WorldWideScience

Sample records for evidence based practice

  1. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    , and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  2. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    was considered through literature searches combined with personal files. Treatments should generally not be chosen based only on evidence from observational studies or single randomised clinical trials. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis of all identifiable randomised clinical trials with Grading...

  4. Evidence-based practice of periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Charles M; MacNeill, Simon R; Satheesh, Keerthana

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice involves complex and conscientious decision making based not only on the available evidence but also on patient characteristics, situations, and preferences. It recognizes that care is individualized and ever-changing and involves uncertainties and probabilities. The specialty of periodontics has abundant high-level evidence upon which treatment decisions can be determined. This paper offers a brief commentary and overview of the available evidence commonly used in the private practice of periodontics.

  5. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  6. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  7. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends......The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  8. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  9. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  10. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  11. From evidence-based to evidence-reflected practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    “Knowledge” is of the utmost significance for professional practice and learning. Today, though, the established knowledge base is changing in all areas of the labour market (Alvesson, 2004). Work and society are dominated by commitment to demands for high levels of demonstrable accountability......, cost-efficiency and measurable quality. Thus, today, evidence-based practice has become an expectation and fashion, often used to emphasize the grounding of practice in research based knowledge that provides measurable evidence for best practice. But at the same time, there is a growing distrust...... of the supremacy of this kind of knowledge, and traditional monopolies of knowledge are challenged (Gabbay & May, 2010). In the literature, there is an on-going debate about professional knowledge enacted in diverse settings. This debate presents a wide range of epistemological terminologies and typologies, which...

  12. Queer challenges to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay; Grant, Alec

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to queer evidence-based practice by troubling the concepts of evidence, knowledge and mental illness. The evidence-based narrative that emerged within biomedicine has dominated health care. The biomedical notion of 'evidence' has been critiqued extensively and is seen as exclusive and limiting, and even though the social constructionist paradigm attempts to challenge the authority of biomedicine to legitimate what constitutes acceptable evidence or knowledge for those experiencing mental illness, biomedical notions of evidence appear to remain relatively intact. Queer theory offers theoretical tools to disrupt biomedical norms and challenges biomedical normativity to indicate how marginalisation occurs when normative truths about mental health classify those who differ from the norm as 'ill' or 'disordered'. Queer theory's emphasis on normativity serves the political aim to subvert marginalisation and bring about radical social and material change. Reference will be made to mental health subjects within each discourse by indicating how the body acts as a vehicle for knowing. Deleuzian notions of the rhizome are used as metaphor to suggest a relational approach to knowledge that does away with either/or positions in either biomedical, or queer knowledge to arrive at a both/and position where the biomedical, constructionist and queer are interrelated and entangled in needing the other for their own evolution. However, queer does not ask for assimilation but celebrates difference by remaining outside to disrupt that which is easily overlooked, assumed to be natural or represented as the norm. The task of queer knowledge is to do justice to the lives lived in the name of evidence-based practice and demands that we consider the relations of power where knowledge is produced. This pursuit creates different knowledge spaces where we identify new intersections that allow for socially just understandings of knowing or evidence to emerge. © 2013 John Wiley

  13. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798.

  14. The evidence-based practice ideologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzoukas, Stefanos

    2007-10-01

    This paper puts forward the argument that there are various, competing, and antithetical evidence-based practice (EBP) definitions and acknowledges that the different EBP definitions are based on different epistemological perspectives. However, this is not enough to understand the way in which nurse professionals choose between the various EBP formations and consequently facilitate them in choosing the most appropriate for their needs. Therefore, the current article goes beyond and behind the various EBP epistemologies to identify how individuals choose an epistemology, which consequently will assist our understanding as to how an individual chooses a specific EBP formation. Individuals choose an epistemology on the mere belief that the specific epistemology offers the ideals or ideas of best explaining or interpreting daily reality. These ideals or ideas are termed by science, history, and politics as ideology. Similarly, individual practitioners choose or should choose between the different EBP formations based on their own personal ideology. Consequently, this article proceeds to analyse the various ideologies behind different EBP definitions as to conclude that there are two broad ideologies that inform the various EBP formations, namely the ideology of truth and the ideology of individual emancipation. These two ideologies are analysed and their connections to the various EBP formations are depicted. Eventually, the article concludes that the in-depth, critical, and intentional analysis by individual nurses of their own ideology will allow them to choose the EBP formation that is most appropriate and fitting for them, and their specific situation. Hence, the conscious analysis of individual ideology becomes the criterion for choosing between competing EBP formations and allows for best evidence to be implemented in practice. Therefore, the best way to teach EBP courses is by facilitating students to analyse their own ideology.

  15. Evidence-Based Practice in Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patrick S; Moyer, Kurtis E

    2018-01-24

    The goal of this study is to examine the existing peer reviewed literature comparing modern adjunctive techniques in liposuction including laser-assisted liposuction (LAL) and ultrasound-assisted liposuction (UAL) to standard suction-assisted liposuction (SAL). We intend to interpret these findings into a literature-based clinical application to influence practice patterns. A literature review was conducted using a keyword search in PubMed. Keyword search items included liposuction, lipoplasty, suction assisted liposuction, ultrasound assisted liposuction, laser assisted liposuction, tumescent, liposuction comparison, liposuction review, and combinations therein. Exclusion criteria included articles with a primary focus on histologic effects of energy devices, primary animal models, primary opinion papers with no reference to available data, and industry-sponsored publications. Inclusion criteria included articles with direct comparison of liposuction modalities, randomized or blinded studies, and studies with objective outcomes. Twenty-five articles that met the inclusion criteria comparing SAL to UAL or LAL out of 9972 articles identified were obtained. The selected literature was assigned into 3 categories: evidence demonstrating an advantage of 1 modality (SAL, UAL, or LAL) over another, evidence that showed no benefit of 1 modality over another, and evidence that demonstrated risks of complications of 1 modality over another. The benefits of UAL and LAL over SAL include the following: (1) UAL over SAL in the treatment of gynecomastia, (2) LAL and UAL over SAL with decreased hemoglobin/hematocrit in high-volume lipoaspirates, and (3) LAL over SAL with skin tightening in select areas specifically the submental area. Otherwise, the literature demonstrates equivocal results among the described techniques with no clear benefit to set one apart from the other. There appears to be no demonstrable added benefit to the addition of either UAL or LAL that would urge a

  16. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  17. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  18. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine: Is It Working in Practice?

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into dai...

  19. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities for im...

  20. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive "medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community." Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs.

  1. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toklu HZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hale Zerrin Toklu Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive “medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community.” Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs. Keywords: pharmacist, rational use of medicine, pharmacotherapy, pharmaceutical, outcome

  2. Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice globally. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... best available evidence from research findings, expert ideas from specialists in the various health ... need to be addressed to enhance utilization of the best available evidence in nursing practice.

  3. Organisational support for evidence-based practice: occupational therapists perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sally; Allen, Shelley; Caldwell, Elizabeth; Whitehead, Mary; Turpin, Merrill; Fleming, Jennifer; Cox, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    Barriers to the use of evidence-based practice extend beyond the individual clinician and often include organisational barriers. Adoption of systematic organisational support for evidence-based practice in health care is integral to its use. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of occupational therapy staff regarding the influence of organisational initiatives to support evidence-based practice on workplace culture and clinical practice. This study used semi-structured interviews with 30 occupational therapists working in a major metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia regarding their perceptions of organisational initiatives designed to support evidence-based practice. Four themes emerged from the data: (i) firmly embedding a culture valuing research and EBP, (ii) aligning professional identity with the Research and Evidence in Practice model, (iii) experiences of change: pride, confidence and pressure and (iv) making evidence-based changes to clinical practices. Organisational initiatives for evidence-based practice were perceived as influencing the culture of the workplace, therapists' sense of identity as clinicians, and as contributing to changes in clinical practice. It is therefore important to consider organisational factors when attempting to increase the use of evidence in practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Colon Trauma: Evidence-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Logue, Alicia J; Muir, Mark T

    2018-01-01

    Colon injury is not uncommon and occurs in about a half of patients with penetrating hollow viscus injuries. Despite major advances in the operative management of penetrating colon wounds, there remains discussion regarding the appropriate treatment of destructive colon injuries, with a significant amount of scientific evidence supporting segmental resection with primary anastomosis in most patients without comorbidities or large transfusion requirement. Although literature is sparse concerning the management of blunt colon injuries, some studies have shown operative decision based on an algorithm originally defined for penetrating wounds should be considered in blunt colon injuries. The optimal management of colonic injuries in patients requiring damage control surgery (DCS) also remains controversial. Studies have recently reported that there is no increased risk compared with patients treated without DCS if fascial closure is completed on the first reoperation, or that a management algorithm for penetrating colon wounds is probably efficacious for colon injuries in the setting of DCS as well.

  5. Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has…

  6. Mistakes, Errors and Foul-Ups: Practice-Based Evidence for Evidence Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In human medicine, the management of care to ensure safety for the service-user constitutes an important element of the patient ‘journey.’ The name given to this discipline is patient safety. It is founded upon those elements of good medical practice which help avoid or mitigate human error.  Investigations in the U.S. first highlighted the alarming extent of medical error: Brennan et al. (1991 concluded that in the state of New York, the overall rate of adverse events was approximately 4% for hospitalised patients, which equated to over 13,000 deaths a year. Doctors looked to other safety critical industries and aviation in particular (Reason 1995, to address this phenomenon: there is now a wealth of research on the impact of various safety initiatives on measurable rates of harm. The World Health Organisation’s ‘Safe Surgery Saves Lives’ initiative - a campaign that advocates the use of a surgical checklist to standardise aspects of peri-operative care - is one example of aviation methodology successfully employed in a clinical setting (van Klei et al. 2012. The critical importance of effective communication, leadership and situational awareness has also been discussed at length in the human patient safety literature.ObjectivesVeterinary patient safety is an analogous discipline and researchers have attempted to understand more about the topic of veterinary medical error. However, the evidence-base for veterinary patient safety is sparse.  This presentation aims to summarise the evidence to date and highlight the benefits in practice of an emerging subject. MethodA search of the terms veterinary patient safety on the PubMed database from 1990 to 2016 was performed.Findings15 articles were identified as contributing to the veterinary patient safety literature.OutcomeThe available literature has addressed a number of areas. The use of checklists in a clinical setting has been proven to reduce the incidence of specific undesirable

  7. Evidence-based music therapy practice: an integral understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The American Music Therapy Association has recently put into action a plan called its Research Strategic Priority, with one of its central purposes to advance the music therapy field through research promoting Evidence-Based Practice of music therapy. The extant literature on music therapy practice, theory, and research conveys a range of very different perspectives on what may count as the "evidence" upon which practice is based. There is therefore a need to conceptualize evidence-based music therapy practice in a multifaceted, yet coherent and balanced way. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a framework based upon four distinct epistemological perspectives on evidence-based music therapy practice that together represent an integral understanding.

  8. Supporting Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices through Practice-Based Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Patricia A.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Fox, Lise

    2015-01-01

    In active implementation science frameworks, coaching has been described as an important competency "driver" to ensure evidence-based practices are implemented as intended. Empirical evidence also has identified coaching as a promising job-embedded professional development strategy to support implementation of quality teaching practices.…

  9. Implementing Evidence-Based Practices for People With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robert E.; Bond, Gary R.; Essock, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, a consensus has emerged regarding a set of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia that address symptom management and psychosocial functioning. Yet, surveys suggest that the great majority of the population of individuals with schizophrenia do not receive evidence-based care. In this article, we review the empirical literature on implementation of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia patients. We first examine lessons learned from implementation studies in general medicine. We then summarize the implementation literature specific to schizophrenia, including medication practices, psychosocial interventions, information technology, and state- and federal-level interventions. We conclude with recommendations for future directions. PMID:19491315

  10. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global acknowledgement of ecological restoration, as an important tool to complement conservation efforts, requires an effort to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions. Evidence-based practice is purported to promote effectiveness...

  11. Evidence Based Practice: Valuable and Successful Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: evidence-based practice, nursing, midwifery, education, quality improvement, ... developed by Deming, the father of quality control. ... representative of the total population. .... and helped the management engage in key areas of.

  12. Evidence - based medicine/practice in sports physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Robert C; Lehecka, B J

    2012-10-01

    A push for the use of evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence-based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision-making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well-being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence-based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy.

  13. Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change.

  14. Clinical librarians as facilitators of nurses' evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Sylvia; Wallmyr, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nurses' and ward-based clinical librarians' reflections on ward-based clinical librarians as facilitators for nurses' use of evidences-based practice. Nurses' use of evidence-based practice is reported to be weak. Studies have suggested that clinical librarians may promote evidence-based practice. To date, little is known about clinical librarians participating nurses in the wards. A descriptive, qualitative design was adopted for the study. In 2007, 16 nurses who had been attended by a clinical librarian in the wards were interviewed in focus groups. Two clinical librarians were interviewed by individual interviews. In the analysis, a content analysis was used. Three themes were generated from the interviews with nurses: 'The grip of everyday work', 'To articulate clinical nursing issues' and 'The clinical librarians at a catalyst'. The nurses experienced the grip of everyday work as a hindrance and had difficulties to articulate and formulate relevant nursing issues. In such a state, the nurses found the clinical librarian presence in the ward as enhancing the awareness of and the use of evidence-based practice. Three themes emerged from the analysis with the librarians. They felt as outsiders, had new knowledge and acquired a new role as ward-based clinical librarians. Facilitation is needed if nurses' evidence-based practice is going to increase. The combined use of nurses and clinical librarians' knowledge and skills can be optimised. To achieve this, nurses' skills in consuming and implementing evidence ought to be strengthened. The fusion of the information and knowledge management skill of the ward-based clinical librarian and the clinical expertise of the nurses can be of value. With such a collaborative model, nurse and ward-based clinical librarian might join forces to increase the use of evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Evidence-based practice for information professionals a handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Examines to what extent the skills and techniques of evidence-based practice are transferable to the areas of professional practice of librarians and information professionals? Is it desirable for information professionals to integrate research findings into their day-to-day decision making?

  16. Health decision making: lynchpin of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Health decision making is both the lynchpin and the least developed aspect of evidence-based practice. The evidence-based practice process requires integrating the evidence with consideration of practical resources and patient preferences and doing so via a process that is genuinely collaborative. Yet, the literature is largely silent about how to accomplish integrative, shared decision making. for evidence-based practice are discussed for 2 theories of clinician decision making (expected utility and fuzzy trace) and 2 theories of patient health decision making (transtheoretical model and reasoned action). Three suggestions are offered. First, it would be advantageous to have theory-based algorithms that weight and integrate the 3 data strands (evidence, resources, preferences) in different decisional contexts. Second, patients, not providers, make the decisions of greatest impact on public health, and those decisions are behavioral. Consequently, theory explicating how provider-patient collaboration can influence patient lifestyle decisions made miles from the provider's office is greatly needed. Third, although the preponderance of data on complex decisions supports a computational approach, such an approach to evidence-based practice is too impractical to be widely applied at present. More troublesomely, until patients come to trust decisions made computationally more than they trust their providers' intuitions, patient adherence will remain problematic. A good theory of integrative, collaborative health decision making remains needed.

  17. The History of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, April; Bassendowski, Sandra

    Beginning with Florence Nightingale in the 1800s and evolving again within the medical community, evidence-based practice continues to advance along with the nursing discipline. Evidence-based practice is foundational to undergraduate and graduate nursing education and is a way for the nursing discipline to minimize the theory to practice gap. This article discusses the concept of evidence-based practice from a historical perspective as it relates to nursing in the educational and practice domains. The concept evidence-based practice is defined, and the similarities and differences to evidence-based medicine are discussed. It is crucial that registered nurses be proactive in their quest for research knowledge, so the gap between theory and practice continues to close. Utilizing nursing best practice guidelines, reviewing and implementing applicable research evidence, and taking advantage of technological advances are all ways in which nursing can move forward as a well-informed discipline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An organizational cybernetics framework for achieving balance in evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2014-01-01

    This article applies the systems science of organizational cybernetics to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the provision of social work services in a residential treatment center setting. It does so by systemically balancing EBP with practice-based evidence (PBE) with a focus on the organizational and information system infrastructures necessary to ensure successful implementation. This application is illustrated by discussing a residential treatment program that implemented evidence-based programming and evaluated the results; however, the systemic principles articulated can be applied to any human services organizational setting.

  19. Developing the skills required for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, B

    1998-01-01

    The current health care environment requires practitioners with the skills to find and apply the best currently available evidence for effective health care, to contribute to the development of evidence-based practice protocols, and to evaluate the impact of utilizing validated research findings in practice. Current approaches to teaching research are based mainly on gaining skills by participation in the research process. Emphasis on the requirement for rigour in the process of creating new knowledge is assumed to lead to skill in the process of using research information created by others. This article reflects upon the requirements for evidence-based practice, and the degree to which current approaches to teaching research prepare practitioners who are able to find, evaluate and best use currently available research information. The potential for using the principles of systematic review as a teaching and learning strategy for research is explored, and some of the possible strengths and weakness of this approach are highlighted.

  20. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application  of  evidence  and  documents.  In  this  study,  criteria  for  evidence-based  practice  in  Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM.

  1. How Quality Improvement Practice Evidence Can Advance the Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼRourke, Hannah M; Fraser, Kimberly D

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the evaluation of quality improvement interventions have been made in order to improve the evidence base of whether, to what extent, and why quality improvement interventions affect chosen outcomes. The purpose of this article is to articulate why these recommendations are appropriate to improve the rigor of quality improvement intervention evaluation as a research endeavor, but inappropriate for the purposes of everyday quality improvement practice. To support our claim, we describe the differences between quality improvement interventions that occur for the purpose of practice as compared to research. We then carefully consider how feasibility, ethics, and the aims of evaluation each impact how quality improvement interventions that occur in practice, as opposed to research, can or should be evaluated. Recommendations that fit the evaluative goals of practice-based quality improvement interventions are needed to support fair appraisal of the distinct evidence they produce. We describe a current debate on the nature of evidence to assist in reenvisioning how quality improvement evidence generated from practice might complement that generated from research, and contribute in a value-added way to the knowledge base.

  2. Navigating Evidence-Based Practice Projects: The Faculty Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan D; Quinn-Lee, Lisa; Gallegos, Cara; Sortedahl, Charlotte K

    : An innovative way to facilitate evidence-based practice (EBP) learning and to get evidence into practice is through academic-clinical agency projects involving faculty, undergraduate students, and agency staff. The central role of the faculty is key to successful academic-clinical agency partnerships. Faculty navigate the often difficult process of focusing students and engaging busy staff through initiating, maintaining, and evaluating projects. Students learn valuable EBP skills, staff become engaged in EBP, and the projects are rated highly by agency administrators.

  3. Implementing evidence-based practice during an economic downturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mary S; Staffileno, Beth A

    2012-01-01

    Building a sustainable evidence-based practice (EBP) infrastructure during times of financial constraints poses challenges for nurse leaders. To be successful, plans need to be creative and adaptive, while mindful of limited resources. This commentary describes change management strategies used to implement an EBP infrastructure at a hospital after organizational restructuring occurred.

  4. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  5. Evidence Based Practice: Valuable and Successful Examples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While research is needed and necessary, promoting the value of evidence-based practice (EBP), quality improvement (QI) and project evaluation (PE) initiatives could rapidly and economically further the development of nursing and midwifery disciplines globally, perhaps especially in resource constrained settings.

  6. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center.

  7. The role of hypnotherapy in evidence-based clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M J

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss the place of hypnotherapy in a modern medical world dominated by so-called evidence-based clinical practice. Hypnosis is an easily learned technique that is a valuable adjuvant to many medical, dental and psychological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice From a Learning Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Per; Neher, Margit; Ellström, Per-Erik; Gardner, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    For many nurses and other health care practitioners, implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) presents two interlinked challenges: acquisition of EBP skills and adoption of evidence-based interventions and abandonment of ingrained non-evidence-based practices. The purpose of this study to describe two modes of learning and use these as lenses for analyzing the challenges of implementing EBP in health care. The article is theoretical, drawing on learning and habit theory. Adaptive learning involves a gradual shift from slower, deliberate behaviors to faster, smoother, and more efficient behaviors. Developmental learning is conceptualized as a process in the "opposite" direction, whereby more or less automatically enacted behaviors become deliberate and conscious. Achieving a more EBP depends on both adaptive and developmental learning, which involves both forming EBP-conducive habits and breaking clinical practice habits that do not contribute to realizing the goals of EBP. From a learning perspective, EBP will be best supported by means of adaptive learning that yields a habitual practice of EBP such that it becomes natural and instinctive to instigate EBP in appropriate contexts by means of seeking out, critiquing, and integrating research into everyday clinical practice as well as learning new interventions best supported by empirical evidence. However, the context must also support developmental learning that facilitates disruption of existing habits to ascertain that the execution of the EBP process or the use of evidence-based interventions in routine practice is carefully and consciously considered to arrive at the most appropriate response. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Evidence-based clinical practice, [corrected] evidence-based medicine and the Cochrane collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, E

    1999-03-01

    Encouraging professionals in training and later to consider practice-related research findings when making important clinical decisions is an on-going concern. Evidenced-Based Medicine (EBM) and the Cochrane Collaboration (CC) provide a source of tools and ideas for doing so, as well as a roster of colleagues who share this interest. Evidenced-based medicine involves integrating clinical expertise with the best available external evidence from systematic research as well as considering the values and expectations of patients/clients. Advantage can be taken of educational formats developed in EBM, such as problem-based learning and critical-appraisal workshops in which participants learn how to ask key answerable questions related to important clinical practice questions (e.g., regarding effectiveness, accuracy of assessment measures, prediction, prevention, and quality of clinical practice guidelines) and to access and critically appraise related research. The Cochrane Collaboration is a world-wide network of centers that prepare, maintain, and disseminate high-quality systematic reviews on the efficacy of healthcare. These databases allow access to evidence related to clinical practice decisions. Forging reciprocal working relationships with those involved in EBM reciprocal and the CC should contribute to the pursuit of shared goals such as basing clinical decisions on the best-available evidence and involving clients as informed consumers.

  10. Pulmonary Metastasectomy: A Common Practice Based on Weak Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The resection of secondary metastases from the lungs is a wide-spread surgical practice. Patients are referred from coloproctology teams to thoracic surgeons specifically for this surgery. What is the expected benefit? I have explored the rationale and searched the literature in order to present these patients with a well-informed opinion for their consideration. I find only weak evidence based on uncontrolled retrospective series which have been interpreted as showing a survival benefit. This has been extrapolated to policy and practice that do not stand up to scrutiny. The practice has never been subjected to randomised trial and I will argue that the present evidence is insufficient to justify the uncontrolled use of an intervention with inescapable short-term morbidity, permanent loss of function, and major cost implications. I propose ways in which the evidence may be improved, including a trial in the areas of most uncertainty. PMID:17999813

  11. [Evidence based medicine. A new paradigm for medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, A V

    1998-01-01

    Modern medical practice is an ever-changing process, and the doctor's need for information has been partially met by continuous medical education (CME) activities. It has been shown that CME activities have not prevented clinical knowledge, as well as medical practice, from deteriorating with time. When faced with the need to get the most recent and relevant information possible, the busy clinician has two major problems: most of the published medical literature is either irrelevant or not useful; and there is little time to read it. Evidence-based medicine constitutes a new paradigm for medical practice in the sense that it tries to transform clinical problems into well formulated clinical questions, selecting and critically appraising scientific evidence with predefined and rigorous rules. It combines the expertise of the individual clinician with the best external evidence from clinical research for rational, ethical and efficacious practice. Evidence-based medicine can be taught and practiced by physicians with different degrees of autonomy, with several subspecialties, working in the hospital or in outpatient clinics, alone or in groups.

  12. Apprehensions of nurse managers on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carolina Camargo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze the apprehensions of nurse managers in the implementation of the Evidence Based Practice in a Teaching Hospital of Triângulo Mineiro. Method: Qualitative research guided by the Theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. Five workshops were conducted per focal group (n = 18 participants, conducted by hermeneutic-dialectic interactions between August and September/2016. Textual records resulting from each workshop were analyzed by semantic categories. Results: Aspects conditioning to the implementation of the Evidence Based Practice permeate from elements related to the fragmentation of the care network to the necessary expansion of the governability of the nurse managers to put changes into practice in their sectors. Most importantly, timely access to the results of research conducted at the teaching hospital was mentioned as crucial to guide better practices. Final considerations: The approach allowed the recognition of contextual conditions for the implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice, which may coincide with similar scenarios, as well as increase the national scientific production on the subject, which is still scarce.

  13. Evidence-based Practice in libraries - Principles and discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2012-01-01

    The article examines problems concerning the introduction and future implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in libraries. It includes important conceptual distinctions and definitions, and it reviews the more controversial aspects of EBP, primarely based on experiences from Denmark. The ....... The purpose of the article is both to qualify existing scepticism and reservations and - maybe - to clarify misunderstandings and objections through the presentation of arguments and data....

  14. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  15. Critical thinking: knowledge and skills for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    I respond to Kamhi's (2011) conclusion in his article "Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice" that rational or critical thinking is an essential complement to evidence-based practice (EBP). I expand on Kamhi's conclusion and briefly describe what clinicians might need to know to think critically within an EBP profession. Specifically, I suggest how critical thinking is relevant to EBP, broadly summarize the relevant skills, indicate the importance of thinking dispositions, and outline the various ways our thinking can go wrong. I finish the commentary by suggesting that critical thinking skills should be considered a required outcome of our professional training programs.

  16. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nurse Practice: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonkaitis, Catherine F.

    2018-01-01

    School nurses report that evidence-based practice (EBP) is not a part of their daily practice, and most have had no formal education regarding EBP or its implementation. The purpose of this review is to identify what strategies might be effective to educate school nurses about EBP as a first step toward establishing EBP in school nurse practice.…

  17. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Klein

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this discussion is to explore the theory, evidence base, and practice of Qigong for individuals with cancer. Questions addressed are: What is qigong? How does it work? What evidence exists supporting its practice in integrative oncology? What barriers to wide-spread programming access exist? Methods: Sources for this discussion include a review of scholarly texts, the Internet, PubMed, field observations, and expert opinion. Results: Qigong is a gentle, mind/body exercise integral within Chinese medicine. Theoretical foundations include Chinese medicine energy theory, psychoneuroimmunology, the relaxation response, the meditation effect, and epigenetics. Research supports positive effects on quality of life (QOL, fatigue, immune function and cortisol levels, and cognition for individuals with cancer. There is indirect, scientific evidence suggesting that qigong practice may positively influence cancer prevention and survival. No one Qigong exercise regimen has been established as superior. Effective protocols do have common elements: slow mindful exercise, easy to learn, breath regulation, meditation, emphasis on relaxation, and energy cultivation including mental intent and self-massage. Conclusions: Regular practice of Qigong exercise therapy has the potential to improve cancer-related QOL and is indirectly linked to cancer prevention and survival. Wide-spread access to quality Qigong in cancer care programming may be challenged by the availability of existing programming and work force capacity.

  18. Expanding the domains of attitudes towards evidence-based practice: the evidence based practice attitude scale-50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Cafri, Guy; Lugo, Lindsay; Sawitzky, Angelina

    2012-09-01

    Mental health and social service provider attitudes toward evidence-based practice have been measured through the development and validation of the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS; Aarons, Ment Health Serv Res 6(2):61-74, 2004). Scores on the EBPAS scales are related to provider demographic characteristics, organizational characteristics, and leadership. However, the EBPAS assesses only four domains of attitudes toward EBP. The current study expands and further identifies additional domains of attitudes towards evidence-based practice. A qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach was used to: (1) generate items from multiples sources (researcher, mental health program manager, clinician/therapist), (2) identify potential content domains, and (3) examine the preliminary domains and factor structure through exploratory factor analysis. Participants for item generation included the investigative team, a group of mental health program managers (n = 6), and a group of clinicians/therapists (n = 8). For quantitative analyses a sample of 422 mental health service providers from 65 outpatient programs in San Diego County completed a survey that included the new items. Eight new EBPAS factors comprised of 35 items were identified. Factor loadings were moderate to large and internal consistency reliabilities were fair to excellent. We found that the convergence of these factors with the four previously identified evidence-based practice attitude factors (15 items) was small to moderate suggesting that the newly identified factors represent distinct dimensions of mental health and social service provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. Combining the original 15 items with the 35 new items comprises the EBPAS 50-item version (EBPAS-50) that adds to our understanding of provider attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Neuropsychology 3.0: Evidence-Based Science and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift towards evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including: (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress towards these goals. PMID:21092355

  20. Motivational Interviewing: An Evidence-Based Practice for Improving Student Practice Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Melinda; Pierce, Paloma; Barnett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based communication method to assist clients in resolving their ambivalence regarding change. With a school emphasis on evidence-based practice and learning outcomes, a social work department implemented a semester-long course on MI. The purpose of this study was to determine baseline skills and…

  1. How to proceed when evidence-based practice is required but very little evidence available?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Lanlo, Olivier; Walker, Bruce F

    2013-01-01

    All clinicians of today know that scientific evidence is the base on which clinical practice should rest. However, this is not always easy, in particular in those disciplines, where the evidence is scarce. Although the last decades have brought an impressive production of research that is of inte...

  2. Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and…

  3. Developing evidence-based librarianship: practical steps for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumley, Ellen; Koufogiannakis, Denise

    2002-06-01

    Evidence-based librarianship (EBL) is a relatively new concept for librarians. This paper lays out a practical framework for the implementation of EBL. A new way of thinking about research in librarianship is introduced using the well-built question process and the assignment of librarian research questions to one of six domains specific to librarianship. As a profession, librarianship tends to reflect more qualitative, social sciences/humanities in its research methods and study types which tend to be less rigorous and more prone to bias. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) do not have to be placed at the top of an evidence 'hierarchy' for librarianship. Instead, a more encompassing model reflecting librarianship as a whole and the kind of research likely to be done by librarians is proposed. 'Evidence' from a number of disciplines including health sciences, business and education can be utilized by librarians and applied to their practice. However, access to and availability of librarianship literature needs to be further studied. While using other disciplines (e.g. EBHC) as a model for EBL has been explored in the literature, the authors develop models unique to librarianship. While research has always been a minor focus in the profession, moving research into practice is becoming more important and librarians need to consider the issues surrounding research in order to move EBL forward.

  4. Evidence-based practice curriculum in allied health professions for teaching-research-practice nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, G V

    2012-11-01

    Allied healthcare workers are from diverse professions and the key skill required is providing evidence-based care but this concept has not permeated enough for using it skillfully in their professions. A well structured curriculum in allied health professions is needed to strengthen concerted teaching, research, and practice to empower their professionals and make considerable differences in the lives of people by adopting evidence-based practice. Information sources for allied health professionals have relied on advice of their supervisors and colleagues, personal experiences, authoritative theory and texts for practice. Because of "research-practice" gap, often the use of evidence is not reflected in an individual day to day professional practice. Although allied health professionals work in resource and evidence challenged settings, there are certain barriers and facilitators, which need to be addressed. To implement practice-related research findings and uptake of evidence requires two essential components, namely, practical component and knowledge component. Research bench marking and research metrics for quality assurance and standardization through evidence-based practice will promote academic status and credibility of allied health profession. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  5. Establishing CASA as an evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Jennifer; Berrick, Jill Duerr

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors examine the evidentiary status of the Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) program through a review of current research findings and a critical analysis of the study methodologies used to produce those findings. Due to the equivocal research findings and widespread methodological weaknesses (most notably selection bias) in the literature base, it is determined that there is not currently enough evidence to establish CASA as an evidence-based practice. In spite of the challenges to the feasibility of such research, a future research agenda is suggested that calls for the execution of large randomized controlled trials in order to produce findings that will inform a deeper understanding of CASA effectiveness in improving child outcomes.

  6. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving evidence based practice in postgraduate nursing programs: A systematic review: Bridging the evidence practice gap (BRIDGE project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Louise D; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Phillips, Jane; Rao, Angela; Newton, Phillip J; Jackson, Debra; Ferguson, Caleb

    2018-04-01

    The nursing profession has a significant evidence to practice gap in an increasingly complex and dynamic health care environment. To evaluate effectiveness of teaching and learning strategies related to a capstone project within a Masters of Nursing program that encourage the development of evidence based practice capabilities. Systematic review that conforms to the PRISMA statement. Master's Nursing programs that include elements of a capstone project within a university setting. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC and PsycInfo were used to search for RCT's or quasi experimental studies conducted between 1979 and 9 June 2017, published in a peer reviewed journal in English. Of 1592 studies, no RCT's specifically addressed the development of evidence based practice capabilities within the university teaching environment. Five quasi-experimental studies integrated blended learning, guided design processes, small group work, role play and structured debate into Masters of Nursing research courses. All five studies demonstrated some improvements in evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation, with three out of five studies demonstrating significant improvements. There is a paucity of empirical evidence supporting the best strategies to use in developing evidence based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills for Master's Nursing students. As a profession, nursing requires methodologically robust studies that are discipline specific to identify the best approaches for developing evidence-based practice skills and/or research knowledge translation skills within the university teaching environment. Provision of these strategies will enable the nursing profession to integrate the best empirical evidence into nursing practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The Evidence-Based Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Timothy A; Detrich, Ronnie; Wilczynski, Susan M; Spencer, Trina D; Lewis, Teri; Wolfe, Katie

    2014-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of professional decision-making in which practitioners integrate the best available evidence with client values/context and clinical expertise in order to provide services for their clients. This framework provides behavior analysts with a structure for pervasive use of the best available evidence in the complex settings in which they work. This structure recognizes the need for clear and explicit understanding of the strength of evidence supporting intervention options, the important contextual factors including client values that contribute to decision making, and the key role of clinical expertise in the conceptualization, intervention, and evaluation of cases. Opening the discussion of EBP in this journal, Smith (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) raised several key issues related to EBP and applied behavior analysis (ABA). The purpose of this paper is to respond to Smith's arguments and extend the discussion of the relevant issues. Although we support many of Smith's (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) points, we contend that Smith's definition of EBP is significantly narrower than definitions that are used in professions with long histories of EBP and that this narrowness conflicts with the principles that drive applied behavior analytic practice. We offer a definition and framework for EBP that aligns with the foundations of ABA and is consistent with well-established definitions of EBP in medicine, psychology, and other professions. In addition to supporting the systematic use of research evidence in behavior analytic decision making, this definition can promote clear communication about treatment decisions across disciplines and with important outside institutions such as insurance companies and granting agencies.

  9. Is evidence-based medicine about democratizing medical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorgård, Keld

    2014-01-01

    The authoritarian standpoint in medicine has been under challenge by various groups and researchers since the 1980s. The challenges have been ethical, political and medical, with patient movements at the forefront. Over the past decade, however, a deep challenge has been posed by evidence......-based medicine (EBM), which has challenged the entire strategy of medical treatment from the point of view of a self-critical, anti-authoritarian and hereby also (it has been claimed) a more democratic medical practice. Previously, the challenges arose out of the patient rights perspective. EBM, by contrast......, was taken to challenge the way doctors consider their medical practice as a whole. The present paper puts this claim of democratization into a historical context. Two dimensions of the democratization hypothesis are discussed and it is argued that they are insufficient to capture the substantial changes...

  10. Determining registered nurses' readiness for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Linda; Ghosh, Yashowanto

    2008-01-01

    As health care systems worldwide move toward instituting evidence-based practice (EBP), its implementation can be challenging. Conducting a baseline assessment to determine nurses' readiness for EBP presents opportunities to plan strategies before implementation. Although a growing body of research literature is focused on implementing EBP, little attention has been paid to assessing nurses' readiness for EBP. The purpose of this study was to assess registered nurses' readiness for EBP in a moderate-sized acute care hospital in the Midwestern United States before implementation of a hospital-wide nursing EBP initiative. A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was used; 121 registered nurses completed the survey. The participants (n= 121) completed the 64-item Nurses' Readiness for Evidence-Based Practice Survey that allowed measurement of information needs, knowledge and skills, culture, and attitudes. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a post hoc analysis. The majority (72.5%) of respondents indicated that when they needed information, they consulted colleagues and peers rather than using journals and books; 24% of nurses surveyed used the health database, Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). The respondents perceived their EBP knowledge level as moderate. Cultural EBP scores were moderate, with unit scores being higher than organizational scores. The nurses' attitudes toward EBP were positive. The post hoc analysis showed many significant correlations. Nurses have access to technological resources and perceive that they have the ability to engage in basic information gathering but not in higher level evidence gathering. The elements important to EBP such as a workplace culture and positive attitudes are present and can be built upon. A "site-specific" baseline assessment provides direction in planning EBP initiatives. The Nurses' Readiness for EBP Survey is a streamlined tool with established reliability and

  11. evidence-based care: an innovation to improve nursing practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-10-13

    Oct 13, 2014 ... of skills for critical thinking and reflective practice as well as promotion of ... consideration of the nature of such evidence. ... nursing has a strong tradition of focusing on various .... Cost/Benefit ratio (Tanner, 1987) taking into.

  12. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers. PMID:27630517

  13. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for chronic pancreatitis 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sakagami, Junichi; Sata, Naohiro; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Hirota, Morihisa; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Lee, Lingaku; Fujiyama, Takashi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Ueda, Keijiro; Tachibana, Yuichi; Sogame, Yoshio; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kato, Ryusuke; Kataoka, Keisho; Shiratori, Keiko; Sugiyama, Masanori; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Tando, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is considered to be an irreversible progressive chronic inflammatory disease. The etiology and pathology of chronic pancreatitis are complex; therefore, it is important to correctly understand the stage and pathology and provide appropriate treatment accordingly. The newly revised Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chronic Pancreatitis 2015 consist of four chapters, i.e., diagnosis, staging, treatment, and prognosis, and includes a total of 65 clinical questions. These guidelines have aimed at providing certain directions and clinically practical contents for the management of chronic pancreatitis, preferentially adopting clinically useful articles. These revised guidelines also refer to early chronic pancreatitis based on the Criteria for the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis 2009. They include such items as health insurance coverage of high-titer lipase preparations and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, new antidiabetic drugs, and the definition of and treatment approach to pancreatic pseudocyst. The accuracy of these guidelines has been improved by examining and adopting new evidence obtained after the publication of the first edition.

  14. Measuring Costs to Community-Based Agencies for Implementation of an Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason M; Connell, Christian M

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare reform has led to an increase in dissemination of evidence-based practices. Cost is frequently cited as a significant yet rarely studied barrier to dissemination of evidence-based practices and the associated improvements in quality of care. This study describes an approach to measuring the incremental, unreimbursed costs in staff time and direct costs to community-based clinics implementing an evidence-based practice through participating in a learning collaborative. Initial implementation costs exceeding those for providing "treatment as usual" were collected for ten clinics implementing trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy through participation in 10-month learning collaboratives. Incremental implementation costs of these ten community-based clinic teams averaged the equivalent of US$89,575 (US$ 2012). The most costly activities were training, supervision, preparation time, and implementation team meetings. Recommendations are made for further research on implementation costs, dissemination of evidence-based practices, and implications for researchers and policy makers.

  15. Leadership in evidence-based practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenpfader, Ursula; Carlfjord, Siw; Nilsen, Per

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to systematically review published empirical research on leadership as a determinant for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) and to investigate leadership conceptualization and operationalization in this field. A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. Relevant electronic bibliographic databases and reference lists of pertinent review articles were searched. To be included, a study had to involve empirical research and refer to both leadership and EBP in health care. Study quality was assessed with a structured instrument based on study design. A total of 17 studies were included. Leadership was mostly viewed as a modifier for implementation success, acting through leadership support. Yet, there was definitional imprecision as well as conceptual inconsistency, and studies seemed to inadequately address situational and contextual factors. Although referring to an organizational factor, the concept was mostly analysed at the individual or group level. The concept of leadership in implementation science seems to be not fully developed. It is unclear whether attempts to tap the concept of leadership in available instruments truly capture and measure the full range of the diverse leadership elements at various levels. Research in implementation science would benefit from a better integration of research findings from other disciplinary fields. Once a more mature concept has been established, researchers in implementation science could proceed to further elaborate operationalization and measurement. Although the relevance of leadership in implementation science has been acknowledged, the conceptual base of leadership in this field has received only limited attention.

  16. De scientist practitioner en de evidence-based practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.; Nijnatten, C.H.C.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Het principe van evidence-based werken heeft kenmerken gekregen van een paradigma en de scientist practitioner lijkt plaatsgemaakt te hebben voor de louter uitvoerende evidence-based practitioner. Dat werkt eerder passiviteit dan wetenschappelijkheid in de hand. Er zijn zes belangrijke problemen met

  17. Autopsy practice in forensic pathology - Evidence-based or experience-based?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Freeman, Michael; Banner, Jytte

    2014-01-01

    Current autopsy practice in forensic pathology is to a large extent based on experience and individual customary practices as opposed to evidence and consensus based practices. As a result there is the potential for substantial variation in how knowledge is applied in each case. In the present case......-gathering and the use of check lists specific to certain injury causes are likely to result in less deviation from evidence-based practices in forensic pathology. Pre-autopsy data-gathering and check lists will help ensure a higher degree of standardization in autopsy reports thus enhancing the quality and accuracy...

