative explorative research design. Standardized instruments were used (Nurse Professional Values Scale-R, Nurse Competence Scale, Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation Scale). The sample included 780 nurses from 20 Slovenian hospitals. The data were collected in 2015. The study identifies two new variables contributing to a better understanding of beliefs on and implementation of evidence-based practice, thus broadening the existing research evidence. These are the values of activism and professionalism and competencies aimed at the development and professionalization of nursing. Values of caring, trust and justice and competencies expected in everyday practice do not influence the beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice. Respondents ascribed less importance to values connected with activism and professionalism and competencies connected with the development of professionalism. Nurses agree that evidence-based practice is useful in their clinical work, but they lack the knowledge to implement it in practice. Evidence-based practice implementation in nursing practice is low. Study results stress the importance of increasing the knowledge and skills on professional values of activism and professionalism and competencies connected to nursing development. The study expands the current understanding of evidence-based practice use and provides invaluable insight for nursing managers, higher education managers and the national nursing association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A framework of quality improvement interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Valuck, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge about a framework of quality improvement (QI) interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Summarize the process of creating and initiating the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention.2. Identify the domains and QI interventions for the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention. Pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention is a priority issue in US hospitals. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel endorses an evidence-based practice (EBP) protocol to help prevent PrUs. Effective implementation of EBPs requires systematic change of existing care units. Quality improvement interventions offer a mechanism of change to existing structures in order to effectively implement EBPs for PrU prevention. The best-practice framework developed by Nelson et al is a useful model of quality improvement interventions that targets process improvement in 4 domains: leadership, staff, information and information technology, and performance and improvement. At 2 academic medical centers, the best-practice framework was shown to physicians, nurses, and health services researchers. Their insight was used to modify the best-practice framework as a reference tool for quality improvement interventions in PrU prevention. The revised framework includes 25 elements across 4 domains. Many of these elements support EBPs for PrU prevention, such as updates in PrU staging and risk assessment. The best-practice framework offers a reference point to initiating a bundle of quality improvement interventions in support of EBPs. Hospitals and clinicians tasked with quality improvement efforts can use this framework to problem-solve PrU prevention and other critical issues.

  15. Advancing the Scientific Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael C; Blossom, Jennifer B; Evans, Spencer C; Amaro, Christina M; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become a central focus in clinical child and adolescent psychology. As originally defined, EBP in psychology is the integration of the best available research evidence, patient characteristics, and clinical expertise. Although evidence-based perspectives have garnered widespread acceptance in recent years, there has also been some confusion and disagreement about the 3-part definition of EBP, particularly the role of research. In this article, we first provide a brief review of the development of EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology. Next, we outline the following 4 points to help clarify the understanding of EBP: (a) knowledge should not be confused with epistemic processes, (b) research on clinician and client factors is needed for EBP, (c) research on assessment is needed for EBP, and (d) the 3-part conceptualization of EBP can serve as a useful framework to guide research. Based on these principles, we put forth a slightly revised conceptualization of EBP, in which the role of research is expanded and more clearly operationalized. Finally, based on our review of the literature, we offer illustrative examples of specific directions for future research to advance the evidence base for EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

  16. Restoration of posterior teeth in clinical practice: evidence base for choosing amalgam versus composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the current use of amalgam versus resin composite in posterior restorations and the evidence-base for choosing between these two treatment options. While much research has been published on the issue of the clinical use of amalgam versus resin composite, there are several issues that limit the true evidence-base on the subject. Furthermore, while the majority of published studies on posterior composites would seem to indicate equivalent clinical performance of resin composite to amalgam restorations, the studies that should be weighted much more heavily (randomized controlled trials) do not support the slant of the rest of the literature. As part of an evidence-based approach to private practice, clinicians need to be aware of the levels of evidence in the literature and need to properly inform patients of the true clinical outcomes that are associated with the use of amalgam versus resin composite for posterior restorations, so that patients are themselves making informed decisions about their dental care.

  17. Creative arts as a public health resource: moving from practice-based research to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    There is growing international acceptance of the notion that participation in the creative arts can be beneficial for well-being and health. For over 30 years practical arts for health projects have been developed to support health care and promote health and well-being in communities. An increasing body of evaluation and research evidence lends weight to the value of such initiatives. However, the field of arts and health is complex and multi-faceted and there are challenges in moving beyond 'practice-based' research, towards building a progressive body of knowledge that can provide a basis for future 'evidence-based' practice in health care and public health. This paper reviews some of the population-level evidence from epidemiological studies on cultural participation and health, before considering research on active initiatives that draw on the creative arts in health care settings and communities to support health and well-being. The notion of a hierarchy of evidence is discussed in relation to arts for health initiatives and a plea is made for recognising the value of concrete case studies, qualitative research and the testimonies of participants and professionals alike in assessing both the value of creative arts activities and for understanding their impacts. Nevertheless, the need for robust controlled studies with precise measurable health outcomes is clear if we are to move towards the scaling up of arts interventions to achieve public health-level impacts from creative arts participation. A brief account of the current programme of research on singing and health that is underway at the Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts and Health is presented as a possible model for future research on arts and health.

  18. Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, Amanda N

    2016-04-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice," found on pages 161-168, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until March 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. • Describe the key components and characteristics related to evidence-based

  19. Evidence based dentistry – between the science and the clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Georgiev, Zlatko

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the more experience a physician or a dentist possess better the quality of health care delivery. However, recent studies had shown that there is in fact an inverse relationship between the number of years of practice and the quality of care provided. Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) is a process that restructures the way in which we think about clinical problems. It is an approach to clinical problem solving that has evolved from a self-directed and problem based a...

  20. Promoting evidence-based practice through a research training program for point-of-care clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Agnes T; Balneaves, Lynda G; Garossino, Candy; Puyat, Joseph H; Qian, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a research training program on clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to research and evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP has been shown to improve patient care and outcomes. Innovative approaches are needed to overcome individual and organizational barriers to EBP. Mixed-methods design was used to evaluate a research training intervention with point-of-care clinicians in a Canadian urban health organization. Participants completed the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Survey over 3 timepoints. Focus groups and interviews were also conducted. Statistically significant improvement in research knowledge and ability was demonstrated. Participants and administrators identified benefits of the training program, including the impact on EBP. Providing research training opportunities to point-of-care clinicians is a promising strategy for healthcare organizations seeking to promote EBP, empower clinicians, and showcase excellence in clinical research.

  1. Information literacy skills of occupational therapy graduates: promoting evidence-based practice in the MOT curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Carol A; Case-Smith, Jane

    2010-10-01

    Are Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) graduates more successful than BS graduates in accessing and analyzing research literature? This retrospective cohort study used a survey sent to Ohio State University MOT graduates, asking why they need information for their practice, what types of information they seek, and how they search for and use it. Results suggest that the MOT program has fostered higher-level skills than did the BS program in independent writing, a greater focus on evidence-based practice, and the use of bibliographic databases. The MOT graduates report high confidence in their ability to apply research to practice and high satisfaction with the lifelong learning skills they learned. The survey findings support the importance of collaboration between Occupational Therapy faculty and medical librarians in developing MOT educational programs.

  2. Tools for evidence-based vascular nursing practice: Achieving information literacy for lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Jodi; Walsh, M Eileen

    2017-12-01

    Information literacy is essential in facilitating evidence-based practice (EBP) activities. In vascular nursing, the implementation of EBP is of utmost importance. Best practice grounded in research evidence can contribute to improved patient care outcomes for individuals with vascular disease. The following paper discusses information literacy competencies for nurses to develop in the context of EBP, with an emphasis on formulating a clinical question and searching for evidence. Relevant health science information resources are described, including their value and purpose in the 6S model of evidence. Also discussed are practical and supportive solutions with proven effectiveness in ensuring nurses' success with EBP. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs: comparing approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Claire

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the potential of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs to support implementation of evidence has been demonstrated, it is not currently being achieved. CPGs are both poorly developed and ineffectively implemented. To improve clinical practice and health outcomes, both well-developed CPGs and effective methods of CPG implementation are needed. We sought to establish whether there is agreement on the fundamental characteristics of an evidence-based CPG development process and to explore whether the level of guidance provided in CPG development handbooks is sufficient for people using these handbooks to be able to apply it. Methods CPG development handbooks were identified through a broad search of published and grey literature. Documents published in English produced by national or international organisations purporting to support development of evidence-based CPGs were included. A list of 14 key elements of a CPG development process was developed. Two authors read each handbook. For each handbook a judgement was made as to how it addressed each element; assigned as: 'mentioned and clear guidance provided', 'mentioned but limited practical detail provided ', or 'not mentioned'. Results Six CPG development handbooks were included. These were produced by the Council of Europe, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK, the New Zealand Guidelines Group, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network, and the World Health Organization (WHO. There was strong concordance between the handbooks on the key elements of an evidence-based CPG development process. All six of the handbooks require and provide guidance on establishment of a multidisciplinary guideline development group, involvement of consumers, identification of clinical questions or problems, systematic searches for and appraisal of research evidence, a process for drafting

  4. Concluding the Series on Evidence-Based Practice: The Spread of Excellence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The child and adolescent psychiatry community has been using large systems of information and new technologies to improve its performance.Evidence-based approach is used by practitioners to find and implement feasible therapies and medication. The different procedures involved of evidence-based practice, as used in child and adolescent psychology,…

  5. A Squandered Opportunity?: A Review of SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices for Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Sheldon X.; Farabee, David

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the push for evidence-based programs has taken on unprecedented prominence in the fields of substance abuse and correctional treatment as a key determinant for intervention funding. The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), managed and funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services…

  6. Linking research to practice: the rise of evidence-based health sciences librarianship*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The lecture explores the origins of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health sciences librarianship beginning with examples from the work of Janet Doe and past Doe lecturers. Additional sources of evidence are used to document the rise of research and EBP as integral components of our professional work. Methods: Four sources of evidence are used to examine the rise of EBP: (1) a publication by Doe and research-related content in past Doe lectures, (2) research-related word usage in articles in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association between 1961 and 2010, (3) Medical Library Association activities, and (4) EBP as an international movement. Results: These sources of evidence confirm the rise of EBP in health sciences librarianship. International initiatives sparked the rise of evidence-based librarianship and continue to characterize the movement. This review shows the emergence of a unique form of EBP that, although inspired by evidence-based medicine (EBM), has developed its own view of evidence and its application in library and information practice. Implications: Health sciences librarians have played a key role in initiating, nurturing, and spreading EBP in other branches of our profession. Our close association with EBM set the stage for developing our own EBP. While we relied on EBM as a model for our early efforts, we can observe the continuing evolution of our own unique approach to using, creating, and applying evidence from a variety of sources to improve the quality of health information services. PMID:24415915

  7. The evidence-based medicine model of clinical practice: scientific teaching or belief-based preaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram; Freeman, Emily

    2011-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is commonly advocated as a 'gold standard' of clinical practice. A prominent definition of EBM is: the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Over time, various versions of a conceptual model or framework for implementing EBM (i.e. how to practice EBM) have been developed. This paper (i) traces the evolution of the different versions of the conceptual model; (ii) tries to make explicit the underlying goals, assumptions and logic of the various versions by exploring the definitions and meaning of the components identified in each model, and the methods suggested for integrating these into clinical practice; and (iii) offers an analytic critique of the various model iterations. A literature review was undertaken to identify, summarize, and compare the content of articles and books discussing EBM as a conceptual model to guide physicians in clinical practice. Our findings suggest that the EBM model of clinical practice, as it has evolved over time, is largely belief-based, because it is lacking in empirical evidence and theoretical support. The model is not well developed and articulated in terms of defining model components, justifying their inclusion and suggesting ways to integrate these in clinical practice. These findings are significant because without a model that clearly defines what constitutes an EBM approach to clinical practice we cannot (i) consistently teach clinicians how to do it and (ii) evaluate whether it is being done. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. National Cancer Institute Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices: a novel approach to pre-analytical standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kelly B; Vaught, Jim; Moore, Helen M

    2014-04-01

    Variable biospecimen collection, processing, and storage practices may introduce variability in biospecimen quality and analytical results. This risk can be minimized within a facility through the use of standardized procedures; however, analysis of biospecimens from different facilities may be confounded by differences in procedures and inferred biospecimen quality. Thus, a global approach to standardization of biospecimen handling procedures and their validation is needed. Here we present the first in a series of procedural guidelines that were developed and annotated with published findings in the field of human biospecimen science. The series of documents will be known as NCI Biospecimen Evidence-Based Practices, or BEBPs. Pertinent literature was identified via the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Biospecimen Research Database ( brd.nci.nih.gov ) and findings were organized by specific biospecimen pre-analytical factors and analytes of interest (DNA, RNA, protein, morphology). Meta-analysis results were presented as annotated summaries, which highlight concordant and discordant findings and the threshold and magnitude of effects when applicable. The detailed and adaptable format of the document is intended to support the development and execution of evidence-based standard operating procedures (SOPs) for human biospecimen collection, processing, and storage operations.

  9. Sicily statement on classification and development of evidence-based practice learning assessment tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilson Julie K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the steps of evidence-based practice (EBP has become standard curriculum for health professions at both student and professional levels. Determining the best methods for evaluating EBP learning is hampered by a dearth of valid and practical assessment tools and by the absence of guidelines for classifying the purpose of those that exist. Conceived and developed by delegates of the Fifth International Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers, the aim of this statement is to provide guidance for purposeful classification and development of tools to assess EBP learning. Discussion This paper identifies key principles for designing EBP learning assessment tools, recommends a common taxonomy for new and existing tools, and presents the Classification Rubric for EBP Assessment Tools in Education (CREATE framework for classifying such tools. Recommendations are provided for developers of EBP learning assessments and priorities are suggested for the types of assessments that are needed. Examples place existing EBP assessments into the CREATE framework to demonstrate how a common taxonomy might facilitate purposeful development and use of EBP learning assessment tools. Summary The widespread adoption of EBP into professional education requires valid and reliable measures of learning. Limited tools exist with established psychometrics. This international consensus statement strives to provide direction for developers of new EBP learning assessment tools and a framework for classifying the purposes of such tools.

  10. The role of intact family childhood on women's earnings capacity: implications for evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Richard K; Mason, Susan E

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the complexities of working with an evidence-based model to design intervention strategies benefiting individuals and families. It addresses the question, to what extent should the evidence of economic advantage for female children raised in two-parent families influence social work support for practices and policies that encourage marriage? The article reviews current research findings indicating benefits of two-parent families on children's well-being and contemporary policy prescriptions promoting marriage. It presents findings of the authors' study which considers the effects of being raised in an intact family on the economic future of young women. The evidence presented in the literature and found in our own study suggests that promotion of marriage may be a sound intervention strategy for parents interested in the economic advantages for their children later in life. For others, it may be the wrong choice based on women's personal circumstances. The association between early family structure and future well-being is further complicated by large gaps in the data on cultural and family diversity. Suggestions for social work practice are based on the synthesis of the evidence-based model and the values of the profession.

  11. Scaling up evidence-based practices for children and families in New York State: toward evidence-based policies on implementation for state mental health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M; Woodlock, Kristin M; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policymakers, providers, and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children's mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with more than 2,000 providers: (a) business practices, (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement, (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders, (d) parent activation, and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems.

  12. Effects of Education Programs on Evidence-Based Practice Implementation for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae Youn; Jang, Keum Seong; Kim, Nam Young

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of an education program for evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation of clinical nursing. EBP knowledge/skill, attitude, and belief; information search ability; and EBP implementation were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Furthermore, the effect on implementation was maintained at week 4 and week 8, indicating that the education program practically promotes the EBP implementation of nurses. Results confirm that the education program for EBP implementation is critical and the continuous education program is an essential part of EBP implementation. Also, to promote EBP implementation and disseminate it to nursing organizations, an immediate concern should be the cultivation of mentors for EBP and fortification of the belief and ability regarding EBP implementation. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):363-371. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Kim C; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R; Hurlburt, Michael S; Roesch, Scott C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care.

  14. Using Debates to Teach Evidence-Based Practice in Large Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Mary R; Baliko, Beverly; Polyakova-Norwood, Vera

    2015-10-01

    To engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), baccalaureate nursing graduates' competencies must include locating, interpreting, appraising, and applying research findings. Faculty are challenged to find effective ways to incorporate this content in large online courses. Faculty in a thriving college of nursing used interactive debates to teach EBP skills in a large (200+ students) online undergraduate course. Students remain highly engaged while practicing critical thinking, team-work, leadership, delegation, communication skills, and peer evaluation through participation in a series of faculty-facilitated online debates. Meticulous course organization and use of structured debates allows one instructor to teach skills for EBP, while keeping students engaged with each other, the instructor, and the material. Use of debates and the amount of engagement among students and faculty achieved could not be accomplished in a large face-to-face course. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. When craft and science collide: Improving therapeutic practices through evidence-based innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M

    2010-04-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of clinical decision-making that is increasingly being advocated for use in the field of speech-language pathology. With the increased emphasis on scientific evidence as a form of knowledge important to EBP, clinicians may wonder whether their craft-based knowledge (i.e., knowledge derived from theory and practice), remains a legitimate form of knowledge for use in clinician decisions. This article describes forms of knowledge that may be used to address clinical questions, to include both craft and science. Additionally, the steps used when engaging in EBP are described so that clinicians understand when and how craft comes into play. The major premise addressed within this article is that craft is a legitimate form of knowledge and that engagement in EBP requires one to employ craft-based knowledge.

  16. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Kim C.; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care. PMID:26152770

  17. Evidence-based Practices Addressed in Community-based Children’s Mental Health Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Erin C.; Taylor, Robin M.; Garland, Ann F.

    2013-01-01

    Context Clinical supervision is the principal method of training for psychotherapeutic practice, however there is virtually no research on supervision practice in community settings. Of particular interest is the role supervision might play in facilitating implementation of evidence-based (EB) care in routine care settings. Objective This study examines the format and functions of clinical supervision sessions in routine care, as well as the extent to which supervision addresses psychotherapeutic practice elements common to EB care for children with disruptive behavior problems, who represent the majority of patients served in publicly-funded routine care settings. Methods Supervisors (n=7) and supervisees (n=12) from four publicly-funded community-based child mental health clinics reported on 130 supervision sessions. Results Supervision sessions were primarily individual in-person meetings lasting one hour. The most common functions included case conceptualization and therapy interventions. Coverage of practice elements common to EB treatments was brief. Discussion Despite the fact that most children presenting to public mental health services are referred for disruptive behavior problems, supervision sessions are infrequently focused on practice elements consistent with EB treatments for this population. Supervision is a promising avenue through which training in EB practices could be supported to improve the quality of care for children in community-based “usual care” clinics. PMID:24761163

  18. Nursing unit leaders' influence on the long-term sustainability of evidence-based practice improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleiszer, Andrea R; Semenic, Sonia E; Ritchie, Judith A; Richer, Marie-Claire; Denis, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    To describe how actions of nursing unit leaders influenced the long-term sustainability of a best practice guidelines (BPG) program on inpatient units. Several factors influence the initial implementation of evidence-based practice improvements in nursing, with leadership recognized as essential. However, there is limited knowledge about enduring change, including how frontline nursing leaders influence the sustainability of practice improvements over the long term. A qualitative descriptive case study included 39 in-depth interviews, observations, and document reviews. Four embedded nursing unit subcases had differing levels of program sustainability at 7 years (average) following implementation. Higher levels of BPG sustainability occurred on units where formal leadership teams used an integrated set of strategies and activities. Two key strategies were maintaining priorities and reinforcing expectations. The coordinated use of six activities (e.g., discussing, evaluating, integrating) promoted the continuation of BPG practices among staff. These leadership processes, fostering exchange and learning, contributed to sustainability-promoting environments characterized by teamwork and accountability. Unit leaders are required to strategically orchestrate several overlapping and synergistic efforts to achieve long-term sustainability of BPG-based practice improvements. As part of managing overall unit performance, unit leaders may influence practice improvement sustainability by aligning vision, strategies, and activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Tailored implementation of evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wensing

    Full Text Available When designing interventions and policies to implement evidence based healthcare, tailoring strategies to the targeted individuals and organizations has been recommended. We aimed to gather insights into the ideas of a variety of people for implementing evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases, which were generated in five European countries.A qualitative study in five countries (Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom was done, involving overall 115 individuals. A purposeful sample of four categories of stakeholders (healthcare professionals, quality improvement officers, healthcare purchasers and authorities, and health researchers was involved in group interviews in each of the countries to generate items for improving healthcare in different chronic conditions per country: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, depression in elderly people, multi-morbidity, obesity. A disease-specific standardized list of determinants of practice in these conditions provided the starting point for these groups. The content of the suggested items was categorized in a pre-defined framework of 7 domains and specific themes in the items were identified within each domain.The 115 individuals involved in the study generated 812 items, of which 586 addressed determinants of practice. These largely mapped onto three domains: individual health professional factors, patient factors, and professional interactions. Few items addressed guideline factors, incentives and resources, capacity of organizational change, or social, political and legal factors. The relative numbers of items in the different domains were largely similar across stakeholder categories within each of the countries. The analysis identified 29 specific themes in the suggested items across countries.The type of suggestions for improving healthcare practice was largely similar across different stakeholder groups, mainly addressing healthcare

  20. Closing the Research-Practice Gap: Increasing Evidence-Based Practice for Nasogastric Tube Insertion Using Education and an Electronic Order Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Ranee; Jurica, Karen

    2017-03-01

    Patients and practitioners rate the insertion of a nasogastric tube as one of the most painful and distressing procedures performed. Research supports using lidocaine and a nasal vasoconstrictor to significantly decrease patient discomfort. The recommended medications were not being used routinely in a large urban emergency department. We identified departmental barriers using a nurse survey and physician interviews. We educated the nursing and physician staff about the comfort medications for nasogastric tube insertion recommended in the literature. In collaboration with the information technology department, we created an order set for the department's computerized physician order entry system linking the order for a nasogastric tube with the recommended comfort medications. Six months after the educational campaign and availability of the new electronic order set, we compared the data from pre- and post-project chart reviews and found the use of literature-recommended comfort medications had increased from 23% to 93%. Nurses have a professional obligation to use the most current evidence-based practice available and to advocate for adequate pain management before, during, and after painful procedures. The use of evidence-based practice has been associated with an increase in both patient and staff satisfaction, improved clinical outcomes, and greater patient safety. An electronic order set combined with staff education resulted in a dramatic increase in the use of evidence-based practice for nasogastric tube insertion. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice (EBP): how nurse academics facilitate EBP use in theory and practice across Australian undergraduate programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-09-01

    This paper is drawn from a grounded theory study that aimed to investigate processes undertaken by academics when integrating evidence-based practice into undergraduate curricula. This paper focuses on how nurse academics facilitated students to apply evidence-based practice in theory and practice. Facilitating undergraduate nursing students to develop skills within an evidence-based practice framework is vital to achieving evidence-based care. Studies on evidence-based practice conducted globally suggests that there is a need to investigate approaches used by nurse academics in facilitating students' understanding and use of evidence-based practice during their nurse education. Employing constructivist grounded theory approach, 23 nurse academics across Australian universities were interviewed and nine observed during their teaching. Some study participants shared their unit guides to enrich analysis. Data analysis was performed by following Charmaz's approach of coding procedures; as a result, four categories were constructed. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice. Findings revealed that most academics-assisted students to use evidence in academic-related activities. Recognising the importance of evidence-based practice in practice, some also expected students to apply evidence-based practice during clinical experiences. However, the level of students' appreciation for evidence-based practice during clinical experiences was unknown to participants and was influenced by practice-related barriers. Acknowledging these challenges, academics were engaged in dialogue with students and suggested the need for academia-practice collaboration in combating the cited barriers. Ensuring academics are supported to emphasise clinical application of evidence-based practice requires strategies at school and practice levels. Faculty development, engagement of clinical nurses with evidence-based practice, supportive

  2. Is Reading Instruction Evidence-Based? Analyzing Teaching Practices Using T-Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Suárez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to analyze whether primary teachers use evidence-based reading instruction for primary-grade readers. The study sample consisted of six teachers whose teaching was recorded. The observation instrument used was developed ad hoc for this study. The recording instrument used was Match Vision Studio. The data analysis was performed using SAS, GT version 2.0 E, and THEME. The results indicated that the teaching practices used most frequently and for the longest duration were: feedback (i.e., correcting the student when reading; fluency (i.e., individual and group reading, both out loud and silently, with and without intonation; literal or inference comprehension exercises (i.e., summarizing, asking questions; and use of educational resources (i.e., stories, songs, poems. Later, we conducted analyses of T-Patterns that showed the sequence of instruction in detail. We can conclude that <50% of the teaching practices used by the majority of teachers were based on the recommendations of the National Reading Panel (NRP. Only one teacher followed best practices. The same was the case for instructional time spent on the five essential components of reading, with the exception of teacher E., who dedicated 70.31% of class time implementing best practices. Teaching practices (i.e., learners' activities designed and implemented to exercise and master alphabetic knowledge and phonological awareness skills were used less frequently in the classroom.

  3. Is Reading Instruction Evidence-Based? Analyzing Teaching Practices Using T-Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Natalia; Sánchez, Carmen R; Jiménez, Juan E; Anguera, M Teresa

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to analyze whether primary teachers use evidence-based reading instruction for primary-grade readers. The study sample consisted of six teachers whose teaching was recorded. The observation instrument used was developed ad hoc for this study. The recording instrument used was Match Vision Studio. The data analysis was performed using SAS, GT version 2.0 E, and THEME. The results indicated that the teaching practices used most frequently and for the longest duration were: feedback (i.e., correcting the student when reading); fluency (i.e., individual and group reading, both out loud and silently, with and without intonation); literal or inference comprehension exercises (i.e., summarizing, asking questions); and use of educational resources (i.e., stories, songs, poems). Later, we conducted analyses of T-Patterns that showed the sequence of instruction in detail. We can conclude that teaching practices used by the majority of teachers were based on the recommendations of the National Reading Panel (NRP). Only one teacher followed best practices. The same was the case for instructional time spent on the five essential components of reading, with the exception of teacher E., who dedicated 70.31% of class time implementing best practices. Teaching practices (i.e., learners' activities) designed and implemented to exercise and master alphabetic knowledge and phonological awareness skills were used less frequently in the classroom.

  4. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2012-02-15

    Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011.We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations.  We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. We included one study from the USA (re-analysed as

  5. Evidence-based practice beliefs and behaviors of nurses providing cancer pain management: a mixed-methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Linda H; Meins, Alexa R; Mitchell, Pamela H; Voss, Joachim; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-03-01

    To describe evidence-based practice (EBP) beliefs and behaviors of nurses who provide cancer pain management. Descriptive, cross-sectional with a mixed-methods approach. Two inpatient oncology units in the Pacific Northwest. 40 RNs.
 Data collected by interviews and web-based surveys. EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, evidence-based pain management. Nurses agreed with the positive aspects of EBP and their implementation ability, although implementation level was low. They were satisfied with their pain management practices. Oncology nursing certification was associated with innovativeness, and innovativeness was associated with EBP beliefs. Themes identified were (a) limited definition of EBP, (b) varied evidence-based pain management decision making, (c) limited identification of evidence-based pain management practices, and (d) integration of nonpharmacologic interventions into patient care. Nurses' low level of EBP implementation in the context of pain management was explained by their trust that standards of care and medical orders were evidence-based. Nurses' EBP beliefs and behaviors should be considered when developing strategies for sustaining evidence-based pain management practices. Implementation of the EBP process by nurses may not be realistic in the inpatient setting; therefore, hospital pain management policies need to be evidence-based and reinforced with nurses.

  6. Nursing-led management of side effects of radiation: evidence-based recommendations for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poirier P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia PoirierUniversity of Maine School of Nursing, Orono, ME, USAAbstract: It has been estimated that 50%–60% of patients diagnosed with cancer will receive radiation therapy at some point in their treatment. Although radiation therapy can play a significant role in the cure or control of cancer, and the palliation of symptoms, it also has side effects. Side effects of radiation therapy can interfere with patient quality of life and daily functioning. Severe side effects can lead to delays in treatment, potentially affecting the outcome of treatment. All patients receiving radiation therapy are at risk of fatigue and skin reactions in the area of the body being treated. Other side effects of radiation therapy are specific to the part of the body being treated. Radiation therapy to the head and neck area may cause oral mucositis, dryness, and nutritional deficiencies. Radiation therapy to the chest or lung area may lead to difficulty in swallowing and eating. Radiation therapy to the pelvis frequently causes diarrhea. There are many nursing interventions available to manage the side effects of treatment based on best available evidence and expert opinion. Nurses in all settings are essential in helping patients manage the side effects of treatment and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this review is to provide nurses with evidence-based recommendations and suggestions for managing common acute side effects of radiation therapy.Keywords: evidence-based practice, radiation therapy, side effects, nursing management

  7. Differential research impact in cancer practice guidelines' evidence base: lessons from ESMO, NICE and SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallari, Elena; Fox, Anthony W; Lewison, Grant

    2018-01-01

    This is an appraisal of the impact of cited research evidence underpinning the development of cancer clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) by the professional bodies of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). A total of 101 CPGs were identified from ESMO, NICE and SIGN websites across 13 cancer sites. Their 9486 cited references were downloaded from the Web of Science Clarivate Group database, analysed on Excel (2016) using Visual Basic Application macros and imported onto SPSS (V.24.0) for statistical tests. ESMO CPGs mostly cited research from Western Europe, while the NICE and SIGN ones from the UK, Canada, Australia and Scandinavian countries. The ESMO CPGs cited more recent and basic research (eg, drugs treatment), in comparison with NICE and SIGN CPGs where older and more clinical research (eg, surgery) papers were referenced. This chronological difference in the evidence base is also in line with that ESMO has a shorter gap between the publication of the research and its citation on the CPGs. It was demonstrated that ESMO CPGs report more chemotherapy research, while the NICE and SIGN CPGs report more surgery, with the results being statistically significant. We showed that ESMO, NICE and SIGN differ in their evidence base of CPGs. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this heterogeneity in effective decision-making of tailored treatments to patients, irrespective of geographic location across Europe.

