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Sample records for evidence-based consensus guideline

  1. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper...

  2. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico; Sanders, Robert D.; Audisio, Riccardo; Borozdina, Anastasia; Cherubini, Antonio; Jones, Christina; Kehlet, Henrik; Maclullich, Alasdair; Radtke, Finn; Riese, Florian; Slooter, Arjen J C; Veyckemans, Francis; Kramer, Sylvia; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss, Bjoern; Spies, Claudia D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care,

  3. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: an evidence-based consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P; Navarro-Rodriguez, Tomas; Barbuti, Ricardo; Eisig, Jaime; Chinzon, Decio; Bernardo, Wanderley

    2010-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders in medical practice. A number of guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GERD have been published in different countries, but a Brazilian accepted directive by the standards of evidence-based medicine is still lacking. As such, the aim of the Brazilian GERD Consensus Group was to develop guidelines for the diagnosis and management of GERD, strictly using evidence-based medicine methodology that could be clinically used by primary care physicians and specialists and would encompass the needs of physicians, investigators, insurance and regulatory bodies. A total of 30 questions were proposed. Systematic literature reviews, which defined inclusion and/or exclusion criteria, were conducted to identify and grade the available evidence to support each statement. A total of 11,069 papers on GERD were selected, of which 6,474 addressed the diagnosis and 4,595, therapeutics. Regarding diagnosis, 51 met the requirements for the analysis of evidence-based medicine: 19 of them were classified as grade A and 32 as grade B. As for therapeutics, 158 met the evidence-based medicine criteria; 89 were classified as grade A and 69 as grade B. In the topic Diagnosis, answers supported by publications grade A and B were accepted. In the topic Treatment only publications grade A were accepted: answers supported by publications grade B were submitted to the voting by the Consensus Group. The present publication presents the most representative studies that responded to the proposed questions, followed by pertinent comments. Follow examples. In patients with atypical manifestations, the conventional esophageal pH-metry contributes little to the diagnosis of GERD. The sensitivity, however, increases with the use of double-channel pH-metry. In patients with atypical manifestations, the impedance-pH-metry substantially contributes to the diagnosis of GERD. The examination, however, is costly

  4. Methylphenidate poisoning: an evidence-based consensus guideline for out-of-hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharman, Elizabeth J; Erdman, Andrew R; Cobaugh, Daniel J; Olson, Kent R; Woolf, Alan D; Caravati, E Martin; Chyka, Peter A; Booze, Lisa L; Manoguerra, Anthony S; Nelson, Lewis S; Christianson, Gwenn; Troutman, William G

    2007-01-01

    A review of US poison center data for 2004 showed over 8,000 ingestions of methylphenidate. A guideline that determines the conditions for emergency department referral and prehospital care could potentially optimize patient outcome, avoid unnecessary emergency department visits, reduce health care costs, and reduce life disruption for patients and caregivers. An evidence-based expert consensus process was used to create the guideline. Relevant articles were abstracted by a trained physician researcher. The first draft of the guideline was created by the lead author. The entire panel discussed and refined the guideline before distribution to secondary reviewers for comment. The panel then made changes based on the secondary review comments. The objective of this guideline is to assist poison center personnel in the appropriate out-of-hospital triage and initial out-of-hospital management of patients with suspected ingestions of methylphenidate by 1) describing the process by which a specialist in poison information should evaluate an exposure to methylphenidate, 2) identifying the key decision elements in managing cases of methylphenidate ingestion, 3) providing clear and practical recommendations that reflect the current state of knowledge, and 4) identifying needs for research. This review focuses on the ingestion of more than a single therapeutic dose of methylphenidate and the effects of an overdose and is based on an assessment of current scientific and clinical information. The expert consensus panel recognizes that specific patient care decisions may be at variance with this guideline and are the prerogative of the patient and the health professionals providing care, considering all of the circumstances involved. This guideline does not substitute for clinical judgment. Recommendations are in chronological order of likely clinical use. The grade of recommendation is in parentheses. 1) All patients with suicidal intent, intentional abuse, or in cases in which

  5. OARSI recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis, Part II: OARSI evidence-based, expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Moskowitz, R W; Nuki, G; Abramson, S; Altman, R D; Arden, N; Bierma-Zeinstra, S; Brandt, K D; Croft, P; Doherty, M; Dougados, M; Hochberg, M; Hunter, D J; Kwoh, K; Lohmander, L S; Tugwell, P

    2008-02-01

    To develop concise, patient-focussed, up to date, evidence-based, expert consensus recommendations for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), which are adaptable and designed to assist physicians and allied health care professionals in general and specialist practise throughout the world. Sixteen experts from four medical disciplines (primary care, rheumatology, orthopaedics and evidence-based medicine), two continents and six countries (USA, UK, France, Netherlands, Sweden and Canada) formed the guidelines development team. A systematic review of existing guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA published between 1945 and January 2006 was undertaken using the validated appraisal of guidelines research and evaluation (AGREE) instrument. A core set of management modalities was generated based on the agreement between guidelines. Evidence before 2002 was based on a systematic review conducted by European League Against Rheumatism and evidence after 2002 was updated using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library and HTA reports. The quality of evidence was evaluated, and where possible, effect size (ES), number needed to treat, relative risk or odds ratio and cost per quality-adjusted life years gained were estimated. Consensus recommendations were produced following a Delphi exercise and the strength of recommendation (SOR) for propositions relating to each modality was determined using a visual analogue scale. Twenty-three treatment guidelines for the management of hip and knee OA were identified from the literature search, including six opinion-based, five evidence-based and 12 based on both expert opinion and research evidence. Twenty out of 51 treatment modalities addressed by these guidelines were universally recommended. ES for pain relief varied from treatment to treatment. Overall there was no statistically significant difference between non-pharmacological therapies [0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16, 0.34] and

  6. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Àlex; Wattjes, Mike P; Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    diagnosis in patients with MS. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the implementation of MRI of the brain and spinal cord in the diagnosis of patients who are suspected of having MS. These guidelines are based on an extensive review of the recent literature, as well as on the personal...

  7. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattjes, Mike P; Rovira, Àlex; Miller, David

    2015-01-01

    . This use of MRI can help predict treatment response and assess the efficacy and safety of new therapies. In the second part of the MAGNIMS (Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MS) network's guidelines on the use of MRI in MS, we focus on the implementation of this technique in prognostic and monitoring tasks. We...

  8. Evidence-based national guidelines for the management of suspected fetal growth restriction: comparison, consensus, and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Lesley M; Figueras, Francesc; Anderson, Ngaire H

    2018-02-01

    Small for gestational age is usually defined as an infant with a birthweight restriction refers to a fetus that has failed to reach its biological growth potential because of placental dysfunction. Small-for-gestational-age babies make up 28-45% of nonanomalous stillbirths, and have a higher chance of neurodevelopmental delay, childhood and adult obesity, and metabolic disease. The majority of small-for-gestational-age babies are not recognized before birth. Improved identification, accompanied by surveillance and timely delivery, is associated with reduction in small-for-gestational-age stillbirths. Internationally and regionally, detection of small for gestational age and management of fetal growth problems vary considerably. The aim of this review is to: summarize areas of consensus and controversy between recently published national guidelines on small for gestational age or fetal growth restriction; highlight any recent evidence that should be incorporated into existing guidelines; and identify future research priorities in this field. A search of MEDLINE, Google, and the International Guideline Library identified 6 national guidelines on management of pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction/small for gestational age published from 2010 onwards. There is general consensus between guidelines (at least 4 of 6 guidelines in agreement) in early pregnancy risk selection, and use of low-dose aspirin for women with major risk factors for placental insufficiency. All highlight the importance of smoking cessation to prevent small for gestational age. While there is consensus in recommending fundal height measurement in the third trimester, 3 specify the use of a customized growth chart, while 2 recommend McDonald rule. Routine third-trimester scanning is not recommended for small-for-gestational-age screening, while women with major risk factors should have serial scanning in the third trimester. Umbilical artery Doppler studies in suspected small

  9. Quality of evidence-based pediatric guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; Lincke, Carsten R.; Offringa, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines and to assess their quality. Methods. We searched Medline, Embase, and relevant Web sites of guideline development programs and national pediatric societies to identify evidence-based pediatric guidelines. A list with titles of identified

  10. Evidence-based guideline update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Peer Carsten Tfelt-Hansen, Glostrup, Denmark: According to the recent American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline update, a drug can be recommended as possibly effective for migraine prevention if it had demonstrated efficacy in one Class II study.(1) Eight drugs are recommended as possibly...

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  12. Annotating Evidence Based Clinical Guidelines : A Lightweight Ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; de Waard, A.; Vdovjak, R.; Paschke, A.; Burger, A.; Romano, P.; Marshall, M.S.; Splendiani, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a lightweight ontology for representing annotations of declarative evidence based clinical guidelines. We present the motivation and requirements for this representation, based on an analysis of several guidelines. The ontology provides the means to connect clinical questions

  13. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders : International comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings: Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The

  14. How evidence-based are the recommendations in evidence-based guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finlay A McAlister

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment recommendations for the same condition from different guideline bodies often disagree, even when the same randomized controlled trial (RCT evidence is cited. Guideline appraisal tools focus on methodology and quality of reporting, but not on the nature of the supporting evidence. This study was done to evaluate the quality of the evidence (based on consideration of its internal validity, clinical relevance, and applicability underlying therapy recommendations in evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional analysis of cardiovascular risk management recommendations was performed for three different conditions (diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension from three pan-national guideline panels (from the United States, Canada, and Europe. Of the 338 treatment recommendations in these nine guidelines, 231 (68% cited RCT evidence but only 105 (45% of these RCT-based recommendations were based on high-quality evidence. RCT-based evidence was downgraded most often because of reservations about the applicability of the RCT to the populations specified in the guideline recommendation (64/126 cases, 51% or because the RCT reported surrogate outcomes (59/126 cases, 47%. CONCLUSIONS: The results of internally valid RCTs may not be applicable to the populations, interventions, or outcomes specified in a guideline recommendation and therefore should not always be assumed to provide high-quality evidence for therapy recommendations.

  15. [Evidence-based therapy guideline of the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, A; Kunze, D; Wabitsch, M

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in childhood and adolescence has increased worldwide in recent years. A consensus guideline (S2) for treating obesity in childhood and adolescence in Germany was first published by the German Working Group on Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence (AGA) in 2000. The intention is to gradually replace this consensus-based (S2) guideline with an evidence-based (S3) guideline. Following a systematic literature search, 21 recommendations were predominantly approved with "strong consensus" (agreement >95%). Body weight and body fat mass can be significantly influenced by conventional behavior-based measures and also by the currently available drug therapies. However, the extent of the achieved weight reduction is small. Surgical measures (unproven, experimental therapy) to reduce body weight, in contrast, are very successful. In addition to the long version of this evidence-based guideline, an abbreviated version exists and a practice guideline is planned. This guideline should be further developed within the competence network on obesity of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The guideline will be published in the scholarly journals of the professional associations concerned, will be available via the Internet, and will also be distributed through periodicals, congress events, and information at facilities.

  16. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  17. Developing evidence-based guidelines for referral for short stature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Dommelen, P. van; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.; Buuren, S. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish evidence based guidelines for growth monitoring on a population basis. Study design: Several auxological referral criteria were formulated and applied to longitudinal growth data from four different patient groups, as well as three samples from the general population.

  18. The development of evidence-based guidelines in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, C M

    2013-02-01

    Use of guidelines is an important means of reducing the gap between research and clinical practice. Sound and unbiased information should be available to enable dental professionals to provide better clinical treatment for their patients. The development of clinical guidelines in dentistry should follow standard and transparent methodology. The purpose of this article is to propose important steps for developing evidence-based clinical recommendations in dentistry. Initially, dental guidelines should be extensively sought and assessed to answer focused clinical questions. If there is a paucity of guidelines or if existing guidelines are not of good methodological quality, systematic reviews should be searched or conducted to serve as a basis for the development of evidence-based guidelines. When systematic reviews are produced, they should be rigorous in order to provide the best evidence possible. In the last phase of the process, the overall quality of evidence should be scrutinized and assessed, together with other factors (balance between treatment effects and side effects, patients' values, and cost-effectiveness of therapy) to determine the strength of recommendations. It is expected this approach will result in the development of sound clinical guidelines and consequent improvement of dental treatment.

  19. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration......, on the use of toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to correct preoperative corneal astigmatism, the use of intracameral and topical antibiotics to prevent endophthalmitis, choice of anti-inflammatory medication to control postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular oedema, the use of immediate...

  20. Formulating evidence-based guidelines for certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives attending home births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Elizabeth; Avery, Melissa; Frisvold, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Implementing national home birth guidelines for certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) in the United States may facilitate a common approach to safe home birth practices. Guidelines are evidence-based care recommendations for specified clinical situations that can be modified by individual providers to meet specific client needs. Following a review of home birth guidelines from multiple countries, a set of home birth practices guidelines for US CNMs/CMs was drafted. Fifteen American Midwifery Certification Board, Inc. (AMCB)-certified home birth midwives who participate in the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) home birth electronic mailing list considered the use of such a document in their practices and reviewed and commented on the guidelines. The proposed guidelines addressed client screening, informed consent, antepartum care, routine intrapartum care, obstetric complications and hospital transports, postpartum care, neonatal care, gynecologic care, primary care, peer reviews, recordkeeping, and physician collaboration. The reviewers had varying assessments as to whether the guidelines reflected international standards and current best evidence. The primary concern expressed was that an adoption of national guidelines could compromise provider autonomy. Incorporation of evidence-based guidelines is an ACNM standard and was recommended by the Home Birth Consensus Summit. Clinical practice guidelines are informed by current evidence and supported by experts in a given discipline. Implementation of guidelines ensures optimal patient care and is becoming increasingly central to reimbursement and to medicolegal support. A set of practice guidelines based on current best evidence and internationally accepted standards was developed and reviewed by an interested group of US CNMs/CMs. Further discussion with home birth midwives and other stakeholders about the development and implementation of home birth guidelines is needed, especially in

  1. Implementation of an evidence-based guideline on fluid resuscitation: lessons learnt for future guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, M.M.; Boluyt, N.; Offringa, M.

    2010-01-01

    There is little experience with the nationwide implementation of an evidence-based pediatric guideline on first-choice fluid for resuscitation in hypovolemia. We investigated fluid prescribing behavior at (1) guideline development, (2) after guideline development, and (3) after active implementation

  2. EPC/HPSG evidence-based guidelines for the management of pediatric pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Párniczky, Andrea; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Husain, Sohail; Lowe, Mark; Oracz, Grzegorz; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra K; Uc, Aliye; Wilschanski, Michael; Witt, Heiko; Czakó, László; Grammatikopoulos, Tassos; Rasmussen, Ib Christian; Sutton, Robert; Hegyi, Péter

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric pancreatitis is an underdiagnosed disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has increased, it is now 3.6-13.3 cases per 100,000 children. Up-to-date evidence based management guidelines are lacking for the pediatric pancreatitis. The European Pancreatic Club, in collaboration with the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group organized a consensus guideline meeting on the diagnosis and management of pancreatitis in the pediatric population. Pediatric Pancreatitis was divided into three main clinical categories: acute pancreatitis, acute recurrent pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Fifteen relevant topics (acute pancreatitis: diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; complications; therapy; biliary tract management; acute recurrent pancreatitis: diagnosis; chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis, etiology, treatment, imaging, intervention, pain, complications; enzyme replacement) were defined. Ten experts from the USA and Europe reviewed and summarized the available literature. Evidence was classified according to the GRADE classification system. Within fifteen topics, forty-seven relevant clinical questions were defined. The draft of the updated guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting held during the 49th Meeting of European Pancreatic Club, in Budapest, on July 1, 2017. These evidence-based guidelines provides the current state of the art of the diagnosis and management of pediatric pancreatitis. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinicians adopting evidence based guidelines: a case study with thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE is a cause of hospital mortality and managing its morbidity is associated with significant expenditure. Uptake of evidenced based guideline recommendations intended to prevent VTE in hospital settings is sub-optimal. This study was conducted to explore clinicians' attitudes and the clinical environment in which they work to understand their reluctance to adopt VTE prophylaxis guidelines. Methods Between February and November 2009, 40 hospital employed doctors from 2 Australian metropolitan hospitals were interviewed in depth. Qualitative data were analysed according to thematic methodology. Results Analysis of interviews revealed that barriers to evidence based practice include i the fragmented system of care delivery where multiple members of teams and multiple teams are responsible for each patient's care, and in the case of VTE, where everyone shares responsibility and no-one in particular is responsible; ii the culture of practice where team practice is tailored to that of the team head, and where medicine is considered an 'art' in which guidelines should be adapted to each patient rather than applied universally. Interviewees recommend clear allocation of responsibility and reminders to counteract VTE risk assessment being overlooked. Conclusions Senior clinicians are the key enablers for practice change. They will need to be convinced that guideline compliance adds value to their patient care. Then with the support of systems in the organisation designed to minimize the effects of care fragmentation, they will drive practice changes in their teams. We believe that evidence based practice is only possible with a coordinated program that addresses individual, cultural and organisational constraints.

  4. Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines Update 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.

  5. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis: consensus conference guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretto, N; Carrara, A; Corradi, A; De Vivo, G; Lazzaro, L; Ricciardelli, L; Agresta, F; Amodio, C; Bergamini, C; Borzellino, G; Catani, M; Cavaliere, D; Cirocchi, R; Gemini, S; Mirabella, A; Palasciano, N; Piazza, D; Piccoli, M; Rigamonti, M; Scatizzi, M; Tamborrino, E; Zago, M

    2012-05-01

    Laparoscopic adhesiolysis has been demonstrated to be technically feasible in small bowel obstruction and carries advantages in terms of post-surgical course. The increasing dissemination of laparoscopic surgery in the emergency setting and the lack of concrete evidence in the literature have called for a consensus conference to draw recommendations for clinical practice. A literature search was used to outline the evidence, and a consensus conference was held between experts in the field. A survey of international experts added expertise to the debate. A public jury of surgeons discussed and validated the statements, and the entire process was reviewed by three external experts. Recommendations concern the diagnostic evaluation, the timing of the operation, the selection of patients, the induction of the pneumoperitoneum, the removal of the cause of obstructions, the criteria for conversion, the use of adhesion-preventing agents, the need for high-technology dissection instruments and behaviour in the case of misdiagnosed hernia or the need for bowel resection. Evidence of this kind of surgery is scanty because of the absence of randomized controlled trials. Nevertheless laparoscopic skills in emergency are widespread. The recommendations given with the consensus process might be a useful tool in the hands of surgeons. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Pediatric psycho-oncology care: standards, guidelines, and consensus reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Lori; Viola, Adrienne; Koretski, Julia; Perper, Emily Diana; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify existing guidelines, standards, or consensus-based reports for psychosocial care of children with cancer and their families. Psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer can systematize the approach to care and create a replicable model that can be utilized in pediatric hospitals around the world. Determining gaps in existing standards in pediatric psycho-oncology can guide development of useful evidence-based and consensus-based standards. The MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched by investigators at two major pediatric oncology centers for existing guidelines, consensus-based reports, or standards for psychosocial care of patients with pediatric cancer and their families published in peer-reviewed journals in English between 1980 and 2013. We located 27 articles about psychosocial care that met inclusion criteria: 5 set forth standards, 19 were guidelines, and 3 were consensus-based reports. None was sufficiently up to date, comprehensive, specific enough, or evidence- or consensus-based to serve as a current standard for psychosocial care for children with cancer and their families. Despite calls by a number of international pediatric oncology and psycho-oncology professional organizations about the urgency of addressing the psychosocial needs of the child with cancer to reduce suffering, there remains a need for development of a widely acceptable, evidence-based and consensus-based, comprehensive standard of care to guide provision of essential psychosocial services to all patients with pediatric cancer. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre; Koller, Michael; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; van Gossum, André

    2015-12-01

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in adults with Philadelphia chromosome–positive or BCR-ABL–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Canadian consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couban, S.; Savoie, L.; Mourad, Y. Abou; Leber, B.; Minden, M.; Turner, R.; Palada, V.; Shehata, N.; Christofides, A.; Lachance, S.

    2014-01-01

    Adult Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) or BCR-ABL–positive (BCR-ABL+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is an acute leukemia previously associated with a high relapse rate, short disease-free survival, and poor overall survival. In adults, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in first remission remains the only proven curative strategy for transplant-eligible patients. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) in the treatment of patients with Ph+ or BCR-ABL+ all has significantly improved the depth and duration of complete remission, allowing more patients to proceed to transplantation. Although tkis are now considered a standard of care in this setting, few randomized trials have examined the optimal use of tkis in patients with Ph+ all. Questions of major importance remain, including the best way to administer these medications, the choice of tki to administer, and the schedule and the duration to use. We present the results of a systematic review of the literature with consensus recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24764712

  9. Evidence-based clinical guidelines in Kyrgyz Republic.

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    Zurdinova, A A

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care in many countries is one of the priorities of health systems. At the same time one of the most important methods of improving quality of care is the widespread use of methods and principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) [1]. The implementation of EBM in public health practice provides for the optimization of quality of care in terms of safety, efficacy and cost, one way of which is the use of clinical guidelines. Clinical guidelines developed with the use of EBM, provide an opportunity to use the latest and accurate information to optimize or neutralize impact on physician decision-making of subjective factors such as intuition, expertise, opinion of respected colleagues, recommendations of popular manuals and handbooks, etc. To assess and analyze the developed clinical guidelines (CG) and protocols (CP) in the Kyrgyz Republic in the period from 2008 to 2014 and evaluate their implementation in practical healthcare. Retrospective analysis of the developed clinical guidelines and protocols according to the approved methodology, interviewing leaders, questioning doctors and patients for their implementation. All participants gave informed consent for voluntary participation in the study. Within the framework of the National Program "Manas Taalimi" "Strategy for development of evidence-based medicine in the Kyrgyz Republic for 2006-2010" (MOH Order №490 from 09.04.06) was developed and approved for use. Its main purpose was to create a sustainable system of development, deployment and monitoring of the CG and CP and further promotion of EBM into practical health care, education and science. As a result, a number of documents ("Expert Council for assessing the quality of clinical guidelines/protocols", "AGREE instrument to assess the methodological content of clinical guidelines" [2], "The methodology of development and adaptation of clinical guidelines based on evidence-based medicine") were approved by the Order of the Ministry of

  10. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  11. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  12. Detecting New Evidences for Evidence-Based Medical Guidelines with Journal Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Qing; Huang, Zisheng; ten Teije, Annette; van Harmelen, Frank; Riaño, David; Lenz, Richard; Reichert, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based medical guidelines are systematically developed recommendations with the aim to assist practitioner and patients decisions regarding appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances, and are based on evidence described in medical research papers. Evidence-based medical

  13. Implementing Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Crowe, Remle P; Cash, Rebecca E; Nudell, Nikiah G; Martin-Gill, Christian; Richards, Christopher T

    2018-01-19

    As prehospital research advances, more evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) are implemented into emergency medical services (EMS) practice. However, incomplete or suboptimal prehospital EBG implementation may hinder improvement in patient outcomes. To inform future efforts, this study's objective was to review existing evidence pertaining to prehospital EBG implementation methods. This study was a systematic literature review and evaluation following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Advanced Search were searched without language or publication date filters for articles addressing prehospital EBG implementation. Conference proceedings, textbooks, and non-English articles were excluded. GRADE was applied to the remaining articles independently by three of five study investigators. Study characteristics and salient findings from the included articles are reported. The systematic literature review identified 1,367 articles, with 41 meeting inclusion criteria. Most articles described prehospital EBG implementation (n = 24, 59%), or implementation barriers (n = 13, 32%). Common study designs were statement documents (n = 12, 29%), retrospective cohort studies (n = 12, 29%), and cross-sectional studies (n = 9, 22%). Using GRADE, evidence quality was rated low (n = 18, 44%), or very low (n = 23, 56%). Salient findings from the articles included: (i) EBG adherence and patient outcomes depend upon successful implementation, (ii) published studies generally lack detailed implementation methods, (iii) EBG implementation takes longer than planned (mostly for EMS education), (iv) EMS systems' heterogeneity affects EBG implementation, and (v) multiple barriers limit successful implementation (e.g., financial constraints, equipment purchasing, coordination with hospitals, and regulatory agencies). This review found no direct evidence for best prehospital EBG implementation practices. There

  14. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome – an interdisciplinary evidence-based guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS of 1–2% in the general population associated with high disease-related costs and the conflicting data on treatment effectiveness had led to the development of evidence-based guidelines designed to provide patients and physicians guidance in selecting among the alternatives. Until now no evidence-based interdisciplinary (including patients guideline for the management of FMS was available in Europe. Therefore a guideline for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS was developed by 13 German medical and psychological associations and two patient self-help organisations. The task was coordinated by two German scientific umbrella organisations, the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany AWMF and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Pain Therapy DIVS. A systematic search of the literature including all controlled studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of FMS was performed in the Cochrane Library (1993–12/2006, Medline (1980–12/2006, PsychInfo (1966–12/2006 and Scopus (1980–12/ 2006. Levels of evidence were assigned according to the classification system of the Oxford-Centre for Evidence Based Medicine. Grading of the strengths of recommendations was done according to the German program for disease management guidelines. Standardized procedures were used to reach a consensus on recommendations. The guideline was reviewed and finally approved by the boards of the societies involved and published online by the AWMF on april 25, 2008: http://www.uni-duesseldorf.de/AWMF/ll/041-004.htm. A short version of the guideline for patients is available as well: http://www.uni-duesseldorf.de/AWMF/ll/041-004p.htm. The following procedures in the management of FMS were strongly recommended: information on diagnosis and therapeutic options and patient-centered communication, aerobic exercise, cognitive and operant

  15. Management of fibromyalgia syndrome – an interdisciplinary evidence-based guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Arnold, Bernhard; Eich, Wolfgang; Felde, Eva; Flügge, Christl; Henningsen, Peter; Herrmann, Markus; Köllner, Volker; Kühn, Edeltraud; Nutzinger, Detlev; Offenbächer, Martin; Schiltenwolf, Marcus; Sommer, Claudia; Thieme, Kati; Kopp, Ina

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) of 1–2% in the general population associated with high disease-related costs and the conflicting data on treatment effectiveness had led to the development of evidence-based guidelines designed to provide patients and physicians guidance in selecting among the alternatives. Until now no evidence-based interdisciplinary (including patients) guideline for the management of FMS was available in Europe. Therefore a guideline for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was developed by 13 German medical and psychological associations and two patient self-help organisations. The task was coordinated by two German scientific umbrella organisations, the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany AWMF and the German Interdisciplinary Association of Pain Therapy DIVS. A systematic search of the literature including all controlled studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of FMS was performed in the Cochrane Library (1993–12/2006), Medline (1980–12/2006), PsychInfo (1966–12/2006) and Scopus (1980–12/ 2006). Levels of evidence were assigned according to the classification system of the Oxford-Centre for Evidence Based Medicine. Grading of the strengths of recommendations was done according to the German program for disease management guidelines. Standardized procedures were used to reach a consensus on recommendations. The guideline was reviewed and finally approved by the boards of the societies involved and published online by the AWMF on april 25, 2008: http://www.uni-duesseldorf.de/AWMF/ll/041-004.htm. A short version of the guideline for patients is available as well: http://www.uni-duesseldorf.de/AWMF/ll/041-004p.htm. The following procedures in the management of FMS were strongly recommended: information on diagnosis and therapeutic options and patient-centered communication, aerobic exercise, cognitive and operant behavioural therapy

  16. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions.

  17. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine Skills through a Residency-Developed Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, John; Smucny, John; Patil, Anita; Tudiver, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Describes a curriculum intended to culminate in a resident-produced, evidence-based guideline for the care of patients with diabetes. Evaluation of the curriculum showed that learners appreciated the skills and knowledge gained in devising guidelines in an evidence-based manner but were uncertain that their searches were complete. Clinical…

  18. Validation of evidence-based clinical practice guideline: Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amel Ibrahim Ahmed

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Determination of needs and scope of the guideline. Pulmonary ... (two nurses) at Sherbin. Knowledge assessment of nurses: A self administered knowl- ...... culosis control in the central health region of Catalonia during the.

  19. Evidence-based guidelines for the wise use of computers by children: physical development guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, L; Maslen, B; Burgess-Limerick, R; Johnson, P; Dennerlein, J

    2010-04-01

    Computer use by children is common and there is concern over the potential impact of this exposure on child physical development. Recently principles for child-specific evidence-based guidelines for wise use of computers have been published and these included one concerning the facilitation of appropriate physical development. This paper reviews the evidence and presents detailed guidelines for this principle. The guidelines include encouraging a mix of sedentary and whole body movement tasks, encouraging reasonable postures during computing tasks through workstation, chair, desk, display and input device selection and adjustment and special issues regarding notebook computer use and carriage, computing skills and responding to discomfort. The evidence limitations highlight opportunities for future research. The guidelines themselves can inform parents and teachers, equipment designers and suppliers and form the basis of content for teaching children the wise use of computers. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Many children use computers and computer-use habits formed in childhood may track into adulthood. Therefore child-computer interaction needs to be carefully managed. These guidelines inform those responsible for children to assist in the wise use of computers.

  20. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, B. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zöllner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures: The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with

  1. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for chronic pancreatitis 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sakagami, Junichi; Sata, Naohiro; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Hirota, Morihisa; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Lee, Lingaku; Fujiyama, Takashi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Ueda, Keijiro; Tachibana, Yuichi; Sogame, Yoshio; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kato, Ryusuke; Kataoka, Keisho; Shiratori, Keiko; Sugiyama, Masanori; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Tando, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is considered to be an irreversible progressive chronic inflammatory disease. The etiology and pathology of chronic pancreatitis are complex; therefore, it is important to correctly understand the stage and pathology and provide appropriate treatment accordingly. The newly revised Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chronic Pancreatitis 2015 consist of four chapters, i.e., diagnosis, staging, treatment, and prognosis, and includes a total of 65 clinical questions. These guidelines have aimed at providing certain directions and clinically practical contents for the management of chronic pancreatitis, preferentially adopting clinically useful articles. These revised guidelines also refer to early chronic pancreatitis based on the Criteria for the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis 2009. They include such items as health insurance coverage of high-titer lipase preparations and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, new antidiabetic drugs, and the definition of and treatment approach to pancreatic pseudocyst. The accuracy of these guidelines has been improved by examining and adopting new evidence obtained after the publication of the first edition.

  2. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, R.S.G.M.; Zollinger, P.E.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I.L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Rosenbrand, C.J.G.M.; Geerzen, J.H.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I.Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  3. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Roberto S.; Zollinger, Paul E.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, Ilona L.; Zuurmond, Wouter W.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J.; Geertzen, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  4. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  5. Vitiligo: concise evidence based guidelines on diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawkrodger, David J; Ormerod, Anthony D; Shaw, Lindsay; Mauri-Sole, Inma; Whitton, Maxine E; Watts, M Jane; Anstey, Alex V; Ingham, Jane; Young, Katharine

    2010-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common disease that causes a great degree of psychological distress. In its classical forms it is easily recognised and diagnosed. This review provides an evidence based outline of the management of vitiligo, particularly with the non-specialist in mind. Treatments for vitiligo are generally unsatisfactory. The initial approach to a patient who is thought to have vitiligo is to make a definite diagnosis, offer psychological support, and suggest supportive treatments such as the use of camouflage cosmetics and sunscreens, or in some cases after discussion the option of no treatment. Active therapies open to the non-specialist, after an explanation of potential side effects, include the topical use of potent or highly potent steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for a defined period of time (usually 2 months), following which an assessment is made to establish whether or not there has been a response. Patients whose condition is difficult to diagnose, unresponsive to straightforward treatments, or is causing psychological distress, are usually referred to a dermatologist. Specialist dermatology units have at their disposal phototherapy, either narrow band ultraviolet B or in some cases photochemotherapy, which is the most effective treatment presently available and can be considered for symmetrical types of vitiligo. Depigmenting treatments and possibly surgical approaches may be appropriate for vitiligo in selected cases. There is no evidence that presently available systemic treatments are helpful and safe in vitiligo. There is a need for further research into the causes of vitiligo, and into discovering better treatments.

  6. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomassen-Hilgersom Ilona L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines.

  7. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  8. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  9. Alcohol use and pregnancy consensus clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, George; Cox, Lori Vitale; Crane, Joan; Croteau, Pascal; Graves, Lisa; Kluka, Sandra; Koren, Gideon; Martel, Marie-Jocelyne; Midmer, Deana; Nulman, Irena; Poole, Nancy; Senikas, Vyta; Wood, Rebecca

    2010-08-01

    to establish national standards of care for the screening and recording of alcohol use and counselling on alcohol use of women of child-bearing age and pregnant women based on the most up-to-date evidence. published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library in May 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., pregnancy complications, alcohol drinking, prenatal care) and key words (e.g., pregnancy, alcohol consumption, risk reduction). Results were restricted to literature published in the last five years with the following research designs: systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2010. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment (HTA) and HTA-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, clinical practice guideline collections, and clinical trial registries. Each article was screened for relevance and the full text acquired if determined to be relevant. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the members of the Expert Workgroup established by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. the quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. these consensus guidelines have been endorsed by the Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Quebec; the Canadian Association of Midwives; the Canadian Association of Perinatal, Women's Health and Neonatal Nurses (CAPWHN); the College of Family Physicians of

  10. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: an evidence-based consensus Diretrizes para o diagnóstico e tratamento da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: um consenso baseado em evidências

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common disorders in medical practice. A number of guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of GERD have been published in different countries, but a Brazilian accepted directive by the standards of evidence-based medicine is still lacking. As such, the aim of the Brazilian GERD Consensus Group was to develop guidelines for the diagnosis and management of GERD, strictly using evidence-based medicine methodology that could be clinically used by primary care physicians and specialists and would encompass the needs of physicians, investigators, insurance and regulatory bodies. A total of 30 questions were proposed. Systematic literature reviews, which defined inclusion and/or exclusion criteria, were conducted to identify and grade the available evidence to support each statement. A total of 11,069 papers on GERD were selected, of which 6,474 addressed the diagnosis and 4,595, therapeutics. Regarding diagnosis, 51 met the requirements for the analysis of evidence-based medicine: 19 of them were classified as grade A and 32 as grade B. As for therapeutics, 158 met the evidence-based medicine criteria; 89 were classified as grade A and 69 as grade B. In the topic Diagnosis, answers supported by publications grade A and B were accepted. In the topic Treatment only publications grade A were accepted: answers supported by publications grade B were submitted to the voting by the Consensus Group. The present publication presents the most representative studies that responded to the proposed questions, followed by pertinent comments. Follow examples. In patients with atypical manifestations, the conventional esophageal pH-metry contributes little to the diagnosis of GERD. The sensitivity, however, increases with the use of double-channel pH-metry. In patients with atypical manifestations, the impedance-pHmetry substantially contributes to the diagnosis of GERD. The examination

  11. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jacob; Tango, Jennifer; Walker, Ian; Waranch, Chris; McKamie, Joshua; Poonja, Zafrina; Messman, Anne

    2018-03-01

    Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS) addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians) Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank - an online resident community - conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module "Self-Care Series" focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module "Clinical Care Series" focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  12. An Evidence-based, Longitudinal Curriculum for Resident Physician Wellness: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Arnold

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians are at much higher risk for burnout, depression, and suicide than their non-medical peers. One of the working groups from the May 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS addressed this issue through the development of a longitudinal residency curriculum to address resident wellness and burnout. Methods: A 30-person (27 residents, three attending physicians Wellness Curriculum Development workgroup developed the curriculum in two phases. In the first phase, the workgroup worked asynchronously in the Wellness Think Tank – an online resident community – conducting a literature review to identify 10 core topics. In the second phase, the workgroup expanded to include residents outside the Wellness Think Tank at the live RWCS event to identify gaps in the curriculum. This resulted in an additional seven core topics. Results: Seventeen foundational topics served as the framework for the longitudinal resident wellness curriculum. The curriculum includes a two-module introduction to wellness; a seven-module “Self-Care Series” focusing on the appropriate structure of wellness activities and everyday necessities that promote physician wellness; a two-module section on physician suicide and self-help; a four-module “Clinical Care Series” focusing on delivering bad news, navigating difficult patient encounters, dealing with difficult consultants and staff members, and debriefing traumatic events in the emergency department; wellness in the workplace; and dealing with medical errors and shame. Conclusion: The resident wellness curriculum, derived from an evidence-based approach and input of residents from the Wellness Think Tank and the RWCS event, provides a guiding framework for residency programs in emergency medicine and potentially other specialties to improve physician wellness and promote a culture of wellness.

  13. Evidence-based practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine for primary open-angle glaucoma (qingfeng -neizhang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingxin; Ma, Qiu-Yan; Yang, Yue; He, Yu-Peng; Ma, Chao-Ting; Li, Qiang; Jin, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a chronic, progressive optic neuropathy. The aim was to develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for POAG with focus on Chinese medicine pattern differentiation and treatment as well as approved herbal proprietary medicine. The guideline development group involved in various pieces of expertise in contents and methods. Authors searched electronic databases include CNKI, VIP, Sino-Med, Wanfang data, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, as well as checked China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) from the inception of these databases to June 30, 2015. Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine treating adults with POAG were evaluated. Risk of bias tool in the Cochrane Handbook and evidence strength developed by the GRADE group were applied for the evaluation, and recommendations were based on the findings incorporating evidence strength. After several rounds of Expert consensus, the final guideline was endorsed by relevant professional committees. CHM treatment principle and formulae based on pattern differentiation together with approved patent herbal medicines are the main treatments for POAG, and the diagnosis and treatment focusing on blood related patterns is the major domain. CHM therapy alone or combined with other conventional treatment reported in clinical studies together with Expert consensus were recommended for clinical practice.

  14. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  15. Risk and Strategic Decision-Making in Developing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) represents an important approach to educating and treating individuals diagnosed with disabilities or disorders. Understanding research findings is the cornerstone of EBP. The methodology of systematic reviews, which involves carefully analyzing research findings, can result a practice guideline that recommends…

  16. Consensus in Guidelines for Evaluation of DSD by the Texas Children's Hospital Multidisciplinary Gender Medicine Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macias CharlesG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Gender Medicine Team (GMT, comprised of members with expertise in endocrinology, ethics, genetics, gynecology, pediatric surgery, psychology, and urology, at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine formed a task force to formulate a consensus statement on practice guidelines for managing disorders of sexual differentiation (DSD and for making sex assignments. The GMT task force reviewed published evidence and incorporated findings from clinical experience. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence presented in the literature for establishing evidence-based guidelines. The task force presents a consensus statement regarding specific diagnostic and therapeutic issues in the management of individuals who present with DSD. The consensus statement includes recommendations for (1 laboratory workup, (2 acute management, (3 sex assignment in an ethical framework that includes education and involvement of the parents, and (4 surgical management.

  17. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, ...

  18. [Isolated primary nocturnal enuresis: international evidence based management. Consensus recommendations by French expert group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, D; Berard, E; Blanc, J-P; Lenoir, G; Liard, F; Lottmann, H

    2010-05-01

    The causes and treatment of isolated primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) are the subject of ongoing controversy. We are proposing consensus practical recommendations, based on a formalised analysis of the literature and validated by a large panel of experts. A task force of six experts based its work on the guide for literature analysis and recommendations and recommendation grading of the French Haute Autorité de Santé (formalized consensus process methodological guidelines) to evaluate the level of scientific proof (grade of 1 to 4) and the strength of the recommendations (grade A, B, C) of the publications on PNE. As a result of this, 223 articles from 2003 on were identified, of which only 127 (57 %) have an evaluable level of proof. This evaluation was then reviewed by a 19-member rating group. Several recommendations, poorly defined by the literature, had to be proposed by a professional agreement resulting from a consultation between the members of the task force and those of the rating group. For its final validation, the document was submitted to a reading group of 21 members working in a wide range of specialist areas and practices but all involved in PNE. The definition of PNE is very specific: intermittent incontinence during sleep, from the age of 5, with no continuous period of continence longer than 6 months, with no other associated symptom, particularly during the day. Its diagnosis is clinical by the exclusion of all other urinary pathologies. Two factors must be identified during the consultation: nocturnal polyuria promoted by excessive fluid intake, inverse secretion of vasopressin, snoring and sleep apnoea. It is sensitive to desmopressin; small bladder capacity evaluated according to a voiding diary and the ICCS formula. It may be associated with diurnal hyperactivity of the detrusor (30 %). It is resistant to desmopressin. Problems associated with PNE are: abnormal arousal threshold, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (10 %), low

  19. The development of the UK National Institute of Health and Care Excellence evidence-based clinical guidelines on motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, David; Radunovic, Aleksandar; Allen, Alexander; McDermott, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    The care of people with motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is often complex and involves a wide multidisciplinary team approach. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK has produced an evidence based guideline for the management of patients. This has made recommendations, based on clear evidence or consensus discussion. The evidence is often limited and areas for further research are suggested.

  20. [Evidence-based clinical oral healthcare guidelines 4. Adherence requires an implementation strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braspenning, J C C; Mettes, T G P H; van der Sanden, W J M; Wensing, M J P

    2015-03-01

    Adherence to clinical guidelines requires support in practice. However, systematic implementation of evidence-based guidelines is not common practice in oral healthcare. The Knowledge Institute Oral Care (KiMo) offers the opportunity to take into account potential barriers and facilitators during the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. These factors which are relevant to the guideline and the oral healthcare practice provide the ingredients for a tailor-made programme of implementation that has a scientific basis. Elements of any implementation programme are the quality indicators derived from the oral healthcare guidelines. These indicators should fit, on the one hand, the specific goals of the guidelines (patient safety, effectiveness, efficiency, patient-centred, timeliness, accessibility) and, onthe other hand, the various perspectives of the different stakeholders, such as patients, caregivers, health insurers and inspectorate. These quality indicators provide information on adherence to the guidelines, the results of a certain treatment and the success of the implementation strategy, all with the aim to improve the quality of oral healthcare.

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for wise use of electronic games by children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, Leon; Abbott, Rebecca; Collins, Rachel; Campbell, Amity

    2014-01-01

    Electronic games (e-games) are widely used by children, often for substantial durations, yet to date there are no evidence-based guidelines regarding their use. The aim of this paper is to present guidelines for the wise use of e-games by children based on a narrative review of the research. This paper proposes a model of factors that influence child-e-games interaction. It summarises the evidence on positive and negative effects of use of e-games on physical activity and sedentary behaviour, cardio-metabolic health, musculoskeletal health, motor coordination, vision, cognitive development and psychosocial health. Available guidelines and the role of guidelines are discussed. Finally, this information is compiled into a clear set of evidence-based guidelines, about wise use of e-games by children, targeting children, parents, professionals and the e-game industry. These guidelines provide an accessible synthesis of available knowledge and pragmatic guidelines based on e-game specific evidence and related research.

  2. Classification and Clinical Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Fitzcharles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS, characterized by subjective complaints without physical or biomarker abnormality, courts controversy. Recommendations in recent guidelines addressing classification and diagnosis were examined for consistencies or differences. Methods. Systematic searches from January 2008 to February 2013 of the US-American National Guideline Clearing House, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, Guidelines International Network, and Medline for evidence-based guidelines for the management of FMS were conducted. Results. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines, independently developed in Canada, Germany, and Israel, recommended that FMS can be clinically diagnosed by a typical cluster of symptoms following a defined evaluation including history, physical examination, and selected laboratory tests, to exclude another somatic disease. Specialist referral is only recommended when some other physical or mental illness is reasonably suspected. The diagnosis can be based on the (modified preliminary American College of Rheumatology (ACR 2010 diagnostic criteria. Discussion. Guidelines from three continents showed remarkable consistency regarding the clinical concept of FMS, acknowledging that FMS is neither a distinct rheumatic nor mental disorder, but rather a cluster of symptoms, not explained by another somatic disease. While FMS remains an integral part of rheumatology, it is not an exclusive rheumatic condition and spans a broad range of medical disciplines.

  3. Current Guidelines Have Limited Applicability to Patients with Comorbid Conditions: A Systematic Analysis of Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Burgers, Jako S.; Clancy, Carolyn; Westert, Gert P.; Schneider, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Guidelines traditionally focus on the diagnosis and treatment of single diseases. As almost half of the patients with a chronic disease have more than one disease, the applicability of guidelines may be limited. The aim of this study was to assess the extent that guidelines address comorbidity and to assess the supporting evidence of recommendations related to comorbidity. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic analysis of evidence-based guidelines focusing on four highly prevalent chronic conditions with a high impact on quality of life: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depressive disorder, diabetes mellitus type 2, and osteoarthritis. Data were abstracted from each guideline on the extent that comorbidity was addressed (general comments, specific recommendations), the type of comorbidity discussed (concordant, discordant), and the supporting evidence of the comorbidity-related recommendations (level of evidence, translation of evidence). Of the 20 guidelines, 17 (85%) addressed the issue of comorbidity and 14 (70%) provided specific recommendations on comorbidity. In general, the guidelines included few recommendations on patients with comorbidity (mean 3 recommendations per guideline, range 0 to 26). Of the 59 comorbidity-related recommendations provided, 46 (78%) addressed concordant comorbidities, 8 (14%) discordant comorbidities, and for 5 (8%) the type of comorbidity was not specified. The strength of the supporting evidence was moderate for 25% (15/59) and low for 37% (22/59) of the recommendations. In addition, for 73% (43/59) of the recommendations the evidence was not adequately translated into the guidelines. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that the applicability of current evidence-based guidelines to patients with comorbid conditions is limited. Most guidelines do not provide explicit guidance on treatment of patients with comorbidity, particularly for discordant combinations. Guidelines should be more

  4. Prostate cancer: ESMO Consensus Conference Guidelines 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horwich, A.; Hugosson, J.; de Reijke, T.; Wiegel, T.; Fizazi, K.; Kataja, V.; Parker, Chris; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Berthold, Dominik; Bill-Axelson, Anna; Carlsson, Sigrid; Daugaard, Gedske; de Meerleer, Gert; Dearnaley, David; Fizazi, Karim; Fonteyne, Valérie; Gillessen, Silke; Heinrich, Daniel; Horwich, Alan; Hugosson, Jonas; Kataja, Vesa; Kwiatkowski, Maciej; Nilsson, Sten; Padhani, Anwar; Papandreou, Christos; Roobol, Monique; Sella, Avishay; Valdagni, Riccardo; van der Kwast, Theo; Verhagen, Paul; Wiegel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The first ESMO Consensus Conference on prostate cancer was held in Zurich, Switzerland, on 17-19 November 2011, with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals including experts in methodological aspects. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically

  5. Management and prevention of refeeding syndrome in medical inpatients: An evidence-based and consensus-supported algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedli, Natalie; Stanga, Zeno; Culkin, Alison; Crook, Martin; Laviano, Alessandro; Sobotka, Lubos; Kressig, Reto W; Kondrup, Jens; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) can be a life-threatening metabolic condition after nutritional replenishment if not recognized early and treated adequately. There is a lack of evidence-based treatment and monitoring algorithm for daily clinical practice. The aim of the study was to propose an expert consensus guideline for RFS for the medical inpatient (not including anorexic patients) regarding risk factors, diagnostic criteria, and preventive and therapeutic measures based on a previous systematic literature search. Based on a recent qualitative systematic review on the topic, we developed clinically relevant recommendations as well as a treatment and monitoring algorithm for the clinical management of inpatients regarding RFS. With international experts, these recommendations were discussed and agreement with the recommendation was rated. Upon hospital admission, we recommend the use of specific screening criteria (i.e., low body mass index, large unintentional weight loss, little or no nutritional intake, history of alcohol or drug abuse) for risk assessment regarding the occurrence of RFS. According to the patient's individual risk for RFS, a careful start of nutritional therapy with a stepwise increase in energy and fluids goals and supplementation of electrolyte and vitamins, as well as close clinical monitoring, is recommended. We also propose criteria for the diagnosis of imminent and manifest RFS with practical treatment recommendations with adoption of the nutritional therapy. Based on the available evidence, we developed a practical algorithm for risk assessment, treatment, and monitoring of RFS in medical inpatients. In daily routine clinical care, this may help to optimize and standardize the management of this vulnerable patient population. We encourage future quality studies to further refine these recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence-based practice guidelines in OHS: are they agree-able?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Carel; Hoenen, John

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acceptance, validity, reliability and feasibility of the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines and REsearch and Evaluation) instrument to assess the quality of evidence-based practice guidelines for occupational physicians. In total, 6 practice guidelines of the Netherlands Society of Occupational Medicine (NVAB) were appraised by 20 occupational health professionals and experts in guideline development or implementation. Although appraisers often disagreed on individual item scores, the internal consistency and interrater reliability for most domains was sufficient. The AGREE criteria were in general considered relevant and no major suggestions for additional items for use in the context of occupational health were brought up. The domain scores for the individual guidelines show a wide variety: 'applicability' had on average the lowest mean score (53%) while 'scope and purpose' had the highest one (87%). Low scores indicate where improvements are possible and necessary, e.g. by providing more information about the development. Key experts in occupational health report that AGREE is a relevant and easy to use instrument to evaluate quality aspects and the included criteria provide a good framework to develop or update evidence-based practice guidelines in the field of occupational health.

  7. The right care, every time: improving adherence to evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnacles, Jane; Roueché, Alice; Lachman, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Guidelines are integral to reducing variation in paediatric care by ensuring that children receive the right care, every time. However, for reasons discussed in this paper, clinicians do not always follow evidence-based guidelines. Strategies to improve guideline usage tend to focus on dissemination and education. These approaches, however, do not address some of the more complex factors that influence whether a guideline is used in clinical practice. In this article, part of the Equipped Quality Improvement series, we outline the literature on barriers to guideline adherence and present practical solutions to address these barriers. Examples outlined include the use of care bundles, integrated care pathways and quality improvement collaboratives. A sophisticated information technology system can improve the use of evidence-based guidelines and provide organisations with valuable data for learning and improvement. Key to success is the support of an organisation that places reliability of service delivery as the way business is done. To do this requires leadership from clinicians in multidisciplinary teams and a system of continual improvement. By learning from successful approaches, we believe that all healthcare organisations can ensure the right care for each patient, every time. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Evidence-based practice guideline: wheelchair biking for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Schoenfelder, Deborah Perry

    2011-07-01

    Depression is a problem that will continue to burden older adults and challenge health care providers. Failing to recognize and effectively treat depression in institutionalized older adults is sanctioning these members of society to live their final years in despair and emotional suffering. The wheelchair biking program described in this evidence-based practice guideline provides a refreshing, safe, innovative tool to address depression and improve quality of life in older adults.