  18. An online community of practice to support evidence-based physiotherapy practice in manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cathy; Yeung, Euson; Markoulakis, Roula; Guilcher, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how a community of practice promoted the creation and sharing of new knowledge in evidence-based manual therapy using Wenger's constructs of mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire as a theoretical framework. We used a qualitative approach to analyze the discussion board contributions of the 19 physiotherapists who participated in the 10-week online continuing education course in evidence-based practice (EBP) in manual therapy. The course was founded on community of practice, constructivism, social, and situated learning principles. The 1436 postings on 9 active discussion boards revealed that the community of practice was a social learning environment that supported strong participation and mutual engagement. Design features such as consistent facilitation, weekly guiding questions, and collaborative assignments promoted the creation and sharing of knowledge. Participants applied research evidence to the contexts in which they worked through reflective comparison of what they were reading to its applicability in their everyday practice. Participants' shared goals contributed to the common ground established in developing collective knowledge about different study designs, how to answer research questions, and the difficulties of conducting sound research. An online longitudinal community of practice utilized as a continuing education approach to deliver an online course based on constructivist and social learning principles allowed geographically dispersed physiotherapists to be mutually engaged in a joint enterprise in evidence-based manual therapy. Advantages included opportunity for reflection, modeling, and collaboration. Future studies should examine the impact of participation on clinical practice. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital

  19. Teaching evidence-based practice: developing a curriculum model to foster evidence-based practice in undergraduate student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, Stefano; Carpanoni, Marika; Turroni, Elena Casadei; Camellini, Riccarda; Mecugni, Daniela

    2013-09-01

    For the nature of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and its relevance to nursing, the skills that it requires should be a component in the basic Nursing degree courses. For this reason, the EBP process should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students' independence and ability to self-learning. the aim of this study is to describe the perception that newly graduated nurses have relative to the benefits of the skills learned during the laboratory's three-year EBP in consideration of the construction of the thesis, the research of evidence and usefulness of the EBP process for the development of their professional career. A descriptive study with a sample of 300 newly graduated nurses from the Degree Course in Nursing of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, venue of Reggio Emilia. The data collection instrument was an anonymous questionnaire. It was possible to answer through a 10 Likert scale. The sample considers effective the research of evidence carried out (mean 6, SD 2), related to the problems of patients (mean 7, SD 2); the sample considered the skills acquired during the laboratory's three-year EBP to be useful for career development (mean 7, SD 2). the decision to include the laboratory's three-year EBP in the curriculum of the Nursing degree promotes the development of skills relating to the use of the EBP process, competence that in the literature is indicated as one of the core competencies that all health professionals should develop and maintain throughout their professional career. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  1. A Quantitative Analysis of Evidence-Based Testing Practices in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is evidence-based testing practices in nursing education. Specifically, this research study explored the implementation of evidence-based testing practices between nursing faculty of various experience levels. While the significance of evidence-based testing in nursing education is well documented, little is known…

  2. Getting to uptake: do communities of practice support the implementation of evidence-based practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Melanie A; Peters, Julia; Boydell, Katherine

    2009-02-01

    Practitioners are increasingly encouraged to adopt evidence-based practices (EBP) leading to a need for new knowledge translation strategies to support implementation and practice change. This study examined the benefits of a community of practice in the context of Ontario's children's mental health sector where organizations are mandated to adopt a standardized outcome measure to monitor client response to treatment. Readiness for change, practice change, content knowledge, and satisfaction with and use of implementation supports were examined among practitioners newly trained on the measure who were randomly assigned to a community of practice (CoP) or a practice as usual (PaU) group. CoP practitioners attended 6 sessions over 12 months; PaU practitioners had access to usual implementation supports. Groups did not differ on readiness for change or reported practice change, although CoP participants demonstrated greater use of the tool in practice, better content knowledge and were more satisfied with implementation supports than PaU participants. CoPs present a promising model for translating EBP knowledge and promoting practice change in children's mental health that requires further study.

  3. [Evidence-based practice competence in undergraduate Nursing Degree students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Molina-Salas, Yolanda; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) learning has become a key issue for nurses. An EPB subject was included in the 4(th) year in the new syllabus of the Nursing Degree at University of Murcia (UM). To know the competence level in EBP of undergraduate nursing students at UM and compare the results between all four years. Observational descriptive study with a cross-sectional approach. undergraduate nursing students from all four years at Nursing Degree at the Faculty of Social and Healthcare Science at UM in the year 2013-14. EBP evaluation of competence of the nursing students consisted of attitude, skills and knowledge on EBP. A validated questionnaire, the EBP-COQ, was used. The scale range is 1 point «lowest level» to 5 points «higher level».The SPSS 21.0 program has been used to carry out descriptive and bivariate analyses. 144 students were included, 76.4% was female, and the median age was 23 years, 84.7% attended more than 75% class hours. The mean differences in the questionnaire between first and fourth years were 0.58 points in attitude, 0.60 in skills, 1.6 in knowledge and 0.83 in global competence in EBP. Significant differences in mean scores between the fourth and the remaining years in the global competence in EBP were observed, as well as in the three dimensions (p <0.05). The undergraduate-nursing students studied here have acquired an appropriate competence level in EBP, with a gradual increase by year. The biggest increase was in the fourth year students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence-Based Secondary Transition Practices for Enhancing School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; White, James; Richter, Sharon; Walker, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 28% of students with disabilities do not complete high school (National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, 2005). This increases the likelihood that these students will experience low wages, high rates of incarceration, and limited access to postsecondary education. This article reviews evidence-based secondary transition practices…

  5. Evidence-Based Practices Project for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Philip L.; Sudak, Howard S.; Silverman, Morton M.; Litts, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide continues to be a serious public health problem. In response to this problem, a myriad of suicide prevention programs have been developed and employed across the United States. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these programs is unknown because they have not been evaluated using rigorous methods. The Evidence-Based Practices…

  6. Implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses working in community settings and their strategies to mentor student nurses to develop evidence-based practice: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne Mary; Mallion, Jaimee

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how community nurses apply the best available evidence to their practice, and how they mentor student nurses to conceptualize and implement evidence-based practice in community settings. In the UK, the expansion of health-care provision in the community has supported the development of highly skilled community nurses. However, there is limited literature regarding the strategies used by community nurses to implement evidence-based practice and mentor student nurses to conceptualize evidence-based practice in community placements. An exploratory qualitative approach applying inductive reasoning to focus group data was used. As a result, nurses working for a community NHS Foundation Trust in South England with a mentor qualification were invited to participate in one of the seven focus groups, 33 nurses participated. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis. The themes discussed in this paper are: 'our practice is evidence-based' as guidelines and policies provided structure, but occasionally stifled autonomous clinical decision-making, and 'time' as a barrier and facilitator to mentoring student nurses in community settings. In conclusion, nurses need to develop the ability to incorporate patients' needs and wishes within evidence-based care. Time was a facilitator for some community mentors, but protected time is required to complete the necessary practice documentation of student nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  8. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration......, on the use of toric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to correct preoperative corneal astigmatism, the use of intracameral and topical antibiotics to prevent endophthalmitis, choice of anti-inflammatory medication to control postoperative inflammation and prevent cystoid macular oedema, the use of immediate...

  9. Complex interventions required to comprehensively educate allied health practitioners on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dizon JM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Janine Margarita Dizon1,2, Karen Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2University of Santo Tomas, Manila, PhilippinesAbstract: There is currently no strong evidence regarding the most effective training approach for allied health professionals that will support them to consistently apply the best research evidence in daily practice. Current evidence-based practice training tends to be 'one size fits all', and is unlikely to be appropriate for all allied health disciplines because of the variability in their tasks and scope of practice. The scant body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of evidence-based practice training for allied health practitioners provides some support for improving knowledge and skills, but equivocal evidence about influencing behaviors and attitudes. We propose a new model of evidence-based practice training, based on the concept of complex interventions reported in the literature. We believe that by offering training in evidence-based practice based on complex interventions relevant to the needs of the attendees, using fixed and variable components, there may be greater success in significantly influencing knowledge skills, attitudes, and behaviors.Keywords: complex interventions, evidence-based practice training, allied health

  10. Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices with Children Self-Efficacy Scale: Development and Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeel, Lorri S.; Leathers, Sonya J.; Strand, Tonya C.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews existing measures related to evidence-based practices with children and self-efficacy and describes the development and psychometric properties of the Evidence-Based Mental Health Practices With Children Efficacy Scale. This scale was developed to assess students' and clinicians' self-efficacy in their abilities to use…

  11. Transformational and Transactional Leadership: Association With Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Leadership in organizations is important in shaping workers’ perceptions, responses to organizational change, and acceptance of innovations, such as evidence-based practices. Transformational leadership inspires and motivates followers, whereas transactional leadership is based more on reinforcement and exchanges. Studies have shown that in youth and family service organizations, mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting an evidence-based practice are associated with organizational context and individual provider differences. The purpose of this study was to expand these findings by examining the association between leadership and mental health providers’ attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice. Methods Participants were 303 public-sector mental health service clinicians and case managers from 49 programs who were providing mental health services to children, adolescents, and their families. Data were gathered on providers’ characteristics, attitudes toward evidence-based practices, and perceptions of their supervisors’ leadership behaviors. Zero-order correlations and multilevel regression analyses were conducted that controlled for effects of service providers’ characteristics. Results Both transformational and transactional leadership were positively associated with providers’ having more positive attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice, and transformational leadership was negatively associated with providers’ perception of difference between the providers’ current practice and evidence-based practice. Conclusions Mental health service organizations may benefit from improving transformational and transactional supervisory leadership skills in preparation for implementing evidence-based practices. PMID:16870968

  12. Evidence based practice in traditional & complementary medicine: An agenda for policy, practice, education and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Canaway, Rachel; Hunter, Jennifer

    2018-05-01

    To develop a policy, practice, education and research agenda for evidence-based practice (EBP) in traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM). The study was a secondary analysis of qualitative data, using the method of roundtable discussion. The sample comprised seventeen experts in EBP and T&CM. The discussion was audio-recorded, and the transcript analysed using thematic analysis. Four central themes emerged from the data; understanding evidence and EBP, drivers of change, interpersonal interaction, and moving forward. Captured within these themes were fifteen sub-themes. These themes/sub-themes translated into three broad calls to action: (1) defining terminology, (2) defining the EBP approach, and (3) fostering social movement. These calls to action formed the framework of the agenda. This analysis presents a potential framework for an agenda to improve EBP implementation in T&CM. The fundamental elements of this action plan seek clarification, leadership and unification on the issue of EBP in T&CM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sustainability of Evidence-Based Acute Pain Management Practices for Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Xie, Xian-Jin; Herr, Keela A; Titler, Marita G

    2017-11-01

    Little is known regarding sustainability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) following implementation. This article reports sustainability of evidence-based acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults following testing of a multifaceted Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) implementation intervention. A cluster randomized trial with follow-up period was conducted in 12 Midwest U.S. hospitals (six experimental, six comparison). Use of evidence-based acute pain management practices and mean pain intensity were analyzed using generalized estimating equations across two time points (following implementation and 18 months later) to determine sustainability of TRIP intervention effects. Summative Index scores and six of seven practices were sustained. Experimental and comparison group differences for mean pain intensity over 72 hours following admission were sustained. Results revealed most evidence-based acute pain management practices were sustained for 18 months following implementation. Further work is needed to identify factors affecting sustainability of EBPs to guide development and testing of sustainability strategies.

  14. Assessment of evidence-based practice among hospital pharmacists in Saudi Arabia: attitude, awareness, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S; Alharbi, Reem

    2017-08-01

    Background Many studies have previously looked at the perceptions, attitude, and use of Evidence-based Practice (EBP) among healthcare providers. However, limited data is available on the implementation of EBP among pharmacists in general, and Saudi Arabia in particular. Objective To evaluate the awareness, attitude, and practice of EBP among hospital practicing pharmacists in Saudi Arabia. Setting Secondary and tertiary care hospitals in Saudi Arabia with a bed capacity of ≥200 Methods This is a cross sectional, survey-based study where a validated selfadministrated questionnaire was utilized. Pharmacists working in secondary and tertiary care hospitals with a bed capacity of ≥200 were targeted. The descriptive data consisted of percentages for discrete and medians for continuous statistics. Results The survey was distributed to a total of 1136 pharmacists. Total number of respondents is 228 which represent a response rate of 20%. Most of them (75% median score = 8) have a positive attitude toward EBP. In addition to clinical expertise, only 48.6% of them were able to identify EBP resource as the second component of EBP concept, while only 1.7% of the respondents were able to identify patient preference as a third component. Lack of personal time, critical appraisal skills, and resources, (40%, 15.6% and 13.9% respectively) are considered as the major barriers to implementing EBP in pharmacy. Conclusion The majority of pharmacists in Saudi Arabia hold a positive attitude of EBP. Unfortunately, most of pharmacists do not consider patients' values as a component of EBP. The major barriers to practicing EBP are lack of personal time, critical appraisal skills, and resources availability.

  15. Factors influencing advanced practice nurses' ability to promote evidence-based practice among frontline nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Kate; Nolan, Mike; McDonnell, Ann; Tod, Angela; Kirshbaum, Marilyn; Guillaume, Louise

    2012-02-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) have an important role in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) among frontline nurses (FLNs). Factors influencing FLNs' engagement with EBP are well documented but little is known about factors that affect APNs' ability to facilitate evidence in practice. To identify factors that influence APNs' ability to promote EBP among FLNs. A multiple case study of 23 APNs from hospital and primary care settings across seven English health authorities was undertaken. Data collection comprised interviews and observation of APNs and interviews with FLNs and other healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. Four groups of influencing factors were identified: (1) Personal attributes of APNs included knowledge and skills in EBP, clinical credibility with frontline staff and leadership style. (2) Relationships with stakeholders included APNs' interactions with FLNs and the level of support from managers and medical colleagues. (3) Aspects of the APN role included their sphere of responsibility and workload. (4) Organisational context included the organisational culture, FLNs' workload, professional networks and available resources. Educational preparation for APNs should enable them to develop expertise in EBP plus interpersonal and leadership skills to manage relational dynamics in clinical settings. APN role specifications should provide the opportunity to promote EBP. The organisational culture should be conducive to enabling EBP with managers supportive of this aspect of the APNs' role. APNs need to be supported to address the individual, interpersonal and organisational factors, which influence their ability to promote EBP. Organisational commitment at the highest level is key to APNs' ability to fulfil this aspect of their role. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Evidence-based Diabetes Care in Indonesia - Knowledge translation and transfer of best practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widyahening, IS

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia is continuously among the top ten countries worldwide in the number of people living with diabetes. Evidence-based practice (EBP) has the potential to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of diabetes care. However, the strategy to efficiently translate the best evidence into practice

  17. Practical Biostatistics A Friendly Step-by-Step Approach for Evidence-based Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Suchmacher, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to apply the best available evidence gained from the scientific method to medical decision making. It is a practice that uses statistical analysis of scientific methods and outcomes to drive further experimentation and diagnosis. The profusion of evidence-based medicine in medical practice and clinical research has produced a need for life scientists and clinical researchers to assimilate biostatistics into their work to meet efficacy and practical standards. Practical Biostatistics provides researchers, medical professionals, and students with a friendly, practica

  18. Embedding evidence-based practice among nursing undergraduates: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Beate; Aune, Anne G; Brænd, Jorunn A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based practice is currently one of the most important developments in health care. Research in nursing science is rapidly growing; however, translating the knowledge based on this research into clinical practice is often hampered, and may be dependent on reflective skills. The aim of this study was to see how undergraduate nursing students in nursing should increase their skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice through participation in clinical research projects. A qualitative approach was used in collecting and analyzing the data. Students participated in a pilot clinical research project and a received guidance related to their bachelor thesis. After the project was completed, all students filled in a questionnaire. The students' motivation to participate in this study was reported to be high, but they reported low knowledge related to evidence-based practice. All students reported that their attitude towards evidence-based practice changed in a positive direction during their participation in the project. Evidence-based practice influenced nursing practices by putting more focus on critical thinking, increasing pride and giving a sense of ownership in the clinical field. The curricula and the pedagogical perspectives in nursing education can influence the attitude towards evidence-based practice and skills among nursing bachelor students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Barriers to implementing evidence-based practice in a private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , individual perceptions that underpin clinical decision-making, lack of access to information required for EBP, inadequate sources to access evidence, inability to synthesise the literature available, and resistance to change. Barriers related to ...

  20. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    The exact cause is unknown but a ... Scratching may result in secondary infec- tion and associated ... general practice. Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition ... There was either insufficient or no .... itch and indirectly improving sleep.

  1. Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aertgeerts Bert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. Methods We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. Results A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice, commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community. Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. Conclusion In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  3. Importance of nursing leadership in advancing evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Wanda G

    Our patients depend on us to do the best on their behalf. If we do not take accountability for our practice, continually examining what is the best way to deliver care, we are limiting our role to technical skills and not fully actualizing our professional role. [Evidence-based practice] is essential to practicing safely as nurses (p. 53).1.

  4. Exploring MSW students’ and social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Zwet, R.J.M.; Weling, J.; Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, D.M.; Schalk, R.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to assess whether practicing social workers currently enrolled in Master Social Work (MSW) programs (hereafter referred to as MSW students) were more oriented to the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and more engaged in it than practicing social workers who

  5. A Critical Assessment of Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Clive; Drewery, Sian

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors consider how effective social work has been in terms of evidence-based policies and practice. They consider the role that "evidence" plays in policy making both in the wider context and, in particular, in relation to social work. The authors argue that there are numerous voices in the policy-making process and evidence only plays a minor role in terms of policy development and practice in social work.

  6. Teaching Primary School Mathematics and Statistics: Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Robin; Harvey, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Here is the only reference book you will ever need for teaching primary school mathematics and statistics. It is full of exciting and engaging snapshots of excellent classroom practice relevant to "The New Zealand Curriculum" and national mathematics standards. There are many fascinating examples of investigative learning experiences,…

  7. Relationship of Evidence-Based Practice and Treatments: A Survey of Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeo, Michelle A.; Moore, G. Kurt; Lichtenstein, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) are "interventions" that have been proven effective through rigorous research methodologies. Evidence-based practice (EBP), however, refers to a "decision-making process" that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics. This study examined community mental health service…

  8. Videoconferencing of a national program for residents on evidence-based practice: early performance evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medium of videoconferencing for the delivery of a course for radiology residents in practice-based learning (PBL), including evidence-based practice, at centers geographically separated from the principal teaching site.

  9. Evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology. Current status and further developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricutoiu, Laurentiu P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the status of evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology (OHP. After several searches on large online databases, we have found that OHP papers that discuss interventions are less than 10% of the overall literature. Furthermore, quantitative reviews research that reports interventions on major OHP topics are generally absent. In the last part of the paper, we formulate some reccomendations for increasing the number of papers relevant for evidence-based practice in OHP.

  10. Translation, cross-cultural adaption and measurement properties of the evidence-based practice profile

    OpenAIRE

    Titlestad, Kristine Berg; Snibsoer, Anne Kristin; Stromme, Hilde; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    Background The evidence-based practice profile (EBP2) questionnaire assesses students? self-reported knowledge, behaviour and attitudes related to evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt EBP2 into Norwegian and to evaluate the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Norwegian version. Methods EBP2 was translated and cross-culturally adapted using recommended methodology. Face validity and feasibility were evaluated in a pilot on bache...

  11. Use of the innovation-decision process teaching strategy to promote evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nola A; Brown, Janet M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the innovation-decision process teaching strategy (I-DPTS) based on the model of diffusion of innovations [Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations (5th ed.). New York: Free Press]. A goal of baccalaureate nursing education is to develop competencies required for evidence-based practice. Such practice merges clinician expertise, patient preferences, and critical evaluation of the literature to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs [Melnyk, B. M. (2005). A primer on evidence-based practice. Paper presented at the Purdue School of Nursing Seventh Annual Helen R. Johnson Leadership Conference, West Lafayette, IN]. Several strategies to promote evidence-based practice have appeared in the literature. However, when they are examined in light of the innovation-decision process (Rogers, 2003), they do not address all the essential steps for adoption to occur. The I-DPTS allows students to achieve competencies necessary to overcome barriers associated with implementing best practices. This strategy was successfully implemented in a senior-level introductory nursing research class. Community representatives identified practice issues that could be addressed by student groups. After conducting a search of the literature, students analyzed the evidence, determined best practice based on the evidence, and developed a policy for implementation in clinical settings. At course end, representatives were invited to attend oral and poster presentations. Use of the I-DPTS better prepares students to implement best practice as they embark on their professional careers.

  12. Changing Nephrology Nurses' Beliefs about the Value of Evidence-Based Practice and Their Ability to Implement in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Debra; Haras, Mary S

    2015-01-01

    A rapidly evolving healthcare environment demands sound research evidence to inform clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. Over the past several decades, nurses have generated new knowledge by conducting research studies, but it takes time for this evidence to be implemented in practice. As nurses strive to be leaders and active participants in healthcare redesign, it is essential that they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Professional nursing organizations can make substantial contributions to the move healthcare quality forward by providing EBP workshops similar to those conducted by the American Nephrology Nurses'Association.

  13. Contributions of qualitative research to evidence-based practice in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailinger Rita L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This article aims to identify the contributions of qualitative research to evidence-based practice in nursing. BACKGROUND: Qualitative research dates back to the 1920s and 1930s, when anthropologists and sociologists used qualitative research methods to study human phenomena in naturalistic settings and from a holistic viewpoint. Afterwards, other subject matters, including nursing, adopted qualitative methods to answer their research questions. The restructuring of health care over the past decade has brought about increased accountability in nursing research. One method for increasing this accountability is evidence-based practice. METHOD: The method used was a search in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature database from 1999-present. The search resulted in 61 citations for evidence-based practice in nursing research; however, only 5 citations focused on evidence-based practice and qualitative research. FINDINGS: The authors' findings revealed six contributions of qualitative research to evidence-based practice: generation of hypotheses; development and validation of instruments; provision of context for evaluation; development of nursing interventions; development of new research questions; and application of Qualitative Outcome Analysis. CONCLUSION: Qualitative research makes important contributions to the quality of evidence-based practice.

  14. Using Gemba Boards to Facilitate Evidence-Based Practice in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgault, Annette M; Upvall, Michele J; Graham, Alison

    2018-06-01

    Tradition-based practices lack supporting research evidence and may be harmful or ineffective. Engagement of key stakeholders is a critical step toward facilitating evidence-based practice change. Gemba , derived from Japanese, refers to the real place where work is done. Gemba boards (visual management tools) appear to be an innovative method to engage stakeholders and facilitate evidence-based practice. To explore the use of gemba boards and gemba huddles to facilitate practice change. Twenty-two critical care nurses participated in interviews in this qualitative, descriptive study. Thematic analysis was used to code and categorize interview data. Two researchers reached consensus on coding and derived themes. Data were managed with qualitative analysis software. The code gemba occurred most frequently; a secondary analysis was performed to explore its impact on practice change. Four themes were derived from the gemba code: (1) facilitation of staff, leadership, and interdisciplinary communication, (2) transparency of outcome data, (3) solicitation of staff ideas and feedback, and (4) dissemination of practice changes. Gemba boards and gemba huddles became part of the organizational culture for promoting and disseminating evidence-based practices. Unit-based, publicly located gemba boards and huddles have become key components of evidence-based practice culture. Gemba is both a tool and a process to engage team members and the public to generate clinical questions and to plan, implement, and evaluate practice changes. Future research on the effectiveness of gemba boards to facilitate evidence-based practice is warranted. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Practice and application of problem-based learning in evidence-based medicine teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Ao Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect of problem-based learning(PBLused in the teaching of medical students' evidence-based medicine(EBM.METHODS: Five classes(total 147 studentswere randomly selected as experimental(PBLgroup, at the same time, another 5 classes(total 149 studentswere also randomly selected as control group, using traditional teaching method(lecture-based learning, LBLin 2010 grade. The final examination scores of the experimental group were compared with control at the end of term. In addition, all students were interviewed using self-administered questionnaire to obtain their evaluation for PBL practice. SPSS13.0 software was used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: The homogeneity test in baseline survey showed that the basic characteristics between the two groups of students were no significant differences, and were comparable(P>0.05. Final exam results showed that in addition to the scores of the EBM basic knowledge indicated no significant difference between two groups of students(P>0.05, for the 5 steps of EBM procedure, namely, asking questions, finding the best evidence, evaluating the evidence, using and practicing the evidence, re-evaluating the evidence, and the total scores between the two groups, there were significant statistically differences(PP>0.05in aspects of better understanding classroom knowledge, improving language expression ability, and writing skill exercises. And other residual items had a significant difference(PPCONCLUSION:PBL teaching mode can effectively improve teaching effectiveness and the quality of EBM teaching, so the this teaching mode is worth further popularizing.

  16. The Research and Education of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice; A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Zareh Gavgani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Evidence based librarianship (EBL was defined as “use of best available evidence from qualitative and quantitative research results and rational experience and decisions acquired from the daily practice of library”. However there are controversies about if the nature of EBL deals with library services or professional practice and if it needs a formal education or informal continuing education is enough? To shed light on this ambiguity, the aim of this study was to find out the state-of-the-art of education of EBL in the world. Material and Methods: The study utilized library and documentation methods to investigate the academic education of EBL through review of the available literature and websites. Results: The findings of the study revealed that evidence based librarianship does have formal curriculum for academic education in post graduate levels (post master and master. It also revealed that “Evidence Based Approach” (EBA and “Evidence Based Medicine” (EBM were also similar courses that are offered in Master and PhD levels. Conclusion: Based on the history and revolution of EBA, it is time to develop formal curriculum and field of study for Evidence Based Information Practice. This study suggests establishment of the academic field of Evidence Based and Information Science to overcome the problems and limitations that library science faces in practice.

  17. Implementing evidence-based practices in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Jeanette W.; Nilsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    of semi-structured interviews. An activity system analysis, as described in the Cultural Historical Activity Theory, was conducted to identify various contradictions that could exist between different parts of the activity system. RESULTS: The main contradiction identified was that guidelines......BACKGROUND: An emergency department is typically a place of high activity where practitioners care for unanticipated presentations, which yields a flow culture so that actions that secure available beds are prioritised by the practitioners. OBJECTIVES: How does the flow culture in an emergency...... department influence nurses' use of a research-based clinical guideline and a nutrition screening routine. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork was carried out over three months. The first author followed nurses, medical secretaries and doctors in the emergency department. Data were also collected by means...

  18. Implementing and Sustaining Evidence Based Practice Through a Nursing Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kevin; Kanaskie, Mary Louise; Knehans, Amy C; Salisbury, Sarah; Doheny, Kim K; Schirm, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The outcomes based emphasis in nursing and health care delivery requires identification of best available evidence in order to produce quality, safe, and effective patient care. Finding, critiquing, and ultimately implementing the best available evidence for practice is a formidable task for many clinical nurses. Development and implementation of a nursing journal club (NJC) became one organization's successful attempt to help clinical nurses better understand and use best available evidence in actual practice. The process and structure for the NJC evolved from an additional activity scheduled outside of work to a fully established endeavor of Nursing Research and Evidence Based Practice Council (NR&EBP). The Nursing Professional Practice Model was foundational to establishing the NJC as a formal component within the NR&EBP Council shared governance structure. Efforts to embed the NJC included taking advantage of resources available at an academic medical center and incorporating them into the council structure. Successful outcomes of the NJC include a quarterly schedule, with topics selected in advance that are based on nursing department as well as organizational driven goals and initiatives. The structure and process in place has eliminated frequently mentioned deterrents to evidence based practice such as not enough time, lack of knowledge, or no immediate application to practice. Incorporating the NJC as a component of NR&EBP Council has provided clinical nurses time away from clinical care that supports scholarship for nursing practice. Committed leadership and garnering of available resources have been key factors for success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparing Dental Students and Residents to Overcome Internal and External Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Brandon G; Johnson, Thomas M; Erley, Kenneth J; Topolski, Richard; Rethman, Michael; Lancaster, Douglas D

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, evidence-based dentistry has become the ideal for research, academia, and clinical practice. However, barriers to implementation are many, including the complexity of interpreting conflicting evidence as well as difficulties in accessing it. Furthermore, many proponents of evidence-based care seem to assume that good evidence consistently exists and that clinicians can and will objectively evaluate data so as to apply the best evidence to individual patients' needs. The authors argue that these shortcomings may mislead many clinicians and that students should be adequately prepared to cope with some of the more complex issues surrounding evidence-based practice. Cognitive biases and heuristics shape every aspect of our lives, including our professional behavior. This article reviews literature from medicine, psychology, and behavioral economics to explore the barriers to implementing evidence-based dentistry. Internal factors include biases that affect clinical decision making: hindsight bias, optimism bias, survivor bias, and blind-spot bias. External factors include publication bias, corporate bias, and lack of transparency that may skew the available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. Raising awareness of how these biases exert subtle influence on decision making and patient care can lead to a more nuanced discussion of addressing and overcoming barriers to evidence-based practice.

  20. Single-Case Research Design: An Alternative Strategy for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Drue; Hawkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The trend of utilizing evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is now requiring clinicians, researchers, educators, and students to be equipped to both engage in and make judgments about research evidence. Single-case design (SCD) research may provide an alternative approach to develop such skills and inform clinical and…

  1. Managerial attitudes and perceived barriers regarding evidence-based practice : An international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, Eric; Villanueva, Josh; Rousseau, Denise M.; Briner, Rob B.; Jepsen, Denise M.; Houghton, Edward; Ten Have, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) in management is still in its infancy. Several studies suggest that managers in businesses and other organizations do not consult the scientific evidence when making decisions. To facilitate its uptake, we need to better understand practitioner attitudes and perceived

  2. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  3. Agency-University Partnership for Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Mullen, Edward J.; Fang, Lin; Manuel, Jennifer I.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about evidence-based practice (EBP) in social service agencies beyond studies of researcher, practitioner, and educator opinions. The Bringing Evidence for Social Work Training (BEST) Project involved 16 participants from 3 social service agencies. The experiential training, delivered by 2 doctoral students, focused on a…

  4. The Delphi Method: An Approach for Facilitating Evidence Based Practice in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A.; Bulger, Sean M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The growing importance of evidence based practice in athletic training is necessitating academics and clinicians to be able to make judgments about the quality or lack of the body of research evidence and peer-reviewed standards pertaining to clinical questions. To assist in the judgment process, consensus methods, namely brainstorming,…

  5. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  6. Scaling up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation (i3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWire, Tom; McKithen, Clarissa; Carey, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    What can the Investing in Innovation (i3) grantees tell us about scaling innovative educational practices? The newly released white paper "Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices: Strategies from Investing in Innovation (i3)" captures the experiences of nine grantees whose projects collectively have reached over 1.2 million students across…

  7. Code of Ethics for Rehabilitation Educators and Counselors: A Call for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burker, Eileen J.; Kazukauskas, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Given the emphasis on evidence-based practice (EBP) in the 2010 Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors, it has become even more critical for rehabilitation educators and rehabilitation counselors to understand EBP, how to implement it in teaching and in practice, and how to access available EBP resources. This paper defines and…

  8. Measuring Collaboration and Communication to Increase Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices: The Cultural Exchange Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Garcia, Antonio; Aarons, Gregory; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Fuentes, Dahlia; Holloway, Ian; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    The Cultural Exchange Inventory (CEI) is a 15-item instrument designed to measure the process (7 items) and outcomes (8 items) of exchanges of knowledge, attitudes and practices between members of different organisations collaborating in implementing evidence-based practice. We conducted principal axis factor analyses and parallel analyses of data…

  9. Risk and Strategic Decision-Making in Developing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) represents an important approach to educating and treating individuals diagnosed with disabilities or disorders. Understanding research findings is the cornerstone of EBP. The methodology of systematic reviews, which involves carefully analyzing research findings, can result a practice guideline that recommends…

  10. Action Research: A Personal Epiphany and Journey with Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    The author reveals in this article that her action research journey in the land of evidence-based practice was not her own idea. She writes that she was lured by the profession's finest scholars who advocated for reflective dispositions for practitioners to improve their practice and demonstrate the school librarian's critical role in teaching and…

  11. The Uses of Qualitative Research: Powerful Methods to Inform Evidence-Based Practice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2017-01-01

    This article offers a rationale for the contributions of qualitative research to evidence-based practice in special education. In it, I make the argument that qualitative research encompasses the ability to study significant problems of practice, engage with practitioners in the conduct of research studies, learn and change processes during a…

  12. What Is Evidence-Based Practice? Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2007-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Allison J. R.; Espiritu, Rachele; Moore, Kristin A.

    2007-01-01

    This brief represents part 1 in a series on fostering the adoption of evidence-based practices in out-of-school time programs. The lag between discovering effective practices and using them "on the ground" can be unnecessarily long, sometimes taking 15 to 20 years! The purpose of this brief is to provide practitioners with a better understanding…

  13. Attitudes of mental health occupational therapists toward evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle P

    2016-02-01

    Evidence-based practice is an important driver in modern health care and has become a priority in mental health occupational therapy in recent years. The aim of this study was to measure the attitudes of a cohort of mental health occupational therapists toward evidence-based practice. Forty-one mental health occupational therapists were surveyed using the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS). Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearman's rho were used to analyze the data. The occupational therapy respondents had generally positive attitudes toward evidence-based practices comparable to established norms. Respondents with further qualifications beyond their professional degree were significantly more likely to try new interventions (p = .31). Significant negative correlations were found also for the subscales of Appeal and Openness in relation to years of occupational therapy practice (rho = -.354, p = .023; rho = -.344, p = 0.28) and mental health experience (rho = -.390, p = 0.12; rho = -.386, p = .013). Therapist factors can significantly impact attitudes toward evidence-based practice. © CAOT 2015.

  14. FACTORS AFFECTING IMPLEMENTATION OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AMONG PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN MOI TEACHING REFFERAL HOSPITAL KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Wanjiru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The application of the concept of Evidenced Based Practice into clinical decision-making and practicehas outstanding benefits both to clinicians and the patient. However, the utilization of this concept has not been copiously utilized in most health facilities by the physiotherapists in Kenya. Therefore, the objectives for this study was to determine the level of awareness of evidence based practice among Physiotherapist, establish the availability of resource for Evidence Based Practice and to assess the challenges encountered by physiotherapist in engaging in evidence based practice at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Methods: All physiotherapists working in Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (42 took part in a cross-sectional descriptive survey. Questionnaires were used for data collection and analyzed by SPSS version 22. Results: there was high level of awareness on Evidence Based Practice (95 % and confidence in EBP (72.5 %. However, lack of information resources, poor skills to implement EBP, poor organization support 90%, insufficient authority to induct change in the practice setting 85%, inadequate facilities 74% and lack of time were identified as the major challenges in implementation of EBP Conclusion: Strategies should be developed to provide PTs with EBP resources, such as access to databases or links to guidelines, and continuous education regarding specific topics. Professional organizations and Associations should aim at changing the current practice to ensure full utilization of EBP.

  15. Proposal of a Holistic Model to Support Local-Level Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to a central drive for evidence-based practice, there have been many research support schemes, setups, and other practices concentrating on facilitating access to external research, such as the Centre for Evidence Based Healthcare Aotearoa, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Very little attention has been paid to supporting internal research in terms of local evidence and internal research capabilities. The whole evidence-based practice movement has alienated internal decision makers and, thus, very little progress has been made in the context of evidence informing local policy formation. Health and social policies are made centrally based on dubious claims and often evidence is sought after implementation. For example, on record, most health care practitioners appear to agree with the causal link between depression and mental illness (sometimes qualified with other social factors with suicide; off the record, even some psychiatrists doubt that such a link is applicable to the population as a whole. Therefore, be it through misplaced loyalty or a lack of support for internal researchers/decision makers, local evidence informing local decision making may have been ignored in favour of external evidence. In this paper, we present a practical holistic model to support local evidence-based decision making. This approach is more relevant in light of a new approach to primary health care of “local knowledge” complementing external evidence. One possible outcome would be to network with other regional programmes around the world to share information and identify “best” practices, such as the “Stop Youth Suicide Campaign”(www.stopyouthsuicide.com.

  16. The Use of Collaboration to Implement Evidence-Based Safe Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with instituti...

  17. Evidence-based emergency medicine. Creating a system to facilitate translation of evidence into standardized clinical practice: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stewart W; Trott, Alexander; Lindsell, Christopher J; Smith, Carol; Gibler, W Brian

    2008-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine, through its landmark report concerning errors in medicine, suggests that standardization of practice through systematic development and implementation of evidence-based clinical pathways is an effective way of reducing errors in emergency systems. The specialty of emergency medicine is well positioned to develop a complete system of innovative quality improvement, incorporating best practice guidelines with performance measures and practitioner feedback mechanisms to reduce errors and therefore improve quality of care. This article reviews the construction, ongoing development, and initial impact of such a system at a large, urban, university teaching hospital and at 2 affiliated community hospitals. The Committee for Procedural Quality and Evidence-Based Practice was formed within the Department of Emergency Medicine to establish evidence-based guidelines for nursing and provider care. The committee measures the effect of such guidelines, along with other quality measures, through pre- and postguideline patient care medical record audits. These measures are fed back to the providers in a provider-specific, peer-matched "scorecard." The Committee for Procedural Quality and Evidence-Based Practice affects practice and performance within our department. Multiple physician and nursing guidelines have been developed and put into use. Using asthma as an example, time to first nebulizer treatment and time to disposition from the emergency department decreased. Initial therapeutic agent changed and documentation improved. A comprehensive, guideline-driven, evidence-based approach to clinical practice is feasible within the structure of a department of emergency medicine. High-level departmental support with dedicated personnel is necessary for the success of such a system. Internet site development (available at http://www.CPQE.com) for product storage has proven valuable. Patient care has been improved in several ways; however, consistent and

  18. Future Directions of Evidence-Based Practice in Athletic Training: Perceived Strategies to Enhance the Use of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E.; Hankemeier, Dorice A.; Wyant, Aimee L.; Hays, Danica G.; Pitney, William A.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The shift to a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) in athletic training is a necessary step in both the optimization of patient care and the advancement of athletic trainers (ATs) as health care professionals. Whereas individuals have gained knowledge in this area, most ATs still are not practicing in an evidence-based manner. Exploring perceived strategies to enhance the use of EBP will help to determine the best approaches to assist ATs in applying EBP concepts to practice to improve patient care. Objective: To explore beneficial strategies and techniques ATs perceived would promote successful implementation of EBP within athletic training education and clinical practice. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Individual telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; athletic training experience = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. Data Collection and Analysis: One phone interview was conducted with each participant. After the interview was transcribed, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Results: Participants identified several components they perceived as essential for enhancing the use of EBP within the athletic training profession. These components included the need for more EBP resources, more processed information, focused workshops, peer discussion and mentorship, and continual repetition and exposure. Participants also indicated that ATs need to accept their professional responsibilities to foster EBP in their daily practices. Conclusions: The proper shift to a culture of EBP in athletic training will take both time and a persistent commitment by ATs to create strategies that will enhance the implementation of EBP across the profession. Researchers should focus on continuing to identify effective educational interventions for ATs

  19. From workshop to work practice: An exploration of context and facilitation in the development of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Isabelle; Howard, Peter; Larson, Ann; Robertson, Jeanette

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the process of translating evidence into practice using a facilitation model developed by the Western Australian Centre for Evidence Based Nursing and Midwifery. Using the conceptual framework Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS), the aims of the study were (1) to explore the relative and combined importance of context and facilitation in the successful implementation of a new evidence-based clinical practice protocol and (2) to examine the establishment of more lasting change to individuals and organizations that resulted in greater incorporation of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP). A pre-workshop, semi-structured telephone survey with 16 nurse managers in six rural hospitals; a summative evaluation immediately post-workshop with 54 participants; and follow-up, semi-structured interviews with 23 workshop participants. The contexts in each of the participating hospitals were very different; of the six hospitals, only one had not implemented the new protocol. Five had reviewed their practices and brought them in line with the protocol developed at the workshop. The rate of adoption varied considerably from 2 weeks to months. The participants reported being better informed about EBP in general and were positive about their ability to improve their practice and search more efficiently for best practice information. Underlying motivations for protocol development should be included in the PARIHS framework. IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION: Good facilitation appears to be more influential than context in overcoming the barriers to the uptake of EBP.

  20. Teaching evidence-based social work in foundation practice courses: learning from pedagogical choices of allied fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traube, Dorian E; Pohle, Cara E; Barley, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The field of social work is attuned to the need to incorporate evidence-based practice education into masters-level curriculum. One question remaining is how to integrate evidence-based practice in the foundation practice courses. Integration of evidence-based practice across the foundation-level curriculum coincides with the Council on Social Work Education's mandate that student's engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research. Through a discussion of definitions, criticisms, and pedagogy across the allied fields of medicine, nursing, and social work the authors address the current status of evidence-based practice curriculum in foundation-level education. The authors incorporate the lessons learned from allied fields and a Masters of Social Work student's analyses of their experience of evidence-based practice learning to propose an adult-learner model to improve evidence-based practice pedagogy in Social Work.