  8. Differential research impact in cancer practice guidelines’ evidence base: lessons from ESMO, NICE and SIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Anthony W; Lewison, Grant

    2018-01-01

    Background This is an appraisal of the impact of cited research evidence underpinning the development of cancer clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) by the professional bodies of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). Methods A total of 101 CPGs were identified from ESMO, NICE and SIGN websites across 13 cancer sites. Their 9486 cited references were downloaded from the Web of Science Clarivate Group database, analysed on Excel (2016) using Visual Basic Application macros and imported onto SPSS (V.24.0) for statistical tests. Results ESMO CPGs mostly cited research from Western Europe, while the NICE and SIGN ones from the UK, Canada, Australia and Scandinavian countries. The ESMO CPGs cited more recent and basic research (eg, drugs treatment), in comparison with NICE and SIGN CPGs where older and more clinical research (eg, surgery) papers were referenced. This chronological difference in the evidence base is also in line with that ESMO has a shorter gap between the publication of the research and its citation on the CPGs. It was demonstrated that ESMO CPGs report more chemotherapy research, while the NICE and SIGN CPGs report more surgery, with the results being statistically significant. Conclusions We showed that ESMO, NICE and SIGN differ in their evidence base of CPGs. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this heterogeneity in effective decision-making of tailored treatments to patients, irrespective of geographic location across Europe. PMID:29344408

  9. Validation of the portuguese version of the attitudes to evidence-based practice questionnaire : an exploratory approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rui Pedro Gomes; Peixoto, Maria; Martins, Maria Alice Correia dos Santos Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lack of cultural and linguistically sensitive instruments prevents the opportunity of assessing attitudes and barriers of health care staff towards evidence-based practice. The aim of this communication is to report the validation process in the Portuguese context of the Attitudes to Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire. Methods: We developed a cross-sectional, descriptive psychometric validation study. For cultural adaptation, a bidirectional translation was carried out, acc...

  10. Using a Guided Journal Club as a Teaching Strategy to Enhance Learning Skills for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Kimberly A; Benson, Jeryl D; Haneman, Brianne

    2017-04-01

    Journal clubs are used in both clinical and academic settings in order for clinicians and students to utilize current best-practices, become competent in evidence based practice and develop critical appraisal skills. Journal clubs encourage students to practice searching for relevant research, critically appraising articles, and contributing to open discussions with peers. Establishing the practice of reading and critiquing literature in the classroom can enable the creation of a habit of using current evidence when students enter practice. This article describes a strategy for delivering a structured academic journal club to support the learning of evidence based practice skills and students' perception of the journal club, including their overall satisfaction, knowledge base skills, and presentation skills. Students had an overall positive experience and perception of the guided journal club activity. From the instructor's perspective, this assignment was an excellent opportunity to engage students in learning the process of evidence based practice.

  11. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda – implications for programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiguli Juliet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. Methods We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children. We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Results Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. Conclusion The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation

  12. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda - implications for programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiswa, Peter; Kemigisa, Margaret; Kiguli, Juliet; Naikoba, Sarah; Pariyo, George W; Peterson, Stefan

    2008-06-21

    Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children). We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation and health systems barriers including the financial burden. Male

  13. Evidence-based practice for the busy nurse practitioner: part four: putting it all together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchiano, Lynda; Snyder, Charlene Hoffman

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the critical appraisal process allows nurse practitioners (NPs) to determine a study's reliability, validity, and applicability to their client(s)/families, and to their clinical practice setting. The purpose of this final part of this four-part evidence-based practice (EBP) series is designed to utilize a clinical scenario that will walk the NP through EBP steps 1 through 3 while providing an example of how to critically appraise a randomized control trial. Scientific literature review, gray literature, PubMed and other online literature databases and resources, and online EBP websites. As healthcare providers, our role is to provide the best possible care we can to our client(s) and their families. One way to do this is through the utilization of the EBP process. When EBP processes are integrated into our clinical practice settings it augments the existing provider-client relationship and shared decision-making process. It is hoped that this four-part series enhanced NPs' understanding of the EBP processes of developing a clinical inquiry, searching for the best evidence, critically appraising the evidence, and integrating EBP into clinical practice. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Impact of organizational change on organizational culture: implications for introducing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael J; Claassen, Jennette

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) seeks to integrate the expertise of individual practitioners with the best available evidence within the context of the values and expectations of clients. Prior to implementing EBP, it is important to understand the significance that organizational change and organizational culture play. This article seeks to explore the literature associated with both organizational change and organizational culture. The analysis of organizational culture and change draw upon findings from both the private, for-profit sector, and the public, non-profit field. It is divided into four sections: organizational change and innovation, organizational culture, managing organizational culture and change, and finally, applying the findings to the implementation of EBP. While the audience for this analysis is managers in public and nonprofit human service organizations who are considering implementing EBP into their work environment, it is not intended to provide a "how to" guide, but rather a framework for critical thinking.

  15. The good, the bad, and the ugly of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Marcel; Reid, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently straightforward idea is beginning to affect adapted physical activity; however, researchers and practitioners in our field often appear to be unaware of fundamental questions related to them. The major purpose of this paper is to outline and discuss 10 of these fundamental questions. This analysis leads us to conclude that EBP is a good direction to pursue in adapted physical activity if we develop a type of EBP congruent with the main tenets of our field.

  16. The Sustainability of Evidence-Based Interventions and Practices in Public Health and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Cooper, Brittany Rhoades; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey

    2018-04-01

    There is strong interest in implementation science to address the gap between research and practice in public health. Research on the sustainability of evidence-based interventions has been growing rapidly. Sustainability has been defined as the continued use of program components at sufficient intensity for the sustained achievement of desirable program goals and population outcomes. This understudied area has been identified as one of the most significant translational research problems. Adding to this challenge is uncertainty regarding the extent to which intervention adaptation and evolution are necessary to address the needs of populations that differ from those in which interventions were originally tested or implemented. This review critically examines and discusses conceptual and methodological issues in studying sustainability, summarizes the multilevel factors that have been found to influence the sustainability of interventions in a range of public health and health care settings, and highlights key areas for future research.

  17. Predicting the adoption of evidence-based practice using "Rogers diffusion of innovation model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaeypoor, Shahzad; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Rassouli, Maryam; Alavi-Majd, Hamid

    2016-02-01

    Predicting the significant determinants of adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) by nursing students has received little attention in the nursing education literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of EBP adoption among Iranian nursing students and to evaluate the fitness of the research model derived from Rogers' model. The study was a cross-sectional survey of 170 nursing students. A path analysis was conducted to predict the determinants of EBP in nursing students. Also, direct and indirect effects of the variables were calculated. The results indicated that knowledge of EBP as well as its perceived complexity, observability and trialability significantly predicted the adoption of EBP. Among the variables, knowledge of EBP had the greatest total impact on the adoption of EBP (P adoption of EBP. The results of this study can be used by health professionals such as nursing managers and educators for teaching any new concept in clinical and educational settings such as EBP.

  18. Exploring Nurse Manager Support of Evidence-Based Practice: Clinical Nurse Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramanica, Laura; Spiva, LeeAnna

    2018-05-01

    The study identifies what constitutes nurse manager (NM) support and other resources that enable clinical nurses (CNs) to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Clinical nurses report that NM support enables them to use EBP but what constitutes NM support is still unclear. Nurse managers, CNs, and EBP mentors received specialized education and use a team approach for EBP. Data were collected preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention from observations, interviews, journaling, and surveys. Results demonstrate how NMs can perform their role responsibilities and still engage CNs to develop a spirit of inquiry, seek answers to their clinical questions using EBP, and advance their clinical performance to improve patient outcomes. Four NM supportive behaviors emerged: cultivating a shared EBP vision, ensuring use of EBP, communicating the value of EBP, and providing resources for EBP. Through education and support, NMs describe supportive behaviors necessary for the successful conduction of EBP by CNs.

  19. Evidence-based practice: a quality indicator analysis of peer-tutoring in adapted physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalef, Laura; Reid, Greg; Macdonald, Cathy

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the research was to conduct a quality indicator analysis of studies investigating peer-tutoring for students with a disability in adapted physical education. An electronic search was conducted among English journals published from 1960 to November 2012. Databases included ERIC, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus. Fifteen research studies employing group-experimental (Gersten et al., 2005) or single-subject designs (Horner et al., 2005) met inclusion criteria. Each study was assessed for the presence and clarity of quality indicators. Group designs met an average of 62.5% essential and 69% desirable indicators. An average of 80% of indicators was present for single-subject designs. Results suggest claims of peer-tutoring being an evidence-based practice are premature. Recommendations for clarifying and applying the quality indicators are offered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation Criteria for Nursing Student Application of Evidence-Based Practice: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Lina; Linden, Lois

    2016-06-01

    Core clinical evaluation criteria do not exist for measuring prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students' application of evidence-based practice (EBP) during direct care assignments. The study objective was to achieve consensus among EBP nursing experts to create clinical criteria for faculty to use in evaluating students' application of EBP principles. A three-round Delphi method was used. Experts were invited to participate in Web-based surveys. Data were analyzed using qualitative coding and categorizing. Quantitative analyses were descriptive calculations for rating and ranking. Expert consensus occurred in the Delphi rounds. The study provides a set of 10 core clinical evaluation criteria for faculty evaluating students' progression toward competency in their application of EBP. A baccalaureate program curriculum requiring the use of Bostwick's EBP Core Clinical Evaluation Criteria will provide a clear definition for understanding basic core EBP competence as expected for the assessment of student learning. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):336-341.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Shouldering the Burden of Evidence-Based Practice: The Experiences of Physiotherapists Partaking in a Community of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen McCreesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to elicit the motivators, barriers, and benefits of participation in a Community of Practice (CoP for primary care physiotherapists. We used a qualitative approach using semistructured interviews. The participants were twelve physiotherapists partaking in a newly formed Shoulder CoP. A desire for peer support was the strongest motivator for joining, with improving clinical practice being less apparent. Barriers to participation included time and work pressures and poor research skills. The structure of the CoP, in terms of access to meetings and the provision of preparation work and deadlines for the journal clubs, was reported to be a facilitator. Multiple benefits ensued from participation. The role of teamwork was emphasised in relation to reducing isolation and achieving goals. The majority of participants reported positive clinical practice changes in terms of improved patient education, increased confidence, and availability of new resources. All participants reported some element of personal growth and development, in particular in their evidence-based practice skills. The results provide support for the use of CoPs as a means of continuing professional development for physiotherapists in the workplace, as significant benefits are gained in terms of evidence-based practice (EBP, patient care, and therapist personal development.

  2. Interagency Collaborative Team Model for Capacity Building to Scale-Up Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, Michael; Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle; Willging, Cathleen; Gunderson, Lara; Chaffin, Mark J

    2014-04-01

    System-wide scale up of evidence-based practice (EBP) is a complex process. Yet, few strategic approaches exist to support EBP implementation and sustainment across a service system. Building on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) implementation framework, we developed and are testing the Interagency Collaborative Team (ICT) process model to implement an evidence-based child neglect intervention (i.e., SafeCare®) within a large children's service system. The ICT model emphasizes the role of local agency collaborations in creating structural supports for successful implementation. We describe the ICT model and present preliminary qualitative results from use of the implementation model in one large scale EBP implementation. Qualitative interviews were conducted to assess challenges in building system, organization, and home visitor collaboration and capacity to implement the EBP. Data collection and analysis centered on EBP implementation issues, as well as the experiences of home visitors under the ICT model. Six notable issues relating to implementation process emerged from participant interviews, including: (a) initial commitment and collaboration among stakeholders, (b) leadership, (c) communication, (d) practice fit with local context, (e) ongoing negotiation and problem solving, and (f) early successes. These issues highlight strengths and areas for development in the ICT model. Use of the ICT model led to sustained and widespread use of SafeCare in one large county. Although some aspects of the implementation model may benefit from enhancement, qualitative findings suggest that the ICT process generates strong structural supports for implementation and creates conditions in which tensions between EBP structure and local contextual variations can be resolved in ways that support the expansion and maintenance of an EBP while preserving potential for public health benefit.

  3. Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and use of research and evidence-based practice - an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Elizabeth Jo

    2016-06-01

    This integrative review of the literature addresses undergraduate nursing students' attitudes towards and use of research and evidence-based practice, and factors influencing this. Current use of research and evidence within practice, and the influences and perceptions of students in using these tools in the clinical setting are explored. Evidence-based practice is an increasingly critical aspect of quality health care delivery, with nurses requiring skills in sourcing relevant information to guide the care they provide. Yet, barriers to engaging in evidence-based practice remain. To increase nurses' use of evidence-based practice within healthcare settings, the concepts and skills required must be introduced early in their career. To date, however, there is little evidence to show if and how this inclusion makes a difference. Integrative literature review. ProQuest, Summon, Science Direct, Ovid, CIAP, Google scholar and SAGE databases were searched, and Snowball search strategies used. One hundred and eighty-one articles were reviewed. Articles were then discarded for irrelevance. Nine articles discussed student attitudes and utilisation of research and evidence-based practice. Factors surrounding the attitudes and use of research and evidence-based practice were identified, and included the students' capability beliefs, the students' attitudes, and the attitudes and support capabilities of wards/preceptors. Undergraduate nursing students are generally positive toward using research for evidence-based practice, but experience a lack of support and opportunity. These students face cultural and attitudinal disadvantage, and lack confidence to practice independently. Further research and collaboration between educational facilities and clinical settings may improve utilisation. This paper adds further discussion to the topic from the perspective of and including influences surrounding undergraduate students and new graduate nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. EFFECTIVE BLENDED LEARNING PRACTICES: Evidence-based Perspectives in ICT-facilitated Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Yasin OZARSLAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available EFFECTIVE BLENDED LEARNING PRACTICES:Evidence-based Perspectives in ICT-facilitated EducationEdited by Elizabeth Stacey and Philippa Gerbic, Information ScienceReference; 1 edition (March 30, 2009, ISBN-10: 1605662968, 358 pp.Reviewed by Yasin OZARSLANFaculty of Education,Eskisehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYBlended learning refers to the integration of faceto-face and online learning activities with the goal of maximizing the value of students' experiences in both settings. This book collects new international research into many aspects of blended learningfrom the perspectives of learners, teachers, designers, and professional and academic developers in various disciplines, learningcommunities and universities from around the world. This book addresses the relative newness of online learning within blended environments. The book's broader audience is anyone who isinterested in areas such as blended learning, communities of learning, virtual education, professional learning and community development, instructional technology, flexible learning, distance education and collaborative learning.Blended approaches in teacher education, blending collaborative online learning,blended learning and teaching philosophies, campus-based student learning environments, ICT-enhanced blended learning, learning communities for K-12 teachers, professional development for blended learning, reciprocal mentoring,redesigning initial teacher education, responses to blended environments, strategiesfor blended teaching and learning, virtual learning and real communities are the topics covered in this book.It reviews literature about blended learning in relation to the three sections of the book and discusses strategies for teaching and learning and establishing communities in its different contexts. The chapters of this book provide research perspectives on a range of blended learning issues and contexts and discuss implications for teaching and learning. The

  5. Evidence-based practice profiles of physiotherapists transitioning into the workforce: a study of two cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEvoy Maureen P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training in the five steps of evidence-based practice (EBP has been recommended for inclusion in entry-level health professional training. The effectiveness of EBP education has been explored predominantly in the medical and nursing professions and more commonly in post-graduate than entry-level students. Few studies have investigated longitudinal changes in EBP attitudes and behaviours. This study aimed to assess the changes in EBP knowledge, attitudes and behaviours in entry-level physiotherapy students transitioning into the workforce. Methods A prospective, observational, longitudinal design was used, with two cohorts. From 2008, 29 participants were tested in their final year in a physiotherapy program, and after the first and second workforce years. From 2009, 76 participants were tested in their final entry-level and first workforce years. Participants completed an Evidence-Based Practice Profile questionnaire (EBP2, which includes self-report EBP domains [Relevance, Terminology (knowledge of EBP concepts, Confidence, Practice (EBP implementation, Sympathy (disposition towards EBP]. Mixed model analysis with sequential Bonferroni adjustment was used to analyse the matched data. Effect sizes (ES (95% CI were calculated for all changes. Results Effect sizes of the changes in EBP domains were small (ES range 0.02 to 0.42. While most changes were not significant there was a consistent pattern of decline in scores for Relevance in the first workforce year (ES -0.42 to -0.29 followed by an improvement in the second year (ES +0.27. Scores in Terminology improved (ES +0.19 to +0.26 in each of the first two workforce years, while Practice scores declined (ES -0.23 to -0.19 in the first year and improved minimally in the second year (ES +0.04. Confidence scores improved during the second workforce year (ES +0.27. Scores for Sympathy showed little change. Conclusions During the first two years in the workforce, there was a

  6. Evidence-based practice: beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, and skills among Colombian physical therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Diana Isabel; Ramírez, Lorena; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Domínguez-Sánchez, María Andrea; Durán-Palomino, Diana; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Flórez-López, María Eugenia; Bagur-Calafat, M Caridad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main purpose of this study was to describe a group of Colombian physical therapists' beliefs and attitudes towards Evidence-Based Practice (EBP), their education, knowledge and skills for implementing EBP, the use of relevant literature in clinical practice, access to and availability of scientific information and perceived barriers to including EBP in practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which involved 1,064 Colombian physical therapists. The study used a 50-item screening questionnaire EBP developed to estimate attitudes, beliefs, knowledge and skills regarding. This instrument has been adapted and was validated previously in Colombia by Flórez-López et al. Results: The population mostly consisted of young females (77.2%) aged 22 to 29 years old (79.4%). Most respondents had an undergraduate degree (87.7%). The physical therapists stated that they had positive attitudes and beliefs regarding EBP, most of them answering that they agreed or strongly agreed that EBP is necessary (71.6%), the relevant literature is useful for practice (61.3%), EBP improves the quality of patient care (64.1%) and evidence helps in decision-making (44.5%). Forty-one percent of the respondents indicated that a lack of research skills was the most important barrier to the use of evidence in practice. Conclusion: The physical therapists reported that they had a positive attitude to EBP and were interested in learning about or improving the skills necessary to adopt EBP in their clinical practice. PMID:26019383

  7. Urban and rural utilization of evidence-based practices for substance use and mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jo Ann Walsh; Roll, John M; Packer, Robert R; Lewis, Jennifer M; McPherson, Sterling; Howell, Donelle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to examine variations in evidence-based practice (EBP) utilization between rural and urban mental health and substance abuse prevention provider agencies in Washington State. We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2007 EBP Survey, which was administered to 250 of Washington State Department of Social and Health Services' contracted mental health and substance abuse treatment agencies. The survey solicited input from solo and group practices across the state on EBP implementation, successes, and challenges. Most mental health and substance abuse treatment agencies used more than 1 EBP, although rural substance abuse agencies were less likely to do so than urban agencies. Rural substance abuse agencies were more likely to be solo than group practices. Urban agencies reporting significantly more collaboration with universities for EBP training, although training by internal staff was the most commonly reported training mechanism regardless of agency focus or location. Over half of agencies reported conducting no systematic assessment of EBPs, and of those who did report systematic assessment, most used outcome monitoring more than program evaluation or benchmarking. Urban and rural mental health and substance abuse prevention providers reported shortages of appropriately trained workforce and financing issues available to pay for EBPs as the greatest barriers to utilization. Challenges to EBP utilization and fidelity should be monitored as EBPs contribute to the delivery of high-quality care. Collaborations between universities and rural agencies may support an agency's abilities to adopt EBPs, train staff, and systematically assess impact. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  8. Family Interview to Enable Donation of Organs for Transplantation: Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, E L; Dos Santos, M J; de Barros E Silva, L B; de Lima Pilan, L A S; de Lima, E A A; de Santana, A C; Martins, M S

    2018-03-21

    In this study we propose a theoretical and practical basis for the best practices for interviewing relatives of brain-dead eligible organ donors. This investigation was a reflective study of the methodologic factors of the family interview that affect their decision regarding the donation of a deceased patient's organs for transplantation. The articles that formed the empirical basis of the trial were obtained from PubMed, which is a free-access tool of the MEDLINE database of the United States National Library of Medicine. Published articles that allowed us to reflect on evidence-based family interview practice were selected. Thirty-six scientific articles were used to guide our assessment the family interview, providing evidence for its adequate execution in view of the following prerequisites: When should the family interview be performed? Where should it be done? How many and which people should participate in the interview? Who should perform it? How should it be done? Scientific studies offer evidence to donation and transplantation specialists that can help them in their daily work regarding their interactions with relatives in the process of decisionmaking and family consent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The barriers perceived to prevent the successful implementation of evidence-based practice by speech and language therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Pettigrew, Catharine M

    2009-01-01

    There is currently a paucity of research investigating what speech and language therapists, in particular, perceive are the greatest barriers to implementing evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived barriers that are faced by speech and language therapists in southern Ireland when attempting to implement evidence-based practice. A 34-item questionnaire was sent to 39 therapists working in several counties in southern Ireland. The survey received an 82.1% (n = 32) response rate. The results of the study indicated that certain barriers are perceived to prevent evidence-based practice being implemented successfully. The most significant barrier affecting evidence-based practice implementation was reported to be a lack of time to read research (71.9%). Additional barriers that were found to be the most significant were the research having methodological inadequacies (62.5%) and insufficient time to implement new ideas (59.4%). Other important factors identified as being significant barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice were those associated with the quality and presentation of the research, workplace setting, and lack of skills of the therapist. Associations between specific barriers and workplace setting or grade were also investigated. Some possible reasons for these barriers and the implications for clinical practice are also discussed. This small study suggests that therapists agreed that evidence-based practice is essential to the practice of speech and language therapy. There are, however, barriers in place that are perceived to prevent its successful implementation. It is hoped that because these barriers have been identified, individual clinicians and organizations can be proactive in aiming to provide an evidence-based service to their clients.

  10. International Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Evidence-Based Practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. Methods and Materials: The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. Results: A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Conclusion: Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of

  11. International patterns of practice in palliative radiotherapy for painful bone metastases: evidence-based practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Alysa; Barnes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Sunita; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William; Holt, Tanya; Wu, Jackson; Janjan, Nora; Chow, Edward

    2009-12-01

    Multiple randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the equivalence of multifraction and single-fraction (SF) radiotherapy for the palliation of painful bone metastases (BM). However, according to previous surveys, SF schedules remain underused. The objectives of this study were to determine the current patterns of practice internationally and to investigate the factors influencing this practice. The members of three global radiation oncology professional organizations (American Society for Radiology Oncology [ASTRO], Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology [CARO], Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists) completed an Internet-based survey. The respondents described what radiotherapy dose fractionation they would recommend for 5 hypothetical cases describing patients with single or multiple painful BMs from breast, lung, or prostate cancer. Radiation oncologists rated the importance of patient, tumor, institution, and treatment factors, and descriptive statistics were compiled. The chi-square test was used for categorical variables and the Student t test for continuous variables. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of the use of SF radiotherapy. A total of 962 respondents, three-quarters ASTRO members, described 101 different dose schedules in common use (range, 3 Gy/1 fraction to 60 Gy/20 fractions). The median dose overall was 30 Gy/10 fractions. SF schedules were used the least often by ASTRO members practicing in the United States and most often by CARO members. Case, membership affiliation, country of training, location of practice, and practice type were independently predictive of the use of SF. The principal factors considered when prescribing were prognosis, risk of spinal cord compression, and performance status. Despite abundant evidence, most radiation oncologists continue to prescribe multifraction schedules for patients who fit the eligibility criteria of previous randomized controlled trials. Our results have

  12. The prevalence of adverse cardiometabolic responses to exercise training with evidence-based practice is low

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalleck LC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lance C Dalleck,1 Gary P Van Guilder,2 Tara B Richardson,1 Chantal A Vella3 1Recreation, Exercise, and Sport Science Department, Western State Colorado University, Gunnison, CO, USA; 2Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA; 3Department of Movement Sciences, WWAMI Medical Education Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of individuals who experienced exercise-induced adverse cardiometabolic response (ACR, following an evidence-based, individualized, community exercise program. Methods: Prevalence of ACR was retrospectively analyzed in 332 adults (190 women, 142 men before and after a 14-week supervised community exercise program. ACR included an exercise training-induced increase in systolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg, increase in plasma triglycerides (TG of >37.0 mg/dL (0.42 mmol/L, or decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C of >4.0 mg/dL (0.12 mmol/L. A second category of ACR was also defined – this was ACR that resulted in a metabolic syndrome component (ACR-risk as a consequence of the adverse response. Results: According to the above criteria, prevalence of ACR between baseline and post-program was systolic blood pressure (6.0%, TG (3.6%, and HDL-C (5.1%. The prevalence of ACR-risk was elevated TG (3.2%, impaired fasting blood glucose (2.7%, low HDL-C (2.2%, elevated waist circumference (1.3%, and elevated blood pressure (0.6%. Conclusion: Evidence-based practice exercise programming may attenuate the prevalence of exercise training-induced ACR. Our findings provide important preliminary evidence needed for the vision of exercise prescription as a personalized form of preventative medicine to become a reality. Keywords: evidence-based research, cardiovascular health, community-based research, metabolic health

  13. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices for Anxiety Disorders in Wyoming: A Survey of Practicing Psychotherapists

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    Hipol, Leilani J.; Deacon, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established effectiveness of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders, therapists have been slow to adopt CBT into their clinical practice. The present study was conducted to examine the utilization of psychotherapy techniques for anxiety disorders among community practitioners in a…

  14. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kyriakoulis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. Methods The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016. Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM. Results Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13 and only few conducted among nursing (n=2, pharmacy (n=2, physiotherapy/therapy (n=1, dentistry (n=1, or mixed disciplines (n=1 students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions, or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Conclusion Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions

  15. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos; Patelarou, Athina; Laliotis, Aggelos; Wan, Andrew C; Matalliotakis, Michail; Tsiou, Chrysoula; Patelarou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying form some hours to even months was

  16. Evidence-based practice and related information literacy skills of nurses in Singapore: an exploratory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Intan Azura; Majid, Shaheen; Foo, Schubert; Zhang, Xue; Theng, Yin-Leng; Chang, Yun-Ke; Luyt, Brendan

    2012-03-01

    Increased demand for medical or healthcare services has meant that nurses are to take on a more proactive and independent role intending to patients, providing basic treatment and deciding relevant clinical practice. This, in turn, translates into the need for nurses to be able to translate research and evidence into their practice more efficiently and effectively. Hence, competencies in looking for, evaluating, synthesizing and applying documented information or evidence-based practice becomes crucial. This article presents a quantitative study that involved more than 300 nurses from a large government hospital in Singapore. A self-reporting questionnaire was developed to collect data pertaining to evidence-based practice and activities, including those that demonstrate information literacy competencies. Results seem to suggest that the nurses preferred to use print and human information sources compared to electronic information sources; were not proactive in looking up research or evidence-based information and, instead, preferred such information to be fed to them; and that they perceived they lacked the ability to evaluate research papers or effectively search electronic information related to nursing or evidence-based practice. It was also found that more than 80% of the nurses have not had any training related to evidence-based practice.

  17. Australian Academic Librarians’ Experience of Evidence Based Practice Involves Empowering, Intuiting, Affirming, Connecting, Noticing, and Impacting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Marie Muellenbach

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Miller, F., Partridge, H., Bruce, C., Yates, C., & Howlett, A. (2017. How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded theory model. Library & Information Science Research, 39(2, 124-130. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003 Abstract Objective – To explore and enhance the understanding of how Australian library and information science (LIS practitioners experience or understand evidence based practice (EBP within the context of their day-to-day professional work. Design – Constructivist grounded theory methodology. Setting – University libraries in Queensland, Australia. Subjects – 13 academic librarians. Methods – Researchers contacted academic librarians by email and invited each participant to take part in a 30-60 minute, semi-structured interview. They designed interview questions to allow participants to explain their process and experience of EBP. Main results – This study identified six categories of experience of EBP using a constructivist grounded theory analysis process. The categories are: Empowering; Intuiting; Affirming; Connecting; Noticing; and Impacting. Briefly, empowering includes being empowered, or empowering clients, colleagues, and institutions through improved practice or performance. Intuiting includes being intuitive, or using one’s own intuition, wisdom, and understanding, of colleagues and clients’ behaviours to solve problems and redesign services. Affirming includes being affirmed through sharing feedback and using affirmation to strengthen support for action. Connecting includes being connected, and building connections, with clients, colleagues, and institutions. Noticing includes being actively aware of, observing, and reflecting on clients, colleagues, and literature within and outside of one’s own university, and noticing patterns in data to inform decision-making. Impacting includes being impactful, or having a visible impact, on clients, colleagues

  18. Patient-centred hand hygiene information in orthopaedics units: an evidence-based implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Arielle Yi Jia; Tan, Joanne; Yeo, Hui Ling; Goh, Mien Li

    2017-03-01

    This project aimed to improve patients' knowledge on the importance of hand hygiene. It involved providing patients with a patient and family education on the importance of hand hygiene using a patient information leaflet that introduces the rationale of hand hygiene, possible consequences of poor hand hygiene, and the seven steps of hand hygiene. This projected used a preimplementation and postimplementation audit strategy using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research Into Practice programs. The implementation occurred in three phases over a period of 6 months from January 2014 to June 2014. The audits took place in two orthopaedic wards in a large acute care setting tertiary hospital in Singapore and involved a sample size of 54 patients. It involved going through the medical records of the cases, assessment of patient knowledge based on the audit criteria, and checking if the patients received the patient information leaflet on hand hygiene. The postimplementation audit found significant improvements in all three audit criteria. The percentage of patients who demonstrated knowledge in the importance of hand hygiene saw an improvement of 48.1%. There was an improvement of 44.5% in nurses' compliance to the documentation of patient education being carried out. The percentage of patients who received a patient information leaflet on hand hygiene saw an increase of 36.1%. This project demonstrated that a preimplementation and postimplementation audit is a viable method to implement change and translate evidence into practice. Through this project, patients gained an understanding on the importance of hand hygiene and could take better ownership of their well being. This may potentially improve hospitalization experience and benefit health outcomes. The positive results of this project are contributed by the enthusiastic involvement of all the stakeholders, from patients and their caregivers to the bedside

  19. Adapting evidence-based interventions using a common theory, practices, and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families' well-being; however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families' everyday lives with a prevention framework. At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, Zumba), and motivated parents were trained to be Family Mentors. Trainings focused on a framework that taught synthesized, foundational prevention science theory, practice elements, and principles, applied to specific content areas (parenting, social skills, and obesity). Family Mentors were then allowed to adapt scripts and activities based on their cultural experiences but were closely monitored and supervised over time. The framework was implemented in a range of activities (summer camps, coaching) aimed at improving social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Successes and challenges are discussed for (a) engaging parents and communities; (b) identifying and training Family Mentors to promote children and families' well-being; and (c) gathering data for supervision, outcome evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. To broadly diffuse prevention to families, far more experimentation is needed with alternative and engaging implementation strategies that are enhanced with knowledge harvested from researchers' past 30 years of experience creating EBIP. One strategy is to train local parents and popular activity leaders in applying robust prevention science theory, common practice elements, and principles of EBIP. More systematic evaluation of such innovations is needed.