  9. Australian and New Zealand three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy consensus guidelines for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Berry, M.; Kneebone, A.; Gogna, K.; Turner, S.; Rolfo, A.; Haworth, A.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) has been shown to reduce normal tissue toxicity and allow dose escalation in the curative treatment of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group initiated a consensus process to generate evidence-based guidelines for the safe and effective implementation of 3DCRT. All radiation oncology departments in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete a survey of their prostate practice and to send representatives to a consensus workshop. After a review of the evidence, key issues were identified and debated. If agreement was not reached, working parties were formed to make recommendations. Draft guidelines were circulated to workshop participants for approval prior to publication. Where possible, evidence-based recommendations have been made with regard to patient selection, risk stratification, simulation, planning, treatment delivery and toxicity reporting. This is the first time a group of radiation therapists, physicists and oncologists representing professional radiotherapy practice across Australia and New Zealand have worked together to develop best-practice guidelines. These guidelines should serve as a baseline for prospective clinical trials, outcome research and quality assurance. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. The development of a multidisciplinary, evidence-based guideline for "HIV and employment".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Marlies N; Roelofs, Pepijin; Miedema, Harold S; Brandjes, Dees P M; Dahmen, Rutger; van Gorp, Eric C M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a multidisciplinary guideline that supports the care and vocational rehabilitation of HIV-infected people with employment-related problems. The guideline was developed according to the "evidence-based guideline development" method developed by the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement. This method consists of the following steps: forming a multidisciplinary core group and an expert panel, formulating key questions, searching and appraising the available literature, formulating considerations and recommendations, peer reviewing the draft guideline, and authorizing the final guideline. All relevant professional associations were represented in the core group that was assembled to develop the guideline, i.e., HIV doctors, HIV nurses, general practitioners, occupational health physicians, psychologists, social workers, occupational health nurses, vocational experts, and insurance physicians. Five key questions for the guideline were formulated with the following themes: determinants of employment, disclosure and stigma, self-management, interventions, and the organization of care. In the literature review on these topics, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the included articles was poor. Factors such as patient preferences and medical/ethical issues were considered. The recommendations in the guideline are a weighting of the scientific evidence and the considerations of the core group. The guideline, as well as its summary for daily practice, clarifies the most important barriers and facilitators to people with HIV either staying at work or returning to work, and it constitutes a clinical, easy-to-use guideline for health-care providers and how they can support people with HIV who want to work.

  11. Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic exercise in the management of hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Smith, Christine Am; Rahman, Prinon; Àlvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Toupin-April, Karine; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Taki, Jade; Marcotte, Rachel; Fransen, Marlene; Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela; Kenny, Glen P; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Brooks, Sydney; Laferriere, Lucie; McLean, Linda; Longchamp, Guy

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective is to identify effective land-based therapeutic exercise interventions and provide evidence-based recommendations for managing hip osteoarthritis. A secondary objective is to develop an Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guideline for hip osteoarthritis. The search strategy and modified selection criteria from a Cochrane review were used. Studies included hip osteoarthritis patients in comparative controlled trials with therapeutic exercise interventions. An Expert Panel arrived at a Delphi survey consensus to endorse the recommendations. The Ottawa Panel hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, or D-) considered the study design (level I: randomized controlled trial and level II: controlled clinical trial), statistical significance (p osteoarthritis. Strength training exercises displayed the greatest improvements for pain (Grade A), disability (Grades A and C+), physical function (Grade A), stiffness (Grade A), and range of motion (Grade A) within a short time period (8-24 weeks). Stretching also greatly improved physical function (Grade A), and flexibility exercises improved pain (Grade A), range of motion (Grade A), physical function (Grade A), and stiffness (Grade C+). The Ottawa Panel recommends land-based therapeutic exercise, notably strength training, for management of hip osteoarthritis in reducing pain, stiffness and self-reported disability, and improving physical function and range of motion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Evidence-based consensus on opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease (republication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients are a high-risk population for opportunistic infections. The IBD group of the Chinese Society of Gastroenterology of the Chinese Medical Association organized an expert group to discuss and develop this consensus opinion. This consensus opinion referenced clinical study results from China and other countries to provide guidance for clinical practices. Eight major topics, including cytomegalovirus infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, viral hepatitis, bacterial infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, fungal infection, parasitic infection, and vaccines were introduced in this article.

  13. Lack of international consensus in low-risk drinking guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtwaengler, Nina A F F; de Visser, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    To encourage moderate alcohol consumption, many governments have developed guidelines for alcohol intake, guidelines for alcohol consumption during pregnancy and legislation relating to blood alcohol limits when driving. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of international consensus within such guidelines. Official definitions of standard drinks and consumption guidelines were searched for on government websites, including all 27 European Union Member States and countries from all global geographic regions. There was a remarkable lack of agreement about what constitutes harmful or excessive alcohol consumption on a daily basis, a weekly basis and when driving, with no consensus about the ratios of consumption guidelines for men and women. International consensus in low-risk drinking guidelines is an important--and achievable--goal. Such agreement would facilitate consistent labelling of packaged products and could help to promote moderate alcohol consumption. However, there are some paradoxes related to alcohol content labelling and people's use of such information: although clearer information could increase people's capacity to monitor and regulate their alcohol consumption, not all drinkers are motivated to drink moderately or sensibly, and drinkers who intend to get drunk may use alcohol content labelling to select more alcoholic products. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. Developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in hospitals in Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand: values, requirements and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Tari J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines support clinical decision-making by making recommendations to guide clinical practice. These recommendations are developed by integrating the expertise of a multidisciplinary group of clinicians with the perspectives of consumers and the best available research evidence. However studies have raised concerns about the quality of guideline development, and particularly the link between research and recommendations. The reasons why guideline developers are not following the established development methods are not clear. We aimed to explore the barriers to developing evidence-based guidelines in eleven hospitals in Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand, so as to better understand how evidence-based guideline development could be facilitated in these settings. The research aimed to identify the value clinicians place on guidelines, what clinicians want in guidelines developed in hospital settings and what factors limit rigorous evidence-based guideline development in these settings. Methods Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were undertaken with senior and junior healthcare providers (nurses, midwives, doctors, allied health from the maternal and neonatal services of the eleven participating hospitals. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and a thematic analysis undertaken. Results Ninety-three individual, 25 pair and eleven group interviews were conducted. Participants were clear that they want guidelines that are based on evidence and updated regularly. They were also clear that there are major barriers to this. Most of the barriers were shared across countries, and included lack of time, lack of skills in finding, appraising and interpreting evidence, lack of access to relevant evidence and difficulty arranging meetings and achieving consensus. Barriers that were primarily identified in Australian hospitals include cumbersome organisational

  15. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  16. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure

  17. Development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs: comparing approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Claire

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the potential of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs to support implementation of evidence has been demonstrated, it is not currently being achieved. CPGs are both poorly developed and ineffectively implemented. To improve clinical practice and health outcomes, both well-developed CPGs and effective methods of CPG implementation are needed. We sought to establish whether there is agreement on the fundamental characteristics of an evidence-based CPG development process and to explore whether the level of guidance provided in CPG development handbooks is sufficient for people using these handbooks to be able to apply it. Methods CPG development handbooks were identified through a broad search of published and grey literature. Documents published in English produced by national or international organisations purporting to support development of evidence-based CPGs were included. A list of 14 key elements of a CPG development process was developed. Two authors read each handbook. For each handbook a judgement was made as to how it addressed each element; assigned as: 'mentioned and clear guidance provided', 'mentioned but limited practical detail provided ', or 'not mentioned'. Results Six CPG development handbooks were included. These were produced by the Council of Europe, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK, the New Zealand Guidelines Group, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network, and the World Health Organization (WHO. There was strong concordance between the handbooks on the key elements of an evidence-based CPG development process. All six of the handbooks require and provide guidance on establishment of a multidisciplinary guideline development group, involvement of consumers, identification of clinical questions or problems, systematic searches for and appraisal of research evidence, a process for drafting

  18. Evidence based medicine guidelines: a solution to rationing or politics disguised as science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarni, S I; Gylling, H A

    2004-04-01

    "Evidence based medicine" (EBM) is often seen as a scientific tool for quality improvement, even though its application requires the combination of scientific facts with value judgments and the costing of different treatments. How this is done depends on whether we approach the problem from the perspective of individual patients, doctors, or public health administrators. Evidence based medicine exerts a fundamental influence on certain key aspects of medical professionalism. Since, when clinical practice guidelines are created, costs affect the content of EBM, EBM inevitably becomes a form of rationing and adopts a public health point of view. This challenges traditional professionalism in much the same way as managed care has done in the US. Here we chart some of these major philosophical issues and show why simple solutions cannot be found. The profession needs to pay more attention to different uses of EBM in order to preserve the good aspects of professionalism.

  19. Expert consensus statement to guide the evidence-based classification of Paralympic athletes with vision impairment: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravensbergen, H J C Rianne; Mann, D L; Kamper, S J

    2016-04-01

    Paralympic sports are required to develop evidence-based systems that allocate athletes into 'classes' on the basis of the impact of their impairment on sport performance. However, sports for athletes with vision impairment (VI) classify athletes solely based on the WHO criteria for low vision and blindness. One key barrier to evidence-based classification is the absence of guidance on how to address classification issues unique to VI sport. The aim of this study was to reach expert consensus on how issues specific to VI sport should be addressed in evidence-based classification. A four-round Delphi study was conducted with 25 participants who had expertise as a coach, athlete, classifier and/or administrator in Paralympic sport for VI athletes. The experts agreed that the current method of classification does not fulfil the requirements of Paralympic classification, and that the system should be different for each sport to account for the sports' unique visual demands. Instead of relying only on tests of visual acuity and visual field, the panel agreed that additional tests are required to better account for the impact of impairment on sport performance. There was strong agreement that all athletes should not be required to wear a blindfold as a means of equalising the impairment during competition. There is strong support within the Paralympic movement to change the way that VI athletes are classified. This consensus statement provides clear guidance on how the most important issues specific to VI should be addressed, removing key barriers to the development of evidence-based classification. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Pre-hospital care after a seizure: Evidence base and United Kingdom management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Andrew; Taylor, Louise; Reuber, Markus; Grünewald, Richard A; Parkinson, Martin; Dickson, Jon M

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation to pre-hospital emergency services and they generate significant healthcare costs. This article summarises the United Kingdom (UK) Ambulance Service guidelines for the management of seizures and explores the extent to which these guidelines are evidence-based. Summary of the Clinical Practice Guidelines of the UK Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee relating to the management of seizures. Review of the literature relating to pre-hospital management of seizure emergencies. Much standard practice relating to the emergency out of hospital management of patients with seizures is drawn from generic Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines although many patients do not need ALS during or after a seizure and the benefit of many ALS interventions in seizure patients remains to be established. The majority of studies identified pertain to medical treatment of status epilepticus. These papers show that benzodiazepines are safe and effective but it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions about the best medication or the optimal route of administration. The evidence base for current pre-hospital guidelines for seizure emergencies is incomplete. A large proportion of patients are transported to hospital after a seizure but many of these may be suitable for home management. However, there is very little research into alternative care pathways or criteria that could be used to help paramedics avoid transport to hospital. More research is needed to improve care for people after a seizure and to improve the cost-effectiveness of the healthcare systems within which they are treated. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. World Allergy Organization Anaphylaxis Guidelines: 2013 update of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, F Estelle R; Ardusso, Ledit R F; Dimov, Vesselin; Ebisawa, Motohiro; El-Gamal, Yehia M; Lockey, Richard F; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Senna, Gian Enrico; Sheikh, Aziz; Thong, Bernard Y; Worm, Margitta

    2013-01-01

    The World Allergy Organization (WAO) Guidelines for the assessment and management of anaphylaxis are a widely disseminated and used resource for information about anaphylaxis. They focus on patients at risk, triggers, clinical diagnosis, treatment in health care settings, self-treatment in the community, and prevention of recurrences. Their unique strengths include a global perspective informed by prior research on the global availability of essentials for anaphylaxis assessment and management and a global agenda for anaphylaxis research. Additionally, detailed colored illustrations are linked to key concepts in the text [Simons et al.: J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011;127:593.e1-e22]. The recommendations in the original WAO Anaphylaxis Guidelines for management of anaphylaxis in health care settings and community settings were based on evidence published in peer-reviewed, indexed medical journals to the end of 2010. These recommendations remain unchanged and clinically relevant. An update of the evidence base was published in 2012 [Simons et al.: Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2012;12:389-399]. In 2012 and early 2013, major advances were reported in the following areas: further characterization of patient phenotypes; development of in vitro tests (for some allergens) that help distinguish clinical risk of anaphylaxis from asymptomatic sensitization; epinephrine (adrenaline) research, including studies of a new epinephrine auto-injector for use in community settings, and randomized controlled trials of immunotherapy to prevent food-induced anaphylaxis. Despite these advances, the need for additional prospective studies, including randomized controlled trials of interventions in anaphylaxis is increasingly apparent. This 2013 Update highlights publications from 2012 and 2013 that further contribute to the evidence base for the recommendations made in the original WAO Anaphylaxis Guidelines. Ideally, it should be used in conjunction with these Guidelines and with the 2012

  2. Evidence based guidelines for the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, P J; Cullinan, P; Taylor, A J Newman; Burge, P S; Boyle, C

    2005-05-01

    Occupational asthma is the most frequently reported work related respiratory disease in many countries. This work was commissioned by the British Occupational Health Research Foundation to assist the Health and Safety Executive in achieving its target of reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in Great Britain by 30% by 2010. The guidelines aim to improve the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma by providing evidence based recommendations on which future practice can be based. The literature was searched systematically using Medline and Embase for articles published in all languages up to the end of June 2004. Evidence based statements and recommendations were graded according to the Royal College of General Practitioner's star system and the revised Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network grading system. A total of 474 original studies were selected for appraisal from over 2500 abstracts. The systematic review produced 52 graded evidence statements and 22 recommendations based on 223 studies. Evidence based guidelines have become benchmarks for practice in healthcare and the process used to prepare them is well established. This evidence review and its recommendations focus on interventions and outcomes to provide a robust approach to the prevention, identification, and management of occupational asthma, based on and using the best available medical evidence. The most important action to prevent cases of occupational asthma is to reduce exposure at source. Thereafter surveillance should be performed for the early identification of symptoms, including occupational rhinitis, with additional functional and immunological tests where appropriate. Effective management of workers suspected to have occupational asthma involves the identification and investigation of symptoms suggestive of asthma immediately they occur. Those workers who are confirmed to have occupational asthma should be advised to avoid further exposure completely

  3. Rapid implementation of evidence-based guidelines for imaging after first urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerardi, Karen E; Elkeeb, Dena; Weiser, Jason; Brinkman, William B

    2013-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics published a new guideline for management of first urinary tract infection (UTI) in children aged 2 to 24 months in September 2011. The imaging evaluation changed from the previous guideline to recommend voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) only for patients with an abnormal renal and bladder ultrasound (RBUS). The objective was to decrease the proportion of guideline-eligible children with a normal RBUS who underwent VCUG from median of 92% for patients treated as inpatients and 100% for patients treated in the emergency department to 5% in both settings. This was a quality improvement implementation study in a large academic medical center. Key drivers included: appropriate guideline knowledge, timely identification of guideline eligible patients, and effective communication with the community-based primary care provider. A multidisciplinary team developed and tested interventions. Impact was assessed with annotated run charts. Statistical comparisons were made with χ(2) analysis and Fisher's exact test. The proportion of children with first UTI and normal RBUS who underwent VCUG decreased from a median of 92% to 0% within 1 month of initiating the project among those hospitalized and from 100% to 40% within 4 months among those diagnosed in the emergency department. Rates have been sustained for 12 months and 8 months, respectively. Interventions using the electronic medical record and ordering system were most impactful. Rapid adoption of evidence-based UTI care across multiple settings is achievable. Practice change occurred faster and to a greater magnitude in the inpatient setting compared with the outpatient setting.

  4. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Depression Detection in Older Adults With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ellen Leslie; Raue, Patrick J; Halpert, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Depression and dementia are the two most common psychiatric syndromes in the older adult population. Depression in older adults with and without dementia often goes unrecognized and untreated. The current guideline recommends a three-step procedure that can be used across health care settings to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms. Implementation of the evidence-based guideline requires administration of the Mini-Mental State Examination and either the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form or Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, depending on level of cognitive functioning. The algorithm provided is designed to be used by nurses, physicians, and social workers for the purpose of depression screening in older adults with dementia. Detection of depression in individuals with dementia is hindered by a lack of a validated, brief screening tool. More research is needed on the use of such screenings among older adults with cognitive impairment. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. [Criticism of evidence-based medicine: from reductionism to realism in the application of guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Jako S

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses recent criticism of evidence-based medicine (EBM), which has tended to place unilateral emphasis on evidence originating from randomised trials into effectiveness. The goal of the pioneers of EBM, however, was actually the application of scientific evidence to the individual patient, including the doctor's experience ('practice-based') and the patient's preference ('preference-based') in decision making. Guidelines can support this process by systematically paying attention to patients' preferences and by presenting the advantages and disadvantages of different management options. The application of guidelines should not involve pursuit of 'standard care' but, primarily, the pursuit of shared decision making. This could lead to 'real EBM', in which medical knowledge is translated to practical choice options from different perspectives.

  6. An Evidence-based Guideline for the air medical transportation of prehospital trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephen H; Brown, Kathleen M; Oliver, Zoë J; Spaite, Daniel W; Lawner, Benjamin J; Sahni, Ritu; Weik, Tasmeen S; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Wright, Joseph L; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    Decisions about the transportation of trauma patients by helicopter are often not well informed by research assessing the risks, benefits, and costs of such transport. The objective of this evidence-based guideline (EBG) is to recommend a strategy for the selection of prehospital trauma patients who would benefit most from aeromedical transportation. A multidisciplinary panel was recruited consisting of experts in trauma, EBG development, and emergency medical services (EMS) outcomes research. Representatives of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) (funding agency), and the Children's National Medical Center (investigative team) also contributed to the process. The panel used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to guide question formulation, evidence retrieval, appraisal/synthesis, and formulate recommendations. The process followed the National Evidence-Based Guideline Model Process, which has been approved by the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS and the National EMS Advisory Council. Two strong and three weak recommendations emerged from the process, all supported only by low or very low quality evidence. The panel strongly recommended that the 2011 CDC Guideline for the Field Triage of Injured Patients be used as the initial step in the triage process, and that ground emergency medical services (GEMS) be used for patients not meeting CDC anatomic, physiologic, and situational high-acuity criteria. The panel issued a weak recommendation to use helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) for higher-acuity patients if there is a time-savings versus GEMS, or if an appropriate hospital is not accessible by GEMS due to systemic/logistical factors. The panel strongly recommended that online medical direction should not be required for activating HEMS. Special consideration was given to the potential need for local

  7. Refining the global spatial limits of dengue virus transmission by evidence-based consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver J Brady

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing problem both in its geographical spread and in its intensity, and yet current global distribution remains highly uncertain. Challenges in diagnosis and diagnostic methods as well as highly variable national health systems mean no single data source can reliably estimate the distribution of this disease. As such, there is a lack of agreement on national dengue status among international health organisations. Here we bring together all available information on dengue occurrence using a novel approach to produce an evidence consensus map of the disease range that highlights nations with an uncertain dengue status.A baseline methodology was used to assess a range of evidence for each country. In regions where dengue status was uncertain, additional evidence types were included to either clarify dengue status or confirm that it is unknown at this time. An algorithm was developed that assesses evidence quality and consistency, giving each country an evidence consensus score. Using this approach, we were able to generate a contemporary global map of national-level dengue status that assigns a relative measure of certainty and identifies gaps in the available evidence.The map produced here provides a list of 128 countries for which there is good evidence of dengue occurrence, including 36 countries that have previously been classified as dengue-free by the World Health Organization and/or the US Centers for Disease Control. It also identifies disease surveillance needs, which we list in full. The disease extents and limits determined here using evidence consensus, marks the beginning of a five-year study to advance the mapping of dengue virus transmission and disease risk. Completion of this first step has allowed us to produce a preliminary estimate of population at risk with an upper bound of 3.97 billion people. This figure will be refined in future work.

  8. Consensus Among International Ethical Guidelines for the Provision of Videoconferencing-Based Mental Health Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Claire E; McGill, Brittany C; Wilson, Helen L; Patterson, Pandora

    2016-01-01

    Background Online technologies may reduce barriers to evidence-based mental health care, yet they also create numerous ethical challenges. Recently, numerous professional organizations and expert groups have produced best-practice guidelines to assist mental health professionals in delivering online interventions in an ethically and clinically sound manner. However, there has been little critical examination of these international best-practice guidelines regarding appropriate electronic mental health (e-mental health) service delivery via technologies such as videoconferencing (including Skype), particularly for specific, vulnerable populations. Further, the extent to which concordance exists between these guidelines remains unclear. Synthesizing this literature to provide clear guidance to both mental health professionals and researchers is critical to ensure continued progress in the field of e-mental health. Objective This study aims to review all currently available ethical and best-practice guidelines relating to videoconferencing-delivered mental health treatments in order to ascertain the recommendations for which international consensus could be found. Additionally, this review examines the extent to which each set of guidance addresses several key special populations, including children and young people, and populations living with illness. Methods This systematic review examined guidelines using a two-armed search strategy, examining (1) professional organizations’ published guidance; and (2) MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE for the past ten years. In order to determine consensus for best-practice, a recommendation was considered "firm" if 50% or more of the reviewed guidelines endorsed it and "tentative" if recommended by fewer guidelines than these. The professional guidelines were also scored by two raters using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE-II) criteria. Results In the study, 19 guidelines were included, yielding 11

  9. Barriers to implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines: A survey of early adopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Song, Mei; Polk, Deborah E; Bekhuis, Tanja; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Aravamudhan, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to identify barriers that early-adopting dentists perceive as common and challenging when implementing recommendations from evidence-based (EB) clinical guidelines. Method This is a cross-sectional study. Dentists who attended the 2008 Evidence-based Dentistry Champion Conference were eligible for inclusion. Forty-three dentists (34%) responded to a 22-item questionnaire administered online. Two investigators independently coded and categorized responses to open-ended items. Descriptive statistics were computed to assess the frequency of barriers and perceived challenges. Results The most common barriers to implementation are difficulty in changing current practice model, resistance and criticism from colleagues, and lack of trust in evidence or research. Barriers perceived as serious problems have to do with lack of up-to-date evidence, lack of clear answers to clinical questions, and contradictory information in the scientific literature. Conclusions Knowledge of barriers will help improve translation of biomedical research for dentists. Information in guidelines needs to be current, clear, and simplified for use at chairside; dentists’ fears need to be addressed. PMID:21093800

  10. The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students' Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. Consensus Statements of Evidence from the Council of Distinguished Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie M.; Kahn, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    "The Evidence Base for How We Learn: Supporting Students' Social, Emotional, and Academic Development" articulates the scientific consensus regarding how people learn. The research brief presents a set of consensus statements--developed and unanimously signed onto by the Commission's Council of Distinguished Scientists--that affirm the…

  11. Comparing consensus guidelines on thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk-Mulder, M C; Ettema, H B; Verheyen, C C; Büller, H R

    2010-04-01

    Different guidelines exist regarding the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in orthopedic surgery. We aimed to compare (inter)national guidelines and analyse differences. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and the internet were searched for guidelines on the prevention of VTE in orthopedic surgery. From these, we constructed a table comparing the different antithrombotic regimens during different orthopedic surgical and plaster cast treatments. Eleven guidelines from nine different countries and one international guideline were included. Few guidelines advise on thrombosis prophylaxis after plaster cast immobilization, (prolonged) arthroscopic surgery and isolated lower extremity trauma. Different opinions exist on the sole use of aspirin and mechanical prophylaxis and on the use of vitamin K antagonists after major hip and knee surgery. Based on the same available literature, different guidelines recommend different thromboprophylactic regimens. Ideally, the grade of recommendation should be based on the same level of evidence world-wide. Whilst there is no agreement on the relevance of different endpoints (e.g. asymptomatic DVT), it is very difficult to reach a consensus. Thromboprophylaxis guidelines should be reviewed and updated on a regular basis, because the evidence is evolving rapidly.

  12. Indicators of activity-friendly communities: an evidence-based consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan Ramirez, Laura K; Hoehner, Christine M; Brownson, Ross C; Cook, Rebeka; Orleans, C Tracy; Hollander, Marla; Barker, Dianne C; Bors, Philip; Ewing, Reid; Killingsworth, Richard; Petersmarck, Karen; Schmid, Thomas; Wilkinson, William

    2006-12-01

    Regular physical activity, even at modest intensities, is associated with many health benefits. Most Americans, however, do not engage in the recommended levels. As practitioners seek ways to increase population rates of physical activity, interventions and advocacy efforts are being targeted to the community level. Yet, advocates, community leaders, and researchers lack the tools needed to assess local barriers to and opportunities for more active, healthy lifestyles. Investigators used a systematic review process to identify key indicators of activity-friendly communities that can assess and improve opportunities for regular physical activity. Investigators conducted a comprehensive literature review of both peer-reviewed literature and fugitive information (e.g., reports and websites) to generate an initial list of indicators for review (n=230). The review included a three-tiered, modified Delphi consensus-development process that incorporated input of international, national, state, and local researchers and practitioners from academic institutions, federal and state government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and funding agencies in public health, transportation, urban planning, parks and recreation, and public policy. Ten promising indicators of activity-friendly communities were identified: land use environment, access to exercise facilities, transportation environment, aesthetics, travel patterns, social environment, land use economics, transportation economics, institutional and organizational policies, and promotion. Collaborative, multidisciplinary approaches are underway to test, refine, and expand this initial list of indicators and to develop measures that communities, community leaders, and policymakers can use to design more activity-friendly community environments.

  13. Evidence based guidelines and current practice for physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nicola E; Hurley, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    To document physiotherapy provision for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in relation to the United Kingdom (UK) recently published National Institute of health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for osteoarthritis. Questionnaire survey of chartered physiotherapists. 300 postal questionnaires were distributed to Physiotherapy Departments requesting information regarding source of referrals, treatment aims, preferred methods of treatment and service delivery. Responses were received from 83 physiotherapists (28 %), predominantly working in the UK National Health Service. Approximately equal numbers of referrals came from primary and secondary care. Aims of physiotherapy management were to; encourage self-management; increase strength and range of movement; reduce pain; and improve function. To achieve these, exercise was utilised by 100% of practitioners, often supplemented with electrotherapeutic modalities (66%), manual therapy (64%) and acupuncture (60%). The majority of patients received individual treatment for a total contact time of 1-2 hours, whilst most group interventions lasted 5-6 hours. Approximately half (54%) of respondents reported using outcome measures to determine treatment efficacy. Although knee OA is usually managed in primary care, the similar number of referrals from primary and secondary care may suggest a deviation from evidence-based management guidelines. The guidelines' recommendations of exercise, patient education and self-management are observed by physiotherapists, but other modalities are often used despite poor or no research evidence supporting their efficacy. Whether any of these interventions are clinically beneficial is speculative as treatment outcomes were frequently under-evaluated.

  14. Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation: international consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Lehner, Burkhard; Willy, Christian; Lavery, Larry; Wolvos, Tom; Orgill, Dennis; Ennis, William; Lantis, John; Gabriel, Allen; Schultz, Gregory

    2013-12-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is increasingly utilized as an adjunct therapy for a wide variety of wounds. Despite its growing popularity, there is a paucity of evidence and lack of guidance to provide effective use of this therapy. A panel of experts was convened to provide guidance regarding the appropriate use of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation. A face-to-face meeting was held where the available evidence was discussed and individual clinical experience with this therapy was shared. Follow-up communication among the panelists continued until consensus was achieved. The final consensus recommendations were derived through more than 80 percent agreement among the panelists. Nine consensus statements were generated that address the appropriate use of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation. The question of clinical effectiveness of this therapy was not directly addressed by the consensus panel. This document serves as preliminary guidelines until more robust evidence emerges that will support or modify these consensus recommendations.

  15. Consensus guidelines on management of childhood convulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Devendra; Sharma, Suvasini; Sankhyan, Naveen; Konanki, Ramesh; Kamate, Mahesh; Kanhere, Sujata; Aneja, Satinder

    2014-12-01

    Status epilepticus has a wide etiological spectrum, and significant morbidity and mortality. Management using a pre-determined uniform protocol leads to better outcomes. Multiple protocols for management of childhood status epilepticus are available, without much consensus. A 'Multi-disciplinary Consensus Development Workshop on Management of Status Epilepticus in Children in India' was organized. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Pediatric neurologists, Neurologists, Epileptologists, and Pediatric intensive care specialists from India, with experience in the relevant field. Experts had previously been divided into focus groups and had interacted on telephone and e-mail regarding their group recommendations, and developed consensus on the topic. During the meeting, each group presented their recommendations, which were deliberated upon by the house and a consensus was reached on various issues; the document was finalized after incorporating suggestions of experts on the draft document. To provide consensus guidelines on evaluation and management of convulsive status epilepticus in children in India (excluding neonatal and super-refractory status epilepticus). Each institution should use a pre-determined protocol for management of status epilepticus; pre-hospital management and early stabilization is the key to a satisfactory outcome of status epilepticus. Pharmacotherapy should not be delayed for any investigations; the initial management should consist of a parenteral benzodiazepine by any route feasible. Subsequent management has been detailed. The group also felt the need for more epidemiological research on status epilepticus from India, and identified certain research areas for the purpose.

  16. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines among diabetes self-management apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Jessica Y; Yeh, Vivian M; Yu, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Smartphone apps can provide real-time, interactive self-management aid to individuals with diabetes. It is currently unclear whether existing diabetes self-management apps follow evidence-based guidelines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which existing diabetes self-management apps address the seven self-management behaviors recommended by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (the AADE7™). The term "diabetes" identified relevant self-management apps via the Apple App Store search engine in March 2012. Ratings were based on app descriptions and downloads. Chi-square analyses assessed differences in apps based on developer type. Apps promoted a median of two AADE7™ skills. Overall reliability between description and download ratings was good (kappa = .66). Reliability of individual skills was variable (kappa = .25 to .91). Most diabetes apps do not conform to evidence-based recommendations, and future app reviews would benefit from testing app performance. Future apps may also benefit from theory-based designs.

  17. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Antipsychotic Prescribing Guidelines to Nursing Homes: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Mazor, Kathleen; Lemay, Celeste A; Kanaan, Abir O; Donovan, Jennifer L; Briesacher, Becky A; Peterson, Daniel; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to translate and disseminate evidence-based guidelines about atypical antipsychotic use to nursing homes (NHs). Three-arm, cluster randomized trial. NHs. NHs in the state of Connecticut. Evidence-based guidelines for atypical antipsychotic prescribing were translated into a toolkit targeting NH stakeholders, and 42 NHs were recruited and randomized to one of three toolkit dissemination strategies: mailed toolkit delivery (minimal intensity); mailed toolkit delivery with quarterly audit and feedback reports about facility-level antipsychotic prescribing (moderate intensity); and in-person toolkit delivery with academic detailing, on-site behavioral management training, and quarterly audit and feedback reports (high intensity). Outcomes were evaluated using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Toolkit awareness of 30% (7/23) of leadership of low-intensity NHs, 54% (19/35) of moderate-intensity NHs, and 82% (18/22) of high-intensity NHs reflected adoption and implementation of the intervention. Highest levels of use and knowledge among direct care staff were reported in high-intensity NHs. Antipsychotic prescribing levels declined during the study period, but there were no statistically significant differences between study arms or from secular trends. RE-AIM indicators suggest some success in disseminating the toolkit and differences in reach, adoption, and implementation according to dissemination strategy but no measurable effect on antipsychotic prescribing trends. Further dissemination to external stakeholders such as psychiatry consultants and hospitals may be needed to influence antipsychotic prescribing for NH residents. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. OnabotulinumtoxinA in overactive bladder: Evidence-based consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cidre, M A; Arlandis-Guzmán, S

    2016-04-01

    To offer a set of useful recommendations for urologists who are starting to provide treatment of overactive bladders with onabotulinumtoxinA. A literature search to December 2013 was conducted, as well as a subsequent critical reading of the selected publications. The coordinators prepared a document that was submitted for review by the members of the Spanish Group for the use of Botulinum Toxin in Urology. The expert group considered that onabotulinumtoxinA may be used for overactive bladder syndrome with urinary urge incontinence secondary to neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity for patients for whom conservative treatment and first-line medical treatment has failed, is not tolerated or is contraindicated. Treatment in most cases was performed with local intravesical anesthesia, although it can also be performed under epidural or general anesthesia. Patients must be informed of the possibility of requiring self-catheterization or temporary catheterization. Clinicians should ensure that the patients are capable of performing this catheterization before the treatment is conducted. Patients must also be informed of the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections. At least 2 follow-up visits are recommended: the first at days 7-14 after the injection and the second at 2-3 months. Reinjection is indicated when the effect of the treatment decreases. These guidelines can help clinicians in their daily decisions and limit the potential risks associated with the incorrect use of the drug. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on safety and quality indicators in endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Bridges, Ron; Carter, Rose; de Gara, Chris; Dube, Catherine; Enns, Robert; Hollingworth, Roger; Macintosh, Donald; Borgaonkar, Mark; Forget, Sylviane; Leontiadis, Grigorios; Meddings, Jonathan; Cotton, Peter; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality, highlight the need for clearly defined, evidence-based processes to support quality improvement in endoscopy. To identify processes and indicators of quality and safety relevant to high-quality endoscopy service delivery. A multidisciplinary group of 35 voting participants developed recommendation statements and performance indicators. Systematic literature searches generated 50 initial statements that were revised iteratively following a modified Delphi approach using a web-based evaluation and voting tool. Statement development and evidence evaluation followed the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation) and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidelines. At the consensus conference, participants voted anonymously on all statements using a 6-point scale. Subsequent web-based voting evaluated recommendations for specific, individual quality indicators, safety indicators and mandatory endoscopy reporting fields. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by 80% of participants. Consensus was reached on 23 recommendation statements addressing the following: ethics (statement 1: agreement 100%), facility standards and policies (statements 2 to 9: 90% to 100%), quality assurance (statements 10 to 13: 94% to 100%), training, education, competency and privileges (statements 14 to 19: 97% to 100%), endoscopy reporting standards (statements 20 and 21: 97% to 100%) and patient perceptions (statements 22 and 23: 100%). Additionally, 18 quality indicators (agreement 83% to 100%), 20 safety indicators (agreement 77% to 100%) and 23 recommended endoscopy-reporting elements (agreement 91% to 100%) were identified. The consensus process identified a clear need for high-quality clinical and outcomes research to support quality improvement in the delivery of endoscopy services. The

  20. Suboptimal compliance with evidence-based guidelines in patients with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Barnes, Sunni A; Millar, D; Sobrino, Justin; Kudyakov, Rustam; Berryman, Candice; Rayan, Nadine; Dubiel, Rosemary; Coimbra, Raul; Magnotti, Louis J; Vercruysse, Gary; Scherer, Lynette A; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Nirula, Raminder

    2014-03-01

    Evidence-based management (EBM) guidelines for severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) were promulgated decades ago. However, the extent of their adoption into bedside clinical practices is not known. The purpose of this study was to measure compliance with EBM guidelines for management of severe TBI and its impact on patient outcome. This was a retrospective study of blunt TBI (11 Level I trauma centers, study period 2008-2009, n = 2056 patients). Inclusion criteria were an admission Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8 and a CT scan showing TBI, excluding patients with nonsurvivable injuries-that is, head Abbreviated Injury Scale score of 6. The authors measured compliance with 6 nonoperative EBM processes (endotracheal intubation, resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy, intracranial pressure monitoring, maintaining cerebral perfusion pressure ≥ 50 cm H2O, and discharge to rehabilitation). Compliance rates were calculated for each center using multivariate regression to adjust for patient demographics, physiology, injury severity, and TBI severity. The overall compliance rate was 73%, and there was wide variation among centers. Only 3 centers achieved a compliance rate exceeding 80%. Risk-adjusted compliance was worse than average at 2 centers, better than average at 1, and the remainder were average. Multivariate analysis showed that increased adoption of EBM was associated with a reduced mortality rate (OR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.96, p < 0.005). Despite widespread dissemination of EBM guidelines, patients with severe TBI continue to receive inconsistent care. Barriers to adoption of EBM need to be identified and mitigated to improve patient outcomes.

  1. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for gastroesophageal reflux disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Habu, Yasuki; Oshima, Tadayuki; Manabe, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagahara, Akihito; Kawamura, Osamu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ozawa, Soji; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Ohara, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Adachi, Kyoichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miwa, Hiroto; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Haruma, Ken; Hongo, Michio; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-08-01

    As an increase in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported in Japan, and public interest in GERD has been increasing, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology published the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for GERD (1st edition) in 2009. Six years have passed since its publication, and there have been a large number of reports in Japan concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and Barrett's esophagus during this period. By incorporating the contents of these reports, the guidelines were completely revised, and a new edition was published in October 2015. The revised edition consists of eight items: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, internal treatment, surgical treatment, esophagitis after surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract, extraesophageal symptoms, and Barrett's esophagus. This paper summarizes these guidelines, particularly the parts related to the treatment for GERD. In the present revision, aggressive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy is recommended for severe erosive GERD, and on-demand therapy or continuous maintenance therapy is recommended for mild erosive GERD or PPI-responsive non-erosive GERD. Moreover, PPI-resistant GERD (insufficient symptomatic improvement and/or esophageal mucosal break persisting despite the administration of PPI at a standard dose for 8 weeks) is defined, and a standard-dose PPI twice a day, change in PPI, change in the PPI timing of dosing, addition of a prokinetic drug, addition of rikkunshito (traditional Japanese herbal medicine), and addition of histamine H2-receptor antagonist are recommended for its treatment. If no improvement is observed even after these treatments, pathophysiological evaluation with esophageal impedance-pH monitoring or esophageal manometry at an expert facility for diseases of the esophagus is recommended.

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  3. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise these guidelines using an evidence-based approach. Twelve multidisciplinary review groups performed systematic literature reviews to answer 38 predefined clinical questions. Recommendations were graded using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The review groups presented their recommendations during the 2012 joint IAP/APA meeting. At this one-day, interactive conference, relevant remarks were voiced and overall agreement on each recommendation was quantified using plenary voting. The 38 recommendations covered 12 topics related to the clinical management of acute pancreatitis: A) diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and etiology, B) prognostication/predicting severity, C) imaging, D) fluid therapy, E) intensive care management, F) preventing infectious complications, G) nutritional support, H) biliary tract management, I) indications for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, J) timing of intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, K) intervention strategies in necrotizing pancreatitis, and L) timing of cholecystectomy. Using the GRADE system, 21 of the 38 (55%) recommendations, were rated as 'strong' and plenary voting revealed 'strong agreement' for 34 (89%) recommendations. The 2012 IAP/APA guidelines provide recommendations concerning key aspects of medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the currently available evidence. These recommendations should serve as a reference standard for current management and guide future clinical research on acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Asian consensus workshop report: expert consensus guideline for the management of intermediate and advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kwang-Hyub; Kudo, Masatochi; Ye, Sheng-Long; Choi, Jong Young; Poon, Roonni Tung-Ping; Seong, Jinsil; Park, Joong-Won; Ichida, Takafumi; Chung, Jin Wook; Chow, Pierce; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly prevalent disease in many Asian countries, accounting for 80% of victims worldwide. Screening programs improve the detection of early HCC and have a positive impact on survival, but the majority of HCC patients in Asia still present with advanced stage disease. The treatment outcomes of HCC are affected by multiple variables, including liver function, performance status of the patient, and tumor stage. Therefore, it is not easy to apply a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach for optimal management. At present, limited numbers of HCC patients are eligible for curative therapies such as surgery or ablation in Asia. Therefore, most patients are eligible for only palliative treatments. For optimal management, the treatment choice is guided by staging systems and treatment guidelines. Numerous staging systems have been proposed and treatment guidelines vary by region. According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) guideline based on evidence from randomized clinical trials, only transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended for intermediate stage HCC and sorafenib for advanced stage HCC. However, treatment guidelines from Asian countries have adopted several other therapeutic modalities such as a surgical approach, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, external radiation, and their combinations based on clinical experiences for intermediate and advanced stage HCC. Although TACE is the main therapeutic modality in the intermediate stage, overall therapeutic outcomes depend on the tumor size. In the advanced stage, the prognosis depends on the tumor status, e.g. major vessel invasion or extrahepatic spread. Thus, a new staging system representing prognoses suitable for Asian HCC patients and a corresponding optimal treatment algorithm should be further investigated using evidence-based data, which will finally bring about an Asian consensus for the management of intermediate and advanced stage HCC. Copyright

  5. The CARE guidelines: consensus-based clinical case report guideline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Joel J; Kienle, Gunver; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Sox, Harold; Riley, David

    2014-01-01

    A case report is a narrative that describes, for medical, scientific, or educational purposes, a medical problem experienced by one or more patients. Case reports written without guidance from reporting standards are insufficiently rigorous to guide clinical practice or to inform clinical study design. Develop, disseminate, and implement systematic reporting guidelines for case reports. We used a three-phase consensus process consisting of (1) pre-meeting literature review and interviews to generate items for the reporting guidelines, (2) a face-to-face consensus meeting to draft the reporting guidelines, and (3) post-meeting feedback, review, and pilot testing, followed by finalization of the case report guidelines. This consensus process involved 27 participants and resulted in a 13-item checklist-a reporting guideline for case reports. The primary items of the checklist are title, key words, abstract, introduction, patient information, clinical findings, timeline, diagnostic assessment, therapeutic interventions, follow-up and outcomes, discussion, patient perspective, and informed consent. We believe the implementation of the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines by medical journals will improve the completeness and transparency of published case reports and that the systematic aggregation of information from case reports will inform clinical study design, provide early signals of effectiveness and harms, and improve healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2014 Reproduced with permission of Global Advances in Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a meta-algorithm for guiding primary care encounters for patients with multimorbidity using evidence-based and case-based guideline development methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Lühmann, Dagmar; Schäfer, Ingmar; Mundt, Rebekka; Wagner, Hans-Otto; Scherer, Martin

    2017-06-22

    The study aimed to develop a comprehensive algorithm (meta-algorithm) for primary care encounters of patients with multimorbidity. We used a novel, case-based and evidence-based procedure to overcome methodological difficulties in guideline development for patients with complex care needs. Systematic guideline development methodology including systematic evidence retrieval (guideline synopses), expert opinions and informal and formal consensus procedures. Primary care. The meta-algorithm was developed in six steps:1. Designing 10 case vignettes of patients with multimorbidity (common, epidemiologically confirmed disease patterns and/or particularly challenging health care needs) in a multidisciplinary workshop.2. Based on the main diagnoses, a systematic guideline synopsis of evidence-based and consensus-based clinical practice guidelines was prepared. The recommendations were prioritised according to the clinical and psychosocial characteristics of the case vignettes.3. Case vignettes along with the respective guideline recommendations were validated and specifically commented on by an external panel of practicing general practitioners (GPs).4. Guideline recommendations and experts' opinions were summarised as case specific management recommendations (N-of-one guidelines).5. Healthcare preferences of patients with multimorbidity were elicited from a systematic literature review and supplemented with information from qualitative interviews.6. All N-of-one guidelines were analysed using pattern recognition to identify common decision nodes and care elements. These elements were put together to form a generic meta-algorithm. The resulting meta-algorithm reflects the logic of a GP's encounter of a patient with multimorbidity regarding decision-making situations, communication needs and priorities. It can be filled with the complex problems of individual patients and hereby offer guidance to the practitioner. Contrary to simple, symptom-oriented algorithms, the meta

  7. Facebook apps for smoking cessation: a review of content and adherence to evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Megan A; Cobb, Caroline O; Abroms, Lorien; Graham, Amanda L

    2014-09-09

    Facebook is the most popular social network site, with over 1 billion users globally. There are millions of apps available within Facebook, many of which address health and health behavior change. Facebook may represent a promising channel to reach smokers with cessation interventions via apps. To date, there have been no published reports about Facebook apps for smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to review the features and functionality of Facebook apps for smoking cessation and to determine the extent to which they adhere to evidence-based guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment. In August 2013, we searched Facebook and three top Internet search engines using smoking cessation keywords to identify relevant Facebook apps. Resultant apps were screened for eligibility (smoking cessation-related, English language, and functioning). Eligible apps were reviewed by 2 independent coders using a standardized coding scheme. Coding included content features (interactive, informational, and social) and adherence to an established 20-item index (possible score 0-40) derived from the US Public Health Service's Clinical Practice Guidelines for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence. We screened 22 apps for eligibility; of these, 12 underwent full coding. Only 9 apps were available on Facebook. Facebook apps fell into three broad categories: public pledge to quit (n=3), quit-date-based calculator/tracker (n=4), or a multicomponent quit smoking program (n=2). All apps incorporated interactive, informational, and social features except for two quit-date-based calculator/trackers apps (lacked informational component). All apps allowed app-related posting within Facebook (ie, on self/other Facebook profile), and four had a within-app "community" feature to enable app users to communicate with each other. Adherence index summary scores among Facebook apps were low overall (mean 15.1, SD 7.8, range 7-30), with multicomponent apps scoring the highest. There are few

  8. Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Stephen; Berk, Lawrence; Chang, Eric; Chow, Edward; Hahn, Carol; Hoskin, Peter; Howell, David; Konski, Andre; Kachnic, Lisa; Lo, Simon; Sahgal, Arjun; Silverman, Larry; Gunten, Charles von; Mendel, Ehud; Vassil, Andrew; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Hartsell, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases according to current published evidence and complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database between 1998 and 2009 yielded 4,287 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to radiotherapy for bone metastases. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and reached a consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force concluded that external beam radiotherapy continues to be the mainstay for the treatment of pain and/or prevention of the morbidity caused by bone metastases. Various fractionation schedules can provide significant palliation of symptoms and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. The evidence for the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment to previously irradiated areas of peripheral bone metastases for pain was derived from both prospective studies and retrospective data, and it can be safe and effective. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy holds theoretical promise in the treatment of new or recurrent spine lesions, although the Task Force recommended that its use be limited to highly selected patients and preferably within a prospective trial. Surgical decompression and postoperative radiotherapy is recommended for spinal cord compression or spinal instability in highly selected patients with sufficient performance status and life expectancy. The use of bisphosphonates, radionuclides, vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty for the treatment or prevention of cancer-related symptoms does not obviate the need for external beam radiotherapy in appropriate patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a successful and time efficient method by which to palliate pain and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. This Guideline reviews the available data to define its proper use

  9. The Case for Using Evidence Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Hutchison Francis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hospital systems and regulating agencies enforce strict guidelines barring personal items from entering the Operating Room - touting surgical site infections and patient safety as the rationale. We sought to determine whether or not evidence supporting this recommendation exists by reviewing available literature.Background data: Rules and guidelines that are not evidence based may lead to increased hospital expenses and limitations on healthcare provider autonomyMethods: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL were searched in order to find articles that correlated personal items in the OR to documented surgical site infections. Articles that satisfied the following criteria were included: (1 studies looking at personal items in the OR such as handbags, purses, badges, pagers, backpacks, jewelry phones, and eyeglasses, etc., but not just operating room equipment; and (2 the primary outcome measure was infection at the surgical site.Results: Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Of the 17, the majority did not determine if personal items increased risk for surgical site infection. Only 1 article examined the correlation between a personal item near the operative site and surgical site infection, concluding that wedding rings worn in the OR had no impact on surgical site infections. Most studies examined colonization rates on personal items as potential infection risk; however, no personal items were causally linked to surgical site infection in any of these studies.Conclusion: There is no objective evidence to suggest that personal items in the OR increase risk for surgical site infections.

  10. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of tracheostomy in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Néstor; Vial, Macarena R; Calleja, José; Quintero, Agamenón; Cortés, Albán; Celis, Edgar; Pacheco, Clara; Ugarte, Sebastián; Añón, José M; Hernández, Gonzalo; Vidal, Erick; Chiappero, Guillermo; Ríos, Fernando; Castilleja, Fernando; Matos, Alfredo; Rodriguez, Enith; Antoniazzi, Paulo; Teles, José Mario; Dueñas, Carmelo; Sinclair, Jorge; Martínez, Lorenzo; von der Osten, Ingrid; Vergara, José; Jiménez, Edgar; Arroyo, Max; Rodríguez, Camilo; Torres, Javier; Fernandez-Bussy, Sebastián; Nates, Joseph L

    2017-04-01

    To provide evidence-based guidelines for tracheostomy in critically ill adult patients and identify areas needing further research. A taskforce composed of representatives of 10 member countries of the Pan-American and Iberic Federation of Societies of Critical and Intensive Therapy Medicine and of the Latin American Critical Care Trial Investigators Network developed recommendations based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. The group identified 23 relevant questions among 87 issues that were initially identified. In the initial search, 333 relevant publications were identified, of which 226 publications were chosen. The taskforce generated a total of 19 recommendations, 10 positive (1B, 3; 2C, 3; 2D, 4) and 9 negative (1B, 8; 2C, 1). A recommendation was not possible in 6 questions. Percutaneous techniques are associated with a lower risk of infections compared with surgical tracheostomy. Early tracheostomy only seems to reduce the duration of ventilator use but not the incidence of pneumonia, the length of stay, or the long-term mortality rate. The evidence does not support the use of routine bronchoscopy guidance or laryngeal masks during the procedure. Finally, proper prior training is as important or even a more significant factor in reducing complications than the technique used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Foot Care in the Management of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Toupin-April, Karine; Wells, George; Smith, Christine A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Stinson, Jennifer N; Duffy, Ciarán M; Gifford, Wendy; Moher, David; Sherrington, Catherine; Cavallo, Sabrina; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; Rahman, Prinon; Marcotte, Rachel; Taki, Jade; Bisaillon, Jacinthe; King, Judy; Coda, Andrea; Hendry, Gordon J; Gauvreau, Julie; Hayles, Martin; Hayles, Kay; Feldman, Brian; Kenny, Glen P; Li, Jing Xian; Briggs, Andrew M; Martini, Rose; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Maltais, Désirée B; Tupper, Susan; Bigford, Sarah; Bisch, Marg

    2016-07-01

    To create evidence-based guidelines evaluating foot care interventions for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). An electronic literature search of the following databases from database inception to May 2015 was conducted: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov. The Ottawa Panel selection criteria targeted studies that assessed foot care or foot orthotic interventions for the management of JIA in those aged 0 to ≤18 years. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used to evaluate study quality, of which only high-quality studies were included (score, ≥5). A total of 362 records were screened, resulting in 3 full-text articles and 1 additional citation containing supplementary information included for the analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted study data (intervention, comparator, outcome, time period, study design) from the included studies by using standardized data extraction forms. Directed by Cochrane Collaboration methodology, the statistical analysis produced figures and graphs representing the strength of intervention outcomes and their corresponding grades (A, B, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-). Clinical significance was achieved when an improvement of ≥30% between the intervention and control groups was present, whereas P>.05 indicated statistical significance. An expert panel Delphi consensus (≥80%) was required for the endorsement of recommendations. All included studies were of high quality and analyzed the effects of multidisciplinary foot care, customized foot orthotics, and shoe inserts for the management of JIA. Custom-made foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts displayed the greatest improvement in pain intensity, activity limitation, foot pain, and disability reduction (grades A, C+). The use of customized foot orthotics and prefabricated shoe inserts seems to be a good choice for managing foot pain and function in JIA. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  12. Danish first aid books compliance with the new evidence-based non-resuscitative first aid guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Viereck, Søren; Roland, Jens; Pedersen, Thomas Egesborg; Lippert, Freddy K

    2018-01-10

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) released new guidelines on resuscitation in 2015. For the first time, the guidelines included a separate chapter on first aid for laypersons. We analysed the current major Danish national first aid books to identify potential inconsistencies between the current books and the new evidence-based first aid guidelines. We identified first aid books from all the first aid courses offered by major Danish suppliers. Based on the new ERC first aid guidelines, we developed a checklist of 26 items within 16 different categories to assess the content; this checklist was adapted following the principle of mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive questioning. To assess the agreement between four raters, Fleiss' kappa test was used. Items that did not reach an acceptable kappa score were excluded. We evaluated 10 first aid books used for first aid courses and published between 2009 and 2015. The content of the books complied with the new in 38% of the answers. In 12 of the 26 items, there was less than 50% consistency. These items include proximal pressure points and elevation of extremities for the control of bleeding, use of cervical collars, treatment for an open chest wound, burn dressing, dental avulsion, passive leg raising, administration of bronchodilators, adrenaline, and aspirin. Danish course material showed significant inconsistencies with the new evidence-based first aid guidelines. The new knowledge from the evidence-based guidelines should be incorporated into revised and updated first aid course material.