  1. What should we mean by empirical validation in hypnotherapy: evidence-based practice in clinical hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen; Sabatini, Linda; Amundson, Jon K

    2007-04-01

    This paper briefly surveys the trend of and controversy surrounding empirical validation in psychotherapy. Empirical validation of hypnotherapy has paralleled the practice of validation in psychotherapy and the professionalization of clinical psychology, in general. This evolution in determining what counts as evidence for bona fide clinical practice has gone from theory-driven clinical approaches in the 1960s and 1970s through critical attempts at categorization of empirically supported therapies in the 1990s on to the concept of evidence-based practice in 2006. Implications of this progression in professional psychology are discussed in the light of hypnosis's current quest for validation and empirical accreditation.

  2. Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, Amanda N

    2016-04-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Probing the Relationship Between Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Models and Critical Thinking in Applied Nursing Practice," found on pages 161-168, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until March 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. • Describe the key components and characteristics related to evidence-based

  3. Attitudes and barriers to evidence-based practice in optometry educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Catherine M; Challinor, Kirsten L; Thompson, Rachel E; Pesudovs, Konrad; Togher, Leanne; Chiavaroli, Neville; Lee, Adrian; Junghans, Barbara; Stapleton, Fiona; Watt, Kathleen; Jalbert, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an essential component of good quality, patient-centered health care. This requires practitioners to acquire EBP skills and knowledge during undergraduate and continuing education. Evidence-based practice education exists in a range of health care disciplines, including optometry. Evidence-based practice education, however, depends on relevant skills and knowledge in educators. Courses and workshops exist for the development of EBP teaching skills in some areas of health care but not in optometry. Here, we describe a pilot workshop designed to enhance the teaching of EBP and to investigate the perspectives of optometric educators on EBP including their attitudes and perceived barriers to EBP and its teaching. Twenty-seven optometric educators including 8 facilitators participated. Of these, 14 were academics (including the 8 facilitators) and 13 were practitioners. Evidence-based practice attitudes were assessed using the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale-50 with appropriate modifications for optometry. Workshop design incorporated strategies to trigger discussion among participants. A nominal group technique was used to identify, prioritize, and reach consensus on barriers to EBP. Although some participants expressed reservations about EBP, a common understanding of the contemporary definition of EBP emerged in educators. Thirty-five barriers to EBP were identified; "time" was selected in the top five barriers by most participants and attracted the highest total score, well above any other barrier (negative attitude to EBP, volume of evidence, integration with clinical practice, and lack of lifelong learning mind-set). Attitudes toward EBP were generally positive and negatively correlated with age and time since graduation, respectively. A group of optometrists and academics new to implementing education in EBP displayed positive attitudes to EBP but considered that its application and teaching could be significantly hindered

  4. [Use of PubMed to improve evidence-based medicine in routine urological practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, M; Kluth, L A; Shariat, S F; Chun, F K; Fisch, M; Dahm, P

    2013-03-01

    Applying evidence-based medicine in daily clinical practice is the basis of patient-centered medicine and knowledge of accurate literature acquisition skills is necessary for informed clinical decision-making. PubMed is an easy accessible, free bibliographic database comprising over 21 million citations from the medical field, life-science journals and online books. The article summarizes the effective use of PubMed in routine urological clinical practice based on a common case scenario. This article explains the simple use of PubMed to obtain the best search results with the highest evidence. Accurate knowledge about the use of PubMed in routine clinical practice can improve evidence-based medicine and also patient treatment.

  5. Integrating evidence-based practice into RN-to-BSN clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eui Geum; Kim, Sunah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sue; Cho, Eun Yong; Yoo, Ji-Soo; Kim, Hee Soon; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Mi Ae; Lee, Hyejung

    2010-07-01

    This study examines the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into clinical practicum on EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization among Korean RN-to-BSN students. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-one students were recruited from a school of nursing in Korea. Evidence-based practice clinical practicum was composed of two consecutive programs during one semester. Lectures, individual mentoring on EBP practicum, small group, and wrap-up conferences were provided. Outcomes of EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization were analyzed using paired t tests for 74 final participants. Evidence-based practice efficacy scores increased significantly (p effectiveness of EBP education among RN-to-BSN students. These results may help health educators develop effective educational strategies to integrate EBP concepts into a clinical practicum. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Integrating evidence into practice: use of McKenzie-based treatment for mechanical low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Angela Dunsford1, Saravana Kumar1,2, Sarah Clarke1 1International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, 2School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Abstract: Low back pain (LBP is a major health issue with significant socioeconomic implications in most Western countries. Many forms of treatment have been proposed and investigated in the past, with exercise being a commonly prescribed intervention. Within allied health, in particular physiotherapy, there has been a growing movement that recognizes the role of the McKenzie method in treating LBP. Within the McKenzie framework, directional preference (DP exercises are one such intervention, with preliminary data demonstrating its effectiveness in the management of LBP. In this paper, we aim to integrate the evidence from current research, identified using a systematic review, and utilize a practical real-life case scenario to outline how evidence from the literature can be implemented in clinical practice. The findings from the systematic review indicate that DP exercises may have positive effects in the management of LBP. While the body of evidence to support this is limited (only four studies and therefore modest at best, it does provide some emerging evidence to support the use of DP exercises in clinical practice. Despite this, gaps also persist in the literature on DP exercises, and this relates to the exercise parameters and the compliance rates. Recognizing this dichotomy (modest evidence in some areas and evidence gaps in other areas, which is likely to confront health practitioners, using a practical approach with a real-life clinical scenario, we outline how the evidence from the systematic review can be implemented in clinical practice. This approach builds on the philosophy of evidence-based practice of integrating research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Keywords: low back pain, McKenzie method, directional

  7. Tools for evidence-based vascular nursing practice: Achieving information literacy for lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Jodi; Walsh, M Eileen

    2017-12-01

    Information literacy is essential in facilitating evidence-based practice (EBP) activities. In vascular nursing, the implementation of EBP is of utmost importance. Best practice grounded in research evidence can contribute to improved patient care outcomes for individuals with vascular disease. The following paper discusses information literacy competencies for nurses to develop in the context of EBP, with an emphasis on formulating a clinical question and searching for evidence. Relevant health science information resources are described, including their value and purpose in the 6S model of evidence. Also discussed are practical and supportive solutions with proven effectiveness in ensuring nurses' success with EBP. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Michael J.; Matthews, Kelly E.; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. PMID:28232589

  9. Evaluating a Teaching Module on Ethically Responsible Evidence-Based Practice Decision Making in an Advanced Micro Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rose

    2017-01-01

    This article adds to the growing body of literature on the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in social work. Specifically, it examines a 9-hour EBP educational model designed to prepare MSW students for appropriate decision-making strategies in working with multicultural client populations. The model places emphasis on identification and…

  10. From Theory to Practice: One Agency's Experience with Implementing an Evidence-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Maureen; Culver, Tom; Farmer, Betsy; Jackson, Leslie Ann; Rixon, Brian

    2014-07-01

    As evidence-based practice is becoming integrated into children's mental health services as a means of improving outcomes for children and youth with severe behavioral and emotional problems, therapeutic foster care (TFC) which is a specialized treatment program for such youth, is one of few community-based programs considered to be evidence-based. "Together Facing the Challenge" (TFTC) which was developed as a component of a randomized trial of TFC has been identified as an evidence-based model. We describe the experiences reported by one of the agencies that participated in our study and how they have incorporated TFTC into their on-going practice. They highlight key implementation strategies, challenges faced, and lessons learned as they moved forward towards full implementation of TFTC throughout their agency.

  11. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. The Zero Suicide Model: Applying Evidence-Based Suicide Prevention Practices to Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Brodsky

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is reaching epidemic proportions, with over 44,000 deaths by suicide in the US, and 800,000 worldwide in 2015. This, despite research and development of evidence-based interventions that target suicidal behavior directly. Suicide prevention efforts need a comprehensive approach, and research must lead to effective implementation across public and mental health systems. A 10-year systematic review of evidence-based findings in suicide prevention summarized the areas necessary for translating research into practice. These include risk assessment, means restriction, evidence-based treatments, population screening combined with chain of care, monitoring, and follow-up. In this article, we review how suicide prevention research informs implementation in clinical settings where those most at risk present for care. Evidence-based and best practices address the fluctuating nature of suicide risk, which requires ongoing risk assessment, direct intervention and monitoring. In the US, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention has put forth the Zero Suicide (ZS Model, a framework to coordinate a multilevel approach to implementing evidence-based practices. We present the Assess, Intervene and Monitor for Suicide Prevention model (AIM-SP as a guide for implementation of ZS evidence-based and best practices in clinical settings. Ten basic steps for clinical management model will be described and illustrated through case vignette. These steps are designed to be easily incorporated into standard clinical practice to enhance suicide risk assessment, brief interventions to increase safety and teach coping strategies and to improve ongoing contact and monitoring of high-risk individuals during transitions in care and high risk periods.

  13. Pedagogical strategies to teach bachelor students evidence-based practice: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglen, B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review international scientific articles about pedagogical strategies to teach nursing students at bachelor degree evidence-based practice (EBP). A literature review including peer reviewed, original, empirical articles describing pedagogical interventions aimed at teaching bachelor's degree nursing students EBP in the period 2004-2014. Theories of discretion, knowledge transfer and cognitive maturity development are used as analytical perspectives. The main challenge teaching evidence based practice is that the students fail to see how research findings contribute to nursing practice. The pedagogical strategies described are student active learning methods to teach the students information literacy and research topics. Information literacy is mainly taught according to the stages of EBP. These stages focus on how to elaborate evidence from research findings for implementation into nursing practice. The articles reviewed mainly use qualitative, descriptive designs and formative evaluations of the pedagogical interventions. Although a considerable effort in teaching information literacy and research topics, nursing students still struggle to see the relevance evidence for nursing practice. Before being introduced to information literacy and research topics, students need insight into knowledge transfer and their own epistemic assumptions. Knowledge transfer related to clinical problems should be the learning situations prioritized when teaching EBP at bachelor level. Theoretical perspectives of cognitive maturity development, knowledge transfer and discretion in professional practice give alternative ways of designing pedagogical strategies for EBP. More research is needed to develop and test pedagogical strategies for EBP in light of these theories. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Teaching evidence based practice and research through blended learning to undergraduate midwifery students from a practice based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, Sidebotham; Julie, Jomeen; Jennifer, Gamble

    2014-03-01

    The international world of higher education is changing with universities now offering students flexible delivery options that allow them to study away from campus and at a time convenient to them. Some students prefer on line learning while others prefer face to face contact offered through a traditional lecture and tutorial delivery modes. The response by many universities is to offer a blend of both. While online and blended mode of delivery may be suitable for some subjects there is little knowledge of the efficacy of blended learning models to teach evidence based practice and research (EBPR) to undergraduate midwifery students. EBPR is a challenging, threshold level subject upon which deeper knowledge and skills are built. This paper describes the design, delivery, and evaluation of an undergraduate EBPR course delivered in blended mode to first year midwifery students. Components of the blended learning innovation included: novel teaching strategies, engaging practical activities, role play, and e-learning strategies to maintain engagement. University-based course evaluation outcomes revealed very positive scores and the course was rated within the top ten percent of all courses offered within the Health Group at the host University. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Linking research to practice: the rise of evidence-based health sciences librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2014-01-01

    The lecture explores the origins of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health sciences librarianship beginning with examples from the work of Janet Doe and past Doe lecturers. Additional sources of evidence are used to document the rise of research and EBP as integral components of our professional work. FOUR SOURCES OF EVIDENCE ARE USED TO EXAMINE THE RISE OF EBP: (1) a publication by Doe and research-related content in past Doe lectures, (2) research-related word usage in articles in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association between 1961 and 2010, (3) Medical Library Association activities, and (4) EBP as an international movement. These sources of evidence confirm the rise of EBP in health sciences librarianship. International initiatives sparked the rise of evidence-based librarianship and continue to characterize the movement. This review shows the emergence of a unique form of EBP that, although inspired by evidence-based medicine (EBM), has developed its own view of evidence and its application in library and information practice. Health sciences librarians have played a key role in initiating, nurturing, and spreading EBP in other branches of our profession. Our close association with EBM set the stage for developing our own EBP. While we relied on EBM as a model for our early efforts, we can observe the continuing evolution of our own unique approach to using, creating, and applying evidence from a variety of sources to improve the quality of health information services.

  16. Readiness and barriers to adopt evidence-based practices for substance abuse treatment in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Horigian, Viviana E.; Espinal, Paula S.; Alonso, Elizabeth; Verdeja, Rosa E.; Duan, Rui; Usaga, Ingrid M.; Pérez-López, Alejandro; Marín-Navarrete, Rodrigo; Feaster, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Evidence shows a lag in adoption of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for substance abuse treatment and supports the need for studying the factors involved in this worldwide problem. Objective: This study aimed to assess the readiness and barriers to adopt EBPs for substance abuse in a sample of outpatient treatment centers of a newly created Mexican Clinical Trials Network. Method: An online survey was administered to directors (n = 8) and clinicians (n = 40) from se...

  17. Integration of evidence-based practice in bedside teaching paediatrics supported by e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potomkova, Jarmila; Mihal, Vladimir; Zapletalova, Jirina; Subova, Dana

    2010-03-01

    Bedside teaching with evidence-based practice elements, supported by e-learning activities, can play an important role in modern medical education. Teachers have to incorporate evidence from the medical literature to increase student motivation and interactivity. An integral part of the medical curricula at Palacky University Olomouc (Czech Republic) are real paediatric scenarios supplemented with a review of current literature to enhance evidence-based bedside teaching & learning. Searching for evidence is taught through librarian-guided interactive hands-on sessions and/or web-based tutorials followed by clinical case presentations and feedback. Innovated EBM paediatric clerkship demonstrated students' preferences towards web-based interactive bedside teaching & learning. In two academic years (2007/2008, 2008/2009), learning-focused feedback from 106 and 131 students, resp. was obtained about their attitudes towards evidence-based bedside teaching. The assessment included among others the overall level of instruction, quality of practical evidence-based training, teacher willingness and impact of instruction on increased interest in the specialty. There was some criticism about excessive workload. A parallel survey was carried out on the perceived values of different forms of information skills training (i.e. demonstration, online tutorials, and librarian-guided interactive search sessions) and post-training self-reported level of search skills. The new teaching/learning paediatric portfolio is a challenge for further activities, including effective knowledge translation, continuing medical & professional development of teachers, and didactic, clinically integrated teaching approaches.

  18. The Experience of Evidence-Based Practice in an Australian Public Library: An Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Ann; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine; Howlett, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the findings from a project that investigated the lived experiences of library and information professionals in relation to evidence-based practice within an Australian public library. Method: The project employed ethnography, which allows holistic description of people's experiences within a particular community…

  19. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  20. Classroom Simulation to Prepare Teachers to Use Evidence-Based Comprehension Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Emily; Alves, Kat D.; Dolenc, Nathan R.; Sebolt, Stephanie; Walton, Emily A.

    2018-01-01

    Reading comprehension is an area of weakness for many students, including those with disabilities. Innovative technology methods may play a role in improving teacher readiness to use evidence-based comprehension practices for all students. In this experimental study, researchers examined a classroom simulation (TLE TeachLivE™) to improve…

  1. Representing Voices from the Life-World in Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarsky, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current models of evidence-based practice marginalize and even silence the voices of those who are the potential beneficiaries of assessment and intervention. These missing voices can be found in the reflections of clients on their own life-world experiences. Aims: This paper examines how voices from the life-world are silenced in…

  2. Awareness of evidence-based practices by organizations in a publicly funded smoking cessation network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provan, K.; Beagles, J.; Mercken, L.; Leischow, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines the awareness of evidence-based practices by the public organizations that fund services in the North American Quitline Consortium (NAQC). NAQC is a large, publicly funded, goal-directed “whole network,” spanning both Canada and the United States, working to get people to quit

  3. Social Workers' Orientation toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Dutch Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwet, Renske J. M.; Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers' orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with…

  4. Evidence-Based Speech-Language Pathology Practices in Schools: Findings from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, LaVae M.; Ireland, Marie; Hall-Mills, Shannon; Flynn, Perry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study documented evidence-based practice (EBP) patterns as reported by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) employed in public schools during 2010-2011. Method: Using an online survey, practioners reported their EBP training experiences, resources available in their workplaces, and the frequency with which they engage in specific EBP…

  5. Promoting Evidence-Based Practices: New Teaching Module for Early Childhood Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Linda Halgunseth, head of NAEYC's Office of Applied Research (OAR), tells readers about Child Care and Early Education Research Connections, a Web site (www.researchconnections.org/teaching_modules) to help teacher educators integrate knowledge about evidence-based practices into teacher education programs. In addition, the article touts the…

  6. How Evidence-Based Teaching Practices Are Challenged by a Deweyan Approach to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    The claim is made in this paper that the discourse of education offers a challenge to evidence-based practices because this latter approach is embedded in the discourse of management. Although claiming the status of being "scientific", this latter development is drawn upon problematically by policy makers to provide the warrant for stipulating…

  7. Social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice process : A Dutch survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwet, R.J.M.; Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, D.M.; Schalk, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the

  8. Perspectives--Talking with Practitioners: How to Integrate Best Practices with Evidence-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments are increasingly important and necessary parts of many disciplines when working with very young children and their families. In using them, it is advantageous to be grounded in the principles and practices that research has shown are critical to children's healthy development, particularly the importance of supporting the…

  9. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Current Assumptions and Future Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Campisi, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Background: The research on evidence-based practices (EBP) in special education has shifted over the last decade from identifying efficacious interventions to exploring issues that impede implementation in the classroom. Common barriers to implementation include absence of training and resources, limited collaboration between researchers and…

  10. 27: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN EVIDENCE BASED KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mardani, Davoud; Molavi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Much of early medical and nursing practice was based on nonscientific traditions that resulted in variable and haphazard patient outcomes. These traditions and rituals, which were based on folklore, gut instinct, trial and error, and personal preference, were often passed down from one generation of practitioner to another. It has become essential for practitioners to use the best data available to make patient care decisions and carry out the scientific and evidence-based...

  11. Comparison of four teaching methods on Evidence-based Practice skills of postgraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ritin S; Tran, Duong Thuy; Ramjan, Lucie; Ho, Carey; Gill, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four teaching methods on the evidence-based practice knowledge and skills of postgraduate nursing students. Students enrolled in the Evidence-based Nursing (EBN) unit in Australia and Hong Kong in 2010 and 2011 received education via either the standard distance teaching method, computer laboratory teaching method, Evidence-based Practice-Digital Video Disc (EBP-DVD) teaching method or the didactic classroom teaching method. Evidence-based Practice (EBP) knowledge and skills were evaluated using student assignments that comprised validated instruments. One-way analysis of covariance was implemented to assess group differences on outcomes after controlling for the effects of age and grade point average (GPA). Data were obtained from 187 students. The crude mean score among students receiving the standard+DVD method of instruction was higher for developing a precise clinical question (8.1±0.8) and identifying the level of evidence (4.6±0.7) compared to those receiving other teaching methods. These differences were statistically significant after controlling for age and grade point average. Significant improvement in cognitive and technical EBP skills can be achieved for postgraduate nursing students by integrating a DVD as part of the EBP teaching resources. The EBP-DVD is an easy teaching method to improve student learning outcomes and ensure that external students receive equivalent and quality learning experiences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence based medicine: teaching, learning and practice: results of a cross-sectional study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ummu Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Cansever, Zeliha; Acemoglu, Hamit; Cayir, Yasemin; Khan, Abdul Sattar

    2014-07-01

    To assess the level of understanding related to the significance of evidence-based medicine among physicians. The cross-sectional study was conducted between March and October 2012 using an online questionnaire that was sent out to physicians and academics working as faculty at training hospitals across Turkey. The questionnaire consisted of questions about the knowledge, attitude and behaviour towards evidence-based medicine. Seven of the questions pertained to the learning of evidence-based medicine, six were about teaching evidence-based medicine, and six were about its practice. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analyses. The questionnaire was returned duly filled by 79 physicians. Of them, 41 (51.9%) were males; and 57 (72.2%) were part of the faculty. Only 1(1.2%) participant had attended a course about evidence-based medicine during undergraduate education, while 19 (24.05)had attended one after graduation. Besides, 26 (32.9%) academics were teaching some concepts of evidence-based medicine, and 21 (26.6%) were giving some information about clinical guidelines. The study found that levels of learning and teaching of evidence-based medicine among physicians were inadequate. They should be emphasised at both pre- and post-graduate tiers.

  13. [Obstacles perceived by nurses for evidence-based practice: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Inmaculada; López-Medina, Isabel M; Pancorbo-Hidalgo, Pedro L

    2013-01-01

    To examine the obstacles perceived by nurses to implement an evidence-based clinical practice. A qualitative study through semi-structured interviews conducted in 2010-2011 including 11 nurses purposively selected from public hospitals and community centres in Jaén and Córdoba (Spain). A content analysis was performed, using Miles and Huberman as a reference and comprising the following steps: data reduction, data presentation, and data conclusion/verification. Data saturation was reached in these categories (obstacles). The obstacles perceived by nurses to introduce an evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) were grouped into 3 major categories: obstacles related with professionals (routine-based practice, unwilling and stagnant attitudes, and lack of training in EBCP), obstacles related to the social context (reluctance from other professionals and from patients or families), and obstacles related to the organization (obsolete cultures that do not promote innovation in nursing care). This study highlights the persistence of various factors that hinder the use of research findings in clinical practice. The results underline the need to change the culture of healthcare organizations, to motivate professionals, and to break some of the resistance attitudes that hinder the implementation of evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Reflections from the Jury Box: Improving Evidence Based Practice through a Comparison with Our Legal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Coppenrath

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An experience serving jury duty prompted reflection on the parallels between evidenced based medicine and our legal system. Findings: The steps of the legal system can be tied to each step of the practice of evidenced based medicine. Implications: Patients should be included in evidence based decisions. Pharmacists can act as resources for other providers practicing evidenced based medicine. Educators can use this analogy to teach evidence based medicine. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Commentary

  15. Teachers' Knowledge and Use of Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Students with Emotional and Behavior Disorders in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhossein, Abdulkarim

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, scholars and policymakers have emphasized the importance of using evidence-based practices in teaching students with disabilities. One barrier to using these practices might be teachers' lack of knowledge about them. This study investigated teachers' knowledge and use of evidence-based teaching practices (EBTPs) for…

  16. Effectiveness of a short-course in improving knowledge and skills on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Villa Josep

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the effectiveness (change in knowledge and skills measured by the Fresno test of a short course in Evidence Based Practice (EBP carried out in a group of family medicine residents Methods Before-after study. Participants' were 152 Family Medicine residents in their second year of the training programme. Settings were Primary Care Teaching Units in Catalonia. Intervention was comprised of a four half-day training course designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to practice evidence-based care. The main outcome measure was change in EBP knowledge and skills, measured using the Spanish version of the Fresno test (score range, 0-212 Results The mean difference between pre-test and post-test was 47.7, a statistically significant result with 95% CI of 42.8-52.5 (p Conclusions The study provides evidence for responsiveness to changes in knowledge and skills in EBP after an educational intervention.

  17. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    for which they were eligible. Infants with low gestational age, growth restriction, low Apgar scores, and who were born on the day of maternal admission to hospital were less likely to receive evidence based care. After adjustment, evidence based care was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (risk...... ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.87) and in-hospital mortality or severe morbidity, or both (0.82, 0.73 to 0.92), corresponding to an estimated 18% decrease in all deaths without an increase in severe morbidity if these interventions had been provided to all infants. CONCLUSIONS: More......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective multinational...

  18. Evidence-based practice among speech-language pathologists: attitudes, utilization, and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipoli, Richard P; Kennedy, Marianne

    2005-08-01

    A total of 240 speech-language pathologists responded to a questionnaire examining attitudes toward and use of research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Perceived barriers to EBP were also explored. Positive attitudes toward research and EBP were reported. Attitudes were predicted by exposure to research and EBP practice during graduate training and the clinical fellowship year (CFY). Clinical experience and opinions of colleagues were used to guide decision making more frequently than research studies or clinical practice guidelines. Only exposure to research and EBP during the CFY predicted use of evidence-based resources. Respondents reported a decline in exposure to research and EBP as they moved from graduate training into the CFY. A lack of time was perceived as a barrier to EBP.

  19. Research-Based Knowledge: Researchers' Contribution to Evidence-Based Practice and Policy Making in Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Erik Hagaseth; Plant, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To present evidence for the outcomes of career guidance is increasingly seen as pivotal for a further professionalization of policy making and service provision. This paper puts an emphasis on researchers' contribution to evidence-based practice and policy making in career guidance. We argue for a broader and more pluralistic research strategy to…

  20. Striving for evidence-based practice innovations through a hybrid model journal club: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marian; Ice, Suzanna; Nakashima, Cathy Y; Cox, Lynn Annette; Morse, Elizabeth C; Philip, Ginu; Vuong, Ellen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot a "hybrid" style journal club and determine whether measurable effects could be detected over 8-weeks' time on evidence-based practice ability, desire, behaviors, use, and barriers. Journal clubs have been suggested as a method to increase nurses' confidence with using research evidence to guide practice. However, it is yet unknown how nurse educators can best implement effective programs for clinicians with varying schedules, education levels, and research skills. Thirty-six participants from one large urban United States hospital (72% registered nurses) were invited to access bi-weekly interdisciplinary journal club activities. Nurse educators created curriculum focused on clinical problem solving that was offered via in-person sessions or a social media site. A pretest-posttest no control group design was used to measure impacts of those engaged in journal club activities. Data were collected using a combination of validated evidence-based practice instruments and program participation records. A two-tailed paired t test showed significant increases over 8weeks' time in evidence-based practice use (p=.002) and behaviors (p=.007). Slight preference for in-person sessions was reported, although greater participation was reflected in online activities. Mean satisfaction ratings were high; however, attrition rates suggest that more is needed to maximize clinician engagement. A hybrid method using online and in-person sessions was feasible and adaptive for varying learning styles and work schedules. Positive changes in measurements were detected among journal club participants. Instruments were identified that may be useful for trialing similar programs intended to increase evidence-based practice self-efficacy, use, behaviors, and ability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing caries: the need to close the gap between the evidence base and current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, F; Doméjean, S; Ricketts, D; Peters, M

    2015-11-13

    Underpinned by a changing knowledge of the aetiology of caries and its sequelae, and assisted by established and advancing dental materials, there is growing evidence supporting less invasive management of dental caries based on the principles of minimal intervention dentistry. This narrative review assesses both the evidence and the adoption of less invasive caries management strategies and describes ways in which the gap between evidence and practice might be overcome. While there is increasing data supporting less invasive management of carious lesions, these are not standard in most dental practices worldwide. Usually, clinical studies focused on efficacy as outcome, and did not take into consideration the views and priorities of other stakeholders, such as primary care dentists, educators, patients and those financing services. Involving these stakeholders into study design and demonstrating the broader advantages of new management strategies might improve translation of research into practice. In theory, clinical dentists can rely on a growing evidence in cariology regarding less invasive management options. In practice, further factors seem to impede adoption of these strategies. Future research should address these factors by involving major stakeholders and investigating their prioritised outcomes to narrow or close the evidence gap.

  2. Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice (EBP): how nurse academics facilitate EBP use in theory and practice across Australian undergraduate programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-09-01

    This paper is drawn from a grounded theory study that aimed to investigate processes undertaken by academics when integrating evidence-based practice into undergraduate curricula. This paper focuses on how nurse academics facilitated students to apply evidence-based practice in theory and practice. Facilitating undergraduate nursing students to develop skills within an evidence-based practice framework is vital to achieving evidence-based care. Studies on evidence-based practice conducted globally suggests that there is a need to investigate approaches used by nurse academics in facilitating students' understanding and use of evidence-based practice during their nurse education. Employing constructivist grounded theory approach, 23 nurse academics across Australian universities were interviewed and nine observed during their teaching. Some study participants shared their unit guides to enrich analysis. Data analysis was performed by following Charmaz's approach of coding procedures; as a result, four categories were constructed. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Envisaging the use of evidence-based practice. Findings revealed that most academics-assisted students to use evidence in academic-related activities. Recognising the importance of evidence-based practice in practice, some also expected students to apply evidence-based practice during clinical experiences. However, the level of students' appreciation for evidence-based practice during clinical experiences was unknown to participants and was influenced by practice-related barriers. Acknowledging these challenges, academics were engaged in dialogue with students and suggested the need for academia-practice collaboration in combating the cited barriers. Ensuring academics are supported to emphasise clinical application of evidence-based practice requires strategies at school and practice levels. Faculty development, engagement of clinical nurses with evidence-based practice, supportive

  3. Promoting Evidence-Based Practice at a Primary Stroke Center: A Nurse Education Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Christina Anne

    Promoting a culture of evidence-based practice within a health care facility is a priority for health care leaders and nursing professionals; however, tangible methods to promote translation of evidence to bedside practice are lacking. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to design and implement a nursing education intervention demonstrating to the bedside nurse how current evidence-based guidelines are used when creating standardized stroke order sets at a primary stroke center, thereby increasing confidence in the use of standardized order sets at the point of care and supporting evidence-based culture within the health care facility. This educational intervention took place at a 286-bed community hospital certified by the Joint Commission as a primary stroke center. Bedside registered nurse (RN) staff from 4 units received a poster presentation linking the American Heart Association's and American Stroke Association's current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to standardized stroke order sets and bedside nursing care. The 90-second oral poster presentation was delivered by a graduate nursing student during preshift huddle. The poster and supplemental materials remained in the unit break room for 1 week for RN viewing. After the pilot unit, a pdf of the poster was also delivered via an e-mail attachment to all RNs on the participating unit. A preintervention online survey measured nurses' self-perceived likelihood of performing an ordered intervention based on whether they were confident the order was evidence based. The preintervention survey also measured nurses' self-reported confidence in their ability to explain how the standardized order sets are derived from current evidence. The postintervention online survey again measured nurses' self-reported confidence level. However, the postintervention survey was modified midway through data collection, allowing for the final 20 survey respondents to retrospectively rate their confidence

  4. Staff views on supporting evidence based practice for children with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembath, David; Sulek, Rhylee; Paynter, Jessica; Simpson, Kate; Keen, Deb

    2017-11-22

    A variety of empirically supported interventions are available for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but previous research suggests that their selection and use within an evidence-based practice (EBP) framework in clinical settings is challenging. To date, research has primarily focused on identifying individual, organisational, and contextual barriers to EBP rather than identifying collaborative solutions to these barriers through consultation with staff. The aim of our study was to explore staff views on supporting EBP in their work with children with ASD. We conducted five focus groups involving 29 professional (e.g., speech pathologists, teachers), paraprofessional (e.g., childcare workers), and managerial staff to explore their views. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Two central themes, comprising six categories, emerged to account for the participants' views. Initiative and Effort accounted for the range of creative strategies staff had developed to support their engagement in EBP. They also expressed the need for A Better Way involving organisational-wide support such as this engagement, including peer-to-peer mentoring. The findings suggest that an organisational-wide model to support engagement in EBP, with peer-to-peer mentoring at its foundation, may provide a desirable, ecologically valid, and acceptable model. Implications for Rehabilitation Clinicians and educators recognise the importance of evidence-based practice. Efforts to support evidence-based practice have focused mostly on access to research evidence. Clinicians and educators in this study were developing their own strategies based on intuition. They identified a need for organisation-wide approaches to supporting evidence-based practice. Peer-to-peer mentoring appears to be an acceptable and viable strategy.

  5. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of information audiologists use when discussing rehabilitation choices with clients, and discuss the findings within the context of evidence-based practice and patient-centered care. To assess the changes that may have occurred over time, this study uses a questionnaire based on one of the few studies of decision-making behavior in audiologists, published in 1989. The present questionnaire was completed by 96 audiologists who attended the World Congress of Audiology in 2014. The responses were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Results suggest that audiologists rank clinical test results and client preferences as the most important factors for decision-making. Discussion with colleagues or experts was also frequently reported as an important source influencing decision-making. Approximately 20% of audiologists mentioned utilizing research evidence to inform decision-making when no clear solution was available. Information shared at conferences was ranked low in terms of importance and reliability. This study highlights an increase in awareness of concepts associated with evidence-based practice and patient-centered care within audiology settings, consistent with current research-to-practice dissemination pathways. It also highlights that these pathways may not be sufficient for an effective clinical implementation of these practices. PMID:28752808

  6. When craft and science collide: Improving therapeutic practices through evidence-based innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M

    2010-04-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of clinical decision-making that is increasingly being advocated for use in the field of speech-language pathology. With the increased emphasis on scientific evidence as a form of knowledge important to EBP, clinicians may wonder whether their craft-based knowledge (i.e., knowledge derived from theory and practice), remains a legitimate form of knowledge for use in clinician decisions. This article describes forms of knowledge that may be used to address clinical questions, to include both craft and science. Additionally, the steps used when engaging in EBP are described so that clinicians understand when and how craft comes into play. The major premise addressed within this article is that craft is a legitimate form of knowledge and that engagement in EBP requires one to employ craft-based knowledge.

  7. Creating infrastructure supportive of evidence-based nursing practice: leadership strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Robin P

    2007-01-01

    Nursing leadership is the cornerstone of successful evidence-based practice (EBP) programs within health care organizations. The key to success is a strategic approach to building an EBP infrastructure, with allocation of appropriate human and material resources. This article indicates the organizational infrastructure that enables evidence-based nursing practice and strategies for leaders to enhance evidence-based practice using "the conceptual model for considering the determinants of diffusion, dissemination, and implementation of innovations in health service delivery and organization." Enabling EBP within organizations is important for promoting positive outcomes for nurses and patients. Fostering EBP is not a static or immediate outcome, but a long-term developmental process within organizations. Implementation requires multiple strategies to cultivate a culture of inquiry where nurses generate and answer important questions to guide practice. Organizations that can enable the culture and build infrastructure to help nurses develop EBP competencies will produce a professional environment that will result in both personal growth for their staff and improvements in quality that would not otherwise be possible.

  8. How Is Science Being Taught? Measuring Evidence-Based Teaching Practices across Undergraduate Science Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, Michael J; Matthews, Kelly E; Seiler, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a wealth of research evidencing the benefits of active-learning approaches, the extent to which these teaching practices are adopted in the sciences is not well known. The aim of this study is to establish an evidential baseline of teaching practices across a bachelor of science degree program at a large research-intensive Australian university. Our purpose is to contribute to knowledge on the adoption levels of evidence-based teaching practices by faculty within a science degree program and inform our science curriculum review in practical terms. We used the Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI) to measure the use of evidence-based teaching approaches in 129 courses (units of study) across 13 departments. We compared the results with those from a Canadian institution to identify areas in need of improvement at our institution. We applied a regression analysis to the data and found that the adoption of evidence-based teaching practices differs by discipline and is higher in first-year classes at our institution. The study demonstrates that the TPI can be used in different institutional contexts and provides data that can inform practice and policy. © 2017 M. J. Drinkwater et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Effectiveness of an Online Educational Module in Improving Evidence-Based Practice Skills of Practicing Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lora

    2017-10-01

    Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) at the bedside has been difficult to achieve. Significant gaps between current research and actual practice have been identified and must be addressed in effort to increase utilization of EBP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an online EBP educational intervention and to examine the relationship between educational preparation and years of nursing experience on nurses' practice, attitudes, and knowledge and skills of EBP. An experimental pretest-posttest design study with three randomized groups utilizing the EBPQ instrument was conducted. No significant differences were noted in EBPQ subscale scores of practice, attitude, or knowledge and skills from pre- to posttest. In addition, no statistical difference in EBPQ subscale scores regarding educational preparation or years of experience were noted. While nurses report positive attitudes toward EBP, their perceptions of practice and knowledge and skills score much lower. Educational interventions are needed for practicing nurses to overcome this knowledge deficit to successfully implement EBP. However, the use of online, independent, computer-based learning modules, while cost-efficient and offer several benefits when educating nurses, may not necessarily be the most effective method for teaching EBP knowledge and skills to practicing nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. Implementation of evidence-based knowledge in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jette Videbæk

    2017-12-01

    Background Keeping up with the evidence and implementing it into the daily care for patients are fundamental prerequisites for delivering a high quality of care in general practice. However, despite many years of research into dissemination and implementation of evidence-based recommendations, significant challenges remain. In recent years, organisational factors have become widely acknowledged as vitally important for ensuring successful implementation. Further knowledge is needed to understand more about which factors affect the seeking and implementation of evidence-based knowledge in general practice. Aim The overall aim was to investigate how evidence-based knowledge is sought and implemented in general practice and to analyse associations with GP characteristics and quality of care. Three separate studies, each covering a specific part of the overall aim, were undertaken: I. To examine how GPs implement clinical practice guidelines in everyday clinical practice, and how implementation approaches differ between practices. II. To assess GPs’ information seeking behaviour with regard to the use and perceived importance of scientific medical information sources and to investigate associations with GP characteristics. III. To investigate if there are associations between specific formalised implementation activities within general practice and quality of care – exemplified by the use of spirometry testing among first-time users of medication against obstructive lung diseases. Methods The study was designed as a mixed methods study combining qualitative interviews, questionnaire and register data. Study I was a qualitative interview study that involved purposefully selected GPs representing seven different practices. The interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation, and results were used to qualify the development of a national survey of general practitioners regarding their seeking and implementation of evidence-based knowledge. This survey was

  11. Impact of Evidence-Based Dentistry Workshops on Educators' Use of Evidence in Teaching and Practice: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Narjara C F; Leonardi-Dutra, Kamile; Feres, Murilo F N; Colangelo, Erica A M; Balevi, Ben; Matthews, Debora; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the short-term impact of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) workshops on educators' use of clinical evidence in their clinical practice and educational activities and to identify barriers they encountered in implementing evidence in their teaching and clinical practice. Between April 2012 and January 2014, a series of EBD workshops was delivered to 31 dental faculty members and postdoctoral students at three Canadian dental schools. Survey I, assessing participants' perceptions of various aspects of the workshops, was administered immediately following the workshops. Survey II, evaluating the impact of the workshops on participants' EBD implementation, was conducted 10 to 31 months after their completion. Survey I was completed by all 31 participants (100% response rate); their mean scores ranged from 3.94 to 4.65 on a five-point scale. Survey II was completed by 20 participants (64.5% response rate; five postdoctoral students and 15 faculty members), using an online 20-item questionnaire. Of the respondents, 19 (95%) reported implementing EBD in their professional activities at that time, and 14 (70%) stated that the workshops had positively helped with EBD implementation. Eight respondents (40%) reported having experienced barriers to EBD implementation, while 15 (75%) reported that their patients/students welcomed use of EBD. The respondents reported believing that strategies such as increasing EBD education and dissemination and improving quality and accessibility of evidence would facilitate the transition to EBD practice. Reported barriers to EBD implementation included resistance and criticism from colleagues, difficulty in changing current practice model, and lack of time.