  20. Load-relief of walking AIDS on osseointegrated fixation: instrument for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Laurent; Hagberg, Kerstin; Haggstrom, Eva; Branemark, Richard

    2009-02-01

    Clinicians are currently in demand of tools enabling individual assessment during their daily practice of load-relief of walking aids. The first aim of this article is to describe a portable kinetic system that could be used to measure directly the true load applied on the residuum during assisted walking. The second aim is to present the information that can be derived from the raw loading data. The third aim is to provide an example for a participant. One active transfemoral amputee fitted with an osseointegrated fixation was asked to walk in straight level line with no aid, one stick, one and two elbow crutches on a 20 m walkway. The load-relief was measured using a six-channel transducer and recorded using a data logger. The overall loading was decreased by 2% using one stick, 5% using one crutch and by 10% using two crutches. This study presents a method that can be used by clinicians facing the challenge of prescribing and assessing walking aids to restore the locomotion of lower limb amputees in the framework of an evidence-based practice.

  1. The STROBE statement and neuropsychology: lighting the way toward evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Bowden, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Reporting appropriate research detail across clinical disciplines is often inconsistent or incomplete. Insufficient report detail reduces confidence in findings, makes study replication more difficult, and decreases the precision of data available for critical review including meta-analysis. In response to these concerns, cooperative attempts across multiple specialties have developed explicit research reporting standards to guide publication detail. These recommendations have been widely adopted by high impact medical journals, but have not yet been widely embraced by neuropsychology. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) is particularly relevant to neuropsychology since clinical research is often based on non-funded studies of patient samples. In this paper we describe the STROBE Statement and demonstrate how STROBE criteria, applied to reporting of neuropsychological findings, will maintain neuropsychology's position as a leader in quantifying brain-behavior relationships. We also provide specific recommendations for data reporting and disclosure of perceived conflicts of interest that will further enhance reporting transparency for possible perceived sources of bias. In an era in which evidence-based practice assumes an increasingly prominent role, improved reporting standards will promote better patient care, assist in developing quality practice guidelines, and ensure that neuropsychology remains a vigorous discipline in the clinical neurosciences that consciously aspires to high methodological rigor.

  2. Integrating evidence-based practice and information literacy skills in teaching physical and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruff, Jill T; Thomas, Aliki

    2011-12-01

    To ensure that physical and occupational therapy graduates develop evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies, their academic training must promote EBP skills, such as posing a clinical question and retrieving relevant literature, and the information literacy skills needed to practice these EBP skills. This article describes the collaborative process and outcome of integrating EBP and information literacy early in a professional physical therapy and occupational therapy programme. The liaison librarian and a faculty member designed an instructional activity that included a lecture, workshop and assignment that integrated EBP skills and information literacy skills in the first year of the programme. The assignment was designed to assess students' ability to conduct a search independently. The lecture and workshop were successful in their objectives, as 101 of the 104 students received at least 8 out of 10 points on the search assignment. The teaching activities developed for the students in this course appear to have achieved the goal of teaching students the EBP research cycle so that they might begin to emulate it. The collaboration between the faculty member and the librarian was integral to the success of this endeavour. Future work will include the evaluation of students' long-term retention of information literacy objectives. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  3. 61: EVIDENCE BASE NURSING PRACTICE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY IN SOUTH OF IRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammarnia, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Mahsa Haj; Amani, Zahra; Rezaeian, Shahab; Setoodehzadeh, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims This study aimed to determine the barriers to implementation of EBP among nurses. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in Zahedan City, South East of Iran, in 2014. The questionnaire of barriers to implementation of EBP consists of 27 statements which were distributed among 280 nurses. Results More than half of the participants agreed that 56% and 57% of barriers to implementation of evidence based practice are related to organizational and individual aspects, respectively. Participants identified barriers at organizational level included the lack of human resources (78.3%), lack of internet access at work (72.2%), and heavy workload (70.0%). Barrier at individual level included lack of time to read literature (83.7%), lack of ability to work with computer (68.8%), and insufficient proficiency in English language (62.0%). Age, educational level, job experience, and employment status were associated with organizational barriers to implementation of EBP. At the individual level only education was associated with barriers to implementation of EBP. Conclusion Barriers to implementation of EBP occur at both individual and organizational levels. The indicator of quality in nursing practice is EBP. Hence, familiarity with EBP is recommended for Iranian nurses. In addition, knowledge of barriers will help health care system and policy makers to provide a culture of EBP.

  4. Case Reports, Case Series - From Clinical Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Jerry W; Toklu, Hale Z; Ye, Fan; Mazza, Joseph; Yale, Steven

    2017-08-07

    Case reports and case series or case study research are descriptive studies that are prepared for illustrating novel, unusual, or atypical features identified in patients in medical practice, and they potentially generate new research questions. They are empirical inquiries or investigations of a patient or a group of patients in a natural, real-world clinical setting. Case study research is a method that focuses on the contextual analysis of a number of events or conditions and their relationships. There is disagreement among physicians on the value of case studies in the medical literature, particularly for educators focused on teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) for student learners in graduate medical education. Despite their limitations, case study research is a beneficial tool and learning experience in graduate medical education and among novice researchers. The preparation and presentation of case studies can help students and graduate medical education programs evaluate and apply the six American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies in the areas of medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, professionalism, systems-based practice, and communication. A goal in graduate medical education should be to assist residents to expand their critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making skills. These attributes are required in the teaching and practice of EBM. In this aspect, case studies provide a platform for developing clinical skills and problem-based learning methods. Hence, graduate medical education programs should encourage, assist, and support residents in the publication of clinical case studies; and clinical teachers should encourage graduate students to publish case reports during their graduate medical education.

  5. Relationships between duration of practice, educational level, and perception of barriers to implement evidence-based practice among critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carswella

    2015-12-01

    Globally, a greater emphasis has been placed on the delivery of safe, patient-centered, evidence-based nursing care. As point-of-care providers, critical care nurses play a key role in ensuring that patients receive the safest, most effective treatment available. In order to deliver scientific-based care, critical care nurses must stay abreast of the current trends, as well as engage in the evidence-based practice process. This study aimed to describe research activities, to identify barriers to implement evidence-based practice and to explore professional factors related to the use of evidence-based practice among critical care nurses at three teaching hospitals in south-eastern United States. A survey design and convenience sampling method was used. A sample of 30 critical care staff nurses participated in the study. A 61-item online questionnaire composed of a demographic survey - BARRIERS scale - and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire was used. Simple descriptive statistics, Pearson's product moment correlations, and independent-sample t test procedures were used to analyze the data. Critical care nurses' reported positive attitudes, but viewed knowledge and use of evidence-based practice less favorably. These results may indicate that having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice does not necessarily translate to knowledge and use of the evidence-based practice process in clinical practice. An unwillingness to change and time constraints were identified as the top barriers to use evidence-based practice in this study. Perceptions of barriers to use evidence-based practice were higher in those critical care nurses who had less practical experience and educational preparation. The results suggest that critical care nurses possess the foundation to engage in the evidence-based practice process; however, their knowledge, practice, and attitudes just need to be cultivated and strengthened. Understanding the nurses' professional factors, current use

  6. Group Supervision Attitudes: Supervisory Practices Fostering Resistance to Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Charles T.; Patterson, David A.; McKiernan, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to qualitatively evaluate worker’s attitudes about clinical supervision. It is believed that poor attitudes toward clinical supervision can create barriers during supervision sessions. Fifty-one participants within a social services organization completed an open-ended questionnaire regarding their clinical supervision experiences. Results suggest four key areas which appear to be strong factors in workers’ experiences and attitudes regarding group supervision: a. facilitator’s skill level; b. creativity; c. utilization of technology; and d. applicability. For organizations interested in overcoming potential barriers to adopting best practices, effectively addressing workers’ negative attitudes toward group supervision would be a worthy endeavor. PMID:23264955

  7. Decision-to-Implement Worksheet for Evidence-based Interventions: From the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin; Tuzzio, Leah; Renz, Anne; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Parchman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Health-related scientific discoveries are often not applied in clinical settings after publication, even when recommended by a trusted journal or professional association. This article describes an assessment tool we developed for use by primary care clinicians and practice administrators to evaluate whether to implement recommended evidence-based interventions in their practices. We used dissemination and implementation theory to develop a worksheet to guide decision making about whether interventions are suitable for implementation in primary care practice settings. We tested the tool by analyzing how members of a primary care practice-based research network rated 4 evidence-based interventions. The median likelihood of implementation ranged from 2 to 3.5 on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Raters' level of agreement with statements about 3 intervention characteristics was associated (P evidence-based interventions are suitable to adopt or adapt to meet their needs. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. Facilitating the implementation of evidence-based practice through contextual support and nursing leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kueny A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela Kueny,1 Leah L Shever,2 Melissa Lehan Mackin,3 Marita G Titler4 1Luther College, Decorah, IA, 2The University of Michigan Hospital and Health Center, Ann Arbor, MI, 3University of Iowa College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 4University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background/purpose: Nurse managers (NMs play an important role promoting evidence-based practice (EBP on clinical units within hospitals. However, there is a dearth of research focused on NM perspectives about institutional contextual factors to support the goal of EBP on the clinical unit. The purpose of this article is to identify contextual factors described by NMs to drive change and facilitate EBP at the unit level, comparing and contrasting these perspectives across nursing units. Methods: This study employed a qualitative descriptive design using interviews with nine NMs who were participating in a large effectiveness study. To stratify the sample, NMs were selected from nursing units designated as high or low performing based on implementation of EBP interventions, scores on the Meyer and Goes research use scale, and fall rates. Descriptive content analysis was used to identify themes that reflect the complex nature of infrastructure described by NMs and contextual influences that supported or hindered their promotion of EBP on the clinical unit. Results: NMs perceived workplace culture, structure, and resources as facilitators or barriers to empowering nurses under their supervision to use EBP and drive change. A workplace culture that provides clear communication of EBP goals or regulatory changes, direct contact with CEOs, and clear expectations supported NMs in their promotion of EBP on their units. High-performing unit NMs described a structure that included nursing-specific committees, allowing nurses to drive change and EBP from within the unit. NMs from high-performing units were more likely to articulate internal resources, such as quality

  9. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    for which they were eligible. Infants with low gestational age, growth restriction, low Apgar scores, and who were born on the day of maternal admission to hospital were less likely to receive evidence based care. After adjustment, evidence based care was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (risk...

  10. Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Cynthia R; Ackerman, Deborah L; Hammerschlag, Richard; Delagran, Louise; Peterson, David H; Berlin, Michelle; Evans, Roni L

    2014-07-01

    To present the varied approaches of 9 complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions (all grantees of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) used to develop faculty expertise in research literacy and evidence-based practice (EBP) in order to integrate these concepts into CAM curricula. A survey to elicit information on the faculty development initiatives was administered via e-mail to the 9 program directors. All 9 completed the survey, and 8 grantees provided narrative summaries of faculty training outcomes. The grantees found the following strategies for implementing their programs most useful: assess needs, develop and adopt research literacy and EBP competencies, target early adopters and change leaders, employ best practices in teaching and education, provide meaningful incentives, capitalize on resources provided by grant partners, provide external training opportunities, and garner support from institutional leadership. Instructional approaches varied considerably across grantees. The most common were workshops, online resources, in-person short courses, and in-depth seminar series developed by the grantees. Many also sent faculty to intensive multiday extramural training programs. Program evaluation included measuring participation rates and satisfaction and the integration of research literacy and EBP learning objectives throughout the academic curricula. Most grantees measured longitudinal changes in beliefs, attitudes, opinions, and competencies with repeated faculty surveys. A common need across all 9 CAM grantee institutions was foundational training for faculty in research literacy and EBP. Therefore, each grantee institution developed and implemented a faculty development program. In developing the framework for their programs, grantees used strategies that were viewed critical for success, including making them multifaceted and unique to their specific institutional needs. These strategies, in conjunction with the

  11. Implementation of evidence-based practices for children in four countries: a project of the World Psychiatric Association Implementação de práticas baseadas em evidências para o tratamento de crianças em quatro países: um projeto da Associação Mundial de Psiquiatria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly E Hoagwood

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: The present study examined implementation issues in adopting cognitive-behavioral therapies in routine clinical settings in four countries reflecting diverse cultures, languages, settings, and traditions. METHOD: A Director's Systems Survey was administered prior to program implementation and one year later. Therapist ratings on attitudes about evidence-based practices and satisfaction were also gathered. RESULTS: All sites reported successful adoption of the program, although significant variations existed in fiscal support, family involvement, prior experience with cognitive-behavioral therapies, and plans for sustainability. Therapists' ratings indicated overall satisfaction with the implementation of the project. Findings from the Director's Systems Survey pointed to five factors facilitating implementation: 1 early adoption and guidance by innovative leaders (i.e., the Directors; 2 attention to the "fit" between the intervention model and local practices; 3 attention to front-end implementation processes (e.g., cultural adaptation, translation, training, fiscal issues; 4 attention to back-end processes early in the project (e.g., sustainability; and 5 establishing strong relationships with multiple stakeholders within the program setting. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation issues here mirror those identified in other studies of evidence-based practices uptake. Some of the obstacles to implementation of evidence-based practices may be generic, whereas issues such as the impact of political/economic instability, availability of translated materials, constitute unique stressors that differentially affect implementation efforts within specific countries.OBJETIVO: Este estudo visa a examinar problemas na implementação de técnicas psicoterápicas cognitivo-comportamentais em ambientes clínicos de atendimento primário em quatro países que refletem diversas culturas, línguas, ambientes e tradições. MÉTODO: Uma pesquisa foi aplicada

  12. Evidence-based practice in the management of lower limb lymphedema after gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwersen, Lisandra Fossari; Sperandio, Fabiana Flores; Toriy, Ariana Machado; Palú, Marina; Medeiros da Luz, Clarissa

    2017-01-01

    Lower limb lymphedema (LLL) is characterized as a physical-functional chronic complication that impacts the quality of life of women who have gone through treatment for gynecological cancer. The present study aims to check the conservative treatments available for lymphedema after gynecological cancer in the context of evidence-based practice. The selection criteria included papers from May 1993 discussing treatment protocols used in LLL after treatment for gynecological cancer. The search was performed until October 2014 in MEDLINE, SciVerse, and PEDro using "rehabilitation," "treatment outcome," "therapeutics," "clinical protocol," "gynecologic surgery," "lower extremity," "lower limb," and "lymphedema" as keywords, focused on women with a previous diagnosis of gynecological cancer who received radiation and/or chemotherapy and/or surgery and/or lymphadenectomy as part of their treatment. From 110 studies found, 3 articles that used the complex decongestive therapy (CDT) as a treatment protocol were selected. There were no randomized clinical trials associated with the conservative treatment of LLL post-treatment of gynecological cancer. The three selected articles are retrospective, and had the same outcome - decreased volume of the affected limb lymphedema. Although LLL is more or as frequent and detrimental as upper limb lymphedema post-cancer treatment, there are only a few studies about this subject. Publications are even scarcer when considering studies with interventional approach. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to support rehabilitation resources on lymphedema post-gynecological cancer treatment.

  13. Evidence based practice in population health: a regional survey to inform workforce development and organisational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adily, A; Ward, J

    2004-06-01

    To assess current capacity to implement evidence based practice (EBP) in population health. Postal survey of a regional population health workforce in Sydney, Australia. Division of Population Health, South Western Sydney Area Health Service. 104 population health staff (response rate: 73%). In the sample of regional population health practitioners, views about the current promotion of EBP were positive. Non-medical respondents with less that Masters degree were more likely to report "high self assessed need" to increase their capacity in EBP (p = 0.022). Confidence in understanding of EBP terminology was not associated with seniority but with highest level of education reached (pskills" or "need to increase their capacity in EBP" in their current position. The proportion of participants "strongly" supporting implementation of a colorectal cancer screening programme whose benefit was expressed as relative risk reduction was greater than that so supporting a programme whose benefit was expressed as number needed to screen (p = 0.008). Most respondents referred to their immediate managers when seeking support for EBP. The findings provide a quantitative baseline for capacity building through workplace programmes. Managerial commitment has been increased and performance development is now underway.

  14. Implementing evidence-based practice in community mental health agencies: a multiple stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Wells, Rebecca S; Zagursky, Karen; Fettes, Danielle L; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2009-11-01

    We sought to identify factors believed to facilitate or hinder evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in public mental health service systems as a step in developing theory to be tested in future studies. Focusing across levels of an entire large public sector mental health service system for youths, we engaged participants from 6 stakeholder groups: county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. Participants generated 105 unique statements identifying implementation barriers and facilitators. Participants rated each statement on importance and changeability (i.e., the degree to which each barrier or facilitator is considered changeable). Data analyses distilled statements into 14 factors or dimensions. Descriptive analyses suggest that perceptions of importance and changeability varied across stakeholder groups. Implementation of EBP is a complex process. Cross-system-level approaches are needed to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light. Examples include agency and program directors facilitating EBP implementation by supporting staff, actively sharing information with policymakers and administrators about EBP effectiveness and fit with clients' needs and preferences, and helping clinicians to present and deliver EBPs and address consumer concerns.

  15. Organizational factors influencing implementation of evidence-based practices for integrated treatment in behavioral health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Caroline A; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities.

  16. How best can we plan & implement HIV prevention? A review of successful evidence based practices & research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Chattu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Around 2.5 million people become infected with HIV each year and its impact on human life and public health can only be tackled and reversed only by sound prevention strategies. Aim: This paper aims to provide the reader about different types of prevention strategies that are effective and practiced in various countries with special emphasis on evidence for success. It also highlights the importance of to the evidence based medicine& strategies. It describes about the importance of combination prevention, which encompasses complementary behavioral, biomedical and structural prevention strategies. Methods & Materials: Searches for peer reviewed journal articles was conducted using the search engines to gather the information from databases of medicine, health sciences and social sciences. Information for each strategy is organized & presented systematically with detailed discussion. Results: For a successful reduction in HIV transmission, there is a great need for combined effects of radical & sustainable behavioral changes among individuals who are potentially at risk. Second, combination prevention is essential for HIV prevention is neither simple nor simplistic. Reductions in HIV transmission need widespread and sustained efforts. A mix of communication channels are essential to disseminate messages to motivate people to engage in various methods of risk reduction. Conclusions: The effect of behavioral strategies could be increased by aiming for many goals that are achieved by use of multilevel approaches with populations both uninfected and infected with HIV. Combination prevention programs operate on different levels to address the specific, but diverse needs of the populations at risk of HIV infection.

  17. Pediatric anxiety disorders: from neuroscience to evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Desousa, Diogo Araújo; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Pine, Daniel Samuel; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this narrative review of the literature is to describe the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders. We aim to guide clinicians in understanding the biology of anxiety disorders and to provide general guidelines for the proper diagnoses and treatment of these conditions early in life. Anxiety disorders are prevalent, associated with a number of negative life outcomes, and currently under-recognized and under-treated. The etiology involves both genes and environmental influences modifying the neural substrate in a complex interplay. Research on pathophysiology is still in its infancy, but some brain regions, such as the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in fear and anxiety. Current practice is to establish diagnosis based purely on clinical features, derived from clinical interviews with the child, parents, and teachers. Treatment is effective using medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, or a combination of both. An introduction to the neuroscience behind anxiety disorders combined with an evidence-based approach may help clinicians to understand these disorders and treat them properly in childhood.

  18. Use of Research Evidence and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Youth-Serving Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Saldana, Lisa; Chou, Chih-Ping; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Although the effectiveness of interventions for prevention and treatment of mental health and behavioral problems in abused and neglected youth is demonstrated through the accumulation of evidence through rigorous and systematic research, it is uncertain whether use of research evidence (URE) by child-serving systems leaders increases the likelihood of evidence- based practice (EBP) implementation and sustainment. Information on URE was collected from 151 directors and senior administrators of child welfare, mental health and juvenile justice systems in 40 California and 11 Ohio counties participating in an RCT of the use of community development teams (CDTs) to scale up implementation of Treatment Foster Care Oregon over a 3 year period (2010-12). Separate multivariate models were used to assess independent effects of evidence acquisition (input), evaluation (process), application (output), and URE in general (SIEU Total) on two measures of EBP implementation, highest stage reached and proportion of activities completed at pre-implementation, implementation and sustainment phases. Stage of implementation and proportion of activities completed in the implementation and sustainment phases were independently associated with acquisition of evidence and URE in general. Participation in CDTs was significantly associated with URE in general and acquisition of research evidence in particular. Implementation of EBPs for treatment of abused and neglected youth does appear to be associated with use of research evidence, especially during the later phases.

  19. Measuring participation in an evidence-based practice: Illness management and recovery group attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Alan B.; Bonfils, Kelsey A.; Kukla, Marina; Myers, Laura; Salyers, Michelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Given the important role of treatment attendance as an indicator of program implementation and as a potential moderator of program effectiveness, this study sought to develop useful indicators of attendance for evidence-based practices. The current study examined consumer attendance patterns in a randomized controlled trial comparing illness management and recovery (n = 60) to a problem solving control condition (n = 58). Associations were examined between consumer clinical indicators, demographics, and level of recovery and indices of attendance. Attendance was poor, but comparable to rates found in many other studies. Four indicators of attendance (percent sessions attended, time enrolled, periods of attendance, and longest period of attendance) were highly inter-related and were more sensitive to baseline differences than a traditional approach of dichotomizing participants into “attenders” and “non-attenders.” Older age, lower hostility, fewer psychotic symptoms, and more education were associated with higher group attendance in both treatment conditions; the client-reported illness management and recovery scale was associated with attendance in the control group. Indicators of attendance were an advancement over dichotomous classification. Strategies to increase attendance are still needed, particularly for younger consumers with greater positive symptoms. PMID:24011850

  20. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace.

  1. An instrument to characterize the environment for residents' evidence-based medicine learning and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Moseley, James L; Green, Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Many residency programs offer training in evidence-based medicine (EBM). However, these curricula often fail to achieve optimal learning outcomes, perhaps because they neglect various contextual factors in the learning environment. We developed and validated an instrument to characterize the environment for EBM learning and practice in residency programs. An EBM Environment Scale was developed following scale development principles. A survey was administered to residents across six programs in primary care specialties at four medical centers. Internal consistency reliability was analyzed with Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing predetermined subscales with the survey's internal structure as assessed via factor analysis. Scores were also compared for subgroups based on residency program affiliation and residency characteristics. Out of 262 eligible residents, 124 completed the survey (response rate 47%). The overall mean score was 3.89 (standard deviation=0.56). The initial reliability analysis of the 48-item scale had a high reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.94). Factor analysis and further item analysis resulted in a shorter 36-item scale with a satisfactory reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.86). Scores were higher for residents with prior EBM training in medical school (4.14 versus 3.62) and in residency (4.25 versus 3.69). If further testing confirms its properties, the EBM Environment Scale may be used to understand the influence of the learning environment on the effectiveness of EBM training. Additionally, it may detect changes in the EBM learning environment in response to programmatic or institutional interventions.

  2. Mapping allied health evidence-based practice: providing a basis for organisational realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziviani, Jenny; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Hinchliffe, Fiona; Feeney, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Ahead of the convergence of two major paediatric services, we examined evidence-based practice (EBP) self-efficacy, outcome expectance, knowledge and use among allied health (AH) staff in two major Queensland (Qld) paediatric services. This was to determine whether any differences existed based on organisational affiliation, profession and any previous training to inform a strategy to enhance AH EBP within the new organisational setting. All AH staff from the two Brisbane (Qld) tertiary paedritic hospitals were invited to participate in the survey. Using a cross-sectional design EBP self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, knowledge and use, as well as previous EBP training, were assessed with an online survey. Background demographic information obtained included professional discipline and hospital. One hundreD and thirty-eight health practitioners completed the survey (37% respone rate). Most practioners had accessed EBP training. Mean scores for EBP attitudes (self-efficacy and outcome expectancy) and knowledge were higher than for EBP use scores. Greater variation was observed across professional disciplines than organisations. Training impacted positively on EBP measures but explained a small proportion of total variance in regression models. The results underscore the need to provide organisational supports to AH staff ro EBP implementation. Strategies other than training are requred to maximally enhance EBP attitudes. The new organisational structure provides an oppotunity for this cultural shift to occur.

  3. Prompt letters to reduce non-attendance: applying evidence based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Mahesh; Rattehalli, Ranganath D; Kader, Ihsan

    2008-11-16

    Non-attendance rates in psychiatric outpatient clinics have been a topic of considerable interest. It is measured as an indicator of quality of service provision. Failed attendances add to the cost of care as well as having an adverse impact on patients leading to missing medications, delay in identifying relapses and increasing waiting list time. Recent trials have demonstrated that prompting letters sent to patients led to a decrease in non-attendance rates. We applied this evidence based practice in our community mental health setting to evaluate its impact. Using a before and after study design, we sent prompting letters to all patients due to attend outpatient clinic appointments for a period of six months in 2007. Non-attendance rates were compared with the corresponding period in 2006. We also looked at trends of non-attendance prior to this intervention and compared results with other parts of our service where this intervention had not been applied. 1433 prompting letters were sent out to all out-patient appointments made from June to November 2007. This resulted in an average non-attendance rate of 17% which was significantly less compared to 27% between June and November 2006 (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.76, NNT 11). No downward trend in non-attendance rate was identified either prior to the intervention or when compared with similar teams across the city. Prompt letters have been shown to reduce non-attendance rates in previous RCTs and systematic reviews. Our findings demonstrate a reduction in non-attendance rates with prompting letters even under non-trial conditions. Majority of the patients were constant during the two periods compared although there were some changes in medical personnel. This makes it difficult to attribute all the change, solely to the intervention alone. Perhaps our work shows that the results of pragmatic randomised trials are easily applicable and produce similar results in non-randomised settings. We found that prompting

  4. Viral immune evasion in dengue: toward evidence-based revisions of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappelli, Francesco; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; Caldeira Brant, Xenia Maria; Bakhordarian, Andre; Thames, April D; Maida, Carl A; Du, Angela M; Jan, Allison L; Nahcivan, Melissa; Nguyen, Mia T; Sama, Nateli

    2014-01-01

    Dengue, a leading cause of illness and death in the tropics and subtropics since the 1950׳s, is fast spreading in the Western hemisphere. Over 30% of the world׳s population is at risk for the mosquitoes that transmit any one of four related Dengue viruses (DENV). Infection induces lifetime protection to a particular serotype, but successive exposure to a different DENV increases the likelihood of severe form of dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Prompt supportive treatment lowers the risk of developing the severe spectrum of Dengue-associated physiopathology. Vaccines are not available, and the most effective protective measure is to prevent mosquito bites. Here, we discuss selected aspects of the syndemic nature of Dengue, including its potential for pathologies of the central nervous system (CNS). We examine the fundamental mechanisms of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to viral infection in general, and the specific implications of these processes in the regulatory control of DENV infection, including DENV evasion from immune surveillance. In line with the emerging model of translational science in health care, which integrates translational research (viz., going from the patient to the bench and back to the patient) and translational effectiveness (viz., integrating and utilizing the best available evidence in clinical settings), we examine novel and timely evidence-based revisions of clinical practice guidelines critical in optimizing the management of DENV infection and Dengue pathologies. We examine the role of tele-medicine and stakeholder engagement in the contemporary model of patient centered, effectiveness-focused and evidence-based health care. BBB - blood-brain barrier, CNS - central nervous system, DAMP - damage-associated molecular patterns, DENV - dengue virus, DF - dengue fever, DHF - dengue hemorrhagic fever, DSS - dengue shock syndrome, DALYs - isability adjusted life years, IFN-g - interferon

  5. Management Involvement--A Decisive Condition When Implementing Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasekjaer, Katrine; Waehle, Hilde Valen; Ciliska, Donna; Nordtvedt, Monica Wammen; Hjälmhult, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Even though health professionals have a positive attitude toward evidence-based practice (EBP), they have limited skills when it comes to implementation of EBP. A postprofessional program in EPB has been offered at Bergen University College since 2004. To date, there is limited knowledge of how the graduates of the program implement and make use of the EBP principles in their working environment in different healthcare settings. The aim of the study was to explore the facilitators and strategies to successful implementation of the steps of EBP as experienced by health professionals who had completed a postgraduate program in EBP. Grounded theory was used in gathering and analyzing data from single and focus group interviews of 20 health professionals who had attended a postprofessional program in EBP. Inclusion criteria also required current clinical practice. This study identified a specific set of activities used by health professionals when implementing EBP within their service organization. Creating an interest and understanding of EBP amongst their colleagues appeared to be a challenge, which they addressed by using the generated grounded theory of "tailoring principles." The dominant condition of this theory was management involvement. This study highlighted the importance of middle-range managers' coordinating and supporting role as a decisive component in the process of implementing EBP to clinical settings in Norway. Moreover, the dynamic complex process of "tailoring principles" also showed how the production of a clinical protocol became an outcome of implementation effectiveness as well as input for further intervention effectiveness. Tailoring the principle of EBP to the organizational and cultural context facilitated the implementation of EBP. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan; Jacob, K.S.; Shyamkumar, N.K.; Sridhar, Gibikote

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  7. Three-year follow-up of implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice in a tertiary hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, A.; Stensballe, J.; de Lichtenberg, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    of the implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice. Materials and Methods: Red blood cell transfusion quality indicators were compared with the evidence-based guideline at hospital and department level. Based on this evaluation, wards were selected for interventions targeting doctors and nurses......Background and Objectives: Traditionally, Denmark has had a high rate of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion caused by a liberal transfusion practice despite the existence of restrictive guidelines. We established a Patient Blood Management programme in a tertiary hospital and report the results...... procedures and 28% in admissions (P blood cell transfusion for non-bleeding patients, and led to significantly fewer patients being exposed to transfusion....