  13. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  14. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: recommendations of recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines with special emphasis on complementary and alternative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablin, Jacob; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Buskila, Dan; Shir, Yoram; Sommer, Claudia; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran) were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques).

  15. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Correa, Candace R.; Hahn, Carol A.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; McCormick, Beryl; McQueen, Julie R.; Pierce, Lori J.; Powell, Simon N.; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Vicini, Frank A.; White, Julia R.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within ±7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  16. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for Microbiology Ad Hoc Committee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  18. Evidence-based practice guidelines for prescribing home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Laura; Coyle, Emma; Todd, Helen; Williams, Cylie

    2018-04-01

    Home modifications maintain people's functional independence and safety. No literature exists to guide the prescription of home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. With Australia's increasing obesity rate, more evidence is needed to support home modification prescribers. This study aimed to map Australian home modification prescribing practices for clients with bariatric care needs and to establish and evaluate a clinical resource for this prescription process. The study included two phases. Phase 1 conducted a cross-sectional survey of therapists practicing in Australia, and Australian industry partners who prescribe or install home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. Phase 2 included design, implementation and evaluation of a clinical resource. Data were analysed with means and frequencies; multivariable regression analysis was used to explore prescribing habits. Therapists surveyed (n = 347) reported 11 different bariatric weight definitions. Less than 3% constantly or regularly prescribed home modifications for these clients; rails were most commonly prescribed. Many therapists (n = 171, 58%) 'never' or 'rarely' knew rail load capacity. Therapists' knowledge of rail load capacity was associated with previous experience prescribing home modifications (P = 0.009); rail manufacturer's advice (P = 0.016) and not using advice from builders (P = 0.001). Clinical resources were used by 11% (n = 26) of therapists to support their prescription, and industry sporadically relied on therapists to specify modification design requirements (n = 5, 45%). Post-implementation of a clinical resource increased consensus regarding understanding of the term bariatric and increased consultation with builders and manufacturers. There was a lack of consistency in bariatric terminology, uncertainty of rail load capacities and minimal use of clinical practice guidelines. Additional resources will assist with consistency in prescribing

  19. Danish first aid books compliance with the new evidence-based non-resuscitative first aid guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Viereck, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) released new guidelines on resuscitation in 2015. For the first time, the guidelines included a separate chapter on first aid for laypersons. We analysed the current major Danish national first aid books to identify potential inconsistencies...... between the current books and the new evidence-based first aid guidelines. METHODS: We identified first aid books from all the first aid courses offered by major Danish suppliers. Based on the new ERC first aid guidelines, we developed a checklist of 26 items within 16 different categories to assess...... the content; this checklist was adapted following the principle of mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive questioning. To assess the agreement between four raters, Fleiss' kappa test was used. Items that did not reach an acceptable kappa score were excluded. RESULTS: We evaluated 10 first aid books...

  20. Consensus on the guidelines for the dietary management of classical galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhove, Kristel Vande; Diels, Marianne; Vanhaesebrouck, Sigrid; Luyten, Karin; Pyck, Nancy; De Meyer, An; Van Driessche, Marleen; Robert, Martine; Corthouts, Karen; Caris, Ariane; Duchateau, Emilie; Dassy, Martine; Bihet, Genevieve

    2015-02-01

    Worldwide there is scientific discussion about the dietary management of galactosemia. The dietary management is very different in several countries among Europe, the US and Canada. The main points of discussion are related to the fact that i) despite a strict diet some patients still have poor outcomes; ii) there is lack of scientific knowledge about the role of endogenous production of galactose on disease evolution, with or without diet. The aim of the current work was the creation of a Belgian consensus on dietary guidelines for the management of galactosemia. A step-wise approach was used to achieve a consensus, including: a workshop, a Delphi round, discussion groups and a round table of different Belgian experts. The consensus is an agreement between strict guidelines (strict limitation of fruits, vegetables and soybean products/French guidelines) and the more liberal guidelines (comparable with a diet free of lactose/guidelines of UK and the Netherlands). The consensus document consists of different modules, including the medical context, the theoretical background of dietary guidelines and the age-specific practical dietary guidelines. A Belgian consensus on the guidelines for the dietary management of classical galactosemia was developed despite the uncertainties of the efficacy and practical application of these guidelines. The final consensus is based on scientific knowledge and practical agreement among experts. In the future, regular revision of the guidelines is recommended and a uniform European guideline is desirable. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Perioperative antibiotic usage by facial plastic surgeons: national survey results and comparison with evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunebaum, Lisa Danielle; Reiter, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine current practice for use of perioperative antibiotics among facial plastic surgeons, to determine the extent of use of literature support for preferences of facial plastic surgeons, and to compare patterns of use with nationally supported evidence-based guidelines. A link to a Web site containing a questionnaire on perioperative antibiotic use was e-mailed to more than 1000 facial plastic surgeons in the United States. Responses were archived in a dedicated database and analyzed to determine patterns of use and methods of documenting that use. Current literature was used to develop evidence-based recommendations for perioperative antibiotic use, emphasizing current nationally supported guidelines. Preferences varied significantly for medication used, dosage and regimen, time of first dose relative to incision time, setting in which medication was administered, and procedures for which perioperative antibiotic was deemed necessary. Surgical site infection in facial plastic surgery can be reduced by better conformance to currently available evidence-based guidelines. We offer specific recommendations that are supported by the current literature.

  2. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  3. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents--an evidence-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Billy; Ceponis, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Czinn, Steve; Ferraro, Richard; Fischbach, Lori; Gold, Ben; Hyunh, Hien; Jacobson, Kevan; Jones, Nicola L; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lebel, Sylvie; Moayyedi, Paul; Ridell, Robert; Sherman, Philip; van Zanten, Sander; Beck, Ivan; Best, Linda; Boland, Margaret; Bursey, Ford; Chaun, Hugh; Cooper, Geraldine; Craig, Brian; Creuzenet, Carole; Critch, Jeffrey; Govender, Krishnasamy; Hassall, Eric; Kaplan, Alan; Keelan, Monica; Noad, Garth; Robertson, Marli; Smith, Lesley; Stein, Markus; Taylor, Diane; Walters, Thomas; Persaud, Robin; Whitaker, Scott; Woodland, Robert

    2005-07-01

    As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H. pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H. pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H. pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H. pylori infection; H. pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H. pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H. pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H. pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H. pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two antibiotics

  4. The `WikiGuidelines' smartphone application: Bridging the gaps in availability of evidence-based smartphone mental health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Mcintyre, Roger S

    2016-07-27

    Over the past decade, there have been massive advances in technology. These advances in technology have significantly transformed various aspects of healthcare. The advent of E-health and its influence on healthcare practice also implies that there is a paradigm shift in the way healthcare professionals work. Conventionally, healthcare professionals would have to refer to books and journals for updates in treatment algorithms, but with the advent of technology, they could access this information via the web or via various smartphone applications on the go. In the field of Psychiatry, one of the commonest mental health disorder to date, with significant morbidity and mortality is that of Major depressive disorder. Routinely, clinicians and healthcare professionals are advised to refer to standard guidelines in guiding them with regards to their treatment options. Given the high prevalence of conditions like Major Depressive Disorder, it is thus of importance that whatever guidelines that clinicians and healthcare professionals refer to are constantly kept up to date, so that patients could benefit from latest evidence based therapy and treatment. A review of the current literature highlights that whilst there are a multitude of smartphone applications designed for mental health care, previous systematic review has highlighted a paucity of evidence based applications. More importantly, current literature with regards to provision of treatment information to healthcare professionals and patients are limited to web-based interventions. It is the aim of this technical note to highlight a methodology to which the authors have conceptualized in the implementation of an evidence based mental health guideline applications, known as the `Wiki Guidelines' smartphone application. The authors hope to illustrate the algorithms behind the development of the application, and how it could be easily updated by the guidelines working group.

  5. Canadian consensus practice guidelines for bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aliya A; Sándor, George K B; Dore, Edward; Morrison, Archibald D; Alsahli, Mazen; Amin, Faizan; Peters, Edmund; Hanley, David A; Chaudry, Sultan R; Dempster, David W; Glorieux, Francis H; Neville, Alan J; Talwar, Reena M; Clokie, Cameron M; Al Mardini, Majd; Paul, Terri; Khosla, Sundeep; Josse, Robert G; Sutherland, Susan; Lam, David K; Carmichael, Robert P; Blanas, Nick; Kendler, David; Petak, Steven; St-Marie, Louis Georges; Brown, Jacques; Evans, A Wayne; Rios, Lorena; Compston, Juliet E

    2008-07-01

    Following publication of the first reports of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in patients receiving bisphosphonates in 2003, a call for national multidisciplinary guidelines based upon a systematic review of the current evidence was made by the Canadian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (CAOMS) in association with national and international societies concerned with ONJ. The purpose of the guidelines is to provide recommendations regarding diagnosis, identification of at-risk patients, and prevention and management strategies, based on current evidence and consensus. These guidelines were developed for medical and dental practitioners as well as for oral pathologists and related specialists. The multidisciplinary task force established by the CAOMS reviewed all relevant areas of research relating to ONJ associated with bisphosphonate use and completed a systematic review of current literature. These evidence-based guidelines were developed utilizing a structured development methodology. A modified Delphi consensus process enabled consensus among the multidisciplinary task force members. These guidelines have since been reviewed by external experts and endorsed by national and international medical, dental, oral surgery, and oral pathology societies. RECOMMENDATIONS regarding diagnosis, prevention, and management of ONJ were made following analysis of all current data pertaining to this condition. ONJ has many etiologic factors including head and neck irradiation, trauma, periodontal disease, local malignancy, chemotherapy, and glucocorticoid therapy. High-dose intravenous bisphosphonates have been identified as a risk factor for ONJ in the oncology patient population. Low-dose bisphosphonate use in patients with osteoporosis or other metabolic bone disease has not been causally linked to the development of ONJ. Prevention, staging, and treatment recommendations are based upon collective expert opinion and current data, which has been limited to case

  6. An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijer, P Paul Fm; Verbeek, Jos Ham; Visser, Bart; Elders, Leo Am; Van Roden, Nico; Van den Wittenboer, Marion Er; Lebbink, Marian; Burdorf, Alex; Hulshof, Carel Tj

    2014-01-01

    We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3-25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and

  7. APASL and AASLD Consensus Guidelines on Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher Heng Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consensus guidelines for radiological diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC have been drafted by several large international working groups. This article reviews the similarities and differences between the most recent guidelines proposed by the American Association for Study of Liver Diseases and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver. Current evidence for the various imaging modalities for diagnosis of HCC and their relevance to the consensus guidelines are reviewed.

  8. Development of quality indicators based on a multidisciplinary, evidence-based guideline on pediatric constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienen, J.J.C.; Tabbers, M.M.; Benninga, M.A.; Harmsen, M.; Ouwens, M.M.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Several clinical guidelines for childhood functional constipation have been developed, but none of them is accompanied by a set of quality indicators. It is important to gain insight into the quality of care in daily practice in order to improve the implementation of clinical guidelines. This can be

  9. An evidence-based assessment of the clinical guidelines for replanted avulsed teeth. Part II: prescription of systemic antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckfuss, Susan Elisabeth; Messer, Louise Brearley

    2009-04-01

    Current clinical guidelines recommend prescribing systemic antibiotic therapy (SAT) for patients having an avulsed permanent tooth replanted. The principles of evidence-based dentistry can be used to assess whether this is the best approach based on currently-available evidence. The objective of this study was to use the principles of evidence-based dentistry to answer the PICO question: (P) for a replanted avulsed permanent tooth, (I) is prescribing SAT, (C) compared with not prescribing SAT, (O) associated with an increased likelihood of successful periodontal healing after tooth replantation? A literature search was performed across four internet databases (Ovid Medline, Cochrane Library, PubMed, ISI Web of Science), for relevant citations (n = 35 702). Limiting citations to those in English and removing duplicates produced a set of titles (n = 14 742) that were sieved according to evidence-based dentistry principles. Relevant titles were selected for abstract assessment (n = 782), identifying papers for examination (n = 74). Inclusion criteria were applied and three papers (326 total teeth) met the final criteria for meta-analysis. Meta-analyses found no statistically significant difference between prescribing or not prescribing antibiotics for acceptable periodontal healing without progressive root resorption (common odds ratio = 0.90, SE = 0.29, 95% confidence intervals = 0.51-1.58). The evidence for an association between prescribing SAT and an increased likelihood of acceptable periodontal healing outcome is inconclusive. This investigation of antibiotic use as defined in the clinical guidelines indicates there is inconclusive clinical evidence from studies of replanted avulsed human teeth to either contradict or support the guideline. Pending future research to the contrary, dentists are recommended to follow current guidelines in prescribing SAT when replanting avulsed teeth.

  10. Comparing consensus guidelines on thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk-Mulder, M. C.; Ettema, H. B.; Verheyen, C. C.; Büller, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different guidelines exist regarding the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare (inter)national guidelines and analyse differences. Methods: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and the internet were searched for guidelines on the

  11. Clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements in oncology--an assessment of their methodological quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Jacobs

    Full Text Available Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents.Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents.Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice guidelines. One journal scored

  12. Vacuum Systems Consensus Guideline for Department of Energy Accelerator Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey,R.; Haas, E.; Hseuh, H-C.; Kane, S.; Lessard, E.; Sharma, S.; Collins, J.; Toter, W. F.; Olis, D. R.; Pushka, D. R.; Ladd, P.; Jobe, R. K.

    2008-09-09

    Vacuum vessels, including evacuated chambers and insulated jacketed dewars, can pose a potential hazard to equipment and personnel from collapse, rupture due to back-fill pressurization, or implosion due to vacuum window failure. It is therefore important to design and operate vacuum systems in accordance with applicable and sound engineering principles. 10 CFR 851 defines requirements for pressure systems that also apply to vacuum vessels subject to back-fill pressurization. Such vacuum vessels are potentially subject to the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII (hereafter referred to as the 'Code'). However, the scope of the Code excludes vessels with internal or external operating pressure that do not exceed 15 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). Therefore, the requirements of the Code do not apply to vacuum systems provided that adequate pressure relief assures that the maximum internal pressure within the vacuum vessel is limited to less than 15 psig from all credible pressure sources, including failure scenarios. Vacuum vessels that cannot be protected from pressurization exceeding 15 psig are subject to the requirements of the Code. 10 CFR 851, Appendix A, Part 4, Pressure Safety, Section C addresses vacuum system requirements for such cases as follows: (c) When national consensus codes are not applicable (because of pressure range, vessel geometry, use of special materials, etc.), contractors must implement measures to provide equivalent protection and ensure a level of safety greater than or equal to the level of protection afforded by the ASME or applicable state or local code. Measures must include the following: (1) Design drawings, sketches, and calculations must be reviewed and approved by a qualified independent design professional (i.e., professional engineer). Documented organizational peer review is acceptable. (2) Qualified personnel must be used to perform examinations

  13. Radiotherapy for non-malignant disorders: state of the art and update of the evidence-based practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micke, O; Muecke, R

    2015-01-01

    Every year in Germany about 50,000 patients are referred and treated by radiotherapy (RT) for “non-malignant disorders”. This highly successful treatment is applied only for specific indications such as preservation or recovery of the quality of life by means of pain reduction or resolution and/or an improvement of formerly impaired physical body function owing to specific disease-related symptoms. Since 1995, German radiation oncologists have treated non-malignant disorders according to national consensus guidelines; these guidelines were updated and further developed over 3 years by implementation of a systematic consensus process to achieve national upgraded and accepted S2e clinical practice guidelines. Throughout this process, international standards of evaluation were implemented. This review summarizes most of the generally accepted indications for the application of RT for non-malignant diseases and presents the special treatment concepts. The following disease groups are addressed: painful degenerative skeletal disorders, hyperproliferative disorders and symptomatic functional disorders. These state of the art guidelines may serve as a platform for daily clinical work; they provide a new starting point for quality assessment, future clinical research, including the design of prospective clinical trials, and outcome research in the underrepresented and less appreciated field of RT for non-malignant disorders. PMID:25955230

  14. Expert consensus statement to guide the evidence-based classification of Paralympic athletes with vision impairment: a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravensbergen, H.J.C.; Mann, D.L.; Kamper, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Paralympic sports are required to develop evidence-based systems that allocate athletes into 'classes' on the basis of the impact of their impairment on sport performance. However, sports for athletes with vision impairment (VI) classify athletes solely based on the WHO criteria for low

  15. Evidence-based Danish guidelines for the treatment of Malassezia-related skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Marianne; Arendrup, Maiken C; Svejgaard, Else L

    2015-01-01

    Internationally approved guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Malassezia-related skin diseases are lacking. Therefore, a panel of experts consisting of dermatologists and a microbiologist under the auspices of the Danish Society of Dermatology undertook a data review and compiled...... guidelines for the diagnostic procedures and management of pityriasis versicolor, seborrhoeic dermatitis and Malassezia folliculitis. Main recommendations in most cases of pityriasis versicolor and seborrhoeic dermatitis include topical treatment which has been shown to be sufficient. As first choice....... Maintenance therapy is often necessary to prevent relapses. In the treatment of Malassezia folliculitis systemic antifungal treatment is probably more effective than topical treatment but a combination may be favourable....

  16. Pharmacological Management of Chronic Neuropathic Pain – Consensus Statement and Guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Moulin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NeP, generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin. Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP.

  17. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, H. van; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise

  18. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, Marc; van Santvoort, Hjalmar; Freeman, Martin; Gardner, Timothy; Mayerle, Julia; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Werner, Jens; Banks, Peter; McKay, Colin; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; French, Jeremy; Gooszen, Hein; Johnson, Colin; Sarr, Mike; Takada, Tadahiro; Windsor, John; Saluja, Ashok; Liddle, Rodger; Papachristou, Georgios; Singh, Vijay; Rünzi, Michael; Wu, Bechien; Singh, Vikesh; Bollen, Thomas; Morgan, Desiree; Mortele, Koenraad; Mittal, Anubhav; En-qiang, Mao; de Waele, Jan; Petrov, Maxim; Dellinger, Patchen; Lerch, Markus M.; Anderson, Roland; McClave, Stephen; Hartwig, Werner; Bruno, Marco; Oria, Alejandro; Baron, Todd; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-Del; Fagenholz, Peter; Horvath, Karen; van Baal, Mark; Nealon, William; Andren-Sandberg, Ake; Bakker, Olaf; Bassi, Claudio; Buchler, Markus; Boermeester, Marja; Bradley, Ed; Fockens, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise these

  19. Evidence-based guidelines, time-based health outcomes, and the Matthew effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.E. Essink-Bot (Marie-Louise); M.E. Kruijshaar (Michelle); J.J.M. Barendregt (Jan); L.G.A. Bonneux (Luc)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cardiovascular risk management guidelines are 'risk based'; health economists' practice is 'time based'. The 'medical' risk-based allocation model maximises numbers of deaths prevented by targeting subjects at high risk, for example, elderly and smokers. The time-based model

  20. Evidence-based guidelines, time-based health outcomes, and the Matthew effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Kruijshaar, Michelle E.; Barendregt, Jan J.; Bonneux, Luc G. A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk management guidelines are 'risk based'; health economists' practice is 'time based'. The 'medical' risk-based allocation model maximises numbers of deaths prevented by targeting subjects at high risk, for example, elderly and smokers. The time-based model maximises

  1. Consensus guidelines for the uniform reporting of study ethics in anatomical research within the framework of the anatomical quality assurance (AQUA) checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Vikse, Jens; Pekala, Przemyslaw; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Walocha, Jerzy A; Jones, D Gareth; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2018-05-01

    Unambiguous reporting of a study's compliance with ethical guidelines in anatomical research is imperative. As such, clear, universal, and uniform reporting guidelines for study ethics are essential. In 2016, the International Evidence-Based Anatomy Working group in collaboration with international partners established reporting guidelines for anatomical studies, the Anatomical Quality Assurance (AQUA) Checklist. In this elaboration of the AQUA Checklist, consensus guidelines for reporting study ethics in anatomical studies are provided with in the framework of the AQUA Checklist. The new guidelines are aimed to be applicable to research across the spectrum of the anatomical sciences, including studies on both living and deceased donors. The authors hope the established guidelines will improve ethical compliance and reporting in anatomical research. Clin. Anat. 31:521-524, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Automation of the consensus guidelines in diabetes care: potential impact on clinical inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisser, A Michael; Inhaber, Francine

    2010-01-01

    To propose that automation of the consensus guidelines and mandated targets (CG&MT) in glycemia, hemoglobin A1c, and body weight will facilitate optimal clinical management of patients with diabetes. (1) A simplified method for capturing diabetes outcomes at home was devised, (2) relevant portions of the CG&MT were translated into computer code and automated, and (3) algorithms were applied to transform data from self-monitoring of blood glucose into circadian profiles and hemoglobin A1c levels. (4) The resulting procedures were integrated into a USB memory drive for use by health-care providers at the point of care. For input from patients, a simple form is used to capture data on diabetes outcomes, including blood glucose measurements before and after meals and at bedtime, medication, and lifestyle events in a structured fashion. At each encounter with a health-care provider, the patient's data are transferred into the device and become available to assist in identifying deviations from mandated targets, potential risks of hypoglycemia, and necessary prescription changes. Preliminary observations during a 2 1/2-year period from a community support group dedicated to glycemic control on 20 unselected patients (10 with and 10 without use of the device) are summarized. With use of the automated information, the health professional is supported at the point of care to achieve better, safer outcomes and practice evidence-based medicine entirely in lockstep with the CG&MT. This automation helps to overcome clinical inertia.

  3. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015 – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAS-Taskforce 2015

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation, Grade “B” (recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation. The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  4. Evidence- and consensus-based (S3) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis - International League of Dermatological Societies in cooperation with the European Dermatology Forum - Short version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, R N; Stockfleth, E; Connolly, S M; Correia, O; Erdmann, R; Foley, P; Gupta, A K; Jacobs, A; Kerl, H; Lim, H W; Martin, G; Paquet, M; Pariser, D M; Rosumeck, S; Röwert-Huber, H-J; Sahota, A; Sangueza, O P; Shumack, S; Sporbeck, B; Swanson, N A; Torezan, L; Nast, A

    2015-11-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a frequent health condition attributable to chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Several treatment options are available and evidence based guidelines are missing. The goal of these evidence- and consensus-based guidelines was the development of treatment recommendations appropriate for different subgroups of patients presenting with AK. A secondary aim of these guidelines was the implementation of knowledge relating to the clinical background of AK, including consensus-based recommendations for the histopathological definition, diagnosis and the assessment of patients. The guidelines development followed a pre-defined and structured process. For the underlying systematic literature review of interventions for AK, the methodology suggested by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was adapted. All recommendations were consented during a consensus conference using a formal consensus methodology. Strength of recommendations was expressed based on the GRADE approach. If expert opinion without external evidence was incorporated into the reasoning for making a certain recommendation, the rationale was provided. The Guidelines underwent open public review and approval by the commissioning societies. Various interventions for the treatment of AK have been assessed for their efficacy. The consenting procedure led to a treatment algorithm as shown in the guidelines document. Based on expert consensus, the present guidelines present recommendations on the classification of patients, diagnosis and histopathological definition of AK. Details on the methods and results of the systematic literature review and guideline development process have been published separately. International guidelines are intended to be adapted to national or regional

  5. Bone Health in Patients with Breast Cancer: Recommendations from an Evidence-Based Canadian Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. G. Paterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss is common in patients with breast cancer. Bone modifying agents (BMAs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, have been shown to reverse or stabilize bone loss and may be useful in the primary and metastatic settings. The purpose of this review is to provide clear evidence-based strategies for the management of bone loss and its symptoms in breast cancer. A systematic review of clinical trials and meta-analyses published between 1996 and 2012 was conducted of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reference lists were hand-searched for additional publications. Recommendations were developed based on the best available evidence. Zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate, and denosumab are recommended for metastatic breast cancer patients; however, no one agent can be recommended over another. Zoledronate or any oral bisphosphonate and denosumab should be considered in primary breast cancer patients who are postmenopausal on aromatase inhibitor therapy and have a high risk of fracture and/or a low bone mineral density and in premenopausal primary breast cancer patients who become amenorrheic after therapy. No one agent can be recommended over another. BMAs are not currently recommended as adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer for the purpose of improving survival, although a major Early Breast Cancer Cooperative Trialists’ Group meta-analysis is underway which may impact future practice. Adverse events can be managed with appropriate supportive care.

  6. Danish evidence-based clinical guideline for use of nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation of undernourished patients with stable COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Tobberup, Randi; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2015-02-01

    Disease-related under-nutrition is a common problem in individuals with COPD. The rationale for nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation therefore seems obvious. However there is limited evidence regarding the patient-relevant outcomes i.e. activities of daily living (ADL) or quality of life. Therefore the topic was included in The Danish Health and Medicines Authority's development of an evidence-based clinical guideline for rehabilitation of patients with stable COPD. The methods were specified by The Danish Health and Medicines Authority as part of a standardized approach to evidence-based national clinical practice guidelines. They included formulation of a PICO with pre-defined criteria for the Population, Intervention, Control and Outcomes. Existing guidelines or systematic reviews were used after assessment using the AGREE II tool or AMSTAR, if possible. We identified primary studies by means of a systematic literature search (July to December 2013), and any identified studies were then quality assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the GRADE approach. The extracted data on our pre-defined outcomes were summarized in meta-analyses when possible, or meta-analyses from existing guidelines or systematic reviews were adapted. The results were used for labeling and wording of the recommendations. Data from 12 randomized controlled trials were included in a systematic review, which formed the basis for our recommendations as no new primary studies had been published. There were evidence of moderate quality that nutritional support for undernourished patients with COPD lead to a weight gain of 1.7kg (95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 2.2kg), but the effect was quantified as a mean change from baseline, which is less reliable. There were evidence of moderate quality that nutritional therapy does not increase in the 6 minute walking distance of 13 m (95% confidence interval: -27 to 54 m) when results in the intervention and control groups were

  7. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, J Matthias; Dominguez-Munoz, Enrique; Rosendahl, Jonas; Besselink, Marc; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Haas, Stephan; Akisik, Fatih; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Keller, Jutta; Boermeester, Marja; Werner, Jens; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Fockens, Paul; Drewes, Asbjorn; Ceyhan, Gürlap; Lindkvist, Björn; Drenth, Joost; Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip; de Madaria, Enrique; Witt, Heiko; Schneider, Alexander; Manfredi, Riccardo; Brøndum, Frøkjer J; Rudolf, Sasa; Bollen, Thomas; Bruno, Marco

    2017-03-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on 'Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis across Europe' (HaPanEU) developed these European guidelines using an evidence-based approach. Twelve multidisciplinary review groups performed systematic literature reviews to answer 101 predefined clinical questions. Recommendations were graded using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system and the answers were assessed by the entire group in a Delphi process online. The review groups presented their recommendations during the 2015 annual meeting of United European Gastroenterology. At this one-day, interactive conference, relevant remarks were voiced and overall agreement on each recommendation was quantified using plenary voting (Test and Evaluation Directorate). After a final round of adjustments based on these comments, a draft version was sent out to external reviewers. The 101 recommendations covered 12 topics related to the clinical management of chronic pancreatitis: aetiology (working party (WP)1), diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis with imaging (WP2 and WP3), diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (WP4), surgery in chronic pancreatitis (WP5), medical therapy (WP6), endoscopic therapy (WP7), treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts (WP8), pancreatic pain (WP9), nutrition and malnutrition (WP10), diabetes mellitus (WP11) and the natural course of the disease and quality of life (WP12). Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system, 70 of the 101 (70%) recommendations were rated as 'strong' and plenary voting revealed 'strong agreement' for 99 (98%) recommendations. The 2016 HaPanEU/United European Gastroenterology guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations concerning key aspects

  8. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: revised third edition Recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G.M.; Haddad, P. M.; Ferrier, I.N.; Aronson, J.K.; Barnes, T.R.H.; Cipriani, A.; Coghill, D.R.; Fazel, S.; Geddes, J.R.; Grunze, H.; Holmes, E.A.; Howes, O.; Hudson, S.; Hunt, N.; Jones, I.; Macmillan, I.C.; McAllister-Williams, H.; Miklowitz, D.M.; Morriss, R.; Munafò, M.; Paton, C.; Saharkian, B.J.; Saunders, K.E.A.; Sinclair, J.M.A.; Taylor, D.; Vieta, E.; Young, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines: in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change. PMID:26979387

  9. Summary of evidence-based guideline: Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Bever, Christopher; Bowen, James; Bowling, Allen; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Cameron, Michelle; Bourdette, Dennis; Gronseth, Gary S.; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We searched the literature (1970–March 2011; March 2011−September 2013 MEDLINE search), classified articles, and linked recommendations to evidence. Results and recommendations: Clinicians might offer oral cannabis extract for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level A). Clinicians might offer tetrahydrocannabinol for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity (short-term)/tremor (Level B) and possibly effective for spasticity and pain (long-term) (Level C). Clinicians might offer Sativex oromucosal cannabinoid spray (nabiximols) for spasticity symptoms, pain, and urinary frequency (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity/urinary incontinence (Level B). Clinicians might choose not to offer these agents for tremor (Level C). Clinicians might counsel patients that magnetic therapy is probably effective for fatigue and probably ineffective for depression (Level B); fish oil is probably ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, MRI lesions, and quality of life (QOL) (Level B); ginkgo biloba is ineffective for cognition (Level A) and possibly effective for fatigue (Level C); reflexology is possibly effective for paresthesia (Level C); Cari Loder regimen is possibly ineffective for disability, symptoms, depression, and fatigue (Level C); and bee sting therapy is possibly ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, lesion burden/volume, and health-related QOL (Level C). Cannabinoids may cause adverse effects. Clinicians should exercise caution regarding standardized vs nonstandardized cannabis extracts and overall CAM quality control/nonregulation. Safety/efficacy of other CAM

  10. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society on prescribing generic antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Serrano-Castro, P J; Mercadé-Cerdá, J M

    Pharmaceutical spending in Spain accounts for 1.2-1.4% of the gross domestic product and is increasing by 5-12% per year. One of the measures adopted by the government to cut this spending is the possible substitution of original prescribed drugs by generics. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AED), which are characterised by a scant therapeutic margin, these steps have sparked a scientific debate about their repercussion on the control of epileptic patients. We propose to draw up a set of implicit evidence-based consensus practice guidelines concerning issues related with this topic. A selective search for quality scientific information on the subject was conducted on PubMed-Medline, Tripdatabase and the Biblioteca Cochrane Plus. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the recommendations deriving from them were collected. A total of 21 primary documents and 16 practice guidelines, protocols or experts' recommendations were identified. Our recommendations were explicitly included at the end of the text. The Andalusian Epilepsy Society makes the following recommendations: 1) not replacing an innovative AED by its generic in a controlled patient; 2) beginning treatment with a generic AED in monotherapy or in association is acceptable; 3) not exchanging generic AED from different pharmaceutical companies; 4) explaining to the patient the rules governing the authorization of generics and the importance of avoiding exchanges between different generic AED; and 5) if there is some worsening of the clinical condition or side effects appear following the introduction of a generic, the causes must be investigated and communicated to the bodies responsible for pharmacovigilance.

  11. European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Consensus Guidelines on Screening, Diagnosis, and Management of Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Juliane; Olivieri, Antonella; Donaldson, Malcolm; Torresani, Toni; Krude, Heiko; van Vliet, Guy; Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). Evidence: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify key articles relating to the screening, diagnosis, and management of CH. The evidence-based guidelines were developed with the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, describing both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. In the absence of sufficient evidence, conclusions were based on expert opinion. Consensus Process: Thirty-two participants drawn from the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and five other major scientific societies in the field of pediatric endocrinology were allocated to working groups with assigned topics and specific questions. Each group searched the literature, evaluated the evidence, and developed a draft document. These papers were debated and finalized by each group before presentation to the full assembly for further discussion and agreement. Recommendations: The recommendations include: worldwide neonatal screening, approaches to assess the cause (including genotyping) and the severity of the disorder, the immediate initiation of appropriate L-T4 supplementation and frequent monitoring to ensure dose adjustments to keep thyroid hormone levels in the target ranges, a trial of treatment in patients suspected of transient CH, regular assessments of developmental and neurosensory functions, consulting health professionals as appropriate, and education about CH. The harmonization of diagnosis, management, and routine health surveillance would not only optimize patient outcomes, but should also facilitate epidemiological studies of the disorder. Individuals with CH require monitoring throughout their lives, particularly during early childhood and pregnancy. PMID:24446653

  12. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Benninger, David H; Brunelin, Jérôme; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Cotelli, Maria; De Ridder, Dirk; Ferrucci, Roberta; Langguth, Berthold; Marangolo, Paola; Mylius, Veit; Nitsche, Michael A; Padberg, Frank; Palm, Ulrich; Poulet, Emmanuel; Priori, Alberto; Rossi, Simone; Schecklmann, Martin; Vanneste, Sven; Ziemann, Ulf; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Paulus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned by the European Chapter of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology to gather knowledge about the state of the art of the therapeutic use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) from studies published up until September 2016, regarding pain, Parkinson's disease, other movement disorders, motor stroke, poststroke aphasia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, depression, schizophrenia, and craving/addiction. The evidence-based analysis included only studies based on repeated tDCS sessions with sham tDCS control procedure; 25 patients or more having received active treatment was required for Class I, while a lower number of 10-24 patients was accepted for Class II studies. Current evidence does not allow making any recommendation of Level A (definite efficacy) for any indication. Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for: (i) anodal tDCS of the left primary motor cortex (M1) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in fibromyalgia; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in major depressive episode without drug resistance; (iii) anodal tDCS of the right DLPFC (with left DLPFC cathode) in addiction/craving. Level C recommendation (possible efficacy) is proposed for anodal tDCS of the left M1 (or contralateral to pain side, with right orbitofrontal cathode) in chronic lower limb neuropathic pain secondary to spinal cord lesion. Conversely, Level B recommendation (probable inefficacy) is conferred on the absence of clinical effects of: (i) anodal tDCS of the left temporal cortex (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in tinnitus; (ii) anodal tDCS of the left DLPFC (with right orbitofrontal cathode) in drug-resistant major depressive episode. It remains to be clarified whether the probable or possible therapeutic effects of tDCS are clinically meaningful and how to optimally perform t

  13. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of tardive syndromes: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Fahn, Stanley; Weiner, William J; Gronseth, Gary S; Sullivan, Kelly L; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2013-07-30

    To make evidence-based recommendations regarding management of tardive syndromes (TDS), including tardive dyskinesias (TDD), by addressing 5 questions: 1) Is withdrawal of dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs) an effective TDS treatment? 2) Does switching from typical to atypical DRBAs reduce TDS symptoms? 3) What is the efficacy of pharmacologic agents in treating TDS? 4) Do patients with TDS benefit from chemodenervation with botulinum toxin? 5) Do patients with TDS benefit from surgical therapy? PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane were searched (1966-2011). Articles were classified according to a 4-tiered evidence-rating scheme; recommendations were tied to the evidence. Clonazepam probably improves TDD and ginkgo biloba probably improves TDS (both Level B); both should be considered as treatment. Risperidone may improve TDS but cannot be recommended as treatment because neuroleptics may cause TDS despite masking symptoms. Amantadine and tetrabenazine might be considered as TDS treatment (Level C). Diltiazem should not be considered as TDD treatment (Level B); galantamine and eicosapentaenoic acid may not be considered as treatment (Level C). Data are insufficient to support or refute use of acetazolamide, bromocriptine, thiamine, baclofen, vitamin E, vitamin B6, selegiline, clozapine, olanzapine, melatonin, nifedipine, fluperlapine, sulpiride, flupenthixol, thiopropazate, haloperidol, levetiracetam, quetiapine, ziprasidone, sertindole, aripiprazole, buspirone, yi-gan san, biperiden discontinuation, botulinum toxin type A, electroconvulsive therapy, α-methyldopa, reserpine, and pallidal deep brain stimulation as TDS treatments (Level U). Data are insufficient to support or refute TDS treatment by withdrawing causative agents or switching from typical to atypical DRBA (Level U).

  14. Summary of evidence-based guideline update: Evaluation and management of concussion in sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffrey S.; Ashwal, Stephen; Barth, Jeffrey; Getchius, Thomas S.D.; Gioia, Gerard A.; Gronseth, Gary S.; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Mandel, Steven; Manley, Geoffrey; McKeag, Douglas B.; Thurman, David J.; Zafonte, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To update the 1997 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) practice parameter regarding sports concussion, focusing on 4 questions: 1) What factors increase/decrease concussion risk? 2) What diagnostic tools identify those with concussion and those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early impairments, neurologic catastrophe, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 3) What clinical factors identify those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early postconcussion impairments, neurologic catastrophe, recurrent concussions, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 4) What interventions enhance recovery, reduce recurrent concussion risk, or diminish long-term sequelae? The complete guideline on which this summary is based is available as an online data supplement to this article. Methods: We systematically reviewed the literature from 1955 to June 2012 for pertinent evidence. We assessed evidence for quality and synthesized into conclusions using a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. We used a modified Delphi process to develop recommendations. Results: Specific risk factors can increase or decrease concussion risk. Diagnostic tools to help identify individuals with concussion include graded symptom checklists, the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, neuropsychological assessments, and the Balance Error Scoring System. Ongoing clinical symptoms, concussion history, and younger age identify those at risk for postconcussion impairments. Risk factors for recurrent concussion include history of multiple concussions, particularly within 10 days after initial concussion. Risk factors for chronic neurobehavioral impairment include concussion exposure and APOE ε4 genotype. Data are insufficient to show that any intervention enhances recovery or diminishes long-term sequelae postconcussion. Practice recommendations are presented for preparticipation counseling, management of suspected concussion, and management of

  15. Danish evidence-based clinical guideline for use of nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation of undernourished patients with stable COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Topperup, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Disease-related under-nutrition is a common problem in individuals with COPD. The rationale for nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation therefore seems obvious. However there is limited evidence regarding the patient-relevant outcomes i.e. activities of daily living (ADL......) or quality of life. Therefore the topic was included in The Danish Health and Medicines Authority's development of an evidence-based clinical guideline for rehabilitation of patients with stable COPD. Methods The methods were specified by The Danish Health and Medicines Authority as part of a standardized...... studies had been published. There were evidence of moderate quality that nutritional support for undernourished patients with COPD lead to a weight gain of 1.7 kg (95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 2.2 kg), but the effect was quantified as a mean change from baseline, which is less reliable. There were...

  16. Barriers to and facilitators for the use of an evidence-based occupational therapy guideline for older people with dementia and their carers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bert de Swart; Marleen Kaijen; Netta van 't Leven; Myrra Vernooij-Dassen; Maud Graff; Marcel Olde-Rikkert

    2011-01-01

    Implementing evidence-based guidelines is not a simple task. This study aimed to define barriers to and facilitators for implementing the proven and effective Community Occupational Therapy in Dementia (COTiD) guideline for older people with dementia and their carers. The qualitative method we used

  17. Barriers to and facilitators for the use of an evidence-based occupational therapy guideline for older people with dementia and their carers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leven, M.A. van het; Graff, M.J.L.; Kaijen, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Implementing evidence-based guidelines is not a simple task. This study aimed to define barriers to and facilitators for implementing the proven and effective Community Occupational Therapy in Dementia (COTiD) guideline for older people with dementia and their carers. METHODS: The

  18. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M.; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K.; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to 'tandard' therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods

  19. Acute pain in children and adults with sickle cell disease: management in the absence of evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Joshua J; Knight-Perry, Jessica E; Debaun, Michael R

    2009-05-01

    Acute, vaso-occlusive pain is the most characteristic complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). Although there has been rigorous work examining the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusion, fewer studies have focused on approaches to the clinical management of acute pain. In this review, we will examine the epidemiology and management strategies of acute pain events and we will identify limitations in the best available studies. Most acute pain events in adults with SCD are managed at home without physician contact. Prior descriptions of the natural history of pain episodes from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease relied on physician contact, limiting the generalizability of these findings to current practice. Patient-controlled analgesia has replaced on-demand therapy to become the standard for management of severe pain events in children and adults with SCD requiring hospital admission. Unfortunately, most clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pain are not based on randomized clinical trials. As a result, our practice of pain management is primarily limited to expert opinion and inferences from observational studies. Additional clinical trials in management of acute pain in children and adults with SCD are critical for the development of evidence-based guidelines.

  20. Nursing students' knowledge and attitude on pressure ulcer prevention evidence-based guidelines: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Valentina; Comparcini, Dania; Flacco, Maria Elena; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2015-04-01

    Pressure ulcers still remain a significant problem in many healthcare settings. Poor knowledge and negative attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention could undesirably affect preventive care strategies. To assess both knowledge and attitudes among nursing students on Pressure Ulcer Prevention Evidence-Based Guidelines. A multicenter cross-sectional survey was carried out from December 2012 to August 2013. The study was carried out in seven Italian nursing schools. We involved a convenience sample of nursing students (n=742) METHODS: Data were collected using two validated questionnaires to assess students' knowledge and attitudes on pressure ulcer prevention. The overall Knowledge and Attitude scores were 51.1% (13.3/26) and 76.7% (39.9/52), respectively. We found a weak correlation between total Knowledge scores and total Attitude scores (rho=0.13, ppressure ulcer prevention was relatively low. However, we observed an association between a high level of education/training experience and higher knowledge scores. Most of the participants showed high attitude scores. These results suggest that positive attitudes toward pressure ulcer prevention may contribute to the compliance with the guidelines in clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Consensus guidelines for lumbar puncture in patients with neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Engelborghs (Sebastiaan); Niemantsverdriet, E. (Ellis); H. Struyfs (Hanne); K. Blennow (Kaj); Brouns, R. (Raf); M. Comabella (Manuel); I. Dujmovic (Irena); W.M. van der Flier (Wiesje); L. Frölich (Lutz); D. Galimberti (Daniela); S. Gnanapavan (Sharmilee); B. Hemmer` (Bernhard); E.I. Hoff (Erik I.); Hort, J. (Jakub); E. Iacobaeus (Ellen); M. Ingelsson (Martin); Jan de Jong, F. (Frank); Jonsson, M. (Michael); M. Khalil (Michael); J. Kuhle (Jens); A. Lleo (Alberto); A. De Mendonça (Alexandre); J.L. Molinuevo (José Luis); G. Nagels (Guy); C. Paquet (Claire); L. Parnetti; C.M.A.A. Roks (Gerwin); Rosa-Neto, P. (Pedro); P. Scheltens (Philip); C. Skarsgård (Constance); E. Stomrud (Erik); H. Tumani (Hayrettin); P. Visser (Pim); Wallin, A. (Anders); B. Winblad; H. Zetterberg (Henrik); F.H. Duits (Flora H.); C.E. Teunissen (Charlotte)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Cerebrospinal fluid collection by lumbar puncture (LP) is performed in the diagnostic workup of several neurological brain diseases. Reluctance to perform the procedure is among others due to a lack of standards and guidelines to minimize the risk of complications, such as

  2. Principles governing heart failure therapy re-examined relative to standard evidence-based medicine-driven guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lip-Bun; Chinnappa, Shanmugakumar; Tan, David K H; Hall, Alistair S

    2011-09-01

    Although all aspects of clinical work nowadays are modified by the pervading influence of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and multiplicative guidelines, not many clinicians realize that the underlying premise of EBM-driven guidelines is a particular strain of consequentialist ideology. Subservience to this ideology has transformed modern medical practice, but there is a real risk of distorting good medical practice, of belittling clinical judgement, of disempowering clinicians, and subjecting patients to skewed medical reality and treatment options. With so many heart failure (HF) guidelines issued by various august bodies, it is therefore timely to reappraise principles governing modern HF therapy with a fresh examination of the hierarchy of medical imperatives, the role of alternatives to consequentialism including deontological principles in HF therapy. In addition, other ideology worth re-examining, aside from EBM, are the principle of appropriate definition of HF underlying therapeutic goals and the principle of prioritizing objectives of HF therapy. Even within standard EBM, there are many questions to reconsider: about what types of evidence are admissible, different interpretations of available evidence, emphasizing patient-centered outcome measures instead of randomized controlled trials quantifiable therapeutic outcomes, how to prescribe drugs for prognostic versus symptomatic benefits, and how to deliver HF therapy based on pathophysiological features through mechanistic considerations and not just confined to randomized controlled trials or meta-analytical statistical imperatives. Through re-examination of these fundamental principles of HF therapy, it is hoped that clinicians will be empowered to manage HF patients more holistically and better deliver HF therapies in the best interest of each individual patient.

  3. Consensus Guidelines for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Neuropsychopharmacology: Update 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemke, C; Bergemann, N; Clement, H W; Conca, A; Deckert, J; Domschke, K; Eckermann, G; Egberts, K; Gerlach, M; Greiner, C; Gründer, G; Haen, E; Havemann-Reinecke, U; Hefner, G; Helmer, R; Janssen, G; Jaquenoud, E; Laux, G; Messer, T; Mössner, R; Müller, M J; Paulzen, M; Pfuhlmann, B; Riederer, P; Saria, A; Schoppek, B; Schoretsanitis, G; Schwarz, M; Gracia, M Silva; Stegmann, B; Steimer, W; Stingl, J C; Uhr, M; Ulrich, S; Unterecker, S; Waschgler, R; Zernig, G; Zurek, G; Baumann, P

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the quantification and interpretation of drug concentrations in blood to optimize pharmacotherapy. It considers the interindividual variability of pharmacokinetics and thus enables personalized pharmacotherapy. In psychiatry and neurology, patient populations that may particularly benefit from TDM are children and adolescents, pregnant women, elderly patients, individuals with intellectual disabilities, patients with substance abuse disorders, forensic psychiatric patients or patients with known or suspected pharmacokinetic abnormalities. Non-response at therapeutic doses, uncertain drug adherence, suboptimal tolerability, or pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are typical indications for TDM. However, the potential benefits of TDM to optimize pharmacotherapy can only be obtained if the method is adequately integrated in the clinical treatment process. To supply treating physicians and laboratories with valid information on TDM, the TDM task force of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Neuropsychopharmakologie und Pharmakopsychiatrie (AGNP) issued their first guidelines for TDM in psychiatry in 2004. After an update in 2011, it was time for the next update. Following the new guidelines holds the potential to improve neuropsychopharmacotherapy, accelerate the recovery of many patients, and reduce health care costs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Consensus Guidelines on Evaluation and Management of the Febrile Child Presenting to the Emergency Department in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Thakur, Neha; Patel, Reena; Rai, Narendra; Trivedi, Nitin; Fassl, Bernhard; Shah, Binita; Lozon, Marie; Oteng, Rockerfeller A; Saha, Abhijeet; Shah, Dheeraj; Galwankar, Sagar

    2017-08-15

    India, home to almost 1.5 billion people, is in need of a country-specific, evidence-based, consensus approach for the emergency department (ED) evaluation and management of the febrile child. We held two consensus meetings, performed an exhaustive literature review, and held ongoing web-based discussions to arrive at a formal consensus on the proposed evaluation and management algorithm. The first meeting was held in Delhi in October 2015, under the auspices of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) Section of Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-INDIA); and the second meeting was conducted at Pune during Emergency Medical Pediatrics and Recent Trends (EMPART 2016) in March 2016. The second meeting was followed with futher e-mail-based discussions to arrive at a formal consensus on the proposed algorithm. To develop an algorithmic approach for the evaluation and management of the febrile child that can be easily applied in the context of emergency care and modified based on local epidemiology and practice standards. We created an algorithm that can assist the clinician in the evaluation and management of the febrile child presenting to the ED, contextualized to health care in India. This guideline includes the following key components: triage and the timely assessment; evaluation; and patient disposition from the ED. We urge the development and creation of a robust data repository of minimal standard data elements. This would provide a systematic measurement of the care processes and patient outcomes, and a better understanding of various etiologies of febrile illnesses in India; both of which can be used to further modify the proposed approach and algorithm.