  12. Linking research to practice: the rise of evidence-based health sciences librarianship*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne Gard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The lecture explores the origins of evidence-based practice (EBP) in health sciences librarianship beginning with examples from the work of Janet Doe and past Doe lecturers. Additional sources of evidence are used to document the rise of research and EBP as integral components of our professional work. Methods: Four sources of evidence are used to examine the rise of EBP: (1) a publication by Doe and research-related content in past Doe lectures, (2) research-related word usage in articles in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association between 1961 and 2010, (3) Medical Library Association activities, and (4) EBP as an international movement. Results: These sources of evidence confirm the rise of EBP in health sciences librarianship. International initiatives sparked the rise of evidence-based librarianship and continue to characterize the movement. This review shows the emergence of a unique form of EBP that, although inspired by evidence-based medicine (EBM), has developed its own view of evidence and its application in library and information practice. Implications: Health sciences librarians have played a key role in initiating, nurturing, and spreading EBP in other branches of our profession. Our close association with EBM set the stage for developing our own EBP. While we relied on EBM as a model for our early efforts, we can observe the continuing evolution of our own unique approach to using, creating, and applying evidence from a variety of sources to improve the quality of health information services. PMID:24415915

  13. Evidence-based practice exposure and physiotherapy students' behaviour during clinical placements: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nina Rydland; Lygren, Hildegunn; Espehaug, Birgitte; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen; Bradley, Peter; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Physiotherapists are expected to practice in an evidence-based way. Evidence-based practice (EBP) should be an integral part of the curriculum to ensure use of the five EBP steps: asking clinical questions, searching for and appraising research evidence, integrating the evidence into clinical practice and evaluating this process. The aim of this study was to compare self-reported EBP behaviour, abilities and barriers during clinical placements reported by five cohorts of final year physiotherapy students' with different EBP exposure across the 3-year bachelor programme. A cross-sectional study was conducted among five cohorts (2006-2010) with third year physiotherapy students at a University College in Norway. In total, 246 students were eligible for this study. To collect data, we used a questionnaire with 42 items related to EBP behaviour, ability and barriers. Associations were investigated using the Spearman's rho (r). In total, 180 out of 246 third year physiotherapy students, who had recently completed a clinical placement, filled out the questionnaire (73 %). The association between the level of EBP exposure and students' self-reported EBP behaviour, abilities and barriers was low for most items in the questionnaire. Statistically significant correlations were found for eight items, related to information need, question formulation, use of checklists, searching and perceived ability to search for and critically appraise research evidence. The strongest correlation was found between the level of EBP exposure and ability to critically appraise research evidence (r = 0.41, p physiotherapy students' EBP behaviour was found for elements such as asking and searching, ability to search for and critically appraise research evidence, and experience of critical appraisal as a barrier. Further research need to explore strategies for EBP exposure throughout the curriculum, regarding content, timing, amount and type of training. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  14. A multi-institutional study of the perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Daphne C

    2018-03-01

    To examine perceived barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based practice among nurses working in psychiatric, geriatric, hospital and community settings in The Bahamas. It is evident from previous studies that a number of factors exist which either obstruct or promote the utilisation of research evidence in nursing practice. Identifying these factors is vital to the successful uptake of evidence-based practice in nursing. Descriptive, comparative study. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. A stratified random sample (n = 100) of registered nurses participated; 5-point Likert-like scales were used to examine nurses' perceptions of barriers and facilitators of evidence-based practice. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic characteristics and to compare responses of nurses. Participants were predominantly female (98.4%), in the 25 to implement evidence-based practice previously. The greatest barriers identified were as follows: "Inadequate resources for implementing research findings" (85.2%; n = 52) and "Inadequate training in research methods" (83.6%; n = 51). The top facilitators identified were as follows: "Training in research methods" (88.5%; n = 54) and "Organisational policies and protocols that are evidence-based" (86.9%; n = 53). Nurses generally expressed that they required additional training in research and evidence-based practice concepts. Although some nurses had a desire to implement evidence-based practice to provide quality care and improve patient outcomes, many expressed that they lacked the required resources. The study draws attention to the need for prioritisation of evidence-based practice both at institutional and governmental levels. Successful adoption of evidence-based practice implies combined efforts of nurses, healthcare providers and policymakers. Further research is needed to determine the best method for successfully incorporating evidence-based practice into nursing

  15. Decreased rates of shoulder dystocia and brachial plexus injury via an evidence-based practice bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienas, Laura E; Hedriana, Herman L; Wiesner, Suzanne; Pelletreau, Barbara; Wilson, Machelle D; Shields, Laurence E

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate whether a standardized approach to identify pregnant women at risk for shoulder dystocia (SD) is associated with reduced incidence of SD and brachial plexus injury (BPI). Between 2011 and 2015, prospective data were collected from 29 community-based hospitals in the USA during implementation of an evidence-based practice bundle, including an admission risk assessment, required "timeout" before operative vaginal delivery (OVD), and low-fidelity SD drills. All women with singleton vertex pregnancies admitted for vaginal delivery were included. Rates of SD, BPI, OVD, and cesarean delivery were compared between a baseline period (January 2011-September 2013) and an intervention period (October 2013-June 2015), during which there was a system-wide average bundle compliance of 90%. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of SD (17.6%; P=0.028), BPI (28.6%; P=0.018), and OVD (18.0%; P<0.001) after implementation of the evidence-based practice bundle. There was a nonsignificant reduction in primary (P=0.823) and total (P=0.396) cesarean rates, but no association between SD drills and incidence of BPI. Implementation of a standard evidence-based practice bundle was found to be associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of SD and BPI. Utilization of low-fidelity drills was not associated with a reduction in BPI. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. Beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice among community health nurses: A cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Pellaux, Victoria; Verloo, Henk

    2018-03-08

    To describe beliefs about evidence-based practice and record levels of implementation among community health nurses working independently and in community healthcare centres in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. In many settings, evidence-based practice is considered a key means of delivering better and secure health care. However, there is a paucity of published studies on the implementation of evidence-based practice in community health care. Cross-sectional descriptive study (n = 100). Beliefs about evidence-based practice and levels of implementation were measured using validated scales developed by Melnyk et al. (Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 5, 2008, 208). Information on respondents' sociodemographic and professional characteristics was collected. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The final response rate was 32.3% (n = 100). More than half of respondents had previously heard about evidence-based practice; most believed in the value of using evidence to guide their practice and were prepared to improve their skills to be able to do so. However, the rate of implementation of evidence-based practice in daily practice in the 8 weeks before the survey was poor. Statistically significant positive associations were found between beliefs about evidence-based practice and how respondents had heard about it and between implementation rates and whether they had heard about evidence-based practice and how they had done so. Evidence-based practices requiring scientific knowledge and skills were implemented less frequently. Greater professional community healthcare experience and management roles did not increase implementation of evidence-based practice. The systematic implementation of evidence-based practice by community health nurses working independently and in healthcare centres in Valais was rare, despite their positive beliefs about it. These results revealed the level of implementation of evidence-based practice by

  17. Evidence-Based Practice in Autism Educational Research: Can We Bridge the Research and Practice Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldberg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    In order to develop deeper and better understandings of what constitutes effective educational practices, and to bridge the gap between research and practice, there is a need for a paradigm shift in autism educational research. The contribution of this paper is to examine the key methodological challenges that stand in the way of autism…

  18. Cognitive schema and naturalistic decision making in evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzer, Paul R

    2004-04-01

    A recent article in this journal proposed a naturalistic approach to decision making that overcomes problems intrinsic to classical decision theory. The approach emphasizes cognitive and multi-level processes, the development of expert reasoning, and the role of decision support in individual and organizational decision making. The current paper builds on this effort by suggesting a naturalistic, multi-level, theory that can facilitate the dissemination of evidence-based practices (EBPs). The paper presents "Image Theory," a theory that has been extensively investigated in other disciplines, but has yet to be utilized in medical decision research. It is suggested that its rich, empirically tested, distinctions among kinds of cognitive and organizational processes and types of decisions and tasks make Image Theory especially valuable in describing impediments to implementing EBPs. The paper discusses how naturalistic theory can assist clinicians, administrators, researchers, and policy makers in achieving a balance between evidence-based medicine and patient-centered practice.

  19. Nursing Librarians Cultivating Evidence-Based Practice Through an Asynchronous Online Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Kim; Blake, Lindsay

    2017-09-01

    In response to a request from the Nursing Shared Governance Evidence-Based Practice Council, librarians created an online evidence-based practice (EBP) continuing education course for clinical nurses. The curriculum was adapted from a previously created face-to-face course and was offered online through a learning management system. Although many nurses registered for the course, only a small sample was able to complete all modules. Feedback revealed that nurses appreciated the ease of online use, but they experienced technical barriers. Overall, nurses completing the course agreed that all learning objectives were met. An online asynchronous course for nurses is a viable option for teaching EBP, but hospital computer limitations must be taken into account to allow for participants' full immersion into the material. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(9):420-424. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis in a Social Work Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Rice

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the psychometric properties of the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ. The 24-item EBPQ was developed to measure health professionals’ attitudes toward, knowledge of, and use of evidence-based practice (EBP. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the EBPQ given to a random sample of National Association of Social Work members (N = 167. The coefficient alpha of the EBPQ was .93. The study supported a 23-item 3-factor model with acceptable model fit indices (χ² = 469.04; RMSEA = .081; SRMR = .068; CFI = .900. This study suggests a slightly modified EBPQ may be a useful tool to assess social workers’ attitudes toward, knowledge of, and use of EBP.

  1. Systems consultation: protocol for a novel implementation strategy designed to promote evidence-based practice in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Quanbeck, Andrew; Brown, Randall T; E Zgierska, Aleksandra; A Johnson, Roberta; Robinson, James M; Jacobson, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Background Adoption of evidence-based practices takes place at a glacial place in healthcare. This research will pilot test an innovative implementation strategy ? systems consultation ?intended to speed the adoption of evidence-based practice in primary care. The strategy is based on tenets of systems engineering and has been extensively tested in addiction treatment. Three innovations have been included in the strategy ? translation of a clinical practice guideline into a checklist-based im...

  2. Consumer preferences and values as an integral key to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Although evidence-based practice (EBP) integrates the best evidence from well-designed studies with a clinician's expertise and patient preferences and values, most of what is emphasized in books and reports on EBP is the 5-step EBP process. However, the consideration of patient values and preferences in making clinical decisions is essential to deliver the highest quality of care. This article briefly reviews the status of EBP in the United States, described the ARCC mentorship model, and highlights how to engage consumers in the EBP process.

  3. A systematic literature review of evidence-based clinical practice for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Ana; Salamon, Valérie; Peixoto, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    diseases comprise the difficulty to recruit participants because of rarity, scattering of patients, limited knowledge on natural history of diseases, difficulties to achieve accurate diagnosis and identify patients in health information systems, and difficulties choosing clinically relevant outcomes....... CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based clinical practice for rare diseases should start by collecting clinical data in databases and registries; defining measurable patient-centred outcomes; and selecting appropriate study designs adapted to small study populations. Rare diseases constitute one of the most paradigmatic...

  4. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sawitzky, Angelina C.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for ...

  5. Evidence-based practice guideline: wheelchair biking for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Schoenfelder, Deborah Perry

    2011-07-01

    Depression is a problem that will continue to burden older adults and challenge health care providers. Failing to recognize and effectively treat depression in institutionalized older adults is sanctioning these members of society to live their final years in despair and emotional suffering. The wheelchair biking program described in this evidence-based practice guideline provides a refreshing, safe, innovative tool to address depression and improve quality of life in older adults.

  6. Measuring Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice: Consideration of Organizational Context and Individual Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Aarons, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of innovation in general, and toward evidence-based practice (EBP) in particular, are important in considering how best to disseminate and implement EBPs. This article first explores the role of attitudes in acceptance of innovation and proposes a model of organizational and individual factors that may affect or be affected by attitudes toward adoption of EBP. Next, a recently developed measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoptio...

  7. Knowledge, Attitude and Use of Evidence-Based Practice among nurses active on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amparo Pérez-Campos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. to determine the evidence-based practice (EBP competence of Spanish and Latin-American nurses participating in professional forums on the Internet and estimate the influence of socio-demographic and professional factors on their competence, which was defined as knowledge of, attitude towards, and implementation of EBP. Methodology: An online survey was administered to a convenience sample of nurses active in Internet forums, comprising validated Spanish versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (EBPQ and Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI and socio-demographics and professional variables. Results: 314 questionnaires were obtained (76.96%. The mean EBPQ score was 5.02 out of 7 (95%CI, 4.89-5.14. The variables associated with a higher competence in EBP were academic level, (p<03001, professional category (p=0.001, country of work (p<0.001, perception of practice environment (p=0,018 and research activities (p<0,036. Conclusions: These nurses showed a moderate level of EBP competence. They revealed a positive attitude towards EBP and achieved intermediate scores in both EBP-related skills and knowledge and their implementation. Higher academic levels and professional categories were associated with greater EBP competence. A practice environment perceived to be unfavorable has a negative influence on EBP implementation.

  8. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting: a participatory action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen-Storms, Jolanda H H M; Moser, Albine; van der Loo, Sandra; Beurskens, Anna J H M; Bours, Gerrie J J W

    2015-01-01

    To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting. Evidence-based practice has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated into daily practice and its implementation is complex. Participatory action research. The main participants were nurses working in a lung unit of a rural hospital. A multi-method process of data collection was used during the observing, reflecting, planning and acting phases. Data were continuously gathered during a 24-month period from 2010 to 2012, and analysed using an interpretive constant comparative approach. Patients were consulted to incorporate their perspective. A best-practice mode of working was prevalent on the ward. The main barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice were that nurses had little knowledge of evidence-based practice and a rather negative attitude towards it, and that their English reading proficiency was poor. The main facilitators were that nurses wanted to deliver high-quality care and were enthusiastic and open to innovation. Implementation strategies included a tailored interactive outreach training and the development and implementation of an evidence-based discharge protocol. The academic model of evidence-based practice was adapted. Nurses worked according to the evidence-based practice discharge protocol but barely recorded their activities. Nurses favourably evaluated the participatory action research process. Action research provides an opportunity to empower nurses and to tailor evidence-based practice to the practice context. Applying and implementing evidence-based practice is difficult for front-line nurses with limited evidence-based practice competencies. Adaptation of the academic model of evidence-based practice to a more pragmatic approach seems necessary to introduce evidence-based practice into clinical practice. The use of scientific evidence can be facilitated by using pre-appraised evidence. For clinical practice

  9. A framework of quality improvement interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Valuck, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    To enhance the learner's competence with knowledge about a framework of quality improvement (QI) interventions to implement evidence-based practices for pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Summarize the process of creating and initiating the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention.2. Identify the domains and QI interventions for the best-practice framework of QI for PrU prevention. Pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention is a priority issue in US hospitals. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel endorses an evidence-based practice (EBP) protocol to help prevent PrUs. Effective implementation of EBPs requires systematic change of existing care units. Quality improvement interventions offer a mechanism of change to existing structures in order to effectively implement EBPs for PrU prevention. The best-practice framework developed by Nelson et al is a useful model of quality improvement interventions that targets process improvement in 4 domains: leadership, staff, information and information technology, and performance and improvement. At 2 academic medical centers, the best-practice framework was shown to physicians, nurses, and health services researchers. Their insight was used to modify the best-practice framework as a reference tool for quality improvement interventions in PrU prevention. The revised framework includes 25 elements across 4 domains. Many of these elements support EBPs for PrU prevention, such as updates in PrU staging and risk assessment. The best-practice framework offers a reference point to initiating a bundle of quality improvement interventions in support of EBPs. Hospitals and clinicians tasked with quality improvement efforts can use this framework to problem-solve PrU prevention and other critical issues.

  10. Moderators and Mediators in Social Work Research: Toward a More Ecologically Valid Evidence Base for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Summary Evidence-based practice involves the consistent and critical consumption of the social work research literature. As methodologies advance, primers to guide such efforts are often needed. In the present work, common statistical methods for testing moderation and mediation are identified, summarized, and corresponding examples, drawn from the substance abuse, domestic violence, and mental health literature, are provided. Findings While methodologically complex, analyses of these third variable effects can provide an optimal fit for the complexity involved in the provision of evidence-based social work services. While a moderator may identify the trait or state requirement for a causal relationship to occur, a mediator is concerned with the transmission of that relationship. In social work practice, these are questions of “under what conditions and for whom?” and of the “how?” of behavior change. Implications Implications include a need for greater attention to these methods among practitioners and evaluation researchers. With knowledge gained through the present review, social workers can benefit from a more ecologically valid evidence base for practice. PMID:22833701

  11. From dental science to clinical practice: Knowledge translation and evidence-based dentistry principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been claimed that in order to decrease the gap between what we know and what we do, research findings must be translated from knowledge to action. Such practices better enable dentists to make evidence-based decisions instead of personal ideas and judgments. To this end, this literature review aims to revisit the concepts of knowledge translation and evidence-based dentistry (EBD and depict their role and influence within dental education. It addresses some possible strategies to facilitate knowledge translation (KT, encourage dental students to use EBD principles, and to encourage dental educators to create an environment in which students become self-directed learners. It concludes with a call to develop up-to-date and efficient online platforms that could grant dentists better access to EBD sources in order to more efficiently translate research evidence into the clinic.

  12. From dental science to clinical practice: Knowledge translation and evidence-based dentistry principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I; Assery, Mansour K

    2017-07-01

    It has been claimed that in order to decrease the gap between what we know and what we do, research findings must be translated from knowledge to action. Such practices better enable dentists to make evidence-based decisions instead of personal ideas and judgments. To this end, this literature review aims to revisit the concepts of knowledge translation and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) and depict their role and influence within dental education. It addresses some possible strategies to facilitate knowledge translation (KT), encourage dental students to use EBD principles, and to encourage dental educators to create an environment in which students become self-directed learners. It concludes with a call to develop up-to-date and efficient online platforms that could grant dentists better access to EBD sources in order to more efficiently translate research evidence into the clinic.

  13. Professional values and competencies as explanatory factors for the use of evidence-based practice in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skela-Savič, Brigita; Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Pesjak, Katja

    2017-08-01

    To establish the connection between values, competencies, selected job characteristics and evidence-based practice use. Nurses rarely apply evidence-based practice in everyday work. A recent body of research has looked at various variables explaining the use of evidence-based practice, but not values and competencies. A cross-sectional, non-experimental quantitative explorative research design. Standardized instruments were used (Nurse Professional Values Scale-R, Nurse Competence Scale, Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Implementation Scale). The sample included 780 nurses from 20 Slovenian hospitals. The data were collected in 2015. The study identifies two new variables contributing to a better understanding of beliefs on and implementation of evidence-based practice, thus broadening the existing research evidence. These are the values of activism and professionalism and competencies aimed at the development and professionalization of nursing. Values of caring, trust and justice and competencies expected in everyday practice do not influence the beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice. Respondents ascribed less importance to values connected with activism and professionalism and competencies connected with the development of professionalism. Nurses agree that evidence-based practice is useful in their clinical work, but they lack the knowledge to implement it in practice. Evidence-based practice implementation in nursing practice is low. Study results stress the importance of increasing the knowledge and skills on professional values of activism and professionalism and competencies connected to nursing development. The study expands the current understanding of evidence-based practice use and provides invaluable insight for nursing managers, higher education managers and the national nursing association. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Teachers' Facility with Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Preparation Programmes and In-Service Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Laura; Quinn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In the present investigation, teachers' self-reported knowledge and competency ratings for the evidence-based classroom management practices were analysed. Teachers also reflected on how they learned evidence-based classroom management practices. Results suggest that teachers working in schools that implement Positive Behavioural Interventions and…

  15. Psychometric Properties and U.S. National Norms of the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Glisson, Charles; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Kelleher, Kelly; Landsverk, John; Cafri, Guy

    2010-01-01

    The Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS) assesses mental health and social service provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practices. Scores on the EBPAS derive from 4 subscales (i.e., Appeal, Requirements, Openness, and Divergence) as well as the total scale, and preliminary studies have linked EBPAS scores to clinic structure…

  16. Evidence-Based Best Practice is More Political than It Looks: A Case Study of the "Scottish Approach"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Paul

    2017-01-01

    National governments use evidence selectively to argue that a successful policy intervention in one local area should be emulated in others ("evidence-based best practice"). However, the value of such evidence is always limited because there is: disagreement on the best way to gather evidence of policy success, uncertainty regarding the…

  17. Strategies for rehabilitation professionals to move evidence-based knowledge into practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anita; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Kastner, Monika; McKibbon, K Ann; Straus, Sharon

    2009-11-01

    Rehabilitation clinicians need to stay current regarding best practices, especially since adherence to clinical guidelines can significantly improve patient outcomes. However, little is known about the benefits of knowledge translation interventions for these professionals. To examine the effectiveness of single or multi-component knowledge translation interventions for improving knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of rehabilitation clinicians. Systematic review of 7 databases conducted to identify studies evaluating knowledge translation interventions specific to occupational therapists and physical therapists. 12 studies met the eligibility criteria. For physical therapists, participation in an active multi-component knowledge translation intervention resulted in improved evidence-based knowledge and practice behaviors compared with passive dissemination strategies. These gains did not translate into change in clinicians' attitudes towards best practices. For occupational therapists, no studies have examined the use of multi-component interventions; studies of single interventions suggest limited evidence of effectiveness for all outcomes measured. While this review suggests the use of active, multi-component knowledge translation interventions to enhance knowledge and practice behaviors of physical therapists, additional research is needed to understand the impact of these strategies on occupational therapists. Serious research gaps remain regarding which knowledge translation strategies impact positively on patient outcomes.

  18. Theory- and Evidence- Based Intervention: Practice-Based Evidence--Integrating Positive Psychology into a Clinical Psychological Assessment and Intervention Model and How to Measure Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a model for assessment and intervention is presented. This model explains how to perform theory- and evidence- based as well as practice-based assessment and intervention. The assessment model applies a holistic approach to treatment planning, which includes recognition of the influence of community, school, peers, family and the…

  19. Using the World Wide Web to Connect Research and Professional Practice: Towards Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Moody

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In most professional (applied disciplines, research findings take a long time to filter into practice, if they ever do at all. The result of this is under-utilisation of research results and sub-optimal practices. There are a number of reasons for the lack of knowledge transfer. On the "demand side", people working in professional practice have little time available to keep up with the latest research in their field. In addition, the volume of research published each year means that the average practitioner would not have time to read all the research articles in their area of interest even if they devoted all their time to it. From the "supply side", academic research is primarily focused on the production rather than distribution of knowledge. While they have highly developed mechanisms for transferring knowledge among themselves, there is little investment in the distribution of research results be-yond research communities. The World Wide Web provides a potential solution to this problem, as it provides a global information infrastructure for connecting those who produce knowledge (researchers and those who need to apply this knowledge (practitioners. This paper describes two projects which use the World Wide Web to make research results directly available to support decision making in the workplace. The first is a successful knowledge management project in a health department which provides medical staff with on-line access to the latest medical research at the point of care. The second is a project currently in progress to implement a similar system to support decision making in IS practice. Finally, we draw some general lessons about how to improve transfers of knowledge from research and practice, which could be applied in any discipline.

  20. Nursing unit leaders' influence on the long-term sustainability of evidence-based practice improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleiszer, Andrea R; Semenic, Sonia E; Ritchie, Judith A; Richer, Marie-Claire; Denis, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    To describe how actions of nursing unit leaders influenced the long-term sustainability of a best practice guidelines (BPG) program on inpatient units. Several factors influence the initial implementation of evidence-based practice improvements in nursing, with leadership recognized as essential. However, there is limited knowledge about enduring change, including how frontline nursing leaders influence the sustainability of practice improvements over the long term. A qualitative descriptive case study included 39 in-depth interviews, observations, and document reviews. Four embedded nursing unit subcases had differing levels of program sustainability at 7 years (average) following implementation. Higher levels of BPG sustainability occurred on units where formal leadership teams used an integrated set of strategies and activities. Two key strategies were maintaining priorities and reinforcing expectations. The coordinated use of six activities (e.g., discussing, evaluating, integrating) promoted the continuation of BPG practices among staff. These leadership processes, fostering exchange and learning, contributed to sustainability-promoting environments characterized by teamwork and accountability. Unit leaders are required to strategically orchestrate several overlapping and synergistic efforts to achieve long-term sustainability of BPG-based practice improvements. As part of managing overall unit performance, unit leaders may influence practice improvement sustainability by aligning vision, strategies, and activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Is the practice of public or private sector doctors more evidence-based? A qualitative study from Vellore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Oluwaseun O; Martineau, Tim; Tharyan, Prathap

    2015-06-01

    The literature on the use of evidence-based practice is sparse, both in the public and private sectors in middle-and low-income countries, and the present literature shows that physician understanding and use of evidence-based practice is poor. The study aimed to explore the perception of medical practitioners in the private for-profit, private not-for-profit and government sectors in Vellore, India, on evidence-based practice, in order to explain the factors affecting the use of evidence-based practice among the practitioners and to inform local policy and management decisions for improvement in quality of care. Qualitative methodology was employed in the study. Sixteen in-depth and two key informant interviews were carried out with medical practitioners selected by purposive sampling in the private for-profit, private not-for-profit and government sectors. The interviews explored participants' knowledge of evidence-based practice, factors affecting its use and possible ways of improving the use of evidence-based practice among physicians in all the health sectors. Data from the in-depth and key informant interviews were analyzed with the NVIVO (version 8) software package using the framework approach. Although most practitioners interviewed have heard of evidence-based practice, knowledge about evidence-based practice seems inadequate. However, doctors in the private not-for-profit sector seem to be more familiar with the concept of evidence-based practice. Also, practitioners in the private not-for profit sector appear to use medical evidence more in their practices compared to government practitioners or doctors in the private for-profit sector. Perceived factors affecting physician use of evidence-based practice include lack of personal time for literature appraisal as a result of high case load, weak regulatory system, pressure from patients, caregivers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as financial considerations. Opinions of the respondents are that use

  2. Cross-sectional study to examine evidence-based practice skills and behaviors of physical therapy graduates: is there a knowledge-to-practice gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Patricia J; Norton, Amy V; Darrah, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Curricula changes in physical therapist education programs in Canada emphasize evidence-based practice skills, including literature retrieval and evaluation. Do graduates use these skills in practice? The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of research information in the clinical decision making of therapists with different years of experience and evidence-based practice preparation. Perceptions about evidence-based practice were explored qualitatively. A cross-sectional study with 4 graduating cohorts was conducted. Eighty physical therapists representing 4 different graduating cohorts participated in interviews focused on 2 clinical scenarios. Participants had varying years of clinical experience (range=1-15 years) and academic knowledge of evidence-based practice skills. Therapists discussed the effectiveness of interventions related to the scenarios and identified the sources of information used to reach decisions. Participants also answered general questions related to evidence-based practice knowledge. Recent graduates demonstrated better knowledge of evidence-based practice skills compared with therapists with 6 to 15 years of clinical experience. However, all groups used clinical experience most frequently as their source of information for clinical decisions. Research evidence was infrequently included in decision making. This study used a convenience sample of therapists who agreed to volunteer for the study. The results suggest a knowledge-to-practice gap; graduates are not using the new skills to inform their practice. Tailoring academic evidence-based activities more to the time constraints of clinical practice may help students to be more successful in applying evidence in practice. Academic programs need to do more to create and nurture environments in both academic and clinical settings to ensure students practice using evidence-based practice skills across settings. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  3. Evidence based dentistry – between the science and the clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Georgiev, Zlatko

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the more experience a physician or a dentist possess better the quality of health care delivery. However, recent studies had shown that there is in fact an inverse relationship between the number of years of practice and the quality of care provided. Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) is a process that restructures the way in which we think about clinical problems. It is an approach to clinical problem solving that has evolved from a self-directed and problem based a...

  4. Utilisation of evidence-based practices by ASD early intervention service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Jessica M; Ferguson, Sarah; Fordyce, Kathryn; Joosten, Annette; Paku, Sofia; Stephens, Miranda; Trembath, David; Keen, Deb

    2017-02-01

    A number of autism intervention practices have been demonstrated to be effective. However, the use of unsupported practices persists in community early intervention settings. Recent research has suggested that personal, professional and workplace factors may influence intervention choices. The aim of this research was to investigate knowledge and use of strategies, organisational culture, individual attitudes, sources of information and considerations informing intervention choices by early intervention providers. An online survey was completed by 72 early intervention providers from four organisations across Australia. Providers reported high levels of trust and access of information from internal professional development, therapists and external professional development. A range of considerations including child factors, family values and research were rated as important in informing intervention choices. Participants reported greater knowledge and use of evidence-based and emerging practices than unsupported. Levels of use were linked to levels of knowledge, as well as some organisational and attitudinal factors. Areas for future research and implications are discussed.

  5. Organizational Culture and Climate and Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-02-01

    Mental health provider attitudes toward adopting evidence-based practice (EBP) are associated with organizational context and provider individual differences. Organizational culture and climate are contextual factors that can affect staff acceptance of innovation. This study examined the association of organizational culture and climate with attitudes toward adopting EBP. Participants were 301 public sector mental health service providers from 49 programs providing mental health services for youths and families. Correlation analyses and multilevel hierarchical regressions, controlling for effects of provider characteristics, showed that constructive culture was associated with more positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP and poor organizational climates with perceived divergence of usual practice and EBP. Behavioral health organizations may benefit from consideration of how culture and climate affect staff attitudes toward change in practice.

  6. Still Subversive after All These Years: The Relevance of Feminist Therapy in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura S.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, based on my Carolyn Wood Sherif Memorial Award Address, I address questions of the viability of feminist practice in the current zeitgeist. Using the framework of responding to questions raised by doctoral students about feminist therapy, I address how feminist practice aligns with the evidence-based practice movement,…

  7. Family Interview to Enable Donation of Organs for Transplantation: Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, E L; Dos Santos, M J; de Barros E Silva, L B; de Lima Pilan, L A S; de Lima, E A A; de Santana, A C; Martins, M S

    2018-04-01

    In this study we propose a theoretical and practical basis for the best practices for interviewing relatives of brain-dead eligible organ donors. This investigation was a reflective study of the methodologic factors of the family interview that affect their decision regarding the donation of a deceased patient's organs for transplantation. The articles that formed the empirical basis of the trial were obtained from PubMed, which is a free-access tool of the MEDLINE database of the United States National Library of Medicine. Published articles that allowed us to reflect on evidence-based family interview practice were selected. Thirty-six scientific articles were used to guide our assessment the family interview, providing evidence for its adequate execution in view of the following prerequisites: When should the family interview be performed? Where should it be done? How many and which people should participate in the interview? Who should perform it? How should it be done? Scientific studies offer evidence to donation and transplantation specialists that can help them in their daily work regarding their interactions with relatives in the process of decisionmaking and family consent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Providers' Attitudes Toward Evidence-Based Practices: Is it Just About Providers, or do Practices Matter, Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E. J.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Lau, Anna S.; Innes-Gomberg, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) attitudes were measured in a sample of Los Angeles County mental health service providers. Three types of data were collected: provider demographic characteristics, attitudes toward EBP in general, and attitudes toward specific EBPs being implemented in the county. Providers could reliably rate characteristics of specific EBPs, and these ratings differed across interventions. Preliminary implementation data indicate that appealing features of an EBP relate to the degree to which providers use it. These findings suggest that assessing EBP-specific attitudes is feasible and may offer implementation-relevant information beyond that gained solely from providers' general attitudes toward EBP. PMID:24166077

  9. Evidence-based medicine knowledge, attitudes, and practices among doctors in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysena, Chrishantha; Jayawardana, Pushpa; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha; Wickramasinghe, Uthpala

    2010-05-01

    To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices on evidence-based medicine (EBM) among doctors in selected hospitals in Sri Lanka. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 315 doctors in five government hospitals in Sri Lanka between December 2007 and January 2008. A pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information on knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Of the 407 invited, 315 doctors participated, among whom, 87% (271) had heard the term EBM, 30% (n= 94) were aware of the Cochrane Library, and 8.5% (n= 27) were current users of it. Forty-seven per cent (n= 148) claimed to understand the terms systematic review and 37% (n= 115) meta-analysis. Twenty-four per cent (n= 77) had been exposed to some form of EBM training. All three components of EBM were known by 18% (n= 56) of participants. Attitudes toward EBM were positive among 76% (n= 239), 80% (n= 251) believed the practice of EBM would lead to improved patient care, and 77% (n= 243) considered EBM to be fundamental to professional practice. Just 3% (n= 13) considered it unimportant. EBM was used in clinical practice by 54% (n= 169) of participants. Thirty-six per cent (n= 114) referred to EBM sources when relevant. Available clinical guidelines were referred to by 56% (n= 176), and 34% (n= 107) thought that available guidelines provide sufficient support for the practice of EBM. The main barriers to practicing EBM were insufficient resources, overwork, lack of exposure to EBM, and lack of time and lack of endorsement of the need to practice EBM. Knowledge and practices of EBM among Sri Lanka doctors were poor. However, attitudes toward EBM were relatively good. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  10. Is Reading Instruction Evidence-Based? Analyzing Teaching Practices Using T-Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Suárez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to analyze whether primary teachers use evidence-based reading instruction for primary-grade readers. The study sample consisted of six teachers whose teaching was recorded. The observation instrument used was developed ad hoc for this study. The recording instrument used was Match Vision Studio. The data analysis was performed using SAS, GT version 2.0 E, and THEME. The results indicated that the teaching practices used most frequently and for the longest duration were: feedback (i.e., correcting the student when reading; fluency (i.e., individual and group reading, both out loud and silently, with and without intonation; literal or inference comprehension exercises (i.e., summarizing, asking questions; and use of educational resources (i.e., stories, songs, poems. Later, we conducted analyses of T-Patterns that showed the sequence of instruction in detail. We can conclude that <50% of the teaching practices used by the majority of teachers were based on the recommendations of the National Reading Panel (NRP. Only one teacher followed best practices. The same was the case for instructional time spent on the five essential components of reading, with the exception of teacher E., who dedicated 70.31% of class time implementing best practices. Teaching practices (i.e., learners' activities designed and implemented to exercise and master alphabetic knowledge and phonological awareness skills were used less frequently in the classroom.

  11. Is Reading Instruction Evidence-Based? Analyzing Teaching Practices Using T-Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Natalia; Sánchez, Carmen R; Jiménez, Juan E; Anguera, M Teresa

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to analyze whether primary teachers use evidence-based reading instruction for primary-grade readers. The study sample consisted of six teachers whose teaching was recorded. The observation instrument used was developed ad hoc for this study. The recording instrument used was Match Vision Studio. The data analysis was performed using SAS, GT version 2.0 E, and THEME. The results indicated that the teaching practices used most frequently and for the longest duration were: feedback (i.e., correcting the student when reading); fluency (i.e., individual and group reading, both out loud and silently, with and without intonation); literal or inference comprehension exercises (i.e., summarizing, asking questions); and use of educational resources (i.e., stories, songs, poems). Later, we conducted analyses of T-Patterns that showed the sequence of instruction in detail. We can conclude that practices used by the majority of teachers were based on the recommendations of the National Reading Panel (NRP). Only one teacher followed best practices. The same was the case for instructional time spent on the five essential components of reading, with the exception of teacher E., who dedicated 70.31% of class time implementing best practices. Teaching practices (i.e., learners' activities) designed and implemented to exercise and master alphabetic knowledge and phonological awareness skills were used less frequently in the classroom.

  12. Relationships between duration of practice, educational level, and perception of barriers to implement evidence-based practice among critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carswella

    2015-12-01

    Globally, a greater emphasis has been placed on the delivery of safe, patient-centered, evidence-based nursing care. As point-of-care providers, critical care nurses play a key role in ensuring that patients receive the safest, most effective treatment available. In order to deliver scientific-based care, critical care nurses must stay abreast of the current trends, as well as engage in the evidence-based practice process. This study aimed to describe research activities, to identify barriers to implement evidence-based practice and to explore professional factors related to the use of evidence-based practice among critical care nurses at three teaching hospitals in south-eastern United States. A survey design and convenience sampling method was used. A sample of 30 critical care staff nurses participated in the study. A 61-item online questionnaire composed of a demographic survey - BARRIERS scale - and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire was used. Simple descriptive statistics, Pearson's product moment correlations, and independent-sample t test procedures were used to analyze the data. Critical care nurses' reported positive attitudes, but viewed knowledge and use of evidence-based practice less favorably. These results may indicate that having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice does not necessarily translate to knowledge and use of the evidence-based practice process in clinical practice. An unwillingness to change and time constraints were identified as the top barriers to use evidence-based practice in this study. Perceptions of barriers to use evidence-based practice were higher in those critical care nurses who had less practical experience and educational preparation. The results suggest that critical care nurses possess the foundation to engage in the evidence-based practice process; however, their knowledge, practice, and attitudes just need to be cultivated and strengthened. Understanding the nurses' professional factors, current use

  13. Development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs: comparing approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Claire

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the potential of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs to support implementation of evidence has been demonstrated, it is not currently being achieved. CPGs are both poorly developed and ineffectively implemented. To improve clinical practice and health outcomes, both well-developed CPGs and effective methods of CPG implementation are needed. We sought to establish whether there is agreement on the fundamental characteristics of an evidence-based CPG development process and to explore whether the level of guidance provided in CPG development handbooks is sufficient for people using these handbooks to be able to apply it. Methods CPG development handbooks were identified through a broad search of published and grey literature. Documents published in English produced by national or international organisations purporting to support development of evidence-based CPGs were included. A list of 14 key elements of a CPG development process was developed. Two authors read each handbook. For each handbook a judgement was made as to how it addressed each element; assigned as: 'mentioned and clear guidance provided', 'mentioned but limited practical detail provided ', or 'not mentioned'. Results Six CPG development handbooks were included. These were produced by the Council of Europe, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK, the New Zealand Guidelines Group, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network, and the World Health Organization (WHO. There was strong concordance between the handbooks on the key elements of an evidence-based CPG development process. All six of the handbooks require and provide guidance on establishment of a multidisciplinary guideline development group, involvement of consumers, identification of clinical questions or problems, systematic searches for and appraisal of research evidence, a process for drafting

  14. Application of evidence-based dentistry: from research to clinical periodontal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Vivien; Caton, Jack G; Polson, Alan M; Hunter, Paul G

    2012-06-01

    Dentists need to make daily decisions regarding patient care, and these decisions should essentially be scientifically sound. Evidence-based dentistry is meant to empower clinicians to provide the most contemporary treatment. The benefits of applying the evidence-based method in clinical practice include application of the most updated treatment and stronger reasoning to justify the treatment. A vast amount of information is readily accessible with today's digital technology, and a standardized search protocol can be developed to ensure that a literature search is valid, specific and repeatable. It involves developing a preset question (population, intervention, comparison and outcome; PICO) and search protocol. It is usually used academically to perform commissioned reviews, but it can also be applied to answer simple clinical queries. The scientific evidence thus obtained can then be considered along with patient preferences and values, clinical patient circumstances and the practitioner's experience and judgment in order to make the treatment decision. This paper describes how clinicians can incorporate evidence-based methods into patient care and presents a clinical example to illustrate the process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Evidence-based practice guidelines in OHS: are they agree-able?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Carel; Hoenen, John

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acceptance, validity, reliability and feasibility of the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines and REsearch and Evaluation) instrument to assess the quality of evidence-based practice guidelines for occupational physicians. In total, 6 practice guidelines of the Netherlands Society of Occupational Medicine (NVAB) were appraised by 20 occupational health professionals and experts in guideline development or implementation. Although appraisers often disagreed on individual item scores, the internal consistency and interrater reliability for most domains was sufficient. The AGREE criteria were in general considered relevant and no major suggestions for additional items for use in the context of occupational health were brought up. The domain scores for the individual guidelines show a wide variety: 'applicability' had on average the lowest mean score (53%) while 'scope and purpose' had the highest one (87%). Low scores indicate where improvements are possible and necessary, e.g. by providing more information about the development. Key experts in occupational health report that AGREE is a relevant and easy to use instrument to evaluate quality aspects and the included criteria provide a good framework to develop or update evidence-based practice guidelines in the field of occupational health.

  16. Workshops for the development of evidence-based practice among nursing leaders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carolina Camargo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of motivational workshops to implement Evidence Based Practice (EBP among nursing leaders. This was a pilot, virtually experimental, before and after type study, conducted in a public teaching hospital. Researchers applied the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire and The Barriers to Research Utilization Scale and analyzed differences of means via Student’s t-test for paired samples or Wilcoxon’s test for non-parametric data. Although they had positive attitudes towards EBP, the workshops were not effective in broadening skills (initial mean=109.8; final mean=107, p=0.58. However, they significantly reduced the perception of barriers (initial mean=73.2; final mean=66.6, p<0.10, the main ones being related to the lack of authority to propose changes, and work overload. Researchers observed that the intervention was effective for motivational purposes. Conducting new research to assess the inclusion of this practice in units headed by nursing leaders is encouraged.

  17. A comparison of policy and direct practice stakeholder perceptions of factors affecting evidence-based practice implementation using concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Aarons, Gregory A

    2011-09-07

    The goal of this study was to assess potential differences between administrators/policymakers and those involved in direct practice regarding factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in a large public mental health service system in the United States. Participants included mental health system county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. As part of concept mapping procedures, brainstorming groups were conducted with each target group to identify specific factors believed to be barriers or facilitating factors to EBP implementation in a large public mental health system. Statements were sorted by similarity and rated by each participant in regard to their perceived importance and changeability. Multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze the data. A total of 105 statements were distilled into 14 clusters using concept-mapping procedures. Perceptions of importance of factors affecting EBP implementation varied between the two groups, with those involved in direct practice assigning significantly higher ratings to the importance of Clinical Perceptions and the impact of EBP implementation on clinical practice. Consistent with previous studies, financial concerns (costs, funding) were rated among the most important and least likely to change by both groups. EBP implementation is a complex process, and different stakeholders may hold different opinions regarding the relative importance of the impact of EBP implementation. Implementation efforts must include input from stakeholders at multiple levels to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light.

  18. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  19. Measuring Clinical Decision Support Influence on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Susan; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    To measure the effect of clinical decision support (CDS) on oncology nurse evidence-based practice (EBP).
. Longitudinal cluster-randomized design.
. Four distinctly separate oncology clinics associated with an academic medical center.
. The study sample was comprised of randomly selected data elements from the nursing documentation software. The data elements were patient-reported symptoms and the associated nurse interventions. The total sample observations were 600, derived from a baseline, posteducation, and postintervention sample of 200 each (100 in the intervention group and 100 in the control group for each sample).
. The cluster design was used to support randomization of the study intervention at the clinic level rather than the individual participant level to reduce possible diffusion of the study intervention. An elongated data collection cycle (11 weeks) controlled for temporary increases in nurse EBP related to the education or CDS intervention.
. The dependent variable was the nurse evidence-based documentation rate, calculated from the nurse-documented interventions. The independent variable was the CDS added to the nursing documentation software.
. The average EBP rate at baseline for the control and intervention groups was 27%. After education, the average EBP rate increased to 37%, and then decreased to 26% in the postintervention sample. Mixed-model linear statistical analysis revealed no significant interaction of group by sample. The CDS intervention did not result in an increase in nurse EBP.
. EBP education increased nurse EBP documentation rates significantly but only temporarily. Nurses may have used evidence in practice but may not have documented their interventions.
. More research is needed to understand the complex relationship between CDS, nursing practice, and nursing EBP intervention documentation. CDS may have a different effect on nurse EBP, physician EBP, and other medical professional EBP.