  8. 'That doesn't translate': the role of evidence-based practice in disempowering speech pathologists in acute aphasia management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Abby; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Miranda; O'Halloran, Robyn

    2015-07-01

    An evidence-practice gap has been identified in current acute aphasia management practice, with the provision of services to people with aphasia in the acute hospital widely considered in the literature to be inconsistent with best-practice recommendations. The reasons for this evidence-practice gap are unclear; however, speech pathologists practising in this setting have articulated a sense of dissonance regarding their limited service provision to this population. A clearer understanding of why this evidence-practice gap exists is essential in order to support and promote evidence-based approaches to the care of people with aphasia in acute care settings. To provide an understanding of speech pathologists' conceptualization of evidence-based practice for acute post-stroke aphasia, and its implementation. This study adopted a phenomenological approach, underpinned by a social constructivist paradigm. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 Australian speech pathologists, recruited using a purposive sampling technique. An inductive thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. A single, overarching theme emerged from the data. Speech pathologists demonstrated a sense of disempowerment as a result of their relationship with evidence-based practice for acute aphasia management. Three subthemes contributed to this theme. The first described a restricted conceptualization of evidence-based practice. The second revealed speech pathologists' strained relationships with the research literature. The third elucidated a sense of professional unease over their perceived inability to enact evidence-based clinical recommendations, despite their desire to do so. Speech pathologists identified a current knowledge-practice gap in their management of aphasia in acute hospital settings. Speech pathologists place significant emphasis on the research evidence; however, their engagement with the research is limited, in part because it is perceived to lack clinical utility. A sense

  9. Evidence-based practice, research utilization, and knowledge translation in chiropractic: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, André E; Al Zoubi, Fadi; Stuber, Kent; French, Simon D; Boruff, Jill; Corrigan, John; Thomas, Aliki

    2016-07-13

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) gaps are widespread across health disciplines. Understanding factors supporting the uptake of evidence can inform the design of strategies to narrow these EBP gaps. Although research utilization (RU) and the factors associated with EBP have been reported in several health disciplines, to date this area has not been reviewed comprehensively in the chiropractic profession. The purpose of this review was to report on the current state of knowledge on EBP, RU, and knowledge translation (KT) in chiropractic. A scoping review using the Arksey and O'Malley framework was used to systematically select and summarize existing literature. Searches were conducted using a combination of keywords and MeSH terms from the earliest date available in each database to May 2015. Quantitative and thematic analyses of the selected literature were conducted. Nearly 85 % (56/67) of the included studies were conducted in Canada, USA, UK or Australia. Thematic analysis for the three categories (EBP, RU, KT) revealed two themes related to EBP (attitudes and beliefs of chiropractors; implementation of EBP), three related to RU (guideline adherence; frequency and sources of information accessed; and perceived value of websites and search engines), and three related to KT (knowledge practice gaps; barriers and facilitators to knowledge use; and selection, tailoring, and implementation of interventions). EBP gaps were noted in the areas of assessment of activity limitation, determination of psychosocial factors influencing pain, general health indicators, establishing a prognosis, and exercise prescription. While most practitioners believed EBP and research to be important and a few studies suggested that traditional and online educational strategies could improve patient care, use of EBP and guideline adherence varied widely. Findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors hold favourable attitudes and beliefs toward EBP. However, much remains to be done for

  10. Negotiating concepts of evidence-based practice in the provision of good service for nursing and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, Jill

    2017-03-01

    The principles of evidence-based medicine have been critiqued by the 'caring' professions, such as nursing and social work, and evidence-informed medicine has been proposed as a more client-centred, integrative approach to practice. The purpose of this study was to explore how Canadian health science librarians who serve nurses and allied health professionals define good service and how they negotiate evidence-based principles in their searching strategies. Twenty-two librarians completed a 30 minute, semi-structured phone interview about strategies for providing good service and supporting evidence-based services. Participants were also asked to respond to three challenging search scenarios. Analysis of results used grounded theory methods. Participants' definitions of good service and strategies for supporting evidence-based practice involved discussions about types of services provided, aspects of the librarian providing the service and aspects of the information provided during the service. Analysis of search scenarios revealed four justifications librarians rely upon when providing evidence that is in opposition to what their patron hopes to receive (evidentiary, ethical, practice-based and boundaries of the profession). The findings of this study suggest that health science librarians are both constrained and enabled by the principles of evidence-based medicine and especially by understandings of 'best evidence'. © 2017 Health Libraries Group.

  11. An Evidence-Based Practice Educational Intervention for Athletic Trainers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: As evidence-based practice (EBP) becomes a necessity in athletic training, Web-based modules have been developed and made available to the National Athletic Trainers' Association membership as a mechanism to educate athletic trainers (ATs) on concepts of EBP. Objective: To assess the effect of an educational intervention on enhancing knowledge of EBP among ATs. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Web-based modules and knowledge assessment. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 164 of 473 ATs (34.7% response rate), including professional athletic training students, graduate students, clinical preceptors, educators, and clinicians, were randomized into a control group (40 men, 42 women) or experimental group (33 men, 49 women). Intervention(s): Ten Web-based modules were developed that covered concepts involved in the EBP process. Both groups completed the Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge Assessment before and after the intervention phase. During the intervention phase, the experimental group had access to the Web-based modules for 4 weeks, whereas the control group had no direct responsibilities for the investigation. The knowledge assessment consisted of 60 multiple choice questions pertaining to concepts presented in the 10 modules. Test-retest reliability was determined to be good (intraclass correlation coefficient [2,1] = 0.726, 95% confidence interval = 0.605, 0.814). Main Outcome Measure(s): Independent variables consisted of group (control, experimental) and time (preassessment, postassessment). Knowledge scores were tabulated by awarding 1 point for each correct answer (maximum = 60). Between-group and within-group differences were calculated using a 2 × 2 repeated-measures analysis of variance (P ≤ .05), post hoc t tests, and Hedges g effect size with 95% confidence intervals. Results: We found a group × time interaction (F1,162 = 26.29, P < .001). No differences were identified between the control (30.12 ± 5.73) and

  12. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nullius in Verba: A Call for the Incorporation of Evidence-based Practice Into the Discipline of Exercise Science

    OpenAIRE

    Amonette, William E.; English, Kirk L.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a concept that was popularized in the early 1990’s by several physicians who recognized that medical practice should be based on the best and most current available evidence. Although this concept seems self-evident, much of medical practice was based on outdated textbooks and oral tradition passed down in medical school. Currently, exercise science is in a similar situation. Due to a lack of regulation within the exercise community, the discipline of exercise...

  14. Changes in nursing students' perceptions of research and evidence-based practice after completing a research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keib, Carrie N; Cailor, Stephanie M; Kiersma, Mary E; Chen, Aleda M H

    2017-07-01

    Nurses need a sound education in research and evidence-based practice (EBP) to provide patients with optimal care, but current teaching methods could be more effective. To evaluate the changes in nursing students 1) perceptions of research and EBP, 2) confidence in research and EBP, and 3) interest in research participation after completing a course in research and EBP. A pre-post assessment design was utilized to compare changes in students. This project was conducted at a small, private liberal arts institution with Bachelor of Science (BSN) students. Two cohorts of third-year BSN students (Year 1 N=55, Year 2 N=54) who were taking a required, semester-long Nursing Research and EBP course. Students' perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP were assessed pre- and post-semester using the Confidence in Research and EBP survey, which contained 7 demographic items, 9 Research Perceptions items, and 19 Confidence in Research items (5-point Likert scale; 1=Not at all confident, 5=Extremely confident). Two years of data were collected and analyzed in SPSS v.24.0. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests and Mann-Whitney-U tests were utilized to examine the data. Students had significant improvements in perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP (pnursing practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Predictors of Evidence-Based Practice Implementation, Job Satisfaction, and Group Cohesion Among Regional Fellowship Program Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Son Chae; Stichler, Jaynelle F; Ecoff, Laurie; Brown, Caroline E; Gallo, Ana-Maria; Davidson, Judy E

    2016-10-01

    A regional, collaborative evidence-based practice (EBP) fellowship program utilizing institution-matched mentors was offered to a targeted group of nurses from multiple local hospitals to implement unit-based EBP projects. The Advancing Research and Clinical Practice through Close Collaboration (ARCC) model postulates that strong EBP beliefs result in high EBP implementation, which in turn causes high job satisfaction and group cohesion among nurses. This study examined the relationships among EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, job satisfaction, group cohesion, and group attractiveness among the fellowship program participants. A total of 175 participants from three annual cohorts between 2012 and 2014 completed the questionnaires at the beginning of each annual session. The questionnaires included the EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, job satisfaction, group cohesion, and group attractiveness scales. There were positive correlations between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation (r = 0.47; p group cohesion, or group attractiveness. Hierarchical multiple regression models showed that EBP beliefs was a significant predictor of both EBP implementation (β = 0.33; p group cohesion, or group attractiveness. In multivariate analyses where demographic variables were taken into account, although EBP beliefs predicted job satisfaction, no significant relationship was found between EBP implementation and job satisfaction or group cohesion. Further studies are needed to confirm these unexpected study findings. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of Science Literacy for All in Science Teaching Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

    2012-10-01

    Science literacy for all is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching journals' recommendations are anchored to high-quality evidence. We found that (a) most National Science Teacher Association journals' science literacy recommendations have weak or no evidence base and (b) those with evidence reference teaching journals, teacher resource books, and literacy education more often than science education research. We concluded that all participants in the knowledge production cycle and transfer process—authors, editors, and reviewers—need to encourage evidence-based practices anchored to ongoing reforms and to literacy and science education research.

  17. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  18. A comparison of policy and direct practice stakeholder perceptions of factors affecting evidence-based practice implementation using concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Aarons, Gregory A

    2011-09-07

    The goal of this study was to assess potential differences between administrators/policymakers and those involved in direct practice regarding factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in a large public mental health service system in the United States. Participants included mental health system county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. As part of concept mapping procedures, brainstorming groups were conducted with each target group to identify specific factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to EBP implementation in a large public mental health system. Statements were sorted by similarity and rated by each participant in regard to their perceived importance and changeability. Multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze the data. A total of 105 statements were distilled into 14 clusters using concept-mapping procedures. Perceptions of importance of factors affecting EBP implementation varied between the two groups, with those involved in direct practice assigning significantly higher ratings to the importance of Clinical Perceptions and the impact of EBP implementation on clinical practice. Consistent with previous studies, financial concerns (costs, funding) were rated among the most important and least likely to change by both groups. EBP implementation is a complex process, and different stakeholders may hold different opinions regarding the relative importance of the impact of EBP implementation. Implementation efforts must include input from stakeholders at multiple levels to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light.

  19. Students' attitudes and perceptions of teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice in an occupational therapy professional Master's curriculum: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aliki; Han, Lu; Osler, Brittony P; Turnbull, Emily A; Douglas, Erin

    2017-03-27

    Most health professions, including occupational therapy, have made the application of evidence-based practice a desired competency and professional responsibility. Despite the increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice for improving patient outcomes, there are numerous research-practice gaps in the health professions. In addition to efforts aimed at promoting evidence-based practice with clinicians, there is a strong impetus for university programs to design curricula that will support the development of the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours associated with evidence-based practice. Though occupational therapy curricula in North America are becoming increasingly focused on evidence-based practice, research on students' attitudes towards evidence-based practice, their perceptions regarding the integration and impact of this content within the curricula, and the impact of the curriculum on their readiness for evidence-based practice is scarce. The present study examined occupational therapy students' perceptions towards the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice within a professional master's curriculum and their self-efficacy for evidence-based practice. The study used a mixed methods explanatory sequential design. The quantitative phase included a cross-sectional questionnaire exploring attitudes towards evidence-based practice, perceptions of the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice and evidence-based practice self-efficacy for four cohorts of students enrolled in the program and a cohort of new graduates. The questionnaire was followed by a focus group of senior students aimed at further exploring the quantitative findings. All student cohorts held favourable attitudes towards evidence-based practice; there was no difference across cohorts. There were significant differences with regards to perceptions of the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice within the curriculum; junior cohorts and students with previous

  20. Interventional techniques: evidence-based practice guidelines in the management of chronic spinal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Mark V; Trescot, Andrea M; Datta, Sukdeb; Schultz, David M; Hansen, Hans C; Abdi, Salahadin; Sehgal, Nalini; Shah, Rinoo V; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Patel, Vikram B; Buenaventura, Ricardo M; Colson, James D; Cordner, Harold J; Epter, Richard S; Jasper, Joseph F; Dunbar, Elmer E; Atluri, Sairam L; Bowman, Richard C; Deer, Timothy R; Swicegood, John R; Staats, Peter S; Smith, Howard S; Burton, Allen W; Kloth, David S; Giordano, James; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2007-01-01

    The evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of chronic spinal pain with interventional techniques were developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in the United States. To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic spinal pain, utilizing all types of evidence and to apply an evidence-based approach, with broad representation by specialists from academic and clinical practices. Study design consisted of formulation of essentials of guidelines and a series of potential evidence linkages representing conclusions and statements about relationships between clinical interventions and outcomes. The elements of the guideline preparation process included literature searches, literature synthesis, systematic review, consensus evaluation, open forum presentation, and blinded peer review. Methodologic quality evaluation criteria utilized included the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria, Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) criteria, and Cochrane review criteria. The designation of levels of evidence was from Level I (conclusive), Level II (strong), Level III (moderate), Level IV (limited), to Level V (indeterminate). Among the diagnostic interventions, the accuracy of facet joint nerve blocks is strong in the diagnosis of lumbar and cervical facet joint pain, whereas, it is moderate in the diagnosis of thoracic facet joint pain. The evidence is strong for lumbar discography, whereas, the evidence is limited for cervical and thoracic discography. The evidence for transforaminal epidural injections or selective nerve root blocks in the preoperative evaluation of patients with negative or inconclusive imaging studies is moderate. The evidence for diagnostic sacroiliac joint injections is moderate. The evidence for therapeutic lumbar intraarticular facet injections is moderate for short-term and long-term improvement, whereas, it is

  1. Whither nursing models? The value of nursing theory in the context of evidence-based practice and multidisciplinary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Niall

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the role of nursing models and theory in the modern clinical environment. Models of nursing have had limited success in bridging the gap between theory and practice. Literature on nursing models and theory since the 1950s, from health and social care databases. Arguments against nursing theory are challenged. In the current context of multidisciplinary services and the doctrine of evidence-based practice, a unique theoretical standpoint comprising the art and science of nursing is more relevant than ever. A theoretical framework should reflect the eclectic, pragmatic practice of nursing. Nurse educators and practitioners should embrace theory-based practice as well as evidence-based practice. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The Barriers Perceived to Prevent the Successful Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice by Speech and Language Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Pettigrew, Catharine M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is currently a paucity of research investigating what speech and language therapists, in particular, perceive are the greatest barriers to implementing evidence-based practice. Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived barriers that are faced by speech and language therapists in southern Ireland when…

  3. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) to Speech-Language Therapy Students: Are Students Competent and Confident EBP Users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use EBP principles in their future…

  4. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students: are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use

  5. A Socio-Cultural Analysis of Practitioner Perspectives on Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Roxanne F.; Davis, Carol A.; Blum, Grace; Greenway, Rosanne; Hackett, Jacob; Kidwell, James; Liberty, Lisa; McCollow, Megan; Patish, Yelena; Pierce, Jennifer; Schulze, Maggie; Smith, Maya M.; Peck, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the central role "evidence-based practice" (EBP) plays in special education agendas for both research and policy, it is widely recognized that achieving "implementation" of EBPs remains an elusive goal. In an effort to better understand this problem, we interviewed special education practitioners in four school…

  6. Adaptation Guidance for Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy and STI/HIV Prevention Curricula: From Development to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolleri, Lori A.; Fuller, Taleria R.; Firpo-Triplett, Regina; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Moore, Claire; Leeks, Kimberly D.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are effective in preventing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; however, prevention practitioners are challenged when selecting and adapting the most appropriate programs. While there are existing adaptation frameworks, there is little practical guidance in applying research in the field.…

  7. Supporting the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Adults with Co-Occurring Mental and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegel, David E.; Kola, Lenore A.; Ronis, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Significant barriers exist to the implementation of evidence-based practices into routine mental health and substance abuse settings. This paper discusses the role and function of technical assistance centers to help support the implementation process using, as a guide, the experience of the Ohio Substance Abuse and Mental Illness Coordinating…

  8. Training the Next Generation of School Psychologists to Deliver Evidence Based Mental Health Practices: Current Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Elisa S.; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are uniquely positioned to support the delivery of evidence-based mental health practices (EBMHPs) to address the overwhelming mental health needs of children and youth. Graduate training programs can promote EBMHPs in schools by ensuring school psychologists enter the workplace prepared to deliver and support high-quality,…

  9. Educators' Self-Reported Training, Use, and Perceived Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Justin T.; Gage, Nicholas A.; Alter, Peter J.; LaPolla, Stefanie; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.; Scott, Terrance M.

    2018-01-01

    A survey study of 248 educators in four states was conducted to identify respondents' formal training, use, and perceived effectiveness of 37 evidence-based classroom management practices within four general categories: (a) antecedent-based, (b) instructionally based, (c) consequence-based, and (d) self-management. Results indicated that, on…

  10. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students : are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Dijk; B. Spek; M Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness

  11. Is Social Work Evidence-Based? Does Saying So Make It So? Ongoing Challenges in Integrating Research, Practice and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    The integration of research and practice is of concern in all helping professions. Has social work become an evidence-based profession as some claim? Characteristics of current-day social work are presented that dispute this view, related continuing concerns are suggested, and promising developments (mostly outside social work) are described that…

  12. Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of "Science Literacy for All" in Science Teaching Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    "Science literacy for all" is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching…

  13. Research-Based Knowledge: Researchers' Contribution to Evidence-Based Practice and Policy Making in Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Erik Hagaseth; Plant, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To present evidence for the outcomes of career guidance is increasingly seen as pivotal for a further professionalization of policy making and service provision. This paper puts an emphasis on researchers' contribution to evidence-based practice and policy making in career guidance. We argue for a broader and more pluralistic research strategy to…

  14. LGB-Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Social Anxiety: A Case Study Applying Evidence-Based Practice Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kate; Hope, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Guided by the American Psychological Association's principles of evidence-based practice, this article reviews a single-case treatment outcome study whereby a client characteristic, sexual identity, was integrated into the assessment and treatment of social anxiety symptoms. The case involved a young adult European-American male who presented to a…

  15. Evidence-Based Practice: SLTs under Siege or Opportunity for Growth? The Use and Nature of Research Evidence in the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurtin, Arlene; Roddam, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Speech and language therapists are encouraged to be evidence-based practitioners in contemporary clinical practice. This apparently signifies their commitment to "good" practice. An examination of evidence-based practice (EBP) and its adoption in clinical practice is therefore warranted. Aims: This paper aims to explore EBP,…

  16. Extent of implementation of evidence-based fall prevention practices for older patients in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Richard H; Baker, Dorothy; Gottschalk, Margaret; King, Mary; Trella, Patricia; Tinetti, Mary E

    2008-04-01

    This study determined the extent to which fall risk assessment and management practices for older patients were implemented in Medicare-certified home health agencies (HHAs) in a defined geographic area in southern New England that had participated in evidence-based fall prevention training between October 2001 and September 2004. The standardized in-service training sessions taught home health nurses and rehabilitation therapists how to conduct assessments for five evidence-based risk factors for falls in older adults--mobility impairments, balance disturbances, multiple medications, postural hypotension, and home environmental hazards--using techniques shown to be efficacious in clinical trials. Twenty-six HHAs participated in these in-service training sessions; 19 of these participated in a survey of nurses and rehabilitation therapists between October 2004 and September 2005. Self-reported assessment and management practices implemented with older patients during home healthcare visits were measured in this survey, and HHA-level measures for each fall risk factor were constructed based on proportions of clinicians reporting assessment and management practices that were recommended in the fall prevention training sessions. For all fall risk factors except postural hypotension, 80% or more of clinicians in all HHAs reported implementing recommended fall risk management practices. Greater variation was found regarding fall risk assessment practices, with fewer than 70% of clinicians in one or more HHAs reporting recommended assessment practices for all risk factors. Results suggest that evidence-based training for home healthcare clinicians can stimulate fall risk assessment and management practices during home health visits. HHA-level comparisons hold the potential to illustrate the extent of diffusion of evidence-based fall prevention practices within and between agencies.

  17. Practical experience from the Office of Adolescent Health's large scale implementation of an evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Amy Lynn; Roper, Allison Yvonne

    2014-03-01

    After 3 years of experience overseeing the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in a diversity of populations and settings across the country, the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) has learned numerous lessons through practical application and new experiences. These lessons and experiences are applicable to those working to implement evidence-based programs on a large scale. The lessons described in this paper focus on what it means for a program to be implementation ready, the role of the program developer in replicating evidence-based programs, the importance of a planning period to ensure quality implementation, the need to define and measure fidelity, and the conditions necessary to support rigorous grantee-level evaluation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum.

  19. Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Charif, Ali; Zomahoun, Hervé Tchala Vignon; LeBlanc, Annie; Langlois, Léa; Wolfenden, Luke; Yoong, Sze Lin; Williams, Christopher M; Lépine, Roxanne; Légaré, France

    2017-11-22

    While an extensive array of existing evidence-based practices (EBPs) have the potential to improve patient outcomes, little is known about how to implement EBPs on a larger scale. Therefore, we sought to identify effective strategies for scaling up EBPs in primary care. We conducted a systematic review with the following inclusion criteria: (i) study design: randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, before-and-after (with/without control), and interrupted time series; (ii) participants: primary care-related units (e.g., clinical sites, patients); (iii) intervention: any strategy used to scale up an EBP; (iv) comparator: no restrictions; and (v) outcomes: no restrictions. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from database inception to August 2016 and consulted clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two reviewers independently selected eligible studies, then extracted and analyzed data following the Cochrane methodology. We extracted components of scaling-up strategies and classified them into five categories: infrastructure, policy/regulation, financial, human resources-related, and patient involvement. We extracted scaling-up process outcomes, such as coverage, and provider/patient outcomes. We validated data extraction with study authors. We included 14 studies. They were published since 2003 and primarily conducted in low-/middle-income countries (n = 11). Most were funded by governmental organizations (n = 8). The clinical area most represented was infectious diseases (HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, n = 8), followed by newborn/child care (n = 4), depression (n = 1), and preventing seniors' falls (n = 1). Study designs were mostly before-and-after (without control, n = 8). The most frequently targeted unit of scaling up was the clinical site (n = 11). The component of a scaling-up strategy most frequently mentioned was human resource-related (n = 12). All

  20. Interventional techniques in the management of chronic spinal pain: evidence-based practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Mark V; Shah, Rinoo V; Everett, Clifford R; Sehgal, Nalini; McKenzie Brown, Ann Marie; Abdi, Salahadin; Bowman, Richard C; Deer, Timothy R; Datta, Sukdeb; Colson, James D; Spillane, William F; Smith, Howard S; Lucas, Linda F; Burton, Allen W; Chopra, Pradeep; Staats, Peter S; Wasserman, Ronald A; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2005-01-01

    The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain has been reported as 54% to 80%, with as many as 60% of patients continuing to have chronic pain five years or longer after the initial episode. Spinal pain is associated with significant economic, societal, and health impact. Available evidence documents a wide degree of variance in the definition and the practice of interventional pain management. To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques in the management of chronic spinal pain, with utilization of all types of evidence, applying an evidence-based approach, with broad representation of specialists from academic and clinical practices. A systematic review of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions applied in managing chronic spinal pain by a policy committee. Design consisted of formulation of essentials of guidelines and a series of potential evidence linkages representing conclusions, and statements about relationships between clinical interventions and outcomes. The elements of the guideline preparation process included literature searches, literature synthesis, systematic review, consensus evaluation, open forum presentation, formal endorsement by the Board of Directors of the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and blinded peer review. Methodologic quality evaluation criteria utilized included AHRQ criteria, QUADAS criteria, and Cochrane review criteria. The designation of levels of evidence was from Level I (conclusive), Level II (strong), Level III (moderate), Level IV (limited), to Level V (indeterminate). The accuracy of facet joint nerve blocks was strong in the diagnosis of lumbar and cervical facet joint pain, whereas, it was moderate in the diagnosis of thoracic facet joint pain. The evidence was strong for lumbar discography, whereas, the evidence was limited for cervical and thoracic discography. The evidence was moderate for transforaminal epidural injections or selective nerve root blocks in

  1. Capacity Building: Evidence-Based Practice and Adolescents on the Autism Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue, Hanna C.; Knox, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Empirical research in the treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has resulted in the identification of numerous evidence-based interventions (EBIs). Adolescents with an ASD are faced with unique academic challenges, complex social environments, and physiological changes. They often require interventions to aid in acclimating to their…

  2. Teaching evidence-based practice principles to prepare health professions students for an interprofessional learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nell Aronoff

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Online EBP learning modules were effective in developing EBP knowledge and skills for health professions students. Using the same modules ensured that students from different health professions at different stages of their professional programs had consistent knowledge and enabled each student to fully engage in an interprofessional evidence-based activity. Student feedback indicated the modules were valued and beneficial.

  3. Cultural Exchange and the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Aarons, Gregory A.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Landsverk, John; Weisz, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The dynamics of interactions between evidence-based intervention (EBI) developers and trainers and organizations and providers that deliver the EBI was examined in two case studies, a statewide randomized effectiveness trial of an EBI to reduce child neglect and a randomized trial of EBIs for depression, anxiety, and conduct problems in…

  4. The PICO Game: An Innovative Strategy for Teaching Step 1 in Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Kerry A; Cosme, Sheryl

    2017-12-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning and implementation of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-6787. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Juvenile Drug Courts by Integrating Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W.; McCart, Michael R.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Chapman, Jason E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The primary purpose of this study was to test a relatively efficient strategy for enhancing the capacity of juvenile drug courts (JDC) to reduce youth substance use and criminal behavior by incorporating components of evidence-based treatments into their existing services. Method: Six JDCs were randomized to a condition in which…

  6. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... effectively and more rapidly into the general health care system. The National Registry of Evidence-based... be used in screening and selecting interventions, and provides guidance on the submission process... documentation to be used in the review. This additional documentation includes full-text copies of all articles...

  7. Psychotherapy Training for Residents: Reconciling Requirements with Evidence-Based, Competency-Focused Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Priyanthy; Manring, John; Lynn, David John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) changed the training requirements in psychotherapy, moving toward evidence-based therapies and emphasizing competence and proficiency as outcomes of training. This article examines whether the therapies…

  8. Teaching evidence based practice and research through blended learning to undergraduate midwifery students from a practice based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Sidebotham; Julie, Jomeen; Jennifer, Gamble

    2014-03-01

    The international world of higher education is changing with universities now offering students flexible delivery options that allow them to study away from campus and at a time convenient to them. Some students prefer on line learning while others prefer face to face contact offered through a traditional lecture and tutorial delivery modes. The response by many universities is to offer a blend of both. While online and blended mode of delivery may be suitable for some subjects there is little knowledge of the efficacy of blended learning models to teach evidence based practice and research (EBPR) to undergraduate midwifery students. EBPR is a challenging, threshold level subject upon which deeper knowledge and skills are built. This paper describes the design, delivery, and evaluation of an undergraduate EBPR course delivered in blended mode to first year midwifery students. Components of the blended learning innovation included: novel teaching strategies, engaging practical activities, role play, and e-learning strategies to maintain engagement. University-based course evaluation outcomes revealed very positive scores and the course was rated within the top ten percent of all courses offered within the Health Group at the host University. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of policy and direct practice stakeholder perceptions of factors affecting evidence-based practice implementation using concept mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Amy E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this study was to assess potential differences between administrators/policymakers and those involved in direct practice regarding factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to evidence-based practice (EBP implementation in a large public mental health service system in the United States. Methods Participants included mental health system county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. As part of concept mapping procedures, brainstorming groups were conducted with each target group to identify specific factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to EBP implementation in a large public mental health system. Statements were sorted by similarity and rated by each participant in regard to their perceived importance and changeability. Multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze the data. Results A total of 105 statements were distilled into 14 clusters using concept-mapping procedures. Perceptions of importance of factors affecting EBP implementation varied between the two groups, with those involved in direct practice assigning significantly higher ratings to the importance of Clinical Perceptions and the impact of EBP implementation on clinical practice. Consistent with previous studies, financial concerns (costs, funding were rated among the most important and least likely to change by both groups. Conclusions EBP implementation is a complex process, and different stakeholders may hold different opinions regarding the relative importance of the impact of EBP implementation. Implementation efforts must include input from stakeholders at multiple levels to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light.