  5. A need for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the use of heparins in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Gouin-Thibault

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Isabelle Gouin-Thibault1,2, Virginie Siguret1,2, Eric Pautas2,31Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Laboratoire d’Hématologie, Hôpital Charles Foix, Paris, France; 2Université Paris Descartes, INSERM U, Paris, France; 3Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Unité de Gériatrie Aiguë, Hôpital Charles Foix, Paris, FranceAbstract: Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs have been widely studied in pivotal clinical trials or in several meta-analyses. However, the safety and optimal use of LMWHs in high-risk patients such as the very elderly remains uncertain since these patients are usually excluded from clinical trials. In terms of LMWHs in the elderly, the main concerns are renal failure and the risk of accumulation. A clinical approach consisting of a LMWH dose reduction in the elderly should be considered with great caution in terms of efficacy, since it has been tested neither in the treatment of VTE nor in VTE prophylaxis. If monitoring is considered in patients receiving therapeutic dose LMWHs, appropriate target ranges for peak anti-Xa activity levels should be used and so far, no anti-Xa activity-based guidelines have been issued. Moreover, no data support any laboratory monitoring in elderly patients treated with prophylactic dose LMWHs.Keywords: elderly patients, low-molecular-weight heparin, renal insufficiency, evidence-based medicine

  6. The diagnostic work up of growth failure in secondary health care ; An evaluation of consensus guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Dommelen, P. van; Buuren, S. van; Dekker, F.W.; Ketel, A.G.; Moll, H.A.; Wit, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: As abnormal growth might be the first manifestation of undetected diseases, it is important to have accurate referral criteria and a proper diagnostic work-up. In the present paper we evaluate the diagnostic work-up in secondary health care according to existing consensus guidelines and

  7. [The SIAARTI consensus document on the management of patients with end-stage chronic organ failure. From evidence-based medicine to knowledge-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with end-stage chronic organ failure is an increasingly important topic, since the extraordinary medical and technological advances have significantly reduced mortality and improved quality of life with prolonged survival of end-stage diseases. What should be the plan of care for these patients? Who should bear the responsibility for care? With what targets? These are crucial questions, to which modern medicine should provide convincing answers. The authors of the document explicitly resisted the temptation to draw up guidelines, showing that it is possible to customize medical intervention on the individual patient, keeping it tightly linked to the available knowledge. This is the most relevant aspect of the document: it goes beyond the classical concept of evidence-based medicine choosing to refer to the most dynamic knowledge-based medicine approach.

  8. Reaching Agreement in Uncertain Circumstances: The Practice of Evidence-Based Policy in the Case of the Swedish National Guidelines for Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Nathalie; Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte; Janzon, Magnus; Levin, Lars-Åke

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the practice of evidence-based policy in a Swedish healthcare context. The study focused on how policymakers in the specific working group, the Priority-Setting Group (PSG), handled the various forms of evidence and values and their competing rationalities, when producing the Swedish National Guidelines for heart diseases that…

  9. Evaluation of evidence-based literature and formulation of recommendations for the clinical preventive guidelines for immigrants and refugees in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugwell, Peter; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Ueffing, Erin; Chambers, Andrea; Feightner, John

    2011-09-06

    This article describes the evidence review and guideline development method developed for the Clinical Preventive Guidelines for Immigrants and Refugees in Canada by the Canadian Collaboration for Immigrant and Refugee Health Guideline Committee. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) best-practice framework was combined with the recently developed Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for immigrants and refugees in Canada. A systematic approach was designed to produce the evidence reviews and apply the GRADE approach, including building on evidence from previous systematic reviews, searching for and comparing evidence between general and specific immigrant populations, and applying the GRADE criteria for making recommendations. This method was used for priority health conditions that had been selected by practitioners caring for immigrants and refugees in Canada. This article outlines the 14-step method that was defined to standardize the guideline development process for each priority health condition.

  10. Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis in adults who are obese or overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Casimiro, Lynn; Bugnariu, Nicoleta; Welch, Vivian A; De Angelis, Gino; Francoeur, Lilliane; Milne, Sarah; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Messier, Steven P; Doucet, Eric; Kenny, Glen P; Prud'homme, Denis; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Poitras, Stéphane; Li, Jing Xian; Finestone, Hillel M; Laferrière, Lucie; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Lambert, Kim; Marshall, Alison D; Cartizzone, Margot; Teav, Adam

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this review was to construct an updated evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the use of physical activity and diet for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) in adults (>18 years of age) who are obese or overweight (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)). Articles were extracted from the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE (Current Contents), SPORTDiscus, SUM, Scopus, CINAHL, AMED, BIOMED, PubMed, ERIC, the Cochrane Controlled Trials, and PEDro. The Ottawa Panel and research assistance team strictly applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria from previous Ottawa Panel publications. An a priori literature search was conducted for articles related to obesity and OA of the lower extremities that were published from January 1, 1966, to November 30, 2010. Inclusion criteria and the methods to grade the recommendations were created by the Ottawa Panel. were graded based on the strength of evidence (A, B, C, C+, D, D+, or D-) as well as experimental design (I for randomized controlled trials and II for nonrandomized studies). In agreement with previous Ottawa Panel methods, Cochrane Collaboration methods were utilized for statistical analysis. Clinical significance was established by an improvement of ≥15% in the experimental group compared with the control group. There were a total of 79 recommendations from 9 articles. From these recommendations, there were 36 positive recommendations: 21 grade A and 15 grade C+. There were no grade B recommendations, and all recommendations were of clinical benefit. Further research is needed, as more than half of the trials were of low methodological quality. This review suggests that physical activity and diet programs are beneficial, specifically for pain relief (9 grade A recommendations) and improved functional status (6 grade A and 7 grade C+ recommendations), for adults with OA who are obese or overweight. The Ottawa Panel was able to demonstrate that when comparing physical activity alone, diet alone

  11. [New Scientific Evidence-based Public Health Guidelines and Practical Manual for Prevention of Sick House Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Reiko; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Araki, Atsuko; Saijo, Yasuaki; Azuma, Kenichi; Kawai, Toshio; Yamato, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruki; Shibata, Eiji; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Masuchi, Ayumi; Minatoya, Machiko; Ait Bamai, Yu

    2018-01-01

    Recently, we have published a book containing evidence-based public health guidelines and a practical manual for the prevention of sick house syndrome. The manual is available through the homepage of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (http://www.mhlw.go.jp/file/06-Seisakujouhou-11130500-Shokuhinanzenbu/0000155147.pdf). It is an almost completely revised version of the 2009 version. The coauthors are 13 specialists in environmental epidemiology, exposure sciences, architecture, and risk communication. Since the 1970s, health problems caused by indoor chemicals, biological pollution, poor temperature control, humidity, and others in office buildings have been recognized as sick building syndrome (SBS) in Western countries, but in Japan it was not until the 1990s that people living in new or renovated homes started to describe a variety of nonspecific subjective symptoms such as eye, nose, and throat irritation, headache, and general fatigue. These symptoms resembled SBS and were designated "sick house syndrome (SHS)." To determine the strategy for prevention of SHS, we conducted a nationwide epidemiological study in six cities from 2003-2013 by randomly sampling 5,709 newly built houses. As a result 1,479 residents in 425 households agreed to environmental monitoring for indoor aldehydes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). After adjustment for possible risk factors, some VOCs and formaldehyde were dose-dependently shown to be significant risk factors. We also studied the dampness of the houses, fungi, allergies, and others. This book is fully based on the scientific evidence collected through these studies and other newly obtained information, especially from the aspect of architectural engineering. In addition to SHS, we included chapters on recent information about "multi-chemical sensitivity."

  12. Features of Mobile Diabetes Applications: Review of the Literature and Analysis of Current Applications Compared Against Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Årsand, Eirik; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    = 101) were (1) insulin and medication recording, 63 (62%), (2) data export and communication, 61 (60%), (3) diet recording, 47 (47%), and (4) weight management, 43 (43%). From the literature search (n = 26), the most prevalent features were (1) PHR or Web server synchronization, 18 (69%), (2) insulin and medication recording, 17 (65%), (3) diet recording, 17 (65%), and (4) data export and communication, 16 (62%). Interestingly, although clinical guidelines widely refer to the importance of education, this is missing from the top functionalities in both cases. Conclusions While a wide selection of mobile applications seems to be available for people with diabetes, this study shows there are obvious gaps between the evidence-based recommendations and the functionality used in study interventions or found in online markets. Current results confirm personalized education as an underrepresented feature in diabetes mobile applications. We found no studies evaluating social media concepts in diabetes self-management on mobile devices, and its potential remains largely unexplored. PMID:21979293

  13. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offersen, Birgitte V.; Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C.; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  14. International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brett W.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lovelock, Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Lis, Eric; Ryu, Samuel; Sheehan, Jason; Gerszten, Peter C.; Chang, Eric; Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott; Sahgal, Arjun; Deasy, Joe; Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina; Mindea, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic

  15. Introducing Evidence-Based Medicine and guidelines for maternal and newborn care in the Republic of Moldova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, A; Wyn Huws, D; Baltag, V

    2005-01-01

    Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there.......Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there....

  16. Treatment Guidelines for Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma: Preliminary Consensus of an International Expert Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Salerno, Kilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Washington, DC (United States); Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Le Pechoux, Cecile [Department of Radiotherapy, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Evidence for external beam radiation therapy (RT) as part of treatment for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) is limited. Preoperative RT is the subject of a current randomized trial, but the results will not be available for many years. In the meantime, many practitioners use preoperative RT for RPS, and although this approach is used in practice, there are no radiation treatment guidelines. An international expert panel was convened to develop consensus treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 15 academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of sarcoma was assembled. A systematic review of reports related to RT for RPS, RT for extremity sarcoma, and RT-related toxicities for organs at risk was performed. Due to the paucity of high-quality published data on the subject of RT for RPS, consensus recommendations were based largely on expert opinion derived from clinical experience and extrapolation of relevant published reports. It is intended that these clinical practice guidelines be updated as pertinent data become available. Results: Treatment guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS are presented. Conclusions: An international panel of radiation oncologists who specialize in sarcoma reached consensus guidelines for preoperative RT for RPS. Many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion because of the absence of higher level evidence and, thus, are best regarded as preliminary. We emphasize that the role of preoperative RT for RPS has not been proven, and we await data from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study of preoperative radiotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with RPS. Further data are also anticipated pertaining to normal tissue dose constraints, particularly for bowel tolerance. Nonetheless, as we await these data, the guidelines herein can be used to establish treatment uniformity to aid future assessments of efficacy

  17. Contrast-medium-induced nephropathy: is there a new consensus? A review of published guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, Henrik S.; Morcos, Sameh K.

    2006-01-01

    The interest in contrast-medium-induced nephropathy has increased considerably during the last few years. Various guidelines regarding identifying patients at risk and measures to reduce the incidence of this complication have been proposed. The aim of this review was to analyse whether there is some consistency amongst these guidelines. A Medline search for the keyword ''contrast medium induced nephropathy'' during the period from the beginning of 2003 through the end of September 2005 was carried out. Only papers in English were reviewed. Thirteen guidelines were identified. Inconsistency was observed regarding advise on the prophylactic use of drugs and the isoosmolar dimer to reduce the incidence of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy. Consistency was found in relation to the importance of hydration, cessation of intake of nephrotoxic drugs and administration of the lowest possible dose of contrast medium. No new consensus has been observed in comparison to the European Society for Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) guidelines, which were published in 1999. (orig.)

  18. Ottawa panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for aerobic walking programs in the management of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Laurianne; Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A; Tugwell, Peter; Kenny, Glen P; Reid, Robert; Maetzel, Andreas; Huijbregts, Maria; McCullough, Carolyn; De Angelis, Gino; Coyle, Douglas

    2012-07-01

    To update the Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (EBCPGs) on aerobic walking programs for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A literature search was conducted using the electronic databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for all studies related to aerobic walking programs for OA from 1966 until February 2011. The literature search found 719 potential records, and 10 full-text articles were included according to the selection criteria. The Ottawa Methods Group established the inclusion and exclusion criteria regarding the characteristics of the population, by selecting adults of 40 years old and older who were diagnosed with OA of the knee. Two reviewers independently extracted important information from each selected study using standardized data extraction forms, such as the interventions, comparisons, outcomes, time period of the effect measured, and study design. The statistical analysis was reported using the Cochrane collaboration methods. An improvement of 15% or more relative to a control group contributes to the achievement of a statistically significant and clinically relevant progress. A specific grading system for recommendations, created by the Ottawa Panel, used a level system (level I for randomized controlled studies and level II for nonrandomized articles). The strength of the evidence of the recommendations was graded using a system with letters: A, B, C+, C, D, D+, or D-. Evidence from 7 high-quality studies demonstrated that facility, hospital, and home-based aerobic walking programs with other therapies are effective interventions in the shorter term for the management of patients with OA to improve stiffness, strength, mobility, and endurance. The greatest improvements were found in pain, quality of life, and functional status (grades A, B, or C+). A common limitation inherent to the EBCPGs is the heterogeneity of studies included with regards to the characteristics of the population, the interventions, the

  19. International consensus guidelines for scoring the histopathological growth patterns of liver metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dam, Pieter Jan; Van Der Stok, Eric P.; Teuwen, Laure Anne

    2017-01-01

    .Results:Good-to-excellent correlations (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.5) with the gold standard were obtained for the assessment of the replacement HGP and desmoplastic HGP. Overall survival was significantly superior in the desmoplastic HGP subgroup compared with the replacement or pushing HGP subgroup (P=0.006).Conclusions:The...... that is present in each pattern and can be scored from standard haematoxylin-and-eosin-stained (H&E) tissue sections. The current study provides consensus guidelines for scoring these HGPs.Methods:Guidelines for defining the HGPs were established by a large international team. To assess the validity...

  20. ENETS Consensus Guidelines for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partelli, Stefano; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Capdevila, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The small intestine and pancreas are among the most frequent abdominal sites of origin of neuroendocrine tumours. Distinctive features of these forms are represented by the relatively low incidence and the wide heterogeneity in biological behaviour. In this light, it is difficult to standardize...... indications for surgery and the most appropriate approach. It would be helpful for surgeons managing patients with these tumours to have guidelines for surgical treatment of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. The proposed guidelines represent a consensus...

  1. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several organizations worldwide have developed procedure-based guidelines and/or position statements regarding various aspects of quality and safety indicators, and credentialing for endoscopy. Although important, they do not specifically address patient needs or provide a framework for their adoption in the context of endoscopy services. The consensus guidelines reported in this article, however, aimed to identify processes and indicators relevant to the provision of high-quality endoscopy services that will support ongoing quality improvement across many jurisdictions, specifically in the areas of ethics, facility standards and policies, quality assurance, training and education, reporting standards and patient perceptions.

  2. Nutrition management guideline for maple syrup urine disease: an evidence- and consensus-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Dianne M; Allgeier, Courtney; Homer, Caroline; Marriage, Barbara J; Ogata, Beth; Rohr, Frances; Splett, Patricia L; Stembridge, Adrya; Singh, Rani H

    2014-07-01

    In an effort to increase harmonization of care and enable outcome studies, the Genetic Metabolic Dietitians International (GMDI) and the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening and Genetics Collaborative (SERC) are partnering to develop nutrition management guidelines for inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) using a model combining both evidence- and consensus-based methodology. The first guideline to be completed is for maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). This report describes the methodology used in its development: formulation of five research questions; review, critical appraisal and abstraction of peer-reviewed studies and unpublished practice literature; and expert input through Delphi surveys and a nominal group process. This report includes the summary statements for each research question and the nutrition management recommendations they generated. Each recommendation is followed by a standardized rating based on the strength of the evidence and consensus used. The application of technology to build the infrastructure for this project allowed transparency during development of this guideline and will be a foundation for future guidelines. Online open access of the full, published guideline allows utilization by health care providers, researchers, and collaborators who advise, advocate and care for individuals with MSUD and their families. There will be future updates as warranted by developments in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adherence to MRI protocol consensus guidelines in multiple sclerosis: an Australian multi-centre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curley, Michael; Josey, Lawrence; Lucas, Robyn; Dear, Keith; Taylor, Bruce V.; Coulthard, Alan; Ausimmune Investigator Group

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease that causes significant morbidity within a young demographic. Diagnostic guidelines for MS have evolved, and imaging has played an increasingly important role in diagnosis over the last two decades. For imaging to contribute to diagnosis in a meaningful way, it must be reproducible. Consensus guidelines for MRI in MS exist to define correct sequence type and imaging technique, but it is not clear to what extent they are followed. This study reviewed MRI studies performed on Australian individuals presenting with a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (FCD) for adherence to published guidelines and discussed practical implementation of MS guidelines in light of recent updates. The Ausimmune study was a prospective case control study of Australian participants presenting with FCD from 2003 to 2006. Baseline cranial and spinal cord MRI studies of 226 case participants from four separate Australian regions were reviewed. MRI sequences were classified according to anatomical location, slice plane, tissue weighting and use of gadolinium-containing contrast media. Results were compared with the 2003 Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centres MRI protocol for the diagnosis of MS. The composition of core cranial MRI sequences performed varied across the 226 scans. Of the studies, 91% included sagittal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Cranial axial T2-weighted, axial FLAIR and axial proton density-weighted sequences were performed in 88%, 60% and 16% (respectively) of scans. Only 25% of the studies included a T1-weighted contrast-enhanced sequence. Concordance with the guidelines in all sequences was very low (2). Only a small number of MRI investigations performed included all of the sequences stipulated by consensus guidelines. This is likely due to poor awareness in the imaging community of the guidelines and the rationale behind certain sequences. Radiologists with a sub

  4. European Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Infants - 2013 Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the perinatal management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), controversies still exist. We report updated recommendations of a European Panel of expert neonatologists who developed consensus guidelines after critical examination of the most up-to-date evide...... maintenance of normal body temperature, proper fluid management, good nutritional support, appropriate management of the ductus arteriosus and support of the circulation to maintain adequate tissue perfusion....

  5. Evidence-Based Guideline: Treatment of Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Children and Adults: Report of the Guideline Committee of the American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnar, Shlomo; Gloss, David; Alldredge, Brian; Arya, Ravindra; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Bare, Mary; Bleck, Thomas; Dodson, W. Edwin; Garrity, Lisa; Jagoda, Andy; Lowenstein, Daniel; Pellock, John; Riviello, James; Sloan, Edward; Treiman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The optimal pharmacologic treatment for early convulsive status epilepticus is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To analyze efficacy, tolerability and safety data for anticonvulsant treatment of children and adults with convulsive status epilepticus and use this analysis to develop an evidence-based treatment algorithm. DATA SOURCES: Structured literature review using MEDLINE, Embase, Current Contents, and Cochrane library supplemented with article reference lists. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials of anticonvulsant treatment for seizures lasting longer than 5 minutes. DATA EXTRACTION: Individual studies were rated using predefined criteria and these results were used to form recommendations, conclusions, and an evidence-based treatment algorithm. RESULTS: A total of 38 randomized controlled trials were identified, rated and contributed to the assessment. Only four trials were considered to have class I evidence of efficacy. Two studies were rated as class II and the remaining 32 were judged to have class III evidence. In adults with convulsive status epilepticus, intramuscular midazolam, intravenous lorazepam, intravenous diazepam and intravenous phenobarbital are established as efficacious as initial therapy (Level A). Intramuscular midazolam has superior effectiveness compared to intravenous lorazepam in adults with convulsive status epilepticus without established intravenous access (Level A). In children, intravenous lorazepam and intravenous diazepam are established as efficacious at stopping seizures lasting at least 5 minutes (Level A) while rectal diazepam, intramuscular midazolam, intranasal midazolam, and buccal midazolam are probably effective (Level B). No significant difference in effectiveness has been demonstrated between intravenous lorazepam and intravenous diazepam in adults or children with convulsive status epilepticus (Level A). Respiratory and cardiac symptoms are the most commonly encountered treatment-emergent adverse events

  6. Systematic review and consensus guidelines for environmental sampling of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Direk Limmathurotsakul

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Tier 1 Select Agent and the cause of melioidosis, is a Gram-negative bacillus present in the environment in many tropical countries. Defining the global pattern of B. pseudomallei distribution underpins efforts to prevent infection, and is dependent upon robust environmental sampling methodology. Our objective was to review the literature on the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei, update the risk map for melioidosis, and propose international consensus guidelines for soil sampling.An international working party (Detection of Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Working Party (DEBWorP was formed during the VIth World Melioidosis Congress in 2010. PubMed (January 1912 to December 2011 was searched using the following MeSH terms: pseudomallei or melioidosis. Bibliographies were hand-searched for secondary references. The reported geographical distribution of B. pseudomallei in the environment was mapped and categorized as definite, probable, or possible. The methodology used for detecting environmental B. pseudomallei was extracted and collated. We found that global coverage was patchy, with a lack of studies in many areas where melioidosis is suspected to occur. The sampling strategies and bacterial identification methods used were highly variable, and not all were robust. We developed consensus guidelines with the goals of reducing the probability of false-negative results, and the provision of affordable and 'low-tech' methodology that is applicable in both developed and developing countries.The proposed consensus guidelines provide the basis for the development of an accurate and comprehensive global map of environmental B. pseudomallei.

  7. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Indian public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of Indian mental health clinicians to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. Experts were recruited by SC, EC and HM. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms.. Responses to the open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 30 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 168 items, 71 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Translated versions of the guidelines will be produced and used for training. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to non-mental health professionals working in health and welfare settings.

  8. The implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based statewide prehospital pain management protocol developed using the national prehospital evidence-based guideline model process for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Alcorta, Richard; Weik, Tasmeen S; Lawner, Ben; Ho, Shiu; Wright, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funded the development of a model process for the development and implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) for emergency medical services (EMS). We report on the implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based prehospital pain management protocol developed using this model process. An evidence-based protocol for prehospital management of pain resulting from injuries and burns was reviewed by the Protocol Review Committee (PRC) of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). The PRC recommended revisions to the Maryland protocol that reflected recommendations in the EBG: weight-based dosing and repeat dosing of morphine. A training curriculum was developed and implemented using Maryland's online Learning Management System and successfully accessed by 3,941 paramedics and 15,969 BLS providers. Field providers submitted electronic patient care reports to the MIEMSS statewide prehospital database. Inclusion criteria were injured or burned patients transported by Maryland ambulances to Maryland hospitals whose electronic patient care records included data for level of EMS provider training during a 12-month preimplementation period and a 12-month postimplementation period from September 2010 through March 2012. We compared the percentage of patients receiving pain scale assessments and morphine, as well as the dose of morphine administered and the use of naloxone as a rescue medication for opiate use, before and after the protocol change. No differences were seen in the percentage of patients who had a pain score documented or the percent of patients receiving morphine before and after the protocol change, but there was a significant increase in the total dose and dose in mg/kg administered per patient. During the postintervention phase, patients received an 18% higher total morphine dose and a 14.9% greater mg/kg dose. We demonstrated that the implementation of a revised

  9. Post resuscitation management of cardiac arrest patients in the critical care environment: A retrospective audit of compliance with evidence based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milonas, Annabel; Hutchinson, Ana; Charlesworth, David; Doric, Andrea; Green, John; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    There is a clear relationship between evidence-based post resuscitation care and survival and functional status at hospital discharge. The Australian Resuscitation Council (ARC) recommends protocol driven care to enhance chance of survival following cardiac arrest. Healthcare providers have an obligation to ensure protocol driven post resuscitation care is timely and evidence based. The aim of this study was to examine adherence to best practice guidelines for post resuscitation care in the first 24h from Return of Spontaneous Circulation for patients admitted to the intensive care unit from the emergency department having suffered out of hospital or emergency department cardiac arrest and survived initial resuscitation. A retrospective audit of medical records of patients who met the criteria for survivors of cardiac arrest was conducted at two health services in Melbourne, Australia. Criteria audited were: primary cardiac arrest characteristics, oxygenation and ventilation management, cardiovascular care, neurological care and patient outcomes. The four major findings were: (i) use of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) of 1.0 and hyperoxia was common during the first 24h of post resuscitation management, (ii) there was variability in cardiac care, with timely 12 lead Electrocardiograph and majority of patients achieving systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than 100mmHg, but delays in transfer to cardiac catheterisation laboratory, (iii) neurological care was suboptimal with a high incidence of hyperglycaemia and failure to provide therapeutic hypothermia in almost 50% of patients and (iv) there was an association between in-hospital mortality and specific elements of post resuscitation care during the first 24h of hospital admission. Evidence-based context-specific guidelines for post resuscitation care that span the whole patient journey are needed. Reliance on national guidelines does not necessarily translate to evidence based care at a local level, so

  10. A Critical Commentary on the 2017 AGNP Consensus Guidelines for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Jose

    2018-01-01

    In 2004, 2011, and 2017, the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Neuropsychopharmakologie und Pharmakopsychiatrie (AGNP), a group of German-speaking psychiatric researchers and psychiatrists, published successive versions of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) expert group consensus guidelines. The 2017 version has as a major strength its encyclopedic nature, including 1358 references. The guideline has 3 major sections: 1) theoretical aspects of TDM, 2) drug concentration levels in blood to guide neuropsychopharmacotherapy, and 3) practical aspects of TDM in psychiatry and neurology. The writer hopes the time is right for a TDM guideline in psychiatry, which is indicated for: 1) psychiatric researchers ready to value how TDM can contribute to moving psychopharmacology forward, 2) flexible clinicians ready to improve their patient care by personalizing dosing, and 3) today's psychiatry residents prepared as a new generation ready to be trained in TDM and willing to continue incorporating TDM as new psychiatric drugs are marketed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Japanese public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 32 Japanese mental health professionals to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms). Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 38 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 176 items, 56 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this article. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the Japanese public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to health professionals working in health and welfare settings who do not have clinical mental health training. PMID:21592409

  12. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on the Treatment of Adults With Vestibular Schwannomas: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jeffrey J; Kalkanis, Steven N; Ryken, Timothy C

    2018-02-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are uncommon lesions that are a substantial challenge to the neurosurgeons, otologists, and radiation oncologists who undertake their clinical management. A starting point to improving the current knowledge is to define the benchmarks of the current research studying VS management using evidence-based techniques in order to allow meaningful points of departure for future scientific and clinical research. To establish the best evidence-based management of VS, including initial otologic evaluation, imaging diagnosis, use of surgical techniques, assessment of tumor pathology, and the administration of radiation therapy. Multidisciplinary writing groups were identified to design questions, literature searches, and collection and classification of relevant findings. This information was then translated to recommendations based on the strength of the available literature. This guideline series yielded some level 2 recommendations and a greater number of level 3 recommendations directed at the management of VS. Importantly, in some cases, a number of well-designed questions and subsequent searches did not yield information that allowed creation of a meaningful and justifiable recommendation. This series of guidelines was constructed to assess the most current and clinically relevant evidence for the management of VS. They set a benchmark regarding the current evidence base for this type of tumor while also highlighting important key areas for future basic and clinical research, particularly on those topics for which no recommendations could be formulated.  The full guidelines can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  13. Evaluation of the International Consensus Guidelines for the Surgical Resection of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Mariko; Araki, Kenichiro; Saito, Fumiyoshi; Kubo, Norio; Watanabe, Akira; Igarashi, Takamichi; Ishii, Norihiro; Yamanaka, Takahiro; Shirabe, Ken; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2018-04-01

    International consensus guidelines for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) were revised in 2012. We aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of each predictor in the 2006 and 2012 guidelines and validate the diagnostic value and surgical indications. Forty-two patients with surgically resected IPMNs were included. Each predictor was applied to evaluate its diagnostic value. The 2012 guidelines had greater accuracy for invasive carcinoma than the 2006 guidelines (64.3 vs. 31.0%). Moreover, the accuracy for high-grade dysplasia was also increased (48.6 vs. 77.1%). When the main pancreatic duct (MPD) size ≥8 mm was substituted for MPD size ≥10 mm in the 2012 guidelines, the accuracy for high-grade dysplasia was 80.0%. The 2012 guidelines exhibited increased diagnostic accuracy for invasive IPMN. It is important to consider surgical resection prior to invasive carcinoma, and high-risk stigmata might be a useful diagnostic criterion. Furthermore, MPD size ≥8 mm may be predictive of high-grade dysplasia.

  14. ESMO Consensus conferences : guidelines on malignant lymphoma. part 2: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyling, M.; Thieblemont, C.; Gallamini, A.; Arcaini, L.; Campo, E.; Hermine, O.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; Ladetto, M.; Le Gouill, S.; Iannitto, E.; Pileri, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wotherspoon, A.; Zinzani, P.; Zucca, E.

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organizes consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. In this setting, a consensus conference on the management of lymphoma was held on 18 June 2011 in Lugano, next to the 11th International

  15. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  16. Are we there yet? The state of the evidence base for guidelines on breaking bad news to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, C L; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, R W; Douglas, H; Webb, G

    2009-11-01

    The way clinicians break bad news to cancer patients has been retrospectively associated with poor psychosocial outcomes for patients. Education and practice in breaking bad news may be ineffective for improving patients' well-being unless it is informed by a sound evidence base. In the health field, research efforts are expected to advance evidence over time to inform evidence-based practice. Key characteristics of an advancing evidence base are a predominance of new data, and rigorous intervention studies which prospectively demonstrate improved outcomes. This review aimed to examine the progress of the evidence base in breaking bad news to cancer patients. Manual and computer-based searches (Medline and PsycINFO) were performed to identify publications on the topic of breaking bad news to cancer patients published between January 1995 and March 2009. Relevant publications were coded in terms of whether they provided new data, examined psychosocial outcomes for patients or tested intervention strategies and whether intervention studies met criteria for design rigour. Of the 245 relevant publications, 55.5% provided new data and 16.7% were intervention studies. Much of the intervention effort was directed towards improving provider skills rather than patient outcomes (9.8% of studies). Less than 2% of publications were rigorous intervention studies which addressed psychosocial outcomes for patients. Rigorous intervention studies which evaluate strategies for improving psychosocial outcomes in relation to breaking bad news to cancer patients are needed. Current practice and training regarding breaking bad news cannot be regarded as evidence-based until further research is completed.

  17. WSES consensus conference: Guidelines for first-line management of intra-abdominal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppaniemi Ari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intra-abdominal infections are still associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of patients with intra-abdominal infections may be an important factor in the quality of care. The presence of a team of health professionals from various disciplines, working in concert, may improve efficiency, outcome, and the cost of care. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES Consensus Conference was held in Bologna on July 2010, during the 1st congress of the WSES, involving surgeons, infectious disease specialists, pharmacologists, radiologists and intensivists with the goal of defining recommendations for the early management of intra-abdominal infections. This document represents the executive summary of the final guidelines approved by the consensus conference.

  18. The diagnostic work up of growth failure in secondary health care; An evaluation of consensus guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Friedo W

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As abnormal growth might be the first manifestation of undetected diseases, it is important to have accurate referral criteria and a proper diagnostic work-up. In the present paper we evaluate the diagnostic work-up in secondary health care according to existing consensus guidelines and study the frequency of underlying medical disorders. Methods Data on growth and additional diagnostic procedures were collected from medical records of new patients referred for short stature to the outpatient clinics of the general paediatric departments of two hospitals (Erasmus MC – Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam and Spaarne Hospital, Haarlem between January 1998 and December 2002. As the Dutch Consensus Guideline (DCG is the only guideline addressing referral criteria as well as diagnostic work-up, the analyses were based on its seven auxological referral criteria to determine the characteristics of children who are incorrectly referred and the adequacy of workup of those who are referred. Results Twenty four percent of children older than 3 years were inappropriately referred (NCR. Of the correctly referred children 74–88% were short corrected for parental height, 40–61% had a height SDS Conclusion Existing guidelines for workup of children with suspected growth failure are poorly implemented. Although poorly implemented the DCG detects at least 5% pathologic causes of growth failure in children referred for short stature. New guidelines for referral are required with a better sensitivity and specificity, wherein distance to target height should get more attention. The general diagnostic work up for short stature should include testing for celiac disease in all children and for Turner syndrome in girls.

  19. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  20. Consensus guidelines on plasma cell myeloma minimal residual disease analysis and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroz, Maria; Came, Neil; Lin, Pei; Chen, Weina; Yuan, Constance; Lagoo, Anand; Monreal, Mariela; de Tute, Ruth; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Rawstron, Andy C; Paiva, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Major heterogeneity between laboratories in flow cytometry (FC) minimal residual disease (MRD) testing in multiple myeloma (MM) must be overcome. Cytometry societies such as the International Clinical Cytometry Society and the European Society for Clinical Cell Analysis recognize a strong need to establish minimally acceptable requirements and recommendations to perform such complex testing. A group of 11 flow cytometrists currently performing FC testing in MM using different instrumentation, panel designs (≥ 6-color) and analysis software compared the procedures between their respective laboratories and reviewed the literature to propose a consensus guideline on flow-MRD analysis and reporting in MM. Consensus guidelines support i) the use of minimum of five initial gating parameters (CD38, CD138, CD45, forward, and sideward light scatter) within the same aliquot for accurate identification of the total plasma cell compartment; ii) the analysis of potentially aberrant phenotypic markers and to report the antigen expression pattern on neoplastic plasma cells as being reduced, normal or increased, when compared to a normal reference plasma cell immunophenotype (obtained using the same instrument and parameters); and iii) the percentage of total bone marrow plasma cells plus the percentages of both normal and neoplastic plasma cells within the total bone marrow plasma cell compartment, and over total bone marrow cells. Consensus guidelines on minimal current and future MRD analyses should target a lower limit of detection of 0.001%, and ideally a limit of quantification of 0.001%, which requires at least 3 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(6) bone marrow cells to be measured, respectively. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  1. European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants - 2010 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the perinatal management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), controversies still exist. We report the updated recommendations of a European panel of expert neonatologists who had developed consensus guidelines after critical examination of the most up-to-date....... For babies with RDS to have best outcomes, it is essential that they have optimal supportive care, including maintenance of a normal body temperature, proper fluid management, good nutritional support, management of the ductus arteriosus and support of the circulation to maintain adequate tissue perfusion....

  2. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löhr, J. Matthias; Dominguez-Munoz, Enrique; Rosendahl, Jonas; Besselink, Marc; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Haas, Stephan; Akisik, Fatih; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Keller, Jutta; Boermeester, Marja; Werner, Jens; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Fockens, Paul; Drewes, Asbjorn; Ceyhan, Gürlap; Lindkvist, Björn; Drenth, Joost; Ewald, Nils; Hardt, Philip; de Madaria, Enrique; Witt, Heiko; Schneider, Alexander; Manfredi, Riccardo; Brøndum, Frøkjer J.; Rudolf, Sasa; Bollen, Thomas; Bruno, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background:There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  3. United European Gastroenterology evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pancreatitis (HaPanEU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohr, J.M.; Dominguez-Munoz, E.; Rosendahl, J.; Besselink, M.; Mayerle, J.; Lerch, M.M.; Haas, S.; Akisik, F.; Kartalis, N.; Iglesias-Garcia, J.; Keller, J.; Boermeester, M.; Werner, J.; Dumonceau, J.M.; Fockens, P.; Drewes, A.; Ceyhan, G.; Lindkvist, B.; Drenth, J.P.; Ewald, N.; Hardt, P.; Madaria, E. de; Witt, H.; Schneider, A.; Manfredi, R.; Brondum, F.J.; Rudolf, S.; Bollen, T.; Bruno, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been substantial improvements in the management of chronic pancreatitis, leading to the publication of several national guidelines during recent years. In collaboration with United European Gastroenterology, the working group on 'Harmonizing diagnosis and treatment of chronic

  4. The impact of evidence-based sepsis guidelines on emergency department clinical practice: a pre-post medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Bernadine; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael

    2017-11-01

    To explore the number of patients presenting with sepsis before and after guideline implementation; the impact of sepsis guidelines on triage assessment, emergency department management and time to antibiotics. Sepsis remains one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity within hospitals. Globally, strategies have been implemented to reduce morbidity and mortality rates, which rely on the early recognition and management of sepsis. To improve patient outcomes, the New South Wales government in Australia introduced sepsis guidelines into emergency departments. However, the impact of the guidelines on clinical practice remains unclear. A 12-month pre-post retrospective randomised medical record audit of adult patients with a sepsis diagnosis. Data were extracted from the emergency department database and paper medical record. Data included patient demographic (age, gender), clinical information (time of arrival, triage code, seen by time, disposition, time to antibiotic, pathology, time to intravenous fluids) and patient assessment data (heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature, oxygen saturations, medication). This study demonstrated a statistically significant 230-minute reduction in time to antibiotics post implementation of the guidelines. The post group (n = 165) received more urgent triage categories (n = 81; 49·1%), a 758-minute reduction in mean time to second litre of intravenous fluids and an improvement in collection of lactate (n = 112, 67·9%), also statistically significant. The findings highlight the impact the guidelines can have on clinician decision-making and behaviour that support best practice and positive patient outcomes. The sepsis guidelines improved the early assessment, recognition and management of patients presenting with sepsis in one tertiary referral emergency department. The use of evidenced-based guidelines can impact clinical decision-making and behaviour, resulting in the translation and support of

  5. Results of an Integrative Analysis: A Call for Contextualizing HIV and AIDS Clinical Practice Guidelines to Support Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nancy; Kahwa, Eulalia; Hoogeveen, Katie

    2017-12-01

    should include more explicit advice on adapting their recommendations to different care conditions. © 2017 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  6. A critical appraisal of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris: 'AGREE-ing' on a common base for European evidence-based psoriasis treatment guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nast, A.; Spuls, Ph; Ormerod, A. D.; Reytan, N.; Saiag, P. H.; Smith, C. H.; Rzany, B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To further improve the standard of care provided to psoriasis patients in Europe, the European Dermatology Forum and the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology have initiated a project to develop common European psoriasis guidelines. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to assess the

  7. Clinical Guidelines for Management of Bone Health in Rett Syndrome Based on Expert Consensus and Available Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jefferson, Amanda; Leonard, Helen; Siafarikas, Aris

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We developed clinical guidelines for the management of bone health in Rett syndrome through evidence review and the consensus of an expert panel of clinicians. METHODS: An initial guidelines draft was created which included statements based upon literature review and 11 open-ended que...

  8. Radiotherapy fractionation for the palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases – an evidence-based practice guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jackson Sai-Yiu; Wong, Rebecca KS; Lloyd, Nancy S; Johnston, Mary; Bezjak, Andrea; Whelan, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    This practice guideline was developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in Ontario on the preferred standard radiotherapy fractionation schedule for the treatment of painful bone metastases. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed and published elsewhere. The Supportive Care Guidelines Group, a multidisciplinary guideline development panel, formulated clinical recommendations based on their interpretation of the evidence. In addition to evidence from clinical trials, the panel also considered patient convenience and ease of administration of palliative radiotherapy. External review of the draft report by Ontario practitioners was obtained through a mailed survey, and final approval was obtained from the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. Meta-analysis did not detect a significant difference in complete or overall pain relief between single treatment and multifraction palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. Fifty-nine Ontario practitioners responded to the mailed survey (return rate 62%). Forty-two percent also returned written comments. Eighty-three percent of respondents agreed with the interpretation of the evidence and 75% agreed that the report should be approved as a practice guideline. Minor revisions were made based on feedback from the external reviewers and the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. The Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee approved the final practice guideline report. For adult patients with single or multiple radiographically confirmed bone metastases of any histology corresponding to painful areas in previously non-irradiated areas without pathologic fractures or spinal cord/cauda equine compression, we conclude that: • Where the treatment objective is pain relief, a single 8 Gy treatment, prescribed to the appropriate target volume, is recommended as the standard dose-fractionation schedule for the treatment of symptomatic and uncomplicated bone metastases. Several factors frequently

  9. Radiotherapy fractionation for the palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases – an evidence-based practice guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezjak Andrea

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This practice guideline was developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in Ontario on the preferred standard radiotherapy fractionation schedule for the treatment of painful bone metastases. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed and published elsewhere. The Supportive Care Guidelines Group, a multidisciplinary guideline development panel, formulated clinical recommendations based on their interpretation of the evidence. In addition to evidence from clinical trials, the panel also considered patient convenience and ease of administration of palliative radiotherapy. External review of the draft report by Ontario practitioners was obtained through a mailed survey, and final approval was obtained from the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. Results Meta-analysis did not detect a significant difference in complete or overall pain relief between single treatment and multifraction palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. Fifty-nine Ontario practitioners responded to the mailed survey (return rate 62%. Forty-two percent also returned written comments. Eighty-three percent of respondents agreed with the interpretation of the evidence and 75% agreed that the report should be approved as a practice guideline. Minor revisions were made based on feedback from the external reviewers and the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. The Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee approved the final practice guideline report. Conclusion For adult patients with single or multiple radiographically confirmed bone metastases of any histology corresponding to painful areas in previously non-irradiated areas without pathologic fractures or spinal cord/cauda equine compression, we conclude that: • Where the treatment objective is pain relief, a single 8 Gy treatment, prescribed to the appropriate target volume, is recommended as the standard dose-fractionation schedule for the treatment of symptomatic and

  10. Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Sarkar, Chitra; Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Chatterjee, Sandip; Shirsat, Neelam; Muzumdar, Dattatreya; Pungavkar, Sona; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Jalali, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    The high success rate in the management medulloblastoma achieved in the western world is not exactly mirrored in developing countries including India. Socio-demographic differences, health-care disparity, and lack in uniformity of care with resultant widespread variations in the clinical practice are some of the reasons that may partly explain this difference in outcomes. Patients with medulloblastoma require a multi-disciplinary team approach involving but not limited to neuro-radiology, neurosurgery; neuropathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, pediatric medical oncology and rehabilitative services for optimizing outcomes. The Indian Society of Neuro-Oncology (ISNO) constituted an expert multi-disciplinary panel with adequate representation from all stakeholders to prepare national consensus guidelines for the contemporary management of medulloblastoma. Minimum desirable, as well as preferable though optional recommendations (as appropriate), were developed and adopted for the pre-surgical work-up including neuroimaging; neurosurgical management including surgical principles, techniques, and complications; neuropathology reporting and molecular testing; contemporary risk-stratification in the molecular era; appropriate adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy and chemotherapy); and follow-up schedule in medulloblastoma. The current document represents a broad consensus reached amongst various stakeholders within the neuro-oncology community involved in the contemporary curative-intent management of children with medulloblastoma. It provides both general as well as specific guidelines and recommendations to be adopted by physicians and health care providers across India to achieve uniformity of care, improve disease-related outcomes, and compare results between institutions within the country.

  11. National guidelines for high-cost drugs in Brazil: achievements and constraints of an innovative national evidence-based public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon, Paulo D; Beltrame, Alberto; Banta, David

    2013-04-01

    The translation of best evidence into practice has become an important purpose of policy making in health care. In Brazil, a country of continental dimensions with widespread regional and social inequalities, the dissemination and use of the best-evidence in policy making is a critical issue for the healthcare system. The main purpose of this study is to describe an evidence-based public health policy with special emphasis on guidelines creation for high-cost medicines. We also describe how that strategy was diffused to the judiciary system and to other parts of the healthcare system. We present an 11-year follow-up of a national project for creating and updating guidelines for high-cost medicines in Brazil. A total of 109 national guidelines were published (new or updated versions) for 66 selected diseases, the first such effort in Brazilian history. The project influenced the Brazilian legislature, which has recently established a Federal Law requiring national guidelines for any new technology listed for payment by the Brazilian public healthcare system. We were able to involve many different stakeholders in a partnership between academia and policy makers, which made possible the widespread dissemination of the clinical practice guidelines. Problems and constraints were also encountered. This evolving public health strategy might be useful for other developing countries.

  12. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  13. Evidence- and consensus-based practice guidelines for the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass, R; Longstreth, G F; Pimentel, M; Fullerton, S; Russak, S M; Chiou, C F; Reyes, E; Crane, P; Eisen, G; McCarberg, B; Ofman, J

    2001-09-24

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) presents a significant diagnostic and management challenge for primary care practitioners. Improving the accuracy and timeliness of diagnosis may result in improved quality and efficiency of care. To systematically appraise the existing diagnostic criteria and combine the evidence with expert opinion to derive evidence- and consensus-based guidelines for a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IBS. We performed a systematic literature review (January 1966-April 2000) of computerized bibliographic databases. Articles meeting explicit inclusion criteria for diagnostic studies in IBS were subjected to critical appraisal, which formed the basis of guideline statements presented to an expert panel. To develop a diagnostic algorithm, an expert panel of specialists and primary care physicians was used to fill in gaps in the literature. Consensus was developed using a modified Delphi technique. The systematic literature review identified only 13 published studies regarding the effectiveness of competing diagnostic approaches for IBS, the accuracy of diagnostic tests, and the internal validity of current diagnostic symptom criteria. Few studies met accepted methodological criteria. While symptom criteria have been validated, the utility of endoscopic and other diagnostic interventions remains unknown. An analysis of the literature, combined with consensus from experienced clinicians, resulted in the development of a diagnostic algorithm relevant to primary care that emphasizes a symptom-based diagnostic approach, refers patients with alarm symptoms to subspecialists, and reserves radiographic, endoscopic, and other tests for referral cases. The resulting algorithm highlights the reliance on symptom criteria and comprises a primary module, 3 submodules based on the predominant symptom pattern (constipation, diarrhea, and pain) and severity level, and a subspecialist referral module. The dearth of available evidence highlights the need

  14. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  15. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  16. Cost Analysis of a Surgical Consensus Guideline in Breast-Conserving Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jennifer; Elmore, Leisha C; Cyr, Amy E; Aft, Rebecca L; Gillanders, William E; Margenthaler, Julie A

    2017-08-01

    The Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology consensus statement was the first professional guideline in breast oncology to declare "no ink on tumor" as a negative margin in patients with stages I/II breast cancer undergoing breast-conservation therapy. We sought to analyze the financial impact of this guideline at our institution using a historic cohort. We identified women undergoing re-excision after breast-conserving surgery for invasive breast cancer from 2010 through 2013 using a prospectively maintained institutional database. Clinical and billing data were extracted from the medical record and from administrative resources using CPT codes. Descriptive statistics were used in data analysis. Of 254 women in the study population, 238 (93.7%) had stage I/II disease and 182 (71.7%) had invasive disease with ductal carcinoma in situ. A subcohort of 83 patients (32.7%) who underwent breast-conservation therapy for stage I/II disease without neoadjuvant chemotherapy had negative margins after the index procedure, per the Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology guideline. The majority had invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 70 [84.3%]) and had invasive disease (n = 45 [54.2%]), and/or ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 49 [59.0%]) within 1 mm of the specimen margin. Seventy-nine patients underwent 1 re-excision and 4 patients underwent 2 re-excisions, accounting for 81 hours of operative time. Considering facility fees and primary surgeon billing alone, the overall estimated cost reduction would have been $195,919, or $2,360 per affected patient, under the guideline recommendations. Implementation of the Society of Surgical Oncology and American Society of Radiation Oncology consensus guideline holds great potential to optimize resource use. Application of the guideline to a retrospective cohort at our institution would have decreased the overall re-excision rate by 5.6% and reduced costs by nearly $200

  17. Introduction to the special section on developing guidelines for the evidence-based assessment (EBA) of adult disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsley, John; Mash, Eric J

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this special section is to encourage greater awareness of evidence-based assessment (EBA) in the development of a scientifically supported clinical psychology. In this introductory article, the authors describe the elements that authors in this special section were asked to consider in their focused reviews (including the scope of available psychometric evidence, advancements in psychopathology research, and evidence of attention to factors such as gender, age, and ethnicity in measure validation). The authors then present central issues evident in the articles that deal with anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and couple distress and in the accompanying commentaries. The authors conclude by presenting key themes emerging from the articles in this special section, including gaps in psychometric information, limited information about the utility of assessment, the discrepancy between recommended EBAs and current training and practice, and the need for further data on the process of clinical assessment.

  18. Effects of Performance Feedback Reports on Adherence to Evidence-Based Guidelines in Use of CT for Evaluation of Pulmonary Embolism in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Ali S; Ip, Ivan K; Dunne, Ruth M; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Mills, Angela M; Khorasani, Ramin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether implementing emergency department (ED) physician performance feedback reports improves adherence to evidence-based guidelines for use of CT for evaluation of pulmonary embolism (PE) beyond that achieved with clinical decision support (CDS) alone. This prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013, at an urban level 1 adult trauma center ED. Attending physicians were stratified into quartiles by use of CT for evaluation of PE in 2012 and were randomized to receive quarterly feedback reporting or not, beginning January 2013. Reports consisted of individual and anonymized group data on guideline adherence (using the Wells criteria), use of CT for PE (number of CT examinations for PE per 1000 patients), and yield (percentage of CT examinations for PE with positive findings). We compared guideline adherence (primary outcome) and use and yield (secondary outcomes) of CT for PE between the control and intervention groups in 2013 and with historical imaging data from 2012. Of 109,793 ED patients during the control and intervention periods, 2167 (2.0%) underwent CT for evaluation of PE. In the control group, guideline adherence remained unchanged between 2012 (78.8% [476/604]) and 2013 (77.2% [421/545]) (p = 0.5); in the intervention group, guideline adherence increased 8.8% after feedback report implementation, from 78.3% (426/544) to 85.2% (404/474) (p guidelines for use of CT for evaluation of PE in ED patients, enhancing the impact of CDS alone. These results suggest potentially synergistic effects of traditional performance improvement tools with CDS to improve guideline adherence.

  19. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindson, Benjamin R.; Turner, Sandra L.; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2012-01-01

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  20. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder : A revision of the 2005 guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Anderson, Ian M.; Nutt, David J.; Allgulander, Christer; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan A.; Christmas, David M.; Davies, Simon; Fineberg, Naomi; Lidbetter, Nicky; Malizia, Andrea; McCrone, Paul; Nabarro, Daniel; O'Neill, Catherine; Scott, Jan; van der Wee, Nic; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    This revision of the 2005 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines for the evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders provides an update on key steps in diagnosis and clinical management, including recognition, acute treatment, longer-term treatment, combination

  1. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  2. Management consensus guideline for hepatocellular carcinoma: 2016 updated by the Taiwan Liver Cancer Association and the Gastroenterological Society of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Lu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in Taiwan. To help clinical physicians to manage patients with HCC, the Taiwan Liver Cancer Association and the Gastroenterological Society of Taiwan produced the management consensus guideline for HCC. Methods: The recommendations focus on nine important issues on management of HCC, including surveillance, diagnosis, staging, surgery, local ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/transarterial radioembolization/hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, systemic therapy, radiotherapy, and prevention. Results: The consensus statements were discussed, debated and got consensus in each expert team. And then the statements were sent to all of the experts for further discussion and refinement. Finally, all of the experts were invited to vote for the statements, including the level of evidence and recommendation. Conclusion: With the development of the management consensus guideline, HCC patients could benefit from the optimal therapeutic modality. Keywords: Diagnosis, Hepatocellular carcinoma, Staging, Surveillance, Treatment

  3. Guideline adherence for pharmacotherapy of chronic systolic heart failure in general practice: a closer look on evidence-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Klimm, F; Müller-Tasch, T; Schellberg, D; Remppis, A; Barth, A; Holzapfel, N; Jünger, J; Herzog, W; Szecsenyi, J

    2008-04-01

    There is robust evidence for effective pharmacotherapy of chronic (systolic) heart failure (CHF) which has led to the creation of guidelines, but many surveys evaluating CHF treatment show an under-utilisation of relevant drugs, while setting and patient population appear to be crucial for adequate appraisal of treatment patterns. To evaluate the guideline adherence (GA) of general practitioners (GPs) in a well-defined patient population with CHF in primary care (PC). A cross-sectional analysis was performed with the data of 167 patients enrolled in 37 GP practices (Germany) with documented left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVEF: 33.3 +/- 6.9%). GA was assessed as usual (prescribing "yes" or "no"), through evaluation of target dosing, while adjusting for potential clinical contraindications, and through a modified Guideline Adherence Indicator-3 (mGAI-3), which assesses three relevant groups of substances according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class: ACE-Inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), beta-blockers (BB) and aldosterone-antagonists (AA). Prescription rates for ACE-I/ARB, BB or both were 80%, 75% and 62%, respectively. The proportion of target doses reached for ACE-I was 16%, for BB only 8%. When adjusted for potential (mainly relative) contraindications (COPD, heart rate <60/min, hypotension, hyperkalaemia and renal dysfunction), the percentage of target doses reached increased to 49% for ACE-I/ARBs and 46% for BB. Application of the mGAI-3 showed moderate to perfect GA for usual assessment, proportion of target dose reached and adjusted in 83%, 16% and 55% of the patients, respectively. In the context of this patient and doctor setting, life-saving treatment was provided above average when assessed by usual criteria. The application of additional criteria showed further room for improvement. Future interventions aiming at optimisation should be tailored to the needs of doctors and patients likewise.