  20. Organizational fidelity to a medication management evidence-based practice in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallakh, Peggy; Howard, Patricia B; Rayens, Mary Kay; Roque, Autumn P; Adkins, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Organizational support is essential for successful implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in clinical settings. This 3-year study used a mixed qualitative and quantitative design to implement a medication management EBP in the treatment of schizophrenia in six community mental health clinics in a south-central state of the United States. Findings from organizational fidelity assessments indicate that support for EBP implementation was moderate. Organizational support was highest for prescriber access to relevant patient information at each medication visit, scheduling flexibility for patients' urgent problems, and availability of medication guidelines. Organizational support was lowest for medication availability and identification of treatment refractory patients. Findings suggest that leadership is essential to support successful implementation. Nurse educators can incorporate implementation research and leadership training into graduate nursing programs to facilitate successful EBP implementation in practice settings. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Kim C; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R; Hurlburt, Michael S; Roesch, Scott C; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-09-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care.

  2. Korean Nursing Students' Acquisition of Evidence-Based Practice and Critical Thinking Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Suk; Kim, Eun Joo; Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Geun Myun; Baek, Hee Chong

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential for enhancing nurses' quality of care. We identified Korean nursing students' practices, attitudes, and knowledge concerning EBP, as well as their critical thinking disposition (CTD). The EBP Questionnaire (EBPQ) was administered to a convenience sample of 266 nursing students recruited from four nursing schools in Seoul and its metropolitan area. Average EBPQ and CTD total scores were 4.69 ± 0.64 and 3.56 ± 0.32, respectively. Students who were ages ⩾23 years, male, and satisfied with their major demonstrated higher EBPQ and CTD scores. EBPQ scores were significantly correlated with CTD scores (r = .459, p students improve their CTD and information utilization skills, as well as integrate EBP in undergraduate programs to enhance nurses' EBP abilities. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):21-27.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Leadership, Organizational Climate, and Perceived Burden of Evidence-Based Practice in Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Kim C.; Fenwick, Karissa; Farahnak, Lauren R.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) is associated with favorable client outcomes, yet perceived burden of using EBPs may affect the adoption and implementation of such practices. Multilevel path analysis was used to examine the associations of transformational leadership with organizational climate, and their associations with perceived burden of using EBPs. Results indicated significant relationships between transformational leadership and empowering and demoralizing climates, and between demoralizing climate and perceived burden of EBPs. We found significant indirect associations of leadership and perceived burden through organizational climate. Findings suggest that further research is needed to examine the extent to which improving leadership and organizational climate may reduce perceived burden and use of EBPs with the ultimate goal of enhancing quality of care. PMID:26152770

  4. Turning Evidence into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH CRTA, Hillary Topazian, attended the National Cancer Institute’s 3rd Symposium on Global Cancer Research; a satellite meeting to the 6th Annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Conference in Boston. The Symposium centered on the theme of implementation science, a field which studies the integration of research findings and evidence into healthcare policy and practice.

  5. Tailored implementation of evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wensing

    Full Text Available When designing interventions and policies to implement evidence based healthcare, tailoring strategies to the targeted individuals and organizations has been recommended. We aimed to gather insights into the ideas of a variety of people for implementing evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases, which were generated in five European countries.A qualitative study in five countries (Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom was done, involving overall 115 individuals. A purposeful sample of four categories of stakeholders (healthcare professionals, quality improvement officers, healthcare purchasers and authorities, and health researchers was involved in group interviews in each of the countries to generate items for improving healthcare in different chronic conditions per country: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, depression in elderly people, multi-morbidity, obesity. A disease-specific standardized list of determinants of practice in these conditions provided the starting point for these groups. The content of the suggested items was categorized in a pre-defined framework of 7 domains and specific themes in the items were identified within each domain.The 115 individuals involved in the study generated 812 items, of which 586 addressed determinants of practice. These largely mapped onto three domains: individual health professional factors, patient factors, and professional interactions. Few items addressed guideline factors, incentives and resources, capacity of organizational change, or social, political and legal factors. The relative numbers of items in the different domains were largely similar across stakeholder categories within each of the countries. The analysis identified 29 specific themes in the suggested items across countries.The type of suggestions for improving healthcare practice was largely similar across different stakeholder groups, mainly addressing healthcare

  6. Nursing-led management of side effects of radiation: evidence-based recommendations for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poirier P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia PoirierUniversity of Maine School of Nursing, Orono, ME, USAAbstract: It has been estimated that 50%–60% of patients diagnosed with cancer will receive radiation therapy at some point in their treatment. Although radiation therapy can play a significant role in the cure or control of cancer, and the palliation of symptoms, it also has side effects. Side effects of radiation therapy can interfere with patient quality of life and daily functioning. Severe side effects can lead to delays in treatment, potentially affecting the outcome of treatment. All patients receiving radiation therapy are at risk of fatigue and skin reactions in the area of the body being treated. Other side effects of radiation therapy are specific to the part of the body being treated. Radiation therapy to the head and neck area may cause oral mucositis, dryness, and nutritional deficiencies. Radiation therapy to the chest or lung area may lead to difficulty in swallowing and eating. Radiation therapy to the pelvis frequently causes diarrhea. There are many nursing interventions available to manage the side effects of treatment based on best available evidence and expert opinion. Nurses in all settings are essential in helping patients manage the side effects of treatment and maintain their quality of life. The purpose of this review is to provide nurses with evidence-based recommendations and suggestions for managing common acute side effects of radiation therapy.Keywords: evidence-based practice, radiation therapy, side effects, nursing management

  7. Effectiveness of organisational infrastructures to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena; Cole, Nick; Foxcroft, David R

    2012-02-15

    Nurses and midwives form the bulk of the clinical health workforce and play a central role in all health service delivery. There is potential to improve health care quality if nurses routinely use the best available evidence in their clinical practice. Since many of the factors perceived by nurses as barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) lie at the organisational level, it is of interest to devise and assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures designed to promote EBP among nurses. To assess the effectiveness of organisational infrastructures in promoting evidence-based nursing. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS, BIREME, IBECS, NHS Economic Evaluations Database, Social Science Citation Index, Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes up to 9 March 2011.We developed a new search strategy for this update as the strategy published in 2003 omitted key terms. Additional search methods included: screening reference lists of relevant studies, contacting authors of relevant papers regarding any further published or unpublished work, and searching websites of selected research groups and organisations.  We considered randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, interrupted times series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies of an entire or identified component of an organisational infrastructure intervention aimed at promoting EBP in nursing. The participants were all healthcare organisations comprising nurses, midwives and health visitors. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. For the ITS analysis, we reported the change in the slopes of the regression lines, and the change in the level effect of the outcome at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. We included one study from the USA (re-analysed as

  8. Oncology nurses and the experience of participation in an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Mary; Frederickson, Keville

    2014-07-01

    To illuminate the experiences of oncology nurses who participated in an evidence-based practice (EBP) project in an institution with an EBP organizational structure. A descriptive phenomenologic approach and in-depth interviews with each participant. An oncology-focused academic medical center with an established organizational infrastructure for EBP. 12 RNs working in an oncology setting who participated in an EBP project. Descriptive, qualitative phenomenologic approach through use of interviews and analysis of interview text. Four essential themes (i.e., support, challenges, evolution, and empowerment) and 11 subthemes emerged that reflected nurses' professional and personal growth, as well as the creation of a culture of EBP in the workplace. The participants described the EBP project as a positive, empowering personal and professional evolutionary experience with supports and challenges that resulted in improvements in patient care. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first qualitative study to demonstrate improved nursing outcomes (e.g., professional growth, improved nursing performance) and nurses' perception of improved patient outcomes (e.g., ongoing healthcare collaboration, evidence-based changes in practice).

  9. Evidence-based decision making in health care settings: from theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Melanie Kazman; Berta, Whitney; Langley, Ann; Davis, David

    2011-01-01

    The relatively recent attention that evidence-based decision making has received in health care management has been at least in part due to the profound influence of evidence-based medicine. The result has been several comparisons in the literature between the use of evidence in health care management decisions and the use of evidence in medical decision making. Direct comparison, however, may be problematic, given the differences between medicine and management as they relate to (1) the nature of evidence that is brought to bear on decision making; (2) the maturity of empirical research in each field (in particular, studies that have substantiated whether or not and how evidence-based decision making is enacted); and (3) the context within which evidence-based decisions are made. By simultaneously reviewing evidence-based medicine and management, this chapter aims to inform future theorizing and empirical research on evidence-based decision making in health care settings.

  10. Dental education and evidence-based educational best practices: bridging the great divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S; Thompson, Thomas J

    2004-12-01

    Research about educational best practices is negatively perceived by many dental faculty. Separation between teaching and learning strategies commonly employed in dental education and evidence-based educational techniques is real and caused by a variety of factors: the often incomprehensible jargon of educational specialists; traditional academic dominance of research, publication, and grantsmanship in faculty promotions; institutional undervaluing of teaching and the educational process; and departmentalization of dental school governance with resultant narrowness of academic vision. Clinician-dentists hired as dental school faculty may model teaching activities on decades-old personal experiences, ignoring recent educational evidence and the academic culture. Dentistry's twin internal weaknesses--factionalism and parochialism--contribute to academic resistance to change and unwillingness to share power. Dental accreditation is a powerful impetus toward inclusion of best teaching and learning evidence in dental education. This article will describe how the gap between traditional educational strategies and research-based practices can be reduced by several approaches including dental schools' promotion of learning cultures that encourage and reward faculty who earn advanced degrees in education, regular evaluation of teaching by peers and educational consultants with inclusion of the results of these evaluations in promotion and tenure committee deliberations, creating tangible reward systems to recognize and encourage teaching excellence, and basing faculty development programs on adult learning principles. Leadership development should be part of faculty enrichment, as effective administration is essential to dental school mission fulfillment. Finally, faculty who investigate the effectiveness of educational techniques need to make their research more available by publishing it, more understandable by reducing educational jargon, and more relevant to the day

  11. Phase II Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN) evaluation: interviews with key informants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Fran Martin; Lordly, Daphne; Thirsk, Jayne; Corby, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Dietitians of Canada has collaborated with experts in knowledge translation and transfer, technology, and dietetic practice to develop and implement an innovative online decision-support system called Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition (PEN). A study was conducted to evaluate the perceived facilitators and barriers that enable dietitians to use or prevent them from using PEN. As part of the overall evaluation framework of PEN, a qualitative descriptive research design was used to address the research purpose. Individual, semi-structured telephone interviews with 17 key informants were completed, and the interview transcripts underwent qualitative content analysis. Respondents identified several facilitators of and barriers to PEN use. Facilitators included specificity to dietetics, rigorous/expert review, easy accessibility, current content, credible/secure material, well-organized/easy-to-use material, material that is valuable to practice, and good value for money. Barriers included perceived high cost, fee structuring/cost to students, certain organizational aspects, and a perceived lack of training for pathway contributors. This formative evaluation has indicated areas in which PEN could be improved and strategies to make PEN the standard for dietetic education and practice. Ensuring that PEN is meeting users' knowledge needs is of the utmost importance if dietitians are to remain on the cutting edge of scientific inquiry.

  12. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Clarke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year.

  13. Case Reports, Case Series - From Clinical Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Jerry W; Toklu, Hale Z; Ye, Fan; Mazza, Joseph; Yale, Steven

    2017-08-07

    Case reports and case series or case study research are descriptive studies that are prepared for illustrating novel, unusual, or atypical features identified in patients in medical practice, and they potentially generate new research questions. They are empirical inquiries or investigations of a patient or a group of patients in a natural, real-world clinical setting. Case study research is a method that focuses on the contextual analysis of a number of events or conditions and their relationships. There is disagreement among physicians on the value of case studies in the medical literature, particularly for educators focused on teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) for student learners in graduate medical education. Despite their limitations, case study research is a beneficial tool and learning experience in graduate medical education and among novice researchers. The preparation and presentation of case studies can help students and graduate medical education programs evaluate and apply the six American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies in the areas of medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, professionalism, systems-based practice, and communication. A goal in graduate medical education should be to assist residents to expand their critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making skills. These attributes are required in the teaching and practice of EBM. In this aspect, case studies provide a platform for developing clinical skills and problem-based learning methods. Hence, graduate medical education programs should encourage, assist, and support residents in the publication of clinical case studies; and clinical teachers should encourage graduate students to publish case reports during their graduate medical education.

  14. Development and psychometric testing of a trans-professional evidence-based practice profile questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Maureen Patricia; Williams, Marie T; Olds, Timothy Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Previous survey tools operationalising knowledge, attitudes or beliefs about evidence-based practice (EBP) have shortcomings in content, psychometric properties and target audience. This study developed and psychometrically assessed a self-report trans-professional questionnaire to describe an EBP profile. Sixty-six items were collated from existing EBP questionnaires and administered to 526 academics and students from health and non-health backgrounds. Principal component factor analysis revealed the presence of five factors (Relevance, Terminology, Confidence, Practice and Sympathy). Following expert panel review and pilot testing, the 58-item final questionnaire was disseminated to 105 subjects on two occasions. Test-retest and internal reliability were quantified using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Cronbach's alpha, convergent validity against a commonly used EBP questionnaire by Pearson's correlation coefficient and discriminative validity via analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on exposure to EBP training. The final questionnaire demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.96), test-retest reliability (ICCs range 0.77-0.94) and convergent validity (Practice 0.66, Confidence 0.80 and Sympathy 0.54). Three factors (Relevance, Terminology and Confidence) distinguished EBP exposure groups (ANOVA p profile (EBP(2)) questionnaire is a reliable instrument with the ability to discriminate for three factors, between respondents with differing EBP exposures.

  15. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda – implications for programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiguli Juliet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. Methods We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children. We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Results Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. Conclusion The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation

  16. Acceptability of evidence-based neonatal care practices in rural Uganda - implications for programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiswa, Peter; Kemigisa, Margaret; Kiguli, Juliet; Naikoba, Sarah; Pariyo, George W; Peterson, Stefan

    2008-06-21

    Although evidence-based interventions to reach the Millennium Development Goals for Maternal and Neonatal mortality reduction exist, they have not yet been operationalised and scaled up in Sub-Saharan African cultural and health systems. A key concern is whether these internationally recommended practices are acceptable and will be demanded by the target community. We explored the acceptability of these interventions in two rural districts of Uganda. We conducted 10 focus group discussions consisting of mothers, fathers, grand parents and child minders (older children who take care of other children). We also did 10 key informant interviews with health workers and traditional birth attendants. Most maternal and newborn recommended practices are acceptable to both the community and to health service providers. However, health system and community barriers were prevalent and will need to be overcome for better neonatal outcomes. Pregnant women did not comprehend the importance of attending antenatal care early or more than once unless they felt ill. Women prefer to deliver in health facilities but most do not do so because they cannot afford the cost of drugs and supplies which are demanded in a situation of poverty and limited male support. Postnatal care is non-existent. For the newborn, delayed bathing and putting nothing on the umbilical cord were neither acceptable to parents nor to health providers, requiring negotiation of alternative practices. The recommended maternal-newborn practices are generally acceptable to the community and health service providers, but often are not practiced due to health systems and community barriers. Communities associate the need for antenatal care attendance with feeling ill, and postnatal care is non-existent in this region. Health promotion programs to improve newborn care must prioritize postnatal care, and take into account the local socio-cultural situation and health systems barriers including the financial burden. Male

  17. Perceived outcomes of web-based modules designed to enhance athletic trainers' knowledge of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Cailee E; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Hankemeier, Dorice A; Wyant, Aimee L; Mutchler, Jessica M; Pitney, William A; Hays, Danica G

    2014-01-01

    The release of evidence-based practice (EBP) Web-based learning modules to the membership of the National Athletic Trainers' Association has provided athletic trainers (ATs) the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of the various EBP concepts. Whereas increasing the knowledge of EBP among ATs is important, assessing whether this newfound knowledge is being translated into clinical practice and didactic education is crucial. To explore the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding EBP on the didactic instruction patterns of athletic training educators and the clinical practice behaviors of clinicians. Qualitative study. Individual telephone interviews. A total of 25 ATs (12 educators, 13 clinicians; experience as an AT = 16.00 ± 9.41 years) were interviewed. We conducted 1 individual telephone interview with each participant. After transcription, the data were analyzed and coded into common themes and categories. Triangulation of the data occurred via the use of multiple researchers and member checking to confirm the accuracy of the data. Participants perceived the EBP Web-based modules to produce numerous outcomes regarding education and clinical practice. These outcomes included perceived knowledge gain among participants, an increase in the importance and scope of EBP, a positive effect on educators' didactic instruction patterns and on instilling value and practice of EBP among students, and an enhanced ability among clinicians to implement EBP within clinical practice. However, some clinicians reported the Web-based modules had no current effect on clinical practice. Although the EBP Web-based modules were successful at enhancing knowledge among ATs, translation of knowledge into the classroom and clinical practice remains limited. Researchers should aim to identify effective strategies to help ATs implement EBP concepts into didactic education and clinical practice.

  18. Concluding the Series on Evidence-Based Practice: The Spread of Excellence in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The child and adolescent psychiatry community has been using large systems of information and new technologies to improve its performance.Evidence-based approach is used by practitioners to find and implement feasible therapies and medication. The different procedures involved of evidence-based practice, as used in child and adolescent psychology,…

  19. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan, E-mail: anuradhachandramohan@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Jacob, K.S., E-mail: ksjacob@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Psychiatry, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Specialist Mental Health Service for Older People, Suite 106, 64–68 Derby Street, Kingswood, Penrith 2750 (Australia); Shyamkumar, N.K., E-mail: aparnashyam@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India); Sridhar, Gibikote, E-mail: gibikote@cmcvellore.ac.in [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632 004 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  20. Evidence-based practice in radiology: Knowledge, attitude and perceived barriers to practice among residents in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuradha, Chandramohan; Jacob, K.S.; Shyamkumar, N.K.; Sridhar, Gibikote

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We examinted the attitude, knowledge and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice of radiology (EBPR) among residents in radiology. Study design and setting: We used the McColl questionnaire (1) and the BARRIERS scale (2) to assess the issues among radiology trainees attending an annual refresher course. Ninety six residents from 32 medical colleges from Southern India attended the course. Results: Eighty (83.3%) residents, 55 male and 25 female of age range 24–34 years, consented and returned the questionnaire. The majority of the participants had a positive attitude towards EBPR. However, 45% were unaware of sources for evidence based literature although many had access to Medline (45%) and the internet (80%). The majority (70%) were aware of the common technical terms (e.g. odds ratio, absolute and relative risk) but other complex details (e.g. meta-analysis, clinical effectiveness, confidence interval, publication bias and number needed to treat) were poorly understood. Though majority of residents (59%) were currently following guidelines and protocols laid by colleagues within their departments, 70% of residents were interested in learning the skills of EBPR and were willing to appraise primary literature or systematic reviews by themselves. Insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas (70.1%); relevant literature is not being complied in one place (68.9%); not being able to understand statistical methods (68.5%) were considered to be the major barriers to EBPR. Training in critical appraisal significantly influence usage of bibliographic databases (p < 0.0001). Attitude of collegues (p = 0.006) influenced attitude of the trainees towards EBPR. Those with higher knowledge scores (p = 0.02) and a greater awareness of sources for seeking evidence based literature (p = 0.05) held stronger beliefs that EBPR significantly improved patient care. Conclusions: The large knowledge gap related to EBPR suggests the need to incorporate structured

  1. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM practice. Methods Thirty-six OPs from ten countries, planning to attend an EBM course and to a large extent recruited via the European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM, participated in a cross-sectional study. Results Research and development institutes, and knowledge products and tools are used by respectively more than 72% and more than 80% of the OPs and they are rated as being important for EBM practice (more than 65 points (range 0–100. Conventional knowledge access facilities, like traditional libraries, are used often (69% but are rated as less important (46.8 points (range 0–100 compared to the use of more novel facilities, like question-and-answer facilities (25% that are rated as more important (48.9 points (range 0–100. To solve cases, OPs mostly use non evidence-based sources. However, they regard the evidence-based sources that are not often used, e.g. the Cochrane library, as important enablers for practising EBM. The main barriers are lack of time, payment for full-text articles, language barrier (most texts are in English, and lack of skills and support. Conclusion This first exploratory study shows that OPs use many knowledge infrastructure facilities and rate them as being important for their EBM practice. However, they are not used to use evidence-based sources in their practice and face many barriers that are comparable to the barriers physicians face in primary health care.

  2. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pedro Gomes Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe the process of translation and linguistic and cultural validation of the Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire for the Portuguese context: Questionário de Eficácia Clínica e Prática Baseada em Evidências (QECPBE. METHOD: a methodological and cross-sectional study was developed. The translation and back translation was performed according to traditional standards. Principal Components Analysis with orthogonal rotation according to the Varimax method was used to verify the QECPBE's psychometric characteristics, followed by confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was determined by Cronbach's alpha. Data were collected between December 2013 and February 2014. RESULTS: 358 nurses delivering care in a hospital facility in North of Portugal participated in the study. QECPBE contains 20 items and three subscales: Practice (α=0.74; Attitudes (α=0.75; Knowledge/Skills and Competencies (α=0.95, presenting an overall internal consistency of α=0.74. The tested model explained 55.86% of the variance and presented good fit: χ2(167=520.009; p = 0.0001; χ2df=3.114; CFI=0.908; GFI=0.865; PCFI=0.798; PGFI=0.678; RMSEA=0.077 (CI90%=0.07-0.08. CONCLUSION: confirmatory factor analysis revealed the questionnaire is valid and appropriate to be used in the studied context.

  3. A survey of Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Bruce F; Stomski, Norman J; Hebert, Jeff J; French, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Background Research into chiropractors’ use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors’ adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors’ attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine t...

  4. Evidence, Engagement, and Technology: Themes of and the State of Primary Care Practice-based Network Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nease, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Practice-based research supported by practice-based research network (PBRN) infrastructure has historically provided an important method for challenging guidelines and evidence arising from secondary and tertiary care settings. This sample of current practice-based research in this issue of the JABFM provides an opportunity to ask whether practice-based research continues to address questions relevant to primary care practices and clinicians and whether a PBRN infrastructure is instrumental to maintaining the relevance and feasibility of practice-based research. Based on this issue's articles, the current state of practice-based research seems to be good, at face value addressing relevant issues for primary care practices. Less clear is the degree to which PBRN infrastructures and relationships informed the questions asked and facilitated the implementation of the studies presented. Practice-based research-related articles that routinely report about how study questions arose-from practices and their clinicians, staff and communities, or elsewhere-could help directly answer questions of relevance. In addition, reporting how practices are recruited to practice-based research studies could inform the degree to which ongoing relationships central to PBRNs facilitate the recruitment and conduct of practice-based research. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practice to Directors of Nursing by an Outreach Campaign in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Chiehfeng; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Directors of nursing (DONs) have an important influence in the dissemination of evidence-based practice (EBP) in hospital settings. The current study examined how the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of DONs changed when EBP was implemented during a 5-year, nationwide promotional campaign providing EBP-related information resources and promotional activities in regional hospitals in Taiwan. Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys for a nationwide representative sample of DONs were conducted in 2007, 2009, and 2011 to examine views related to EBP, including changes in beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviors, and barriers. This study enrolled 267 DONs in 2007, 257 in 2009, and 287 in 2011. During the study period, DONs' EBP knowledge and skills increased, but their beliefs and attitudes did not significantly change. Furthermore, the use of Internet-based resources, including web portals, electronic textbooks, electronic journals, and evidence-based online databases, increased. Most barriers significantly declined after the intervention. DONs' knowledge, skills, and behaviors regarding EBP increased after the multifaceted intervention. The data suggest this outreach program is useful in disseminating EBP implementation to DONs. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Evidence-based practice profiles of physiotherapists transitioning into the workforce: a study of two cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEvoy Maureen P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training in the five steps of evidence-based practice (EBP has been recommended for inclusion in entry-level health professional training. The effectiveness of EBP education has been explored predominantly in the medical and nursing professions and more commonly in post-graduate than entry-level students. Few studies have investigated longitudinal changes in EBP attitudes and behaviours. This study aimed to assess the changes in EBP knowledge, attitudes and behaviours in entry-level physiotherapy students transitioning into the workforce. Methods A prospective, observational, longitudinal design was used, with two cohorts. From 2008, 29 participants were tested in their final year in a physiotherapy program, and after the first and second workforce years. From 2009, 76 participants were tested in their final entry-level and first workforce years. Participants completed an Evidence-Based Practice Profile questionnaire (EBP2, which includes self-report EBP domains [Relevance, Terminology (knowledge of EBP concepts, Confidence, Practice (EBP implementation, Sympathy (disposition towards EBP]. Mixed model analysis with sequential Bonferroni adjustment was used to analyse the matched data. Effect sizes (ES (95% CI were calculated for all changes. Results Effect sizes of the changes in EBP domains were small (ES range 0.02 to 0.42. While most changes were not significant there was a consistent pattern of decline in scores for Relevance in the first workforce year (ES -0.42 to -0.29 followed by an improvement in the second year (ES +0.27. Scores in Terminology improved (ES +0.19 to +0.26 in each of the first two workforce years, while Practice scores declined (ES -0.23 to -0.19 in the first year and improved minimally in the second year (ES +0.04. Confidence scores improved during the second workforce year (ES +0.27. Scores for Sympathy showed little change. Conclusions During the first two years in the workforce, there was a

  7. Evidence-based speech-language pathology practices in schools: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Lavae M; Ireland, Marie; Hall-Mills, Shannon; Flynn, Perry

    2013-07-01

    This study documented evidence-based practice (EBP) patterns as reported by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) employed in public schools during 2010-2011. Using an online survey, practioners reported their EBP training experiences, resources available in their workplaces, and the frequency with which they engage in specific EBP activities, as well as their resource needs and future training format preferences. A total of 2,762 SLPs in 28 states participated in the online survey, 85% of whom reported holding the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology credential. Results revealed that one quarter of survey respondents had no formal training in EBP, 11% of SLPs worked in school districts with official EBP procedural guidelines, and 91% had no scheduled time to support EBP activities. The majority of SLPs posed and researched 0 to 2 EBP questions per year and read 0 to 4 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) journal articles per year on either assessment or intervention topics. Use of ASHA online resources and engagement in EBP activities were documented to be low. However, results also revealed that school-based SLPs have high interest in additional training and resources to support scientifically based practices. Suggestions for enhancing EBP support in public schools and augmenting knowledge transfer are provided.

  8. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. DESIGN: Prospective multinational populat...

  9. Strategies to promote practice nurse capacity to deliver evidence-based care: An example from sexual healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadich, Ann; Abbott, Penny; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is pivotal to effective patient care. However, its translation into practice remains limited. Given the central role of primary care in many healthcare systems, it is important to identify strategies that bolster clinician-capacity to promote evidence-based care. The purpose of this paper is to identify strategies to increase Practice Nurse capacity to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare within general practice. A survey of 217 Practice Nurses in an Australian state and ten respondent-interviews regarding two resources to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare - namely, a clinical aide and online training. The perceived impact of both resources was determined by views on relevance and design - particularly for the clinical aide. Resource-use was influenced by role and responsibilities within the workplace, accessibility, and support from patients and colleagues. This is the first Australian study to reveal strategies to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare among Practice Nurses. The findings provide a platform for future research on knowledge translation processes, particularly among clinicians who might be disengaged from sexual healthcare. Given the benefits of evidence-based practices, it is important that managers recognize their role, and the role of their services, in promoting these. Without explicit support for evidence-based care and recognition of the Practice Nurse role in such care, knowledge translation is likely to be limited. Knowledge translation among Practice Nurses can be facilitated by: resources-deemed informative, relevant, and user-friendly, as well as support from patients, colleagues, and their workplace.

  10. Teaching evidence-based practice principles to prepare health professions students for an interprofessional learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell; Stellrecht, Elizabeth; Lyons, Amy G; Zafron, Michelle L; Glogowski, Maryruth; Grabowski, Jeremiah; Ohtake, Patricia J

    2017-10-01

    The research assessed online learning modules designed to teach health professions students evidence-based practice (EBP) principles in an interprofessional context across two institutions. Students from nine health professions at two institutions were recruited to participate in this pilot project consisting of two online learning modules designed to prepare students for an in-person case-based interprofessional activity. Librarians and an instructional designer created two EBP modules. Students' competence in EBP was assessed before and after the modules as well as after the in-person activity. Students evaluated the online learning modules and their impact on the students' learning after the in-person session. A total of 39 students from 8 health professions programs participated in the project. Average quiz scores for online EBP module 1 and module 2 were 83% and 76%, respectively. Following completion of the learning modules, adapted Fresno test of competence in EBP scores increased ( p =0.001), indicating that the modules improved EBP skill competence. Student evaluations of the learning modules were positive. Students indicated that they acquired new information skills that contributed to their ability to develop a patient care plan and that they would use these information skills in their future clinical practice. Online EBP learning modules were effective in developing EBP knowledge and skills for health professions students. Using the same modules ensured that students from different health professions at different stages of their professional programs had consistent knowledge and enabled each student to fully engage in an interprofessional evidence-based activity. Student feedback indicated the modules were valued and beneficial.

  11. Evidence-based practice in Physiotherapy curricula: A survey of Indian Health Science Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VRUSHALI P PANHALE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based practice (EBP is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current evidence in clinical decision making. The physiotherapy profession has expressed a commitment to the development and use of evidence. However, very little is known about the extent to which EBP is integrated in physiotherapy curricula in India. The purpose of this study was to describe integration of EBP in Indian physiotherapy programs. Methods: An observational study was conducted where a review of curricula of all Health Science Universities (HSU in India, offering an undergraduate (UG and post-graduate (PG degree program in physical therapy was conducted using a data abstraction sheet. It gathered data on inclusion of research components of EBP in the curricula, content and hours of teaching EBP, and assessment methods. Data were analyzed descriptively. Results: Curricula of fifteen HSU offering physiotherapy programs were reviewed. Contents relevant to EBP were incorporated from the 2nd yr to final year. Common courses included research methodology (84.61%, research project (69.23% and clinical management subjects (57.14%. No guidelines were given about adopting EBP in clinical practice. Didactic lectures were the mode of teaching (81.81%. Preferred method for assessing research projects was viva (44.44%. Critical appraisal was least included in the entry level education. Contents relevant to all the five steps of EBP were included in PG curricula. Conclusions: Though physiotherapy programs are introducing EBP teaching at the entry level, it lacks structured systematic approach and is fragmented. There is inadequate emphasis on clinical oriented teaching of EBP and assessment methods. Moreover, there is adequate coverage of EBP content in PG curricula.

  12. Evidence-based practice beliefs and behaviors of nurses providing cancer pain management: a mixed-methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Linda H; Meins, Alexa R; Mitchell, Pamela H; Voss, Joachim; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-03-01

    To describe evidence-based practice (EBP) beliefs and behaviors of nurses who provide cancer pain management. Descriptive, cross-sectional with a mixed-methods approach. Two inpatient oncology units in the Pacific Northwest. 40 RNs.
 Data collected by interviews and web-based surveys. EBP beliefs, EBP implementation, evidence-based pain management. Nurses agreed with the positive aspects of EBP and their implementation ability, although implementation level was low. They were satisfied with their pain management practices. Oncology nursing certification was associated with innovativeness, and innovativeness was associated with EBP beliefs. Themes identified were (a) limited definition of EBP, (b) varied evidence-based pain management decision making, (c) limited identification of evidence-based pain management practices, and (d) integration of nonpharmacologic interventions into patient care. Nurses' low level of EBP implementation in the context of pain management was explained by their trust that standards of care and medical orders were evidence-based. Nurses' EBP beliefs and behaviors should be considered when developing strategies for sustaining evidence-based pain management practices. Implementation of the EBP process by nurses may not be realistic in the inpatient setting; therefore, hospital pain management policies need to be evidence-based and reinforced with nurses.

  13. Evidence-based practice, research utilization, and knowledge translation in chiropractic: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, André E; Al Zoubi, Fadi; Stuber, Kent; French, Simon D; Boruff, Jill; Corrigan, John; Thomas, Aliki

    2016-07-13

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) gaps are widespread across health disciplines. Understanding factors supporting the uptake of evidence can inform the design of strategies to narrow these EBP gaps. Although research utilization (RU) and the factors associated with EBP have been reported in several health disciplines, to date this area has not been reviewed comprehensively in the chiropractic profession. The purpose of this review was to report on the current state of knowledge on EBP, RU, and knowledge translation (KT) in chiropractic. A scoping review using the Arksey and O'Malley framework was used to systematically select and summarize existing literature. Searches were conducted using a combination of keywords and MeSH terms from the earliest date available in each database to May 2015. Quantitative and thematic analyses of the selected literature were conducted. Nearly 85 % (56/67) of the included studies were conducted in Canada, USA, UK or Australia. Thematic analysis for the three categories (EBP, RU, KT) revealed two themes related to EBP (attitudes and beliefs of chiropractors; implementation of EBP), three related to RU (guideline adherence; frequency and sources of information accessed; and perceived value of websites and search engines), and three related to KT (knowledge practice gaps; barriers and facilitators to knowledge use; and selection, tailoring, and implementation of interventions). EBP gaps were noted in the areas of assessment of activity limitation, determination of psychosocial factors influencing pain, general health indicators, establishing a prognosis, and exercise prescription. While most practitioners believed EBP and research to be important and a few studies suggested that traditional and online educational strategies could improve patient care, use of EBP and guideline adherence varied widely. Findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors hold favourable attitudes and beliefs toward EBP. However, much remains to be done for

  14. Educating change agents: a qualitative descriptive study of graduates of a Master's program in evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Grete Oline; Brenna, Sissel Johansson; Graverholt, Birgitte; Ciliska, Donna; Nortvedt, Monica Wammen

    2016-02-25

    Health care professionals are expected to build decisions upon evidence. This implies decisions based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence, informed by clinical expertise and patient values. A multi-professional master's program in evidence-based practice was developed and offered. The aims of this study were to explore how students in this program viewed their ability to apply evidence-based practice and their perceptions of what constitute necessary conditions to implement evidence-based practice in health care organizations, one year after graduation. A qualitative descriptive design was chosen to examine the graduates' experiences. All students in the first two cohorts of the program were invited to participate. Six focus-group interviews, with a total of 21 participants, and a telephone interview of one participant were conducted. The data was analyzed thematically, using the themes from the interview guide as the starting point. The graduates reported that an overall necessary condition for evidence-based practice to occur is the existence of a "readiness for change" both at an individual level and at the organizational level. They described that they gained personal knowledge and skills to be "change-agents" with "self-efficacy, "analytic competence" and "tools" to implement evidence based practice in clinical care. An organizational culture of a "learning organization" was also required, where leaders have an "awareness of evidence- based practice", and see the need for creating "evidence-based networks". One year after graduation the participants saw themselves as "change agents" prepared to improve clinical care within a learning organization. The results of this study provides useful information for facilitating the implementation of EBP both from educational and health care organizational perspectives.

  15. The good, the bad, and the ugly of evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Marcel; Reid, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently straightforward idea is beginning to affect adapted physical activity; however, researchers and practitioners in our field often appear to be unaware of fundamental questions related to them. The major purpose of this paper is to outline and discuss 10 of these fundamental questions. This analysis leads us to conclude that EBP is a good direction to pursue in adapted physical activity if we develop a type of EBP congruent with the main tenets of our field.

  16. Evidence-based practice: a quality indicator analysis of peer-tutoring in adapted physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalef, Laura; Reid, Greg; Macdonald, Cathy

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the research was to conduct a quality indicator analysis of studies investigating peer-tutoring for students with a disability in adapted physical education. An electronic search was conducted among English journals published from 1960 to November 2012. Databases included ERIC, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus. Fifteen research studies employing group-experimental (Gersten et al., 2005) or single-subject designs (Horner et al., 2005) met inclusion criteria. Each study was assessed for the presence and clarity of quality indicators. Group designs met an average of 62.5% essential and 69% desirable indicators. An average of 80% of indicators was present for single-subject designs. Results suggest claims of peer-tutoring being an evidence-based practice are premature. Recommendations for clarifying and applying the quality indicators are offered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of Maternal-Infant Attachment In The Early Postpartum Period With Evidence Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Gulesen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthy attachment is a key concept in creating a positive environment for the development of the infant after birth. The earlier and the healthier the mother creates a communication and interaction with her baby, a stronger maternal-infant attachment will be developed. The time period immediately after birth is the most convenient time for the initiation of positive mother-infant relationship as it is the most intense period of attachment. The aim of this article was to define mother-infant attachment and to examine the evidence-based practices for midwives and nurses who play a role in the development of this attachment in the early postpartum period. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 177-182

  18. Where the worlds of e-inclusion and evidence-based practice meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Steyaert

    2010-12-01

    De beschikbaarheid van computers en internet wordt in de hedendaagse kennissamenleving gezien als een van de factoren die sociale inclusie (of exclusie kunnen versterken. Bijgevolg zijn er diverse initiatieven in het leven geroepen om digitale inclusie te stimuleren. Daarnaast is er sprake van een toenemende roep tot het toepassen van effectief bewezen interventies in sociale interventiepraktijken (evidence-based practice. Deze twee tendensen, samengevoegd, roepen de vraag op of interventies gericht op het stimuleren van digitale inclusie ook daadwerkelijk effectief zijn en digitale inclusie daadwerkelijk versterken. Het is een gewoonte om bewezen interventies als “goede praktijken” te beschouwen, maar de vraag is of er een beoordelingskader is waarmee classificaties als “goed” toegekend kunnen worden. Levert het een bijdrage aan sociale inclusie om burgers toegang tot computers en internet te verschaffen? Kunnen we verschillende interventies die hierop gericht zijn categoriseren en beoordelen op basis van hun effectiviteit? In dit artikel wordt antwoord gezocht op deze vragen.

  19. Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices Among Substance Abuse Treatment Providers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A.; Shopshire, Michael; Tajima, Barbara; Gruber, Valerie; Guydish, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This research was conducted at a Substance Abuse Forum designed to address local community needs by focusing on Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) in addiction treatment. The purpose of the study was to assess substance abuse treatment professionals’ readiness to adopt EBPs, experience with EBPs, and attitudes toward EBPs, as well as agency support for EBPs. A total of 119 addiction treatment providers completed pre-test measures, and 82% completed a post-test. Eighty-three percent of participants reported using some EBPs in the past year, and 75% reported currently using EBPs. Participants who were currently licensed or certified in addictions had less negative attitudes toward EBPs than those without credentials. While respondents reported agency support for EBPs, most expressed interest in further training. This study underscores the movement toward EBPs in addiction treatment and the need for effective dissemination and training in this area. PMID:18724657

  20. Exploring Nurse Manager Support of Evidence-Based Practice: Clinical Nurse Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramanica, Laura; Spiva, LeeAnna

    2018-05-01

    The study identifies what constitutes nurse manager (NM) support and other resources that enable clinical nurses (CNs) to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Clinical nurses report that NM support enables them to use EBP but what constitutes NM support is still unclear. Nurse managers, CNs, and EBP mentors received specialized education and use a team approach for EBP. Data were collected preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention from observations, interviews, journaling, and surveys. Results demonstrate how NMs can perform their role responsibilities and still engage CNs to develop a spirit of inquiry, seek answers to their clinical questions using EBP, and advance their clinical performance to improve patient outcomes. Four NM supportive behaviors emerged: cultivating a shared EBP vision, ensuring use of EBP, communicating the value of EBP, and providing resources for EBP. Through education and support, NMs describe supportive behaviors necessary for the successful conduction of EBP by CNs.