  10. Testing use of payers to facilitate evidence-based practice adoption: protocol for a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Kim, Jee-Seon; Quanbeck, Andrew; Patel-Porter, Terry; Starr, Sandy; McCarty, Dennis

    2013-05-10

    More effective methods are needed to implement evidence-based findings into practice. The Advancing Recovery Framework offers a multi-level approach to evidence-based practice implementation by aligning purchasing and regulatory policies at the payer level with organizational change strategies at the organizational level. The Advancing Recovery Buprenorphine Implementation Study is a cluster-randomized controlled trial designed to increase use of the evidence-based practice buprenorphine medication to treat opiate addiction. Ohio Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Services Boards (ADAMHS), who are payers, and their addiction treatment organizations were recruited for a trial to assess the effects of payer and treatment organization changes (using the Advancing Recovery Framework) versus treatment organization changes alone on the use of buprenorphine. A matched-pair randomization, based on county characteristics, was applied, resulting in seven county ADAMHS boards and twenty-five treatment organizations in each arm. Opioid dependent patients are nested within cluster (treatment organization), and treatment organization clusters are nested within ADAMHS county board. The primary outcome is the percentage of individuals with an opioid dependence diagnosis who use buprenorphine during the 24-month intervention period and the 12-month sustainability period. The trial is currently in the baseline data collection stage. Although addiction treatment providers are under increasing pressure to implement evidence-based practices that have been proven to improve patient outcomes, adoption of these practices lags, compared to other areas of healthcare. Reasons frequently cited for the slow adoption of EBPs in addiction treatment include, regulatory issues, staff, or client resistance and lack of resources. Yet the way addiction treatment is funded, the payer's role-has not received a lot of attention in research on EBP adoption.This research is unique because it

  11. Providing education on evidence-based practice improved knowledge but did not change behaviour: a before and after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovarini Meryl

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health professionals lack the skills to find and appraise published research. This lack of skills and associated knowledge needs to be addressed, and practice habits need to change, for evidence-based practice to occur. The aim of this before and after study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted intervention on the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour of allied health professionals. Methods 114 self-selected occupational therapists were recruited. The intervention included a 2-day workshop combined with outreach support for eight months. Support involved email and telephone contact and a workplace visit. Measures were collected at baseline, post-workshop, and eight months later. The primary outcome was knowledge, measured using the Adapted Fresno Test of Evidence-Based Practice (total score 0 to 156. Secondary outcomes were attitude to evidence-based practice (% reporting improved skills and confidence; % reporting barriers, and behaviour measured using an activity diary (% engaging/not engaging in search and appraisal activities, and assignment completion. Results Post-workshop, there were significant gains in knowledge which were maintained at follow-up. The mean difference in the Adapted Fresno Test total score was 20.6 points (95% CI, 15.6 to 25.5. The change from post-workshop to follow-up was small and non-significant (mean difference 1.2 points, 95% CI, -6.0 to 8.5. Fewer participants reported lack of searching and appraisal skills as barriers to evidence-based practice over time (searching = 61%, 53%, 24%; appraisal 60%, 65%, 41%. These differences were statistically significant (p = 0.0001 and 0.010 respectively. Behaviour changed little. Pre-workshop, 6% engaged in critical appraisal increasing to 18% post-workshop and 18% at follow-up. Nearly two thirds (60% were not reading any research literature at follow-up. Twenty-three participants (20.2% completed their assignment. Conclusion Evidence-based

  12. Practitioner characteristics and organizational contexts as essential elements in the evidence-based practice versus cultural competence debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vivian Hopkins

    2015-04-01

    The different pathways chosen to efficiently and effectively provide relief to those struggling with mental health challenges reflect different assumptions about the human condition and have led to disagreements over which intervention strategies are best suited to particular individuals or populations. Evidence-based practice and culturally competent services, as discussed within the United States, have been characterized as opposites. However, neither approach captures all of the elements that embody the full treatment experience. This article offers a framework that includes the personal identity of the practitioner and the organizational context as two elements that serve as active agents in the helping relationship, although they have rarely been included in the discourse about evidence-based practice or cultural competence. Suggestions for practice, education, and research are included based on this analysis. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Developing a tool that explores factors influencing the adoption of evidence-based principles in nursing practice in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Momani, Muwafaq M; Al-Barmawi, Marwa A; Al-Hadid, Lourance; Aljabery, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    To measure the psychometric properties, reliability and validity of a tool that explores factors influencing the adoption of principles of evidence-based in nursing practice in Jordan. The use of principles of evidenced-based practice in nursing practice has been widely endorsed in many countries around the world; these principles have not yet been implemented in Jordan. Factors influencing the adoption of evidence-based practice in Jordanian nursing context were not identified to date. A descriptive, cross-sectional research design approached experienced nurses from different specialties across Jordan (3 military, 3 governmental and 5 private hospitals). The psychometric properties indicated a valid and reliable tool. It consisted of three factors: personal characteristics; source of professional knowledge; and organizational environment. Findings provided evidence on the impact of the identified factors on nurses' adoption of evidence-based practice. Although tests in this report showed the validity of this new tool, it still requires further testing to ensure its stability over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Approaches, knowledge and capabilities of nurses and physicians regarding evidence-based clinical practice in the Imbadura province (Ecuador)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Mula, Jesús; Muñoz Navarro, Paulina; Vaca Auz, Janeth; Cabascango Cabascango, Carmita; Cabascango Cabascango, Katty

    2015-01-01

    The research raises the need to increase understanding of organizational and personal factors that influence the attitude and aptitude of each professional, with respect to evidence-based clinical practice. The aim of this study is to describe the transfer of knowledge into clinical practice in hospital units in Imbabura (Ecuador) identifying the obstacles to implementing evidence-based clinical practice validated questionnaire EBPQ-19. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in hospitals of the Ministry of Public Health of Imbabura of Ecuador took place, including a total of 281 nurses and physicians. Nurses and physicians showed positive attitudes toward evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) and their use to support clinical decision-making. This research evidences perceptions of professionals on strategies for knowledge transfer and obstacles to carry it out. Significant differences between the perception of the use of EBCP strategies between nurses and physicians are observed. Physicians consider they use them frequently, while nurses acknowledge using them less (chi-square: 105.254, P=.018). In conclusion, we can say that these factors should be considered as necessary to improve the quality of care that is provided to users based on the best available evidence. It is necessary to start developing change interventions in this regard to remedy the current situation of clinical practice based not on evidence, but rather on experience only. Experimental studies demonstrating the effectiveness of strategies to eliminate barriers to scientific evidence-based clinical practice should be conducted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of research education on student nurse attitude, skill and uptake of evidence-based practice: a descriptive longitudinal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Hofmeyer, Anne; Bobridge, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    To measure the impact of an undergraduate research education program on the attitude, skill and uptake of evidence-based practice among undergraduate student nurses. The contribution of evidence-based practice to clinical decision-making, quality of care and patient outcomes is well-documented. One approach to improving evidence-based practice uptake in clinical practice is through the provision of undergraduate research education; notwithstanding, the impact of research training on nursing practice is poorly established. Descriptive longitudinal survey. Three hundred and fifty four third-year nursing students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing program of a large Australian University were invited. Pre- (Phase 1) and post-completion (Phase 2) of a 16-week research education program, participants were asked to complete the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude and Utilization Survey; an 82-item online questionnaire measuring attitudes, skills and use of evidence-based practice, and barriers and facilitators of evidence-based practice uptake. The survey was completed by 84 (24%) participants in Phase 1 and 33 (39% of Phase 1) participants in Phase 2. Program exposure resulted in a significant improvement in median skill and use subscores, but not median attitude subscore. Participants perceived inadequate skills in the interpretation, appraisal and application of research findings to clinical practice as being less of a barrier to evidence-based practice uptake posteducation, and access to online critical appraisal tools as being significantly more useful in facilitating evidence-based practice uptake posteducation. The findings suggest that undergraduate research education may have a significant effect on nursing students' research skills and use of evidence-based practice, and minimise barriers to evidence-based practice uptake posteducation. Undergraduate research education may play an important role in improving student nurse uptake of evidence-based practice; whether

  16. Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions Using a Common Theory, Practices, and Principles

    OpenAIRE

    Rotheram-Borus, MJ; Swendeman, D; Becker, KD

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families' well-being; however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families' everyday lives with a prevention framework. At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, Zumba), and motivated parents were tr...

  17. Evidence-Based Practice Point-of-Care Resources: A Quantitative Evaluation of Quality, Rigor, and Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jared M; Umapathysivam, Kandiah; Xue, Yifan; Lockwood, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Clinicians and other healthcare professionals need access to summaries of evidence-based information in order to provide effective care to their patients at the point-of-care. Evidence-based practice (EBP) point-of-care resources have been developed and are available online to meet this need. This study aimed to develop a comprehensive list of available EBP point-of-care resources and evaluate their processes and policies for the development of content, in order to provide a critical analysis based upon rigor, transparency and measures of editorial quality to inform healthcare providers and promote quality improvement amongst publishers of EBP resources. A comprehensive and systematic search (Pubmed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Central) was undertaken to identify available EBP point-of-care resources, defined as "web-based medical compendia specifically designed to deliver predigested, rapidly accessible, comprehensive, periodically updated, and evidence-based information (and possibly also guidance) to clinicians." A pair of investigators independently extracted information on general characteristics, content presentation, editorial quality, evidence-based methodology, and breadth and volume. Twenty-seven summary resources were identified, of which 22 met the predefined inclusion criteria for EBP point-of-care resources, and 20 could be accessed for description and assessment. Overall, the upper quartile of EBP point-of-care providers was assessed to be UpToDate, Nursing Reference Centre, Mosby's Nursing Consult, BMJ Best Practice, and JBI COnNECT+. The choice of which EBP point-of-care resources are suitable for an organization is a decision that depends heavily on the unique requirements of that organization and the resources it has available. However, the results presented in this study should enable healthcare providers to make that assessment in a clear, evidence-based manner, and provide a comprehensive list of the available options. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau

  18. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: unpacking the black box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S

    2013-11-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert consultation fits into the larger implementation support system, or the most effective consultation strategies. This commentary reviews the literature on consultation in child mental health, and proposes a set of core consultation functions, processes, and outcomes that should be further studied in the implementation of evidence-based practices for children.

  19. Assessing Fidelity to Evidence-Based Practices in Usual Care: The Example of Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a multimethod evaluation of treatment fidelity to the family therapy (FT) approach demonstrated by front-line therapists in a community behavioral health clinic that utilized FT as its routine standard of care. Study cases (N = 50) were adolescents with conduct and/or substance use problems randomly assigned to routine family therapy (RFT) or to a treatment-as-usual clinic not aligned with the FT approach (TAU). Observational analyses showed that RFT therapists consistently achieved a level of adherence to core FT techniques comparable to the adherence benchmark established during an efficacy trial of a research-based FT. Analyses of therapist-report measures found that compared to TAU, RFT demonstrated strong adherence to FT and differentiation from three other evidence-based practices: cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and drug counseling. Implications for rigorous fidelity assessments of evidence-based practices in usual care settings are discussed. PMID:23314000

  20. Updating nurse graduate knowledge – the development of the “Evidence Based Practice In Nursing” continuing educational programme

    OpenAIRE

    Stavropoulou, Areti

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been given great importance in designing continuing education and lifelong learning programs. The development process of such programs is strongly related to successful learning outcomes. The aim of this paper is to describe the process followed to design the “Evidence Based Practice in Nursing” Continuing Educational Program which implemented at the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, TEI Athens and ΑTEI of Thessaloniki during the academic year 2014-...

  1. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: Unpacking the black box

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S.

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert c...

  2. Introducing a Chair-Side Novel Approach to Reach Evidence-based Periodontal Information in the Daily Periodontal Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannan, Aous

    2009-10-01

    Evidence-based healthcare is not an easier approach to patient management, but should provide both clinicians and patients with greater confidence and trust in their mutual relationship. The intellectual embrace of evidence-based methods, coupled with clinical expertise and consideration of the patients individual uniqueness and requirements, is needed for all periodontal therapists if optimum care is the goal. One important element of evidence-based decision making in periodontology is the systematic review. Systematic reviews usually provide the periodontist with the highest level of evidence which should be taken into consideration when constructing any treatment plan in the dental clinic. However, reaching systematic reviews might be a time-consuming procedure that needs further personal skills. In this paper, a chair-side novel approach to facilitate the incorporation of systematic reviews into daily periodontal practice is presented. It is based on three simple tools, namely, a list of suitable periodontics-related key words, a data bank of all up-to-date published systematic reviews in periodontology, and hand-made paper sheets to match the key words with their related systematic review statements. A primary validation of this method indicated the simplicity in learning and application. Chair-side; Evidence-based medicine; Periodontology; Systematic review.

  3. Adaptation and validation of the Evidence-Based Practice Belief and Implementation scales for French-speaking Swiss nurses and allied healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate two psychometric properties of the French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales, namely their internal consistency and construct validity. The Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales developed by Melnyk et al. are recognised as valid, reliable instruments in English. However, no psychometric validation for their French versions existed. Secondary analysis of a cross sectional survey. Source data came from a cross-sectional descriptive study sample of 382 nurses and other allied healthcare providers. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency, and principal axis factor analysis and varimax rotation were computed to determine construct validity. The French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales showed excellent reliability, with Cronbach's alphas close to the scores established by Melnyk et al.'s original versions. Principal axis factor analysis showed medium-to-high factor loading scores without obtaining collinearity. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 16-item Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs scale resulted in a four-factor loading structure. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 17-item Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale revealed a two-factor loading structure. Further research should attempt to understand why the French Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale showed a two-factor loading structure but Melnyk et al.'s original has only one. The French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales can both be considered valid and reliable instruments for measuring Evidence-Based Practice beliefs and implementation. The results suggest that the French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales are valid and reliable and can therefore be used to

  4. Building Capacity for Evidence-Based Public Health: Reconciling the Pulls of Practice and the Push of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Ross C; Fielding, Jonathan E; Green, Lawrence W

    2017-11-20

    Timely implementation of principles of evidence-based public health (EBPH) is critical for bridging the gap between discovery of new knowledge and its application. Public health organizations need sufficient capacity (the availability of resources, structures, and workforce to plan, deliver, and evaluate the preventive dose of an evidence-based intervention) to move science to practice. We review principles of EBPH, the importance of capacity building to advance evidence-based approaches, promising approaches for capacity building, and future areas for research and practice. Although there is general agreement among practitioners and scientists on the importance of EBPH, there is less clarity on the definition of evidence, how to find it, and how, when, and where to use it. Capacity for EBPH is needed among both individuals and organizations. Capacity can be strengthened via training, use of tools, technical assistance, assessment and feedback, peer networking, and incentives. Modest investments in EBPH capacity building will foster more effective public health practice. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health Volume 39 is April 1, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  5. Evidence-based practice implementation: case report of the evolution of a quality improvement program in a multicenter physical therapy organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevans, Joel M; Bise, Christopher G; McGee, John C; Miller, Debora L; Rockar, Paul; Delitto, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Our nation's suboptimal health care quality and unsustainable costs can be linked to the failure to implement evidence-based interventions. Implementation is the bridge between the decision to adopt a strategy and its sustained use in practice. The purpose of this case report is threefold: (1) to outline the historical implementation of an evidence-based quality improvement project, (2) to describe the program's future direction using a systems perspective to identify implementation barriers, and (3) to provide implications for the profession as it works toward closing the evidence-to-practice gap. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Centers for Rehab Services is a large, multicenter physical therapy organization. In 2005, they implemented a Low Back Initiative utilizing evidence-based protocols to guide clinical decision making. The initial implementation strategy used a multifaceted approach. Formative evaluations were used repeatedly to identify barriers to implementation. Barriers may exist outside the organization, they can be created internally, they may result from personnel, or they may be a direct function of the research evidence. Since the program launch, 3 distinct improvement cycles have been utilized to address identified implementation barriers. Implementation is an iterative process requiring evaluation, measurement, and refinement. During this period, behavior change is actualized as clinicians become increasingly proficient and committed to their use of new evidence. Successfully incorporating evidence into routine practice requires a systems perspective to account for the complexity of the clinical setting. The value the profession provides can be enhanced by improving the implementation of evidence-based strategies. Achieving this outcome will require a concerted effort in all areas of the profession. New skills will be needed by leaders, researchers, managers, and clinicians. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. Steps in Moving Evidence-Based Health Informatics from Theory to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Michael; Magrabi, Farah; Scott, Philip; Doupi, Persephone; Hypponen, Hannele; Ammenwerth, Elske

    2016-10-01

    To demonstrate and promote the importance of applying a scientific process to health IT design and implementation, and of basing this on research principles and techniques. A review by international experts linked to the IMIA Working Group on Technology Assessment and Quality Development. Four approaches are presented, linking to the creation of national professional expectations, adherence to research-based standards, quality assurance approaches to ensure safety, and scientific measurement of impact. Solely marketing- and aspiration-based approaches to health informatics applications are no longer ethical or acceptable when scientifically grounded evidence-based approaches are available and in use.

  7. Expanding the lens of evidence-based practice in psychotherapy: a common factors perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Kevin M; Gurman, Alan S; Wampold, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we examine the science and policy implications of the common factors perspective (CF; Frank & Frank, 1993; Wampold, 2007). As the empirically supported treatment (EST) approach, grounded in randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is the received view (see Baker, McFall, & Shoham, 2008; McHugh & Barlow, 2012), we make the case for the CF perspective as an additional evidence-based approach for understanding how therapy works, but also as a basis for improving the quality of mental health services. Finally, we argue that it is time to integrate the 2 perspectives, and we challenge the field to do so.

  8. Closing the Research to Practice Gap in Therapeutic Residential Care: Service Provider-University Partnerships Focused on Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Duppong Hurley, Kristin; Trout, Alexandra L.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Residential care has been criticized for its high cost and limited research evidence. While recent studies and reviews of the literature suggest that a number of evidence-based practices are being implemented in residential care settings, more research is needed to develop and test empirically based practices that can be successfully implemented…

  9. Effectiveness of an education intervention to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice: A single-blind randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Hannele; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Stevens, Kathleen R

    2016-08-01

    Nurses' lack of readiness for evidence-based practice slows down the uptake, adoption, and implementation of evidence-based practice which is of international concern as it impedes attainment of the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice. To evaluate the effectiveness of an Advanced Practice Nurse-delivered education program to strengthen nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice at a university hospital. A single-blind randomized controlled trial with repeated measures design, with measures completed during spring and fall 2015, before the education program (T0), within 1week after (T1), 8weeks after (T2), and 4months after completion of education interventions (T3). One large university hospital system in Finland, consisting of 15 acute care hospitals. The required sample size, calculated by a priori power analysis and including a 20% estimated attrition rate, called for 85 nurse participants to be recruited. Nurses working in different professional nursing roles and care settings were randomly allocated into two groups: intervention (evidence-based practice education, N=43) and control (research utilization education, N=34). The nurse participants received live 4-h education sessions on the basic principles of evidence-based practice (intervention group) and on the principles of research utilization (control group). The intervention group also received a web-based interactive evidence-based practice education module with a booster mentoring intervention. Readiness for evidence-based practice data, previous experience with evidence-based practice, and participant demographics were collected using the Stevens' EBP Readiness Inventory. Nurses' confidence in employing evidence-based practice and actual evidence-based practice knowledge were lower at T0, compared with the post-education scores, specifically at T1. The improvement

  10. Implementing evidence-based practice in the neuroscience intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jonathan; Kahn, Jeremy

    2014-02-21

    Mechanical ventilation is associated with substantial morbidity in brain-injured patients. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an extubation readiness bundle to decrease duration of mechanical ventilation after brain injury. To evaluate whether the implementation of an evidence-based care bundle can accelerate extubation readiness in brain-injured patients. Before/after observational study. Two ICUs in one university hospital in France. Brain-injured patients ventilated >24 hours with an initial Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤12 and an acutely abnormal brain computerized tomography. One year of targeted education focused on a four-element treatment bundle consisting of lung protective ventilation, early enteral nutrition, standardization of antibiotherapy for hospital-acquired pneumonia and a systematic approach to extubation. Observational data were recorded prospectively during the pre- and post-intervention periods. The primary endpoint was the duration of mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints included ventilator-free days at 28 and 90 days, ICU and 90 day mortality, development of hospital acquired pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome and unplanned or failed extubation. The study included 499 patients, 299 in the control phase and 200 in the intervention phase. Admission during the intervention phase was associated with lower mean tidal volume (P free days at day 90 increased from 50 ± 33 in the control phase to 57 ± 29 in the intervention phase (P education focused on an evidence-based extubation readiness bundle was associated with a reduction in the duration of ventilation in brain-injured patients.

  11. Practical Android Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Take a practical approach to becoming a leading-edge Android developer, learning by example while combining the many technologies needed to create a successful, up-to-date web app. Practical Android Projects introduces the Android software development kit and development tools of the trade, and then dives into building cool-looking and fun apps that put Android's amazing capabilities to work. Android is the powerful, full-featured, open source mobile platform that powers phones like Google Nexus, Motorola Droid, Samsung Galaxy S, and a variety of HTC phones and tablet computers. This book help

  12. Implementing administrative evidence based practices: lessons from the field in six local health departments across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Kathleen; Aisaka, Kristelle; Tabak, Rachel G; Smith, Carson; Erwin, Paul; Brownson, Ross C

    2015-06-06

    Administrative evidence based practices (A-EBPs) are agency level structures and activities positively associated with performance measures (e.g., achieving core public health functions, carrying out evidence-based interventions). The objectives of this study were to examine the contextual conditions and explore differences in local health department (LHD) characteristics that influence the implementation of A-EBPs. Qualitative case studies were conducted based on data from 35 practitioners in six LHDs across the United States. The sample was chosen using an A-EBP score from our 2012 national survey and was linked to secondary data from the National Public Health Performance Standards Program. Three LHDs that scored high and three LHDs that scored low on both measures were selected as case study sites. The 37-question interview guide explored LHD use of an evidence based decision making process, including A-EBPs and evidence-based programs and policies. Each interview took 30-60 min. Standard qualitative methodology was used for data coding and analysis using NVivo software. As might be expected, high-capacity LHDs were more likely to have strong leadership, partnerships, financial flexibility, workforce development activities, and an organizational culture supportive of evidence based decision making and implementation of A-EBPs. They were also more likely to describe having strong or important relationships with universities and other educational resources, increasing their access to resources and allowing them to more easily share knowledge and expertise. Differences between high- and low-capacity LHDs in A-EBP domains highlight the importance of investments in these areas and the potential those investments have to contribute to overall efficiency and performance. Further research may identify avenues to enhance resources in these domains to create an organizational culture supportive of A-EBPs.

  13. Protocol for development of the guideline for reporting evidence based practice educational interventions and teaching (GREET) statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anna C; Lewis, Lucy K; McEvoy, Maureen P; Galipeau, James; Glasziou, Paul; Hammick, Marilyn; Moher, David; Tilson, Julie; Williams, Marie T

    2013-01-25

    There are an increasing number of studies reporting the efficacy of educational strategies to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills underpinning evidence based practice (EBP). To date there is no standardised guideline for describing the teaching, evaluation, context or content of EBP educational strategies. The heterogeneity in the reporting of EBP educational interventions makes comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this program of research is to develop the Guideline for Reporting EBP Educational interventions and Teaching (GREET) statement and an accompanying explanation and elaboration (E&E) paper. Three stages are planned for the development process. Stage one will comprise a systematic review to identify features commonly reported in descriptions of EBP educational interventions. In stage two, corresponding authors of articles included in the systematic review and the editors of the journals in which these studies were published will be invited to participate in a Delphi process to reach consensus on items to be considered when reporting EBP educational interventions. The final stage of the project will include the development and pilot testing of the GREET statement and E&E paper. The final outcome will be the creation of a Guideline for Reporting EBP Educational interventions and Teaching (GREET) statement and E&E paper. The reporting of health research including EBP educational research interventions, have been criticised for a lack of transparency and completeness. The development of the GREET statement will enable the standardised reporting of EBP educational research. This will provide a guide for researchers, reviewers and publishers for reporting EBP educational interventions.

  14. A pilot project using evidence-based clinical pathways and payment reform in China's rural hospitals shows early success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsung-Mei

    2013-05-01

    Reforming China's public hospitals to curb widespread overtreatment and improve the quality and affordability of care has been the most challenging aspect of that nation's ambitious health reform, which began in 2009. This article describes a pilot project under way in several of China's provinces that combines payment reform with the implementation of evidence-based clinical pathways at a few hospitals serving rural areas. Results to date include reduced length-of-stay and prescription drug use and higher patient and provider satisfaction. These early results suggest that the pilot may be achieving its goals, which may have far-reaching and positive implications for China's ongoing reform.

  15. The Influence of Social Capital on Nurse-Perceived Evidence-Based Practice Implementation in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji In; Lee, Eunjoo

    2017-05-01

    To examine the relationship between evidence-based practice (EBP) adoption and social capital in nurses and to determine how social capital affected EBP adoption in South Korea. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used. In total, 432 registered nurses from two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in South Korea completed the questionnaire, which included demographic items, the Developing Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire, and the Social Capital Outcomes for Nurses scale. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression to identify the predictors of EBP adoption. Nurses with higher social capital scores reported fewer perceived barriers to finding and reviewing evidence, and changing practice. Higher social capital scores were associated with higher levels of perceived facilitators of EBP adoption and skills appraisal in finding and reviewing evidence. Social capital was a significant predictor of EBP adoption. Nurses with greater opportunities to exchange and communicate their ideas freely are more likely to accept new evidence through diverse channels and trust-based relationships between nurses, which allows healthcare organizations to promote innovations such as EBP adoption. Therefore, social capital in nurses could serve as a driving force for EBP adoption and should provide a healthy foundation for changes in patient care practices. Nurses with higher social capital are tending to adopt EBP willingly. High trust enables nurses to facilitate and support change in practice. Therefore, to improve EBP adoption in patient care, it needs to be monitored that relationships between nurses are carefully structured and that they foster mutual interaction. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Using Evidence Based Practice in LIS Education: Results of a Test of a Communities of Practice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Yukawa

    2010-03-01

    the end of the course may indicate that an effective balance between face‐to‐face and online media was achieved. At the meso‐level, students valued learning in community for developing mutual respect, confidence building, risk taking, deeper and more varied learning, learning with and from their peers, and greater enjoyment in the classes. Students found that the online environments were useful for organizing the class objectives and subject matter, “staying connected” between classes, sharing ideas, keeping track of their work, and preparing them for future work in blended environments. At the macro‐level, the findings of the effects on student growth related to core LIS concepts, practices, professional identity and leadership skills were inconclusive. However, students’ expressed a high regard for the value of collaboration, and there were indications that the model supported differentiated learning of professional knowledge and skills.Conclusion ‐ The findings strongly suggest that the use of the CoP model had positive effects on the learning process. Students’ high regard for the value of collaboration appears to be a clear effect of using the CoP model. The assessment methods were sufficient for testing the efficacy of most aspects of the model under the limited conditions of this study. Student responses led to refinements in both the model and methods. This study contributes to social constructivist learning approaches and LIS curricular development by presenting an innovative model for supporting professional growth among adult learners, as well as a conceptual framework to guide evidence based practice. Further testing and refinement of the model in other contexts and by other educators are needed to ensure that the model is robust and broadly applicable.

  17. Teaching evidence-based practice in a distance education occupational therapy doctoral program: strategies for professional growth and advancing the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Centennial Vision of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) projects that by 2017 all occupational therapy (OT) practice areas will be supported by evidence. Achieving this goal requires preparing clinicians with the skills to assimilate, analyze, and apply research to their areas of practice and communicate the value of OT services to consumers and payers. These skills are at the heart of evidence-based practice (EBP). Educators must be prepared to teach EBP skills in both entry-level and postprofessional programs. This article outlines how EBP can be taught to postprofessional occupational therapy clinical doctoral students using a distance education format. Key features of a successful EBP course include having access to full-text electronic articles, opportunities for students to explore the literature in their own areas of interest, consistent and timely feedback on written work and discussion topics, and opportunities to collaborate with peers.

  18. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management.

  19. The American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry: a critical resource for 21st century dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Jeske, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Through its website (http:// www.ada.org/prof/resources/ebd/index.asp), the American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry offers dental health professionals access to systematic reviews of oral health-related research findings, as well as Clinical Recommendations, which summarize large bodies of scientific evidence in the form of practice recommendations, e.g., the use of professionally-applied topical fluoride and pit-and-fissure sealants. Another feature of the site of great practical importance to the practicing dentist is the Critical Summary, which is a concise review of an individual systematic review's methodology and findings, as well as the importance and context of the outcomes, and the strengths and weaknesses of the systematic review and its implications for dental practice.

  20. Practice Parameter: Evaluation of the child with microcephaly (an evidence-based review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Stephen; Michelson, David; Plawner, Lauren; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To make evidence-based recommendations concerning the evaluation of the child with microcephaly. Methods: Relevant literature was reviewed, abstracted, and classified. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered scheme of evidence classification. Results: Microcephaly is an important neurologic sign but there is nonuniformity in its definition and evaluation. Microcephaly may result from any insult that disturbs early brain growth and can be seen in association with hundreds of genetic syndromes. Annually, approximately 25,000 infants in the United States will be diagnosed with microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (−2 to −3 SD; ∼40%). Coexistent conditions include epilepsy (∼40%), cerebral palsy (∼20%), mental retardation (∼50%), and ophthalmologic disorders (∼20% to ∼50%). Recommendations: Neuroimaging may be considered useful in identifying structural causes in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly (Level C). Targeted and specific genetic testing may be considered in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly who has clinical or imaging abnormalities that suggest a specific diagnosis or who shows no evidence of an acquired or environmental etiology (Level C). Screening for coexistent conditions such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and sensory deficits may also be considered (Level C). Further study is needed regarding the yield of diagnostic testing in children with microcephaly. GLOSSARY CP = cerebral palsy; GDD = global developmental delay; HC = head circumference; MRE = medically refractory epilepsy; OMIM = Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. PMID:19752457

  1. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilisation of Evidence-Based Practices by ASD Early Intervention Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Jessica M.; Ferguson, Sarah; Fordyce, Kathryn; Joosten, Annette; Paku, Sofia; Stephens, Miranda; Trembath, David; Keen, Deb

    2017-01-01

    A number of autism intervention practices have been demonstrated to be effective. However, the use of unsupported practices persists in community early intervention settings. Recent research has suggested that personal, professional and workplace factors may influence intervention choices. The aim of this research was to investigate knowledge and…

  3. Partnership for implementation of evidence-based mental health practices in rural federally qualified health centers: theory and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Justin B; Curran, Geoffrey; Kramer, Teresa; Mouden, Sip; Ward-Jones, Susan; Owen, Richard; Fortney, John

    2012-01-01

    Mental health and substance abuse are among the most commonly reported reasons for visits to Federally Qualified Health Centers (CHCs), yet only 6.5% of encounters are with on-site behavioral health specialists. Rural CHCs are significantly less likely to have on-site behavioral specialists than urban CHCs. Because of this lack of mental health specialists in rural areas, the most promising approach to improving mental health outcomes is to help rural primary care (PC) providers deliver evidence-based practices (EBPs). Despite the scope of these problems, no research has developed an effective implementation strategy for facilitating the adoption of mental health EBPs for rural CHCs. We sought to describe the conceptual components of an implementation partnership that focuses on the adaption and adoption of mental health EBPs by rural CHCs in Arkansas. We present a conceptual model that integrates seven separate frameworks: (1) Jones and Wells' Evidence-Based Community Partnership Model, (2) Kitson's Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS) implementation framework, (3) Sackett's definition of evidence-based medicine, (4) Glisson's organizational social context model, (5) Rubenstein's Evidence-Based Quality Improvement (EBQI) facilitation process, (6) Glasgow's RE-AIM evaluation approach, and (7) Naylor's concept of shared decision making. By integrating these frameworks into a meaningful conceptual model, we hope to develop a successful implementation partnership between an academic health center and small rural CHCs to improve mental health outcomes. Findings from this implementation partnership should have relevance to hundreds of clinics and millions of patients, and could help promote the sustained adoption of EBPs across rural America.