  4. Evidence-based concepts and procedures for bonded inlays and onlays. Part II. Guidelines for cavity preparation and restoration fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Rizcalla, Nicolas; Krejci, Ivo; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this article series presents an evidence-based update of clinical protocols and procedures for cavity preparation and restoration selection for bonded inlays and onlays. More than ever, tissue conservation dictates preparation concepts, even though some minimal dimensions still have to be considered for all restorative materials. In cases of severe bruxism or tooth fragilization, CAD/CAM composite resins or pressed CAD/CAM lithium disilicate glass ceramics are often recommended, although this choice relies mainly on scarce in vitro research as there is still a lack of medium- to long-term clinical evidence. The decision about whether or not to cover a cusp can only be made after a multifactorial analysis, which includes cavity dimensions and the resulting tooth biomechanical status, as well as occlusal and esthetic factors. The clinical impact of the modern treatment concepts that were outlined in the previous article - Dual Bonding (DB)/Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS), Cavity Design Optimization (CDO), and Cervical Margins Relocation (CMR) - are described in detail in this article and discussed in light of existing clinical and scientific evidence for simpler, more predictable, and more durable results. Despite the wide choice of restorative materials (composite resin or ceramic) and techniques (classical or CAD/CAM), the cavity for an indirect restoration should meet five objective criteria before the impression.

  5. 161: BRIDGING BETWEEN PATIENTS PREFERENCE AND EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE ACCORDING TO GUIDELINES IN OSTEOARTHRITIS MANAGEMENT: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behshid, Mozhgan; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Irajpoor, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Osteoarthritis is the major cause of disability worldwide that causes significant problems in activities of daily living and deeply affects the quality of life. Osteoarthritis is predicted to become one of the major causes of disability in future that necessitates comprehensive global plans for resolving this health issue in accordance with patients' local culture, beliefs and attitudes. This study was a part of PhD dissertation that was conducted to carry out an in-depth examination of the experiences of patients with OA about their use of strategies for the OA self-management and compare them with scientific evidences. Methods The present qualitative study was conducted using a conventional content analysis approach on 33participantincluding patients with OA, their family members and healthcare personnel who were selected by purposive sampling. Data were collected through unstructured and semi-structured interviews and continued until data saturation occurred. Data analysis was carried out simultaneously. Guba and Lincoln's standards of rigor and trustworthiness were respected including the credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability of the data. A narrative systematic review was conducted on osteoarthritis care guidelines and algorithms in order to compare patients' preference with scientific evidences. Results The analysis of the data revealed four main categories, including: Conservative approach in selecting treatment modalities, trend toward traditional treatment, Preferring complementary and alternative medicine, and concerns and barriers treatment modalities. The review of literature demonstrated little attention by professionals to the patients' values or priorities. Comparing of the modalities that were preferred by patients with scientific guidelines indicated some inconsistencies. Conclusion Patient's perceptions, preference, and adherence to treatment, play an essential role in relieving nagging symptoms and

  6. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  7. Can current analytical quality performance of UK clinical laboratories support evidence-based guidelines for diabetes and ischaemic heart disease?--A pilot study and a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Nuthar; Yundt-Pacheco, John; Jansen, Rob; Thomas, Annette; Barth, Julian H

    2013-08-01

    The implementation of national and international guidelines is beginning to standardise clinical practice. However, since many guidelines have decision limits based on laboratory tests, there is an urgent need to ensure that different laboratories obtain the same analytical result on any sample. A scientifically-based quality control process will be a pre-requisite to provide this level of analytical performance which will support evidence-based guidelines and movement of patients across boundaries while maintaining standardised outcomes. We discuss the finding of a pilot study performed to assess UK clinical laboratories readiness to work to a higher grade quality specifications such as biological variation-based quality specifications. Internal quality control (IQC) data for HbA1c, glucose, creatinine, cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol were collected from UK laboratories participating in the Bio-Rad Unity QC programme. The median of the coefficient of variation (CV%) of the participating laboratories was evaluated against the CV% based on biological variation. Except creatinine, the other four analytes had a variable degree of compliance with the biological variation-based quality specifications. More than 75% of the laboratories met the biological variation-based quality specifications for glucose, cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol. Slightly over 50% of the laboratories met the analytical goal for HBA1c. Only one analyte (cholesterol) had a performance achieving the higher quality specifications consistent with 5σ. Our data from IQC do not consistently demonstrate that the results from clinical laboratories meet evidence-based quality specifications. Therefore, we propose that a graded scale of quality specifications may be needed at this stage.

  8. Report from AmSECT's International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion: American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Standards and Guidelines for Perfusion Practice: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert A; Bronson, Shahna L; Dickinson, Timothy A; Fitzgerald, David C; Likosky, Donald S; Mellas, Nicholas B; Shann, Kenneth G

    2013-09-01

    One of the roles of a professional society is to develop standards and guidelines of practice as an instrument to guide safe and effective patient care. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) first published its Essentials for Perfusion Practice, Clinical Function: Conduct of Extracorporeal Circulation in 1993. The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion (ICEBP), a committee within AmSECT, was tasked with updating this document in 2010. The aim of this report is to describe the method of development and content of AmSECT's new professional standards and guidelines. The ICEBP committee independently evaluated and provided input regarding the current "Essentials and Guidelines." Structural changes were made to the entire document, and a draft document was developed, presented, and circulated to the AmSECT Board of Directors and broader membership for comment. Informed by these reviews, a revised document was then presented to the Society for a membership vote. The final document consists of 15 areas of practice covered by 50 Standards and 38 Guidelines (see Appendix 1) with the first standard focusing on the development of institutional protocols to support their implementation and use. A majority of the membership voted to accept the document (81.2% of the voting membership accepting, 18.8% rejecting). After an audit of the balloting process by AmSECT's Ethics Committee, the results were reported to the membership and the document was officially adopted on July 24, 2013. The Standards and Guidelines will serve as a useful guide for cardiac surgical teams that wish to develop institution-specific standards and guidelines to improve the reliability, safety, and effectiveness of adult cardiopulmonary bypass. The ICEBP recognizes that the development of a Standards and Guidelines statement alone will not change care. Safe, reliable, and effective care will be best served through the development and implementation of institutional

  9. Guidelines for the ethical use of neuroimages in medical testimony: report of a multidisciplinary consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, C C; Sze, G; Rommelfanger, K S; Kinlaw, K; Banja, J D; Wolpe, P R

    2014-04-01

    With rapid advances in neuroimaging technology, there is growing concern over potential misuse of neuroradiologic imaging data in legal matters. On December 7 and 8, 2012, a multidisciplinary consensus conference, Use and Abuse of Neuroimaging in the Courtroom, was held at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Through this interactive forum, a highly select group of experts-including neuroradiologists, neurologists, forensic psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, neuroscientists, legal scholars, imaging statisticians, judges, practicing attorneys, and neuroethicists-discussed the complex issues involved in the use of neuroimaging data entered into legal evidence and for associated expert testimony. The specific contexts of criminal cases, child abuse, and head trauma were especially considered. The purpose of the conference was to inform the development of guidelines on expert testimony for the American Society of Neuroradiology and to provide principles for courts on the ethical use of neuroimaging data as evidence. This report summarizes the conference and resulting recommendations.

  10. Developing the Australasian Hepatology Association's Consensus-based Guidelines for the Nursing Care of Patients with Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jacqueline; Wheeler, Emily; Warner, Sherryne; Mason, Susan

    2014-05-03

    Abstract Purpose: Hepatology nursing is an emerging speciality. To define best practice, the Australasian Hepatology Association developed consensus-based guidelines for the nursing care of patients with liver disease. Methods: Using the Delphi technique, six rounds of consultation were conducted with Australian hepatology nurses and non-nursing hepatology professionals. Input was captured through face-to-face and electronic communication and questionnaires. Results: The experts' opinions were collated and consensus on the delivery of hepatology nursing care was achieved. In total, 90 consensus guidelines were developed. The principles underpinning the Guidelines include patient-centred care, non-discriminatory practice, cultural competence, collaboration and partnership and working within own scope of practice. Conclusion: Internationally, the Australasian Hepatology Association Guidelines are the first to document a consensus on the scope of hepatology nursing practice. The Guidelines reflect the expansion of hepatology nursing, from viral hepatitis to caring for patients with advanced liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, and provides a framework for future nursing practice.

  11. Suicide first aid guidelines for Sri Lanka: a Delphi consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Saranga A; Colucci, Erminia; Mendis, Jayan; Kelly, Claire M; Jorm, Anthony F; Minas, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka has one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Gatekeeper programs aimed at specific target groups could be a promising suicide prevention strategy in the country. The aim of this study was to develop guidelines that help members of the public to provide first aid to persons in Sri Lanka who are at risk of suicide. The Delphi method was used to elicit consensus on potential helping statements to include in the guidelines. These statements describe information members of the public should have and actions they can take to help a person who is experiencing suicidal thoughts. An expert panel, comprised of mental health and suicide experts in Sri Lanka, rated each statement. The panellists were encouraged to suggest any additional action that was not included in the original questionnaire and, in particular, to include items that were culturally appropriate or gender specific. Responses to open-ended questions were used to generate new items. These items were included in the subsequent Delphi rounds. Three Delphi rounds were carried out. Statements were accepted for inclusion in the guidelines if they were endorsed (rated as essential or important) by at least 80 % of the panel. Statements endorsed by 70-79 % of the panel were re-rated in the following round. Statements with less than 70 % endorsement, or re-rated items that did not receive 80 % or higher endorsement were rejected. The output from the Delphi process was a set of endorsed statements. In the first round questionnaire 473 statements were presented to the panel and 58 new items were generated from responses to the open-ended questions. Of the total 531 statements presented, 304 were endorsed. These statements were used to develop the suicide first aid guidelines for Sri Lanka. By engaging Sri Lankans who are experts in the field of mental health or suicide this research developed culturally appropriate guidelines for providing mental health first aid to a person at risk of suicide in Sri

  12. Using anti-muscarinic drugs in the management of death rattle: evidence-based guidelines for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mike; Lucas, Viv; Brennan, Mary; Hughes, Andrew; O'Donnell, Valerie; Wee, Bee

    2002-09-01

    The management of 'death rattle' was reviewed by a task group on behalf of the Association for Palliative Medicine's Science Committee. Evidence was searched for the effectiveness of various anti-muscarinic drugs in drying oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions in dying patients. Clinical guidelines were constructed based on evidence from volunteer and clinical studies. Death rattle occurs in half of all dying patients and some response occurs in around 80% of treated patients. Clinical studies demonstrate that subcutaneous hyoscine hydrobromide 400 microg is more effective at improving symptoms at 30 min than glycopyrronium 200 microg by the same route. Volunteer studies demonstrate that intramuscular glycopyrronium 400 microg is as effective in drying secretions at 30 min as a dose of 200 microg given intravenously. Duration of response is shortest for hyoscine butylbromide (1 h) and longest for glycopyrronium (more than 6 h). There is insufficient evidence to support the use of one drug over another in a continuous infusion and prescribers should base decisions on different characteristics of each anti-muscarinic drug.

  13. Management of Hepatitis B: A Longitudinal National Survey – Impact of the Canadian Hepatitis B Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marotta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver, and The Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada, jointly developed the Canadian Chronic Hepatitis B (HBV Consensus Guidelines to assist practitioners involved in the management of this complex disease. These guidelines were published in The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology in June 2007 and distributed to all Canadian gastroenterologists and hepatologists.

  14. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  15. What is new since the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L P; Bai, T R; Becker, A; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R; Bowie, D M; Chapman, K R; Côté, J; Cockcroft, D; Ducharme, F M; Ernst, P; FitzGerald, J M; Kovesi, T; Hodder, R V; O'Byrne, P; Rowe, B; Sears, M R; Simons, F E; Spier, S

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999) Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children's Asthma Management Project (CAMP) study, are discussed.

  16. What Is New Since the Last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children’s Asthma Management Project (CAMP study, are discussed.

  17. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on treatment strategies for localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werier, Joel; Yao, Xiaomei; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; di Primio, Gina; Ghert, Michelle; Gupta, Abha A; Kandel, Rita; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-06-01

    (1) To provide recommendations regarding the choice of surgery, radiation therapy (RT), or the combination of surgery plus RT in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (2) To determine the appropriate surgical planning imaging (pre-chemotherapy magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or post-chemotherapy MRI) to identify optimal resection margins in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who undergo surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1999 to February 2015), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2012 to January 2015) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. 1. Recommendation (1) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: (a) Surgery alone or RT alone are two reasonable treatment options; the combination of surgery plus RT is not recommended as an initial treatment option. (b) The local treatment for an individual patient should be decided by a multidisciplinary tumour board together with the patient after consideration of the following: (1) patient characteristics (e.g., age, tumour location, tumour size, response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and existing comorbidities), (2) the potential benefit weighed against the potential complications from surgery and/or toxicities associated with RT, and (3) patient preferences. 2. Recommendation (2) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who will undergo surgery: (a) Both pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy MRI scans should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. In certain anatomic locations with good chemotherapy response, the post-chemotherapy MRI may be the appropriate imaging modality to plan surgical resection margins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consensus Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in Korea (Part II): Systemic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lew, Bark-Lynn; Lee, Kyung Ho; Hong, Seung Phil; Jang, Yong Hyun; Park, Kui Young; Seo, Seong Jun; Bae, Jung Min; Choi, Eung Ho; Suhr, Ki Beom; Lee, Seung Chul; Ko, Hyun Chang; Park, Young Lip; Son, Sang Wook; Seo, Young Jun; Lee, Yang Won; Cho, Sang Hyun; Park, Chun Wook; Roh, Joo Young

    2015-10-01

    Since the treatment guidelines for atopic dermatitis (AD) were issued by the Korean Atopic Dermatitis Association (KADA) work group in 2006, there have been further advances in the systemic treatment of AD. We aimed to establish updated evidence- and experience-based systemic treatment guidelines for Korean AD. We compiled a database of references from relevant systematic reviews and guidelines regarding the systemic management of AD, including antihistamines, antimicrobials, systemic immunomodulators, allergen-specific immunotherapy, phototherapy, adjunctive treatment, and complementary and alternative medicines. Evidence for each statement was graded and classified based on the strength of the recommendation. Thirty-nine council members of KADA participated in the three rounds of votes and expert consensus recommendations were established. The use of antihistamines is recommended to relieve pruritus and to prevent exacerbation due to scratching in AD patients. Infection should be controlled as needed and long-term medication should be avoided. For moderate to severe AD patients, concomitant active treatments with systemic immunomodulators are indicated. Cyclosporine is the first choice among systemic immunomodulators and others should be considered as second-line alternatives. Allergen-specific immunotherapy could be effective in AD patients with aeroallergen hypersensitivity. Phototherapy can be useful for moderate to severe AD patients and narrow-band ultraviolet B is the most effective option. Complementary and alternative medicines cannot be recommended for treating AD. We expect these recommendations to be a reference guide for physicians and AD patients in choosing the appropriate treatment to improve quality of life and decrease unnecessary social medical costs.

  19. Post-prostatectomy radiation therapy: Consensus guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, Mark A.; Kneebone, Andrew B.; Lehman, Margot; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Tai, Keen-Hun

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Three randomised trials have demonstrated the benefit of adjuvant post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) for high risk patients. Data also documents the effectiveness of salvage radiotherapy following a biochemical relapse post-prostatectomy. The Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised the need to develop consensus guidelines on to whom, when and how to deliver PPRT. Materials and methods: Draft guidelines were developed and refined at a consensus conference in June 2006 attended by 63 delegates where urological, radiotherapy and diagnostic imaging experts spoke on aspects of PPRT. Unresolved issues were further developed by working parties and redistributed until consensus was reached. Results: Central to the recommendations is that patients with positive surgical margins, seminal vesicle invasion and/or extracapsular extension have a high risk of residual local disease and should be informed of the options of either immediate adjuvant radiotherapy or active surveillance with early salvage in the event of biochemical recurrence. Salvage radiotherapy should be instituted at the earliest confirmation of biochemical recurrence. Detailed contouring guidelines have been developed, defining the regions at risk of residual microscopic disease which should be included in the clinical target volume. The recommended doses are 60-64 Gy for adjuvant, and 60-66 Gy for salvage radiotherapy. The role of hormone therapy in conjunction with PPRT is yet to be defined. Conclusions: These consensus guidelines have been developed to give clinical and technical guidance to radiation oncologists and urologists in the management of high risk post-prostatectomy patients

  20. Evidence-based guideline: assessment and management of psychiatric disorders in individuals with MS: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minden, Sarah L; Feinstein, Anthony; Kalb, Rosalind C; Miller, Deborah; Mohr, David C; Patten, Scott B; Bever, Christopher; Schiffer, Randolph B; Gronseth, Gary S; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2014-01-14

    To make evidence-based recommendations for screening, diagnosing, and treating psychiatric disorders in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). We reviewed the literature (1950 to August 2011) and evaluated the available evidence. Clinicians may consider using the Center for Neurologic Study Emotional Lability Scale to screen for pseudobulbar affect (Level C). Clinicians may consider the Beck Depression Inventory and a 2-question tool to screen for depressive disorders and the General Health Questionnaire to screen for broadly defined emotional disturbances (Level C). Evidence is insufficient to support/refute the use of other screening tools, the possibility that somatic/neurovegetative symptoms affect these tools' accuracy, or the use of diagnostic instruments or clinical evaluation procedures for identifying psychiatric disorders in MS (Level U). Clinicians may consider a telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy program for treating depressive symptoms (Level C). Although pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies are widely used to treat depressive and anxiety disorders in individuals with MS, evidence is insufficient to support/refute the use of the antidepressants and individual and group therapies reviewed herein (Level U). For pseudobulbar affect, a combination of dextromethorphan and quinidine may be considered (Level C). Evidence is insufficient to determine the psychiatric effects in individuals with MS of disease-modifying and symptomatic therapies and corticosteroids; risk factors for suicide; and treatment of psychotic disorders (Level U). Research is needed on the effectiveness in individuals with MS of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments frequently used in the non-MS population.

  1. Continuing medical education effect on physician knowledge application and psychomotor skills: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Kevin M; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen J

    2009-03-01

    Recommendations for optimizing continuing medical education (CME) effectiveness in improving physician application of knowledge and psychomotor skills are needed to guide the development of processes that effect physician change and improve patient care. The guideline panel reviewed evidence tables and a comprehensive review of the effectiveness of CME developed by The Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ Evidence Report). The panel considered studies relevant to the effect of CME on physician knowledge application and psychomotor skill development. From the 136 studies identified in the systematic review, 15 articles, 12 addressing physician application of knowledge and 3 addressing psychomotor skills, were identified and reviewed. Recommendations for optimizing CME were developed using the American College of Chest Physicians guideline grading system. The preponderance of evidence demonstrated improvement in physician application of knowledge with CME. The quality of evidence did not allow specific recommendations regarding optimal media or educational techniques or the effectiveness of CME in improving psychomotor skills. CME is effective in improving physician application of knowledge. Multiple exposures and longer durations of CME are recommended to optimize educational outcomes.

  2. Good practice in the management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: clinical guidelines. An evidence-based review with good practice points. EALSC Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Peter Munch; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Dengler, Reinhard; Hardiman, Orla; Kollewe, Katja; Leigh, Peter Nigel; Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Silani, Vincenzo; Tomik, Barbara

    2007-08-01

    The evidence base for diagnosis and management of ALS is still weak, and curative therapy is lacking. Nonetheless, early diagnosis and symptomatic therapy can profoundly influence care and quality of life of the patient and relatives, and may increase survival time. This review addresses the current optimal clinical approach to ALS. The literature search is complete to December 2006. Where there was lack of evidence but consensus was clear we have stated our opinion as good practice points. We conclude that a diagnosis of ALS can be achieved by early examination by an experienced neurologist. The patient should be informed of the diagnosis by the consultant. Following diagnosis, a multi-diciplinary care team should support the patient and relatives. Medication with riluzole should be initiated as early as possible. PEG is associated with improved nutrition and should be inserted early. The operation is hazardous in patients with VC <50%: RIG may be a better alternative. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation improves survival and quality of life but is underused in Europe. Maintaining the patient's ability to communicate is essential. During the course of the disease, every effort should be made to maintain patient autonomy. Advance directives for palliative end of life care are important and should be discussed early with the patient and relatives if they so wish.

  3. Summary of evidence-based guideline: complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Bever, Christopher; Bowen, James; Bowling, Allen; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Cameron, Michelle; Bourdette, Dennis; Gronseth, Gary S; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2014-03-25

    To develop evidence-based recommendations for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). We searched the literature (1970-March 2011; March 2011-September 2013 MEDLINE search), classified articles, and linked recommendations to evidence. Clinicians might offer oral cannabis extract for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level A). Clinicians might offer tetrahydrocannabinol for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity (short-term)/tremor (Level B) and possibly effective for spasticity and pain (long-term) (Level C). Clinicians might offer Sativex oromucosal cannabinoid spray (nabiximols) for spasticity symptoms, pain, and urinary frequency (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity/urinary incontinence (Level B). Clinicians might choose not to offer these agents for tremor (Level C). Clinicians might counsel patients that magnetic therapy is probably effective for fatigue and probably ineffective for depression (Level B); fish oil is probably ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, MRI lesions, and quality of life (QOL) (Level B); ginkgo biloba is ineffective for cognition (Level A) and possibly effective for fatigue (Level C); reflexology is possibly effective for paresthesia (Level C); Cari Loder regimen is possibly ineffective for disability, symptoms, depression, and fatigue (Level C); and bee sting therapy is possibly ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, lesion burden/volume, and health-related QOL (Level C). Cannabinoids may cause adverse effects. Clinicians should exercise caution regarding standardized vs nonstandardized cannabis extracts and overall CAM quality control/nonregulation. Safety/efficacy of other CAM/CAM interaction with MS disease-modifying therapies is unknown.

  4. A survey of Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce F; Stomski, Norman J; Hebert, Jeff J; French, Simon D

    2013-12-17

    Research into chiropractors' use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors' adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines. We used an online questionnaire about attitudes, beliefs and behaviours towards the use of EBP in clinical practice that had been developed to survey physiotherapists and modified it to ensure that it was relevant to chiropractic practice. We endeavoured to survey all registered Australian chiropractors (n = 4378) via email invitation distributed by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring attitudes and beliefs with items measuring: age; years since registration; attention to literature; and use of clinical practice guidelines. Questionnaires were returned by 584 respondents (response rate approximately 13%). The respondents' perceptions of EBP were generally positive: most agreed that the application of EBP is necessary (77.9%), literature and research findings are useful (80.2%), EBP helps them make decisions about patient care (66.5%), and expressed an interest in learning or improving EBP skills (74.9%). Almost half of the respondents (45.1%) read between two to five articles a month. Close to half of the respondents (44.7%) used literature in the process of clinical decision making two to five times each month. About half of the respondents (52.4%) agreed that they used clinical practice guidelines, and around half (54.4%) agreed that they were able

  5. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmond, Kristin J.; Robertson, Scott; Lo, Simon S.; Soltys, Scott G.; Ryu, Samuel; McNutt, Todd; Chao, Samuel T.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Ghia, Amol; Chang, Eric L.; Sheehan, Jason; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Results: Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a “donut-shaped” CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. Conclusions: We provide

  6. Use of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Guidelines Improves the Diagnostic Sensitivity of Gastrointestinal Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Diana M; Detweiler, Claire J; Shealy, Michael J; Sung, Anthony D; Wild, Daniel M; Poleski, Martin H; Balmadrid, Bryan L; Cirrincione, Constance T; Howell, David N; Sullivan, Keith M

    2018-04-26

    - Graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract is a common complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be difficult and is a truly clinicopathologic endeavor. - To assess the diagnostic sensitivity of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease using the 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH) histology consensus guidelines and to analyze histologic findings that support the guidelines. - Patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants were identified via a retrospective search of our electronic medical record from January 1, 2005, to January 1, 2011. Endoscopies with available histology were reviewed by 2 pathologists using the 2015 NIH guidelines. The clinical diagnosis was used as the gold standard. A nontransplant set of endoscopic biopsies was used as a control. - Of the 250 total endoscopies, 217 (87%) had a clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease. Use of the NIH consensus guidelines showed a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 65%. Thirty-seven of 58 (64%) cases with an initial false-negative histopathologic diagnosis were diagnosed as graft-versus-host disease on our review. - Use of the NIH histology consensus guidelines results in a high sensitivity and specificity, thereby decreasing false-negatives. Additionally, use of the NIH guidelines aids in creating uniformity and diagnostic clarity. Correlation with clinical and laboratory findings is critical in evaluating the differential diagnosis and to avoid false-positives. As expected, increased apoptosis with decreased inflammation was associated with a pathologic diagnosis of graft-versus-host disease and supports the NIH guidelines.

  7. The expert consensus guideline series. Optimizing pharmacologic treatment of psychotic disorders. Introduction: methods, commentary, and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, John M; Leucht, Stefan; Carpenter, Daniel; Docherty, John P

    2003-01-01

    A growing number of atypical antipsychotics are available for clinicians to choose from in the treatment of psychotic disorders. However, a number of important questions concerning medication selection, dosing and dose equivalence, and the management of inadequate response, compliance problems, and relapse have not been adequately addressed by clinical trials. To aid clinical decision-making, a consensus survey of expert opinion on the pharmacologic treatment of psychotic disorders was undertaken to address questions not definitively answered in the research literature. Based on a literature review, a written survey was developed with 60 questions and 994 options. Approximately half of the options were scored using a modified version of the RAND 9-point scale for rating the appropriateness of medical decisions. For the other options, the experts were asked to write in answers (e.g., average doses) or check a box to indicate their preferred answer. The survey was sent to 50 national experts on the pharmacologic treatment of psychotic disorders, 47 (94%) of whom completed it. In analyzing the responses to items rated on the 9-point scale, consensus on each option was defined as a non random distribution of scores by chi-square "goodness-of-fit"test. We assigned a categorical rank (first line/preferred choice,second line/alternate choice, third line/usually inappropriate) to each option based on the 95% confidence interval around the mean rating. Guideline tables indicating preferred treatment strategies were then developed for key clinical situations. The expert panel reached consensus on 88% of the options rated on the 9-point scale. The experts overwhelmingly endorsed the atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of psychotic disorders. Risperidone was the top choice for first-episode and multi-episode patients, with the other newer atypicals rated first line or high second line depending on the clinical situation. Clozapine and a long-acting injectable atypical

  8. Summary of evidence-based guideline update: evaluation and management of concussion in sports: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Christopher C; Kutcher, Jeffrey S; Ashwal, Stephen; Barth, Jeffrey; Getchius, Thomas S D; Gioia, Gerard A; Gronseth, Gary S; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Mandel, Steven; Manley, Geoffrey; McKeag, Douglas B; Thurman, David J; Zafonte, Ross

    2013-06-11

    To update the 1997 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) practice parameter regarding sports concussion, focusing on 4 questions: 1) What factors increase/decrease concussion risk? 2) What diagnostic tools identify those with concussion and those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early impairments, neurologic catastrophe, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 3) What clinical factors identify those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early postconcussion impairments, neurologic catastrophe, recurrent concussions, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 4) What interventions enhance recovery, reduce recurrent concussion risk, or diminish long-term sequelae? The complete guideline on which this summary is based is available as an online data supplement to this article. We systematically reviewed the literature from 1955 to June 2012 for pertinent evidence. We assessed evidence for quality and synthesized into conclusions using a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. We used a modified Delphi process to develop recommendations. Specific risk factors can increase or decrease concussion risk. Diagnostic tools to help identify individuals with concussion include graded symptom checklists, the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, neuropsychological assessments, and the Balance Error Scoring System. Ongoing clinical symptoms, concussion history, and younger age identify those at risk for postconcussion impairments. Risk factors for recurrent concussion include history of multiple concussions, particularly within 10 days after initial concussion. Risk factors for chronic neurobehavioral impairment include concussion exposure and APOE ε4 genotype. Data are insufficient to show that any intervention enhances recovery or diminishes long-term sequelae postconcussion. Practice recommendations are presented for preparticipation counseling, management of suspected concussion, and management of diagnosed concussion.

  9. Systematic review of the literature and evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis in trauma: results from an Italian consensus of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Daniele; Chieregato, Arturo; Langer, Martin; Viaggi, Bruno; Cingolani, Emiliano; Malacarne, Paolo; Mengoli, Francesca; Nardi, Giuseppe; Nascimben, Ennio; Riccioni, Luigi; Turriziani, Ilaria; Volpi, Annalisa; Coniglio, Carlo; Gordini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is frequently administered in severe trauma. However, the risk of selecting resistant bacteria, a major issue especially in critical care environments, has not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of the present study was to provide guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis for four different trauma-related clinical conditions, taking into account the risks of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection, thus innovating previous guidelines in the field. The MEDLINE database was searched for studies comparing antibiotic prophylaxis to controls (placebo or no antibiotic administration) in four clinical traumatic conditions that were selected on the basis of the traumatic event frequency and/or infection severity. The selected studies focused on the prevention of early ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in comatose patients with traumatic brain injury, of meningitis in severe basilar skull fractures, of wound infections in long-bone open fractures. Since no placebo-controlled study was available for deep surgical site-infections prevention in abdominal trauma with enteric contamination, we compared 24-hour and 5-day antibiotic prophylaxis policies. A separate specific research focused on the question of antibiotic-resistant bacteria selection caused by antibiotic prophylaxis, an issue not adequately investigated by the selected studies. Randomised trials, reviews, meta-analyses, observational studies were included. Data extraction was carried out by one author according to a predefined protocol, using an electronic form. The strength of evidence was stratified and recommendations were given according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Uncertain evidence deserving further studies was found for two-dose antibiotic prophylaxis for early VAP prevention in comatose patients. In the other cases the risk of resistant-bacteria selection caused by antibiotic administration for 48 hours or more

  10. The Global Spine Care Initiative: applying evidence-based guidelines on the non-invasive management of back and neck pain to low- and middle-income communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Côté, Pierre; Randhawa, Kristi; Torres, Paola; Yu, Hainan; Nordin, Margareta; Hurwitz, Eric L; Haldeman, Scott; Cedraschi, Christine

    2018-02-19

    The purpose of this review was to develop recommendations for the management of spinal disorders in low-income communities, with a focus on non-invasive pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for non-specific low back and neck pain. We synthesized two evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of low back and neck pain. Our recommendations considered benefits, harms, quality of evidence, and costs, with attention to feasibility in medically underserved areas and low- and middle-income countries. Clinicians should provide education and reassurance, advise patients to remain active, and provide information about self-care options. For acute low back and neck pain without serious pathology, primary conservative treatment options are exercise, manual therapy, superficial heat, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). For patients with chronic low back and neck pain without serious pathology, primary treatment options are exercise, yoga, cognitive behavioral therapies, acupuncture, biofeedback, progressive relaxation, massage, manual therapy, interdisciplinary rehabilitation, NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and antidepressants. For patients with spinal pain with radiculopathy, clinicians may consider exercise, spinal manipulation, or NSAIDs; use of other interventions requires extrapolation from evidence regarding effectiveness for non-radicular spinal pain. Clinicians should not offer treatments that are not effective, including benzodiazepines, botulinum toxin injection, systemic corticosteroids, cervical collar, electrical muscle stimulation, short-wave diathermy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and traction. Guidelines developed for high-income settings were adapted to inform a care pathway and model of care for medically underserved areas and low- and middle-income countries by considering factors such as costs and feasibility, in addition to benefits, harms, and the quality of underlying evidence. The selection of

  11. Pre-Hospital Care Management of a Potential Spinal Cord Injured Patient: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Evidence-Based Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Henry; Singh, Jeffrey; Nathens, Avery; MacDonald, Russell D.; Travers, Andrew; Tallon, John; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An interdisciplinary expert panel of medical and surgical specialists involved in the management of patients with potential spinal cord injuries (SCI) was assembled. Four key questions were created that were of significant interest. These were: (1) what is the optimal type and duration of pre-hospital spinal immobilization in patients with acute SCI?; (2) during airway manipulation in the pre-hospital setting, what is the ideal method of spinal immobilization?; (3) what is the impact of pre-hospital transport time to definitive care on the outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury?; and (4) what is the role of pre-hospital care providers in cervical spine clearance and immobilization? A systematic review utilizing multiple databases was performed to determine the current evidence about the specific questions, and each article was independently reviewed and assessed by two reviewers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Guidelines were then created related to the questions by a national Canadian expert panel using the Delphi method for reviewing the evidence-based guidelines about each question. Recommendations about the key questions included: the pre-hospital immobilization of patients using a cervical collar, head immobilization, and a spinal board; utilization of padded boards or inflatable bean bag boards to reduce pressure; transfer of patients off of spine boards as soon as feasible, including transfer of patients off spinal boards while awaiting transfer from one hospital institution to another hospital center for definitive care; inclusion of manual in-line cervical spine traction for airway management in patients requiring intubation in the pre-hospital setting; transport of patients with acute traumatic SCI to the definitive hospital center for care within 24 h of injury; and training of emergency medical personnel in the pre-hospital setting to apply criteria to clear patients of cervical spinal injuries, and immobilize patients

  12. Translating evidence-based guidelines into practice: a survey of practices of commissioners and managers of the English stop smoking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Máirtín S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The English National Health Service’s (NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSSs constitute one of the most highly developed behavioural support programmes in the world. However, there is significant variation in success rates across the approximately 150 services, some of which may be due to variation in practice. This study aimed to assess these differences in practice. Methods Two online surveys were administered. All commissioners (people who purchase services for the NHS and managers (those who run the services of NHS SSSs in England were invited to participate. Items included details of current practices and services provided, what informed the commissioning of SSSs, what targets were included within service specifications and whether the types of treatment model to be delivered were specified. Results Both surveys had a response rate of 35%, with 50 commissioners and 58 managers participating. There were no significant differences between the characteristics of the Primary Care Trusts (PCTs from which commissioners and managers responded to this survey and those PCTs from which there was no response. Managers reported that the treatment model most frequently offered by SSSs was one-to-one (98%. A total of 16% of managers reported that some approved medications were not available as first-line treatments. Just over one third (38% of commissioners reported consulting national guidelines or best evidence to inform local commissioning. Almost one third (30% of commissioners reported that they specified the types of stop smoking interventions to be delivered by the providers. Conclusions A substantial part of commissioning of Stop Smoking Services in England appears to take place without adequate consultation of evidence-based guidelines or specification of the service to be provided. This may account for at least some of the variation in success rates.

  13. Translating evidence-based guidelines into practice: a survey of practices of commissioners and managers of the English stop smoking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Máirtín S; Thomson, Heather; West, Robert; Kenyon, Jennifer A M; McEwen, Andy

    2012-05-23

    The English National Health Service's (NHS) Stop Smoking Services (SSSs) constitute one of the most highly developed behavioural support programmes in the world. However, there is significant variation in success rates across the approximately 150 services, some of which may be due to variation in practice. This study aimed to assess these differences in practice. Two online surveys were administered. All commissioners (people who purchase services for the NHS) and managers (those who run the services) of NHS SSSs in England were invited to participate. Items included details of current practices and services provided, what informed the commissioning of SSSs, what targets were included within service specifications and whether the types of treatment model to be delivered were specified. Both surveys had a response rate of 35%, with 50 commissioners and 58 managers participating. There were no significant differences between the characteristics of the Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) from which commissioners and managers responded to this survey and those PCTs from which there was no response. Managers reported that the treatment model most frequently offered by SSSs was one-to-one (98%). A total of 16% of managers reported that some approved medications were not available as first-line treatments. Just over one third (38%) of commissioners reported consulting national guidelines or best evidence to inform local commissioning. Almost one third (30%) of commissioners reported that they specified the types of stop smoking interventions to be delivered by the providers. A substantial part of commissioning of Stop Smoking Services in England appears to take place without adequate consultation of evidence-based guidelines or specification of the service to be provided. This may account for at least some of the variation in success rates.

  14. Patterns and predictors of evidence-based medication continuation among hospitalized heart failure patients (from Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Ambardekar, Amrut V; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Hernandez, Adrian F; Heidenreich, Paul A; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2011-06-15

    Hospitalized patients with heart failure and decreased ejection fraction are at substantial risk for mortality and rehospitalization, yet no acute therapies are proven to decrease this risk. Therefore, in-hospital use of medications proved to decrease long-term mortality is a critical strategy to improve outcomes. Although endorsed in guidelines, predictors of initiation and continuation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), β blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have not been well studied. We assessed noncontraindicated use patterns for the 3 medications using the Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure (GWTG-HF) registry from February 2009 through March 2010. Medication continuation was defined as treatment on admission and discharge. Multivariable logistic regression using generalized estimating equations was used to determine factors associated with discharge use. In total 9,474 patients were enrolled during the study period. Of those treated before hospitalization, overall continuation rates were 88.5% for ACE inhibitors/ARBs, 91.6% for β blockers, and 71.9% for aldosterone-antagonists. Of patients untreated before admission, 87.4% had ACE inhibitors/ARBs and 90.1% had β blocker initiated during hospitalization or at discharge, whereas only 25.2% were started on an aldosterone antagonist. In multivariate analysis, admission therapy was most strongly associated with discharge use (adjusted odds ratios 7.4, 6.0, and 20.9 for ACE inhibitors/ARBs, β blockers, and aldosterone antagonists, respectively). Western region, younger age, and academic affiliation were also associated with higher discharge use. Although ACE inhibitor/ARB and β-blocker continuation rates were high, aldosterone antagonist use was lower despite potential eligibility. In conclusion, being admitted on evidence-based medications is the most powerful, independent predictor of discharge use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Continuing medical education effect on physician knowledge: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordage, Georges; Carlin, Brian; Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-03-01

    Physicians are continuously engaging in continuing medical education (CME) activities. Whether CME activities actually improve their knowledge and whether multiple media, instructional techniques, and exposures are better than single experiences are questions that are still under discussion. The Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center for Healthcare Research and Quality conducted a systematic review of the effectiveness of CME (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Evidence Report) from which the guideline panel used 28 (+/- 2) studies to answer these questions about improvements in knowledge. The studies were selected based on the presence of an adequate control group from an initial pool of 136 studies on CME. Despite the heterogeneity of the studies reviewed and the low quality of the evidence, the results from the majority of the studies (79%) showed that CME activities were associated with improvements in physician knowledge. The evidence gathered about the use of media and instructional techniques and the frequency of exposure suggests that multimedia, multiple instructional techniques, and multiple exposures be used whenever possible in CME. Future studies of CME should include assessment of applied knowledge, and should incorporate programmatic and collaborative studies of CME.

  16. [Using new media for online consensus conferences and open external review of guidelines - results of two pilot studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Alexander; Rosumeck, Stefanie; Sporbeck, Birte; Rzany, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The development of guidelines almost always requires considerable time and financial resources. An important task is therefore to identify and evaluate online methods that facilitate guideline work. ONLINE CONSENSUS CONFERENCE: During the development of the S2k guideline for the management of staphylococcus aureus infections an online consensus conference was held using an online tool provided by the Deutsche Forschungsnetz in combination with a telephone conference. During the 2-hour meeting, no technical difficulties occurred. A survey among the participants showed that this format had a high rate of acceptance. ONLINE REVIEW: During the development of the update of the German S3-Guidelines for the therapy of psoriasis an external open review was performed. An online platform allowing direct visible commenting was chosen. During the five week period of commenting, 26 users added 160 comments. After the review process, the comments were assessed by the editors and the original authors. The selected instrument provides a suitable means for online commenting of guidelines and facilitates the revision of the text. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Prevention of generalized reactions to contrast media: a consensus report and guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, S.K. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Thomsen, H.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Webb, J.A.W. [Diagnostic Radiology Department, St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to document, using consensus methodology, current practice for prevention of generalized reactions to contrast media, to identify areas where there is disagreement or confusion and to draw up guidelines for reducing the risk of generalized contrast media reactions based on the survey and a review of the literature. A document with 165 questions was mailed to 202 members of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The questions covered risk factors and prophylactic measures for generalized contrast media reactions. Sixty-eight members (34%) responded. The majority indicated that a history of moderate and severe reaction(s) to contrast media and asthma are important risk factors. The survey also indicated that patients with risk factors should receive non-ionic contrast media. In patients at high risk of reaction, if the examination is deemed absolutely necessary, a resuscitation team should be available at the time of the procedure. The majority (91%) used corticosteroid prophylaxis given at least 11 h before contrast medium to patients at increased risk of reaction. The frequency of the dosage varied from one to three times. Fifty-five percent also use antihistamine Hl, mainly administered orally and once. Antihistamine H2 and ephedrine are rarely used. All essential drugs are available on the emergency resuscitation trolley. Patients with risk factors are observed up to 30 min by 48% and up to 60 min by 43% of the responders. Prophylactic measures are not taken before extravascular use of contrast media. Prophylactic drugs are given to patients with a history of moderate or severe generalized reaction to contrast media. In patients with asthma, opinion is divided with only half of the responders giving prophylactic drugs. Aspirin, {beta}-blockers, interleukin-2 and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are not considered risk factors and therefore are not stopped before injection of contrast media. The survey showed some variability in

  18. Prevention of generalized reactions to contrast media: a consensus report and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, S.K.; Thomsen, H.S.; Webb, J.A.W.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document, using consensus methodology, current practice for prevention of generalized reactions to contrast media, to identify areas where there is disagreement or confusion and to draw up guidelines for reducing the risk of generalized contrast media reactions based on the survey and a review of the literature. A document with 165 questions was mailed to 202 members of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology. The questions covered risk factors and prophylactic measures for generalized contrast media reactions. Sixty-eight members (34%) responded. The majority indicated that a history of moderate and severe reaction(s) to contrast media and asthma are important risk factors. The survey also indicated that patients with risk factors should receive non-ionic contrast media. In patients at high risk of reaction, if the examination is deemed absolutely necessary, a resuscitation team should be available at the time of the procedure. The majority (91%) used corticosteroid prophylaxis given at least 11 h before contrast medium to patients at increased risk of reaction. The frequency of the dosage varied from one to three times. Fifty-five percent also use antihistamine Hl, mainly administered orally and once. Antihistamine H2 and ephedrine are rarely used. All essential drugs are available on the emergency resuscitation trolley. Patients with risk factors are observed up to 30 min by 48% and up to 60 min by 43% of the responders. Prophylactic measures are not taken before extravascular use of contrast media. Prophylactic drugs are given to patients with a history of moderate or severe generalized reaction to contrast media. In patients with asthma, opinion is divided with only half of the responders giving prophylactic drugs. Aspirin, β-blockers, interleukin-2 and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs are not considered risk factors and therefore are not stopped before injection of contrast media. The survey showed some variability in

  19. The establishment of an ethical guideline for genetic testing through citizen consensus via the Internet in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Chung, Chun-Chih; Yang, Che-Ming

    2010-10-18

    With the rapid advance of genetics, the application of genetic testing has become increasingly popular. Test results have had a tremendous impact on individuals who receive the test and his or her family. The ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of genetic testing cannot be overlooked. The Internet is a potential tool for public engagement. This study aimed at establishing ethical guidelines for genetic testing in Taiwan through a participatory citizen consensus approach via the Internet. The research method used was a citizen consensus conference modified by an Internet application and the Delphi technique. The citizen consensus conference is one of the public participation mechanisms. The draft ethical guidelines for genetic testing were written by an expert panel of 10. The Delphi technique was applied to a citizen panel recruited via the Internet until a consensus was reached. Our research population was restricted to people who had Internet access. Included in the citizen panel were 100 individuals. A total of 3 individuals dropped out of the process. The citizen panel was exposed to the issues through Internet learning and sharing. In all, 3 rounds of anonymous questionnaires were administered before a consensus was reached in terms of importance and feasibility. The result was ethical guidelines composed of 4 categories and 25 items. The 4 categories encompassed decision making (6 items), management of tissue samples (5 items), release of results (8 items), and information flow (6 items). On a scale of 1 to 10, the average (SD) importance score for the decision-making category was 9.41 (SD 0.58); for the management of tissue samples category, the average score was 9.62 (SD 0.49); for the release of results category, the average score was 9.34 (SD= 0.59); and for the information flow category, the average score was 9.6 (SD = 0.43). Exploratory analyses indicated that participants with higher education tended to attribute more importance to these

  20. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Erminia; Kelly, Claire M; Minas, Harry; Jorm, Anthony F; Nadera, Dinah

    2010-12-20

    This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Filipino public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 34 Filipino mental health clinicians to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms). Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 48 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 186 items, 102 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. The guidelines are currently being translated into local languages. There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to non-mental health professionals working in health and welfare settings.

  1. Mental Health First Aid guidelines for helping a suicidal person: a Delphi consensus study in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to develop guidelines for how a member of the Filipino public should provide mental health first aid to a person who is suicidal. Methods The guidelines were produced by developing a questionnaire containing possible first aid actions and asking an expert panel of 34 Filipino mental health clinicians to rate whether each action should be included in the guidelines. The content of the questionnaire was based on a systematic search of the relevant evidence and claims made by authors of consumer and carer guides and websites. The panel members were asked to complete the questionnaire by web survey. Three rounds of the rating were carried and, at the end of each round, items that reached the consensus criterion were selected for inclusion in the guidelines. During the first round, panel members were also asked to suggest any additional actions that were not covered in the original questionnaire (to include items that are relevant to local cultural circumstances, values, and social norms. Responses to these open-ended questions were used to generate new items. Results The output from the Delphi process was a set of agreed upon action statements. The Delphi process started with 138 statements, 48 new items were written based on suggestions from panel members and, of these 186 items, 102 met the consensus criterion. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. The guidelines are currently being translated into local languages. Conclusions There are a number of actions that are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts or engaging in suicidal behaviour. Although the guidelines are designed for members of the public, they may also be helpful to non-mental health professionals working in health and welfare settings.

  2. International consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: Executive summary-Workgroup Report of the Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Chehade, Mirna; Groetch, Marion E; Spergel, Jonathan M; Wood, Robert A; Allen, Katrina; Atkins, Dan; Bahna, Sami; Barad, Ashis V; Berin, Cecilia; Brown Whitehorn, Terri; Burks, A Wesley; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Cianferoni, Antonella; Conte, Marisa; Davis, Carla; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Grimshaw, Kate; Gupta, Ruchi; Hofmeister, Brittany; Hwang, J B; Katz, Yitzhak; Konstantinou, George N; Leonard, Stephanie A; Lightdale, Jennifer; McGhee, Sean; Mehr, Sami; Sopo, Stefano Miceli; Monti, Giovanno; Muraro, Antonella; Noel, Stacey Katherine; Nomura, Ichiro; Noone, Sally; Sampson, Hugh A; Schultz, Fallon; Sicherer, Scott H; Thompson, Cecilia C; Turner, Paul J; Venter, Carina; Westcott-Chavez, A Amity; Greenhawt, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis (FPIES) is a non-IgE cell- mediated food allergy that can be severe and lead to shock. Despite the potential seriousness of reactions, awareness of FPIES is low; high-quality studies providing insight into the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management are lacking; and clinical outcomes are poorly established. This consensus document is the result of work done by an international workgroup convened through the Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the International FPIES Association advocacy group. These are the first international evidence-based guidelines to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with FPIES. Research on prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic markers, and future treatments is necessary to improve the care of patients with FPIES. These guidelines will be updated periodically as more evidence becomes available. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of theory-based knowledge translation interventions to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based guidelines on the early management of adults with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Mélanie; Albert, Martin; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Contandriopoulos, Damien; DuSablon, Anne; Lacroix, Sébastien; Gagné, Annick; Laflamme, Élise; Boutin, Nathalie; Delisle, Stéphane; Pauzé, Anne-Marie; MacThiong, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Optimal, early management following a spinal cord injury (SCI) can limit individuals' disabilities and costs related to their care. Several knowledge syntheses were recently published to guide health care professionals with regard to early interventions in SCI patients. However, no knowledge translation (KT) intervention, selected according to a behaviour change theory, has been proposed to facilitate the use of SCI guidelines in an acute care setting. To develop theory-informed KT interventions to promote the application of evidence-based recommendations on the acute care management of SCI patients. The first four phases of the knowledge-to-action model were used to establish the study design. Knowledge selection was based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Knowledge adaptation to the local context was sourced from the ADAPTE process. The theoretical domains framework oriented the selection and development of the interventions based on an assessment of barriers and enablers to knowledge application. Twenty-nine recommendations were chosen and operationalized in measurable clinical indicators. Barriers related to knowledge, skills, perceived capacities, beliefs about consequences, social influences, and the environmental context and resources theoretical domains were identified. The mapping of behaviour change techniques associated with those barriers led to the development of an online educational curriculum, interdisciplinary clinical pathways as well as policies and procedures. This research project allowed us developing KT interventions according to a thorough behavioural change methodology. Exposure to the generated interventions will support health care professionals in providing the best care to SCI patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Achieving 90% Adoption of Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the Delphi Consensus Method in a Large Orthopedic Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Stefano A; Mahajan, John

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the implementation rate of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Our purpose was to report on the adoption rate of CPGs created and implemented by a large orthopedic group using the Delphi consensus method. The draft CPGs were created before the group's annual meeting by 5 teams each assigned a subset of topics. The draft guidelines included a statement and a summary of the available evidence. Each guideline was debated in both small-group and plenary sessions. Voting was anonymous and a 75% supermajority was required for passage. A Likert scale was used to survey the patient's experience with the process at 1 week, and the Kirkpatrick evaluation model was used to gauge the efficacy of the process over a 6-month time frame. Eighty-five orthopedic surgeons attended the meeting. Fifteen guidelines grouped into 5 topics were created. All passed. Eighty-six percent of attendees found the process effective and 84% felt that participating in the process made it more likely that they would adopt the guidelines. At 1 week, an average of 62% of attendees stated they were practicing the guideline as written (range: 35%-72%), and at 6 months, 96% stated they were practicing them (range: 82%-100%). We have demonstrated that a modified Delphi method for reaching consensus can be very effective in both creating CPGs and leading to their adoption. Further we have shown that the process is well received by participants and that an inclusionary approach can be highly successful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A consensus guideline for antipsychotic drug use for dementia in care homes. Bridging the gap between scientific evidence and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U.; Johansson, Alice; Selbaek, Geir; Murray, Matt; Burns, Alistair; Ballard, Clive; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.