  1. 'That doesn't translate': the role of evidence-based practice in disempowering speech pathologists in acute aphasia management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Abby; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Miranda; O'Halloran, Robyn

    2015-07-01

    An evidence-practice gap has been identified in current acute aphasia management practice, with the provision of services to people with aphasia in the acute hospital widely considered in the literature to be inconsistent with best-practice recommendations. The reasons for this evidence-practice gap are unclear; however, speech pathologists practising in this setting have articulated a sense of dissonance regarding their limited service provision to this population. A clearer understanding of why this evidence-practice gap exists is essential in order to support and promote evidence-based approaches to the care of people with aphasia in acute care settings. To provide an understanding of speech pathologists' conceptualization of evidence-based practice for acute post-stroke aphasia, and its implementation. This study adopted a phenomenological approach, underpinned by a social constructivist paradigm. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 Australian speech pathologists, recruited using a purposive sampling technique. An inductive thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. A single, overarching theme emerged from the data. Speech pathologists demonstrated a sense of disempowerment as a result of their relationship with evidence-based practice for acute aphasia management. Three subthemes contributed to this theme. The first described a restricted conceptualization of evidence-based practice. The second revealed speech pathologists' strained relationships with the research literature. The third elucidated a sense of professional unease over their perceived inability to enact evidence-based clinical recommendations, despite their desire to do so. Speech pathologists identified a current knowledge-practice gap in their management of aphasia in acute hospital settings. Speech pathologists place significant emphasis on the research evidence; however, their engagement with the research is limited, in part because it is perceived to lack clinical utility. A sense

  2. Preparing for fieldwork: Students' perceptions of their readiness to provide evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' perceptions of their confidence to use research evidence to complete a client case analysis assignment in preparation for participation in fieldwork and future practice. A convenience sample of 42 entry-level occupational therapy Masters students, included 41 females and one male, ages 24 to 35. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used. Students participated in a problem-based learning approach supported by educational technology. Measures included a pre- and post-semester confidence survey, a post-semester satisfaction survey, and an assignment rubric. Based on paired t-tests and Wilcoxin Signed Ranks Tests, statistically significant differences in pre- and post-test scores were noted for all 18 items on the confidence survey (plearning methods were significantly associated with students' perceptions of their confidence to use research evidence to analyze a client case. These results cannot necessarily be generalized due to the limitations of using non-standardized measures with a convenience sample, without a control group, within the context of a single course as part of one academic program curriculum.

  3. Adapting evidence-based interventions using a common theory, practices, and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families' well-being; however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families' everyday lives with a prevention framework. At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, Zumba), and motivated parents were trained to be Family Mentors. Trainings focused on a framework that taught synthesized, foundational prevention science theory, practice elements, and principles, applied to specific content areas (parenting, social skills, and obesity). Family Mentors were then allowed to adapt scripts and activities based on their cultural experiences but were closely monitored and supervised over time. The framework was implemented in a range of activities (summer camps, coaching) aimed at improving social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Successes and challenges are discussed for (a) engaging parents and communities; (b) identifying and training Family Mentors to promote children and families' well-being; and (c) gathering data for supervision, outcome evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. To broadly diffuse prevention to families, far more experimentation is needed with alternative and engaging implementation strategies that are enhanced with knowledge harvested from researchers' past 30 years of experience creating EBIP. One strategy is to train local parents and popular activity leaders in applying robust prevention science theory, common practice elements, and principles of EBIP. More systematic evaluation of such innovations is needed.

  4. The STROBE statement and neuropsychology: lighting the way toward evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Bowden, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Reporting appropriate research detail across clinical disciplines is often inconsistent or incomplete. Insufficient report detail reduces confidence in findings, makes study replication more difficult, and decreases the precision of data available for critical review including meta-analysis. In response to these concerns, cooperative attempts across multiple specialties have developed explicit research reporting standards to guide publication detail. These recommendations have been widely adopted by high impact medical journals, but have not yet been widely embraced by neuropsychology. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) is particularly relevant to neuropsychology since clinical research is often based on non-funded studies of patient samples. In this paper we describe the STROBE Statement and demonstrate how STROBE criteria, applied to reporting of neuropsychological findings, will maintain neuropsychology's position as a leader in quantifying brain-behavior relationships. We also provide specific recommendations for data reporting and disclosure of perceived conflicts of interest that will further enhance reporting transparency for possible perceived sources of bias. In an era in which evidence-based practice assumes an increasingly prominent role, improved reporting standards will promote better patient care, assist in developing quality practice guidelines, and ensure that neuropsychology remains a vigorous discipline in the clinical neurosciences that consciously aspires to high methodological rigor.

  5. Educators' Self-Reported Training, Use, and Perceived Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Classroom Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Justin T.; Gage, Nicholas A.; Alter, Peter J.; LaPolla, Stefanie; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.; Scott, Terrance M.

    2018-01-01

    A survey study of 248 educators in four states was conducted to identify respondents' formal training, use, and perceived effectiveness of 37 evidence-based classroom management practices within four general categories: (a) antecedent-based, (b) instructionally based, (c) consequence-based, and (d) self-management. Results indicated that, on…

  6. Systematic Review of Cyberbullying Interventions for Youth and Parents With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Elizabeth; Kelly, Stephanie; Militello, Lisa K

    2018-02-01

    Cyberbullying is a new risk factor for the well-being of pediatric populations. Consequences of cyberbullying include both physical and mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, and somatic concerns. Adolescents who have been victims of cyberbullying and developed secondary symptoms are often recommended to visit a healthcare provider to obtain effective, evidence-based treatment. To date, no interventions exist in the healthcare setting for adolescents who are victims of cyberbullying. The purpose of this project is to review interventional studies on cyberbullying that have components for adolescents who have been involved with cyberbullying and their parents and to provide recommendations on effective intervention components with the goal of guiding clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted using the Institute of Medicine guidelines. A comprehensive electronic literature search was completed targeting interventions of cyberbullying in any setting. No date limits were used. Literature was searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Education Information Resource Center (ERIC), and PsycINFO databases. The following search terms were applied "cyberbullying" + "intervention" or "treatment" or "therapy" or "program." Only articles with a pediatric population were selected for review. Seventeen cyberbullying intervention programs in 23 articles were found to meet the search criteria. The most frequently used intervention components included education on cyberbullying for the adolescent, coping skills, empathy training, communication and social skills, and digital citizenship. Parent education on cyberbullying was also found to be important and was included in programs with significant outcomes. As youth present to healthcare providers with symptoms related to cyberbullying, effective interventions are needed to guide evidence-based practice. This review

  7. Low Level Evidence Suggests That Librarian-Led Instruction in Evidence Based Practice is Effective Regardless of Instructional Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J. Alcock

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Swanberg, S. M., Dennison, C. C., Farrell, A., Machel, V., Marton, C., O'Brien, K. K., … & Holyoke, A. N. (2016. Instructional methods used by health sciences librarians to teach evidence-based practice (EBP: a systematic review. Journal of the Medical Library Association: JMLA, 104(3, 197-208. http://dx.doi.org/10.3163/1536-5050.104.3.004 Abstract Objective – To determine both the instructional methods and their effectiveness in teaching evidence based practice (EBP by librarians in health sciences curricula. Design – Systematic review. Setting – A total of 16 databases, Google Scholar, and MLA Annual Meeting abstracts. Subjects – There were 27 studies identified through a systematic literature search. Methods – An exhaustive list of potential articles was gathered through searching 16 online databases, Google Scholar, and MLA Annual Conference abstracts. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified to inform the literature search and determine article eligibility. Duplicates were removed and the remaining search results were divided into sets and assigned to two reviewers who screened first by title/abstract and then by full-text. A third reviewer addressed disagreement in article inclusion. Data extraction, using a validated method described by Koufogiannakis and Wiebe (2006, and critical appraisal, using the Glasgow checklist (1999, were performed concurrently. Main Results – After removal of duplicates 30,043 articles were identified for initial title/abstract screening. Of the 637 articles assessed for full-text screening 26 articles and 1 conference proceeding ultimately met all eligibility criteria. There was no meta-analysis included in the synthesis. There were 16 articles published in library and information science journals and 10 in health sciences journals. Of those studies, 22 were conducted in the United States. A wide range of user groups was identified as participants in the studies with medical

  8. The use of collaboration to implement evidence-based safe practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John R

    2013-12-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority receives over 235,000 reports of medical error per year. Near miss and serious event reports of common and interesting problems are analysed to identify best practices for preventing harmful errors. Dissemination of this evidence-based information in the peer-reviewed Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory and presentations to medical staffs are not sufficient for adoption of best practices. Adoption of best practices has required working with institutions to identify local barriers to and incentives for adopting best practices and redesigning the delivery system to make desired behaviour easy and undesirable behaviour more difficult. Collaborations, where institutions can learn from the experiences of others, have show decreases in harmful events. The Pennsylvania Program to Prevent Wrong-Site Surgery is used as an example. Two collaborations to prevent wrong-site surgery have been completed, one with 30 institutions in eastern Pennsylvania and one with 19 in western Pennsylvania. The first collaboration achieved a 73% decrease in the rolling average of wrong-site events over 18 months. The second collaboration experienced no wrong-site operating room procedures over more than one year. Significance for public healthSince the Institute of Medicine's To Err is Human identified medical errors as a major cause of death, the public has been interested in the recommendations for reporting of medical errors and implementing safe systems for the delivery of healthcare. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has followed those recommendations and found that an essential intermediate step between analysing reports and implementing safe systems is collaborative learning among healthcare institutions. The experience in Pennsylvania should be useful to other public organizations wishing to improve safety.

  9. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  10. Australian Academic Librarians’ Experience of Evidence Based Practice Involves Empowering, Intuiting, Affirming, Connecting, Noticing, and Impacting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Marie Muellenbach

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Miller, F., Partridge, H., Bruce, C., Yates, C., & Howlett, A. (2017. How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded theory model. Library & Information Science Research, 39(2, 124-130. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003 Abstract Objective – To explore and enhance the understanding of how Australian library and information science (LIS practitioners experience or understand evidence based practice (EBP within the context of their day-to-day professional work. Design – Constructivist grounded theory methodology. Setting – University libraries in Queensland, Australia. Subjects – 13 academic librarians. Methods – Researchers contacted academic librarians by email and invited each participant to take part in a 30-60 minute, semi-structured interview. They designed interview questions to allow participants to explain their process and experience of EBP. Main results – This study identified six categories of experience of EBP using a constructivist grounded theory analysis process. The categories are: Empowering; Intuiting; Affirming; Connecting; Noticing; and Impacting. Briefly, empowering includes being empowered, or empowering clients, colleagues, and institutions through improved practice or performance. Intuiting includes being intuitive, or using one’s own intuition, wisdom, and understanding, of colleagues and clients’ behaviours to solve problems and redesign services. Affirming includes being affirmed through sharing feedback and using affirmation to strengthen support for action. Connecting includes being connected, and building connections, with clients, colleagues, and institutions. Noticing includes being actively aware of, observing, and reflecting on clients, colleagues, and literature within and outside of one’s own university, and noticing patterns in data to inform decision-making. Impacting includes being impactful, or having a visible impact, on clients, colleagues

  11. The prevalence of adverse cardiometabolic responses to exercise training with evidence-based practice is low

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalleck LC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lance C Dalleck,1 Gary P Van Guilder,2 Tara B Richardson,1 Chantal A Vella3 1Recreation, Exercise, and Sport Science Department, Western State Colorado University, Gunnison, CO, USA; 2Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA; 3Department of Movement Sciences, WWAMI Medical Education Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of individuals who experienced exercise-induced adverse cardiometabolic response (ACR, following an evidence-based, individualized, community exercise program. Methods: Prevalence of ACR was retrospectively analyzed in 332 adults (190 women, 142 men before and after a 14-week supervised community exercise program. ACR included an exercise training-induced increase in systolic blood pressure of 10 mmHg, increase in plasma triglycerides (TG of >37.0 mg/dL (0.42 mmol/L, or decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C of >4.0 mg/dL (0.12 mmol/L. A second category of ACR was also defined – this was ACR that resulted in a metabolic syndrome component (ACR-risk as a consequence of the adverse response. Results: According to the above criteria, prevalence of ACR between baseline and post-program was systolic blood pressure (6.0%, TG (3.6%, and HDL-C (5.1%. The prevalence of ACR-risk was elevated TG (3.2%, impaired fasting blood glucose (2.7%, low HDL-C (2.2%, elevated waist circumference (1.3%, and elevated blood pressure (0.6%. Conclusion: Evidence-based practice exercise programming may attenuate the prevalence of exercise training-induced ACR. Our findings provide important preliminary evidence needed for the vision of exercise prescription as a personalized form of preventative medicine to become a reality. Keywords: evidence-based research, cardiovascular health, community-based research, metabolic health

  12. A Practical Probabilistic Graphical Modeling Tool for Weighing Ecological Risk-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past weight-of-evidence frameworks for adverse ecological effects have provided soft-scoring procedures for judgments based on the quality and measured attributes of evidence. Here, we provide a flexible probabilistic structure for weighing and integrating lines of evidence for e...

  13. The Ruling Relation of Evidence-Based Practice: The Case of Documentary Governance in a Social Welfare Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilerot, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based practice has broadened and spread into new areas including librarianship. This reorientation has resulted in increased uncertainty regarding what counts as evidence and has caused a tension between formalised procedures and professional judgment. This theoretical paper aims to extend the knowledge about how…

  14. Recent Social Work Practitioners' Understanding and Use of Evidence-Based Practice and Empirically Supported Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Melissa D.; Wike, Traci; Putzu, Caren; Field, Sara; Hill, Jacqueline; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer; Massey, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how [the Council on Social Work Education's] (CSWE's) 2008 shift placing more emphasis on research have affected newly trained social workers' use of evidence-based practice (EBP). This qualitative study examined the educational and practice experiences of newly trained social workers and how those experiences…

  15. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting : a participatory action research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandra van der Loo; Gerrie Bours; Anna Beurskens; Albine Moser; Jolanda Friesen-Storms

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in a clinical nursing setting. Background: EBP has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated in daily practice and its implementation is complex. Design: Participatory action

  16. Views of Evidence-Based Practice: Social Workers' Code of Ethics and Accreditation Standards as Guides for Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Different views of evidence-based practice (EBP) include defining it as the use of empirically-validated treatments and practice guidelines (i.e., the EBPs approach) in contrast to the broad philosophy and related evolving process described by the originators. Social workers can draw on their code of ethics and accreditation standards both to…

  17. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  18. Refining knowledge, attitude and practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among pharmacy students for professional challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Gharbieh, Eman; Khalidi, Doaa Al; Baig, Mirza R; Khan, Saeed A

    2015-04-01

    Practicing evidence based medicine (EBM) is a professional need for the future clinical pharmacist in UAE and around the world. An attempt was made to evaluate pharmacy student's knowledge, attitude and proficiency in the practice of EBM. A within-subject study design with pre and post survey and skill test were conducted using case based practice of EBM through a validated questionnaire. The results were tabulated and there was a statistically significant increase in pharmacy students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (95.3%), searching for evidence (97%), appraising the evidence (81%), understanding statistics (78.1%), and applying evidence at point of care (81.2%). In this study, workshops and (Problem Based Learning) PBLs were used as a module of EBM teaching and practices, which has been shown to be an effective educational method in terms of improving students' skills, knowledge and attitude toward EBM. Incorporating hands on experience, PBLs will become an impetus for developing EBM skills and critical appraisal of research evidence alongside routine clinical practice. This integration would constitute the cornerstone in lifting EBM in UAE up to the needed standards and would enable pharmacy students to become efficient pharmacists that rely on evidence in their health practice.

  19. How best can we plan & implement HIV prevention? A review of successful evidence based practices & research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Chattu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Around 2.5 million people become infected with HIV each year and its impact on human life and public health can only be tackled and reversed only by sound prevention strategies. Aim: This paper aims to provide the reader about different types of prevention strategies that are effective and practiced in various countries with special emphasis on evidence for success. It also highlights the importance of to the evidence based medicine& strategies. It describes about the importance of combination prevention, which encompasses complementary behavioral, biomedical and structural prevention strategies. Methods & Materials: Searches for peer reviewed journal articles was conducted using the search engines to gather the information from databases of medicine, health sciences and social sciences. Information for each strategy is organized & presented systematically with detailed discussion. Results: For a successful reduction in HIV transmission, there is a great need for combined effects of radical & sustainable behavioral changes among individuals who are potentially at risk. Second, combination prevention is essential for HIV prevention is neither simple nor simplistic. Reductions in HIV transmission need widespread and sustained efforts. A mix of communication channels are essential to disseminate messages to motivate people to engage in various methods of risk reduction. Conclusions: The effect of behavioral strategies could be increased by aiming for many goals that are achieved by use of multilevel approaches with populations both uninfected and infected with HIV. Combination prevention programs operate on different levels to address the specific, but diverse needs of the populations at risk of HIV infection.

  20. Mary Seacole and claims of evidence-based practice and global influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the contribution of Mary Seacole to nursing and health care, notably in comparison with that of Florence Nightingale. Much information is available, in print and electronic, that presents Mary Seacole as a nurse, even as a pioneer nurse and leader in public health care. Her own memoir and copious primary sources, show rather than she was a businesswoman, who gave assistance during the Crimean War, mainly to officers. Florence Nightingale's role as the major founder of the nursing profession, a visionary of public health care and key player in advocating 'environmental' health, reflected in her own Notes on Nursing , is ignored or misconstrued. Discussion paper. British newspapers of 19th century and The Times digital archive; Australian and New Zealand newspaper archives, published memoirs, letters and biographies/autobiographies of Crimean War participants were the major sources. Careful examination of primary sources, notably digitized newspaper sources, British, Australian and New Zealand, show that the claims for Seacole's 'global influence' in nursing do not hold, while her use of 'practice-based evidence' might better be called self-assessment. Primary sources, moreover, show substantial evidence of Nightingale's contributions to nursing and health care, in Australia, New Zealand, the USA and many countries and the UK much material shows her influence also on hospital safety and health promotion.

  1. Comparison of manual versus automated data collection method for an evidence-based nursing practice study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M D; Jordan, T R; Welle, T

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and improve the use of automated data collection procedures for nursing research and quality assurance. A descriptive, correlational study analyzed 44 orthopedic surgical patients who were part of an evidence-based practice (EBP) project examining post-operative oxygen therapy at a Midwestern hospital. The automation work attempted to replicate a manually-collected data set from the EBP project. Automation was successful in replicating data collection for study data elements that were available in the clinical data repository. The automation procedures identified 32 "false negative" patients who met the inclusion criteria described in the EBP project but were not selected during the manual data collection. Automating data collection for certain data elements, such as oxygen saturation, proved challenging because of workflow and practice variations and the reliance on disparate sources for data abstraction. Automation also revealed instances of human error including computational and transcription errors as well as incomplete selection of eligible patients. Automated data collection for analysis of nursing-specific phenomenon is potentially superior to manual data collection methods. Creation of automated reports and analysis may require initial up-front investment with collaboration between clinicians, researchers and information technology specialists who can manage the ambiguities and challenges of research and quality assurance work in healthcare.

  2. Rescue dose orders as an alternative to range orders: an evidence-based practice project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cassia

    2015-06-01

    Relief of pain is a fundamental aspect of optimal patient care. However, pain management in the inpatient setting is often constrained by concerns related to regulatory oversight, particularly with regard to the use of opioid dose range orders. These concerns can inadvertently result in the development of policies and practices that can negatively impact the health care team's ability to deliver optimal and individualized pain management. An evidence-based practice project was undertaken to address concerns about regulatory oversight of pain management processes by changing the way pain was managed in a large academic hospital setting. A novel pain management approach using rescue dose medications was established as an alternative to opioid dose range orders. The use of the rescue dose protocol was successfully implemented. Outcomes included an overall reduction in the administration of inappropriate intravenous opioids and opioid-acetaminophen combination medications, with a subsequent increase in single-entity first-line opioid analgesics. Rescue dose protocols may offer an alternative to opioid dose range orders as a means of effectively managing pain. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Building Capacity for Evidence-Based Public Health: Reconciling the Pulls of Practice and the Push of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Ross C; Fielding, Jonathan E; Green, Lawrence W

    2018-04-01

    Timely implementation of principles of evidence-based public health (EBPH) is critical for bridging the gap between discovery of new knowledge and its application. Public health organizations need sufficient capacity (the availability of resources, structures, and workforce to plan, deliver, and evaluate the preventive dose of an evidence-based intervention) to move science to practice. We review principles of EBPH, the importance of capacity building to advance evidence-based approaches, promising approaches for capacity building, and future areas for research and practice. Although there is general agreement among practitioners and scientists on the importance of EBPH, there is less clarity on the definition of evidence, how to find it, and how, when, and where to use it. Capacity for EBPH is needed among both individuals and organizations. Capacity can be strengthened via training, use of tools, technical assistance, assessment and feedback, peer networking, and incentives. Modest investments in EBPH capacity building will foster more effective public health practice.

  4. Leadership for evidence-based practice: strategic and functional behaviors for institutionalizing EBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl B; Ritchie, Judith A; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Charns, Martin P

    2014-08-01

    Making evidence-based practice (EBP) a reality throughout an organization is a challenging goal in healthcare services. Leadership has been recognized as a critical element in that process. However, little is known about the exact role and function of various levels of leadership in the successful institutionalization of EBP within an organization. To uncover what leaders at different levels and in different roles actually do, and what actions they take to develop, enhance, and sustain EBP as the norm. Qualitative data from a case study regarding institutionalization of EBP in two contrasting cases (Role Model and Beginner hospitals) were systematically analyzed. Data were obtained from multiple interviews of leaders, both formal and informal, and from staff nurse focus groups. A deductive coding schema, based on concepts of functional leadership, was developed for this in-depth analysis. Participants' descriptions reflected a hierarchical array of strategic, functional, and cross-cutting behaviors. Within these macrolevel "themes," 10 behavioral midlevel themes were identified; for example, Intervening and Role modeling. Each theme is distinctive, yet various themes and their subthemes were interrelated and synergistic. These behaviors and their interrelationships were conceptualized in the framework "Leadership Behaviors Supportive of EBP Institutionalization" (L-EBP). Leaders at multiple levels in the Role Model case, both formal and informal, engaged in most of these behaviors. Supportive leadership behaviors required for organizational institutionalization of EBP reflect a complex set of interactive, multifaceted EBP-focused actions carried out by leaders from the chief nursing officer to staff nurses. A related framework such as L-EBP may provide concrete guidance needed to underpin the often-noted but abstract finding that leaders should "support" EBP. © 2014 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  5. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos; Patelarou, Athina; Laliotis, Aggelos; Wan, Andrew C; Matalliotakis, Michail; Tsiou, Chrysoula; Patelarou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying form some hours to even months was

  6. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kyriakoulis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. Methods The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016. Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM. Results Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13 and only few conducted among nursing (n=2, pharmacy (n=2, physiotherapy/therapy (n=1, dentistry (n=1, or mixed disciplines (n=1 students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions, or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Conclusion Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions

  7. Facilitating the implementation of evidence-based practice through contextual support and nursing leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kueny A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela Kueny,1 Leah L Shever,2 Melissa Lehan Mackin,3 Marita G Titler4 1Luther College, Decorah, IA, 2The University of Michigan Hospital and Health Center, Ann Arbor, MI, 3University of Iowa College of Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 4University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Background/purpose: Nurse managers (NMs play an important role promoting evidence-based practice (EBP on clinical units within hospitals. However, there is a dearth of research focused on NM perspectives about institutional contextual factors to support the goal of EBP on the clinical unit. The purpose of this article is to identify contextual factors described by NMs to drive change and facilitate EBP at the unit level, comparing and contrasting these perspectives across nursing units. Methods: This study employed a qualitative descriptive design using interviews with nine NMs who were participating in a large effectiveness study. To stratify the sample, NMs were selected from nursing units designated as high or low performing based on implementation of EBP interventions, scores on the Meyer and Goes research use scale, and fall rates. Descriptive content analysis was used to identify themes that reflect the complex nature of infrastructure described by NMs and contextual influences that supported or hindered their promotion of EBP on the clinical unit. Results: NMs perceived workplace culture, structure, and resources as facilitators or barriers to empowering nurses under their supervision to use EBP and drive change. A workplace culture that provides clear communication of EBP goals or regulatory changes, direct contact with CEOs, and clear expectations supported NMs in their promotion of EBP on their units. High-performing unit NMs described a structure that included nursing-specific committees, allowing nurses to drive change and EBP from within the unit. NMs from high-performing units were more likely to articulate internal resources, such as quality

  8. Using pedagogical approaches to influence evidence-based practice integration - processes and recommendations: findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2017-04-01

    The study aimed to explore the processes undertaken by nurse academics when integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into their teaching and learning practices. This article focuses on pedagogical approaches employed by academics to influence evidence-based practice integration into undergraduate programs across Australian universities. Nursing academics are challenged to incorporate a variety of teaching and learning strategies to teach evidence-based practice and determine their effectiveness. However, literature suggests that there are limited studies available focusing on pedagogical approaches in evidence-based practice education. A constructivist grounded theory methodology, informed by Charmaz was used for this study. Data were collected during 2014 from 23 nurse academics across Australian universities through semi-structured interviews. Additionally, nine were observed during teaching of undergraduate students. Twenty subject outlines were also analysed following Charmaz's approach of data analysis. 'Influencing EBP integration' describes the pedagogical approaches employed by academics to incorporate EBP knowledge and skills into undergraduate curricula. With the use of various teaching and learning strategies, academics attempted to contextualize EBP by engaging students with activities aiming to link evidence to practice and with the EBP process. Although, some strategies appeared to be engaging, others were traditional and seemed to be disengaging for students due to the challenges experienced by participants that impeded the use of the most effective teaching methods. Study findings offer valuable insights into the teaching practices and identify some key challenges that require the adoption of appropriate strategies to ensure future nurses are well prepared in the paradigm of evidence-based practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Leadership for Evidence-Based Practice: Strategic and Functional Behaviors for Institutionalizing EBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl B; Ritchie, Judith A; Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Charns, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    Background Making evidence-based practice (EBP) a reality throughout an organization is a challenging goal in healthcare services. Leadership has been recognized as a critical element in that process. However, little is known about the exact role and function of various levels of leadership in the successful institutionalization of EBP within an organization. Aims To uncover what leaders at different levels and in different roles actually do, and what actions they take to develop, enhance, and sustain EBP as the norm. Methods Qualitative data from a case study regarding institutionalization of EBP in two contrasting cases (Role Model and Beginner hospitals) were systematically analyzed. Data were obtained from multiple interviews of leaders, both formal and informal, and from staff nurse focus groups. A deductive coding schema, based on concepts of functional leadership, was developed for this in-depth analysis. Results Participants’ descriptions reflected a hierarchical array of strategic, functional, and cross-cutting behaviors. Within these macrolevel “themes,” 10 behavioral midlevel themes were identified; for example, Intervening and Role modeling. Each theme is distinctive, yet various themes and their subthemes were interrelated and synergistic. These behaviors and their interrelationships were conceptualized in the framework “Leadership Behaviors Supportive of EBP Institutionalization” (L-EBP). Leaders at multiple levels in the Role Model case, both formal and informal, engaged in most of these behaviors. Linking Evidence to Action Supportive leadership behaviors required for organizational institutionalization of EBP reflect a complex set of interactive, multifaceted EBP-focused actions carried out by leaders from the chief nursing officer to staff nurses. A related framework such as L-EBP may provide concrete guidance needed to underpin the often-noted but abstract finding that leaders should “support” EBP. PMID:24986669

  10. Sources of Knowledge and Barriers of Implementing Evidence-Based Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, Shaher H

    2017-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the sources of knowledge for nursing practices and to identify the barriers of using "evidence-based practice" (EBP). Descriptive cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 164 Saudi mental health nurses by completing the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The most frequently used sources of knowledge were relied on social interactions and the nurses' own experiences, while the least frequently used sources were external sources of knowledge and research evidences. Insufficient time to find research reports, difficulty in understanding research reports, and insufficient resources for evidences were the barriers of using EBP. The organizations should encourage using EBP by providing adequate time, resources, knowledge, and skills for mental health nurses through conducting workshops and mentoring. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. An instrument to characterize the environment for residents' evidence-based medicine learning and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Moseley, James L; Green, Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Many residency programs offer training in evidence-based medicine (EBM). However, these curricula often fail to achieve optimal learning outcomes, perhaps because they neglect various contextual factors in the learning environment. We developed and validated an instrument to characterize the environment for EBM learning and practice in residency programs. An EBM Environment Scale was developed following scale development principles. A survey was administered to residents across six programs in primary care specialties at four medical centers. Internal consistency reliability was analyzed with Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing predetermined subscales with the survey's internal structure as assessed via factor analysis. Scores were also compared for subgroups based on residency program affiliation and residency characteristics. Out of 262 eligible residents, 124 completed the survey (response rate 47%). The overall mean score was 3.89 (standard deviation=0.56). The initial reliability analysis of the 48-item scale had a high reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.94). Factor analysis and further item analysis resulted in a shorter 36-item scale with a satisfactory reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.86). Scores were higher for residents with prior EBM training in medical school (4.14 versus 3.62) and in residency (4.25 versus 3.69). If further testing confirms its properties, the EBM Environment Scale may be used to understand the influence of the learning environment on the effectiveness of EBM training. Additionally, it may detect changes in the EBM learning environment in response to programmatic or institutional interventions.

  12. Pediatric anxiety disorders: from neuroscience to evidence-based clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Abrahao Salum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this narrative review of the literature is to describe the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders. We aim to guide clinicians in understanding the biology of anxiety disorders and to provide general guidelines for the proper diagnoses and treatment of these conditions early in life. Anxiety disorders are prevalent, associated with a number of negative life outcomes, and currently under-recognized and under-treated. The etiology involves both genes and environmental influences modifying the neural substrate in a complex interplay. Research on pathophysiology is still in its infancy, but some brain regions, such as the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, have been implicated in fear and anxiety. Current practice is to establish diagnosis based purely on clinical features, derived from clinical interviews with the child, parents, and teachers. Treatment is effective using medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, or a combination of both. An introduction to the neuroscience behind anxiety disorders combined with an evidence-based approach may help clinicians to understand these disorders and treat them properly in childhood.

  13. Organizational factors influencing implementation of evidence-based practices for integrated treatment in behavioral health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Caroline A; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities.

  14. Mapping allied health evidence-based practice: providing a basis for organisational realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziviani, Jenny; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Hinchliffe, Fiona; Feeney, Rachel

    2015-06-01

    Ahead of the convergence of two major paediatric services, we examined evidence-based practice (EBP) self-efficacy, outcome expectance, knowledge and use among allied health (AH) staff in two major Queensland (Qld) paediatric services. This was to determine whether any differences existed based on organisational affiliation, profession and any previous training to inform a strategy to enhance AH EBP within the new organisational setting. All AH staff from the two Brisbane (Qld) tertiary paedritic hospitals were invited to participate in the survey. Using a cross-sectional design EBP self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, knowledge and use, as well as previous EBP training, were assessed with an online survey. Background demographic information obtained included professional discipline and hospital. One hundreD and thirty-eight health practitioners completed the survey (37% respone rate). Most practioners had accessed EBP training. Mean scores for EBP attitudes (self-efficacy and outcome expectancy) and knowledge were higher than for EBP use scores. Greater variation was observed across professional disciplines than organisations. Training impacted positively on EBP measures but explained a small proportion of total variance in regression models. The results underscore the need to provide organisational supports to AH staff ro EBP implementation. Strategies other than training are requred to maximally enhance EBP attitudes. The new organisational structure provides an oppotunity for this cultural shift to occur.

  15. Organizational Factors Influencing Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Integrated Treatment in Behavioral Health Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A. Bonham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38 supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities.

  16. The Evidence Base on the Effects of Policy and Practice in Faith Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinger, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses some of the common assertions made in the public debate about the merits and disadvantages of faith schools and tests them against actual research findings. It argues that there is a growing body of evidence showing that current policy and practice in faith schools creates social division and that faith schools need to do…

  17. Three-year follow-up of implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice in a tertiary hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, A.; Stensballe, J.; de Lichtenberg, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    of the implementation of evidence-based transfusion practice. Materials and Methods: Red blood cell transfusion quality indicators were compared with the evidence-based guideline at hospital and department level. Based on this evaluation, wards were selected for interventions targeting doctors and nurses......Background and Objectives: Traditionally, Denmark has had a high rate of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion caused by a liberal transfusion practice despite the existence of restrictive guidelines. We established a Patient Blood Management programme in a tertiary hospital and report the results...... procedures and 28% in admissions (P blood cell transfusion for non-bleeding patients, and led to significantly fewer patients being exposed to transfusion....

  18. Using Evidence Based Practice in LIS Education: Results of a Test of a Communities of Practice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Yukawa

    2010-03-01

    the end of the course may indicate that an effective balance between face‐to‐face and online media was achieved. At the meso‐level, students valued learning in community for developing mutual respect, confidence building, risk taking, deeper and more varied learning, learning with and from their peers, and greater enjoyment in the classes. Students found that the online environments were useful for organizing the class objectives and subject matter, “staying connected” between classes, sharing ideas, keeping track of their work, and preparing them for future work in blended environments. At the macro‐level, the findings of the effects on student growth related to core LIS concepts, practices, professional identity and leadership skills were inconclusive. However, students’ expressed a high regard for the value of collaboration, and there were indications that the model supported differentiated learning of professional knowledge and skills.Conclusion ‐ The findings strongly suggest that the use of the CoP model had positive effects on the learning process. Students’ high regard for the value of collaboration appears to be a clear effect of using the CoP model. The assessment methods were sufficient for testing the efficacy of most aspects of the model under the limited conditions of this study. Student responses led to refinements in both the model and methods. This study contributes to social constructivist learning approaches and LIS curricular development by presenting an innovative model for supporting professional growth among adult learners, as well as a conceptual framework to guide evidence based practice. Further testing and refinement of the model in other contexts and by other educators are needed to ensure that the model is robust and broadly applicable.

  19. Evaluating Visual Activity Schedules as Evidence-Based Practice for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Victoria; Sartini, Emily; Spriggs, Amy D.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted for articles published between 1993 and 2013 to evaluate the quality of the Visual Activity Schedules (VAS) literature using current evidence-based criteria developed by Horner et al. (Except Child 71:165-179, 2005). Authors sought to determine whether VAS can be considered an evidence-based…

  20. Evidence-based practice in physiotherapy: a systematic review of barriers, enablers and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock-Evans, Laura; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2014-09-01

    Despite clear benefits of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) approach to ensuring quality and consistency of care, its uptake within physiotherapy has been inconsistent. Synthesise the findings of research into EBP barriers, facilitators and interventions in physiotherapy and identify methods of enhancing adoption and implementation. Literature concerning physiotherapists' practice between 2000 and 2012 was systematically searched using: Academic Search Complete, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, American Psychological Association databases, Medline, Journal Storage, and Science Direct. Reference lists were searched to identify additional studies. Thirty-two studies, focusing either on physiotherapists' EBP knowledge, attitudes or implementation, or EBP interventions in physiotherapy were included. One author undertook all data extraction and a second author reviewed to ensure consistency and rigour. Synthesis was organised around the themes of EBP barriers/enablers, attitudes, knowledge/skills, use and interventions. Many physiotherapists hold positive attitudes towards EBP. However, this does not necessarily translate into consistent, high-quality EBP. Many barriers to EBP implementation are apparent, including: lack of time and skills, and misperceptions of EBP. Only studies published in the English language, in peer-reviewed journals were included, thereby introducing possible publication bias. Furthermore, narrative synthesis may be subject to greater confirmation bias. There is no "one-size fits all" approach to enhancing EBP implementation; assessing organisational culture prior to designing interventions is crucial. Although some interventions appear promising, further research is required to explore the most effective methods of supporting physiotherapists' adoption of EBP. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nursing and midwifery use, perceptions and barriers to evidence-based practice: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Margaret; Attawet, Jutharat

    2018-03-01

    The study aimed to explore how nurses and midwives obtain, use and embed evidence in everyday practice. The study design was cross-sectional survey method. The setting was one local health district in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. All nurses and midwives working within the local health district, with access to an email account, were invited to participate in the study. An online survey questionnaire was distributed to explore how evidence is obtained, used and embedded within the clinical setting. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages). Pearson's Chi-square tests were used for comparison between groups. There were 204 survey respondents. The findings identified that the majority (n = 157; 76.96%) of respondents obtained evidence primarily from clinical practice guidelines. The majority (n = 149; 73.04%) of respondents reportedly searched databases and used evidence related to general clinical practice. There was a statistical difference (χ = 17.069; df = 8; P = 0.029) when comparing leadership positions and other registered practitioner groups in the frequency of searching for evidence. Most respondents (n = 138; 67.65%) were confident in their ability to change practice on the basis of available evidence. Thematic analysis identified four barriers to sustaining evidence-based practice, which included: the need for time; the need for organizational and management support; the need for educational opportunities and challenges to accessing evidence. The study provided an understanding of how nurses and midwives obtain, use and embed evidence into everyday practice. More importantly, the role of leadership is significant to support a process of knowledge generation, research translation and the implementation of evidence into clinical settings.

  2. Moving from tacit knowledge to evidence-based practice: the Kaiser Permanente community partners study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enguídanos, Susan M; Jamison, Paula M

    2006-01-01

    For several decades both medical and social work practices have failed to consistently include measures to determine the effectiveness of their care and practices. This is especially true of care management practices. With the growth and aging of our population, this is of particular concern when many of our resources for older adults are channeled into services such as geriatric care management. This article describes a randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of four levels of geriatric care management. Results from this study did not support the tacit knowledge of the clinicians in terms of the effectiveness of their practices. This article describes the study methods and results, and how evidence from this study impacted subsequent service provided by geriatric care managers.

  3. Obstacles to implementing evidence-based practice in Belgium: a context-specific qualitative evidence synthesis including findings from different health care disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannes, K; Goedhuys, J; Aertgeerts, B

    2012-01-01

    A number of barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice have already been inventoried. However, little attention has been given to their context-specific nature. This qualitative evidence synthesis examines commonalities in the obstacles perceived by different groups of health care practitioners working in the Belgian health care system and sets out to discuss potential strategies to bridge some of these barriers. We actively searched for primary studies addressing our topic of interest in international and national databases (1990 to May 2008), consulted experts and screened references of retrieved studies. We opted for the meta-aggregative approach, developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute, to analyse our findings. The findings indicate that (1) evidence might have a limited role in decision-making processes; (2) aspects other than quality of care steer the evidence-based practice agenda; (3) some health care providers benefit less from evidence-based practice than others and (4) there is a lack of competences to put the evidence-based principles in practice. Belgian policy makers might consider health care system characteristics from and strategies developed or suggested by others to respond to country-specific obstacles. Examples include but are not limited to; (a) providing incentives for patient-centred care coordination and patient communication, (b) supporting practitioners interested in applying research-related activities, (c) considering direct access systems and interprofessional learning to respond to the demand for autonomous decision-making from satellite professional groups, (d) systematically involving allied health professionals in important governmental advisory boards, (e) considering pharmaceutical companies perceived as 'the enemy' an ally in filling in research gaps, (f) embedding the evaluation of evidence-based knowledge and skills in examinations (g) moving from (in)formative learning to transformative learning and (h

  4. Implementing evidence-based practice in community mental health agencies: a multiple stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Wells, Rebecca S; Zagursky, Karen; Fettes, Danielle L; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2009-11-01

    We sought to identify factors believed to facilitate or hinder evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in public mental health service systems as a step in developing theory to be tested in future studies. Focusing across levels of an entire large public sector mental health service system for youths, we engaged participants from 6 stakeholder groups: county officials, agency directors, program managers, clinical staff, administrative staff, and consumers. Participants generated 105 unique statements identifying implementation barriers and facilitators. Participants rated each statement on importance and changeability (i.e., the degree to which each barrier or facilitator is considered changeable). Data analyses distilled statements into 14 factors or dimensions. Descriptive analyses suggest that perceptions of importance and changeability varied across stakeholder groups. Implementation of EBP is a complex process. Cross-system-level approaches are needed to bring divergent and convergent perspectives to light. Examples include agency and program directors facilitating EBP implementation by supporting staff, actively sharing information with policymakers and administrators about EBP effectiveness and fit with clients' needs and preferences, and helping clinicians to present and deliver EBPs and address consumer concerns.

  5. Evidence based practice in population health: a regional survey to inform workforce development and organisational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adily, A; Ward, J

    2004-06-01

    To assess current capacity to implement evidence based practice (EBP) in population health. Postal survey of a regional population health workforce in Sydney, Australia. Division of Population Health, South Western Sydney Area Health Service. 104 population health staff (response rate: 73%). In the sample of regional population health practitioners, views about the current promotion of EBP were positive. Non-medical respondents with less that Masters degree were more likely to report "high self assessed need" to increase their capacity in EBP (p = 0.022). Confidence in understanding of EBP terminology was not associated with seniority but with highest level of education reached (pskills" or "need to increase their capacity in EBP" in their current position. The proportion of participants "strongly" supporting implementation of a colorectal cancer screening programme whose benefit was expressed as relative risk reduction was greater than that so supporting a programme whose benefit was expressed as number needed to screen (p = 0.008). Most respondents referred to their immediate managers when seeking support for EBP. The findings provide a quantitative baseline for capacity building through workplace programmes. Managerial commitment has been increased and performance development is now underway.

  6. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace.

  7. Librarian involvement in a nutrition undergraduate research course: preparing nutrition students for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan C; Penumetcha, Meera

    2010-01-01

    Given the foundational importance of literature searching skills to later stages of research and, ultimately, evidence-based practice, the authors wanted to assess a unique strategy for teaching such skills. This pilot study describes the results of an undergraduate nutrition research course in which a librarian lead several class sessions. The goal of this study was to assess students' perceptions, attitudes and use of research literature and resources before and after a course partially taught by a librarian. Twenty-seven students enrolled in an undergraduate Introduction to Research course at Georgia State University were given pre- and post-test questionnaires at the beginning and end of a course that included three librarian-led class sessions. Most of the results indicate that the repeated involvement of a librarian enriched this particular undergraduate research course. By the end of the course, students were more comfortable in libraries and with using library resources; they used the campus library more frequently; they were more confident in their ability to find high-quality information on nutrition-related topics and identify strengths and weaknesses of different information sources; and they felt they gained skills that will help them achieve their educational and career goals.