  4. Icelandic nurses' beliefs, skills, and resources associated with evidence-based practice and related factors: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Hrund S

    2013-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential to the improvement of patient outcomes and the quality of care. Nurses' use of evidence in practice, however, remains limited. Assessing nurses' readiness for EBP where it is not as prominent as in countries leading EBP research was of particular interest. To determine Icelandic registered nurses' (RNs') ability to provide care based on evidence as measured by their beliefs, perception of skills, and access to resources associated with EBP. A descriptive survey was used in which a random sample of 540 Icelandic RNs completed the translated and modified version of the Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice and the translated EBP Beliefs Scale. Descriptive statistics, correlations, chi-square tests, t tests and one-way ANOVAs were used to analyze the data. Participants strongly believed in the value of EBP for patient care, but were less confident regarding their own knowledge and skills needed for EBP. Most (82%) of the respondents (i.e., RNs) turned to peers when in need of information, rather than peer-reviewed resources. Although over half of the RNs (54%) had received instructions in the use of electronic databases, only a third indicated success in using them. They considered "lack of search skills" as the primary barrier to use of research in practice. Using research findings in practice was associated with positive EBP beliefs, familiarity with EBP and other EBP-related activities. Clinical RNs were found to be at a disadvantage when it came to access to EBP-related resources and participated less frequently in EBP-related activities other than using research in practice. Icelandic RNs' beliefs regarding EBP are similar to those of RNs in other countries. Their access to EBP resources is generally good, but they lack the skills and knowledge needed for EBP. Strategies aimed at changing the organizational and practice context need to be developed. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Applying psychological theory to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of taking intra-oral radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Debbie; Pitts, Nigel B; Eccles, Martin; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Johnston, Marie; Steen, Nick; Glidewell, Liz; Thomas, Ruth; Maclennan, Graeme; Clarkson, Jan E; Walker, Anne

    2006-10-01

    This study applies psychological theory to the implementation of evidence-based clinical practice. The first objective was to see if variables from psychological frameworks (developed to understand, predict and influence behaviour) could predict an evidence-based clinical behaviour. The second objective was to develop a scientific rationale to design or choose an implementation intervention. Variables from the Theory of Planned Behaviour, Social Cognitive Theory, Self-Regulation Model, Operant Conditioning, Implementation Intentions and the Precaution Adoption Process were measured, with data collection by postal survey. The primary outcome was the number of intra-oral radiographs taken per course of treatment collected from a central fee claims database. Participants were 214 Scottish General Dental Practitioners. At the theory level, the Theory of Planned Behaviour explained 13% variance in the number of radiographs taken, Social Cognitive Theory explained 7%, Operant Conditioning explained 8%, Implementation Intentions explained 11%. Self-Regulation and Stage Theory did not predict significant variance in radiographs taken. Perceived behavioural control, action planning and risk perception explained 16% of the variance in number of radiographs taken. Knowledge did not predict the number of radiographs taken. The results suggest an intervention targeting predictive psychological variables could increase the implementation of this evidence-based practice, while influencing knowledge is unlikely to do so. Measures which predicted number of radiographs taken also predicted intention to take radiographs, and intention accounted for significant variance in behaviour (adjusted R(2)=5%: F(1,166)=10.28, ptheory-based approach enabled the creation of a methodology that can be replicated for identifying factors predictive of clinical behaviour and for the design and choice of interventions to modify practice as new evidence emerges.

  6. Implementing evidence-based practices for youth in an HMO: the roles of external ratings and market share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John; Daleiden, Eric; Dopson, Sue

    2011-05-01

    A qualitative study of child clinicians in a non-profit HMO examined implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for anxiety and oppositional defiant disorders using interviews and focus groups with 33 clinicians (97% of participants), and ethnography of emails and meetings. Analysis showed statistical measures of access and service-key elements of rating organizations' "report cards"- were central in creating "pressure" making transition to EBPs difficult. EBPs were secondary to access and service targets. "Research" and "statistics" were perceived as unrealistic, "literature" as lacking authority. Rating organizations should include outcome and fidelity metrics to align market share pressures with children's health.

  7. Place shaping to create health and wellbeing using health impact assessment: health geography applied to develop evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Alyson; Curtis, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    In a political milieu where there is pressure towards localised and participative decisionmaking, and an environment of global recession and environmental degradation, it is crucial that population health considerations inform strategic decisions. The paper puts forward 'place shaping to create health and wellbeing' as a strategic tool, drawing on ideas that are fundamental in health geography, and argues that this is an important emerging application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA), as part of evidence-based practice. These views developed primarily from case study work in the North East of England aiming to enhance health and wellbeing in a population with significant health disadvantages. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians.

  9. The Role of Lean Process Improvement in Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Scott, Jennifer; Vilander, Gavin; Marx, Larry; Quirk, Michael; Lindberg, Julie; Koerner, Kelly

    2015-10-01

    To effectively implement evidence-based practices (EBP) in behavioral health care, an organization needs to have operating structures and processes that can address core EBP implementation factors and stages. Lean, a widely used quality improvement process, can potentially address the factors crucial to successful implementation of EBP. This article provides an overview of Lean and the relationship between Lean process improvement steps, and EBP implementation models. Examples of how Lean process improvement methodologies can be used to help plan and carry out implementation of EBP in mental health delivery systems are presented along with limitations and recommendations for future research and clinical application.

  10. Aligning Theory and Design: The Development of an Online Learning Intervention to Teach Evidence-based Practice for Maximal Reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagran, Louise; Vihstadt, Corrie; Evans, Roni

    2015-09-01

    Online educational interventions to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) are a promising mechanism for overcoming some of the barriers to incorporating research into practice. However, attention must be paid to aligning strategies with adult learning theories to achieve optimal outcomes. We describe the development of a series of short self-study modules, each covering a small set of learning objectives. Our approach, informed by design-based research (DBR), involved 6 phases: analysis, design, design evaluation, redesign, development/implementation, and evaluation. Participants were faculty and students in 3 health programs at a complementary and integrative educational institution. We chose a reusable learning object approach that allowed us to apply 4 main learning theories: events of instruction, cognitive load, dual processing, and ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction). A formative design evaluation suggested that the identified theories and instructional approaches were likely to facilitate learning and motivation. Summative evaluation was based on a student survey (N=116) that addressed how these theories supported learning. Results suggest that, overall, the selected theories helped students learn. The DBR approach allowed us to evaluate the specific intervention and theories for general applicability. This process also helped us define and document the intervention at a level of detail that covers almost all the proposed Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational intervention and Teaching (GREET) items. This thorough description will facilitate the interpretation of future research and implementation of the intervention. Our approach can also serve as a model for others considering online EBP intervention development.

  11. Evidence-based practices to increase hand hygiene compliance in health care facilities: An integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Jun Rong Jeffrey; Sagha-Zadeh, Rana; Vielemeyer, Ole; Franklin, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) in health care facilities is a key component to reduce pathogen transmission and nosocomial infections. However, most HH interventions (HHI) have not been sustainable. This review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of recently published evidence-based HHI designed to improve HH compliance (HHC) that will enable health care providers to make informed choices when allocating limited resources to improve HHC and patient safety. The Medline electronic database (using PubMed) was used to identify relevant studies. English language articles that included hand hygiene interventions and related terms combined with health care environments or related terms were included. Seventy-three studies that met the inclusion criteria were summarized. Interventions were categorized as improving awareness with education, facility design, and planning, unit-level protocols and procedures, hospital-wide programs, and multimodal interventions. Past successful HHIs may not be as effective when applied to other health care environments. HH education should be interactive and engaging. Electronic monitoring and reminders should be implemented in phases to ensure cost-effectiveness. To create hospitalwide programs that engage end users, policy makers should draw expertise from interdisciplinary fields. Before implementing the various components of multimodal interventions, health care practitioners should identify and examine HH difficulties unique to their organizations. Future research should seek to achieve the following: replicate successful HHI in other health care environments, develop reliable HHC monitoring tools, understand caregiver-patient-family interactions, examine ways (eg, hospital leadership, financial support, and strategies from public health and infection prevention initiatives) to sustain HHC, and use simulated lab environments to refine study designs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  12. Evidence-Based Dentistry: The Next Frontier in Translational and Trans-National Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ajaj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD is a systematic approach for ob-taining the best available clini-cally relevant scientific evidence with the ultimate goal and intent of increasing effectiveness and efficacy in clinical decision-making. EBD pursues optimizing both the patient’s benefit through the best utilization of dentist’s experience and clinical expertise, and on making full use of the most reliable and va-lid research outcomes. EBD is initiated by the patient-dentist interaction, which is translated into a patient-centered P.I.C.O. question. The resulting literature bibliome is assessed and quantified for the level and quality of the evidence by means of fully validated and reli-able instruments based on common standard criteria of research methodology, design and statistical analysis. The outcomes are evaluated by acceptable sampling analysis, Such that studies, whose flaws have been identified to result potentially into misleading infor-mation to the patients and/or practitioner may be judiciously removed from further consideration". The research synthesis process tests for overarching statistical sig-nificance among non-heterogeneous outcomes, and yields a consensus of the best available evidence. The systematic nature of the re-search review and synthesis that characterizes EBD is reported in the literature as “systematic reviews”, “complex systematic reviews”, or “clinically relevant complex systematic reviews”. Thus the reported best available evidence ensures patient-centered clinical decision for interventions of the highest possible effectiveness and effi-cacy. EBD contrasts with traditional dentistry based on the evidence for its systematic stringency, coupled with its fundamental validity as a patient-centered optimization of clinical modes of interventions.

  13. Moving from tacit knowledge to evidence-based practice: the Kaiser Permanente community partners study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguídanos, Susan M; Jamison, Paula M

    2006-01-01

    For several decades both medical and social work practices have failed to consistently include measures to determine the effectiveness of their care and practices. This is especially true of care management practices. With the growth and aging of our population, this is of particular concern when many of our resources for older adults are channeled into services such as geriatric care management. This article describes a randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of four levels of geriatric care management. Results from this study did not support the tacit knowledge of the clinicians in terms of the effectiveness of their practices. This article describes the study methods and results, and how evidence from this study impacted subsequent service provided by geriatric care managers.

  14. Roles for education in development and implementation of evidence-based practices for community programs for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Patricia; Conway, Francine

    2015-01-01

    It is essential for key stakeholders in evidence-based practice (EBP) to be informed about barriers and achievements in EBP and collaborate in developing and implementing EBP. This article provides information to assist educators, students, practitioners, clients, and researchers who are stakeholders in use of EBP in community-based aging programs to understand barriers to EBP and approaches for developing and implementing EBP. Highlighting roles of education in EBP, the authors describe barriers to EBP; use of education to address gaps among research, education, and practice for EBP; cultural competence; and educational approaches for community-based implementation. EBP has been central to development of quality health and social services for older adults, but challenges remain in translation of research findings into EBP. Examples of programs in which research, education, and practice are linked for provision of EBP, as well as educational resources and tools for developing and implementing EBP, are identified.

  15. Surgical wound irrigation: a call for evidence-based standardization of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sue; Spencer, Maureen; Graham, Denise; Johnson, Helen Boehm

    2014-05-01

    Surgical wound irrigation has long been debated as a potentially critical intraoperative measure taken to prevent the development of surgical site infection (SSI). Unlike many other SSI prevention efforts, there are no official practice guidelines or recommendations from any major medical group for the practice of surgical irrigation. As a result, practitioner implementation of the 3 major irrigation variables (delivery method, volume, and solution additives) can differ significantly. A focus group of key thought leaders in infection prevention and epidemiology convened recently to address the implications of different surgical irrigation practices. They identified an urgent need for well-designed clinical trials investigating surgical irrigation practices, improved collaboration between surgical personnel and infection preventionists, and examination of existing evidence to standardize irrigation practices. The group agreed that current published data are sufficient to support the elimination of antibiotic solutions for surgical irrigation; the avoidance of surfactants for surgical irrigation; and the use of sterile normal saline, sterile water, and 1 medical device containing a sterile 0.05% chlorhexidine gluconate solution followed by sterile saline. Given the current lack of sufficient evidence identifying ideal delivery method and volume choices, expert opinion must be relied on to guide best practice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  16. Assessment of nurses' knowledge on evidence-based preventive practices for pressure ulcer risk reduction in patients with impaired mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akese, M I; Adejumo, P O; Ilesanmi, R E; Obilor, H N

    2014-09-01

    The increase in the prevalence of pressure ulcer among patients with impaired physical mobility has currently been associated with nurses' inadequate knowledge of preventive interventions. To assess nurses' knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors and evidence-based preventive practices. This descriptive study was carried out at the University Teaching Hospital Maiduguri (UMTH), Borno State, Nigeria. Total sampling technique was utilized in the recruitment of the study participants. An adapted 75-item-pressure ulcer questionnaire was used for data collection. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. The hypotheses on nurses' knowledge were tested at 0.05 level of significance using Chi square test. A total of 219 nurses participated in this study with response rate of 68.0%. The nurses' years of professional practice ranged from 1 to 35 years with a mean of 11.7 (± 7.8) years. Approximately, 73% of the nurses demonstrated a low level of knowledge of pressure ulcer identification/staging, 69.4% demonstrated an average level of knowledge of risk factors and 79.9% demonstrated high level of knowledge of preventive practices. The relationship between nurses' knowledge of risk factors and knowledge of preventive practices (p = 0.37) was not significant. Nurses demonstrated a knowledge deficit in core areas on pressure ulcer identification/staging, risk factors' assessment and evidence-based preventive practices. In order to address this dearth, there is a need to institute an educational-based practice-guideline on pressure ulcer prevention for nurses.

  17. Steroid injections in the upper extremity: experienced clinical opinion versus evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Gary; Marshall, Astrid; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z; Kuhn, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    A survey regarding upper-extremity steroid injection practices was distributed to all active members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) using SurveyMonkey. Response rates for the ASSH and ASES were 26% and 24%, respectively. The potency-adjusted dose of steroid injected for common hand and wrist injections ranged from 0.375 to 133.33 mg and for shoulder injections ranged from 0.375 to 250 mg. These ranges span 356-fold and 667-fold differences, respectively. Potency-adjusted doses differed significantly between steroid types for all injections evaluated in this study. American Society for Surgery of the Hand members gave significantly smaller doses of steroid for the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints than ASES members. Only 9% of respondents based injection practice on a scientific reference. Sixteen percent of ASSH and 31% of ASES respondents reported no specific rationale for their steroid injection practice; 78% of ASSH and 52% of ASES respondents attributed their rationale to some kind of instruction from their mentors or colleagues. Upper-extremity surgeons demonstrate substantial variability in their practice of steroid injections, with up to a 667-fold range in steroid dose. Experienced clinical opinion is the principal rationale for these injection practices; little rationale is based on formal scientific evidence. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Development and validation of an assessment instrument for teaching evidence-based practice to students in allied health care: the Dutch Modified Fresno

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, Bea; de Wolf, G. S.; van Dijk, N. [=Nynke; Lucas, C.

    2012-01-01

    To enable students to become competent evidence-based working professionals, teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to students in allied health care has to be effective. Measuring effectiveness of EBP curricula, however, appears to be difficult due to the lack of valid instruments for this target

  19. Supporting User Involvement in Child Welfare Work: A Way of Implementing Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Karin; Hyvönen, Ulf; Karlsson, Per-Åke; Larsson, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The article describes and analyses some preliminary working methods for user involvement in child welfare. The models are based on the results of a national project in Sweden where children and young people have been involved as informants. How experiences and viewpoints from children and young people can be a source of knowledge in child welfare…

  20. A practical, evidence-based, comprehensive (PEC) physical examination for diagnosing pathology of the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Samuel; Krill, Michael K; Amoo-Achampong, Kelms; Kwon, KiHyun; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Clinical examination of the shoulder joint has gained attention as clinicians aim to use an evidence-based examination of the biceps tendon, with the desire for a proper diagnosis while minimizing costly imaging procedures. The purpose of this study is to create a decision tree analysis that enables the development of a clinical algorithm for diagnosing long head of biceps (LHB) pathology. A literature review of Level I and II diagnostic studies was conducted to extract characteristics of clinical tests for LHB pathology through a systematic review of PubMed, Medline, Ovid, and Cochrane Review databases. Tests were combined in series and parallel to determine sensitivities and specificities, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined for each combination using a subjective pretest probability. The "gold standard" for diagnosis in all included studies was arthroscopy or arthrotomy. The optimal testing modality was use of the uppercut test combined with the tenderness to palpation of the biceps tendon test. This combination achieved a sensitivity of 88.4% when performed in parallel and a specificity of 93.8% when performed in series. These tests used in combination optimize post-test probability accuracy greater than any single individual test. Performing the uppercut test and biceps groove tenderness to palpation test together has the highest sensitivity and specificity of known physical examinations maneuvers to aid in the diagnosis of LHB pathology compared with diagnostic arthroscopy (practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination). A decision tree analysis aides in the practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination diagnostic accuracy post-testing based on the ordinal scale pretest probability. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementing an evidence-based Tai Ji Quan program in a multicultural setting: A pilot dissemination project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fink

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Falls in older adults are a significant public health issue and a particularly significant health risk in Minnesota. With accumulating research evidence suggesting that falls can be prevented through exercise, there is an increased public health effort among organizations serving older adults to translate and disseminate evidence-based programs into the community. Such efforts, however, face additional challenges if they are implemented in communities with older adults from different cultural backgrounds and languages. This paper briefly describes a pilot community-based dissemination project, including the initiation, implementation, process, and outcomes, of an evidence-based fall prevention (Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance formerly known as Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance through a local Area Agency on Aging in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area in Minnesota (USA. Overall, the program was successfully implemented resulting in adoption by local community organizations serving Asian and, to a lesser degree, East African non-English speaking older adults. Bilingual community instructors were trained to lead the classes resulting in broad participation and improved physical performance by the older adults targeted for the intervention. The results from this pilot study indicate that Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance can be implemented with positive results in non-English speaking community settings using bilingual leaders.

  2. Teaching EBP: strategies for achieving sustainable organizational change toward evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Williamson, Kathleen M; Kent, Bridie; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2010-03-01

    Given that changes in health care are now the norm, organizational change needs to be part of all nurses' curricula. Engaging students in learning how change happens by sharing real world examples can make the learning meaningful for students and increase the likelihood that the knowledge will be applied to their practices.

  3. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part III. Critical Appraisal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related problem and searching for reliable evidence to provide an answer. Once potential evidence has been found, it is necessary to determine whether the information is credible and whether it is useful in one's practice by using the technique of ...

  4. Ability Grouping in New Zealand High Schools: Are Practices Evidence-Based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Garry; Witte, Chrystal

    2014-01-01

    There is an extensive international research literature on the effect of ability grouping (e.g., tracking, streaming, banding, setting) on children's academic and behavioral outcomes. However, it is questionable to what extent the findings of research on this topic have influenced the practice of ability grouping in New Zealand schools. Fifteen…

  5. Enhancing the Impact of Evidence-Based Publications on K-12 ESL Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Marilyn L.; Lee, Kent; Rossiter, Marian J.

    2017-01-01

    The reading of current research-informed publications is an essential component of teacher professional development that has the potential to lead to or reinforce the implementation of effective instructional practices. To our knowledge, no studies have examined kindergarten to grade 12 (K-12) ESL teacher engagement in professional reading related…

  6. Caries preventive measures used in orthodontic practices: an evidence-based decision?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Katsaros, C.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although it is well known that treatment with fixed appliances increases the risk of enamel demineralization, little information is available about preventive measures that orthodontists actually use. This study was executed to survey measures used in orthodontic practices to prevent

  7. How to proceed when evidence-based practice is required but very little evidence available?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Lanlo, Olivier; Walker, Bruce F

    2013-01-01

    All clinicians of today know that scientific evidence is the base on which clinical practice should rest. However, this is not always easy, in particular in those disciplines, where the evidence is scarce. Although the last decades have brought an impressive production of research that is of inte...

  8. Impact of Online Education on Nurses' Delivery of Smoking Cessation Interventions With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialous, Stella A; Sarna, Linda; Wells, Marjorie J; Brook, Jenny K; Kralikova, Eva; Pankova, Alexandra; Zatoński, Witold; Przewozniak, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Europe and worldwide. Nurses, if properly educated, can contribute to decreasing the burden of tobacco use in the region by helping smokers quit smoking. To assess: (a) the feasibility of an online program to educate nurses in Czech Republic and Poland on evidence-based smoking cessation interventions for patients and (b) self-reported changes in practices related to consistently (usually or always) providing smoking cessation interventions to smokers, before and 3 months after participation in the program. A prospective single-group pre-post design. A total of 280 nurses from Czech Republic and 156 from Poland completed baseline and follow-up surveys. At 3 months, nurses were significantly more likely to provide smoking cessation interventions to patients who smoke and refer patients for cessation services (p Education about tobacco control can make a difference in clinical practice, but ongoing support is needed to maintain these changes. Health system changes can also facilitate the expectation that delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions should be routine nursing care. Educating nurses on cessation interventions and tobacco control is pivotal to decrease tobacco-related disparities, disease, and death. Online methods provide an accessible way to reach a large number of nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. A systematic review of evidence-based assessment practices by allied health practitioners for children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Bridget; Kerr, Claire; Shields, Nora; Imms, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The routine use of psychometrically robust assessment tools is integral to best practice. This systematic review aims to determine the extent to which evidence-based assessment tools were used by allied health practitioners for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis protocols 2015 was employed. A search strategy applied the free text terms: 'allied health practitioner', 'assessment', and 'cerebral palsy', and related subject headings to seven databases. Included articles reported assessment practices of occupational therapists, physiotherapists, or speech pathologists working with children with CP aged 0 to 18 years, published from the year 2000. Fourteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-eight assessment tools were reported, of which 23 were in high use. Of these, three tools focused on gross motor function and had acceptable validity for use with children with CP: Gross Motor Function Measure, Gross Motor Function Classification System, and goniometry. Validated tools to assess other activity components, participation, quality of life, and pain were used infrequently or not at all. Allied health practitioners used only a few of the available evidence-based assessment tools. Assessment findings in many areas considered important by children and families were rarely documented using validated assessment tools. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Factors affecting implementation of an evidence-based practice in the Veterans Health Administration: Illness management and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Alan B; Salyers, Michelle P; White, Dominique A; Gilbride, Daniel J; White, Laura M; Kean, Jacob; Kukla, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Illness management and recovery (IMR) is an evidence-based practice that assists consumers in managing their illnesses and pursuing personal recovery goals. Although research has examined factors affecting IMR implementation facilitated by multifaceted, active roll-outs, the current study attempted to elucidate factors affecting IMR implementation outside the context of a research-driven implementation. Semi-structured interviews with 20 local recovery coordinators and 18 local IMR experts were conducted at 23 VA medical centers. Interviews examined perceived and experienced barriers and facilitators to IMR implementation. Data were analyzed via thematic inductive/deductive analysis in the form of crystallization/immersion. Six factors differed between sites implementing IMR from those not providing IMR: awareness of IMR, importer-champions, autonomy-supporting leadership, veteran-centered care, presence of a sensitive period, and presence of a psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery center. Four factors were common in both groups: recovery orientation, evidence-based practices orientation, perceived IMR fit within program structure, and availability of staff time. IMR can be adopted in lieu of active implementation support; however, knowledge dissemination appears to be key. Future research should examine factors affecting the quality of implementation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Assessment scales for disorders of consciousness: evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Ronald T; Sherer, Mark; Whyte, John; Katz, Douglas I; Giacino, Joseph T; Rosenbaum, Amy M; Hammond, Flora M; Kalmar, Kathleen; Pape, Theresa Louise-Bender; Zafonte, Ross; Biester, Rosette C; Kaelin, Darryl; Kean, Jacob; Zasler, Nathan

    2010-12-01

    To conduct a systematic review of behavioral assessment scales for disorders of consciousness (DOC); provide evidence-based recommendations for clinical use based on their content validity, reliability, diagnostic validity, and ability to predict functional outcomes; and provide research recommendations on DOC scale development and validation. Articles published through March 31, 2009, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Biomedical Reference Collection, and PsycINFO. Thirteen primary terms that defined DOC were paired with 30 secondary terms that defined aspects of measurement. Scale names, abbreviations, and authors were also used as search terms. Task force members identified additional articles by using personal knowledge and examination of references in reviewed articles. Primary criteria included the following: (1) provided reliability, diagnostic validity, and/or prognostic validity data; (2) examined a cohort, case control, or case series sample of persons with DOC who were age older than or equal to 18 years; and (3) assessed in an acute care or rehabilitation setting. Articles were excluded if peer review was not conducted, original data were not reported, or an English language article was not available. The initial search yielded 580 articles. After paired rater review of study abstracts, guideline development was based on 37 articles representing 13 DOC scales. Rater pairs classified studies addressing diagnostic and prognostic validity by using the American Academy of Neurology 4-tier level of evidence scheme, and reliability by using a task force-developed 3-tier evidence scheme. An independent quality review of ratings was conducted, and corrections were made. The Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R), Sensory Stimulation Assessment Measure (SSAM), Wessex Head Injury Matrix (WHIM

  12. Incorporating equity into developing and implementing for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Sandoval-Vargas, Gisella; Mosquera, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are useful tools for clinical decision making, processes standardization and quality of care improvements. The current General Social Security and Health System (GSSHS) in Colombia is promoting the initiative of developing and implementing CPG based on evidence in order to improve efficiency and quality of care. The reduction of inequalities in health should be an objective of the GSSHS. The main propose of this analysis is to argue why it is necessary to co...

  13. Knowledge of evidence-based urinary catheter care practice recommendations among healthcare workers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Saint, Sanjay; Galecki, Andrzej; Chen, Shu; Krein, Sarah L

    2010-08-01

    To assess the knowledge of recommended urinary catheter care practices among nursing home (NH) healthcare workers (HCWs) in southeast Michigan. Self-administered survey. Seven NHs in southeast Michigan. HCWs. The survey included questions about respondent characteristics and knowledge about indications, care, and personal hygiene pertaining to urinary catheters. The association between knowledge measures and occupation (nurses vs aides) was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Three hundred fifty-six of 440 HCWs (81%) responded. More than 90% of HCWs were aware of measures such as cleaning around the catheter daily, glove use, and hand hygiene with catheter manipulation. They were less aware of research-proven recommendations of not disconnecting the catheter from its bag (59% nurses, 30% aides, Phand hygiene after casual contact (60% nurses, 69% aides, P=.07). HCWs were also unaware of recommendations regarding alcohol-based hand rub (27% nurses and 32% aides with correct responses, P=.38). HCWs reported informal (e.g., nurse supervisors) and formal (in-services) sources of knowledge about catheter care. Significant discrepancies remain between research-proven recommendations pertaining to urinary catheter care and HCWs' knowledge. Nurses and aides differ in their knowledge of recommendations against harmful practices, such as disconnecting the catheter from the bag and routinely irrigating catheters. Further research should focus on strategies to enhance dissemination of proven infection control practices in NHs. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Nursing journal clubs: A literature review on the effective teaching strategy for continuing education and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Carly

    2014-12-01

    This literature review on nursing journal clubs evaluates the efficacy of the teaching strategy within the clinical setting. Peer-reviewed articles were retrieved using an online journal database. Inclusion criteria incorporated information on efficacy of the teaching strategy, evidence-based practices, and continuing education as they related to nursing journal club initiatives. The literature cited numerous benefits and proved to be in favor of nursing journal clubs. The most common benefits found were nurses remaining abreast of current research, skill development in reading and critically appraising research, and incorporation of evidenice-based practices to patient care. Due to the self-motivated and voluntary nature of this teaching strategy, a limitation commonly identified was lack of participation, and further research on this limitation often was suggested. Nursing journal clubs proved to be an effective teaching strategy; a finding that remains consistent with the medical pioneers of the movement.

  15. A Multi-Level Examination of Organizational Context on Adult Probation Officer Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglione, Jill

    2018-04-01

    Currently, both researchers and criminal justice agencies recognize the need to consider evidence-based practices (EBPs) as means to provide effective supervision and reduce recidivism rates. Research documents the importance of organizational characteristics in relation to EBP adoption and implementation, including organizational climate, commitment to the organization, and cynicism for change. Using data collected through surveys of 251 probation staff nested within 12 probation agencies in the United States, the current study utilizes Hierarchical Linear Modeling to examine the association of these important organizational characteristics with probation staff reported attitudes toward EBPs. These findings are critical for understanding how probation staff perceptions relate to the transportability of EBPs and which/how contextual factors influence attitudes toward best practices.

  16. Evidence-based use of electronic clinical tracking systems in advanced practice registered nurse education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstetter, M Laurie; Smith, Lynette S; Brooks, Andrea F

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, the federal government has mandated healthcare providers to incorporate electronic health records into practice by 2015. This technological update in healthcare documentation has generated a need for advanced practice RN programs to incorporate information technology into education. The National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties created core competencies to guide program standards for advanced practice RN education. One core competency is Technology and Information Literacy. Educational programs are moving toward the utilization of electronic clinical tracking systems to capture students' clinical encounter data. The purpose of this integrative review was to evaluate current research on advanced practice RN students' documentation of clinical encounters utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems to meet advanced practice RN curriculum outcome goals in information technology as defined by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. The state of the science depicts student' and faculty attitudes, preferences, opinions, and data collections of students' clinical encounters. Although electronic clinical tracking systems were utilized to track students' clinical encounters, these systems have not been evaluated for meeting information technology core competency standards. Educational programs are utilizing electronic clinical tracking systems with limited evidence-based literature evaluating the ability of these systems to meet the core competencies in advanced practice RN programs.