    Background: To produce a practice guideline that includes a set of detailed consensus principles regarding the prescription of antipsychotics (APs) amongst people with dementia living in care homes. Methods: We used a modified Delphi consensus procedure with three rounds, where we actively specified

  6. A consensus guideline for antipsychotic drug use for dementia in care homes. Bridging the gap between scientific evidence and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, S.U.; Johansson, A; Selbaek, G.; Murray, M.; Burns, A.; Ballard, C.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To produce a practice guideline that includes a set of detailed consensus principles regarding the prescription of antipsychotics (APs) amongst people with dementia living in care homes. METHODS: We used a modified Delphi consensus procedure with three rounds, where we actively specified

  7. Consensus guidelines for the identification and treatment of biofilms in chronic nonhealing wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Gregory; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; James, Garth A.

    2017-01-01

    diagnostic options; clinical indicators of biofilms; future options for diagnostic tests; treatment strategies; mechanical debridement; topical antiseptics; screening antibiofilm agents; and levels of evidence when choosing antibiofilm treatments. Conclusion: This consensus document attempts to clarify...... misunderstandings about the role of biofilms in clinical practice, and provides a basis for clinicians to recognize biofilms in chronic nonhealing wounds and manage patients optimally. A new paradigm for wound care, based on a stepped-down treatment approach, was derived from the consensus statements....

  8. Comparing American Gastroenterological Association Pancreatic Cyst Management Guidelines with Fukuoka Consensus Guidelines as Predictors of Advanced Neoplasia in Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gene K; Goldberg, David S; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Vollmer, Charles M; Ahmad, Nuzhat A

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published guidelines to provide recommendations for management of suspected pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs). The aim of this study was to compare efficacy of these with the Fukuoka consensus guidelines in predicting advanced neoplasia (AN) in patients with suspected PCNs. We performed a retrospective study of 239 patients who underwent surgical resection for suspected mucinous PCN at a tertiary care center from 2000 to 2014. Surgical pathology was the gold standard. The AGA and Fukuoka criteria were applied, and their performance in predicting AN, defined as invasive cancer or high-grade dysplasia (HGD), was assessed. Advanced neoplasia was found in 71 of 239 (29.7%) patients (28 invasive cancer, 43 HGD). The Fukuoka "high-risk" (FG-HR) and AGA "high-risk" (AGA-HR) criteria identified patients with AN with sensitivities of 28.2% and 35.2%, specificities of 95.8% and 94.0%, positive predictive values of 74.1% and 71.4%, and negative predictive values of 75.9% and 77.5%, respectively. Overall, there was no significant difference between the guidelines for prediction of AN. There were 7 and 6 cases with invasive cancer, and 23 and 24 cases with HGD missed by the FG-HR and AGA-HR guidelines, respectively. In a retrospective analysis, the AGA guidelines are not superior to the Fukuoka guidelines in identifying AN in suspected PCNs. Both sets of guidelines have fair PPV for detection of AN, which would lead to avoidable resections in patients without AN. Additionally, the high-risk features of both guidelines do not accurately identify all patients with AN. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CT-based delineation of lymph node levels and related CTVs in the node-negative neck: DAHANCA, EORTC, GORTEC, NCIC,RTOG consensus guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, Vincent; Levendag, Peter; Ang, Kian K.; Bernier, Jacques; Braaksma, Marijel; Budach, Volker; Chao, Cliff; Coche, Emmanuel; Cooper, Jay S.; Cosnard, Guy; Eisbruch, Avraham; El-Sayed, Samy; Emami, Bahman; Grau, Cai; Hamoir, Marc; Lee, Nancy; Maingon, Philippe; Muller, Karin; Reychler, Herve

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The appropriate application of 3-D CRT and IMRT for HNSCC requires a standardization of the procedures for the delineation of the target volumes. Over the past few years, two proposals - the so-called Brussels guidelines from Gregoire et al., and the so-called Rotterdam guidelines from Nowak et al. - emerged from the literature for the delineation of the neck node levels. Detailed examination of these proposals however revealed some important discrepancies. Materials and methods: Within this framework, the Brussels and Rotterdam groups decided to review their guidelines and derive a common set of recommendations for delineation of neck node levels. This proposal was then discussed with representatives of major cooperative groups in Europe (DAHANCA, EORTC, GORTEC) and in North America (NCIC, RTOG), which, after some additional refinements, have endorsed them. The objective of the present article is to present the consensus guidelines for the delineation of the node levels in the node-negative neck. Results and conclusions: First a short discussion of the discrepancies between the previous Brussels and the Rotterdam guidelines is presented. The general philosophy of the consensus guidelines and the methodology used to resolve the various discrepancies are then described. The consensus proposal is then presented and representative CTVs that are consistent with these guidelines are illustrated on CT sections. Last, the limitations of the consensus guidelines are discussed and some concerns about the direct applications of these guidelines to the node-positive neck and the post-operative neck are described

  10. [The guideline for the treatment of mood disorders in USA and Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, T

    2001-08-01

    Recently, the number of available antidepressants has increased dramatically and psychopharmacological treatment is becoming complex. It is important to present some guideline for supporting clinical decision making. Three different kinds of guideline for the treatment of mood disorders, that is, the APA style guideline, the algorithm and the consensus guideline, have been developed in our country. The APA style guideline and the algorithm are basically evidence based and the consensus guideline is developed through the consensus panel format. These guidelines should be used as 'a starting point' for specifying decisions that will be modified occasionally.

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical management of colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tekkis, Paris; Vini, Louiza; Tzardi, Maria; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Karachaliou, Niki; Zoras, Odysseas; Agalianos, Christos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable improvement in the management of colon cancer, there is a great deal of variation in the outcomes among European countries, and in particular among different hospital centers in Greece and Cyprus. Discrepancy in the approach strategies and lack of adherence to guidelines for the management of colon cancer may explain the situation. The aim was to elaborate a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of colon cancer, based on European guidelines (ESMO and EURECCA), and also taking into account local special characteristics of our healthcare system. Following discussion and online communication among members of an executive team, a consensus was developed. Statements entered the Delphi voting system on two rounds to achieve consensus by multidisciplinary international experts. Statements with an agreement rate of ≥80% achieved a large consensus, while those with an agreement rate of 60-80% a moderate consensus. Statements achieving an agreement of colon cancer were subjected to the Delphi methodology. Voting experts were 109. The median rate of abstain per statement was 10% (range: 0-41%). In the end of the voting process, all statements achieved a consensus by more than 80% of the experts. A consensus on the management of colon cancer was developed by applying the Delphi methodology. Guidelines are proposed along with algorithms of diagnosis and treatment. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, and adherence to guidelines is emphasized.

  12. Building the adult protective services system of tomorrow: The role of the APS national voluntary consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobitt, Julie; Kuhne, Jamie; Carter, Julie; Whittier Eliason, Stephanie; Twomey, Mary

    2018-01-01

    In 2015, the Administration for Community Living (ACL) established the first federal "home" for Adult Protective Services (APS). This leadership has included working collaboratively with state Adult Protective Service systems to ensure that older adults and adults with disabilities are afforded the same protections against abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation regardless of where in the country they live. As part of that leadership, ACL created draft Voluntary Consensus Guidelines for State APS Systems. ACL undertook a process of public and stakeholder engagement and analyzed the resulting comments to improve upon the initial draft of the draft to arrive at the final version. This article examines the comments, including the concerns raised by the commenters about specific areas of the Guidelines, areas identified for future research, and reflections and opinions on the role of the federal government in guiding the development of the field of adult protection.

  13. [Consensus on objectives and action guidelines on low density lipoproteins-cholesterol control in very high risk cardiovascular patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Guijarro-Herraiz, Carlos; Masana-Marin, Luis; Cordero-Fort, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Among cardiovascular disease risk factors one of the most relevant is low-density lipoprotein-associated cholesterol (LDL-c), but there is controversy about the methods used to control it. The aim was to obtain an expert opinion to clarify the most relevant issues regarding the control of dyslipidemia in very high cardiovascular risk patients. A survey with 55 items, stratified into 4 blocks: LDL-c as a therapeutic target, therapeutic goals, causes of the failure to achieve LDL-c goals, and recommendations to optimize their achievement, was addressed to 41 specialists (Cardiology and Internal Medicine) using the Delphi method to achieve professional consensus criteria. A high consensus was reached among all items, in line with the European recommendations. The panelists considered that the goal of 70mg/dl for LDL-c for high cardiovascular disease risk (mainly vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and renal failure), using combined treatment when necessary. Lack of adherence and therapeutic inertia were considered the main reasons for treatment failure. The Spanish experts show an elevated consensus with the European recommendations, confirming the LDL-c control target of <70mg/dl. The simplification of the guidelines and the combined treatment may favor an improvement the achievement of lipid target goals. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Guidelines for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection in Italy: The III Working Group Consensus Report 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagari, Rocco Maurizio; Romano, Marco; Ojetti, Veronica; Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Gullini, Sergio; Annibale, Bruno; Farinati, Fabio; Ierardi, Enzo; Maconi, Giovanni; Rugge, Massimo; Calabrese, Carlo; Di Mario, Francesco; Luzza, Francesco; Pretolani, Stefano; Savio, Antonella; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Caselli, Michele

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge on the role of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is continually evolving, and treatment is becoming more challenging due to increasing bacterial resistance. Since the management of HP infection is changing, an update of the national Italian guidelines delivered in 2007 was needed. In the III Working Group Consensus Report 2015, a panel of 17 experts from several Italian regions reviewed current evidence on different topics relating to HP infection. Four working groups examined the following topics: (1) "open questions" on HP diagnosis and treatment (focusing on dyspepsia, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin use and extra-gastric diseases); (2) non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tests; (3) treatment of HP infection; (4) role of HP in the prevention of gastric cancer. Statements and recommendations were discussed and a consensus reached in a final plenary session held in February 2015 in Bologna. Recommendations are based on the best current evidence to help physicians manage HP infection in Italy. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Society of Digestive Endoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-based approach to the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa, based on the European guidelines for hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulliver, Wayne; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Prens, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by painful, recurrent nodules and abscesses that rupture and lead to sinus tracts and scarring. To date, an evidence-based therapeutic approach has not been the standard of care and this is likely due...

  16. Evidence-based approach to the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa, based on the European guidelines for hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Gulliver (Wayne P.); C.C. Zouboulis (Christos C.); E.P. Prens (Errol); G.B.E. Jemec (Gregor); T. Tzellos (Thrasivoulos)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by painful, recurrent nodules and abscesses that rupture and lead to sinus tracts and scarring. To date, an evidence-based therapeutic approach has not been the standard of care and this is

  17. Guidelines for preclinical animal research in ALS/MND: A consensus meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Albert C; Bendotti, Caterina; Blaugrund, Eran; Chio, Adriano; Greensmith, Linda; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Mead, Richard; Niessen, Heiko G; Petri, Susanne; Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Robberecht, Wim; Ruegg, Markus; Schwalenstöcker, Birgit; Stiller, Detlev; van den Berg, Leonard; Vieira, Fernando; von Horsten, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    The development of therapeutics for ALS/MND is largely based on work in experimental animals carrying human SOD mutations. However, translation of apparent therapeutic successes from in vivo to the human disease has proven difficult and a considerable amount of financial resources has been apparently wasted. Standard operating procedures (SOPs) for preclinical animal research in ALS/MND are urgently required. Such SOPs will help to establish SOPs for translational research for other neurological diseases within the next few years. To identify the challenges and to improve the research methodology, the European ALS/MND group held a meeting in 2006 and published guidelines in 2007 (1). A second international conference to improve the guidelines was held in 2009. These second and improved guidelines are dedicated to the memory of Sean F. Scott.

  18. [Evidence-based management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Latest guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, S

    2010-12-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and its consequences (death, chronic ischemic coronary artery disease, heart failure) are still the number 1 causes of death and of cardiovascular diseases in Germany. In this context, patients with STEMI are at the highest risk. The first-line management of STEMI patients often determines if the outcome is life or death. This overview presents the current optimal evidence-based management of STEMI patients as a practice-oriented extract according to the latest ESC guidelines, fully published some weeks ago (http://www.escardio.org).All efforts must be made to keep the respective time intervals between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of reperfusion therapy as short as possible, i.e. best within a dedicated STEMI network. Two of the time intervals are particularly essential: the time delay between the onset of symptoms and the first medical contact (FMC) and the time delay between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion. The time delay between the onset of symptoms and FMC depends on the patient as well as on the organization of the emergency medical service (EMS). Unfortunately, too many patients/bystanders still hesitate to immediately call the EMS. More intense measures must therefore be taken to educate the public. The optimal FMC by medical doctors or paramedics reacts quickly and ideally arrives with ECG equipment for immediate diagnosis of STEMI (persistent ST-segment elevation or presumably new left bundle branch block) before hospital admission. Unfortunately in many cases, the FMC is the emergency room of a hospital. Further decisions can be made without laboratory findings. In Germany, the average time delay between onset of symptoms and FMC is 100 min and therefore longer than in some other European countries.The next critical time interval is that between FMC and the beginning of reperfusion: this interval depends solely on the EMS organization and the distance to the next catheter laboratory with 24 h PCI (percutaneous

  19. Consensus definitions and application guidelines for control groups in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, Charlotte; Menge, Til; Altintas, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    The choice of appropriate control group(s) is critical in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker research in multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a lack of definitions and nomenclature of different control groups and a rationalized application of different control groups. We here propose consensus......). Furthermore, we discuss the application of these control groups in specific study designs, such as for diagnostic biomarker studies, prognostic biomarker studies and therapeutic response studies. Application of these uniform definitions will lead to better comparability of biomarker studies and optimal use...

  20. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cutsem, E; Cervantes, A; Adam, R

    2016-01-01

    for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team...... based on the current available evidence to provide a series of evidence-based recommendations to assist in the treatment and management of patients with mCRC in this rapidly evolving treatment setting.......Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred...

  1. A survey of Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Bruce F; Stomski, Norman J; Hebert, Jeff J; French, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Background Research into chiropractors’ use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors’ adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine t...

  2. Prevention of thrombosis in pregnancy: how practical are consensus derived clinical practice guidelines?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes-Ryan, D

    2012-11-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) has, for many years, consistently been identified as one of the leading causes of direct maternal mortality. In November 2009, the RCOG published a guideline on the prevention of TED that has been rapidly adopted by hospital trusts in the UK. The aim of our study was to determine the number and profile of women in our population that would require treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and the cost implications of such treatment if these guidelines were implemented. A retrospective review of the first 100 women who delivered at the Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital (CWIUH) in 2010 was conducted and risk stratification applied at the relevant time points. A total of 51% were deemed to be at intermediate or high risk of TED at some point during pregnancy. In 35 of the 51 women (70%), this risk was attributable to factors such as age>35 years, parity≥3, BMI>30 kg\\/m2 or cigarette smoking. In our obstetric population, the percentage of women with these risk factors was: 25.5%, 8.5%, 19% and 16.7%, respectively. Implementation of this guideline would increase the hospital annual expenditure on LMWH by a factor of 17. The strategy of attributing risk by accumulating factors that individually have a low risk of TED and are prevalent in the population needs to be re-visited. The cost of implementation of these guidelines is not inconsiderable in the absence of data to indicate that clinical outcome is improved with their implementation.

  3. South Asian Consensus Guideline: Use of GLP-1 analogue therapy in diabetes during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Faruque Pathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan is a lunar based month, during which Muslims across the world observe the ritual fast. This provides a challenge not only to the diabetic patient who wishes to observe the fast but also to the health care professional managing his diabetes. The challenge is to use therapies which are effective in maintaining good glycemic control and at the same time have a low propensity to cause hypoglycemia during the several hours of no calorie intake. The GLP-1 analogues are unique agents which are effective in providing glycemic reduction with a very low risk of hypoglycemia and hence find an important place in the management of diabetes during Ramadan. This Consensus Statement describes the pre-Ramadan assessment, planning, prescription and management and monitoring of patients who are on GLP-1 analogues, with or without other antidiabetic therapies.

  4. [Is our approach to thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid carcinoma in agreement with the American guideline and European consensus?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Sáez, José Manuel

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the approaches of specialists in Spain to patients with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid carcinoma and to compare them with the American guideline and European consensus. We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire addressed to clinical endocrinologists specialized in thyroid cancer and specialists in nuclear medicine throughout Spain. A total of 177 questionnaires were completed, representing an overall response rate of 85%; 74% of responses were from endocrinologists and 24% from physicians active in nuclear medicine; 82% of respondents worked in third-level hospitals, 10% in second level hospitals and the remainder in private practice. Most used ultrasonography and cytology to assess thyroid nodules and collaborated with a group of surgeons expert in thyroid surgery. The majority preferred total or subtotal thyroidectomy in tumors with a diameter of 1 cm or more, and systematic lymph node dissection. Only 43 (24%) preferred prophylactic central lymph node dissection. Eighty-one respondents (45%) would still use whole body scan with ¹³¹I or ¹²³I before ¹³¹I ablation. Follow-up was based on cervical echography and thyroglobulin determination; however, 101 (57%) respondents continued to use diagnostic whole body scan in the follow-up. The approaches of the respondents were mainly in accordance with the guideline and consensus, although some variations were found, especially in the use of whole body scan with ¹³¹I before ablation and in follow-up. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    , and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  6. Development of a theory- and evidence-based intervention to enhance implementation of physical therapy guidelines for the management of low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Geert M; Harting, Janneke; Bartholomew, Leona K; Braspenning, Jozé C; van Dolder, Rob; Heijmans, Marcel FGJ; Hendriks, Erik JM; Kremers, Stef PJ; van Peppen, Roland PS; Rutten, Steven TJ; Schlief, Angelique; de Vries, Nanne K; Oostendorp, Rob AB

    2014-01-01

    Background Systematic planning could improve the generally moderate effectiveness of interventions to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of our study was to demonstrate how the process of Intervention Mapping was used to develop an intervention to address the lack of adherence to the national CPG for low back pain by Dutch physical therapists. Methods We systematically developed a program to improve adherence to the Dutch physical therapy guidelines for low back pain. ...

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder: consensus guidelines on assessment, treatment and research from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Oliver D; Charman, Tony; King, Bryan H.; Loth, Eva; McAlonan, Gráinne M.; McCracken, James T.; Parr, Jeremy R; Santosh, Paramala; Wallace, Simon; Murphy, Declan G.

    2018-01-01

    An expert review of the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and recommendations for diagnosis, management and service provision was coordinated by the British Association for Psychopharmacology, and evidence graded. The aetiology of ASD involves genetic and environmental contributions, and implicates a number of brain systems, in particular the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonergic and glutamatergic systems. The presentation of ASD varies widely and co-occurring health problems (in particular epilepsy, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and irritability) are common. We did not recommend the routine use of any pharmacological treatment for the core symptoms of ASD. In children, melatonin may be useful to treat sleep problems, dopamine blockers for irritability, and methylphenidate, atomoxetine and guanfacine for ADHD. The evidence for use of medication in adults is limited and recommendations are largely based on extrapolations from studies in children and patients without ASD. We discuss the conditions for considering and evaluating a trial of medication treatment, when non-pharmacological interventions should be considered, and make recommendations on service delivery. Finally, we identify key gaps and limitations in the current evidence base and make recommendations for future research and the design of clinical trials. PMID:29237331

  8. Autism spectrum disorder: Consensus guidelines on assessment, treatment and research from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Oliver D; Rogdaki, Maria; Findon, James L; Wichers, Robert H; Charman, Tony; King, Bryan H; Loth, Eva; McAlonan, Gráinne M; McCracken, James T; Parr, Jeremy R; Povey, Carol; Santosh, Paramala; Wallace, Simon; Simonoff, Emily; Murphy, Declan G

    2018-01-01

    An expert review of the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of autism spectrum disorder, and recommendations for diagnosis, management and service provision was coordinated by the British Association for Psychopharmacology, and evidence graded. The aetiology of autism spectrum disorder involves genetic and environmental contributions, and implicates a number of brain systems, in particular the gamma-aminobutyric acid, serotonergic and glutamatergic systems. The presentation of autism spectrum disorder varies widely and co-occurring health problems (in particular epilepsy, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and irritability) are common. We did not recommend the routine use of any pharmacological treatment for the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. In children, melatonin may be useful to treat sleep problems, dopamine blockers for irritability, and methylphenidate, atomoxetine and guanfacine for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The evidence for use of medication in adults is limited and recommendations are largely based on extrapolations from studies in children and patients without autism spectrum disorder. We discuss the conditions for considering and evaluating a trial of medication treatment, when non-pharmacological interventions should be considered, and make recommendations on service delivery. Finally, we identify key gaps and limitations in the current evidence base and make recommendations for future research and the design of clinical trials.

  9. Validation of the 2012 Fukuoka Consensus Guideline for Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas From a Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Songfeng; Takasu, Naoki; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Fukumoto, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shinji; Tezuka, Koji; Sugawara, Shuichiro; Hirai, Ichiro; Kimura, Wataru

    2017-08-01

    The 2012 Fukuoka consensus guideline has stratified the risks of malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas into "high-risk stigmata" (HRS) and "worrisome feature" (WF). This study aimed to evaluate its clinical validity based on a single institution experience. Eighty-nine patients who underwent surgical resection with pathological diagnosis of IPMN were retrospectively studied. High-risk stigmata was significantly correlated with the prevalence of malignant IPMN as compared with WF. The positive predictive values of HRS and WF were 66.7% and 35.7% for branch duct IPMN and 80% and 38.1% for main duct IPMN, respectively. Univariate analysis indicated that all the factors in HRS and WF had statistical significance. Whereas multivariate analysis revealed only enhanced solid component (odds ratio [OR], 50.01; P = 0.008), presence of mural nodule (OR, 73.83; P < 0.001) and lymphadenopathy (OR, 20.85; P = 0.03) were independent predictors. Scoring HRS and WF by different numbers of positive factors resulted in improved predictive value. The area under the curve of HRS score was significantly lower than that of WF or HRS + WF score (0.680 vs 0.900 or 0.902, respectively; P < 0.001). As supplementary to the 2012 Fukuoka guideline, we suggest that calculating scores of WF and HRS may have superior diagnostic accuracy in predicting malignant IPMN.

  10. American brachytherapy society (ABS) consensus guidelines for brachytherapy of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Laurie E.; Nag, Subir; Herskovic, Arnold; Mantravadi, Rao; Speiser, Burton

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: There is wide variation in the indications, treatment regimens, and dosimetry for brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the esophagus. No guidelines for optimal therapy currently exist. Methods and Materials: Utilizing published reports and clinical experience, representatives of the Clinical Research Committee of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) formulated guidelines for brachytherapy in esophageal cancer. Results: Recommendations were made for brachytherapy in the definitive and palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. (A) Definitive treatment: Good candidates for brachytherapy include patients with unifocal thoracic adeno- or squamous cancers ≤ 10 cm in length, with no evidence of intra-abdominal or metastatic disease. Contraindications include tracheal or bronchial involvement, cervical esophagus location, or stenosis that cannot be bypassed. The esophageal brachytherapy applicator should have an external diameter of 6-10 mm. If 5FU-based chemotherapy and 45-50-Gy external beam are used, recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10 Gy in two weekly fractions of 5 Gy each; or (ii) LDR 20 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. All doses are specified 1 cm from the midsource or middwell position. Brachytherapy should follow external beam radiation therapy and should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy. (B) Palliative treatment: Patients with adeno- or squamous cancers of the thoracic esophagus with distant metastases or unresectable local disease progression/recurrence after definitive radiation treatment should be considered for brachytherapy with palliative intent. After limited dose (30 Gy) EBRT, the recommended brachytherapy is either: (i) HDR 10-14 Gy in one or two fractions; or (ii) LDR 20-25 Gy in a single course at 0.4-1 Gy/hr. The need for external beam radiation in newly diagnosed patients with a life expectancy of less than 3 months is controversial. In these cases, HDR of 15-20 Gy in two to four fractions or

  11. Development of a theory- and evidence-based intervention to enhance implementation of physical therapy guidelines for the management of low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, G.M.J.; Harting, J.; Bartholomew, L.K.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Dolder, R. van; Heijmans, M.F.; Hendriks, E.J.; Kremers, S.P.; Peppen, R.P. van; Rutten, S.T.; Schlief, A.; Vries, N.K. de; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systematic planning could improve the generally moderate effectiveness of interventions to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of our study was to demonstrate how the process of Intervention Mapping was used to develop an intervention to address the lack of

  12. Development of a theory- and evidence-based intervention to enhance implementation of physical therapy guidelines for the management of low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Geert M.; Harting, Janneke; Bartholomew, Leona K.; Braspenning, Jozé C.; van Dolder, Rob; Heijmans, Marcel Fgj; Hendriks, Erik Jm; Kremers, Stef Pj; van Peppen, Roland Ps; Rutten, Steven Tj; Schlief, Angelique; de Vries, Nanne K.; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2014-01-01

    Systematic planning could improve the generally moderate effectiveness of interventions to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of our study was to demonstrate how the process of Intervention Mapping was used to develop an intervention to address the lack of adherence to the

  13. Development of a theory- and evidence-based intervention to enhance implementation of physical therapy guidelines for the management of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Geert M; Harting, Janneke; Bartholomew, Leona K; Braspenning, Jozé C; van Dolder, Rob; Heijmans, Marcel Fgj; Hendriks, Erik Jm; Kremers, Stef Pj; van Peppen, Roland Ps; Rutten, Steven Tj; Schlief, Angelique; de Vries, Nanne K; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2014-01-15

    Systematic planning could improve the generally moderate effectiveness of interventions to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. The aim of our study was to demonstrate how the process of Intervention Mapping was used to develop an intervention to address the lack of adherence to the national CPG for low back pain by Dutch physical therapists. We systematically developed a program to improve adherence to the Dutch physical therapy guidelines for low back pain. Based on multi-method formative research, we formulated program and change objectives. Selected theory-based methods of change and practical applications were combined into an intervention program. Implementation and evaluation plans were developed. Formative research revealed influential determinants for physical therapists and practice quality managers. Self-regulation was appropriate because both the physical therapists and the practice managers needed to monitor current practice and make and implement plans for change. The program stimulated interaction between practice levels by emphasizing collective goal setting. It combined practical applications, such as knowledge transfer and discussion-and-feedback, based on theory-based methods, such as consciousness raising and active learning. The implementation plan incorporated the wider environment. The evaluation plan included an effect and process evaluation. Intervention Mapping is a useful framework for formative data in program planning in the field of clinical guideline implementation. However, a decision aid to select determinants of guideline adherence identified in the formative research to analyse the problem may increase the efficiency of the application of the Intervention Mapping process.

  14. Availability, consistency and evidence-base of policies and guidelines on the use of mask and respirator to protect hospital health care workers: a global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina

    2013-05-31

    Currently there is an ongoing debate and limited evidence on the use of masks and respirators for the prevention of respiratory infections in health care workers (HCWs). This study aimed to examine available policies and guidelines around the use of masks and respirators in HCWs and to describe areas of consistency between guidelines, as well as gaps in the recommendations, with reference to the WHO and the CDC guidelines. Policies and guidelines related to mask and respirator use for the prevention of influenza, SARS and TB were examined. Guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), three high-income countries and six low/middle-income countries were selected. Uniform recommendations are made by the WHO and the CDC in regards to protecting HCWs against seasonal influenza (a mask for low risk situations and a respirator for high risk situations) and TB (use of a respirator). However, for pandemic influenza and SARS, the WHO recommends mask use in low risk and respirators in high risk situations, whereas, the CDC recommends respirators in both low and high risk situations. Amongst the nine countries reviewed, there are variations in the recommendations for all three diseases. While, some countries align with the WHO recommendations, others align with those made by the CDC. The choice of respirator and the level of filtering ability vary amongst the guidelines and the different diseases. Lastly, none of the policies discuss reuse, extended use or the use of cloth masks. Currently, there are significant variations in the policies and recommendations around mask and respirator use for protection against influenza, SARS and TB. These differences may reflect the scarcity of level-one evidence available to inform policy development. The lack of any guidelines on the use of cloth masks, despite widespread use in many low and middle-income countries, remains a policy gap. Health organizations and countries should

  15. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology in candidates for surgical resection of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: should the International Consensus Guidelines be revised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Maehara, Tadayuki

    2009-03-01

    The International Consensus Guidelines are helpful for the management of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), because they allow us to exclude malignancy. However, it is not possible to predict malignancy with certainty, and further preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs is required to avoid the false-positive results. To examine the usefulness of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology by using an originally designed double-lumen catheter for discriminating benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology was investigated in 24 patients with branch-duct IPMNs who underwent surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines, namely, they either had intramural nodules or the ectatic branch duct was >30 mm in diameter. Single-center retrospective study. Academic medical center. The sensitivity and specificity of pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology for discriminating benign from malignant IPMNs. More than 30 mL of pancreatic-duct-lavage fluid was obtained from each patient, and there were no patients with noninformative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the cytologic diagnosis were 78%, 93%, 88%, and 88%, respectively. Single-center and small number of patients. Pancreatic-duct-lavage cytology can improve differentiation between benign and malignant IPMNs of the branch-duct type in candidates for surgical resection based on the International Consensus Guidelines.

  16. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research: Consensus and practical guidelines for data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Beeson, Pélagie M.; Cappa, Stefano; Crinion, Jenny; Kiran, Swathi; Saur, Dorothee; Parrish, Todd; Crosson, Bruce; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging is the most widely used imaging technique to study treatment-induced recovery in post-stroke aphasia. The longitudinal design of such studies adds to the challenges researchers face when studying patient populations with brain damage in cross-sectional settings. The present review focuses on issues specifically relevant to neuroimaging data analysis in aphasia treatment research identified in discussions among international researchers at the Neuroimaging in Aphasia Treatment Research Workshop held at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois, USA). In particular, we aim to provide the reader with a critical review of unique problems related to the pre-processing, statistical modeling and interpretation of such data sets. Despite the fact that data analysis procedures critically depend on specific design features of a given study, we aim to discuss and communicate a basic set of practical guidelines that should be applicable to a wide range of studies and useful as a reference for researchers pursuing this line of research. PMID:22387474

  17. Health professionals working with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis consensus guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Don; de la Ronde, Sandra; Brascoupé, Simon; Apale, Alisha Nicole; Barney, Lucy; Guthrie, Bing; Harrold, Elizabeth; Horn, Ojistoh; Johnson, Robin; Rattray, Darrien; Robinson, Nicole; Alainga-Kango, Natsiq; Becker, Gisela; Senikas, Vyta; Aningmiuq, Annie; Bailey, Geri; Birch, Darlene; Cook, Katsi; Danforth, Jessica; Daoust, Mary; Kitty, Darlene; Koebel, Jaime; Kornelsen, Judith; Tsatsa Kotwas, Ndakaitedzva; Lawrence, Audrey; Mudry, Amanda; Senikas, Vyta; Turner, Gail Theresa; Van Wagner, Vicki; Vides, Eduardo; Wasekeesikaw, Fjola Hart; Wolfe, Sara

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to provide health care professionals in Canada with the knowledge and tools to provide culturally safe care to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women and through them, to their families, in order to improve the health of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, and The Cochrane Library in 2011 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g.,cultural competency, health services, indigenous, transcultural nursing) and key words (e.g., indigenous health services, transcultural health care, cultural safety). Targeted searches on subtopics (e.g., ceremonial rites and sexual coming of age) were also performed. The PubMed search was restricted to the years 2005 and later because of the large number of records retrieved on this topic. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2012. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of selected related agencies (e.g., Campbell Collaboration, Social Care Online, Institute for Healthcare Improvement). The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task force on Preventive Health Care (Table).

  18. Strategies for addressing adherence problems in patients with serious and persistent mental illness: recommendations from the expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Weiden, Peter J; Sajatovic, Martha; Scott, Jan; Carpenter, Daniel; Ross, Ruth; Docherty, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poor adherence to medication can have devastating consequences for patients with serious mental illness. The literature review and recommendations in this article are reprinted from The Expert Consensus Guideline Series: Adherence Problems in Patients with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness, published in 2009. The expert consensus survey (39 questions, 521 options) on adherence problems in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was completed by 41 experts in 2008. This article first reviews the literature on interventions aimed at improving adherence. It then presents the experts' recommendations for targeting factors that can contribute to nonadherence and relates them to the literature. The following psychosocial/programmatic and pharmacologic interventions were rated first line for specific problems that can lead to nonadherence: ongoing symptom/ side-effect monitoring for persistent symptoms or side effects; services targeting logistic problems; medication monitoring/environmental supports (e.g., Cognitive Adaptation Training, assertive community treatment) for lack of routines or cognitive deficits; and adjusting the dose or switching to a different oral antipsychotic for persistent side effects (also high second-line for persistent symptoms). Among pharmacologic interventions, the experts gave high second-line ratings to switching to a long-acting antipsychotic when lack of insight, substance use, persistent symptoms, logistic problems, lack of routines, or lack of family/ social support interfere with adherence and to simplifying the treatment regimen when logistic problems, lack of routines, cognitive deficits, or lack of family/social support interfere with adherence. Psychosocial/programmatic interventions that received high second-line ratings in a number of situations included medication monitoring/environmental supports, patient psychoeducation, more frequent and/or longer visits if possible, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), family-focused therapy

  19. Assessment of adherence problems in patients with serious and persistent mental illness: recommendations from the Expert Consensus Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velligan, Dawn I; Weiden, Peter J; Sajatovic, Martha; Scott, Jan; Carpenter, Daniel; Ross, Ruth; Docherty, John P

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication treatment can have devastating consequences for patients with serious mental illness. The literature review and recommendations in this article concerning assessment of adherence are reprinted from The Expert Consensus Guideline Series: Adherence Problems in Patients with Serious and Persistent Mental Illness, published in 2009. The expert consensus survey contained 39 questions (521 options) that asked about defining nonadherence, extent of adherence problems in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, risk factors for nonadherence, assessment methods, and interventions for specific types of adherence problems. The survey was completed by 41 (85%) of the 48 experts to whom it was sent. When evaluating adherence, the experts considered it important to assess both behavior and attitude, although they considered actual behavior most important. They also noted the importance of distinguishing patients who are not willing to take medication from those who are willing but not able to take their medication as prescribed due to forgetfulness, misunderstanding of instructions, or financial or environmental problems, since this will affect the type of intervention needed. Although self- and physician report are most commonly used to clinically assess adherence, they are often inaccurate and may underestimate nonadherence. The experts believe that more accurate information will be obtained by asking about any problems patients are having or anticipate having taking medication rather than if they have been taking their medication; They also recommended speaking with family or caregivers, if the patient gives permission, as well as using more objective measures (e.g., pill counts, pharmacy records, smart pill containers if available, and, when appropriate, medication plasma levels). Use of a validated self-report scale may also help improve accuracy. For patients who appear adherent to medication, the experts recommended monthly assessments for

  20. Evidence-based surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Rems

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is setting a new ground by the reign of evidence that was brought up by the Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. While experiences and opinion of an expert count the least by the principles of EBM, randomized controlled trials (RCT and other comparative studies have gained their importance. Recommendations that were included in guidelines represent a demanding shift in surgeon’s professional thinking. Their thinking and classical education have not yet been completely based on the results of such studies and are still very very much master-pupil centred. Assessment of someone’s own experiences is threatened by objectivity as negative experiences get recorded in deeper memory. Randomized studies and meta-analyses do appear also in surgery. However, they demand an extra knowledge about critical assessment.Conclusions: Setting a patient to the foreground brings a surgeon’s decision to the field of EBM. The process has already begun and cannot be avoided. Decision hierarchy moves from the experience field to the evidence territory but to a lesser extent when compared to the rest of medicine. There exist objective restrictions with approving a new paradigm. However, these should not stop the process of EBM implementation. Finally, there is an ethic issue to be considered. Too slow activities in research, education and critical assessment can bring the surgeon to the position when a well-informed patient loses his/her trust.

  1. RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis on veterinary CPR. Part 1: Evidence analysis and consensus process: collaborative path toward small animal CPR guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Manuel; Fletcher, Daniel J

    2012-06-01

    To describe the methodology used by the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) to evaluate the scientific evidence relevant to small animal CPR and to compose consensus-based clinical CPR guidelines for dogs and cats. This report is part of a series of 7 articles on the RECOVER evidence and knowledge gap analysis and consensus-based small animal CPR guidelines. It describes the organizational structure of RECOVER, the evaluation process employed, consisting of standardized literature searches, the analysis of relevant articles according to study design, species and predefined quality markers, and the drafting of clinical CPR guidelines based on these data. Therefore, this article serves as the methodology section for the subsequent 6 RECOVER articles. Academia, referral practice. RECOVER is a collaborative initiative that systematically evaluated the evidence on 74 topics relevant to small animal CPR and generated 101 clinical CPR guidelines from this analysis. All primary contributors were veterinary specialists, approximately evenly split between academic institutions and private referral practices. The evidence evaluation and guideline drafting processes were conducted according to a predefined sequence of steps designed to reduce bias and increase the repeatability of the findings, including multiple levels of review, culminating in a consensus process. Many knowledge gaps were identified that will allow prioritization of research efforts in veterinary CPR. Collaborative systematic evidence review is organizationally challenging but feasible and effective in veterinary medicine. More experience is needed to refine the process. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  2. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Schnitt, Stuart J. [Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Giuliano, Armando E. [Department of Surgery, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Harris, Jay R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Khan, Seema A. [Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Horton, Janet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Klimberg, Suzanne [Department of Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas (United States); Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Houssami, Nehmat [School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Johnson, Peggy L. [Advocate in Science, Susan G. Komen, Wichita, Kansas (United States); Morrow, Monica, E-mail: morrowm@mskcc.org [Breast Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs.

  3. Society of Surgical Oncology–American Society for Radiation Oncology Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Surgery With Whole-Breast Irradiation in Stages I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Meena S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Giuliano, Armando E.; Harris, Jay R.; Khan, Seema A.; Horton, Janet; Klimberg, Suzanne; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Freedman, Gary; Houssami, Nehmat; Johnson, Peggy L.; Morrow, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To convene a multidisciplinary panel of breast experts to examine the relationship between margin width and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) and develop a guideline for defining adequate margins in the setting of breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A multidisciplinary consensus panel used a meta-analysis of margin width and IBTR from a systematic review of 33 studies including 28,162 patients as the primary evidence base for consensus. Results: Positive margins (ink on invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ) are associated with a 2-fold increase in the risk of IBTR compared with negative margins. This increased risk is not mitigated by favorable biology, endocrine therapy, or a radiation boost. More widely clear margins than no ink on tumor do not significantly decrease the rate of IBTR compared with no ink on tumor. There is no evidence that more widely clear margins reduce IBTR for young patients or for those with unfavorable biology, lobular cancers, or cancers with an extensive intraductal component. Conclusions: The use of no ink on tumor as the standard for an adequate margin in invasive cancer in the era of multidisciplinary therapy is associated with low rates of IBTR and has the potential to decrease re-excision rates, improve cosmetic outcomes, and decrease health care costs

  4. Consensus-based guidelines for Video EEG monitoring in the pre-surgical evaluation of children with epilepsy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, Ronit M; Seri, Stefano; Kane, Nick; Martland, Tim; Goyal, Sushma; Iyer, Anand; Warren, Elliott; Notghi, Lesley; Bill, Peter; Thornton, Rachel; Appleton, Richard; Doyle, Sarah; Rushton, Sarah; Worley, Alan; Boyd, Stewart G

    2017-08-01

    Paediatric Epilepsy surgery in the UK has recently been centralised in order to improve expertise and quality of service available to children. Video EEG monitoring or telemetry is a highly specialised and a crucial component of the pre-surgical evaluation. Although many Epilepsy Monitoring Units work to certain standards, there is no national or international guideline for paediatric video telemetry. Due to lack of evidence we used a modified Delphi process utilizing the clinical and academic expertise of the clinical neurophysiology sub-specialty group of Children's Epilepsy Surgical Service (CESS) centres in England and Wales. This process consisted of the following stages I: Identification of the consensus working group, II: Identification of key areas for guidelines, III: Consensus practice points and IV: Final review. Statements that gained consensus (median score of either 4 or 5 using a five-point Likerttype scale) were included in the guideline. Two rounds of feedback and amendments were undertaken. The consensus guidelines includes the following topics: referral pathways, neurophysiological equipment standards, standards of recording techniques, with specific emphasis on safety of video EEG monitoring both with and without drug withdrawal, a protocol for testing patient's behaviours, data storage and guidelines for writing factual reports and conclusions. All statements developed received a median score of 5 and were adopted by the group. Using a modified Delphi process we were able to develop universally-accepted video EEG guidelines for the UK CESS. Although these recommendations have been specifically developed for the pre-surgical evaluation of children with epilepsy, it is assumed that most components are transferable to any paediatric video EEG monitoring setting. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. Methods A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal youth mental health, participated in a Delphi study investigating how members of the public can be culturally appropriate when helping an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent with mental health problems. The panel varied in size across the three sequential rounds, from 37–41 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about cultural considerations and communication strategies via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional content. All statements endorsed as either Essential or Important by ≥ 90% of panel members were written into a guideline document. To assess the panel members’ satisfaction with the research method, participants were invited to provide their feedback after the final survey. Results From a total of 304 statements shown to the panel of experts, 194 statements were endorsed. The methodology was found to be useful and appropriate by the panellists. Conclusion Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth mental health experts were able to reach consensus about what the appropriate communication strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent. These outcomes will help ensure that the community provides the best possible support to Aboriginal adolescents who

  6. Providing culturally appropriate mental health first aid to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent: development of expert consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Kathryn J; Bond, Kathy S; Jorm, Anthony F; Kelly, Claire M; Kitchener, Betty A; Williams-Tchen, Aj

    2014-01-28

    It is estimated that the prevalence of mental illness is higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescents compared to non-Aboriginal adolescents. Despite this, only a small proportion of Aboriginal youth have contact with mental health services, possibly due to factors such as remoteness, language barriers, affordability and cultural sensitivity issues. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for anyone who is providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal youth mental health, participated in a Delphi study investigating how members of the public can be culturally appropriate when helping an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander adolescent with mental health problems. The panel varied in size across the three sequential rounds, from 37-41 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about cultural considerations and communication strategies via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional content. All statements endorsed as either Essential or Important by ≥ 90% of panel members were written into a guideline document. To assess the panel members' satisfaction with the research method, participants were invited to provide their feedback after the final survey. From a total of 304 statements shown to the panel of experts, 194 statements were endorsed. The methodology was found to be useful and appropriate by the panellists. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth mental health experts were able to reach consensus about what the appropriate communication strategies for providing mental health first aid to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adolescent. These outcomes will help ensure that the community provides the best possible support to Aboriginal adolescents who are developing mental illnesses or are in a

  7. Consensus Guidelines for Practical Competencies in Anatomic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine for the Undifferentiated Graduating Medical Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magid, Margret S; Shah, Darshana T; Cambor, Carolyn L; Conran, Richard M; Lin, Amy Y; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Pessin, Melissa S; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-01-01

    The practice of pathology is not generally addressed in the undergraduate medical school curriculum. It is desirable to develop practical pathology competencies in the fields of anatomic pathology and laboratory medicine for every graduating medical student to facilitate (1) instruction in effective utilization of these services for optimal patient care, (2) recognition of the role of pathologists and laboratory scientists as consultants, and (3) exposure to the field of pathology as a possible career choice. A national committee was formed, including experts in anatomic pathology and/or laboratory medicine and in medical education. Suggested practical pathology competencies were developed in 9 subspecialty domains based on literature review and committee deliberations. The competencies were distributed in the form of a survey in late 2012 through the first half of 2013 to the medical education community for feedback, which was subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. An approval rate of ≥80% constituted consensus for adoption of a competency, with additional inclusions/modifications considered following committee review of comments. The survey included 79 proposed competencies. There were 265 respondents, the majority being pathologists. Seventy-two percent (57 of 79) of the competencies were approved by ≥80% of respondents. Numerous comments (N = 503) provided a robust resource for qualitative analysis. Following committee review, 71 competencies (including 27 modified and 3 new competencies) were considered to be essential for undifferentiated graduating medical students. Guidelines for practical pathology competencies have been developed, with the hope that they will be implemented in undergraduate medical school curricula.

  8. Systematic review and evidence based recommendations on texture modified foods and thickened liquids for adults (above 17 years) with oropharyngeal dysphagia - An updated clinical guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Hansen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    /chin down (RR 1.18; 95% CI 1.01-1.37). No evidence was identified for review question 2. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the quality of the evidence, assessment of the risk benefit ratio, and perceived patient preferences a weak recommendation against the use of texture modified liquids and good clinical practice......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) has significant consequences for both the person with dysphagia and the society. An often-used treatment for OD is the recommendation of the texture of food and liquids. This recommendation seems to be based more on best practice than on evidence from...... a systematic review of existing scientific evidence. The aim of this paper was to report the result of an up-date of an original national guideline focussing on whether thickened liquids (review question 1) and modified foods (review question 2) are beneficial for adults above 17 years with OD in relation...

  9. Quality assessment of recent evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Muhammad A; Al-Fahed, Ousama B; Arif, Samir I; Amer, Yasser S; Titi, Maher A; Al-Rukban, Mohammed O

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide and national public health problem that has a great impact on the population in Saudi Arabia. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are cornerstones in improving the health care provided for patients with diabetes. This study evaluated the methodological rigour, transparency, and applicability of recently published CPGs. Our group conducted a systematic search for recently published CPGs for T2DM. The searching and screening for Source CPGs were guided by tools from the ADAPTE methods with specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Five reviewers using the second version of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument independently assessed the quality of the retrieved Source CPGs. Domains of Scope and purpose and Clarity of presentation received the highest scores in all CPGs. Most of the assessed CPGs (86%) were considered with high overall quality and were recommended for use. Rigour of development and applicability domains were together highest in 3 CPGs (43%). The overall high quality of DM CPGs published in the last 3 years demonstrated the continuous development and improvement in CPG methodologies and standards. Health care professionals should consider the quality of any CPG for T2DM before deciding to use it in their daily clinical practice. Three CPGs have been identified, using the AGREE criteria, as high-quality and trustworthy. Ideally, the resources provided by the AGREE trust including the AGREE II Instrument should be used by a clinician to scan through the large number of published T2DM CPGs to identify the CPGs with high methodological quality and applicability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Surgical Resection for the Treatment of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Carlson, Matthew L; Link, Michael J; Rayan, Tarek A; Parish, John; Atkins, Tyler; Asher, Anthony L; Dunn, Ian F; Corrales, C Eduardo; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Sughrue, Michael; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2018-02-01

    to either subspecialist working alone. Does a subtotal surgical resection of a VS followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the residual tumor provide comparable hearing and FN preservation to patients who undergo a complete surgical resection? There is insufficient evidence to support subtotal resection (STR) followed by SRS provides comparable hearing and FN preservation to patients who undergo a complete surgical resection. Does surgical resection of VS treat preoperative balance problems more effectively than SRS? There is insufficient evidence to support either surgical resection or SRS for treatment of preoperative balance problems. Does surgical resection of VS treat preoperative trigeminal neuralgia more effectively than SRS? Level 3: Surgical resection of VSs may be used to better relieve symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia than SRS. Is surgical resection of VSs more difficult (associated with higher facial neuropathies and STR rates) after initial treatment with SRS? Level 3: If microsurgical resection is necessary after SRS, it is recommended that patients be counseled that there is an increased likelihood of a STR and decreased FN function.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_8. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  11. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Frederick D; Gelfand, Michael J; Drubach, Laura A; Treves, S Ted; Fahey, Frederic H

    2015-04-01

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  12. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.; Treves, S. Ted; Fahey, Frederic H.; Gelfand, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  13. Evidence-based guideline update: determining brain death in adults: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Varelas, Panayiotis N; Gronseth, Gary S; Greer, David M

    2010-06-08

    To provide an update of the 1995 American Academy of Neurology guideline with regard to the following questions: Are there patients who fulfill the clinical criteria of brain death who recover neurologic function? What is an adequate observation period to ensure that cessation of neurologic function is permanent? Are complex motor movements that falsely suggest retained brain function sometimes observed in brain death? What is the comparative safety of techniques for determining apnea? Are there new ancillary tests that accurately identify patients with brain death? A systematic literature search was conducted and included a review of MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1996 to May 2009. Studies were limited to adults. In adults, there are no published reports of recovery of neurologic function after a diagnosis of brain death using the criteria reviewed in the 1995 American Academy of Neurology practice parameter. Complex-spontaneous motor movements and false-positive triggering of the ventilator may occur in patients who are brain dead. There is insufficient evidence to determine the minimally acceptable observation period to ensure that neurologic functions have ceased irreversibly. Apneic oxygenation diffusion to determine apnea is safe, but there is insufficient evidence to determine the comparative safety of techniques used for apnea testing. There is insufficient evidence to determine if newer ancillary tests accurately confirm the cessation of function of the entire brain.