  8. Evaluating Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge and Beliefs Through the e-Learning EBP Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Angela; Jeffs, Debra A; Boateng, Beatrice A; Lowe, Gary R; Walden, Marlene

    2017-07-01

    This research examined evidence-based practice (EBP) knowledge and beliefs before and after a 3-month e-learning program was implemented to build EBP capacity at a large children's hospital. Ten clinicians completed the development, implementation, and evaluation of the e-learning education, comprising phase one. Revision and participation by 41 clinicians followed in phase two. Participants in both phases completed the EBP Beliefs and Implementation Scales preintervention, postintervention, and 6 months after postintervention. EBP beliefs and implementation increased immediately and 6 months after postintervention, with statistically significant increases in both phases. Participants in both phases applied knowledge by completing mentor-supported EBP projects. Although EBP beliefs and implementation scores increased and e-learning provided flexibility for clinician participation, challenges arose, resulting in lower-than-expected completion. Subsequent revisions resulted in hybrid education, integrating classroom and e-learning with project mentoring. This funded e-learning research contributes knowledge to the growing specialty of professional development. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(7):304-311. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology curricula: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togher, Leanne; Yiannoukas, Corina; Lincoln, Michelle; Power, Emma; Munro, Natalie; Mccabe, Patricia; Ghosh, Pratiti; Worrall, Linda; Ward, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Alison; Harrison, Elisabeth; Douglas, Jacinta

    2011-12-01

    This scoping study investigated how evidence-based practice (EBP) principles are taught in Australian speech-language pathology (SLP) teaching and learning contexts. It explored how Australian SLP university programs: (1) facilitate student learning about the principles of EBP in academic and clinical settings, and (2) self-evaluate their curricula in relation to EBP. The research involved two surveys. Survey 1 respondents were 131 academic staff, program coordinators, and on-campus and off-campus clinical educators. This survey gathered information about EBP teaching and learning in SLP programs as well as future EBP curriculum plans. Survey 2 investigated how clinical educators incorporated EBP into the way they taught clinical decision-making to students. Surveys responses from 85 clinical educators were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics and thematic grouping of open-ended qualitative responses. Both surveys revealed strengths and gaps in integrating EBP into Australian SLP curricula. Perceived strengths were that respondents were positive about EBP, most had EBP training and access to EBP resources. The perceived gaps included the academic staff's perceptions of students' understanding and application of EBP, respondents' understanding of research methodologies, communication and collaboration between academic staff and clinical educators, and a lack of explicit discussion by clinical educators and students of EBP in relation to clients.

  10. SCIRehab uses practice-based evidence methodology to associate patient and treatment characteristics with outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteneck, Gale G; Gassaway, Julie

    2013-04-01

    To describe the application of practice-based evidence (PBE) methodology to spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in the SCIRehab study, and to summarize associations of patient characteristics and treatment interventions to outcomes. Prospective observational study. Six SCI rehabilitation centers. Patients with traumatic SCI (N=1376) admitted for first rehabilitation. Not applicable. FIM and residence at discharge, and FIM, residence, Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, work/school status, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale, rehospitalization, and presence of pressure ulcers at 1 year postinjury. Patient demographic and injury characteristics explained significant variation in rehabilitation outcomes, particularly functional outcomes. Regression modeling also identified a large number of significant associations with outcomes when total time in each discipline was modeled and when models were developed for each discipline, examining time spent in the many specific interventions provided by each discipline. The application of PBE methodology in the SCIRehab study provided extensive information about the process of inpatient SCI rehabilitation. While patient demographic and injury characteristics explain substantial variation in rehabilitation outcomes, particularly functional outcomes, significant relations also were found between the type and quantity of treatment interventions delivered by each rehabilitation discipline and a broad range of outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Long term care staff beliefs about evidence based practices for the management of dementia and agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Arean, Patricia; Bornfeld, Heather; Beard, Renee

    2009-02-01

    Despite a growing literature on effective interventions for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and agitation, the management of these conditions in long term care (LTC) often is inadequate. The goals of the present study were: (a) to evaluate existing beliefs about evidence based practices (EBP) for the management of Alzheimer's disease and agitation among LTC staff; and (b) to evaluate the contribution of demographic and attitudinal variables to LTC staff beliefs about these EBP. A cross sectional study of 371 LTC staff members completed an EBP questionnaire, a short demographic questionnaire, and an attitudinal questionnaire about AD and agitation. Paraprofessional caregivers, those of lower educational level, and ethnic minorities were more likely to be in disagreement with the EBP views examined in this study. Those in disagreement with the EBP views also reported a preference towards not working with residents with AD and agitation and a sense of helplessness associated with such work. Disagreement with EBP views was associated with both normalization and stigmatization of AD and agitation. Paraprofessional caregivers, ethnic minorities, and people of lower educational level are most at need for educational activities about AD and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Educational efforts geared towards changing the belief system of LTC staff should target not only EBP but also information about AD and agitation as conditions that are deviant from the normal aging process, yet non-stigmatizing. It is expected that following EBP will empower staff and improve staff motivation to work with residents with AD and agitation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Lessons Learned from A System-Wide Evidence-Based Practice Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    incorporating scientific evidence, clinical expertise and the patient’s values and preferences to provide quality healthcare . Despite growing...MEMORANDUM FOR ST DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL WING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO - LACKLAND TEXAS ATTN: LT COL JACQUELINE KILLIAN...FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 14 FEB 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Lesson Learned From A System-Wide Evidence- Based

  13. Psychometric properties of a test in evidence based practice: the Spanish version of the Fresno test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Villa Josep

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Validated instruments are needed to evaluate the programmatic impact of Evidence Based Practice (EBP training and to document the competence of individual trainees. This study aimed to translate the Fresno test into Spanish and subsequently validate it, in order to ensure the equivalence of the Spanish version against the original English version. Methods Before and after study performed between October 2007 and June 2008. Three groups of participants: (a Mentors of family medicine residents (expert group (n = 56; (b Family medicine physicians (intermediate experience group (n = 17; (c Family medicine residents (novice group (n = 202; Medical residents attended an EBP course, and two sets of the test were administered before and after the course. The Fresno test is a performance based measure for use in medical education that assesses EBP skills. The outcome measures were: inter-rater and intra-rater reliability, internal consistency, item analyses, construct validity, feasibility of administration, and responsiveness. Results Inter-rater correlations were 0.95 and 0.85 in the pre-test and the post-test respectively. The overall intra-rater reliability was 0.71 and 0.81 in the pre-test and post-test questionnaire, respectively. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 and 0.77, respectively. 152 residents (75.2% returned both sets of the questionnaire. The observed effect size for the residents was 1.77 (CI 95%: 1.57-1.95, the standardised response mean was 1.65 (CI 95%:1.47-1.82. Conclusions The Spanish version of the Fresno test is a useful tool in assessing the knowledge and skills of EBP in Spanish-speaking residents of Family Medicine.

  14. Skills and attributes required by clinical nurse specialists to promote evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T Diane; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to describe the challenges that clinical nurse specialists (CNS) face in their role and to examine how CNSs describe the skills and attributes that are needed to promote the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in their workplaces. This article is based on findings from a dissertation regarding how CNSs promote EBP in a western Canadian province. A sequential explanatory participant selection mixed-methods design was used for this study. The study took place in a western Canadian province that has a population of 1 million people, with 42.7% of the population residing in the 2 largest cities. The sample was drawn from a provincial registered nurse database. The sample for the survey was 23, and for the interviews, there were 11 participants. The telephone survey contained 113 questions grouped into several subcategories. SPSS 18 was used to analyze the survey data. The semistructured interviews were conducted face to face, transcribed, and reviewed for recurrent themes. Interpretive description was used to analyze the themes. The major challenges faced by CNSs are role strain, lack of support and resources, and role ambiguity. The skills and attributes required to be a CNS are graduate preparation, clinical expertise, and people/communication skills. Clinical nurse specialists can improve patient outcomes by promoting EBP; to do so, they need to work in supportive contexts that give those in the CNS role a set of clear role expectations. There are challenges faced by CNSs in Canada, and there is a need to strengthen the CNS's role by standardizing the regulatory requirements at a national level.

  15. Facilitating the implementation of evidence- based practice through contextual support and nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueny, Angela; Shever, Leah L; Lehan Mackin, Melissa; Titler, Marita G

    2015-01-01

    Nurse managers (NMs) play an important role promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) on clinical units within hospitals. However, there is a dearth of research focused on NM perspectives about institutional contextual factors to support the goal of EBP on the clinical unit. The purpose of this article is to identify contextual factors described by NMs to drive change and facilitate EBP at the unit level, comparing and contrasting these perspectives across nursing units. This study employed a qualitative descriptive design using interviews with nine NMs who were participating in a large effectiveness study. To stratify the sample, NMs were selected from nursing units designated as high or low performing based on implementation of EBP interventions, scores on the Meyer and Goes research use scale, and fall rates. Descriptive content analysis was used to identify themes that reflect the complex nature of infrastructure described by NMs and contextual influences that supported or hindered their promotion of EBP on the clinical unit. NMs perceived workplace culture, structure, and resources as facilitators or barriers to empowering nurses under their supervision to use EBP and drive change. A workplace culture that provides clear communication of EBP goals or regulatory changes, direct contact with CEOs, and clear expectations supported NMs in their promotion of EBP on their units. High-performing unit NMs described a structure that included nursing-specific committees, allowing nurses to drive change and EBP from within the unit. NMs from high-performing units were more likely to articulate internal resources, such as quality-monitoring departments, as critical to the implementation of EBP on their units. This study contributes to a deeper understanding of institutional contextual factors that can be used to support NMs in their efforts to drive EBP changes at the unit level.

  16. Stroke unit Nurse Managers' views of individual and organizational factors liable to influence evidence-based practice: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Peta; McInnes, Elizabeth; Hardy, Jennifer; Dale, Simeon; Middleton, Sandy

    2016-04-01

    The uptake of evidence into practice may be impeded or facilitated by individual and organizational factors within the local context. This study investigated Nurse Managers of New South Wales, Australia, stroke units (n = 19) in their views on: leadership ability (measured by the Leadership Practices Inventory), organizational learning (measured by the Organizational Learning Survey), attitudes and beliefs towards evidence-based practice (EBP) and readiness for change. Overall Nurse Managers reported high-level leadership skills and a culture of learning. Nurse Managers' attitude towards EBP was positive, although nursing colleague's attitudes were perceived as less positive. Nurse Managers agreed that implementing evidence in practice places additional demands on staff; and almost half (n = 9, 47%) reported that resources were not available for evidence implementation. The findings indicate that key persons responsible for evidence implementation are not allocated sufficient time to coordinate and implement guidelines into practice. The findings suggest that barriers to evidence uptake, including insufficient resources and time constraints, identified by Nurse Managers in this study are not likely to be unique to stroke units. Furthermore, Nurse Managers may be unable to address these organizational barriers (i.e. lack of resources) and thus provide all the components necessary to implement EBP. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Students' attitudes and perceptions of teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice in an occupational therapy professional Master's curriculum: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aliki; Han, Lu; Osler, Brittony P; Turnbull, Emily A; Douglas, Erin

    2017-03-27

    Most health professions, including occupational therapy, have made the application of evidence-based practice a desired competency and professional responsibility. Despite the increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice for improving patient outcomes, there are numerous research-practice gaps in the health professions. In addition to efforts aimed at promoting evidence-based practice with clinicians, there is a strong impetus for university programs to design curricula that will support the development of the knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours associated with evidence-based practice. Though occupational therapy curricula in North America are becoming increasingly focused on evidence-based practice, research on students' attitudes towards evidence-based practice, their perceptions regarding the integration and impact of this content within the curricula, and the impact of the curriculum on their readiness for evidence-based practice is scarce. The present study examined occupational therapy students' perceptions towards the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice within a professional master's curriculum and their self-efficacy for evidence-based practice. The study used a mixed methods explanatory sequential design. The quantitative phase included a cross-sectional questionnaire exploring attitudes towards evidence-based practice, perceptions of the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice and evidence-based practice self-efficacy for four cohorts of students enrolled in the program and a cohort of new graduates. The questionnaire was followed by a focus group of senior students aimed at further exploring the quantitative findings. All student cohorts held favourable attitudes towards evidence-based practice; there was no difference across cohorts. There were significant differences with regards to perceptions of the teaching and assessment of evidence-based practice within the curriculum; junior cohorts and students with previous

  18. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-05-01

    This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional community, and features of clinical practice such as private versus public practice as well as local management policies. This review brings together the different strands of knowledge concerning non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making. This aspect of decision-making may be the biggest obstacle to the reality of practising evidence-based medicine. It needs to be understood in order to develop clinical strategies that will facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine.

  19. Evidence-based radiology: a new approach to evaluate the clinical practice of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Felder-Puig, R.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last several years, the concept and methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have received significant attention in the scientific community. However, compared to therapeutic medical disciplines, EBM-based radiological publications are still underrepresented. This article summarizes the principles of EBM and discusses the possibilities of their application in radiology. The presented topics include the critical appraisal of studies on the basis on EBM principles, the explanation of EBM-relevant statistical outcome parameters (e.g., ''likelihood ratio'' for diagnostic and ''number needed to treat'' for interventional procedures), as well as the problems facing evidence-based radiology. Evidence-based evaluation of radiological procedures does not only address aspects of cost-effectiveness, but is also particularly helpful in identifying patient-specific usefulness. Therefore it should become an integral part of radiologist training. (orig.)

  20. EFFECTIVE BLENDED LEARNING PRACTICES: Evidence-based Perspectives in ICT-facilitated Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Yasin OZARSLAN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available EFFECTIVE BLENDED LEARNING PRACTICES:Evidence-based Perspectives in ICT-facilitated EducationEdited by Elizabeth Stacey and Philippa Gerbic, Information ScienceReference; 1 edition (March 30, 2009, ISBN-10: 1605662968, 358 pp.Reviewed by Yasin OZARSLANFaculty of Education,Eskisehir Osmangazi University,Eskisehir-TURKEYBlended learning refers to the integration of faceto-face and online learning activities with the goal of maximizing the value of students' experiences in both settings. This book collects new international research into many aspects of blended learningfrom the perspectives of learners, teachers, designers, and professional and academic developers in various disciplines, learningcommunities and universities from around the world. This book addresses the relative newness of online learning within blended environments. The book's broader audience is anyone who isinterested in areas such as blended learning, communities of learning, virtual education, professional learning and community development, instructional technology, flexible learning, distance education and collaborative learning.Blended approaches in teacher education, blending collaborative online learning,blended learning and teaching philosophies, campus-based student learning environments, ICT-enhanced blended learning, learning communities for K-12 teachers, professional development for blended learning, reciprocal mentoring,redesigning initial teacher education, responses to blended environments, strategiesfor blended teaching and learning, virtual learning and real communities are the topics covered in this book.It reviews literature about blended learning in relation to the three sections of the book and discusses strategies for teaching and learning and establishing communities in its different contexts. The chapters of this book provide research perspectives on a range of blended learning issues and contexts and discuss implications for teaching and learning. The

  1. Mass lesions in chronic pancreatitis: benign or malignant? An "evidence-based practice" approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gerstenmaier, Jan F

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of a pancreatic mass lesion in the presence of chronic pancreatitis can be extremely challenging. At the same time, a high level of certainty about the diagnosis is necessary for appropriate management planning. The aim of this study was to establish current best evidence about which imaging methods reliably differentiate a benign from a malignant lesion, and show how that evidence is best applied. A diagnostic algorithm based on Bayesian analysis is proposed.

  2. Engaging Nursing Students: Integrating Evidence-Based Inquiry, Informatics, and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiffer, Melanie R

    2017-12-05

    The nursing research class requires faculty to create a spirit of inquiry while integrating technology, flexibility, and responsiveness to student needs. This article discusses new pedagogies to actively engage students in the evidence-based nursing process and the achievement of course learning outcomes. Through course exemplar, the author demonstrates a creative method to engage traditional baccalaureate nursing students in a nursing project that links evidence to improved patient outcomes.

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for gastroesophageal reflux disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Habu, Yasuki; Oshima, Tadayuki; Manabe, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagahara, Akihito; Kawamura, Osamu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ozawa, Soji; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Ohara, Shuichi; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Adachi, Kyoichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Miwa, Hiroto; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Haruma, Ken; Hongo, Michio; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-08-01

    As an increase in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported in Japan, and public interest in GERD has been increasing, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology published the Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for GERD (1st edition) in 2009. Six years have passed since its publication, and there have been a large number of reports in Japan concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and Barrett's esophagus during this period. By incorporating the contents of these reports, the guidelines were completely revised, and a new edition was published in October 2015. The revised edition consists of eight items: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, internal treatment, surgical treatment, esophagitis after surgery of the upper gastrointestinal tract, extraesophageal symptoms, and Barrett's esophagus. This paper summarizes these guidelines, particularly the parts related to the treatment for GERD. In the present revision, aggressive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy is recommended for severe erosive GERD, and on-demand therapy or continuous maintenance therapy is recommended for mild erosive GERD or PPI-responsive non-erosive GERD. Moreover, PPI-resistant GERD (insufficient symptomatic improvement and/or esophageal mucosal break persisting despite the administration of PPI at a standard dose for 8 weeks) is defined, and a standard-dose PPI twice a day, change in PPI, change in the PPI timing of dosing, addition of a prokinetic drug, addition of rikkunshito (traditional Japanese herbal medicine), and addition of histamine H2-receptor antagonist are recommended for its treatment. If no improvement is observed even after these treatments, pathophysiological evaluation with esophageal impedance-pH monitoring or esophageal manometry at an expert facility for diseases of the esophagus is recommended.

  4. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  5. Pressure Ulcers: Developing Clinical Indicators in Evidence-based Practice. A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaras, Konstantinos; Chatzi, Maria; Kleisiaris, Christos F; Fradelos, Evangelos C; Kourkouta, Lambrini; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2016-10-01

    It is widely recognized that Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients have a greater likelihood of developing pressure ulcers in comparison to hospital or home care patients. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate whether specific clinical characteristics could be used as clinical indicators towards pressure ulcers prevention. We monitored 210 hospitalized ICU patients during a 12-month period. Pressure ulcers were assessed following the current guidelines. Clinical characteristics such as gender, age, hospitalized days, hemodialysis treatment, hematocrit, and serum albumin levels were considered as the most common predictors for pressure ulcers development. The significance of associations was controlled using multiple logistic regression after adjusting for clinical characteristics and was presented as adjusted odds ratio (AOR). The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 24.3%. Logistic regression revealed that patients with increased age AOR=1.04; (CI: 1.01-1.07) and last-long hospitalization AOR=1.17; (CI: 1.11-1.23) were significantly more likely to present pressure ulcers compared to the younger ones and patients with less length of stay, respectively. We also found that patients under hemodialysis treatment were more likely to present pressure ulcers AOR=4.09; (CI: 1.12-14.98) compared to patients that did not underwent hemodialysis and the risk of pressure ulcers development was decreased by 9% for every single unit of hematocrit value increase AOR=0.91; (CI: 0.82-0.99). Our data analysis confirms that the clinical characteristics that were studied are independently associated with pressure ulcers development, and therefore, it is a crucial incentive to consider that these specific clinical characteristics are important indicators in the evidence-based practice.

  6. Generalist solutions to complex problems: generating practice-based evidence--the example of managing multi-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Joanne; Blakeman, Tom; Freeman, George K; Green, Larry A; James, Paul A; Lucassen, Peter; Martin, Carmel M; Sturmberg, Joachim P; van Weel, Chris

    2013-08-07

    A growing proportion of people are living with long term conditions. The majority have more than one. Dealing with multi-morbidity is a complex problem for health systems: for those designing and implementing healthcare as well as for those providing the evidence informing practice. Yet the concept of multi-morbidity (the presence of >2 diseases) is a product of the design of health care systems which define health care need on the basis of disease status. So does the solution lie in an alternative model of healthcare? Strengthening generalist practice has been proposed as part of the solution to tackling multi-morbidity. Generalism is a professional philosophy of practice, deeply known to many practitioners, and described as expertise in whole person medicine. But generalism lacks the evidence base needed by policy makers and planners to support service redesign. The challenge is to fill this practice-research gap in order to critically explore if and when generalist care offers a robust alternative to management of this complex problem. We need practice-based evidence to fill this gap. By recognising generalist practice as a 'complex intervention' (intervening in a complex system), we outline an approach to evaluate impact using action-research principles. We highlight the implications for those who both commission and undertake research in order to tackle this problem. Answers to the complex problem of multi-morbidity won't come from doing more of the same. We need to change systems of care, and so the systems for generating evidence to support that care. This paper contributes to that work through outlining a process for generating practice-based evidence of generalist solutions to the complex problem of person-centred care for people with multi-morbidity.

  7. Training the Next Generation of School Psychologists to Deliver Evidence Based Mental Health Practices: Current Challenges and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shernoff, Elisa S.; Bearman, Sarah Kate; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are uniquely positioned to support the delivery of evidence-based mental health practices (EBMHPs) to address the overwhelming mental health needs of children and youth. Graduate training programs can promote EBMHPs in schools by ensuring school psychologists enter the workplace prepared to deliver and support high-quality,…

  8. Systems Thinking Tools for Improving Evidence-Based Practice: A Cross-Case Analysis of Two High School Leadership Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Lisa A. W.; Reames, Ellen; Murray, John; Patrick, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Teachers and administrators have access to large volumes of data but research suggests that they lack the skills to use data effectively for continuous school improvement. This study involved a cross-case analysis of two high school leadership teams' early stages of evidence-based practice development; differing forms of external support were…

  9. A Socio-Cultural Analysis of Practitioner Perspectives on Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Roxanne F.; Davis, Carol A.; Blum, Grace; Greenway, Rosanne; Hackett, Jacob; Kidwell, James; Liberty, Lisa; McCollow, Megan; Patish, Yelena; Pierce, Jennifer; Schulze, Maggie; Smith, Maya M.; Peck, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the central role "evidence-based practice" (EBP) plays in special education agendas for both research and policy, it is widely recognized that achieving "implementation" of EBPs remains an elusive goal. In an effort to better understand this problem, we interviewed special education practitioners in four school…

  10. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students : are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van Dijk; B. Spek; M Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness

  11. Teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to speech-language therapy students: are students competent and confident EBP users?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and value of the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the decision-making process is recognized by speech-language therapists (SLTs) worldwide and as a result curricula for speech-language therapy students incorporated EBP principles. However, the willingness actually to use

  12. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Horvath, Andrea R.; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However,

  13. Adaptation Guidance for Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy and STI/HIV Prevention Curricula: From Development to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolleri, Lori A.; Fuller, Taleria R.; Firpo-Triplett, Regina; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Moore, Claire; Leeks, Kimberly D.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are effective in preventing adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; however, prevention practitioners are challenged when selecting and adapting the most appropriate programs. While there are existing adaptation frameworks, there is little practical guidance in applying research in the field.…

  14. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  15. Communicating Chemistry: A Framework for Sharing Science: A Practical Evidence-Based Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that, increasingly, the public is engaging with science in a wide range of informal environments, which can be any setting outside of school such as community-based programs, festivals, libraries, or home. Yet undergraduate and graduate schools often don't prepare scientists for public communication. This…

  16. Psychotherapy Training for Residents: Reconciling Requirements with Evidence-Based, Competency-Focused Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Priyanthy; Manring, John; Lynn, David John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) changed the training requirements in psychotherapy, moving toward evidence-based therapies and emphasizing competence and proficiency as outcomes of training. This article examines whether the therapies…

  17. The PICO Game: An Innovative Strategy for Teaching Step 1 in Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Kerry A; Cosme, Sheryl

    2017-12-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning and implementation of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-6787. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Positional skull deformation in infants: heading towards evidence-based practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Renske

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a young infant’s skull can deform as a result of prolonged external forces. The prevalence of positional skull deformation increased dramatically during the last decades. The primary aim of this dissertation was to provide a stronger evidence base for the treatment of skull deformation.

  19. Teaching evidence-based practice principles to prepare health professions students for an interprofessional learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nell Aronoff

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Online EBP learning modules were effective in developing EBP knowledge and skills for health professions students. Using the same modules ensured that students from different health professions at different stages of their professional programs had consistent knowledge and enabled each student to fully engage in an interprofessional evidence-based activity. Student feedback indicated the modules were valued and beneficial.

  20. Icelandic nurses' beliefs, skills, and resources associated with evidence-based practice and related factors: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Hrund S

    2013-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential to the improvement of patient outcomes and the quality of care. Nurses' use of evidence in practice, however, remains limited. Assessing nurses' readiness for EBP where it is not as prominent as in countries leading EBP research was of particular interest. To determine Icelandic registered nurses' (RNs') ability to provide care based on evidence as measured by their beliefs, perception of skills, and access to resources associated with EBP. A descriptive survey was used in which a random sample of 540 Icelandic RNs completed the translated and modified version of the Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice and the translated EBP Beliefs Scale. Descriptive statistics, correlations, chi-square tests, t tests and one-way ANOVAs were used to analyze the data. Participants strongly believed in the value of EBP for patient care, but were less confident regarding their own knowledge and skills needed for EBP. Most (82%) of the respondents (i.e., RNs) turned to peers when in need of information, rather than peer-reviewed resources. Although over half of the RNs (54%) had received instructions in the use of electronic databases, only a third indicated success in using them. They considered "lack of search skills" as the primary barrier to use of research in practice. Using research findings in practice was associated with positive EBP beliefs, familiarity with EBP and other EBP-related activities. Clinical RNs were found to be at a disadvantage when it came to access to EBP-related resources and participated less frequently in EBP-related activities other than using research in practice. Icelandic RNs' beliefs regarding EBP are similar to those of RNs in other countries. Their access to EBP resources is generally good, but they lack the skills and knowledge needed for EBP. Strategies aimed at changing the organizational and practice context need to be developed. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Providing education on evidence-based practice improved knowledge but did not change behaviour: a before and after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovarini Meryl

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health professionals lack the skills to find and appraise published research. This lack of skills and associated knowledge needs to be addressed, and practice habits need to change, for evidence-based practice to occur. The aim of this before and after study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted intervention on the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour of allied health professionals. Methods 114 self-selected occupational therapists were recruited. The intervention included a 2-day workshop combined with outreach support for eight months. Support involved email and telephone contact and a workplace visit. Measures were collected at baseline, post-workshop, and eight months later. The primary outcome was knowledge, measured using the Adapted Fresno Test of Evidence-Based Practice (total score 0 to 156. Secondary outcomes were attitude to evidence-based practice (% reporting improved skills and confidence; % reporting barriers, and behaviour measured using an activity diary (% engaging/not engaging in search and appraisal activities, and assignment completion. Results Post-workshop, there were significant gains in knowledge which were maintained at follow-up. The mean difference in the Adapted Fresno Test total score was 20.6 points (95% CI, 15.6 to 25.5. The change from post-workshop to follow-up was small and non-significant (mean difference 1.2 points, 95% CI, -6.0 to 8.5. Fewer participants reported lack of searching and appraisal skills as barriers to evidence-based practice over time (searching = 61%, 53%, 24%; appraisal 60%, 65%, 41%. These differences were statistically significant (p = 0.0001 and 0.010 respectively. Behaviour changed little. Pre-workshop, 6% engaged in critical appraisal increasing to 18% post-workshop and 18% at follow-up. Nearly two thirds (60% were not reading any research literature at follow-up. Twenty-three participants (20.2% completed their assignment. Conclusion Evidence-based

  2. Evidence-Based Dentistry: The Next Frontier in Translational and Trans-National Dental Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ajaj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD is a systematic approach for ob-taining the best available clini-cally relevant scientific evidence with the ultimate goal and intent of increasing effectiveness and efficacy in clinical decision-making. EBD pursues optimizing both the patient’s benefit through the best utilization of dentist’s experience and clinical expertise, and on making full use of the most reliable and va-lid research outcomes. EBD is initiated by the patient-dentist interaction, which is translated into a patient-centered P.I.C.O. question. The resulting literature bibliome is assessed and quantified for the level and quality of the evidence by means of fully validated and reli-able instruments based on common standard criteria of research methodology, design and statistical analysis. The outcomes are evaluated by acceptable sampling analysis, Such that studies, whose flaws have been identified to result potentially into misleading infor-mation to the patients and/or practitioner may be judiciously removed from further consideration". The research synthesis process tests for overarching statistical sig-nificance among non-heterogeneous outcomes, and yields a consensus of the best available evidence. The systematic nature of the re-search review and synthesis that characterizes EBD is reported in the literature as “systematic reviews”, “complex systematic reviews”, or “clinically relevant complex systematic reviews”. Thus the reported best available evidence ensures patient-centered clinical decision for interventions of the highest possible effectiveness and effi-cacy. EBD contrasts with traditional dentistry based on the evidence for its systematic stringency, coupled with its fundamental validity as a patient-centered optimization of clinical modes of interventions.

  3. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ) in an Australian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaria, Lisa; Beccaria, Gavin; McCosker, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    It is crucial that nursing students develop skills and confidence in using Evidence-Based Practice principles early in their education. This should be assessed with valid tools however, to date, few measures have been developed and applied to the student population. To examine the structural validity of the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ), with an Australian online nursing student cohort. A cross-sectional study for constructing validity. Three hundred and forty-five undergraduate nursing students from an Australian regional university were recruited across two semesters. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was used to examine the structural validity. Confirmatory Factor Analysis was applied which resulted in a good fitting model, based on a revised 20-item tool. The S-EBPQ tool remains a psychometrically robust measure of evidence-based practice use, attitudes, and knowledge and skills and can be applied in an online Australian student context. The findings of this study provided further evidence of the reliability and four factor structure of the S-EBPQ. Opportunities for further refinement of the tool may result in improvements in structural validity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Charif, Ali; Zomahoun, Hervé Tchala Vignon; LeBlanc, Annie; Langlois, Léa; Wolfenden, Luke; Yoong, Sze Lin; Williams, Christopher M; Lépine, Roxanne; Légaré, France

    2017-11-22

    While an extensive array of existing evidence-based practices (EBPs) have the potential to improve patient outcomes, little is known about how to implement EBPs on a larger scale. Therefore, we sought to identify effective strategies for scaling up EBPs in primary care. We conducted a systematic review with the following inclusion criteria: (i) study design: randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, before-and-after (with/without control), and interrupted time series; (ii) participants: primary care-related units (e.g., clinical sites, patients); (iii) intervention: any strategy used to scale up an EBP; (iv) comparator: no restrictions; and (v) outcomes: no restrictions. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from database inception to August 2016 and consulted clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two reviewers independently selected eligible studies, then extracted and analyzed data following the Cochrane methodology. We extracted components of scaling-up strategies and classified them into five categories: infrastructure, policy/regulation, financial, human resources-related, and patient involvement. We extracted scaling-up process outcomes, such as coverage, and provider/patient outcomes. We validated data extraction with study authors. We included 14 studies. They were published since 2003 and primarily conducted in low-/middle-income countries (n = 11). Most were funded by governmental organizations (n = 8). The clinical area most represented was infectious diseases (HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, n = 8), followed by newborn/child care (n = 4), depression (n = 1), and preventing seniors' falls (n = 1). Study designs were mostly before-and-after (without control, n = 8). The most frequently targeted unit of scaling up was the clinical site (n = 11). The component of a scaling-up strategy most frequently mentioned was human resource-related (n = 12). All

  5. Effective strategies for scaling up evidence-based practices in primary care: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ben Charif

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While an extensive array of existing evidence-based practices (EBPs have the potential to improve patient outcomes, little is known about how to implement EBPs on a larger scale. Therefore, we sought to identify effective strategies for scaling up EBPs in primary care. Methods We conducted a systematic review with the following inclusion criteria: (i study design: randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, before-and-after (with/without control, and interrupted time series; (ii participants: primary care-related units (e.g., clinical sites, patients; (iii intervention: any strategy used to scale up an EBP; (iv comparator: no restrictions; and (v outcomes: no restrictions. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from database inception to August 2016 and consulted clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two reviewers independently selected eligible studies, then extracted and analyzed data following the Cochrane methodology. We extracted components of scaling-up strategies and classified them into five categories: infrastructure, policy/regulation, financial, human resources-related, and patient involvement. We extracted scaling-up process outcomes, such as coverage, and provider/patient outcomes. We validated data extraction with study authors. Results We included 14 studies. They were published since 2003 and primarily conducted in low-/middle-income countries (n = 11. Most were funded by governmental organizations (n = 8. The clinical area most represented was infectious diseases (HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, n = 8, followed by newborn/child care (n = 4, depression (n = 1, and preventing seniors’ falls (n = 1. Study designs were mostly before-and-after (without control, n = 8. The most frequently targeted unit of scaling up was the clinical site (n = 11. The component of a scaling-up strategy most frequently mentioned was

  6. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for Microbiology Ad Hoc Committee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice update: practice guidelines for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on a systematic review and multidisciplinary consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melick, N. van; Cingel, R.E. van; Brooijmans, F.; Neeter, C.; Tienen, T. van; Hullegie, W.; Sanden, M.W. van der

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) instructed a multidisciplinary group of Dutch anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) experts to develop an evidence statement for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction. DESIGN: Clinical practice guideline underpinned by systematic review and

  8. Making generic tutorials content specific: recycling evidence-based practice (EBP) tutorials for two disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Keven M; Maggio, Lauren; Blanchard, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Librarians at the Boston University Medical Center constructed two interactive online tutorials, "Introduction to EBM" and "Formulating a Clinical Question (PICO)," for a Family Medicine Clerkship and then quickly repurposed the existing tutorials to support an Evidence-based Dentistry course. Adobe's ColdFusion software was used to populate the tutorials with course-specific content based on the URL used to enter each tutorial, and a MySQL database was used to collect student input. Student responses were viewable immediately by course faculty on a password-protected Web site. The tutorials ensured that all students received the same baseline training and allowed librarians to tailor a subsequent library skills workshop to student tutorial answers. The tutorials were well-received by the medical and dental schools and have been added to mandatory first-year Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) and Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD) courses, meaning that every medical and dental student at BUMC will be expected to complete these tutorials.

  9. Evidence-based practice, step by step: critical appraisal of the evidence: part II: digging deeper--examining the "keeper" studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Stillwell, Susan B; Williamson, Kathleen M

    2010-09-01

    This is the sixth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we've scheduled "Chat with the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. Details about how to participate in the next call will be published with November's Evidence-Based Practice, Step by Step.

  10. Evidence-based practice guidelines for prescribing home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Laura; Coyle, Emma; Todd, Helen; Williams, Cylie

    2018-04-01

    Home modifications maintain people's functional independence and safety. No literature exists to guide the prescription of home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. With Australia's increasing obesity rate, more evidence is needed to support home modification prescribers. This study aimed to map Australian home modification prescribing practices for clients with bariatric care needs and to establish and evaluate a clinical resource for this prescription process. The study included two phases. Phase 1 conducted a cross-sectional survey of therapists practicing in Australia, and Australian industry partners who prescribe or install home modifications for clients with bariatric care needs. Phase 2 included design, implementation and evaluation of a clinical resource. Data were analysed with means and frequencies; multivariable regression analysis was used to explore prescribing habits. Therapists surveyed (n = 347) reported 11 different bariatric weight definitions. Less than 3% constantly or regularly prescribed home modifications for these clients; rails were most commonly prescribed. Many therapists (n = 171, 58%) 'never' or 'rarely' knew rail load capacity. Therapists' knowledge of rail load capacity was associated with previous experience prescribing home modifications (P = 0.009); rail manufacturer's advice (P = 0.016) and not using advice from builders (P = 0.001). Clinical resources were used by 11% (n = 26) of therapists to support their prescription, and industry sporadically relied on therapists to specify modification design requirements (n = 5, 45%). Post-implementation of a clinical resource increased consensus regarding understanding of the term bariatric and increased consultation with builders and manufacturers. There was a lack of consistency in bariatric terminology, uncertainty of rail load capacities and minimal use of clinical practice guidelines. Additional resources will assist with consistency in prescribing

  11. Building a Unit-Level Mentored Program to Sustain a Culture of Inquiry for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara T; Throop, Meryia D; Raju, Dheeraj; Murphy, Deborah A; Loan, Lori A; Patrician, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of a dynamic educational and mentoring program, facilitated by unit-level mentors, to introduce, promote, and sustain an evidence-based practice (EBP) culture among nurses in a military healthcare setting. The need to identify gaps in practice, apply principles of EBP, and advance scientific applications in the pursuit of quality nursing care is as important to military healthcare as it is in the civilian sector. The Advancing Research through Close Collaboration Model guided the intervention and study. Three instruments were used: the Organizational Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-Based Practice, EBP Beliefs, and EBP Implementation scales. The study took place in 3 military hospitals simultaneously undergoing facility and staff integration. Data were collected from staff nurses in the inpatient nursing units before and after a facilitated education and mentoring intervention. Three hundred sixty nurses (38%) completed baseline, and 325 (31%) completed follow-up surveys. Scores improved on all 3 measures following implementation of the program; however, the differences were statistically significant only for the Organizational Readiness for System-wide Integration of Evidence-Based Practice scale (70.96 vs 77.63, t = -3.95, P culture may diffuse among individuals in an organization, even while experiencing significant change. It also demonstrates that a unit-level mentored EBP program is sustainable despite changes in organizational structure and workforce composition.

  12. Radiotherapy fractionation for the palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases – an evidence-based practice guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jackson Sai-Yiu; Wong, Rebecca KS; Lloyd, Nancy S; Johnston, Mary; Bezjak, Andrea; Whelan, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    This practice guideline was developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in Ontario on the preferred standard radiotherapy fractionation schedule for the treatment of painful bone metastases. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed and published elsewhere. The Supportive Care Guidelines Group, a multidisciplinary guideline development panel, formulated clinical recommendations based on their interpretation of the evidence. In addition to evidence from clinical trials, the panel also considered patient convenience and ease of administration of palliative radiotherapy. External review of the draft report by Ontario practitioners was obtained through a mailed survey, and final approval was obtained from the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. Meta-analysis did not detect a significant difference in complete or overall pain relief between single treatment and multifraction palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. Fifty-nine Ontario practitioners responded to the mailed survey (return rate 62%). Forty-two percent also returned written comments. Eighty-three percent of respondents agreed with the interpretation of the evidence and 75% agreed that the report should be approved as a practice guideline. Minor revisions were made based on feedback from the external reviewers and the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. The Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee approved the final practice guideline report. For adult patients with single or multiple radiographically confirmed bone metastases of any histology corresponding to painful areas in previously non-irradiated areas without pathologic fractures or spinal cord/cauda equine compression, we conclude that: • Where the treatment objective is pain relief, a single 8 Gy treatment, prescribed to the appropriate target volume, is recommended as the standard dose-fractionation schedule for the treatment of symptomatic and uncomplicated bone metastases. Several factors frequently

  13. Radiotherapy fractionation for the palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases – an evidence-based practice guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezjak Andrea

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This practice guideline was developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in Ontario on the preferred standard radiotherapy fractionation schedule for the treatment of painful bone metastases. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed and published elsewhere. The Supportive Care Guidelines Group, a multidisciplinary guideline development panel, formulated clinical recommendations based on their interpretation of the evidence. In addition to evidence from clinical trials, the panel also considered patient convenience and ease of administration of palliative radiotherapy. External review of the draft report by Ontario practitioners was obtained through a mailed survey, and final approval was obtained from the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. Results Meta-analysis did not detect a significant difference in complete or overall pain relief between single treatment and multifraction palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. Fifty-nine Ontario practitioners responded to the mailed survey (return rate 62%. Forty-two percent also returned written comments. Eighty-three percent of respondents agreed with the interpretation of the evidence and 75% agreed that the report should be approved as a practice guideline. Minor revisions were made based on feedback from the external reviewers and the Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee. The Practice Guidelines Coordinating Committee approved the final practice guideline report. Conclusion For adult patients with single or multiple radiographically confirmed bone metastases of any histology corresponding to painful areas in previously non-irradiated areas without pathologic fractures or spinal cord/cauda equine compression, we conclude that: • Where the treatment objective is pain relief, a single 8 Gy treatment, prescribed to the appropriate target volume, is recommended as the standard dose-fractionation schedule for the treatment of symptomatic and

  14. "That Doesn't Translate": The Role of Evidence-Based Practice in Disempowering Speech Pathologists in Acute Aphasia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Abby; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Miranda; O'Halloran, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: An evidence-practice gap has been identified in current acute aphasia management practice, with the provision of services to people with aphasia in the acute hospital widely considered in the literature to be inconsistent with best-practice recommendations. The reasons for this evidence-practice gap are unclear; however, speech…

  15. The Model of Problem Based Learning in Practice: Evidence from Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    into practice when they go through solving such problems. At the end of the day, the PBL based teaching is assessed based on the success of the problems solved, e.g., in the form of solution(s) provided, their creativity, innovation and applicability. Moreover, PBL-based teaching can identify theoretical gaps......The aim of this paper is to share an experience from Aalborg University on the application of Problem Based Learning (PBL) model, with a specific example from a bachelor studies. PBL model has now been acknowledged worldwide as a powerful tool that allows students, faculty members and industry...... practitioners engage in multi-disciplinary, collaborative and geographically distributed activities. The key word in the model is ‘problem’ – a problem that is correctly formulated eventually affects the process of learning. It is also linked to the intended outcome of the PBL based teaching, whereby students...