  17. Overcoming barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice concepts in athletic training education: perceptions of select educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manspeaker, Sarah; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    The need to include evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in entry-level athletic training education is evident as the profession transitions toward using evidence to inform clinical decision making. To evaluate athletic training educators' experience with implementation of EBP concepts in Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)-accredited entry-level athletic training education programs in reference to educational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Qualitative interviews of emergent design with grounded theory. Undergraduate CAATE-accredited athletic training education programs. Eleven educators (3 men, 8 women). The average number of years teaching was 14.73 ± 7.06. Interviews were conducted to evaluate perceived barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers to implementation of evidence-based concepts in the curriculum. Interviews were explored qualitatively through open and axial coding. Established themes and categories were triangulated and member checked to determine trustworthiness. Educators identified 3 categories of need for EBP instruction: respect for the athletic training profession, use of EBP as part of the decision-making toolbox, and third-party reimbursement. Barriers to incorporating EBP concepts included time, role strain, knowledge, and the gap between clinical and educational practices. Suggested strategies for surmounting barriers included identifying a starting point for inclusion and approaching inclusion from a faculty perspective. Educators must transition toward instruction of EBP, regardless of barriers present in their academic programs, in order to maintain progress with other health professions' clinical practices and educational standards. Because today's students are tomorrow's clinicians, we need to include EBP concepts in entry-level education to promote critical thinking, inspire potential research interest, and further develop the available body of knowledge in our

  18. Evidence based workplace interventions to promote breastfeeding practices among Pakistani working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali; Karmaliani, Rozina

    2013-03-01

    Breastfeeding is an essential source of nutrition for young babies; however, it is challenging for employed mothers to continue breastfeeding with employment, especially if workplace support is minimal or missing. In Pakistan, from 1983 to 2008, the prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 months has decreased from 96% to 31%. In this region, workplace barriers have been reported as one of the reasons that result in early cessation of breastfeeding among working mothers. This paper aims at reviewing global literature to explore workplace interventions that can promote the breastfeeding practices among working mothers in Pakistan. A literature search of peer reviewed databases, including CINHAL (1980-2009), MEDLINE (1980-2009), Pub Med (1980-2009), Springer Link (1980-2008), and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3rd quarter, 2008), was undertaken. Considering the pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria, out of more than 500 literature sources, 50 were shortlisted and reviewed. A review of global literature revealed that in order to promote breastfeeding practices among employed mothers, the most powerful workplace interventions include: educating working mothers about management of breastfeeding with employment; enhancing employers' awareness about benefits of breastfeeding accommodation at workplace; arranging physical facilities for lactating mothers (including privacy, childcare facilities, breast pumps, and breast milk storage facilities); providing job-flexibility to working mothers; and initiating mother friendly policies at workplace that support breastfeeding. In Pakistani workplace settings, where little attention is paid to sustain breastfeeding practices among working mothers, there is a need to initiate lactation support programmes. These programmes can be made effective by implementing composite interventions at the level of breastfeeding working mothers, employers, and workplace. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier

  19. Evidence-based practice to improve outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayeni, O R; Evaniew, N; Ogilvie, R; Peterson, D C; Denkers, M R; Bhandari, M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have considered native knee anatomy and biomechanical function, and emphasized the long-term goals of protecting knee health and preventing the development of symptomatic ACL-deficient degenerative arthrosis. Validated and reproducible examination maneuvers are necessary for accurate diagnosis and appraisal of surgical interventions. Appropriately powered expertise-based trials should be emphasized to minimize bias, enhance validity, and reduce crossover. Best practice rehabilitation protocols can guide postoperative care while minimizing heterogeneity within studies. Functional outcome scores should be sensitive, responsive, and able to reliably detect small changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Complementary and integrative medicine for breast cancer patients - Evidence based practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, C M; Cardoso, M J

    2016-08-01

    On average half of the breast cancer patients' population uses complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) therapies and many of them would like to receive information on CIM from their conventional treatment team. However, often they don't feel comfortable in discussing CIM related questions, with their conventional treatment team, because they think they don't have enough expertise and available time to deal with this topic. Furthermore, information on the evidence of CIM is not easily accessible and the available information is not always reliable. The purpose of the current paper is to provide: 1) an overview about the CIM interventions that have shown positive effects in breast cancer patients and might be useful in supportive cancer care, 2) practical guidance on how to choose and find a qualified referral to a CIM treatment: 3) recommendations on how these interventions could be integrated into Breast Cancer Centers and which factors should be taken into consideration in this setting. This paper takes available CIM practice guidelines for cancer patients and previous research on CIM implementation models into account. There are CIM interventions that have shown a potential to reduce symptoms of cancer or cancer treatments in breast cancer patients and the vast majority uses a non-pharmacological approach and have a good potential for implementation. Nevertheless, further and more rigorous research is still needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Developing effective research-practice partnerships for creating a culture of evidence-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Manuel; Kelley, Susan Douglas; Casey, Susan; Taylor Haynes, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    With growing evidence that treatment as usual may have limited effectiveness in mental health the pressure on service providers to be accountable and produce evidence as to the effectiveness of their services has increased. Measurement Feedback Systems, such as the Contextualized Feedback System (CFS), have the potential to be powerful tools for service providers in assessing their own effectiveness at multiple levels with an organization. These systems represent an amalgamation of the data driven world of science and the experience driven world of clinical practice. However, the synthesis of these two worlds is not without significant challenges as these two very different cultures can easily clash. The key for successful collaboration in developing and implementing Measurement Feedback Systems is a good university-practice partnership that has a strong foundation in common goals and the positive relationships among its members. In addition, the partnership needs to be flexible so that it can adapt to new challenges and continuously grow with each obstacle. These are some of several lessons learned the authors of this article will share as part of their experience with developing and implementing CFS in one of the largest behavioral health service providers in the U.S.

  2. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2017-11-01

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  3. Perceived outcomes of web-based modules designed to enhance athletic trainers' knowledge of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Hankemeier, Dorice A; Wyant, Aimee L; Mutchler, Jessica M; Pitney, William A; Hays, Danica G

    2014-01-01

    The release of evidence-based practice (EBP) Web-based learning modules to the membership of the National Athletic Trainers' Association has provided athletic trainers (ATs) the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of the various EBP concepts. Whereas increasing the knowledge of EBP among ATs is important, assessing whether this newfound knowledge is being translated into clinical practice and didactic education is crucial. To explore the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding EBP on the didactic instruction patterns of athletic training educators and the clinical practice behaviors of clinicians. Qualitative study. Individual telephone interviews. A total of 25 ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; experience as an AT = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. We conducted 1 individual telephone interview with each participant. After transcription, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Participants perceived the EBP Web-based modules to produce numerous outcomes regarding education and clinical practice. These outcomes included perceived knowledge gain among participants, an increase in the importance and scope of EBP, a positive effect on educators' didactic instruction patterns and on instilling value and practice of EBP among students, and an enhanced ability among clinicians to implement EBP within clinical practice. However, some clinicians reported the Web-based modules had no current effect on clinical practice. Although the EBP Web-based modules were successful at enhancing knowledge among ATs, translation of knowledge into the classroom and clinical practice remains limited. Researchers should aim to identify effective strategies to help ATs implement EBP concepts into didactic education and clinical practice.

  4. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... and electronic patient records for diabetes patients, this paper reports research in progress regarding the prospects and pitfalls of evidence-based development....

  5. Stroke unit Nurse Managers' views of individual and organizational factors liable to influence evidence-based practice: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Peta; McInnes, Elizabeth; Hardy, Jennifer; Dale, Simeon; Middleton, Sandy

    2016-04-01

    The uptake of evidence into practice may be impeded or facilitated by individual and organizational factors within the local context. This study investigated Nurse Managers of New South Wales, Australia, stroke units (n = 19) in their views on: leadership ability (measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory), organizational learning (measured by the Organizational Learning Survey), attitudes and beliefs towards evidence-based practice (EBP) and readiness for change. Overall Nurse Managers reported high-level leadership skills and a culture of learning. Nurse Managers' attitude towards EBP was positive, although nursing colleague's attitudes were perceived as less positive. Nurse Managers agreed that implementing evidence in practice places additional demands on staff; and almost half (n = 9, 47%) reported that resources were not available for evidence implementation. The findings indicate that key persons responsible for evidence implementation are not allocated sufficient time to coordinate and implement guidelines into practice. The findings suggest that barriers to evidence uptake, including insufficient resources and time constraints, identified by Nurse Managers in this study are not likely to be unique to stroke units. Furthermore, Nurse Managers may be unable to address these organizational barriers (i.e. lack of resources) and thus provide all the components necessary to implement EBP. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Interventions to Reduce Perceived Stress Among Graduate Students: A Systematic Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, Susan B; Vermeesch, Amber L; Scott, Jane G

    2017-12-01

    Stress is a part of daily life for graduate students, including graduate nursing students. Contemporary graduate nursing students are facing unprecedented challenges to meet rigorous academic standards as they prepare for their advanced professional role to meet the demands of the nation's complex and ever-changing healthcare system. Empowering graduate nursing students to ease their perceived stress and minimize undesirable health effects may benefit their capacity to adapt and successfully manage perceived stress in their future healthcare role. To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the existing evidence with the aim of identifying evidence-based self-care interventions for coping with perceived stress. We conducted a systematic review, searching CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycINFO, and MEDLINE. Inclusion criteria included self-care, graduate students, perceived stress as measured by Perceived Stress Scale, quantitative analysis, conducted within the United States, English language, and peer reviewed. Two authors completed an asynchronous review of the articles, and one expert evidence-based practice mentor and one wellness expert conducted rigorous appraisal of the eight identified studies. Evidence was evaluated and synthesized, and recommendations for practice were determined. Eight studies meeting the criteria for this systematic review were critically appraised. The interventions varied from a stress management course to mind-body-stress-reduction (MBSR) techniques, such as yoga, breath work, meditation, and mindfulness. All studies measured the outcome of stress with the Perceived Stress Scale. Each study demonstrated a reduction in perceived stress postintervention. Most effective self-care MBSR interventions include (a) a didactic component, (b) a guided MBSR practice session, and (c) homework. Consideration should be given to a trained or certified MBSR instructor to teach the intervention. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  8. Implementation of a blended learning approach to teaching evidence based practice: a protocol for a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Bin Nordin, Rusli; Glasziou, Paul; Tilson, Julie K; Villanueva, Elmer

    2013-12-19

    Evidence based practice (EBP) requires that health professionals are competent in integrating the best evidence in their decision making. Being 'evidence-based' requires skills and knowledge in epidemiology, biostatistics and information literacy. EBP is commonly taught in medical and health sciences degrees, yet there is little evidence to guide educators as to the best teaching modality to increase learner competency in EBP. This study is mixed methods in design. A randomised controlled trial will examine the effectiveness of blended learning versus didactic approach of teaching EBP to medical students. The primary outcome of the RCT is EBP competency as assessed by the Berlin tool. Focus groups will be conducted to explore student perceptions and attitudes towards implementing a blended learning approach in teaching EBP. A concurrent triangulation design will be implemented, permitting quantitative data to inform the effectiveness of the intervention and qualitative data to contextualise the results. This study will provide novel evidence on the effectiveness of blended learning in teaching EBP to a cohort of undergraduate and graduate-entry medical students.

  9. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Hagigi, Fred; Parker, Louise E; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E

    2009-09-28

    Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  10. Mechanisms which help explain implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care facilities: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso, Malcolm; McCarthy, Grace; Kitson, Alison

    2014-07-01

    The context for the study was a nation-wide programme in Australia to implement evidence-based practice in residential aged care, in nine areas of practice, using a wide range of implementation strategies and involving 108 facilities. The study drew on the experiences of those involved in the programme to answer the question: what mechanisms influence the implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care and how do those mechanisms interact? The methodology used grounded theory from a critical realist perspective, informed by a conceptual framework that differentiates between the context, process and content of change. People were purposively sampled and invited to participate in semi-structured interviews, resulting in 44 interviews involving 51 people during 2009 and 2010. Participants had direct experience of implementation in 87 facilities, across nine areas of practice, in diverse locations. Sampling continued until data saturation was reached. The quality of the research was assessed using four criteria for judging trustworthiness: credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Data analysis resulted in the identification of four mechanisms that accounted for what took place and participants' experiences. The core category that provided the greatest understanding of the data was the mechanism On Common Ground, comprising several constructs that formed a 'common ground' for change to occur. The mechanism Learning by Connecting recognised the ability to connect new knowledge with existing practice and knowledge, and make connections between actions and outcomes. Reconciling Competing Priorities was an ongoing mechanism whereby new practices had to compete with an existing set of constantly shifting priorities. Strategies for reconciling priorities ranged from structured approaches such as care planning to more informal arrangements such as conversations during daily work. The mechanism Exercising Agency bridged the gap between

  11. Fatigue in adolescents with and following a cancer diagnosis: developing an evidence base for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J L; Gibson, F; Richardson, A; Sepion, B; Ream, E

    2003-12-01

    Although fatigue has been a focus for research in adult cancer care for some time, the same cannot be said for adolescent oncology practice. This paper summarises the literature concerning fatigue in adolescents with, and following, cancer diagnoses, drawing on data from four empirical studies. Fatigue is multidimensional, multifactorial and highly subjective, but can be managed to enhance self-caring and coping strategies. All of the studies reviewed within indicate that fatigue is a troublesome symptom, which impacts on quality of life. From this review, we set up a research study. This paper provides a brief report of preliminary data from this study drawn from a group of adolescents in late remission from childhood cancer. These data are used to evaluate the utility of focus groups as a method of data collection in exploring the concept of fatigue in adolescents. Concurring with the studies we reviewed, findings from the preliminary data suggest that fatigue is a highly subjective and 'abnormal' phenomenon that holds a variety of implied meanings and associated metaphors connected with past experiences of childhood cancer. The focus group proved to be a viable research method to facilitate mutual disclosure and provoke discussion. Recognition of the research challenges with adolescents, where there is the potential for a range of meanings for the experience of fatigue, is an important finding for future studies.

  12. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  13. Nullius in verba: a call for the incorporation of evidence-based practice into the discipline of exercise science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonette, William E; English, Kirk L; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2010-06-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a concept that was popularized in the early 1990s by several physicians who recognized that medical practice should be based on the best and most current available evidence. Although this concept seems self-evident, much of medical practice was based on outdated textbooks and oral tradition passed down in medical school. Currently, exercise science is in a similar situation. Due to a lack of regulation within the exercise community, the discipline of exercise science is particularly prone to bias and misinformation, as evidenced by the plethora of available programmes with efficacy supported by anecdote alone. In this review, we provide a description of the five steps in EBP: (i) develop a question; (ii) find evidence; (iii) evaluate the evidence; (iv) incorporate evidence into practice; and (v) re-evaluate the evidence. Although objections have been raised to the EBP process, we believe that its incorporation into exercise science will improve the credibility of our discipline and will keep exercise practitioners and academics on the cutting edge of the most current research findings.

  14. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  15. The effect of education with workplace supports on practitioners' evidence-based practice knowledge and implementation behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Iona; McIntyre, Sarah

    2010-12-01

    Individual and workplace barriers affect uptake of evidence-based practice (EBP). This study evaluated the effects of a 1-day workshop with workplace supports on allied health professionals' EBP knowledge and behaviour. A prospective longitudinal pre-post design was used. A total of 88 allied health professionals participated. Knowledge was measured using the Adapted Fresno Test (AFT), behaviour was measured using frequency counts of presentations using EBP methodologies and critically appraised topics (CATs) were produced. Mean differences were analysed using paired t-tests. EBP knowledge significantly improved immediately after education on the AFT (from 36.67 to 46.84/156) a mean change of 10.17 points (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.19-13.50) (P Education with workplace supports (supervision, incentives, resource allocation and working groups) may lead to improvements in EBP knowledge and implementation. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2010 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  16. Inter-organizational collaboration in the implementation of evidence-based practices among public agencies serving abused and neglected youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Fuentes, Dahlia; Finno, Megan; Garcia, Antonio R; Holloway, Ian W; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of inter-organizational collaboration in implementing new evidence-based practices for addressing problem behaviors in at-risk youth. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 38 systems leaders of probation, mental health, and child welfare departments of 12 California counties participating in a large randomized controlled trial to scale-up the use of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care. Three sets of collaboration characteristics were identified: (1) characteristics of collaboration process, (2) characteristics of the external environment, and (3) characteristics of participating organizations and individuals. Inter-organizational collaboration enables an exchange of information and advice and a pooling of resources individual agencies may require for successful implementation.

  17. Perioperative Care Implementation: Evidence-Based Practice for Patients With Pancreaticoduodenectomy Using the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Guidelines 
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Cesar; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Vrochides, Dionisios; Iannitti, David; Cochran, Allyson; Tezber, Kendra; Eller, Misty; Desamero, Janet

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer that carries a poor prognosis. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) offers the only potential cure, but the associated morbidity is high. The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) evidence-based guidelines for perioperative care for PD can be used to reduce variations in practice.
. The primary aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the ERAS guidelines for patients undergoing PD. Secondary aims were to assess length of stay (LOS), readmission within 30 days, 30-day mortality, and total surgical complication rates.
. Guideline feasibility was evaluated by percentage completion and compliance to each of the perioperative phases of the guideline. Hospital LOS, 30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and total surgical complication rates were compared before and after ERAS implementation. 
. The ERAS guidelines were feasible and safely implemented with no change in LOS, readmission, morbidity, and mortality rates.

  18. Mediating role of critical thinking disposition in the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ae; Song, Youngshin; Sim, Hee-Sook; Ahn, Eun-Kyong; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of critical thinking in clinical and educational settings, little is known about its role in evidence-based practice (EBP). This study examined whether critical thinking disposition (CTD) mediates the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and EBP in clinical nurses (N=409). A path diagram using structural equation modeling was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of perceived barriers to research use on EBP, controlling for CTD as a mediator. CTD partially mediated the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and EBP. Furthermore, the hypothesized mediation model demonstrated an appropriate fit to the data. Individual and organizational efforts are needed to help nurses further improve their critical thinking skills. CTD is important as research barriers to engage effectively in EBP. Without the skills to evaluate evidence carefully, research utilization may be compromised.

  19. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: turnover rates and their association with client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Modisette, Kathryn C; Ihnes, Pamela C; Godley, Susan H

    2012-03-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (N = 249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. In addition, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability: an evidence-based review and practical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuofei; Wu, Xingjiang; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou

    2014-02-01

    Early enteral nutrition (EEN) in critically ill patients is associated with significant benefit as well as elevated risk of complications. Concomitant use of EEN with vasopressors has been associated with nonocclusive bowel necrosis in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability. The decision when to initiate enteral nutrition in hemodynamically unstable patients that require vasoactive substances remains a clinical dilemma. This review summarizes the effect of EEN and vasoactive agents on gastrointestinal blood flow and perfusion in critically ill patients, based on current evidence. Animal and clinical data involving simultaneous administration of EEN and vasoactive agents for hemodynamic instability are reviewed, and the factors related to the safety and effectiveness of EEN support in this patient population are analyzed. Moreover, practical recommendations are provided. Additional randomized clinical trials are warranted to provide cutting-edge evidence-based guidance about this issue for practitioners of critical care.

  1. EVIDENCE-BASED DATA ON EFFECTIVENESS OF LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS GG AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS ВB-12 IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Andreyeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of prebiotics in treatment of different disorders is used very often nowadays. However, this kind of a treatment confirmed its efficacy in only several diseases. The review presents the data on efficacy of two probiotic microorganisms (L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 in pediatric practice. Author summarizes and analyzes existing evidence-based data on efficacy of probiotics in treatment of acute diarrhea, prophylaxis of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and nosocomial infections. L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 have their own place in prophylaxis of infections of airways and gastrointestinal tract. Administration of probiotics for treatment and prophylaxis of allergic and other diseases is reviewed. Safety of probiotics is described as well.

  2. How do nurse academics value and engage with evidence-based practice across Australia: Findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2016-06-01

    Integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into undergraduate education and preparing future nurses to embrace EBP in clinical practice becomes paramount in today's complex and evolving healthcare environment. The role that EBP plays in the practical lives of nursing students will depend on the degree to which it is promoted by academics, how it is incorporated into courses and its application to clinical setting. Hence, nursing academics play a crucial role in influencing its integration into curricula. Drawn from a larger doctoral study, this paper presents findings discussing how nurse academics value and engage with EBP. Grounded theory was employed to explore processes used by nursing academics while incorporating EBP into teaching and learning practices. Twenty-three academics across Australian universities were interviewed. Nine were also observed while teaching undergraduate students. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. In keeping with the tenets of grounded theory, data collection and analysis continued until theoretical saturation was reached. In total, four categories emerged. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Valuing and Engaging with EBP. How nursing academics valued and engaged with EBP was closely associated with meanings they constructed around understanding it, attitudes and commitment to implementation while teaching and working clinically. Different opinions also existed in regard to what actually constituted EBP. However, they engaged with and valued EBP by keeping themselves up-to-date, being involved in research activities, using evidence in teaching, therefore leading by example. Participants identified a number of barriers influencing their engagement with EBP including heavy workloads, limited time, lack of commitment within their schools, lack of confidence with teaching EBP, and complexity of EBP application. Faculty clinical practice, committed academics, workload

  3. Teaching tools in Evidence Based Practice: evaluation of reusable learning objects (RLOs for learning about Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wharrad Heather

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All healthcare students are taught the principles of evidence based practice on their courses. The ability to understand the procedures used in systematically reviewing evidence reported in studies, such as meta-analysis, are an important element of evidence based practice. Meta-analysis is a difficult statistical concept for healthcare students to understand yet it is an important technique used in systematic reviews to pool data from studies to look at combined effectiveness of treatments. In other areas of the healthcare curricula, by supplementing lectures, workbooks and workshops with pedagogically designed, multimedia learning objects (known as reusable learning objects or RLOs we have shown an improvement in students' perceived understanding in subjects they found difficult. In this study we describe the development and evaluation of two RLOs on meta-analysis. The RLOs supplement associated lectures and aim to improve students' understanding of meta-analysis in healthcare students. Methods Following a quality controlled design process two RLOs were developed and delivered to two cohorts of students, a Master in Public Health course and Postgraduate diploma in nursing course. Students' understanding of five key concepts of Meta-analysis were measured before and after a lecture and again after RLO use. RLOs were also evaluated for their educational value, learning support, media attributes and usability using closed and open questions. Results Students rated their understanding of meta-analysis as improved after a lecture and further improved after completing the RLOs (Wilcoxon paired test, p Conclusions Meta-analysis RLOs that are openly accessible and unrestricted by usernames and passwords provide flexible support for students who find the process of meta-analysis difficult.

  4. Randomised controlled trial of a theoretically grounded tailored intervention to diffuse evidence-based public health practice [ISRCTN23257060

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordheim Lena

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that Norwegian public health physicians do not systematically and explicitly use scientific evidence in their practice. They work in an environment that does not encourage the integration of this information in decision-making. In this study we investigate whether a theoretically grounded tailored intervention to diffuse evidence-based public health practice increases the physicians' use of research information. Methods 148 self-selected public health physicians were randomised to an intervention group (n = 73 and a control group (n = 75. The intervention group received a multifaceted intervention while the control group received a letter declaring that they had access to library services. Baseline assessments before the intervention and post-testing immediately at the end of a 1.5-year intervention period were conducted. The intervention was theoretically based and consisted of a workshop in evidence-based public health, a newsletter, access to a specially designed information service, to relevant databases, and to an electronic discussion list. The main outcome measure was behaviour as measured by the use of research in different documents. Results The intervention did not demonstrate any evidence of effects on the objective behaviour outcomes. We found, however, a statistical significant difference between the two groups for both knowledge scores: Mean difference of 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.6 in the score for knowledge about EBM-resources and mean difference of 0.2 (95% CI: 0.0–0.3 in the score for conceptual knowledge of importance for critical appraisal. There were no statistical significant differences in attitude-, self-efficacy-, decision-to-adopt- or job-satisfaction scales. There were no significant differences in Cochrane library searching after controlling for baseline values and characteristics. Conclusion Though demonstrating effect on knowledge the study failed to provide support for

  5. Teaching tools in evidence based practice: evaluation of reusable learning objects (RLOs) for learning about meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Wharrad, Heather; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2011-05-04

    All healthcare students are taught the principles of evidence based practice on their courses. The ability to understand the procedures used in systematically reviewing evidence reported in studies, such as meta-analysis, are an important element of evidence based practice. Meta-analysis is a difficult statistical concept for healthcare students to understand yet it is an important technique used in systematic reviews to pool data from studies to look at combined effectiveness of treatments. In other areas of the healthcare curricula, by supplementing lectures, workbooks and workshops with pedagogically designed, multimedia learning objects (known as reusable learning objects or RLOs) we have shown an improvement in students' perceived understanding in subjects they found difficult. In this study we describe the development and evaluation of two RLOs on meta-analysis. The RLOs supplement associated lectures and aim to improve students' understanding of meta-analysis in healthcare students. Following a quality controlled design process two RLOs were developed and delivered to two cohorts of students, a Master in Public Health course and Postgraduate diploma in nursing course. Students' understanding of five key concepts of Meta-analysis were measured before and after a lecture and again after RLO use. RLOs were also evaluated for their educational value, learning support, media attributes and usability using closed and open questions. Students rated their understanding of meta-analysis as improved after a lecture and further improved after completing the RLOs (Wilcoxon paired test, p < 0.01 in all cases) Whilst the media components of the RLOs such as animations helped most students (86%) understand concepts including for example Forest plots, 93% of students rated usability and control as important to their learning. A small number of students stated they needed the support of a lecturer alongside the RLOs (7% 'Agreed' and 21% 'Neutral'). Meta-analysis RLOs that

  6. Measuring evidence-based practice in physical therapy: translation, adaptation, further development, validation, and reliability test of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsson, Susanne; Larsson, Maria E H

    2013-06-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are becoming increasingly important in physical therapy. For the purpose of meeting the goals of designing, implementing, and evaluating strategies to facilitate the development of more EBP in primary care physical therapy, a valid and reliable questionnaire for measuring attitudes, knowledge, behavior, prerequisites, and barriers related to EBP and guidelines is needed. The 3 objectives of this study were: (1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt a questionnaire to a Swedish primary care context for the purpose of measuring various aspects of EBP and guidelines in physical therapy, (2) to further develop the questionnaire to examine more aspects of guidelines, and (3) to test the validity and reliability of the adapted Swedish questionnaire. This was an instrument development study with validity and reliability testing. A previously used questionnaire about EBP was translated and cross-culturally adapted to a Swedish primary care physical therapy context. Additional items were constructed. A draft version was pilot tested for content validity (n=10), and a revised version was tested for test-retest reliability (n=42). The percentage of agreement between the 2 tests was analyzed. The development process resulted in a first questionnaire draft containing 48 items. The validation process resulted in a second draft with acceptable content validity and consisting of 38 items. The test-retest analysis showed that the median percentage of agreement was 67% (range=41%-81%). After removal or revision of items with poor agreement, the final questionnaire included 31 items. Only face validity and content validity were tested. The final translated and adapted questionnaire was determined to have good face and content validity and acceptable reliability for measuring self-reported attitudes, knowledge, behavior, prerequisites, and barriers related to EBP and guidelines among physical therapists in

  7. Evidence-based Practice Intentions and Long-term Behaviours of Physiotherapy Graduates Following an Intensive Education Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraton, L; Machotka, Z; Gibbs, C; Mahar, C; Kennedy, K; Grimmer, K

    2017-07-01

    Assisting physiotherapists to implement research evidence into clinical practice is essential to ensure the quality of practice and encourage lifelong learning and professional progression. However, many physiotherapists report barriers to implementing research, and there is little evidence regarding the sustainability of intended evidence-based practice (EBP) behaviours following EBP education programmes. This paper reports on intended and actual long-term EBP behaviours of physiotherapy students who completed an intensive EBP training programme embedded within a post-graduate coursework programme. An intensive 3-week course in quantitative health research methods and EBP was delivered annually from 2007 to 2014 as part of the programme to national and international students. Following the course, students were asked about their intention of using evidence to inform their future clinical practice. An online survey was used to evaluate EBP behaviours of graduates. Of a possible total of 202 students, contact details for 193 students were sourced, and 65 students responded to the survey (34% response rate). At course completion, 174 students (86%) indicated that they intended to use research to guide their clinical decisions at least once a week. At follow-up, most graduates reported frequently using research to inform their clinical practice; indicated by a mean score of 6.5 (±1.9) from a possible range of 0 (not at all) to 10 (all the time). On average, students reported spending 2.2 (±2.2) hours accessing and reading research evidence per week. The most common barriers to implementing evidence were lack of time, limited access to evidence sources and a perceived lack of generalizability of research findings to specific patient groups. Graduates of an intensive EBP training programme embedded within an existing post-graduate physiotherapy programme regularly implemented EBP in clinical practice. Barriers to evidence implementation were time, access to research

  8. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Practice and Innovation in Physical Therapy Using the IDEAL-Physio Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, David; Hamilton, David; Davies, Loretta; Cook, Jonathan; Hirst, Allison; McCulloch, Peter; Paez, Arsenio

    2018-02-01

    The IDEAL framework is an established method for initial and ongoing evaluations of innovation and practice for complex health care interventions. First derived for surgical sciences and embedded at a global level for evaluating surgery/surgical devices, the IDEAL framework is based on the principle that innovation and evaluation in clinical practice can, and should, evolve together in an ordered manner: from conception to development and then to validation by appropriate clinical studies and, finally, longer-term follow-up. This framework is highly suited to other complex, nonpharmacological interventions, such as physical therapist interventions. This perspective outlines the application of IDEAL to physical therapy in the new IDEAL-Physio framework. The IDEAL-Physio framework comprises 5 stages. In stage 1, the idea phase, formal data collection should begin. Stage 2a is the phase for iterative improvement and adjustment with thorough data recording. Stage 2b involves the onset of formal evaluation using systematically collected group or cohort data. Stage 3 is the phase for formal comparative assessment of treatment, usually involving randomized studies. Stage 4 involves long-term follow-up. The IDEAL-Physio framework is recommended as a method for guiding and evaluating both innovation and practice in physical therapy, with the overall goal of providing better evidence-based care. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  9. Igniting an agenda for health promotion for women: critical perspectives, evidence-based practice, and innovative knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Ann; Ponic, Pamela; Greaves, Lorraine; Mills, Sue; Christilaw, Jan; Frisby, Wendy; Humphries, Karin; Poole, Nancy; Young, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Health promotion is a set of strategies for positively influencing health through a range of individual, community-based, and population interventions. Despite international recognition that gender is a primary determinant of health and that gender roles can negatively affect health, the health promotion field has not yet articulated how to integrate gender theoretically or practically into its vision. For example, interventions often fail to critically consider women's or men's diverse social locations, gender-based power relations, or sex-based differences in health status. Yet without such analyses, interventions can result in the accommodation or exploitation of gender relations that disadvantage women and compromise their health. In this paper, we seek to ignite an agenda for health promotion for women. We discuss the need for a conceptual framework that includes a sex-gender-diversity analysis and critically considers 'what counts' as health promotion to guide the development and implementation of evidence-based practice. We also consider how innovative knowledge translation practices, technology developments and action research can advance this agenda in ways that foster the participation of a wide range of stakeholders.