  14. Management of hip fractures in older people in Beijing: a retrospective audit and comparison with evidence-based guidelines and practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, M; Gong, X; Rath, S; Wei, J; Yan, L L; Lamb, S E; Lindley, R I; Sherrington, C; Willett, K; Norton, R

    2016-02-01

    Despite the high burden of hip fracture in China, there is limited information on its management. This study investigated the management of hip fractures in a Beijing tertiary hospital and compared practice with that in 180 hospitals in the UK. The findings show a significant gap exists between the countries. The purpose of this study was to determine if the management of older people with hip fractures in a Beijing tertiary hospital is comparable with the UK best practice guidelines for hip fracture management and the UK National Hip Fracture Database 2012, obtained from 180 hospitals. A retrospective audit was undertaken in a large tertiary care hospital in Beijing. Data were compared with the National Hip Fracture Database 2012 collected in 180 hospitals in the UK on the proportion of patients managed according to the UK Blue Book standards. Sixty-six percent of patients were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 24 h of fracture, while 100 % of patients in the UK were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 24 h of arrival to an accident and emergency department. Only 8 % of patients received surgery within 48 h of admission compared with 83 % in the UK; 10 % received no surgery compared with 2.5 % in the UK; and 27 % received orthogeriatrician assessment compared with 70 % in the UK. New pressure ulcers developed in 2 % of patients compared with 3.7 % of those in the UK; whereas, 0.3 % of patients were assessed for osteoporosis treatment and 3.8 % received falls assessment, and comparable figures for the UK were 94 and 92 %, respectively. Significant gaps exist in hip fracture management in the Beijing hospital compared with the best practice achieved in 180 UK hospitals, highlighting the need to implement and evaluate proactive strategies to increase the uptake of best practice hip fracture care in China.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a consensus guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon; Abrahams, Mark; Doble, Andrew; Cooper, Alison

    2015-10-01

    To improve awareness and recognition of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) among non-specialists and patients. To provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating patients with CBP and CP/CPPS, in both non-specialist and specialist settings. To promote efficient referral of care between non-specialists and specialists and the involvement of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). The guideline population were men with CBP or CP/CPPS (persistent or recurrent symptoms and no other urogenital pathology for ≥3 of the previous 6 months). Consensus recommendations for the guidelines were based on a search to identify literature on the diagnosis and management of CBP and CP/CPPS (published between 1999 and February 2014). A Delphi panel process was used where high-quality, published evidence was lacking. CBP and CP/CPPS can present with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The four main symptom domains are urogenital pain, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS - voiding or storage symptoms), psychological issues and sexual dysfunction. Patients should be managed according to their individual symptom pattern. Options for first-line treatment include antibiotics, α-adrenergic antagonists (if voiding LUTS are present) and simple analgesics. Repeated use of antibiotics, such as quinolones, should be avoided if there is no obvious symptomatic benefit from infection control or cultures do not support an infectious cause. Early use of treatments targeting neuropathic pain and/or referral to specialist services should be considered for patients who do not respond to initial measures. An MDT approach (urologists, pain specialists, nurse specialists, specialist physiotherapists, general practitioners, cognitive behavioural therapists/psychologists, and sexual health specialists) is recommended. Patients should be fully informed about the possible underlying causes and treatment options, including an explanation of

  16. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Tae K. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shyn, Paul [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Cheng, Jason C. [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Feng, Mary U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital/McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Crane, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment

  17. A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume for pelvic lymph nodes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline as well as an atlas defining pelvic nodal clinical target volumes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. A working subgroup to establish the consensus-based guideline on clinical target volumes for uterine cervical cancer was formulated by the Radiation Therapy Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group in July 2008. The working subgroup consisted of seven radiation oncologists. The process resulting in the consensus included a comparison of contouring on CT images among the members, reviewing of published textbooks and the relevant literature and a distribution analysis of metastatic nodes on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of actual patients. The working subgroup defined the pelvic nodal clinical target volumes for cervical cancer and developed an associated atlas. As a basic criterion, the lymph node clinical target volume was defined as the area encompassed by a 7 mm margin around the applicable pelvic vessels. Modifications were made in each nodal area to cover adjacent adipose tissues at risk of microscopic nodal metastases. Although the bones and muscles were excluded, the bowel was not routinely excluded in the definition. Each of the following pelvic node regions was defined: common iliac, external iliac, internal iliac, obturator and presacral. Anatomical structures bordering each lymph node region were defined for six directions; anterior, posterior, lateral, medial, cranial and caudal. Drafts of the definition and the atlas were reviewed by members of the JCOG Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG). We developed a consensus-based guideline defining the pelvic node clinical target volumes that included an atlas. The guideline will be continuously updated to reflect the ongoing changes in the field. (author)

  18. A consensus-based guideline defining clinical target volume for primary disease in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kaneyasu, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline to define clinical target volume for primary disease (clinical target volume primary) in external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. The working subgroup of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) Radiation Therapy Study Group began developing a guideline for primary clinical target volume in November 2009. The group consisted of 10 radiation oncologists and 2 gynecologic oncologists. The process started with comparing the contouring on computed tomographic images of actual cervical cancer cases among the members. This was followed by a comprehensive literature review that included primary research articles and textbooks as well as information on surgical procedures. Extensive discussion occurred in face-to-face meetings (three occasions) and frequent e-mail communications until a consensus was reached. The working subgroup reached a consensus on the definition for the clinical target volume primary. The clinical target volume primary consists of the gross tumor volume, uterine cervix, uterine corpus, parametrium, vagina and ovaries. Definitions for these component structures were determined. Anatomical boundaries in all directions were defined for the parametrium. Examples delineating these boundaries were prepared for the posterior border of the parametrium for various clinical situations (id est (i.e.) central tumor bulk, degree of parametrial involvement). A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume primary was developed for external beam radiotherapy for intact uterine cervical cancer. This guideline will serve as a template for radiotherapy protocols in future clinical trials. It may also be used in actual clinical practice in the setting of highly precise external beam radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Four Consensus Guidelines and Dosimetric Evaluation of 3D-CRT Versus Tomotherapy IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Shawn; Croke, Jennifer; Roustan-Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Malone, Colin; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Li Yan; Malone, Kyle; Nyiri, Balazs; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, approximately one-half of patients relapse. Four consensus guidelines have been published (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group, Princess Margaret Hospital, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) with the aim of standardizing the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and improve outcomes. To date, no attempt has been made to compare these guidelines in terms of treatment volumes or organ at risk (OAR) irradiation. The extent to which the guideline-derived plans meet the dosimetric constraints of present trials or of the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) trial is also unknown. Our study also explored the dosimetric benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients treated with postoperative RT were included. The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were applied to cover the guideline-generated planning target volumes (66 Gy in 33 fractions). Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for CTV/planning target volume coverage and to evaluate OAR irradiation. The OAR DVHs were compared with the constraints proposed in the QUANTEC and Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trials. 3D-CRT plans were compared with the tomotherapy plans for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group planning target volume to evaluate the advantages of IMRT. Results: The CTV differed significantly between guidelines (p < 0.001). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-CTVs were significantly smaller than the other CTVs (p < 0.001). Differences in prostate bed coverage superiorly accounted for the major volumetric differences between the guidelines. Using 3D-CRT, the DVHs rarely met the QUANTEC or RADICALS rectal constraints, independent of the guideline used. The RADICALS

  20. Consensus guidelines for the use of bowel preparation prior to colonic diagnostic procedures: colonoscopy and small bowel video capsule endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Pellisé, Maria; Heresbach, Denis; Fischbach, Wolfgang; Dixon, Tricia; Belsey, Jonathan; Parente, Fabrizio; Rio-Tinto, Ricardo; Brown, Alistair; Toth, Ervin; Crosta, Cristiano; Layer, Peter; Epstein, Owen; Boustiere, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Adequate bowel preparation prior to colonic diagnostic procedures is essential to ensure adequate visualisation. This consensus aims to provide guidance as to the appropriate use of bowel preparation for a range of defined clinical circumstances. A consensus group from across Europe was convened and

  1. [The German program for disease management guidelines: type 2 diabetes--diabetic retinopathy/maculopathy guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Thole, Henning; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-02-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus between six medical scientific associations on evidence-based recommendations for prevention and therapy of retinopathy/maculopathy in type 2 diabetes was reached in fall 2006. The recommendations' main sources are the NICE Retinopathy Guideline 2002, and existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Type 2 Diabetes-Retinopathy/Maculopathy 2006 (www.diabetes.versorgungsleitlinien.de).

  2. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Small, William; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  3. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  4. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered...... and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine. Opioid analgesics and tramadol are recommended as generally second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in select clinical circumstances. Other medications that would generally be used as third-line treatments but that could also be used as second......, and whether prompt onset of pain relief is necessary. To date, no medications have demonstrated efficacy in lumbosacral radiculopathy, which is probably the most common type of NP. Long-term studies, head-to-head comparisons between medications, studies involving combinations of medications, and RCTs...

  5. Delineation of the neck node levels for head and neck tumors: A 2013 update. DAHANCA, EORTC, HKNPCSG, NCIC CTG, NCRI, RTOG, TROG consensus guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Ang, Kian; Budach, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, a panel of experts published a set of consensus guidelines for the delineation of the neck node levels in node negative patients (Radiother Oncol, 69: 227-36, 2003). In 2006, these guidelines were extended to include the characteristics of the node positive and the post-operative neck...... (Radiother Oncol, 79: 15-20, 2006). These guidelines did not fully address all nodal regions and some of the anatomic descriptions were ambiguous, thereby limiting consistent use of the recommendations. In this framework, a task force comprising opinion leaders in the field of head and neck radiation...... of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and in alignment with the TNM atlas for lymph nodes in the neck, 10 node groups (some being divided into several levels) were defined with a concise description of their main anatomic boundaries, the normal structures juxtaposed to these nodes, and the main tumor sites...

  6. Commentary on the "Evidence- and Consensus-Based (S3) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis" Published by the International League of Dermatological Societies in Cooperation with the European Dermatology Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepgen, Thomas L; Kresken, Joachim; Krutmann, Jean; Merk, Hans F; Senger, Erik; Surber, Christian; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus

    2018-04-03

    In 2015, the International League of Dermatological Societies and the European Dermatology Forum published a guideline for the treatment of actinic keratosis, which is classified as an evidence- and consensus-based S3 guideline. From the point of view of the GD Task Force "Licht.Hautkrebs.Prävention," an interdisciplinary expert panel of the Society for Dermopharmacy for the prevention and treatment of skin cancer, this guideline reveals strengths and weaknesses but, in summary, does not meet the claim for an evidence- and consensus-based S3 guideline. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  8. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    -makers and the research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for...

  9. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  10. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  11. The convergence of medicine and neurotoxins: a focus on botulinum toxin type A and its application in aesthetic medicine--a global, evidence-based botulinum toxin consensus education initiative: part II: incorporating botulinum toxin into aesthetic clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean; Fournier, Nathalie; Kerscher, Martina; Ruiz-Avila, Javier; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R; Kaeuper, Gina

    2013-03-01

    The new world of safe aesthetic injectables has become increasingly popular with patients. Not only is there less risk than with surgery, but there is also significantly less downtime to interfere with patients' normal work and social schedules. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) type A (BoNTA) is an indispensable tool used in aesthetic medicine, and its broad appeal has made it a hallmark of modern culture. The key to using BoNTA to its best effect is to understand patient-specific factors that will determine the treatment plan and the physician's ability to personalize injection strategies. To present international expert viewpoints and consensus on some of the contemporary best practices in aesthetic BoNTA, so that beginner and advanced injectors may find pearls that provide practical benefits. Expert aesthetic physicians convened to discuss their approaches to treatment with BoNT. The discussions and consensus from this meeting were used to provide an up-to-date review of treatment strategies to improve patient results. Information is presented on patient management and assessment, documentation and consent, aesthetic scales, injection strategies, dilution, dosing, and adverse events. A range of product- and patient-specific factors influence the treatment plan. Truly optimized outcomes are possible only when the treating physician has the requisite knowledge, experience, and vision to use BoNTA as part of a unique solution for each patient's specific needs. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evidence-based guideline: Management of an unprovoked first seizure in adults: Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Allan; Wiebe, Samuel; Gronseth, Gary S; Gloss, David S; Sanchez, Ana M; Kabir, Arif A; Liferidge, Aisha T; Martello, Justin P; Kanner, Andres M; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hopp, Jennifer L; French, Jacqueline A

    2015-04-21

    To provide evidence-based recommendations for treatment of adults with an unprovoked first seizure. We defined relevant questions and systematically reviewed published studies according to the American Academy of Neurology's classification of evidence criteria; we based recommendations on evidence level. Adults with an unprovoked first seizure should be informed that their seizure recurrence risk is greatest early within the first 2 years (21%-45%) (Level A), and clinical variables associated with increased risk may include a prior brain insult (Level A), an EEG with epileptiform abnormalities (Level A), a significant brain-imaging abnormality (Level B), and a nocturnal seizure (Level B). Immediate antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, as compared with delay of treatment pending a second seizure, is likely to reduce recurrence risk within the first 2 years (Level B) but may not improve quality of life (Level C). Over a longer term (>3 years), immediate AED treatment is unlikely to improve prognosis as measured by sustained seizure remission (Level B). Patients should be advised that risk of AED adverse events (AEs) may range from 7% to 31% (Level B) and that these AEs are likely predominantly mild and reversible. Clinicians' recommendations whether to initiate immediate AED treatment after a first seizure should be based on individualized assessments that weigh the risk of recurrence against the AEs of AED therapy, consider educated patient preferences, and advise that immediate treatment will not improve the long-term prognosis for seizure remission but will reduce seizure risk over the subsequent 2 years. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Discordant American College of Physicians and international rheumatology guidelines for gout management: consensus statement of the Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Bardin, Thomas; Doherty, Michael; Lioté, Frédéric; Richette, Pascal; Saag, Kenneth G; So, Alexander K; Stamp, Lisa K; Choi, Hyon K; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In November 2016, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a clinical practice guideline on the management of acute and recurrent gout. This guideline differs substantially from the latest guidelines generated by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative, despite reviewing largely the same body of evidence. The Gout, Hyperuricemia and Crystal-Associated Disease Network (G-CAN) convened an expert panel to review the methodology and conclusions of these four sets of guidelines and examine possible reasons for discordance between them. The G-CAN position, presented here, is that the fundamental pathophysiological knowledge underlying gout care, and evidence from clinical experience and clinical trials, supports a treat-to-target approach for gout aimed at lowering serum urate levels to below the saturation threshold at which monosodium urate crystals form. This practice, which is truly evidence-based and promotes the steady reduction in tissue urate crystal deposits, is promoted by the ACR, EULAR and 3e Initiative recommendations. By contrast, the ACP does not provide a clear recommendation for urate-lowering therapy (ULT) for patients with frequent, recurrent flares or those with tophi, nor does it recommend monitoring serum urate levels of patients prescribed ULT. Results from emerging clinical trials that have gout symptoms as the primary end point are expected to resolve this debate for all clinicians in the near term future.

  14. Developing evidence-based maternity care in Iran: a quality improvement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Iranian perinatal statistics indicate that maternity care continues to need improvement. In response, we implemented a multi-faceted intervention to improve the quality of maternity care at an Iranian Social Security Hospital. Using a before-and-after design our aim was to improve the uptake of selected evidence based practices and more closely attend to identified women's needs and preferences. Methods The major steps of the study were to (1 identify women's needs, values and preferences via interviews, (2 select through a process of professional consensus the top evidence-based clinical recommendations requiring local implementation (3 redesign care based on the selected evidence-based recommendations and women's views, and (4 implement the new care model. We measured the impact of the new care model on maternal satisfaction and caesarean birth rates utilising maternal surveys and medical record audit before and after implementation of the new care model. Results Twenty women's needs and requirements as well as ten evidence-based clinical recommendations were selected as a basis for improving care. Following the introduction of the new model of care, women's satisfaction levels improved significantly on 16 of 20 items (p Conclusion The introduction of a quality improvement care model improved compliance with evidence-based guidelines and was associated with an improvement in women's satisfaction levels and a reduction in rates of caesarean birth.

  15. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Oral Surgery: Could We Do Better?”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Verlato, Giuseppe; Frustaci, Andrea; de Gemmis, Antonio; Rigoni, Giovanni; De Santis, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD), like Evidence-based Medicine (EBM), was born in order to seek the “best available research evidence” in the field of dentistry both in research and clinical routine. But evidence is not clearly measurable in all fields of healthcare: in particular, while drug effect is rather independent from clinician’s characteristics, the effectiveness of surgical procedures is strictly related to surgeon’s expertise, which is difficult to quantify. The research problems of dentistry have a lot in common with other surgical fields, where at the moment the best therapeutic recommendations and guidelines originates from an integration of evidence-based medicine and data from consensus conferences. To cope with these problems, new instruments have been developed, aimed at standardizing clinical procedures (CAD-CAM technology) and at integrating EBM achievements with the opinions of expert clinicians (GRADE System). One thing we have to remember however: it is necessary to use the instruments developed by evidence-based medicine but is impossible to produce sound knowledge without considering clinical expertise and quality of surgical procedures simultaneously. Only in this way we will obtain an evidence-based dentistry both in dental research and clinical practice, which is up to third millennium standards. PMID:20871758

  16. The development of oncology treatment guidelines: an analysis of the National Guidelines Clearinghouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Lee, W Robert

    2011-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, guidelines have been developed to improve quality of patient care. A recent editorial of guideline development procedures suggested the process has significant limitations that affect their scientific validity.(1) This prompted us to review oncology treatment guidelines to determine if such limitations are widespread. We performed a review of oncology treatment guidelines registered at the National Guidelines Clearinghouse (www.guideline.gov). Each guideline was independently reviewed by 2 authors and the following criteria were assessed: coordinating organization, guideline panel composition, reporting conflict of interest, peer review, dissent, expiration date, PubMed citation, and evidence-based scoring and grading of recommendations. Disagreements were resolved by consensus in subsequent discussions. Sixty-four guidelines were reviewed (39 [61%] were developed by a medical specialty society and 25 [39%] were developed by government agencies). Fifty (78%) guideline panels were multidisciplinary and 44 (69%) included individuals with epidemiologic and health services research expertise. Potential conflicts of interest were disclosed in 43 (67%) guidelines. Sixty (94%) guidelines underwent peer review, with external review in 31 (48%). Seventeen (27%) guidelines are indexed by PubMed. Fifty-one (80%) guidelines included evidence-based methodologies and 46 (72%) used evidence-based scoring of recommendations. Significant differences were observed according to coordinating organization (eg, disclosure of conflict of interest in 46% of guidelines developed by medical specialty societies versus 100% authored by government agencies [P <.0001]). The majority of oncology-related treatment guidelines registered at the National Guidelines Clearinghouse satisfy most of the criteria for sound guideline development. Significant differences in these criteria were observed according to the coordinating organization that developed the guideline. Copyright

  17. An evidence-based public health approach to climate change adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jeremy J; Eidson, Millicent; Tlumak, Jennifer E; Raab, Kristin K; Luber, George

    2014-11-01

    Public health is committed to evidence-based practice, yet there has been minimal discussion of how to apply an evidence-based practice framework to climate change adaptation. Our goal was to review the literature on evidence-based public health (EBPH), to determine whether it can be applied to climate change adaptation, and to consider how emphasizing evidence-based practice may influence research and practice decisions related to public health adaptation to climate change. We conducted a substantive review of EBPH, identified a consensus EBPH framework, and modified it to support an EBPH approach to climate change adaptation. We applied the framework to an example and considered implications for stakeholders. A modified EBPH framework can accommodate the wide range of exposures, outcomes, and modes of inquiry associated with climate change adaptation and the variety of settings in which adaptation activities will be pursued. Several factors currently limit application of the framework, including a lack of higher-level evidence of intervention efficacy and a lack of guidelines for reporting climate change health impact projections. To enhance the evidence base, there must be increased attention to designing, evaluating, and reporting adaptation interventions; standardized health impact projection reporting; and increased attention to knowledge translation. This approach has implications for funders, researchers, journal editors, practitioners, and policy makers. The current approach to EBPH can, with modifications, support climate change adaptation activities, but there is little evidence regarding interventions and knowledge translation, and guidelines for projecting health impacts are lacking. Realizing the goal of an evidence-based approach will require systematic, coordinated efforts among various stakeholders.

  18. Meta-analysis of screening and case finding tools for depression in cancer: evidence based recommendations for clinical practice on behalf of the Depression in Cancer Care consensus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alex J; Meader, Nick; Davies, Evan; Clover, Kerrie; Carter, Gregory L; Loscalzo, Matthew J; Linden, Wolfgang; Grassi, Luigi; Johansen, Christoffer; Carlson, Linda E; Zabora, James

    2012-10-01

    To examine the validity of screening and case-finding tools used in the identification of depression as defined by an ICD10/DSM-IV criterion standard. We identified 63 studies involving 19 tools (in 33 publications) designed to help clinicians identify depression in cancer settings. We used a standardized rating system. We excluded 11 tools without at least two independent studies, leaving 8 tools for comparison. Across all cancer stages there were 56 diagnostic validity studies (n=10,009). For case-finding, one stem question, two stem questions and the BDI-II all had level 2 evidence (2a, 2b and 2c respectively) and given their better acceptability we gave the stem questions a grade B recommendation. For screening, two stem questions had level 1b evidence (with high acceptability) and the BDI-II had level 2c evidence. For every 100 people screened in advanced cancer, the two questions would accurately detect 18 cases, while missing only 1 and correctly reassure 74 with 7 falsely identified. For every 100 people screened in non-palliative settings the BDI-II would accurately detect 17 cases, missing 2 and correctly re-assure 70, with 11 falsely identified as cases. The main cautions are the reliance on DSM-IV definitions of major depression, the large number of small studies and the paucity of data for many tools in specific settings. Although no single tool could be offered unqualified support, several tools are likely to improve upon unassisted clinical recognition. In clinical practice, all tools should form part of an integrated approach involving further follow-up, clinical assessment and evidence based therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... meeting customer needs. We are suggesting that the effects of the use of a system should play a prominent role in the contractual definition of IT projects and that contract fulfilment should be determined on the basis of evidence of these effects. Based on two ongoing studies of home-care management...

  20. ESUR prostate MR guidelines 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barentsz, Jelle O; Richenberg, Jonathan; Clements, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to develop clinical guidelines for multi-parametric MRI of the prostate by a group of prostate MRI experts from the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR), based on literature evidence and consensus expert opinion. True evidence-based guidelines could not be formulated......, but a compromise, reflected by "minimal" and "optimal" requirements has been made. The scope of these ESUR guidelines is to promulgate high quality MRI in acquisition and evaluation with the correct indications for prostate cancer across the whole of Europe and eventually outside Europe. The guidelines...... provides guidelines for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate cancer. Clinical indications, and minimal and optimal imaging acquisition protocols are provided. A structured reporting system (PI-RADS) is described....

  1. Exploration of knowledge of, adherence to, attitude and barriers toward evidence-based guidelines (EBGs for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in healthcare workers of pediatric cardiac intensive care units (PCICUs: A Quali-Quantitative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jahansefat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs is an effective measure for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Appropriate knowledge, attitude and adherence of healthcare workers (HCWs to EBGs are necessary factors for implementation of EBGs. This study was conducted with objective of evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs to EBGs for prevention of VAP and exploration of the barriers of their implementation in clinical practice. Totally, a total number of 45 HCWs of two pediatric cardiac surgery ICU (PCICUs participated in this quali-quantitative survey. Knowledge, attitude and adherence of participants was evaluated by a validated multiple-choice questionnaire and barriers of implementation of EBGs was extracted from participants’ answer to an open-ended question of our self-made questionnaire. Knowledge of HCWs was poor and significantly different between nurse assistants (RAs, nurses (RNs, and physicians (MDs (respectively, 1.25±0.95, 4.53±1.73, and 5.54±2.01, P=0.001. Likewise, attit ude of HCWs is not positive and significantly different between NAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 32.96±2.42, 34.00±2.44, 36.81±4.35, P=0.003. The adherence of HCWs is not good and different between RAs, RNs, and MDs (respectively, 11.50±1.00, 13.13±1.83, and 17.18±6.06, P= 0.17. The Barriers of implementation of EBGs was categorized into four category of individual, organizational, social, and educational factors. Unsatisfying status of knowledge, attitude, and adherence of HCWs is a challenging concern of health-care system, especially in PICUs. In addition to these well-known factors, poor implementation of EBGs is related to many other barriers which should recognized and taken into consideration for designation of infection controlling programs.

  2. Delineation of the neck node levels for head and neck tumors: A 2013 update. DAHANCA, EORTC, HKNPCSG, NCIC CTG, NCRI, RTOG, TROG consensus guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Ang, Kian; Budach, Wilfried; Grau, Cai; Hamoir, Marc; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Lee, Anne; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maingon, Philippe; Nutting, Chris; O’Sullivan, Brian; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Lengele, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, a panel of experts published a set of consensus guidelines for the delineation of the neck node levels in node negative patients (Radiother Oncol, 69: 227–36, 2003). In 2006, these guidelines were extended to include the characteristics of the node positive and the post-operative neck (Radiother Oncol, 79: 15–20, 2006). These guidelines did not fully address all nodal regions and some of the anatomic descriptions were ambiguous, thereby limiting consistent use of the recommendations. In this framework, a task force comprising opinion leaders in the field of head and neck radiation oncology from European, Asian, Australia/New Zealand and North American clinical research organizations was formed to review and update the previously published guidelines on nodal level delineation. Based on the nomenclature proposed by the American Head and Neck Society and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and in alignment with the TNM atlas for lymph nodes in the neck, 10 node groups (some being divided into several levels) were defined with a concise description of their main anatomic boundaries, the normal structures juxtaposed to these nodes, and the main tumor sites at risk for harboring metastases in those levels. Emphasis was placed on those levels not adequately considered previously (or not addressed at all); these included the lower neck (e.g. supraclavicular nodes), the scalp (e.g. retroauricular and occipital nodes), and the face (e.g. buccal and parotid nodes). Lastly, peculiarities pertaining to the node-positive and the post-operative clinical scenarios were also discussed. In conclusion, implementation of these guidelines in the daily practice of radiation oncology should contribute to the reduction of treatment variations from clinician to clinician and facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials

  3. Mental health first aid for Indigenous Australians: using Delphi consensus studies to develop guidelines for culturally appropriate responses to mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Claire M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic minority groups are under-represented in mental health care services because of barriers such as poor mental health literacy. In 2007, the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA program implemented a cultural adaptation of its first aid course to improve the capacity of Indigenous Australians to recognise and respond to mental health issues within their own communities. It became apparent that the content of this training would be improved by the development of best practice guidelines. This research aimed to develop culturally appropriate guidelines for providing first aid to an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who is experiencing a mental health crisis or developing a mental illness. Methods A panel of Australian Aboriginal people who are experts in Aboriginal mental health, participated in six independent Delphi studies investigating depression, psychosis, suicidal thoughts and behaviours, deliberate self-injury, trauma and loss, and cultural considerations. The panel varied in size across the studies, from 20-24 participants. Panellists were presented with statements about possible first aid actions via online questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional actions not covered by the survey content. Statements were accepted for inclusion in a guideline if they were endorsed by ≥ 90% of panellists as essential or important. Each study developed one guideline from the outcomes of three Delphi questionnaire rounds. At the end of the six Delphi studies, participants were asked to give feedback on the value of the project and their participation experience. Results From a total of 1,016 statements shown to the panel of experts, 536 statements were endorsed (94 for depression, 151 for psychosis, 52 for suicidal thoughts and behaviours, 53 for deliberate self-injury, 155 for trauma and loss, and 31 for cultural considerations. The methodology and the guidelines themselves were found to be useful

  4. Development and Validation of Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer After Radical Cystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Brian C. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Bahl, Amit [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Birtle, Alison J. [Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Breau, Rodney H. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Challapalli, Amarnath [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Chang, Albert J. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Choudhury, Ananya [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Heath Science Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Daneshmand, Sia [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); El-Gayed, Ali [Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon (Canada); Feldman, Adam [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa, Oklahoma (United States); Guzzo, Thomas J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hilman, Serena [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Jani, Ashesh [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Master, Viraj [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Mitra, Anita V. [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Murthy, Vedang [Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai (India); and others

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To develop multi-institutional consensus clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) for male and female bladder cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: We convened a multidisciplinary group of bladder cancer specialists from 15 centers and 5 countries. Six radiation oncologists and 7 urologists participated in the development of the initial contours. The group proposed initial language for the CTVs and OARs, and each radiation oncologist contoured them on computed tomography scans of a male and female cystectomy patient with input from ≥1 urologist. On the basis of the initial contouring, the group updated its CTV and OAR descriptions. The cystectomy bed, the area of greatest controversy, was contoured by another 6 radiation oncologists, and the cystectomy bed contouring language was again updated. To determine whether the revised language produced consistent contours, CTVs and OARs were redrawn by 6 additional radiation oncologists. We evaluated their contours for level of agreement using the Landis-Koch interpretation of the κ statistic. Results: The group proposed that patients at elevated risk for local-regional failure with negative margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes alone (internal/external iliac, distal common iliac, obturator, and presacral), whereas patients with positive margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes and cystectomy bed. Proposed OARs included the rectum, bowel space, bone marrow, and urinary diversion. Consensus language describing the CTVs and OARs was developed and externally validated. The revised instructions were found to produce consistent contours. Conclusions: Consensus descriptions of CTVs and OARs were successfully developed and can be used in clinical trials of adjuvant radiation therapy for bladder cancer.

  5. Consensus Report by the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium Joint Working Committees on Supportive Care Guidelines for Management of Veno-Occlusive Disease in Children and Adolescents: Part 2-Focus on Ascites, Fluid and Electrolytes, Renal, and Transfusion Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeo, Kris M; McArthur, Jennifer; Adams, Roberta H; Radhi, Mohamed; Angelo, Joseph; Jeyapalan, Asumthia; Nicol, Kathleen; Su, Leon; Rabi, Hanna; Auletta, Jeffery J; Pai, Vinita; Duncan, Christine N; Tamburro, Robert; Dvorak, Christopher C; Bajwa, Rajinder P S

    2017-12-01

    Even though hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), there is paucity of research on the management of associated multiorgan dysfunction. To help provide standardized care for the management of these patients, the HCT Subgroup of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and the Supportive Care Committee of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium, collaborated to develop evidence-based consensus guidelines. After conducting an extensive literature search, in part 2 of this series we discuss the management of fluids and electrolytes, renal dysfunction; ascites, pleural effusion, and transfusion and coagulopathy issues in patients with VOD. We consider the available evidence using the GRADE criteria. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of the Stroke-unit Discharge Guideline: choice of assessment instruments for prediction in the subacute phase post-stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Ronald; van Limbeek, Jacques; de Haan, Rob

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the design of an evidence-based dataset of assessment instruments for the prognostic factors of the Stroke-unit Discharge Guideline (SDG), a consensus based guideline for the decision of the discharge destination from the hospital stroke unit. In our

  7. Development of the Stroke-unit Discharge Guideline: choice of assessment instruments for prediction in the subacute phase post-stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Limbeek, J. van; Haan, R. de

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the design of an evidence-based dataset of assessment instruments for the prognostic factors of the Stroke-unit Discharge Guideline (SDG), a consensus based guideline for the decision of the discharge destination from the hospital stroke unit. In our

  8. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  9. Consensus Guideline for Use of Glucarpidase in Patients with High-Dose Methotrexate Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Delayed Methotrexate Clearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsey, Laura B; Balis, Frank M; O'Brien, Maureen M

    2018-01-01

    Acute kidney injury due to high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) is a serious, life-threatening toxicity that can occur in pediatric and adult patients. Glucarpidase is a treatment approved by the Food and Drug Administration for high methotrexate concentrations in the context of kidney dysfunction...... is above 30 µM, 42-hour concentration is above 10 µM, or 48-hour concentration is above 5 µM and the serum creatinine is significantly elevated relative to the baseline measurement (indicative of HDMTX-induced acute kidney injury), glucarpidase may be indicated. After a 36- to 42-hour HDMTX infusion......: Glucarpidase is a rarely used medication that is less effective when given after more than 60 hours of exposure to high-dose methotrexate, so predicting early which patients will need it is imperative. There are no currently available consensus guidelines for the use of this medication. The indication...

  10. Development of guidelines for tertiary education institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Reavley

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The age at which most young people are in tertiary education is also the age of peak onset for mental illness. Because mental health problems can have adverse effects on students’ academic performance and welfare, institutions require guidance how they can best provide support. However, the scientific evidence for how best to do this is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts.Methods. A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 172 item survey containing strategies that institutions might use to support students with a mental illness. Two panels of Australian experts (74 professionals and 35 consumers were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines.Results. The overall response rate across three rounds was 83% (80% consumers, 85% professionals. 155 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of panel members. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy, measures to promote support services, service provision, accessibility of support services, relationships between services, other types of support and issues associated with reasonable adjustments. They also provided guidance on the procedures the institutions should have for making staff aware of issues associated with mental illness, mental illness training, support for staff and communicating with a student with a mental illness. They also covered student rights and responsibilities, the procedures the institutions should have for making students aware of issues associated with mental illness, dealing with mental health crises, funding and research and evaluation.Conclusions. The guidelines provide guidance for tertiary institutions to assist them in supporting students with a mental illness. It is hoped that they may be used to

  11. Evidence-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Jeffrey; Sutton, Robert I

    2006-01-01

    For the most part, managers looking to cure their organizational ills rely on obsolete knowledge they picked up in school, long-standing but never proven traditions, patterns gleaned from experience, methods they happen to be skilled in applying, and information from vendors. They could learn a thing or two from practitioners of evidence-based medicine, a movement that has taken the medical establishment by storm over the past decade. A growing number of physicians are eschewing the usual, flawed resources and are instead identifying, disseminating, and applying research that is soundly conducted and clinically relevant. It's time for managers to do the same. The challenge is, quite simply, to ground decisions in the latest and best knowledge of what actually works. In some ways, that's more difficult to do in business than in medicine. The evidence is weaker in business; almost anyone can (and many people do) claim to be a management expert; and a motley crew of sources--Shakespeare, Billy Graham,Jack Welch, Attila the Hunare used to generate management advice. Still, it makes sense that when managers act on better logic and strong evidence, their companies will beat the competition. Like medicine, management is learned through practice and experience. Yet managers (like doctors) can practice their craft more effectively if they relentlessly seek new knowledge and insight, from both inside and outside their companies, so they can keep updating their assumptions, skills, and knowledge.

  12. The Australasian Hepatology Association consensus guidelines for the provision of adherence support to patients with hepatitis C on direct acting antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richmond JA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline A Richmond,1,2 Suzanne Sheppard-Law,3,4 Susan Mason,5 Sherryne L Warner6,7 1Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, 2Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, 3Faculty of Health, University of Technology, 4Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, 5AW Morrow Gastroenterology and Liver Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 6Department of Gastroenterology, Monash Health, 7Department of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus primarily spread through sharing of drug-injecting equipment. Approximately 150 million people worldwide and 230,000 Australians are living with chronic hepatitis C infection. In March 2016, the Australian government began subsidizing direct acting antivirals (DAAs for the treatment of hepatitis C, which are highly effective (95% cure rate and have few side effects. However, there is limited evidence to inform the provision of adherence support to people with hepatitis C on DAAs including the level of medication adherence required to achieve a cure. Methodology: In February 2016, a steering committee comprising four authors convened an expert panel consisting of six hepatology nurses, a hepatologist, a pharmacist, a consumer with hepatitis C and treatment experience, and a consumer advocate. The expert panel focused on the following criteria: barriers and enablers to DAA adherence; assessment and monitoring of DAA adherence; components of a patient-centered approach to DAA adherence; patients that may require additional adherence support; and interventions to support DAA adherence. The resultant guidelines underwent three rounds of consultation with the expert panel, Australasian Hepatology Association (AHA members (n=12, and key stakeholders (n=7 in June 2016. Feedback was considered by the steering committee and incorporated if consensus was achieved. Results

  13. The improvement of the best practice guidelines for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: toward an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardet, Anne; Viart, Victoria; Plaza, Stéphanie; Daina, Gemma; De Rycke, Martine; Des Georges, Marie; Fiorentino, Francesco; Harton, Gary; Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Navarro, Joaquima; Raynal, Caroline; Renwick, Pamela; Saguet, Florielle; Schwarz, Martin; SenGupta, Sioban; Tzetis, Maria; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Claustres, Mireille

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for single gene disorders, giving couples the opportunity to conceive unaffected children without having to consider termination of pregnancy. However, there are no available standardized protocols, so that each center has to develop its own diagnostic strategies and procedures. Furthermore, reproductive decisions are complicated by the diversity of disease-causing variants in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene and the complexity of correlations between genotypes and associated phenotypes, so that attitudes and practices toward the risks for future offspring can vary greatly between countries. On behalf of the EuroGentest Network, eighteen experts in PGD and/or molecular diagnosis of CF from seven countries attended a workshop held in Montpellier, France, on 14 December 2011. Building on the best practice guidelines for amplification-based PGD established by ESHRE (European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology), the goal of this meeting was to formulate specific guidelines for CF-PGD in order to contribute to a better harmonization of practices across Europe. Different topics were covered including variant nomenclature, inclusion criteria, genetic counseling, PGD strategy and reporting of results. The recommendations are summarized here, and updated information on the clinical significance of CFTR variants and associated phenotypes is presented.

  14. TDM in psychiatry and neurology: A comprehensive summary of the consensus guidelines for therapeutic drug monitoring in neuropsychopharmacology, update 2017; a tool for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoretsanitis, Georgios; Paulzen, Michael; Unterecker, Stefan; Schwarz, Markus; Conca, Andreas; Zernig, Gerald; Gründer, Gerhard; Haen, Ekkerhard; Baumann, Pierre; Bergemann, Niels; Clement, Hans Willi; Domschke, Katharina; Eckermann, Gabriel; Egberts, Karin; Gerlach, Manfred; Greiner, Christine; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Hefner, Gudrun; Helmer, Renate; Janssen, Ger; Jaquenoud-Sirot, Eveline; Laux, Gerd; Messer, Thomas; Mössner, Rainald; Müller, Matthias J; Pfuhlmann, Bruno; Riederer, Peter; Saria, Alois; Schoppek, Bernd; Silva Gracia, Margarete; Stegmann, Benedikt; Steimer, Werner; Stingl, Julia C; Uhr, Manfred; Ulrich, Sven; Waschgler, Roland; Zurek, Gabriela; Hiemke, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) combines the quantification of drug concentrations in blood, pharmacological interpretation and treatment guidance. TDM introduces a precision medicine tool in times of increasing awareness of the need for personalized treatment. In neurology and psychiatry, TDM can guide pharmacotherapy for patient subgroups such as children, adolescents, pregnant women, elderly patients, patients with intellectual disabilities, patients with substance use disorders, individuals with pharmacokinetic peculiarities and forensic patients. Clear indications for TDM include lack of clinical response in the therapeutic dose range, assessment of drug adherence, tolerability issues and drug-drug interactions. Based upon existing literature, recommended therapeutic reference ranges, laboratory alert levels, and levels of recommendation to use TDM for dosage optimization without specific indications, conversion factors, factors for calculation of dose-related drug concentrations and metabolite-to-parent ratios were calculated. This summary of the updated consensus guidelines by the TDM task force of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Neuropsychopharmakologie und Pharmakopsychiatrie offers the practical and theoretical knowledge for the integration of TDM as part of pharmacotherapy with neuropsychiatric agents into clinical routine. The present guidelines for TDM application for neuropsychiatric agents aim to assist clinicians in enhancing safety and efficacy of treatment.

  15. Expert surgical consensus for prenatal counseling using the Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Loren; Jackson, Jordan; Miller, Kristen; Kowalski, Rebecca; Kolm, Paul; Luks, Francois I

    2017-11-28

    Pediatric surgeons frequently offer prenatal consultation for congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH); however, there is no evidence-based consensus to guide prenatal decision making and counseling for these conditions. Eliciting feedback from experts is integral to defining best practice regarding prenatal counseling and intervention. A Delphi consensus process was undertaken using a panel of pediatric surgeons identified as experts in fetal therapy to address current limitations. Areas of discrepancy in the literature on CPAM and CDH were identified and used to generate a list of content and intervention questions. Experts were invited to participate in an online Delphi survey. Items that did not reach first-round consensus were broken down into additional questions, and consensus was achieved in the second round. Fifty-four surgeons (69%) responded to at least one of the two survey rounds. During round one, consensus was reached on 54 of 89 survey questions (61%), and 45 new questions were developed. During round two, consensus was reached on 53 of 60 survey questions (88%). We determined expert consensus to establish guidelines regarding perinatal management of CPAM and CDH. Our results can help educate pediatric surgeons participating in perinatal care of these patients. V. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  17. Implementing Evidence-Based Practices for People With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robert E.; Bond, Gary R.; Essock, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, a consensus has emerged regarding a set of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia that address symptom management and psychosocial functioning. Yet, surveys suggest that the great majority of the population of individuals with schizophrenia do not receive evidence-based care. In this article, we review the empirical literature on implementation of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia patients. We first examine lessons learned from implementation studies in general medicine. We then summarize the implementation literature specific to schizophrenia, including medication practices, psychosocial interventions, information technology, and state- and federal-level interventions. We conclude with recommendations for future directions. PMID:19491315

  18. Consensus Guidelines and Contouring Atlas for Pelvic Node Delineation in Prostate and Pelvic Node Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria A. [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Staffurth, John [Institute of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Naismith, Olivia [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Esmail, Alikhan [Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich (United Kingdom); Gulliford, Sarah [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Khoo, Vincent [Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lewis, Rebecca [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Littler, John [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen [Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Sadoyze, Azmat [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Scotland, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Scrase, Christopher [Ipswich Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ipswich (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Syndikus, Isabel [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Zarkar, Anjali [University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David, E-mail: David.Dearnaley@icr.ac.uk [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to establish reproducible guidelines for delineating the clinical target volume (CTV) of the pelvic lymph nodes (LN) by combining the freehand Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) vascular expansion techniques. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with prostate cancer underwent standard planning computed tomography scanning. Four different CTVs (RMH, RTOG, modified RTOG, and Prostate and pelvIs Versus prOsTate Alone treatment for Locally advanced prostate cancer [PIVOTAL] trial) were created for each patient, and 6 different bowel expansion margins (BEM) were created to assess bowel avoidance by the CTV. The resulting CTVs were compared visually and by using Jaccard conformity indices. The volume of overlap between bowel and planning target volume (PTV) was measured to aid selection of an appropriate BEM to enable maximal LN yet minimal normal tissue coverage. Results: In total, 84 nodal contours were evaluated. LN coverage was similar in all groups, with all of the vascular-expansion techniques (RTOG, modified RTOG, and PIVOTAL), resulting in larger CTVs than that of the RMH technique (mean volumes: 287.3 cm{sup 3}, 326.7 cm{sup 3}, 310.3 cm{sup 3}, and 256.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). Mean volumes of bowel within the modified RTOG PTV were 19.5 cm{sup 3} (with 0 mm BEM), 17.4 cm{sup 3} (1-mm BEM), 10.8 cm{sup 3} (2-mm BEM), 6.9 cm{sup 3} (3-mm BEM), 5.0 cm{sup 3} (4-mm BEM), and 1.4 cm{sup 3} (5-mm BEM) in comparison with an overlap of 9.2 cm{sup 3} seen using the RMH technique. Evaluation of conformity between LN-CTVs from each technique revealed similar volumes and coverage. Conclusions: Vascular expansion techniques result in larger LN-CTVs than the freehand RMH technique. Because the RMH technique is supported by phase 1 and 2 trial safety data, we proposed modifications to the RTOG technique, including the addition of a 3-mm BEM, which resulted in LN-CTV coverage similar

  19. Evidence-based management - healthcare manager viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Hasanpoor, Edris; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2018-06-11

    Purpose Hospital manager decisions can have a significant impact on service effectiveness and hospital success, so using an evidence-based approach can improve hospital management. The purpose of this paper is to identify evidence-based management (EBMgt) components and challenges. Consequently, the authors provide an improving evidence-based decision-making framework. Design/methodology/approach A total of 45 semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2016. The authors also established three focus group discussions with health service managers. Data analysis followed deductive qualitative analysis guidelines. Findings Four basic themes emerged from the interviews, including EBMgt evidence sources (including sub-themes: scientific and research evidence, facts and information, political-social development plans, managers' professional expertise and ethical-moral evidence); predictors (sub-themes: stakeholder values and expectations, functional behavior, knowledge, key competencies and skill, evidence sources, evidence levels, uses and benefits and government programs); EBMgt barriers (sub-themes: managers' personal characteristics, decision-making environment, training and research system and organizational issues); and evidence-based hospital management processes (sub-themes: asking, acquiring, appraising, aggregating, applying and assessing). Originality/value Findings suggest that most participants have positive EBMgt attitudes. A full evidence-based hospital manager is a person who uses all evidence sources in a six-step decision-making process. EBMgt frameworks are a good tool to manage healthcare organizations. The authors found factors affecting hospital EBMgt and identified six evidence sources that healthcare managers can use in evidence-based decision-making processes.

  20. International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Lindsey; Bernstein, Laurie E; Berry, Gerard T; Burlina, Alberto B; Eyskens, François; Gautschi, Matthias; Grünewald, Stephanie; Gubbels, Cynthia S; Knerr, Ina; Labrune, Philippe; van der Lee, Johanna H; MacDonald, Anita; Murphy, Elaine; Portnoi, Pat A; Õunap, Katrin; Potter, Nancy L; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Spencer, Jessica B; Timmers, Inge; Treacy, Eileen P; Van Calcar, Sandra C; Waisbren, Susan E; Bosch, Annet M

    2017-03-01

    Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.

  1. Discrepancies among consensus documents, guidelines, clinical practice and the legal framework for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo-Fernández, Carlos; Pardo-Ruiz, Carlos; Sánchez-Botella, Concepción; Blanes-Castañer, Vanesa; López-Menchero, Ramón; Gisbert-Sellés, Cristina; Sánchez-Jodar, Carmen; Alvarez-Avellán, Luis

    2012-05-14

    In this paper we analyse the discrepancies that exist in the widespread prescription of metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes and the lack of guidelines concerning its prescription in the different stages of renal failure. This cross-sectional study includes 304 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral antidiabetic drugs (ADOs) and a glomerular filtration rate (estimated GFR) <60ml/min/1.73m2. Patients were attended in consecutive visits to primary health centres or in hospital departments of endocrinology or nephrology during 2010. We studied the frequency of metformin and other ADO prescriptions according to renal function and the department in which the patient was treated. The ADO most frequently prescribed was metformin (54.9%), followed by repaglinide (47.7%), DPP4 inhibitors (28.6%), and sulfonylureas (18.4%). However, in nephrology departments, repaglinide was more frequently prescribed than metformin (P<.001), whereas in primary health centres, the prescription of DPP4 inhibitors increased. In patients with an estimated GFR of 15-29ml/min/1.73m2, metformin (13.3%) and sulfonylureas were the least prescribed, whereas metformin was much more frequently prescribed (70.0%) when estimated GFR was 45-59ml/min/1.73m2 (P<.001). In contrast, patients with an estimated GFR of 15-29ml/min/1.73m2 were mainly prescribed repaglinide (76.7%), as opposed to patients with an estimated GFR of 45-59ml/min/1.73m2 (38.9%) (P<.001). Substantial evidence suggests that the recommendations for the use of ADO should be modified. This would lead to safely prescribing ADO in patients with an estimated GFR<60ml/min/1.73m2, and more importantly in medical practice, according to the law.

  2. GrowthHormone Research Society workshop summary: consensus guidelines for recombinant human growth hormone therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Cheri L; Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ≥ 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as long as demonstrated benefits outweigh the risks.

  3. English language version of the S3-consensus guidelines on chronic pancreatitis: Definition, aetiology, diagnostic examinations, medical, endoscopic and surgical management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, A; Mayerle, J; Beglinger, C; Büchler, M W; Bufler, P; Dathe, K; Fölsch, U R; Friess, H; Izbicki, J; Kahl, S; Klar, E; Keller, J; Knoefel, W T; Layer, P; Loehr, M; Meier, R; Riemann, J F; Rünzi, M; Schmid, R M; Schreyer, A; Tribl, B; Werner, J; Witt, H; Mössner, J; Lerch, M M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas in which recurrent inflammatory episodes result in replacement of pancreatic parenchyma by fibrous connective tissue. This fibrotic reorganization of the pancreas leads to a progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, characteristic complications arise, such as pseudocysts, pancreatic duct obstructions, duodenal obstruction, vascular complications, obstruction of the bile ducts, malnutrition and pain syndrome. Pain presents as the main symptom of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic carcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis significantly reduces the quality of life and the life expectancy of affected patients. These guidelines were researched and compiled by 74 representatives from 11 learned societies and their intention is to serve evidence-based professional training as well as continuing education. On this basis they shall improve the medical care of affected patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Chronic pancreatitis requires an adequate diagnostic workup and systematic management, given its severity, frequency, chronicity, and negative impact on the quality of life and life expectancy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Treatment of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Hedy L; Ismaila, Nofisat; Armato, Samuel G; Bueno, Raphael; Hesdorffer, Mary; Jahan, Thierry; Jones, Clyde Michael; Miettinen, Markku; Pass, Harvey; Rimner, Andreas; Rusch, Valerie; Sterman, Daniel; Thomas, Anish; Hassan, Raffit

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to practicing physicians and others on the management of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, thoracic surgery, radiation oncology, pulmonary, pathology, imaging, and advocacy experts to conduct a literature search, which included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective comparative observational studies published from 1990 through 2017. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease-free or recurrence-free survival, and quality of life. Expert Panel members used available evidence and informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 222 relevant studies to inform the evidence base for this guideline. Recommendations Evidence-based recommendations were developed for diagnosis, staging, chemotherapy, surgical cytoreduction, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/thoracic-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  5. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  6. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society: therapeutic recommendations when dealing with a first epileptic seizure and in epileptic status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Cerda, J M; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Galán-Barranco, J M; Moreno-Alegre, V; Serrano-Castro, P J; Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M

    Most epileptic seizures are brief and self-limiting, but sometimes they can last longer than expected and this entails (in the case of generalised seizures) a high risk of morbidity and mortality, which increases as they get longer. This severity justifies the need to draw up a set of consensus-based practice guidelines based on implicit evidence, to use Liberati's nomenclature, concerning aspects related to the recommended therapeutic management of a patient with prolonged seizures who is being attended in an emergency department. A selective search was conducted on PubMed-Medline for scientific information related to the subject using scientific evidence filters. This search was completed in other scientific evidence search engines, such as Tripdatabase, Biblioteca Cochrane Plus or DARE. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the available evidence and any recommendations that could be drawn from it were collected. The search revealed the existence of 33 primary documents and six practice guidelines or protocols related with the topic under study. The recommendations were inserted in the text explicitly. The therapeutic protocol must be started when faced with any seizures that last more than five minutes. First, steps must be taken to ensure proper respiratory and cardiocirculatory functioning, and then fast-acting antiepileptic drugs are administered intravenously and in high doses until the cause is identified and controlled. Due to their lower level of morbidity and mortality, prolonged non-convulsive seizures do not generally require therapy that is so vigorous and with such a high risk of complications.

  7. Limitations of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel Guidelines on the Use of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank; Arthur, Douglas; Wazer, David; Chen, Peter; Mitchell, Christina; Wallace, Michelle; Kestin, Larry; Ye, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We applied the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel (CP) guidelines for the use of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) to patients treated with this technique to determine the ability of the guidelines to differentiate patients with significantly different clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients treated with APBI and 199 with whole-breast irradiation (WBI) (matched for tumor size, nodal status, age, margins, receptor status, and tamoxifen use) were stratified into the three ASTRO CP levels of suitability ('suitable,' 'cautionary,' and 'unsuitable') to assess rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure, distant metastases, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival based on CP category. Median follow-up was 11.1 years. Results: Analysis of the APBI and WBI patient groups, either separately or together (n = 398), did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in 10-year actuarial rates of IBTR when stratified by the three ASTRO groups. Regional nodal failure and distant metastasis were generally progressively worse when comparing the suitable to cautionary to unsuitable CP groups. However, when analyzing multiple clinical, pathologic, or treatment-related variables, only patient age was associated with IBTR using WBI (p = 0.002). Conclusions: The ASTRO CP suitable group predicted for a low risk of IBTR; however, the cautionary and unsuitable groups had an equally low risk of IBTR, supporting the need for continued refinement of patient selection criteria as additional outcome data become available and for the continued accrual of patients to Phase III trials.

  8. Managing challenging interactions with family caregivers in the cancer setting: Guidelines for clinicians (TRIO Guidelines-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidsaar-Powell, Rebekah; Butow, Phyllis; Boyle, Frances; Juraskova, Ilona

    2018-06-01

    Family caregivers can, at times, add complexity to clinical encounters. Difficult family caregivers and dynamics may: derail consultation communication, reduce patient autonomy, and compromise effective clinical care. A paucity of practical strategies guiding effective clinician-family communication exists. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the first comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines (the TRIO guidelines) for oncology physicians and nurses to better manage several complex/challenging situations involving family members. TRIO Guidelines were based on a comprehensive review of literature, relevant guidelines, and feedback from an expert advisory group (n = 10). Draft guidelines underwent two rounds of evaluation via an online Delphi consensus process involving international experts (n = 35). Guidelines incorporate topic areas, strategies, and sub-strategies on managing challenging family involvement (7 topics). Example wording, behaviours and level of evidence are provided. Challenging triadic interactions require skillful navigation, and the TRIO Guidelines provide clear, specific, and evidence-based strategies for clinicians to utilise in these potentially stressful encounters. Training based on these guidelines may improve both patient care and clinician confidence. Implementation of these guidelines into medical/nursing curricula and as a component of continuing professional development programs will likely be highly beneficial. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-based cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Khorasani, Ramin [Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients.

  10. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services

  11. Guidelines for Improving Entry Into and Retention in Care and Antiretroviral Adherence for Persons With HIV: Evidence-Based Recommendations From an International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Amico, K. Rivet; Cargill, Victoria A.; Chang, Larry W.; Gross, Robert; Orrell, Catherine; Altice, Frederick L.; Bangsberg, David R.; Bartlett, John G.; Beckwith, Curt G.; Dowshen, Nadia; Gordon, Christopher M.; Horn, Tim; Kumar, Princy; Scott, James D.; Stirratt, Michael J.; Remien, Robert H.; Simoni, Jane M.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2014-01-01

    Description After HIV diagnosis, timely entry into HIV medical care and retention in that care are essential to the provision of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART adherence is among the key determinants of successful HIV treatment outcome and is essential to minimize the emergence of drug resistance. The International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care convened a panel to develop evidence-based recommendations to optimize entry into and retention in care and ART adherence for people with HIV. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted to produce an evidence base restricted to randomized, controlled trials and observational studies with comparators that had at least 1 measured biological or behavioral end point. A total of 325 studies met the criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted and coded data from each study using a standardized data extraction form. Panel members drafted recommendations based on the body of evidence for each method or intervention and then graded the overall quality of the body of evidence and the strength for each recommendation. Recommendations Recommendations are provided for monitoring of entry into and retention in care, interventions to improve entry and retention, and monitoring of and interventions to improve ART adherence. Recommendations cover ART strategies, adherence tools, education and counseling, and health system and service delivery interventions. In addition, they cover specific issues pertaining to pregnant women, incarcerated individuals, homeless and marginally housed individuals, and children and adolescents, as well as substance use and mental health disorders. Recommendations for future research in all areas are also provided. PMID:22393036

  12. Organizational change tactics: the evidence base in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Thomas; Shih, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Planned organizational change processes can be used to address the many challenges facing human service organizations (HSOs) and improve organizational outcomes. There is massive literature on organizational change, ranging from popular management books to academic research on specific aspects of change. Regarding HSOs, there is a growing literature, including increasing attention to implementation science and evidence-based practices. However, research which offers generalizable, evidence-based guidelines for implementing change is not common. The purpose of the authors was to assess the evidence base in this organizational change literature to lay the groundwork for more systematic knowledge development in this important field.

  13. Mexican consensus on dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carmona-Sánchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the 2007 dyspepsia guidelines of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología, there have been significant advances in the knowledge of this disease. A systematic search of the literature in PubMed (01/2007 to 06/2016 was carried out to review and update the 2007 guidelines and to provide new evidence-based recommendations. All high-quality articles in Spanish and English were included. Statements were formulated and voted upon using the Delphi method. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation of each statement were established according to the GRADE system. Thirty-one statements were formulated, voted upon, and graded. New definition, classification, epidemiology, and pathophysiology data were provided and include the following information: Endoscopy should be carried out in cases of uninvestigated dyspepsia when there are alarm symptoms or no response to treatment. Gastric and duodenal biopsies can confirm Helicobacter pylori infection and rule out celiac disease, respectively. Establishing a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as dietary and lifestyle changes, are useful initial measures. H2-blockers, proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics, and antidepressants are effective pharmacologic therapies. H. pylori eradication may be effective in a subgroup of patients. There is no evidence that complementary and alternative therapies are beneficial, with the exception of Iberogast and rikkunshito, nor is there evidence on the usefulness of prebiotics, probiotics, or psychologic therapies. The new consensus statements on dyspepsia provide guidelines based on up-to-date evidence. A discussion, level of evidence, and strength of recommendation are presented for each statement. Resumen: Desde la publicación de las guías de dispepsia 2007 de la Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología ha habido avances significativos en el conocimiento de esta enfermedad. Se realizó una revisión sistemática de la

  14. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  15. Clinical algorithms to aid osteoarthritis guideline dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, S R F; Goode, A P; Nelson, A E; Lin, J; Jordan, J M; Allen, K D; Bennell, K L; Lohmander, L S; Fernandes, L; Hochberg, M C; Underwood, M; Conaghan, P G; Liu, S; McAlindon, T E; Golightly, Y M; Hunter, D J

    2016-09-01

    Numerous scientific organisations have developed evidence-based recommendations aiming to optimise the management of osteoarthritis (OA). Uptake, however, has been suboptimal. The purpose of this exercise was to harmonize the recent recommendations and develop a user-friendly treatment algorithm to facilitate translation of evidence into practice. We updated a previous systematic review on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for OA management. The guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation for quality and the standards for developing trustworthy CPGs as established by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Four case scenarios and algorithms were developed by consensus of a multidisciplinary panel. Sixteen guidelines were included in the systematic review. Most recommendations were directed toward physicians and allied health professionals, and most had multi-disciplinary input. Analysis for trustworthiness suggests that many guidelines still present a lack of transparency. A treatment algorithm was developed for each case scenario advised by recommendations from guidelines and based on panel consensus. Strategies to facilitate the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice are necessary. The algorithms proposed are examples of how to apply recommendations in the clinical context, helping the clinician to visualise the patient flow and timing of different treatment modalities. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Value and limitations of clinical practice guidelines in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Richard A; Lorenz, John M

    2015-12-01

    Given the overwhelming size of the neonatal literature, clinicians must rely upon expert panels such as the Committee on Fetus and Newborn in the USA and the National Institute for Healthcare and Excellence in the UK for guidance. Guidelines developed by expert panels are not equivalent to evidence-based medicine and are not rules, but do provide evidence-based recommendations (when possible) and at minimum expert consensus reports. The standards used to develop evidence-based guidelines differ among expert panels. Clinicians must be able judge the quality of evidence from an expert panel, and decide whether a recommendation applies to their neonatal intensive care unit or infant under their care. Furthermore, guidelines become outdated within a few years and must be revised or discarded. Clinical practice guidelines should not always be equated with standard of care. However, they do provide a framework for determining acceptable care. Clinicians do not need to follow guidelines if the recommendations are not applicable to their population or infant. However, if a plan of care is not consistent with apparently applicable clinical practice guidelines, the medical record should include an explanation for the deviation from the relevant practice guideline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Applying an Evidence-Based Framework to the Early Childhood Coaching Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen; Fettig, Angel; Barton, Erin E.; Penney, Ashley; Zeng, Songtian

    2015-01-01

    Professional development (PD) is a critical pathway for promoting the use of evidence-based intervention practices in early childhood (EC) settings. Coaching has been proposed as a type of PD that is especially promising for job-embedded learning. A lack of consensus exists regarding evidence-based EC coaching strategies and what types of support…

  18. Evidence-based playground design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refshauge, Anne Dahl; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Lamm, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    , best practice, and the theories of Affordances and Behaviour Settings. A post-occupancy evaluation was carried out through a questionnaire survey and observation studies, which revealed that a majority of the potential evidence-based affordances were actualised, and that the application of the theories...

  19. Evidence-Based IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based IT development aims at developing a new commercial contract model for IT projects where the cus-tomers payment is dependent on measurable effects of using the vendors system. The idea is to establish a strategic part-nership in which customer and IT vendor share the responsi-bility...

  20. Anatomy of an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, David B.; Taymans, Juliana M.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) research evidence base on the effectiveness of replicable education interventions. Most interventions were found to have little or no support from technically adequate research studies, and intervention effect sizes were of questionable magnitude to meet education policy goals. These…

  1. Evidence-Based Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), and as is true in most health care professions, the primary focus of EBPP has been on treatment. Comparatively little attention has been devoted to applying the principles of EBPP to psychological assessment, despite the fact that assessment plays a central role in myriad domains of empirical and applied psychology (e.g., research, forensics, behavioral health, risk management, diagnosis and classification in mental health settings, documentation of neuropsychological impairment and recovery, personnel selection and placement in organizational contexts). This article outlines the central elements of evidence-based psychological assessment (EBPA), using the American Psychological Association's tripartite definition of EBPP as integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences. After discussing strategies for conceptualizing and operationalizing evidence-based testing and evidence-based assessment, 6 core skills and 3 meta-skills that underlie proficiency in psychological assessment are described. The integration of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences is discussed in terms of the complex interaction of patient and assessor identities and values throughout the assessment process. A preliminary framework for implementing EBPA is offered, and avenues for continued refinement and growth are described.

  2. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  3. Lack of consensus on the role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in acute biliary pancreatitis in published meta-analyses and guidelines: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, E.J.M. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Peet, D.L. van der; Erpecum, K.J. van; Fockens, P.; Mulder, C.J.; Bruno, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Several randomized controlled trials studied the role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) in acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). No study assessed whether these trials resulted in international consensus in published meta-analyses

  4. Lack of Consensus on the Role of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiography in Acute Biliary Pancreatitis in Published Meta-Analyses and Guidelines A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geenen, Erwin-Jan M.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van der Peet, Donald L.; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Fockens, Paul; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Several randomized controlled trials studied the role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) in acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP). No study assessed whether these trials resulted in international consensus in published meta-analyses

  5. Decision making in advanced otosclerosis: an evidence-based strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkus, P.; van Loon, M.C.; Smit, C.F.G.M.; Smits, J.C.M.; de Cock, A.F.C.; Hensen, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: To propose an evidence-based strategy for the management of patients with advanced otosclerosis accompanied by severe to profound hearing loss. Study Design: Systematic review of the literature and development of treatment guidelines. Methods: A systematic review was conducted

  6. Interverntion, evidence-based research and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Intervention is a key concept in the technology of psychology and it plays a decisive role in evidence-based research. But analyses of this concept are remarkably sparse. Based on a critical analysis of the conception of intervention in the American Psychological Association’s guidelines for evid...

  7. [The German Program for Disease Management Guidelines: CHD Guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Lelgemann, Monika; Kopp, Ina

    2006-12-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus on evidence-based recommendations for disease management in patients with chronic coronary heart disease was reached in summer 2006. After a development period of 4 years, the National Disease Management Guideline Chronic Coronary Heart Disease was finalized by nominal group process under the authorship of the scientific associations for cardiac rehabilitation (DGPR), cardiac surgery (DGTHG), cardiology (DGK), general internal medicine (DGIM), family medicine (DEGAM), and the Drug Commission of the German Medical Association (AKDAE). The recommendations' main sources are the ACC/AHA guidelines 2002 updates as well as existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Chronic Coronary Heart Disease 2006 (www.khk.versorgungsleitlinie.de).

  8. [The German Program for Disease Management Guidelines: COPD Guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-01-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus on evidence-based recommendations for COPD prevention and disease management was reached in spring 2006. After a development period of 9 months, the National Disease Management Guideline COPD was finalized by nominal group process under the authorship of the scientific societies for pneumology (DGP and Atemwegsliga), general internal medicine (DGIM), family medicine (DEGAM), and the Drug Commission of the German Medical Association (AKDAE). The recommendations' main sources are the NICE COPD Guideline 2004, the GOLD Recommendations as well as existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline COPD 2006 (www.copd.versorgungsleitlinien.de).

  9. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  10. The Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) Consensus on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India: The Puri Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Acharya, Subrat K; Singh, Shivaram P; Saraswat, Vivek A; Arora, Anil; Duseja, Ajay; Goenka, Mahesh K; Jain, Deepali; Kar, Premashish; Kumar, Manoj; Kumaran, Vinay; Mohandas, Kunisshery M; Panda, Dipanjan; Paul, Shashi B; Ramachandran, Jeyamani; Ramesh, Hariharan; Rao, Padaki N; Shah, Samir R; Sharma, Hanish; Thandassery, Ragesh B

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. There are no consensus guidelines on diagnosis and management of HCC in India. The Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) set up a Task-Force on HCC in 2011, with a mandate to develop consensus guidelines for diagnosis and management of HCC, relevant to disease patterns and clinical practices in India. The Task-Force first identified various contentious issues on various aspects of HCC and these issues were allotted to individual members of the Task-Force who reviewed them in detail. The Task-Force used the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine-Levels of Evidence of 2009 for developing an evidence-based approach. A 2-day round table discussion was held on 9th and 10th February, 2013 at Puri, Odisha, to discuss, debate, and finalize the consensus statements. The members of the Task-Force reviewed and discussed the existing literature at this meeting and formulated the INASL consensus statements for each of the issues. We present here the INASL consensus guidelines (The Puri Recommendations) on prevention, diagnosis and management of HCC in India.

  11. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix 1. The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhys Williams, William Herman, Ann-Louise Kinmonth...

  12. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline on Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Internus Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Patients With Parkinson's Disease: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughani, Anand; Schwalb, Jason M; Sidiropoulos, Christos; Pilitsis, Julie; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Sweet, Jennifer A; Mittal, Sandeep; Espay, Alberto J; Martinez, Jorge Gonzalez; Abosch, Aviva; Eskandar, Emad; Gross, Robert; Alterman, Ron; Hamani, Clement

    2018-06-01

    , then the clinician should consider using GPi DBS rather than STN DBS, while taking into consideration other goals of surgery. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS associated with a higher, lower, or similar risk of mood disturbance than GPi DBS in Parkinson's disease? If there is significant concern about the risk of depression in a patient undergoing DBS, then the clinician should consider using pallidal rather than STN stimulation, while taking into consideration other goals of surgery. (Level I). Is bilateral STN DBS associated with a higher, lower, or similar risk of adverse events compared to GPi DBS in Parkinson's disease? There is insufficient evidence to recommend bilateral DBS in 1 target over the other in order to minimize the risk of surgical adverse events.  The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/deep-brain-stimulation-parkinsons-disease.

  13. Treatment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, Mark A; Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-05-01

    Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the presence of specific genetic mutations.

  14. Barriers to evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has emerged as an effective strategy to improve health care quality. The aim of this study was to systematically review and carry out an analysis on the barriers to EBM. Different database searching methods and also manual search were employed in this study using the search words ('evidence-based' or 'evidence-based medicine' or 'evidence-based practice' or 'evidence-based guidelines' or 'research utilization') and (barrier* or challenge or hinder) in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane library, Pro Quest, Magiran, SID. Out of 2592 articles, 106 articles were finally identified for study. Research barriers, lack of resources, lack of time, inadequate skills, and inadequate access, lack of knowledge and financial barriers were found to be the most common barriers to EBM. Examples of these barriers were found in primary care, hospital/specialist care, rehabilitation care, medical education, management and decision making. The most common barriers to research utilization were research barriers, cooperation barriers and changing barriers. Lack of resources was the most common barrier to implementation of guidelines. The result of this study shows that there are many barriers to the implementation and use of EBM. Identifying barriers is just the first step to removing barriers to the use of EBM. Extra resources will be needed if these barriers are to be tackled. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Consensus Statement of the Indian Academy of Pediatrics on Evaluation and Management of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalwai, Samir; Ahmed, Shabina; Udani, Vrajesh; Mundkur, Nandini; Kamath, S S; C Nair, M K

    2017-05-15

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a clinically heterogenous condition with a wide range of etiological factors and causing significant public health burden. ASD poses a serious developmental disadvantage to the child in the form of poor schooling, social function and adult productivity. Thus, framing evidence-based national guidelines is a pressing need. The meeting on formulation of national consensus guidelines on neurodevelopmental disorders was organized by Indian Academy of Paediatrics in Mumbai on 18th and 19th December 2015. The invited experts included Pediatricians, Developmental Pediatricians, Psychiatrists, Remedial Educators, Pediatric Neurologists and Clinical Psychologists. The participants framed guidelines after extensive discussions. Thereafter, a committee was established to review the points discussed in the meeting. To provide consensus guidelines on evaluation and management of ASD in children in India. Intervention should begin as early as possible. A definitive diagnosis is not necessary for commencing intervention. Intervention should target core features of autism i.e. deficits in social communication and interaction, and restricted repetitive patterns of behavior, activities and/ or interests. Intervention should be specific, evidence-based, structured and appropriate to the developmental needs of the child. Management of children should be provided through interdisciplinary teams, coordinated by the Pediatrician. Management of co-morbidities is critical to effectiveness of treatment. Pharmacotherapy may be offered to children when there is a specific target symptom or co-morbid condition.

  16. Persuasive Evidence: Improving Customer Service through Evidence Based Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Abbott

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To demonstrate how evidence based practice has contributed to informaing decisions and resolving issues if concern in service delivery at Bond University Librray. Methods - This paper critically analyses three evidence based research projects conducted at Bond University Library. Each project combined a range of research methods including surveys, literature reviews and the analysis of internal performance data to find solutions to problems in library service delivery. The first research project investigated library opening hours and the feasability of twenty-four hour opening. Another project reseached questions about the management of a collection of feature films on DVD and video. The thrd project investigated issues surrounding the teaching of EndNote to undergarduate students. Results - Despite some deficiencies in the methodologies used, each evidence based research project had positive outcomes. One of the highlights asn an essential feature of the process at Bond University Library was the involvement of stakeholders. The ability to build consensus and agree action plans with stakeholders was an important outcome of that process. Conclusion - Drawing on the experience of these research projects, the paper illustrates the benefits of evidence based information practice to stimulate innovation and improve library services. Librarians, like most professionals, need to continue to develop the skills and a culture to effectively carry out evidence based practice.

  17. Evidence- and consensus-based practice guidelines for the therapy of primary myelodysplastic syndromes. A statement from the Italian Society of Hematology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Amadori, Sergio; Barosi, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    or older than 75 years and the strategy of watchful waiting were decided by patient-oriented questions. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Using evidence and consensus, recommendations for the treatment of MDS were issued. Statements were graded according to the strength of the supporting evidence...

  18. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M.; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T.; Wise, Sarah K.; Rotenberg, Brian W.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population>18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. Results This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Conclusion Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision ESS. PMID:27480830

  19. Development of guidelines to assist organisations to support employees returning to work after an episode of anxiety, depression or a related disorder: a Delphi consensus study with Australian professionals and consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reavley Nicola J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders are a significant cause of disability and loss of workplace productivity. The scientific evidence for how organisations should best support those returning to work after common mental disorders is relatively limited. Therefore a Delphi expert consensus study was carried out with professional and consumer experts. Methods A systematic review of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a 387 item survey containing strategies that organisations might use to support those returning to work after common mental disorders. Three panels of Australian experts (66 health professionals, 30 employers and 80 consumers were recruited and independently rated the items over three rounds, with strategies reaching consensus on importance written into the guidelines. Results The participation rate across all three rounds was 60.2% (57.6% health professionals, 76.7% employers, 56.3% consumers. 308 strategies were endorsed as essential or important by at least 80% of all three panels. The endorsed strategies provided information on policy and procedures, the roles of supervisors, employees and colleagues in managing absence and return to work, and provision of mental health information and training. Conclusions The guidelines outline strategies for organisations supporting those returning to work after common mental disorders. It is hoped that they may be used to inform policy and practice in a variety of workplaces.

  20. Core components for effective infection prevention and control programmes: new WHO evidence-based recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Storr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health care-associated infections (HAI are a major public health problem with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. They represent also an important economic burden to health systems worldwide. However, a large proportion of HAI are preventable through effective infection prevention and control (IPC measures. Improvements in IPC at the national and facility level are critical for the successful containment of antimicrobial resistance and the prevention of HAI, including outbreaks of highly transmissible diseases through high quality care within the context of universal health coverage. Given the limited availability of IPC evidence-based guidance and standards, the World Health Organization (WHO decided to prioritize the development of global recommendations on the core components of effective IPC programmes both at the national and acute health care facility level, based on systematic literature reviews and expert consensus. The aim of the guideline development process was to identify the evidence and evaluate its quality, consider patient values and preferences, resource implications, and the feasibility and acceptability of the recommendations. As a result, 11 recommendations and three good practice statements are presented here, including a summary of the supporting evidence, and form the substance of a new WHO IPC guideline.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, N. Kumar; Dhesy-Thind, S.

    2018-01-01

    Background A number of clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) concerning breast cancer (bca) screening and management are available. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of cpgs from various professional organizations and consensus groups with respect to their methodologic quality, recommendations, and implementability. Methods Guidelines from four groups were reviewed with respect to two clinical scenarios: adjuvant ovarian function suppression (ofs) in premenopausal women with early-stage estrogen receptor–positive bca, and use of sentinel lymph node biopsy (slnb) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nac) for locally advanced bca. Guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (asco); Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence Based Care (cco’s pebc); the U.S. National Comprehensive Cancer Network (nccn); and the St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Consensus Conference were reviewed by two independent assessors. Guideline methodology and applicability were evaluated using the agree ii tool. Results The quality of the cpgs was greatest for the guidelines developed by asco and cco’s pebc. The nccn and St. Gallen guidelines were found to have lower scores for methodologic rigour. All guidelines scored poorly for applicability. The recommendations for ofs were similar in three guidelines. Recommendations by the various organizations for the use of slnb after nac were contradictory. Conclusions Our review demonstrated that cpgs can be heterogeneous in methodologic quality. Low-quality cpg implementation strategies contribute to low uptake of, and adherence to, bca cpgs. Further research examining the barriers to recommendations—such as intrinsic guideline characteristics and the needs of end users—is required. The use of bca cpgs can improve the knowledge-to-practice gap and patient outcomes.

  2. A critical appraisal of standard guidelines for grading levels of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugiu, P Cristian; Gugiu, Mihaiela Ristei

    2010-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, a general consensus has emerged within the medical community regarding the essential role served by grading guidelines in evaluating the quality of evidence produced by a medical research study. Specifically, consensus exists regarding the hierarchy of evidence, where randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the ''gold standard'' followed by nonrandomized controlled trials (non-RCTs) and uncontrolled trials. As guidelines have become more sophisticated, processes have been developed for downgrading poorly conducted studies and upgrading strong studies. Lists of threats to internal validity have been disseminated, thereby assisting reviewers in grading studies. However, despite these many accomplishments, considerable issues remain unresolved with respect to how to evaluate the strength of evidence produced by flawed RCTs versus well-conducted non-RCTs. The purpose of this article is to evaluate existing evidence-based grading guidelines and to offer suggestions for how such guidelines may be improved.

  3. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Boelens, Petra G; Borras, Josep M; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H; van Krieken, J Han; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason J; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    applicable for treatment of colon cancer, rectal cancer and metastatic colorectal disease separately. Moreover, evidence based algorithms for diagnostics and treatment were composed which were also submitted to the Delphi process. The total number of the voted sentences was 465. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the experts. Of the 465 sentences, 84% achieved large consensus, 6% achieved moderate consensus, and 7% resulted in minimum consensus. Only 3% was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. Multidisciplinary consensus on key diagnostic and treatment issues for colon and rectal cancer management using the Delphi method was successful. This consensus document embodies the expertise of professionals from all disciplines involved in the care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms were developed to implement the current evidence and to define core treatment guidance for multidisciplinary team management of colon and rectal cancer throughout Europe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Update on Diagnosis and Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Consensus Guideline of the Working Group of Ocular Health (Spanish Society of Diabetes and Spanish Vitreous and Retina Society)

    OpenAIRE

    Borja Corcóstegui; Santiago Durán; María Olga González-Albarrán; Cristina Hernández; José María Ruiz-Moreno; Javier Salvador; Patricia Udaondo; Rafael Simó

    2017-01-01

    A group of members of the Spanish Retina and Vitreous Society (SERV) and of the Working Group of Ocular Health of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED) updated knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) based on recent evidence reported in the literature. A synthesis of this consensus forms the basis of the present review, which is intended to inform clinicians on current advances in the field of DR and their clinical applicability to patients with this disea...

  5. Evidence-based dentistry: fundamentals for the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Chiappelli, Francesco; Spackman, Sue; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-06-01

    This article explains the fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry for the dentist. Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline whose primary participant is the translational researcher. Recent developments have emphasized the importance of this discipline (clinical and translational research) for improving health care. The process of evidence-based dentistry is the reciprocation of new and existing evidence between dentists and quantitative and qualitative researchers, facilitated by the translational researcher. The product of this reciprocation is the clinical practice guideline, or best evidence, that provides the patient options in choosing treatments or services. These options are quantified and qualified by decision, utility, and cost data. Using shared decision-making, the dentist and patient arrive at a mutual understanding of which option best meets an acceptable and preferred treatment course that is cost effective. This option becomes the clinical decision.

  6. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  7. Historical perspectives on evidence-based nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, Suzanne C; Slattery, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The authors of this article offer a review and historical perspective on research utilization and evidence-based practice in nursing. They present the evolution of research utilization to the more contemporary framework of evidence-based nursing practice. The authors address the role of qualitative research in the context of evidence-based practice. Finally, some approaches and resources for learning more about the fundamentals of evidence-based healthcare are provided.

  8. Evidence-based guideline development in paediatric gastroenterology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Merit Tabbers beschrijft de ontwikkeling van een Nederlandse richtlijn voor kinderen van 0 tot 18 jaar met obstipatie. Ze concludeert dat er een tekort is aan goed opgezette studies over diagnostische procedures bij deze leeftijdsgroep. Tevens ontbreken korte- en langetermijnstudies van voldoende

  9. Evidence-based nursing interventions and guidelines for prone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the prone positioning of a critically ill patient poses a challenge to nursing interventions, it remains the responsibility of nurses to develop a way to provide the same basic and intensive care to those patients lying prone as to those lying supine. The purpose of this study was firstly to conduct a systematic review of ...

  10. Management of REM sleep behavior disorder: An evidence based review

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Devnani; Racheal Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream enactment behavior resulting from a loss of REM skeletal muscle atonia. The neurobiology of REM sleep and the characteristic features of REM atonia have an important basis for understanding the aggravating etiologies the proposed pharmacological interventions in its management. This review outlines the evidence for behavioral and therapeutic measures along with evidence-based guidelines for their implementation, ...

  11. Integrating evidence-based interventions into client care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Carryer, Jennifer; Paterson, Jane; Goering, Paula; Nagle, Lynn; Kushniruk, Andre; Bajnok, Irmajean; Clark, Carrie; Srivastava, Rani

    2009-01-01

    Within the mental health care system, there is an opportunity to improve patient safety and the overall quality of care by integrating clinical practice guidelines with the care planning process through the use of information technology. Electronic assessment tools such as the Resident Assessment Inventory - Mental Health (RAI-MH) are widely used to identify the health care needs and outcomes of clients. In this knowledge translation initiative, an electronic care planning tool was enhanced to include evidence-based clinical interventions from schizophrenia guidelines. This paper describes the development of a mental health decision support prototype, a field test by clinicians, and user experiences with the application.

  12. Report on the International Society for Laboratory Hematology Survey on guidelines to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M; Iorio, A

    2016-05-01

    Given the importance of evidence-based guidelines in health care, we surveyed the laboratory hematology community to determine their opinions on guideline development and their experience and interest in developing clinical hematology laboratory practice guidelines. The study was conducted using an online survey, distributed to members of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) in 2015, with analysis of collected, anonymized responses. A total of 245 individuals participated. Most worked in clinical and/or research laboratories (83%) or industry (11%). 42% felt there were gaps in current guidelines. The majority (58%) recommended that ISLH engages its membership in guideline development. Participants differed in their familiarity with, and use of, different organizations' guidelines. Participants felt it was important to follow best practice recommendations on guideline development, including engagement of experts, statement about conflict of interests and how they were managed, systematic review and grading evidence for recommendations, identifying recommendations lacking evidence or consensus, and public input and peer review of the guideline. Moreover, it was considered important to provide guidelines free of charge. Industry involvement in guidelines was considered less important. The clinical laboratory hematology community has high expectations of laboratory practice guidelines that are consistent with recent recommendations on evidence-based guideline development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798.

  14. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. ESUR prostate MR guidelines 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barentsz, Jelle O.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Richenberg, Jonathan [Brighton and Sussex University Hospital Trust, Brighton (United Kingdom); Clements, Richard [Royal Gwent Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Newport, South Wales (United Kingdom); Choyke, Peter [National Cancer Institute, Molecular Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Verma, Sadhna [University Of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Villeirs, Geert [Ghent University Hospital, Division of Genitourinary Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Imaging, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Lyon (France); Logager, Vibeke [Copenhagen University, Hospital Herlev, Herlev (Denmark)

    2012-04-15

    The aim was to develop clinical guidelines for multi-parametric MRI of the prostate by a group of prostate MRI experts from the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR), based on literature evidence and consensus expert opinion. True evidence-based guidelines could not be formulated, but a compromise, reflected by ''minimal'' and ''optimal'' requirements has been made. The scope of these ESUR guidelines is to promulgate high quality MRI in acquisition and evaluation with the correct indications for prostate cancer across the whole of Europe and eventually outside Europe. The guidelines for the optimal technique and three protocols for ''detection'', ''staging'' and ''node and bone'' are presented. The use of endorectal coil vs. pelvic phased array coil and 1.5 vs. 3 T is discussed. Clinical indications and a PI-RADS classification for structured reporting are presented. (orig.)

  16. Adherence to best practice consensus guidelines for implant-based breast reconstruction: Results from the iBRA national practice questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylvaganam, Senthurun; Conroy, Elizabeth J; Williamson, Paula R; Barnes, Nicola L P; Cutress, Ramsey I; Gardiner, Matthew D; Jain, Abhilash; Skillman, Joanna M; Thrush, Steven; Whisker, Lisa J; Blazeby, Jane M; Potter, Shelley; Holcombe, Christopher

    2018-05-01

    The 2008 National Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction Audit demonstrated marked variation in the practice and outcomes of breast reconstruction in the UK. To standardise practice and improve outcomes for patients, the British professional associations developed best-practice guidelines with specific guidance for newer mesh-assisted implant-based techniques. We explored the degree of uptake of best-practice guidelines within units performing implant-based reconstruction (IBBR) as the first phase of the implant Breast Reconstruction Evaluation (iBRA) study. A questionnaire developed by the iBRA Steering Group was completed by trainee and consultant leads at breast and plastic surgical units across the UK. Simple summary statistics were calculated for each survey item to assess compliance with current best-practice guidelines. 81 units from 79 NHS Trusts completed the questionnaire. Marked variation was observed in adherence to guidelines, especially those relating to clinical governance and infection prevention strategies. Less than half (n = 28, 47%) of units obtained local clinical governance board approval prior to offering new mesh-based techniques and prospective audit of the clinical, cosmetic and patient-reported outcomes of surgery was infrequent. Most units screened for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus prior to surgery but fewer than 1 in 3 screened for methicillin-sensitive strains. Laminar-flow theatres (recommended for IBBR) were not widely-available with less than 1 in 5 units having regular access. Peri-operative antibiotics were widely-used, but the type and duration were highly-variable. The iBRA national practice questionnaire has demonstrated variation in reported practice and adherence to IBBR guidelines. High-quality evidence is urgently required to inform best practice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Crafting consensus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zápal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, 1–2 (2017), s. 169-200 ISSN 0048-5829 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-27902P Institutional support: Progres-Q24 Keywords : consensus building * agenda setting * vote buying Subject RIV: AH - Economics OBOR OECD: Economic Theory Impact factor: 0.788, year: 2016

  18. Addressing implementation challenges during guideline development - a case study of Swedish national guidelines for methods of preventing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Sundberg, Linda; Kardakis, Therese; Weinehall, Lars; Garvare, Rickard; Nyström, Monica E

    2015-01-22

    Many of the world's life threatening diseases (e.g. cancer, heart disease, stroke) could be prevented by eliminating life-style habits such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol use. Incorporating evidence-based research on methods to change unhealthy lifestyle habits in clinical practice would be equally valuable. However gaps between guideline development and implementation are well documented, with implications for health care quality, safety and effectiveness. The development phase of guidelines has been shown to be important both for the quality in guideline content and for the success of implementation. There are, however, indications that guidelines related to general disease prevention methods encounter specific barriers compared to guidelines that are diagnosis-specific. In 2011 the Swedish National board for Health and Welfare launched guidelines with a preventive scope. The aim of this study was to investigate how implementation challenges were addressed during the development process of these disease preventive guidelines. Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of the guideline development management group. Archival data detailing the guideline development process were also collected and used in the analysis. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis as the analytical framework. The study identified several strategies and approaches that were used to address implementation challenges during guideline development. Four themes emerged from the analysis: broad agreements and consensus about scope and purpose; a formalized and structured development procedure; systematic and active involvement of stakeholders; and openness and transparency in the specific guideline development procedure. Additional factors concerning the scope of prevention and the work environment of guideline developers were perceived to influence the possibilities to address implementation issues. This case study

  19. Comparison study of the rates of manual peripheral blood smear review from 3 automated hematology analyzers, Unicel DxH 800, ADVIA 2120i, and XE 2100, using international consensus group guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sue Jung; Kim, Yoonjung; Shin, Saeam; Song, Jaewoo; Choi, Jong Rak

    2012-11-01

    In the clinical laboratory, it is important both to reduce the number of peripheral blood slide reviews to save time and money and to avoid reporting false results. To determine differences in the slide review rates of 3 widely used automated hematologic analyzers, the Unicel DxH 800 (Beckman Coulter Inc, Fullerton, California), ADVIA 2120i (Siemens Diagnostics, Tarrytown, New York), and XE 2100 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan), using International Consensus Group for Hematology Review guidelines. A total of 1485 samples were tested, and 300 were manually reviewed. Slide review rates, sensitivity, specificity, and false-positive and false-negative rates were estimated using consensus group rules and compared using χ(2) tests, Fisher exact tests, or generalized estimating equations. Unicel DxH 800, ADVIA 2120i, and XE 2100 showed 22.8%, 20.2%, and 28.6% slide review rates; 14.3%, 14.3%, and 9.7% false-negative rates; and 13.7, 11.3%, and 17.3% false-positive rates, respectively. All analyzers showed significantly higher false-negative rates than that of the consensus group (2.9%). False-negative rates were higher than the recommended levels. Among 3 automated hematologic analyzers, XE 2100 showed the highest rate of slide review. Because the present study clearly shows that the slide review rates have distinct characteristics among the studied analyzers, each individual laboratory should consider selecting the most appropriate analyzer according to clinical characteristics. Analyzers with high sensitivity may be advantageous in outpatient settings for screening patients, whereas analyzers with high specificity may be beneficial in inpatient settings for efficient patient care.

  20. [First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans/ Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaria, María C; Bianchini, Hebe M; Castello, Liliana; Carloni, Graciela; Di Martino, Ana; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Litterio, Mirta; Rollet, Raquel; Rossetti, Adelaida; Predari, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Through time, anaerobic bacteria have shown good susceptibility to clinically useful antianaerobic agents. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial resistance profile of most of the anaerobic species related to severe infections in humans has been modified in the last years and different kinds of resistance to the most active agents have emerged, making their effectiveness less predictable. With the aim of finding an answer and for the purpose of facilitating the detection of anaerobic antimicrobial resistance, the Anaerobic Subcommittee of the Asociación Argentina de Microbiología developed the First Argentine consensus guidelines for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria in humans. This document resulted from the compatibilization of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations, the international literature and the work and experience of the Subcommittee. The Consensus document provides a brief taxonomy review, and exposes why and when anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests should be conducted, and which antimicrobial agents can be used according to the species involved. The recommendations on how to perform, read and interpret in vitro anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility tests with each method are exposed. Finally, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, the classification of antibiotics according to their in vitro activities, the natural and acquired mechanisms of resistance, the emerging resistance and the regional antibiotic resistance profile of clinically relevant anaerobic species are shown.

  1. Guidelines for the conduct of pharmacological clinical trials in hand osteoarthritis: Consensus of a Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginster, Jean-Yves L; Arden, Nigel K; Haugen, Ida K; Rannou, Francois; Cavalier, Etienne; Bruyère, Olivier; Branco, Jaime; Chapurlat, Roland; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Dennison, Elaine M; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Laslop, Andrea; Leeb, Burkhard F; Maggi, Stefania; Mkinsi, Ouafa; Povzun, Anton S; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Thomas, Thierry; Uebelhart, Daniel; Veronese, Nicola; Cooper, Cyrus

    2017-12-07

    To gather expert opinion on the conduct of clinical trials that will facilitate regulatory review and approval of appropriate efficacious pharmacological treatments for hand osteoarthritis (OA), an area of high unmet clinical need. The European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal diseases (ESCEO) organized a working group under the auspices of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the World Health Organization (WHO). This consensus guideline is intended to provide a reference tool for practice, and should allow for better standardization of the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease affecting different, and often multiple, joints of the thumb and fingers. It was recognized that the various phenotypes and limitations of diagnostic criteria may make the results of hand OA trials difficult to interpret. Nonetheless, practical recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials of both symptom and structure modifying drugs are outlined in this consensus statement, including guidance on study design, execution, and analysis. While the working group acknowledges that the methodology for performing clinical trials in hand OA will evolve as knowledge of the disease increases, it is hoped that this guidance will support the development of new pharmacological treatments targeting hand OA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  3. Interdisciplinary consensus on diagnosis and treatment of testicular germ cell tumors. Results of an update conference based on evidence-based medicine (EBM); Interdisziplinaerer Konsensus zur Diagnostik und Therapie von Hodentumoren. Ergebnisse einer Update-Konferenz auf Grundlage evidenzbasierter Medizin (EBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) (Germany); Arbeitsgemeinschaft Radiologische Onkologie (ARO), Strahlenklinik AKH Hagen (Germany); Krege, S. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Urologie (DGU) (Germany); Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Urologie; Schmoll, H.J. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO), Zentrum fuer innere Medizin IV der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Albers, P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Beyer, J. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin; Bokemeyer, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2; Classen, J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Dieckmann, K.P. [Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Hartmann, M. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Heidenreich, A. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Hoeltl, W. [Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Spital Wien (Austria). Urologische Klinik; Kliesch, S. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Koehrmann, K.U. [Urologische Klinik des Klinikums der Stadt Mannheim (Germany); Kuczyk, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Schmidberger, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Weinknecht, S. [Krankenhaus am Urban Berlin (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Winter, E. [Klinikum Schwerin (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Wittekind, C. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie

    2000-09-01

    An 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus Statement' summarizes and defines the diagnostic and therapeutic standards according to the current scientific practices in testicular cancer. For 21 separate areas scientifically based decision criteria are suggested. For treatment areas where more than one option exist without a consensus being reached for a preferred strategy, such as in seminoma in clinical Stage I or in non-seminoma Stages CS I or CS IIA/B, all acceptable alternative strategies with their respecitve advantages and disadvantages are presented. This 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus' was presented at the 24th National Congress of the German Cancer Society on March 21st and subsequently evaluated and approved by the various German scientific medical societies. (orig.) [German] Der zu 21 Themenkomplexen anhand wissenschaftlich begruendeter Entscheidungskriterien erarbeitete 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' praezisiert und definiert diagnostische und therapeutische Standards entsprechend dem aktuellen Wissensstand ueber die Tumorentitaet. Fuer Therapiesituationen, bei denen mehrere Optionen bestehen und kein Konsens ueber die favorisierte Strategie erzielt wurde wie beim Seminom im klinischen Stadium I oder beim Nichtseminom in den Stadien CS I bzw. CS IIA/B, wurden jeweilige Alternativen mit deren Vor- und Nachteilen dargestellt. Der 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' wurde beim 24. Deutschen Krebskongress am 21.3.2000 vorgestellt, nachfolgend von den daran beteiligten wissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften geprueft und gebilligt. (orig.)

  4. 26th Hohenheim Concensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, van B.; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zollner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term “Hohenheim Consensus Conference” defines conferences dealing with

  5. Development of an evidence-based review with recommendations using an online iterative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke; Smith, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    The practice of modern medicine is governed by evidence-based principles. Due to the plethora of medical literature, clinicians often rely on systematic reviews and clinical guidelines to summarize the evidence and provide best practices. Implementation of an evidence-based clinical approach can minimize variation in health care delivery and optimize the quality of patient care. This article reports a method for developing an "Evidence-based Review with Recommendations" using an online iterative process. The manuscript describes the following steps involved in this process: Clinical topic selection, Evidence-hased review assignment, Literature review and initial manuscript preparation, Iterative review process with author selection, and Manuscript finalization. The goal of this article is to improve efficiency and increase the production of evidence-based reviews while maintaining the high quality and transparency associated with the rigorous methodology utilized for clinical guideline development. With the rise of evidence-based medicine, most medical and surgical specialties have an abundance of clinical topics which would benefit from a formal evidence-based review. Although clinical guideline development is an important methodology, the associated challenges limit development to only the absolute highest priority clinical topics. As outlined in this article, the online iterative approach to the development of an Evidence-based Review with Recommendations may improve productivity without compromising the quality associated with formal guideline development methodology. Copyright © 2011 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  6. Evidence-Based Psychotherapy: Advantages and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah C; Schwartz, Ann C; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2017-07-01

    Evidence-based psychotherapies have been shown to be efficacious and cost-effective for a wide range of psychiatric conditions. Psychiatric disorders are prevalent worldwide and associated with high rates of disease burden, as well as elevated rates of co-occurrence with medical disorders, which has led to an increased focus on the need for evidence-based psychotherapies. This chapter focuses on the current state of evidence-based psychotherapy. The strengths and challenges of evidence-based psychotherapy are discussed, as well as misperceptions regarding the approach that may discourage and limit its use. In addition, we review various factors associated with the optimal implementation and application of evidence-based psychotherapies. Lastly, suggestions are provided on ways to advance the evidence-based psychotherapy movement to become truly integrated into practice.

  7. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...... on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process...

  8. Evidence-based rehabilitation of athletes with glenohumeral instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ann M; Borms, Dorien; Castelein, Birgit; Vanderstukken, Fran; Johansson, Fredrik R

    2016-02-01

    To give an overview of current knowledge and guidelines with respect to evidence-based rehabilitation of athletes with glenohumeral instability. This narrative review combines scientific evidence with clinical guidelines based on the current literature to highlight the different components of the rehabilitation of glenohumeral instability. Depending on the specific characteristics of the instability pattern, the severity, recurrence, and direction, the therapeutic approach may be adapted to the needs and demands of the athlete. In general, attention should go to (1) restoration of rotator cuff strength and inter-muscular balance, focusing on the eccentric capacity of the external rotators, (2) normalization of rotational range of motion with special attention to the internal rotation ROM, (3) optimization of the flexibility and muscle performance of the scapular muscles, and (4) gradually increasing the functional sport-specific load on the shoulder girdle. The functional kinetic chain should be implemented throughout all stages of the rehabilitation program. Return to play should be based on subjective assessment as well as objective measurements of ROM, strength, and function. This paper summarizes evidence-based guidelines for treatment of glenohumeral instability. These guidelines may assist the clinician in the prevention and rehabilitation of the overhead athlete. Expert opinion, Level V.

  9. Commentary on recent therapeutic guidelines for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Berenbaum, Francis; Hochberg, Marc; Punzi, Leonardo; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2015-06-01

    Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. A symposium of European and US OA experts was held within the framework of the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology to discuss and compare guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of knee OA and to reach a consensus for management, particularly for areas in which there is no clear consensus: non-pharmacological therapy; efficacy and safety of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); intra-articular (i.a.) hyaluronates (HA); and the role of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and/or glucosamine sulfate (GS). All guidelines reviewed agree that knee OA is a progressive disease of the joint whose management requires non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Discrepancies between guidelines are few and mostly reflect heterogeneity of expert panels involved, geographical differences in the availability of pharmacotherapies, and heterogeneity of the studies included. Panels chosen for guideline development should include experts with real clinical experience in drug use and patient management. Implementation of agreed guidelines can be thwarted by drug availability and reimbursement plans, resulting in optimal OA treatment being jeopardized, HA and symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SySADOAs) being clear examples of drugs whose availability and prescription can greatly vary geographically. In addition, primary care providers, often responsible for OA management (at least in early disease), may not adhere to clinical care guidelines, particularly for non-pharmacological OA treatment. Harmonization of the recommendations for knee OA treatment is challenging but feasible, as shown by the step-by-step therapeutic algorithm developed by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO). More easily disseminated and

  10. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  11. ICCS/ESCCA consensus guidelines to detect GPI-deficient cells in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and related disorders part 4 - assay validation and quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldaker, Teri; Whitby, Liam; Saber, Maryam; Holden, Jeannine; Wallace, Paul K; Litwin, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Over the past six years, a diverse group of stakeholders have put forth recommendations regarding the analytical validation of flow cytometric methods and described in detail the differences between cell-based and traditional soluble analyte assay validations. This manuscript is based on these general recommendations as well as the published experience of experts in the area of PNH testing. The goal is to provide practical assay-specific guidelines for the validation of high-sensitivity flow cytometric PNH assays. Examples of the reports and validation data described herein are provided in Supporting Information. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  12. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Lin, Lilie L.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  13. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Erickson, Beth [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Beriwal, Sushil [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bhatia, Sudershan K. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lee Burnett, Omer [University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); D' Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh [London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Haddock, Michael G. [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Ellen L. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kunos, Charles A. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Lee, Larissa J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Lilie L. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mayr, Nina A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Petric, Primoz [Division of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Small, William [Loyola University Strich School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  14. Consenso brasileiro sobre câncer gástrico: diretrizes para o câncer gástrico no Brasil Brazilian consensus in gastric cancer: guidelines for gastric cancer in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zilberstein

    2013-03-01

    staging of the tumor and number of lymph nodes resected and involved. AIM: The Brazilian Consensus on Gastric Cancer promoted by ABCG was designed with the intention to issue guidelines that can guide medical professionals to care for patients with this disease. METHODS: Were summarized and answered 43 questions reflecting consensus or not on diagnosis and treatment that may be used as guidance for its multidisciplinary approach. The method involved three steps. Initially, 56 digestive surgeons and related medical specialties met to formulate the questions that were sent to participants for answers on scientific evidence and personal experience. Summaries were presented, discussed and voted in plenary in two other meetings. They covered 53 questions involving: diagnosis and staging (six questions; surgical treatment (35 questions; chemotherapy and radiotherapy (seven questions and anatomopathology, immunohistochemistry and perspective (five questions. It was considered consensus agreement on more than 70% of the votes in each item. RESULTS: All the answers were presented and voted upon, and in 42 there was consensus. CONCLUSION: It could be developed consensus on most issues that come with the care of patients with gastric cancer and they can be transformed in guidelines.

  15. Index-TB Guidelines: Guidelines on extrapulmonary tuberculosis for India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Ryan, H.; Khaparde, Sunil; Sachdeva, K. S.; Singh, Achintya D.; Mohan, Alladi; Sarin, Rohit; Paramasivan, C N; Kumar, Prahlad; Nischal, Neeraj; Khatiwada, Saurav; Garner, Paul; Tharyan, Prathap

    2017-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a common opportunistic infection in people living with HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised states such as diabetes mellitus and malnutrition. There is a paucity of data from clinical trials in EPTB and most of the information regarding diagnosis and management is extrapolated from pulmonary TB. Further, there are no formal national or international guidelines on EPTB. To address these concerns, Indian EPTB guidelines were developed under the auspices of Central TB Division and Directorate of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The objective was to provide guidance on uniform, evidence-informed practices for suspecting, diagnosing and managing EPTB at all levels of healthcare delivery. The guidelines describe agreed principles relevant to 10 key areas of EPTB which are complementary to the existing country standards of TB care and technical operational guidelines for pulmonary TB. These guidelines provide recommendations on three priority areas for EPTB: (i) use of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis, (ii) use of adjunct corticosteroids in treatment, and (iii) duration of treatment. The guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria, which were evidence based, and due consideration was given to various healthcare settings across India. Further, for those forms of EPTB in which evidence regarding best practice was lacking, clinical practice points were developed by consensus on accumulated knowledge and experience of specialists who participated in the working groups. This would also reflect the needs of healthcare providers and develop a platform for future research. PMID:28862176

  16. Index-TB guidelines: Guidelines on extrapulmonary tuberculosis for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a common opportunistic infection in people living with HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised states such as diabetes mellitus and malnutrition. There is a paucity of data from clinical trials in EPTB and most of the information regarding diagnosis and management is extrapolated from pulmonary TB. Further, there are no formal national or international guidelines on EPTB. To address these concerns, Indian EPTB guidelines were developed under the auspices of Central TB Division and Directorate of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The objective was to provide guidance on uniform, evidence-informed practices for suspecting, diagnosing and managing EPTB at all levels of healthcare delivery. The guidelines describe agreed principles relevant to 10 key areas of EPTB which are complementary to the existing country standards of TB care and technical operational guidelines for pulmonary TB. These guidelines provide recommendations on three priority areas for EPTB: (i use of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis, (ii use of adjunct corticosteroids in treatment, and (iii duration of treatment. The guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE criteria, which were evidence based, and due consideration was given to various healthcare settings across India. Further, for those forms of EPTB in which evidence regarding best practice was lacking, clinical practice points were developed by consensus on accumulated knowledge and experience of specialists who participated in the working groups. This would also reflect the needs of healthcare providers and develop a platform for future research.