  10. Beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses and allied healthcare providers in the Valais hospital, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is upheld as a means for patients to receive the most efficient care in a given context. Despite the available evidence and positive beliefs about it, implementing EBP as standard daily practice still faces many obstacles. This study investigated the beliefs about and implementation of EBP among nurses and allied healthcare providers (AHP) in 9 acute care hospitals in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted. The target population was composed of 1899 nurses and 126 AHPs. Beliefs about and implementation of EBP were measured using EBP-Beliefs and EBP-Implementation scales of Melnyk et al. The initial sample consisted in 491 participants (overall response rate 24.2%): 421 nurses (22.4% response rate) and 78 AHPs (61.9% response rate). The final sample, composed only of those who declared previous exposure to EBP, included 391 participants (329 nurses and 62 AHPs). Overall, participants had positive attitudes towards EBP and were willing to increase their knowledge to guide practice. However, they acknowledged poor implementation of EBP in daily practice. A significantly higher level of EBP implementation was declared by those formally trained in it (P = 0.006) and by those occupying more senior professional functions (P = 0.004). EBP-Belief scores predicted 13% of the variance in the EBP-Implementation scores (R 2  = 0.13). EBP is poorly implemented despite positive beliefs about it. Continuing education and support on EBP would help to ensure that patients receive the best available care based on high-quality evidence, patient needs, clinical expertise, and a fair distribution of healthcare resources. This study's results will be used to guide institutional strategy to increase the use of EBP in daily practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Searching for Elements of Evidence-based Practices in Children’s Usual Care and Examining their Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ann F.; Accurso, Erin C.; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Roesch, Scott; Zhang, Jin Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Most of the knowledge generated to bridge the research - practice gap has been derived from experimental studies implementing specific treatment models. Alternatively, this study uses observational methods to generate knowledge about community-based treatment processes and outcomes. Aims are to (1) describe outcome trajectories for children with disruptive behavior problems (DBPs), and (2) test how observed delivery of a benchmark set of practice elements common in evidence-based (EB) treatments may be associated with outcome change, while accounting for potential confounding variables. Method Participants included 190 children ages 4–13 with DBPs and their caregivers, plus 85 psychotherapists, recruited from six clinics. All treatment sessions were video-taped and a random sample of four sessions in the first four months of treatment was reliably coded for intensity on 27 practice elements (benchmark set and others). Three outcomes (child symptom severity, parent discipline, and family functioning) were assessed by parent report at intake, four, and eight months. Data were collected on several potential covariates including child, parent, therapist, and service use characteristics. Multi-level modeling was used to assess relationships between observed practice and outcome slopes, while accounting for covariates. Results Children and families demonstrated improvements in all three outcomes, but few significant associations between treatment processes and outcome change were identified. Families receiving greater intensity on the benchmark practice elements did demonstrate greater improvement in the parental discipline outcome. Conclusion Observed changes in outcomes for families in community care were generally not strongly associated with the type or amount of treatment received. PMID:24555882

  12. Current state of evidence-based practice education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan: A questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsiao-Ying; Huang, Yu-Fang; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Chang, Ying-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been emphasized as the core competency of undergraduate nursing students and must be cultivated before graduation. However, there is limited information of EBP education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the current state of EBP education for undergraduate nursing students in Taiwan. A self-developed questionnaire, validated by experienced educators, was designed to explore curriculum design, teaching resources, qualification of teachers, and barriers regarding EBP education. A total of 21 nursing schools and colleges participated. The chair of each recommended a faculty member involved in teaching EBP as the school's representative to fill out the questionnaire. Among the 21 nursing schools and colleges, 18 (85.7%) had implemented EBP education in the curriculum. Among these schools, 22.2% conducted an independent EBP course, 50% incorporated EBP concepts into other courses, and the remainder offered both kinds of EBP courses. Multiple strategies were incorporated to teach the EBP. Less than 35% of the schools had designed or adopted standardized teaching materials and evaluated students' learning outcomes. Although 55.6% of the schools reimbursed faculty for participation in EBP training, 39% of their faculty members who taught EBP did not receive any EBP training. Shortage of qualified faculty and limited opportunity to involve students in evidence-based applications were reported as major obstacles to teaching EBP. EBP education has already gained the attention of nursing schools in Taiwan. However, lack of comprehensive EBP training among teachers and the difficulty of teaching clinical application of EBP require special consideration. In order to promote EBP education in undergraduate nursing curriculums, we suggest that nursing schools reinforce and support faculty to participate in formal EBP training. Also needed is a systematic curriculum design with multiple

  13. Implementing and up-scaling evidence-based eMental health in Europe: The study protocol for the MasterMind project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan Vis

    2015-11-01

    Discussion: The use of Internet interventions in routine practice is limited. MasterMind attempts to bridge the gap between routine practice and effectiveness research by evaluating the implementation of evidence-based Internet interventions for depressive disorders in routine mental healthcare settings in Europe.

  14. Aligning Leadership Across Systems and Organizations to Develop Strategic Climate to for Evidence-Based Practice Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Farahnak, Lauren R.; Ehrhart, Mark G.; Sklar, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing impetus to bridge the gap between basic science discovery, development of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and their availability and delivery in order to improve public health impact of such practices. In seeking to capitalize on factors that support implementation and sustainment of EBPs, it is important to consider that healthcare is delivered within the outer context of public health systems, and the inner context of healthcare organizations and workgroups. Leaders have a key role in determining the nature of system and organizational context. This article will addresses the role of leadership across levels in developing strategic climate for EBP implementation within the outer (i.e., system) and inner (i.e., organization, work group) contexts of healthcare. Within the framework of Edgar Schein’s “climate embedding mechanisms,” we describe strategies that leaders at the system, organization, and work group levels can consider and apply to develop a strategic climates that support the implementation and sustainment of EBP in healthcare and allied healthcare settings. PMID:24641560

  15. Collaboration, negotiation, and coalescence for interagency-collaborative teams to scale-up evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle L; Hurlburt, Michael S; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, Lara; Willging, Cathleen E; Chaffin, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Implementation and scale-up of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is often portrayed as involving multiple stakeholders collaborating harmoniously in the service of a shared vision. In practice, however, collaboration is a more complex process that may involve shared and competing interests and agendas, and negotiation. The present study examined the scale-up of an EBP across an entire service system using the Interagency Collaborative Team approach. Participants were key stakeholders in a large-scale county-wide implementation of an EBP to reduce child neglect, SafeCare. Semistructured interviews and/or focus groups were conducted with 54 individuals representing diverse constituents in the service system, followed by an iterative approach to coding and analysis of transcripts. The study was conceptualized using the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment framework. Although community stakeholders eventually coalesced around implementation of SafeCare, several challenges affected the implementation process. These challenges included differing organizational cultures, strategies, and approaches to collaboration; competing priorities across levels of leadership; power struggles; and role ambiguity. Each of the factors identified influenced how stakeholders approached the EBP implementation process. System-wide scale-up of EBPs involves multiple stakeholders operating in a nexus of differing agendas, priorities, leadership styles, and negotiation strategies. The term collaboration may oversimplify the multifaceted nature of the scale-up process. Implementation efforts should openly acknowledge and consider this nexus when individual stakeholders and organizations enter into EBP implementation through collaborative processes.

  16. Japanese Resident Physicians' Attitudes, knowledge, and Perceived Barriers on the Practice of Evidence Based Medicine: a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emura Sei SE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine plays a crucial role as a tool that helps integrate research evidence into clinical practice. However, few reports have yet to examine its application in daily practice among resident physicians in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes towards and knowledge of EBM among resident physicians in Japanese and determine perceived barriers to its use. Findings A cross-sectional, self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 60 resident staffs at Saga University Hospital in Japan. Forty residents completed and returned the questionnaire. Fifty four percent of respondents understood the basic terminology of EBM, 3% could explain this to others, and 41% indicated they would like to understand the terminology more. Thirteen percent admitted having a good understanding of EBM basic skills. Fifty respondents indicated having read EBM sources, but only 3% indicated that they use these sources in clinical decision making. The most prominent barriers of EBM application revealed in this study were insufficient time to access the sources, a lack of native language references, and insufficient basic EBM skills, but not scepticism about the EBM concept. Conclusions In general, respondents positively welcomed EBM, and moderately understood and knew basic EBM skill; however, barriers in its application were shown to exist.

  17. Evidence-based practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine for primary open-angle glaucoma (qingfeng -neizhang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingxin; Ma, Qiu-Yan; Yang, Yue; He, Yu-Peng; Ma, Chao-Ting; Li, Qiang; Jin, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a chronic, progressive optic neuropathy. The aim was to develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for POAG with focus on Chinese medicine pattern differentiation and treatment as well as approved herbal proprietary medicine. The guideline development group involved in various pieces of expertise in contents and methods. Authors searched electronic databases include CNKI, VIP, Sino-Med, Wanfang data, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, as well as checked China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) from the inception of these databases to June 30, 2015. Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine treating adults with POAG were evaluated. Risk of bias tool in the Cochrane Handbook and evidence strength developed by the GRADE group were applied for the evaluation, and recommendations were based on the findings incorporating evidence strength. After several rounds of Expert consensus, the final guideline was endorsed by relevant professional committees. CHM treatment principle and formulae based on pattern differentiation together with approved patent herbal medicines are the main treatments for POAG, and the diagnosis and treatment focusing on blood related patterns is the major domain. CHM therapy alone or combined with other conventional treatment reported in clinical studies together with Expert consensus were recommended for clinical practice.

  18. Practical Issues in Evidence-Based Use of Performance Supplements: Supplement Interactions, Repeated Use and Individual Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M

    2017-03-01

    Current sports nutrition guidelines recommend that athletes only take supplements following an evidence-based analysis of their value in supporting training outcomes or competition performance in their specific event. While there is sound evidence to support the use of a few performance supplements under specific scenarios (creatine, beta-alanine, bicarbonate, caffeine, nitrate/beetroot juice and, perhaps, phosphate), there is a lack of information around several issues needed to guide the practical use of these products in competitive sport. First, there is limited knowledge around the strategy of combining the intake of several products in events in which performance benefits are seen with each product in isolation. The range in findings from studies involving combined use of different combinations of two supplements makes it difficult to derive a general conclusion, with both the limitations of individual studies and the type of sporting event to which the supplements are applied influencing the potential for additive, neutral or counteractive outcomes. The repeated use of the same supplement in sports involving two or more events within a 24-h period is of additional interest, but has received even less attention. Finally, the potential for individual athletes to respond differently, in direction and magnitude, to the use of a supplement seems real, but is hard to distinguish from normal day to day variability in performance. Strategies that can be used in research or practice to identify whether individual differences are robust include repeat trials, and the collection of data on physiological or genetic mechanisms underpinning outcomes.

  19. Understanding physicians' acceptance of the Medline system for practicing evidence-based medicine: a decomposed TPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shin-Yuan; Ku, Yi-Cheng; Chien, Jui-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) supports physicians in their improvement of clinical quality and enhances hospitals' improvement of patient safety. Many health care institutions implement information systems to support physicians practicing EBM. However, studies exploring the antecedent factors of physicians' usage intention of information systems facilitating EBM practice are rare. Hence this study proposed a research model based on the decomposed theory of the planned behavior model (decomposed TPB) to investigate the factors influencing physicians' acceptance of the Medline system. A field survey was conducted in Taiwan to collect data from physicians with experience in using the Medline system. A valid sample of 224 physicians was collected for data analysis. Structural equation modeling using the partial least squares (PLS) method with bootstrap estimate was used to test the research model. The findings of this study show that a physician's usage intention is significantly influenced by three factors, i.e. attitude, the subjective norm, and perceived behavior control. Furthermore, these three factors can be predicted by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, interpersonal influence, personal innovativeness in IT and self-efficacy, respectively. The results of this study indicate that our research model provides an effective prediction of the intention of physicians to use the Medline system and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Evidence-based medicine in surgical practice - locating clinical studies and systematic reviews by searching the Medline database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummich, K; Jensen, K; Obst, O; Seiler, C M; Diener, M K

    2014-12-01

    Every day approximately 75 clinical trials and 11 systematic reviews are published in the health-care intervention and medical field. Due to this growing number of publications it is a challenge for every practicing clinician to keep track with the latest research. The implementation of new and effective diagnostic and therapeutic interventions into daily clinical routine may thus be delayed. Conversely, ineffective or even harmful interventions might still be in use. Decision-making in evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires consideration of the most recent high quality evidence. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are regarded as the "gold standard" to prove the efficacy of surgical interventions in patient-oriented research. Systematic reviews combine results from RCTs by summarising single RCTs which answer a particular clinical question. Some basic knowledge in systematic literature searching is required and helpful for detecting relevant publications. This article shows various possibilities for locating clinical studies and systematic reviews in the database Medline on the basis of illustrative step-by-step instructions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Depending on the aim and topic of the literature search, the time required for the task may vary. In routine practice, a systematic literature search is unrealistic in most cases. Clinicians in need of a quick update of current evidence on a certain clinical topic may make use of up-to-date systematic reviews. During a systematic literature search, different approaches and strategies might be necessary. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Laying a Firm Foundation: Embedding Evidence-Based Emergent Literacy Practices Into Early Intervention and Preschool Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Pamela; Watson, Maggie

    2018-04-05

    As part of this clinical forum on curriculum-based intervention, the goal of this tutorial is to share research about the importance of language and literacy foundations in natural environments during emergent literacy skill development, from infancy through preschool. Following an overview of intervention models in schools by Powell (2018), best practices at home, in child care, and in preschool settings are discussed. Speech-language pathologists in these settings will be provided a toolbox of best emergent literacy practices. A review of published literature in speech-language pathology, early intervention, early childhood education, and literacy was completed. Subsequently, an overview of the impact of early home and preschool literacy experiences are described. Research-based implementation of best practice is supported with examples of shared book reading and child-led literacy embedded in play within the coaching model of early intervention. Finally, various aspects of emergent literacy skill development in the preschool years are discussed. These include phonemic awareness, print/alphabet awareness, oral language skills, and embedded/explicit literacy. Research indicates that rich home literacy environments and exposure to rich oral language provide an important foundation for the more structured literacy environments of school. Furthermore, there is a wealth of evidence to support a variety of direct and indirect intervention practices in the home, child care, and preschool contexts to support and enhance all aspects of oral and written literacy. Application of this "toolbox" of strategies should enable speech-language pathologists to address the prevention and intervention of literacy deficits within multiple environments during book and play activities. Additionally, clinicians will have techniques to share with parents, child care providers, and preschool teachers for evidence-based literacy instruction within all settings during typical daily

  2. PSOCUBE, a multidimensional assessment of psoriasis patients as a both clinically/practically sustainable and evidence-based algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, D; Altomare, G; Amato, S; Amerio, P; Balato, N; Campanati, A; Conti, A; Gisondi, P; Prignano, F; Saraceno, R; Piaserico, S

    2015-07-01

    There is increasing awareness of the clinical relevance of psoriasis comorbidities and of the importance of timely and effective screening for such comorbidities in the management of psoriatic patients. Previous works have focused on assessing evidence for prevalence of comorbidities and on the best available evidence for sensitivity in diagnosing suspected comorbidities. No algorithms are available, which have been tested on large numbers of physicians concerning the acceptance of such algorithms both by practicing clinical dermatologists and by their consulting specialists from other fields. To propose a multidimensional assessment algorithm for psoriasis comorbidities which may prove at the same time enough sensitive and practically sustainable in daily clinical practice. After an exhaustive literature search, we performed a Delphi procedure involving 50 dedicated dermatological centres to obtain a standardized assessment algorithm, which would meet requirements of sustainability and acceptability both from the point of view of Evidence-Based Medicine as well as from the point of view of practical and clinical feasibility: to meet both requirements, results from the Delphi procedure were elaborated and modified by a restricted panel of experts. The procedure has yielded PSOCUBE, a three-dimensional table comprising 14 clinical examination and history taking items, 32 screening laboratory and instrumental exams and 11 clinimetric scores. PSOCUBE, a simple algorithm, may be employed by practising dermatologists to perform standardized assessment procedures on psoriatic patients raising the chances of early recognition of patients at risk for comorbidities, thus fostering more effective prevention; PSOCUBE may therefore contribute to reduce the overall impact of this chronic, widespread disease. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  3. "Keeping on track"-Hospital nurses' struggles with maintaining workflow while seeking to integrate evidence-based practice into their daily work: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renolen, Åste; Høye, Sevald; Hjälmhult, Esther; Danbolt, Lars Johan; Kirkevold, Marit

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is considered a foundation for the provision of quality care and one way to integrate scientific knowledge into clinical problem-solving. Despite the extensive amount of research that has been conducted to evaluate evidence-based practice implementation and research utilization, these practices have not been sufficiently incorporated into nursing practice. Thus, additional research regarding the challenges clinical nurses face when integrating evidence-based practice into their daily work and the manner in which these challenges are approached is needed. The aim of this study was to generate a theory about the general patterns of behaviour that are discovered when clinical nurses attempt to integrate evidence-based practice into their daily work. We used Glaser's classical grounded theory methodology to generate a substantive theory. The study was conducted in two different medical wards in a large Norwegian hospital. In one ward, nurses and nursing assistants were developing and implementing new evidence-based procedures, and in the other ward, evidence-based huddle boards for risk assessment were being implemented. A total of 54 registered nurses and 9 assistant nurses were observed during their patient care and daily activities. Of these individuals, thirteen registered nurses and five assistant nurses participated in focus groups. These participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data were collected during 90h of observation and 4 focus groups conducted from 2014 to 2015. Each focus group session included four to five participants and lasted between 55 and 65min. Data collection and analysis were performed concurrently, and the data were analysed using the constant comparative method. "Keeping on track" emerged as an explanatory theory for the processes through which the nurses handled their main concern: the risk of losing the workflow. The following three strategies were used by nurses when attempting to integrate evidence-based

  4. The organizational social context of mental health services and clinician attitudes toward evidence-based practice: a United States national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarons Gregory A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practices have not been routinely adopted in community mental health organizations despite the support of scientific evidence and in some cases even legislative or regulatory action. We examined the association of clinician attitudes toward evidence-based practice with organizational culture, climate, and other characteristics in a nationally representative sample of mental health organizations in the United States. Methods In-person, group-administered surveys were conducted with a sample of 1,112 mental health service providers in a nationwide sample of 100 mental health service institutions in 26 states in the United States. The study examines these associations with a two-level Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM analysis of responses to the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS at the individual clinician level as a function of the Organizational Social Context (OSC measure at the organizational level, controlling for other organization and clinician characteristics. Results We found that more proficient organizational cultures and more engaged and less stressful organizational climates were associated with positive clinician attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice. Conclusions The findings suggest that organizational intervention strategies for improving the organizational social context of mental health services may contribute to the success of evidence-based practice dissemination and implementation efforts by influencing clinician attitudes.

  5. Pediatric nurses' perceived knowledge and beliefs of evidence-based practice in the care of children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesanya, Tolu O; Snedden, Traci R

    2018-04-01

    Pediatric nurses play a significant role in all phases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) recovery, particularly during the hospital stay. Although evidence-based nursing practice is known to improve patient outcomes, limited research exists on nurses' evidence-based perceived knowledge and beliefs specific to TBI care. As nurses' perceived knowledge and beliefs are known to guide their practice behaviors, this assessment is important to overall TBI outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric nurses' evidence-based perceived knowledge and beliefs in providing care for children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe TBI. Data for this study were obtained from a larger parent study on nurses' perceptions of caring for patients of all ages with moderate-to-severe TBI. The parent study was an exploratory, cross-sectional electronic survey of registered nurses across all hospital departments within a large Midwestern health system. Only data specific to pediatric nurses (n = 330) were analyzed for this study. Descriptive statistics and latent class analysis (LCA) were performed. Pediatric nurses, on average, were 38.79 years, female (90.37%), had over a decade of nursing experience (13.55 years), and practiced as a staff nurse (80.07%) on an inpatient unit (45.51%). Findings indicated pediatric nurses reported overall low levels of evidence-based perceived knowledge and had inaccurate beliefs about caring for patients with TBI. LCA indicated two distinct homogenous subgroups specific to evidence-based perceived knowledge: low (41%) and high (59%). Nurses in the low evidence-based perceived knowledge group were younger, had less nursing experience, worked primarily on an inpatient unit, and cared for patients with TBI at a higher frequency compared to high evidence-based perceived knowledge nurses. Additionally, there were significant differences in beliefs about sex-based patient differences after TBI and the role of nurses in caring for patients with

  6. Development and validation of the guideline for reporting evidence-based practice educational interventions and teaching (GREET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anna C; Lewis, Lucy K; McEvoy, Maureen P; Galipeau, James; Glasziou, Paul; Moher, David; Tilson, Julie K; Williams, Marie T

    2016-09-06

    The majority of reporting guidelines assist researchers to report consistent information concerning study design, however, they contain limited information for describing study interventions. Using a three-stage development process, the Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational interventions and Teaching (GREET) checklist and accompanying explanatory paper were developed to provide guidance for the reporting of educational interventions for evidence-based practice (EBP). The aim of this study was to complete the final development for the GREET checklist, incorporating psychometric testing to determine inter-rater reliability and criterion validity. The final development for the GREET checklist incorporated the results of a prior systematic review and Delphi survey. Thirty-nine items, including all items from the prior systematic review, were proposed for inclusion in the GREET checklist. These 39 items were considered over a series of consensus discussions to determine the inclusion of items in the GREET checklist. The GREET checklist and explanatory paper were then developed and underwent psychometric testing with tertiary health professional students who evaluated the completeness of the reporting in a published study using the GREET checklist. For each GREET checklist item, consistency (%) of agreement both between participants and the consensus criterion reference measure were calculated. Criterion validity and inter-rater reliability were analysed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Three consensus discussions were undertaken, with 14 items identified for inclusion in the GREET checklist. Following further expert review by the Delphi panelists, three items were added and minor wording changes were completed, resulting in 17 checklist items. Psychometric testing for the updated GREET checklist was completed by 31 participants (n = 11 undergraduate, n = 20 postgraduate). The consistency of agreement between the participant ratings

  7. Training Community Mental Health Therapists to Deliver a Package of Evidence-Based Practice Strategies for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren I.; Drahota, Amy; Stadnick, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Research on moving evidence-based practice (EBP) intervention strategies to community service settings for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is urgently needed. The current pilot study addresses this need by examining the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary outcomes of training therapists practicing in community mental health…

  8. Competent in Evidence-Based Practice (EBP): Validation of a Measurement Tool that Measures EBP Self-Efficacy and Task Value in Speech-Language Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the impact their teaching has on these…

  9. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP): validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the

  10. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP) : validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Lucas; M. Wieringa-de Waard; N. van Dijk; B. Spek

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to

  11. Employing Policy and Purchasing Levers to Increase the Use of Evidence-Based Practices in Community-Based Substance Abuse Treatment Settings: Reports from Single State Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci R.; Kovas, Anne E.; Cassidy, Elaine F.; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    State public health authorities are critical to the successful implementation of science based addiction treatment practices by community-based providers. The literature to date, however, lacks examples of state level policy strategies that promote evidence-based practices (EBPs). This mixed-methods study documents changes in two critical…

  12. Teacher Progress Monitoring of Instructional and Behavioral Management Practices: An Evidence-Based Approach to Improving Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    In the era of teacher evaluation and effectiveness, assessment tools that identify and monitor educators' instruction and behavioral management practices are in high demand. The Classroom Strategies Scale (CSS) Observer Form is a multidimensional teacher progress monitoring tool designed to assess teachers' usage of instructional and behavioral…

  13. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Phelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ with a history of repeated falls or fall-related healthcare use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79±8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged 6 primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety to 78% (for vitamin D. An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21% and home safety (24%. Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall risk factors (P=0.003. Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p=.04 and perform more fall risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p=.007 than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  14. Psychometric analysis of two new scales: the evidence-based practice nursing leadership and work environment scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryse, Yvette; McDaniel, Anna; Schafer, John

    2014-08-01

    Those in nursing have been charged with practicing to the full extent of their education and training by the Institute of Medicine. Therefore, evidence-based practice (EBP) has never been more important to nursing than in the current healthcare environment. Frequently the burden of EBP is the responsibility of the bedside practitioner, but has been found to be a process that requires leadership and organizational support. A key underlying component of a strong EBP environment includes effective communications and collaboration among staff and nursing leadership. Developing measurement tools that examine the milieu and nursing leadership in which the staff nurse practices is an important component of understanding the factors that support or hinder EBP. The aim of this study is to report on the development and analysis of two new scales designed to explore leadership and organizational support for EBP. The EBP Nursing Leadership Scale (10 items) examines the staff nurses perception of support provided by the nurse manager for EBP, and the EBP Work Environment Scale (8 items) examines organizational support for EBP. Staff nurses who worked at least .5 FTE in direct patient care, from two inner city hospitals (n = 422) completed the scales. The scales were evaluated for internal consistency reliability with the Cronbach alpha technique, content validity using a panel of experts, and construct validity by The content validity index computed from expert rankings was .78 to 1.0 with an average of.96. Cronbach's alpha was .96 (n = 422) for the EBP Nursing Leadership Scale and .86 (n = 422) for the EBP Work Environment Scale. Factor analysis confirmed that each scale measured a unidimensional construct (p Leadership Scale and the EBP Work Environment Scale are psychometrically sound instruments to examine organizational influences on EBP. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of State Strategies and Policies to Accelerate Evidence-Based Practices in the Context of Systems Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci; Abraham, Amanda; Zwick, Janet; Rasplica, Caitlin; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To profile state agency efforts to promote implementation of three evidence-based practices (EBPs): screening and brief intervention (SBIRT), psychosocial interventions, and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected from representatives of 50 states and the District of Columbia’s Single State Authorities from 2007 to 2009. Study Design/Data Collection The study used mixed methods, in-depth, semistructured interviews and quantitative surveys. Interviews assessed state and provider strategies to accelerate implementation of EBPs. Principal Findings Statewide implementation of psychosocial interventions and MAT increased significantly over 3 years. In the first two assessments, states that contracted directly with providers were more likely to link use of EBPs to reimbursement, and states with indirect contract, through counties and other entities, increased recommendations, and some requirements for provision of specific EBPs. The number of states using legislation as a policy lever to promote EBPs was unchanged. Conclusions Health care reform and implementation of parity in coverage increases access to treatment for alcohol and drug use. Science-based substance abuse treatment will become even more crucial as payers seek consistent quality of care. This study provides baseline data on service delivery, contracting, and financing as state agencies and treatment providers prepare for implementation of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25532616

  16. Moderating effects of nurses' organizational justice between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Lack of existing literature on the correlation among organizational justice, organizational support, and organizational citizenship behaviors has created a research gap in previous evidence-based practice (EBP) studies on nursing personnel. To investigate whether organizational justice among nurses has a moderating effect between their organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors in order to bridge such a gap of existing literature with the EBP study on nursing personnel. Nursing staff of one large and influential hospital in Taiwan was surveyed. Four hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 386 were collected with a valid response rate of 96.50%. SPSS 17.0 and Amos 17.0 statistical software packages were used for data analysis. Nurses' organizational support positively influences their organizational citizenship behaviors, and their organizational justice perception has a positive moderating effect between organizational support and organizational citizenship behaviors. Results call hospitals' attention to the type of individual behaviors that may improve organizational performance. When nursing staff perceive fair and impartial treatment by the organization and supportive emotional attachment, behaviors beneficial for the organization are expressed in return. Subjective perceptions of nursing staff play an important role in organizational exchange relationship; the higher the degree of nursing staff's perceived organizational justice, the higher the degree of their organizational support, perception, and exhibition of organizational citizenship behaviors such as altruistic behavior and dedication to the work. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Are Evidence-based Practices Associated With Effective Prevention of Hospital-acquired Pressure Ulcers in US Academic Medical Centers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Gibbons, Robert D; Valuck, Robert J; Makic, Mary B F; Mishra, Manish K; Pronovost, Peter J; Meltzer, David O

    2016-05-01

    In 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established nonpayment policies resulting from costliness of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) to hospitals. This prompted hospitals to adopt quality improvement (QI) interventions that increase use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for HAPU prevention. To evaluate the longitudinal impact of CMS policy and QI adoption on HAPU rates. We characterized longitudinal adoption of 25 QI interventions that support EBPs through hospital leadership, staff, information technology, and performance and improvement. Quarterly counts of HAPU incidence and inpatient characteristics were collected from 55 University HealthSystem Consortium hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Mixed-effects regression models tested the longitudinal association of CMS policy, HAPU coding, and QI on HAPU rates. The models assumed level-2 random intercepts and random effects for CMS policy and EBP implementation to account for between-hospital variability in HAPU incidence. Controlling for all 25 QI interventions, specific updates to EBPs for HAPU prevention had a significant, though modest reduction on HAPU rates (-1.86 cases/quarter; P=0.002) and the effect of CMS nonpayment policy on HAPU prevention was much greater (-11.32 cases/quarter; P<0.001). HAPU rates were significantly lower after changes in CMS reimbursement. Reductions are associated with hospital-wide implementation of EBPs for HAPU prevention. Given that administrative data were used, it remains unknown whether these improvements were due to changes in coding or improved quality of care.

  18. A Longitudinal Study of State Strategies and Policies to Accelerate Evidence-Based Practices in the Context of Systems Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci; Abraham, Amanda; Zwick, Janet; Rasplica, Caitlin; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    To profile state agency efforts to promote implementation of three evidence-based practices (EBPs): screening and brief intervention (SBIRT), psychosocial interventions, and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Primary data collected from representatives of 50 states and the District of Columbia's Single State Authorities from 2007 to 2009. The study used mixed methods, in-depth, semistructured interviews and quantitative surveys. Interviews assessed state and provider strategies to accelerate implementation of EBPs. Statewide implementation of psychosocial interventions and MAT increased significantly over 3 years. In the first two assessments, states that contracted directly with providers were more likely to link use of EBPs to reimbursement, and states with indirect contract, through counties and other entities, increased recommendations, and some requirements for provision of specific EBPs. The number of states using legislation as a policy lever to promote EBPs was unchanged. Health care reform and implementation of parity in coverage increases access to treatment for alcohol and drug use. Science-based substance abuse treatment will become even more crucial as payers seek consistent quality of care. This study provides baseline data on service delivery, contracting, and financing as state agencies and treatment providers prepare for implementation of the Affordable Care Act. © Health Research and Educational Trust.