  16. Practical experience from the Office of Adolescent Health's large scale implementation of an evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Amy Lynn; Roper, Allison Yvonne

    2014-03-01

    After 3 years of experience overseeing the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in a diversity of populations and settings across the country, the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) has learned numerous lessons through practical application and new experiences. These lessons and experiences are applicable to those working to implement evidence-based programs on a large scale. The lessons described in this paper focus on what it means for a program to be implementation ready, the role of the program developer in replicating evidence-based programs, the importance of a planning period to ensure quality implementation, the need to define and measure fidelity, and the conditions necessary to support rigorous grantee-level evaluation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Making the links between domestic violence and child safeguarding: an evidence-based pilot training for general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilassy, Eszter; Drinkwater, Jess; Hester, Marianne; Larkins, Cath; Stanley, Nicky; Turner, William; Feder, Gene

    2017-11-01

    We describe the development of an evidence-based training intervention on domestic violence and child safeguarding for general practice teams. We aimed - in the context of a pilot study - to improve knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-efficacy of general practice clinicians caring for families affected by domestic violence. Our evidence sources included: a systematic review of training interventions aiming to improve professional responses to children affected by domestic violence; content mapping of relevant current training in England; qualitative assessment of general practice professionals' responses to domestic violence in families; and a two-stage consensus process with a multi-professional stakeholder group. Data were collected between January and December 2013. This paper reports key research findings and their implications for practice and policy; describes how the research findings informed the training development and outlines the principal features of the training intervention. We found lack of cohesion and co-ordination in the approach to domestic violence and child safeguarding. General practice clinicians have insufficient understanding of multi-agency work, a limited competence in gauging thresholds for child protection referral to children's services and little understanding of outcomes for children. While prioritising children's safety, they are more inclined to engage directly with abusive parents than with affected children. Our research reveals uncertainty and confusion surrounding the recording of domestic violence cases in families' medical records. These findings informed the design of the RESPONDS training, which was developed in 2014 to encourage general practice clinicians to overcome barriers and engage more extensively with adults experiencing abuse, as well as responding directly to the needs of children. We conclude that general practice clinicians need more support in managing the complexity of this area of practice. We need to

  18. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  19. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: evidence-based report on diagnostic guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Lee, Linda S; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S; Miller, Frank H; Mortele, Koenraad J; Levy, Michael J; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Phillip P; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U; Forsmark, Christopher E; Vege, Santhi S

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed, and evidence-based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable, or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; survey, tomography, endoscopy, and pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a noninvasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false-positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Furthermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (toxic, idiopathic, genetic, autoimmune, recurrent, and obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria), and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multicenter research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves.

  20. Practice Parameter: Evaluation of the child with microcephaly (an evidence-based review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, Stephen; Michelson, David; Plawner, Lauren; Dobyns, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To make evidence-based recommendations concerning the evaluation of the child with microcephaly. Methods: Relevant literature was reviewed, abstracted, and classified. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered scheme of evidence classification. Results: Microcephaly is an important neurologic sign but there is nonuniformity in its definition and evaluation. Microcephaly may result from any insult that disturbs early brain growth and can be seen in association with hundreds of genetic syndromes. Annually, approximately 25,000 infants in the United States will be diagnosed with microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (head circumference microcephaly (−2 to −3 SD; ∼40%). Coexistent conditions include epilepsy (∼40%), cerebral palsy (∼20%), mental retardation (∼50%), and ophthalmologic disorders (∼20% to ∼50%). Recommendations: Neuroimaging may be considered useful in identifying structural causes in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly (Level C). Targeted and specific genetic testing may be considered in the evaluation of the child with microcephaly who has clinical or imaging abnormalities that suggest a specific diagnosis or who shows no evidence of an acquired or environmental etiology (Level C). Screening for coexistent conditions such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and sensory deficits may also be considered (Level C). Further study is needed regarding the yield of diagnostic testing in children with microcephaly. GLOSSARY CP = cerebral palsy; GDD = global developmental delay; HC = head circumference; MRE = medically refractory epilepsy; OMIM = Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. PMID:19752457

  1. Evidence-based practice in women's health: hormone therapy for women at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, M E

    2001-01-01

    Women's health providers, especially midwives, must take into account the known benefits and risks, as well as the "unknown," when recommending the use of hormone therapy for menopausal women, especially as it relates to heart disease, breast cancer, impaired cognition, and osteoporosis. The most recent evidence available from various studies about the benefits and risks of estrogen and hormone therapy at menopause suggests that, although hormone therapy may be protective in some women against heart disease and osteoporosis, evidence is less certain about the benefits of hormone protection against impaired cognition and the risks of breast cancer with use. The clinical approach used by midwives in which individualizing care based on each woman's health status history as well as preferences is highly appropriate for women in the perimenopausal and menopausal period.

  2. Difficulties in conducting a randomized controlled trial of health service interventions in intellectual disability: implications for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, P C; Piachaud, J; Done, J; Regan, A; Cooray, S; Tyrer, P

    2002-05-01

    In an era of evidence-based medicine, practice is constantly monitored for quality in accordance with the needs of clinical governance (Oyebode et al. 1999). This is likely to lead to a dramatic change in the treatment of those with intellectual disability (ID), in which evidence for effective intervention is limited for much that happens in ordinary practice. As Fraser (2000, p. 10) has commented, the word that best explains "the transformation of learning disability practice in the past 30 years is 'enlightenment'." This is not enough to satisfy the demands of evidence, and Fraser exhorted us to embrace more research-based practice in a subject that has previously escaped randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of treatment because of ethical concerns over capacity and consent, which constitute a denial of opportunity which "is now at last regarded as disenfranchising". The present paper describes the difficulties encountered in setting up a RCT of a common intervention, i.e. assertive community treatment, and concludes that a fundamental change in attitudes to health service research in ID is needed if proper evaluation is to prosper.

  3. How dentists diagnose and treat defective restorations: evidence from the dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S

    2009-01-01

    , Norway and Sweden. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all DPBRN practitioner-investigators who reported doing some restorative dentistry (n = 901). Questions included clinical case scenarios that used text and clinical photographs of defective restorations. Dentists were asked what type of treatment......OBJECTIVES: To (1) identify and quantify the types of treatment that dentists use to manage defective dental restorations and (2) identify characteristics that are associated with these dentists' decisions to replace existing restorations. The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) consists...... of dentists in outpatient practices from five regions: AL/MS: Alabama/Mississippi; FL/GA: Florida/Georgia; MN: dentists employed by HealthPartners and private practitioners in Minnesota; PDA: Permanente Dental Associates in cooperation with Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research and SK: Denmark...

  4. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: unpacking the black box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S

    2013-11-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert consultation fits into the larger implementation support system, or the most effective consultation strategies. This commentary reviews the literature on consultation in child mental health, and proposes a set of core consultation functions, processes, and outcomes that should be further studied in the implementation of evidence-based practices for children.

  5. Adaptation and validation of the Evidence-Based Practice Belief and Implementation scales for French-speaking Swiss nurses and allied healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate two psychometric properties of the French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales, namely their internal consistency and construct validity. The Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales developed by Melnyk et al. are recognised as valid, reliable instruments in English. However, no psychometric validation for their French versions existed. Secondary analysis of a cross sectional survey. Source data came from a cross-sectional descriptive study sample of 382 nurses and other allied healthcare providers. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency, and principal axis factor analysis and varimax rotation were computed to determine construct validity. The French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales showed excellent reliability, with Cronbach's alphas close to the scores established by Melnyk et al.'s original versions. Principal axis factor analysis showed medium-to-high factor loading scores without obtaining collinearity. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 16-item Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs scale resulted in a four-factor loading structure. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 17-item Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale revealed a two-factor loading structure. Further research should attempt to understand why the French Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale showed a two-factor loading structure but Melnyk et al.'s original has only one. The French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales can both be considered valid and reliable instruments for measuring Evidence-Based Practice beliefs and implementation. The results suggest that the French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales are valid and reliable and can therefore be used to

  6. Learn, see, practice, prove, do, maintain: an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Taylor; White, Marjorie; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd; Ades, Anne; French, Heather; Anderson, JoDee; Auerbach, Marc; Johnston, Lindsay; Kessler, David

    2015-08-01

    Acquisition of competency in procedural skills is a fundamental goal of medical training. In this Perspective, the authors propose an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training. The framework was developed based on a review of the literature using a critical synthesis approach and builds on earlier models of procedural skill training in medicine. The authors begin by describing the fundamentals of procedural skill development. Then, a six-step pedagogical framework for procedural skills training is presented: Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, and Maintain. In this framework, procedural skill training begins with the learner acquiring requisite cognitive knowledge through didactic education (Learn) and observation of the procedure (See). The learner then progresses to the stage of psychomotor skill acquisition and is allowed to deliberately practice the procedure on a simulator (Practice). Simulation-based mastery learning is employed to allow the trainee to prove competency prior to performing the procedure on a patient (Prove). Once competency is demonstrated on a simulator, the trainee is allowed to perform the procedure on patients with direct supervision, until he or she can be entrusted to perform the procedure independently (Do). Maintenance of the skill is ensured through continued clinical practice, supplemented by simulation-based training as needed (Maintain). Evidence in support of each component of the framework is presented. Implementation of the proposed framework presents a paradigm shift in procedural skill training. However, the authors believe that adoption of the framework will improve procedural skill training and patient safety.

  7. Reconciling evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services: introduction to a special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Joseph P

    2015-04-01

    The calls for evidence-based practice (EBP) and cultural competence (CC) represent two increasingly influential mandates within the mental health professions. Advocates of EBP seek to standardize clinical practice by ensuring that only treatment techniques that have demonstrated therapeutic outcomes under scientifically controlled conditions would be adopted and promoted in mental health services. Advocates of CC seek to diversify clinical practice by ensuring that treatment approaches are designed and refined for a multicultural clientele that reflects a wide variety of psychological orientations and life experiences. As these two powerful mandates collide, the fundamental challenge becomes how to accommodate substantive cultural divergences in psychosocial experience using narrowly prescriptive clinical practices and approaches, without trivializing either professional knowledge or cultural difference. In this Introduction to a special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry, the virtue of an interdisciplinary conversation between and among anthropologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social work researchers in addressing these tensions is extolled. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Training Therapists in Evidence-Based Practice: A Critical Review of Studies From a Systems-Contextual Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP), a preferred psychological treatment approach, requires training of community providers. The systems-contextual (SC) perspective, a model for dissemination and implementation efforts, underscores the importance of the therapist, client, and organizational variables that influence training and consequent therapist uptake and adoption of EBP. This review critiques the extant research on training in EBP from an SC perspective. Findings suggest that therapist knowled...

  9. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice : the EU-EBM project

    OpenAIRE

    Thangaratinam, S.; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Horvath, Andrea R.; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry FRCOG‏; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid Saeed

    2009-01-01

    Background:\\ud Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional developme...

  10. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    OpenAIRE

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben WJ; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional deve...

  11. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: Unpacking the black box

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S.

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert c...

  12. Evidence- and consensus-based practice guidelines for the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass, R; Longstreth, G F; Pimentel, M; Fullerton, S; Russak, S M; Chiou, C F; Reyes, E; Crane, P; Eisen, G; McCarberg, B; Ofman, J

    2001-09-24

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) presents a significant diagnostic and management challenge for primary care practitioners. Improving the accuracy and timeliness of diagnosis may result in improved quality and efficiency of care. To systematically appraise the existing diagnostic criteria and combine the evidence with expert opinion to derive evidence- and consensus-based guidelines for a diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IBS. We performed a systematic literature review (January 1966-April 2000) of computerized bibliographic databases. Articles meeting explicit inclusion criteria for diagnostic studies in IBS were subjected to critical appraisal, which formed the basis of guideline statements presented to an expert panel. To develop a diagnostic algorithm, an expert panel of specialists and primary care physicians was used to fill in gaps in the literature. Consensus was developed using a modified Delphi technique. The systematic literature review identified only 13 published studies regarding the effectiveness of competing diagnostic approaches for IBS, the accuracy of diagnostic tests, and the internal validity of current diagnostic symptom criteria. Few studies met accepted methodological criteria. While symptom criteria have been validated, the utility of endoscopic and other diagnostic interventions remains unknown. An analysis of the literature, combined with consensus from experienced clinicians, resulted in the development of a diagnostic algorithm relevant to primary care that emphasizes a symptom-based diagnostic approach, refers patients with alarm symptoms to subspecialists, and reserves radiographic, endoscopic, and other tests for referral cases. The resulting algorithm highlights the reliance on symptom criteria and comprises a primary module, 3 submodules based on the predominant symptom pattern (constipation, diarrhea, and pain) and severity level, and a subspecialist referral module. The dearth of available evidence highlights the need

  13. Communication channels to promote evidence-based practice: a survey of primary care clinicians to determine perceived effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadich, Ann; Hosseinzadeh, Hassan

    2016-08-11

    Research suggests that the channels through which evidence-based practices are communicated to healthcare professionals can shape the ways they engage with, and use, this information. For instance, there is evidence to suggest that information should be communicated via sources that are deemed to be credible, like government departments, professional bodies and peers. This article examines the contention that information should be communicated via credible sources. More specifically, the article examines the different communication channels through which primary care clinicians learnt of resources on evidence-based sexual healthcare - namely, clinical aides and online training programs. Furthermore, the article determines whether these communication channels influenced the perceived impact of the resources. Primary care clinicians in Australia (n = 413), notably General Practitioners (n = 214) and Practice Nurses (n = 217), were surveyed on the GP Project - a suite of resources to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare within primary care. Survey items pertained to the source of information about the resources (or communication channel), perceived usefulness of the resources, frequency of use, subsequent contact with the Sexual Health Infoline and a sexual health clinic, as well as the perceived impact of the resources. To determine the relationships between the different communication channels and the perceived impact of the resources, a one-way ANOVA using Tukey's post-hoc test, an independent sample t-test, a χ(2) test, and a Kruskal-Wallis H test were performed where appropriate. Of the respondents who were aware of the clinical aides (49.9%), the largest proportion became aware of these through an educational event or a colleague. Of those who were aware of the online training programs (36.9%), the largest proportion became aware of these through a professional body or government organisation, either directly or via their website. Although both resource

  14. Challenges and Ideas from a Research Program on High Quality, Evidence-Based Practice in School Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Stephan, Sharon; Lever, Nancy; Fowler, Johnathan; Taylor, Leslie; McDaniel, Heather; Chappelle, Lori; Paggeot, Samantha; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Objective Reviews the progression of a research program designed to develop, implement and study the implementation of “achievable” evidence-based practices (EBPs) in schools. Reviews challenges encountered and ideas to overcome them to enhance this avenue of research. Method Presents two federally funded randomized controlled trials involving comparison of a four-component targeted intervention (Quality Assessment and Improvement, Family Engagement and Empowerment, Modular Evidence-Based Practice, Implementation Support) versus a comparison intervention focused on Personal Wellness. In both studies primary aims focused on changes in clinician attitudes and behavior, including the delivery of high quality, evidence-based practices and secondary aims focused on student level impacts. Results A number of challenges, many not reported in the literature are reviewed, and ideas for overcoming them are presented. Conclusions Given the reality that the majority of youth mental health services are delivered in schools and the potential of school mental health (SMH) services to provide a continuum of mental health care from promotion to intervention, it is critical that the field consider and address the logistical and methodological challenges associated with implementing and studying EBP implementation by clinicians. PMID:24063310

  15. Developing and Evaluating Communication Strategies to Support Informed Decisions and Practice Based on Evidence (DECIDE): protocol and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treweek, Shaun; Oxman, Andrew D; Alderson, Philip; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Brandt, Linn; Brożek, Jan; Davoli, Marina; Flottorp, Signe; Harbour, Robin; Hill, Suzanne; Liberati, Alessandro; Liira, Helena; Schünemann, Holger J; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Thornton, Judith; Vandvik, Per Olav; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2013-01-09

    Healthcare decision makers face challenges when using guidelines, including understanding the quality of the evidence or the values and preferences upon which recommendations are made, which are often not clear. GRADE is a systematic approach towards assessing the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations in healthcare. GRADE also gives advice on how to go from evidence to decisions. It has been developed to address the weaknesses of other grading systems and is now widely used internationally. The Developing and Evaluating Communication Strategies to Support Informed Decisions and Practice Based on Evidence (DECIDE) consortium (http://www.decide-collaboration.eu/), which includes members of the GRADE Working Group and other partners, will explore methods to ensure effective communication of evidence-based recommendations targeted at key stakeholders: healthcare professionals, policymakers, and managers, as well as patients and the general public. Surveys and interviews with guideline producers and other stakeholders will explore how presentation of the evidence could be improved to better meet their information needs. We will collect further stakeholder input from advisory groups, via consultations and user testing; this will be done across a wide range of healthcare systems in Europe, North America, and other countries. Targeted communication strategies will be developed, evaluated in randomized trials, refined, and assessed during the development of real guidelines. Results of the DECIDE project will improve the communication of evidence-based healthcare recommendations. Building on the work of the GRADE Working Group, DECIDE will develop and evaluate methods that address communication needs of guideline users. The project will produce strategies for communicating recommendations that have been rigorously evaluated in diverse settings, and it will support the transfer of research into practice in healthcare systems globally.

  16. Evaluation of musculoskeletal pain management practices in rural nursing homes compared with evidence-based criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Sheila A; Culp, Kennith R; Cacchione, Pamela Z

    2009-06-01

    Chronic pain, mainly associated with musculoskeletal diagnoses, is inadequately and often inappropriately treated in nursing home residents. The purpose of this descriptive study is to identify the musculoskeletal diagnoses associated with pain and to compare pain management of a sample of nursing home residents with the 1998 evidence-based guideline proposed by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). The sample consists of 215 residents from 13 rural Iowa nursing home homes. The residents answered a series of face-to-face questions that addressed the presence/absence of pain and completed the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Data on pain were abstracted from the Minimum Data Set (MDS). Analyses included descriptive statistics, cross tabulations, and one-way analysis of variance. Residents' responses to the face-to-face pain questions yielded higher rates of pain compared with the MDS pain data. Resident records showed that acetaminophen was the most frequently administered analgesic medication (30.9%). Propoxyphene, not an AGS-recommended opioid, was also prescribed for 23 residents (10.7%). Of the 70 residents (32.6%) expressing daily pain, 23 (32.9%) received no scheduled or pro re nata analgesics. There was no significant difference between MMSE scores and number of scheduled analgesics. Additionally, residents' self-reported use of topical agents was not documented in the charts. The findings suggest that the 1998 AGS evidence-based guideline for the management of chronic pain is inconsistently implemented.

  17. The evidence base for the use of internal dosimetry in the clinical practice of molecular radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Lidia [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Rome (Italy); Konijnenberg, Mark [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chiesa, Carlo [Instituto Nazionale Tumori, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Bardies, Manuel [UMR 1037 INSERM / Universite Paul Sabatier, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Du, Yong [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT, Sutton, London (United Kingdom); Gleisner, Katarina Sjoegreen [Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences, Lund (Sweden); Lassmann, Michael [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Flux, Glenn [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Joint Department of Physics, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Molecular radiotherapy (MRT) has demonstrated unique therapeutic advantages in the treatment of an increasing number of cancers. As with other treatment modalities, there is related toxicity to a number of organs at risk. Despite the large number of clinical trials over the past several decades, considerable uncertainties still remain regarding the optimization of this therapeutic approach and one of the vital issues to be answered is whether an absorbed radiation dose-response exists that could be used to guide personalized treatment. There are only limited and sporadic data investigating MRT dosimetry. The determination of dose-effect relationships for MRT has yet to be the explicit aim of a clinical trial. The aim of this article was to collate and discuss the available evidence for an absorbed radiation dose-effect relationships in MRT through a review of published data. Based on a PubMed search, 92 papers were found. Out of 79 studies investigating dosimetry, an absorbed dose-effect correlation was found in 48. The application of radiobiological modelling to clinical data is of increasing importance and the limited published data on absorbed dose-effect relationships based on these models are also reviewed. Based on National Cancer Institute guideline definition, the studies had a moderate or low rate of clinical relevance due to the limited number of studies investigating overall survival and absorbed dose. Nevertheless, the evidence strongly implies a correlation between the absorbed doses delivered and the response and toxicity, indicating that dosimetry-based personalized treatments would improve outcome and increase survival. (orig.)

  18. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  19. Systems consultation: protocol for a novel implementation strategy designed to promote evidence-based practice in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Andrew; Brown, Randall T; E Zgierska, Aleksandra; A Johnson, Roberta; Robinson, James M; Jacobson, Nora

    2016-01-27

    Adoption of evidence-based practices takes place at a glacial place in healthcare. This research will pilot test an innovative implementation strategy - systems consultation -intended to speed the adoption of evidence-based practice in primary care. The strategy is based on tenets of systems engineering and has been extensively tested in addiction treatment. Three innovations have been included in the strategy - translation of a clinical practice guideline into a checklist-based implementation guide, the use of physician peer coaches ('systems consultants') to help clinics implement the guide, and a focus on reducing variation in practices across prescribers and clinics. The implementation strategy will be applied to improving opioid prescribing practices in primary care, which may help ultimately mitigate the increasing prevalence of opioid abuse and addiction. The pilot test will compare four intervention clinics to four control clinics in a matched-pairs design. A leading clinical guideline for opioid prescribing has been translated into a checklist-based implementation guide in a systematic process that involved experts who wrote the guideline in consultation with implementation experts and primary care physicians. Two physicians with expertise in family and addiction medicine are serving as the systems consultants. Each systems consultant will guide two intervention clinics, using two site visits and follow-up communication by phone and email, to implement the translated guideline. Mixed methods will be used to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of the implementation strategy in an evaluation that meets standards for 'fully developed use' of the RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance). The clinic will be the primary unit of analysis. The systems consultation implementation strategy is intended to generalize to the adoption of other clinical guidelines. This pilot test is intended to prepare

  20. Organizational contextual features that influence the implementation of evidence-based practices across healthcare settings: a systematic integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly-Anne; Jeffs, Lianne; Barwick, Melanie; Stevens, Bonnie

    2018-05-05

    Organizational contextual features have been recognized as important determinants for implementing evidence-based practices across healthcare settings for over a decade. However, implementation scientists have not reached consensus on which features are most important for implementing evidence-based practices. The aims of this review were to identify the most commonly reported organizational contextual features that influence the implementation of evidence-based practices across healthcare settings, and to describe how these features affect implementation. An integrative review was undertaken following literature searches in CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from January 2005 to June 2017. English language, peer-reviewed empirical studies exploring organizational context in at least one implementation initiative within a healthcare setting were included. Quality appraisal of the included studies was performed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Inductive content analysis informed data extraction and reduction. The search generated 5152 citations. After removing duplicates and applying eligibility criteria, 36 journal articles were included. The majority (n = 20) of the study designs were qualitative, 11 were quantitative, and 5 used a mixed methods approach. Six main organizational contextual features (organizational culture; leadership; networks and communication; resources; evaluation, monitoring and feedback; and champions) were most commonly reported to influence implementation outcomes in the selected studies across a wide range of healthcare settings. We identified six organizational contextual features that appear to be interrelated and work synergistically to influence the implementation of evidence-based practices within an organization. Organizational contextual features did not influence implementation efforts independently from other features. Rather, features were interrelated and often influenced each

  1. Aligning Theory and Design: The Development of an Online Learning Intervention to Teach Evidence-based Practice for Maximal Reach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagran, Louise; Vihstadt, Corrie; Evans, Roni

    2015-09-01

    Online educational interventions to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) are a promising mechanism for overcoming some of the barriers to incorporating research into practice. However, attention must be paid to aligning strategies with adult learning theories to achieve optimal outcomes. We describe the development of a series of short self-study modules, each covering a small set of learning objectives. Our approach, informed by design-based research (DBR), involved 6 phases: analysis, design, design evaluation, redesign, development/implementation, and evaluation. Participants were faculty and students in 3 health programs at a complementary and integrative educational institution. We chose a reusable learning object approach that allowed us to apply 4 main learning theories: events of instruction, cognitive load, dual processing, and ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction). A formative design evaluation suggested that the identified theories and instructional approaches were likely to facilitate learning and motivation. Summative evaluation was based on a student survey (N=116) that addressed how these theories supported learning. Results suggest that, overall, the selected theories helped students learn. The DBR approach allowed us to evaluate the specific intervention and theories for general applicability. This process also helped us define and document the intervention at a level of detail that covers almost all the proposed Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational intervention and Teaching (GREET) items. This thorough description will facilitate the interpretation of future research and implementation of the intervention. Our approach can also serve as a model for others considering online EBP intervention development.

  2. Evidence based guidelines and current practice for physiotherapy management of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nicola E; Hurley, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    To document physiotherapy provision for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in relation to the United Kingdom (UK) recently published National Institute of health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines for osteoarthritis. Questionnaire survey of chartered physiotherapists. 300 postal questionnaires were distributed to Physiotherapy Departments requesting information regarding source of referrals, treatment aims, preferred methods of treatment and service delivery. Responses were received from 83 physiotherapists (28 %), predominantly working in the UK National Health Service. Approximately equal numbers of referrals came from primary and secondary care. Aims of physiotherapy management were to; encourage self-management; increase strength and range of movement; reduce pain; and improve function. To achieve these, exercise was utilised by 100% of practitioners, often supplemented with electrotherapeutic modalities (66%), manual therapy (64%) and acupuncture (60%). The majority of patients received individual treatment for a total contact time of 1-2 hours, whilst most group interventions lasted 5-6 hours. Approximately half (54%) of respondents reported using outcome measures to determine treatment efficacy. Although knee OA is usually managed in primary care, the similar number of referrals from primary and secondary care may suggest a deviation from evidence-based management guidelines. The guidelines' recommendations of exercise, patient education and self-management are observed by physiotherapists, but other modalities are often used despite poor or no research evidence supporting their efficacy. Whether any of these interventions are clinically beneficial is speculative as treatment outcomes were frequently under-evaluated.

  3. Overcoming barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice concepts in athletic training education: perceptions of select educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manspeaker, Sarah; Van Lunen, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    The need to include evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in entry-level athletic training education is evident as the profession transitions toward using evidence to inform clinical decision making. To evaluate athletic training educators' experience with implementation of EBP concepts in Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)-accredited entry-level athletic training education programs in reference to educational barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers. Qualitative interviews of emergent design with grounded theory. Undergraduate CAATE-accredited athletic training education programs. Eleven educators (3 men, 8 women). The average number of years teaching was 14.73 ± 7.06. Interviews were conducted to evaluate perceived barriers and strategies for overcoming these barriers to implementation of evidence-based concepts in the curriculum. Interviews were explored qualitatively through open and axial coding. Established themes and categories were triangulated and member checked to determine trustworthiness. Educators identified 3 categories of need for EBP instruction: respect for the athletic training profession, use of EBP as part of the decision-making toolbox, and third-party reimbursement. Barriers to incorporating EBP concepts included time, role strain, knowledge, and the gap between clinical and educational practices. Suggested strategies for surmounting barriers included identifying a starting point for inclusion and approaching inclusion from a faculty perspective. Educators must transition toward instruction of EBP, regardless of barriers present in their academic programs, in order to maintain progress with other health professions' clinical practices and educational standards. Because today's students are tomorrow's clinicians, we need to include EBP concepts in entry-level education to promote critical thinking, inspire potential research interest, and further develop the available body of knowledge in our

  4. [Evidence-based practice in nursing curricula: the experience of nursing degree course of Reggio Emilia. A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, Stefano; Chiesi, Ivens; Mecugni, Daniela; Casali, Patrizia; Doro, Lucia Maria Grazia; Lusetti, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Given the lack of evidence in literature concerning the presence of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing curricula, but considering its importance in order to educate future nurses to use critical thinking and to base their practice on scientific evidence, tutors and nursing teachers of the Nursing Degree Course of Reggio Emilia (Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia), have decided to introduce a three-year laboratory of EBP. The purposes of this project are: to describe the three-year EBP laboratory of Nursing Degree, its objectives, its structure, its integration with practical training and nursing subjects and its students evaluation strategies; to get students verify the perception of the usefulness of the three-year EBP laboratory regarding the elaboration of the graduation thesis, the search for appropriatem answers for patients met during clinical trainings and the usefulness of the EBP process in view of the development of their professional career. The design of research of this pilot study is correlation-descriptive. It has been selected a sample of convenience consisting of 56 nurses graduated in the autumn session of the academic year 2007-2008. For data collection we have used an electronic questionnaire (Microsoft Word with closed fields) structured for the purpose. The laboratory has been effective in learning to use the database to search for evidences and to use the database to search for evidences related to nursing problems met in training placements. Finally, graduated nurses consider the EBP process an essential element of professional nursing luggage. Although the sample is restricted the results indicates the good educational choice made by our Nursing Degree Course of integrating the EBP Laboratory in the curriculum.

  5. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Depression Detection in Older Adults With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ellen Leslie; Raue, Patrick J; Halpert, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Depression and dementia are the two most common psychiatric syndromes in the older adult population. Depression in older adults with and without dementia often goes unrecognized and untreated. The current guideline recommends a three-step procedure that can be used across health care settings to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms. Implementation of the evidence-based guideline requires administration of the Mini-Mental State Examination and either the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form or Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, depending on level of cognitive functioning. The algorithm provided is designed to be used by nurses, physicians, and social workers for the purpose of depression screening in older adults with dementia. Detection of depression in individuals with dementia is hindered by a lack of a validated, brief screening tool. More research is needed on the use of such screenings among older adults with cognitive impairment. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Beliefs and implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses and allied healthcare providers in the Valais hospital, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is upheld as a means for patients to receive the most efficient care in a given context. Despite the available evidence and positive beliefs about it, implementing EBP as standard daily practice still faces many obstacles. This study investigated the beliefs about and implementation of EBP among nurses and allied healthcare providers (AHP) in 9 acute care hospitals in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted. The target population was composed of 1899 nurses and 126 AHPs. Beliefs about and implementation of EBP were measured using EBP-Beliefs and EBP-Implementation scales of Melnyk et al. The initial sample consisted in 491 participants (overall response rate 24.2%): 421 nurses (22.4% response rate) and 78 AHPs (61.9% response rate). The final sample, composed only of those who declared previous exposure to EBP, included 391 participants (329 nurses and 62 AHPs). Overall, participants had positive attitudes towards EBP and were willing to increase their knowledge to guide practice. However, they acknowledged poor implementation of EBP in daily practice. A significantly higher level of EBP implementation was declared by those formally trained in it (P = 0.006) and by those occupying more senior professional functions (P = 0.004). EBP-Belief scores predicted 13% of the variance in the EBP-Implementation scores (R 2  = 0.13). EBP is poorly implemented despite positive beliefs about it. Continuing education and support on EBP would help to ensure that patients receive the best available care based on high-quality evidence, patient needs, clinical expertise, and a fair distribution of healthcare resources. This study's results will be used to guide institutional strategy to increase the use of EBP in daily practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Evidence-based medicine, the research-practice gap, and biases in medical and surgical decision making in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaglstein, William H

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this article are to promote a better understanding of a group of biases that influence therapeutic decision making by physicians/dermatologists and to raise the awareness that these biases contribute to a research-practice gap that has an impact on physicians and treatment solutions. The literature included a wide range of peer-reviewed articles dealing with biases in decision making, evidence-based medicine, randomized controlled clinical trials, and the research-practice gap. Bias against new therapies, bias in favor of indirect harm or omission, and bias against change when multiple new choices are offered may unconsciously affect therapeutic decision making. Although there is no comprehensive understanding or theory as to how choices are made by physicians, recognition of certain cognition patterns and their associated biases will help narrow the research-practice gap and optimize decision making regarding therapeutic choices.

  8. Evidence-based practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine for primary open-angle glaucoma (qingfeng -neizhang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingxin; Ma, Qiu-Yan; Yang, Yue; He, Yu-Peng; Ma, Chao-Ting; Li, Qiang; Jin, Ming; Chen, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a chronic, progressive optic neuropathy. The aim was to develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for POAG with focus on Chinese medicine pattern differentiation and treatment as well as approved herbal proprietary medicine. The guideline development group involved in various pieces of expertise in contents and methods. Authors searched electronic databases include CNKI, VIP, Sino-Med, Wanfang data, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, as well as checked China State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) from the inception of these databases to June 30, 2015. Systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine treating adults with POAG were evaluated. Risk of bias tool in the Cochrane Handbook and evidence strength developed by the GRADE group were applied for the evaluation, and recommendations were based on the findings incorporating evidence strength. After several rounds of Expert consensus, the final guideline was endorsed by relevant professional committees. CHM treatment principle and formulae based on pattern differentiation together with approved patent herbal medicines are the main treatments for POAG, and the diagnosis and treatment focusing on blood related patterns is the major domain. CHM therapy alone or combined with other conventional treatment reported in clinical studies together with Expert consensus were recommended for clinical practice.

  9. How do nurse academics value and engage with evidence-based practice across Australia: Findings from a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Gulzar; McKenna, Lisa; Griffiths, Debra

    2016-06-01

    Integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into undergraduate education and preparing future nurses to embrace EBP in clinical practice becomes paramount in today's complex and evolving healthcare environment. The role that EBP plays in the practical lives of nursing students will depend on the degree to which it is promoted by academics, how it is incorporated into courses and its application to clinical setting. Hence, nursing academics play a crucial role in influencing its integration into curricula. Drawn from a larger doctoral study, this paper presents findings discussing how nurse academics value and engage with EBP. Grounded theory was employed to explore processes used by nursing academics while incorporating EBP into teaching and learning practices. Twenty-three academics across Australian universities were interviewed. Nine were also observed while teaching undergraduate students. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews and non-participant observation. In keeping with the tenets of grounded theory, data collection and analysis continued until theoretical saturation was reached. In total, four categories emerged. This paper focuses on the category conceptualised as Valuing and Engaging with EBP. How nursing academics valued and engaged with EBP was closely associated with meanings they constructed around understanding it, attitudes and commitment to implementation while teaching and working clinically. Different opinions also existed in regard to what actually constituted EBP. However, they engaged with and valued EBP by keeping themselves up-to-date, being involved in research activities, using evidence in teaching, therefore leading by example. Participants identified a number of barriers influencing their engagement with EBP including heavy workloads, limited time, lack of commitment within their schools, lack of confidence with teaching EBP, and complexity of EBP application. Faculty clinical practice, committed academics, workload

  10. Thinking and practice of accelerating transformation of traditional Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyan; Zhang, Yanhong; Hu, Jingqing; He, Liyun; Zhou, Xuezhong

    2011-06-01

    The gradual development of Chinese medicine is based on constant accumulation and summary of experience in clinical practice, but without the benefit of undergoing the experimental medicine stage. Although Chinese medicine has formed a systematic and unique theory system through thousands of years, with the development of evidence-based medicine, the bondage of the research methods of experience medicine to Chinese medicine is appearing. The rapid transition and transformation from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine have become important content in the development of Chinese medicine. According to the features of Chinese medicine, we propose the research idea of "taking two ways simultaneously," which is the study both in the ideal condition and in the real world. Analyzing and constructing the theoretical basis and methodology of clinical research in the real world, and building the stage for research technique is key to the effective clinical research of Chinese medicine. Only by gradually maturing and completing the clinical research methods of the real world could we realize "taking two ways simultaneously" and complementing each other, continuously produce scientific and reliable evidence of Chinese medicine, as well as transform and develop Chinese medicine from experience medicine to evidence-based medicine.

  11. Evidence-based integrated environmental solutions for secondary lead smelters: Pollution prevention and waste minimization technologies and practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genaidy, A.M., E-mail: world_tek_inc@yahoo.com [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Sequeira, R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Tolaymat, T. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Kohler, J. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Washington DC (United States); Rinder, M. [WorldTek Inc, Cincinnati (United States)

    2009-05-01

    An evidence-based methodology was adopted in this research to establish strategies to increase lead recovery and recycling via a systematic review and critical appraisal of the published literature. In particular, the research examines pollution prevention and waste minimization practices and technologies that meet the following criteria: (a) reduce/recover/recycle the largest quantities of lead currently being disposed of as waste, (b) technically and economically viable, that is, ready to be diffused and easily transferable, and (c) strong industry interest (i.e., industry would consider implementing projects with higher payback periods). The following specific aims are designed to achieve the study objectives: Aim 1 - To describe the recycling process of recovering refined lead from scrap; Aim 2 - To document pollution prevention and waste management technologies and practices adopted by US stakeholders along the trajectory of LAB and lead product life cycle; Aim 3 - To explore improved practices and technologies which are employed by other organizations with an emphasis on the aforementioned criteria; Aim 4 - To demonstrate the economic and environmental costs and benefits of applying improved technologies and practices to existing US smelting operations; and Aim 5 - To evaluate improved environmental technologies and practices using an algorithm that integrates quantitative and qualitative criteria. The process of identifying relevant articles and reports was documented. The description of evidence was presented for current practices and technologies used by US smelters as well as improved practices and technologies. Options for integrated environmental solutions for secondary smelters were introduced and rank ordered on the basis of costs (i.e., capital investment) and benefits (i.e., production increases, energy and flux savings, and reduction of SO2 and slag). An example was provided to demonstrate the utility of the algorithm by detailing the costs and

  12. Evidence-based integrated environmental solutions for secondary lead smelters: pollution prevention and waste minimization technologies and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genaidy, A M; Sequeira, R; Tolaymat, T; Kohler, J; Rinder, M

    2009-05-01

    An evidence-based methodology was adopted in this research to establish strategies to increase lead recovery and recycling via a systematic review and critical appraisal of the published literature. In particular, the research examines pollution prevention and waste minimization practices and technologies that meet the following criteria: (a) reduce/recover/recycle the largest quantities of lead currently being disposed of as waste, (b) technically and economically viable, that is, ready to be diffused and easily transferable, and (c) strong industry interest (i.e., industry would consider implementing projects with higher payback periods). The following specific aims are designed to achieve the study objectives: Aim 1 - To describe the recycling process of recovering refined lead from scrap; Aim 2 - To document pollution prevention and waste management technologies and practices adopted by US stakeholders along the trajectory of LAB and lead product life cycle; Aim 3 - To explore improved practices and technologies which are employed by other organizations with an emphasis on the aforementioned criteria; Aim 4 - To demonstrate the economic and environmental costs and benefits of applying improved technologies and practices to existing US smelting operations; and Aim 5 - To evaluate improved environmental technologies and practices using an algorithm that integrates quantitative and qualitative criteria. The process of identifying relevant articles and reports was documented. The description of evidence was presented for current practices and technologies used by US smelters as well as improved practices and technologies. Options for integrated environmental solutions for secondary smelters were introduced and rank ordered on the basis of costs (i.e., capital investment) and benefits (i.e., production increases, energy and flux savings, and reduction of SO(2) and slag). An example was provided to demonstrate the utility of the algorithm by detailing the costs and

  13. Reverse quality management: developing evidence-based best practices in health emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Tim; Cox, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Framework for Core Functions in Public Health was the catalyst that inspired this review of best practices in health emergency management. The fieldwork was conducted in the fall of 2005 between hurricane Katrina and the South Asia earthquake. These tragedies, shown on 24/7 television news channels, provided an eyewitness account of disaster management, or lack of it, in our global village world. It is not enough to just have best practices in place. There has to be a governance structure that can be held accountable. This review of best practices lists actions in support of an emergency preparedness culture at the management, executive, and corporate/governance levels of the organization. The methodology adopted a future quality management approach of the emergency management process to identify the corresponding performance indictors that correlated with practices or sets of practices. Identifying best practice performance indictors needed to conduct a future quality management audit is described as reverse quality management. Best practices cannot be assessed as stand-alone criteria; they are influenced by organizational culture. The defining of best practices was influenced by doubt about defining a practice it is hoped will never be performed, medical staff involvement, leadership, and an appreciation of the resources required and how they need to be managed. Best practice benchmarks are seen as being related more to "measures" of performance defined locally and agreed on by 2 or more parties rather than to achieving industrial standards. Relating practices to performance indicators and then to benchmarks resulted in the development of a Health Emergency Management Best Practices Matrix that lists specific practice in the different phases of emergency management.

  14. Early enteral nutrition in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability: an evidence-based review and practical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuofei; Wu, Xingjiang; Yu, Wenkui; Li, Jieshou

    2014-02-01

    Early enteral nutrition (EEN) in critically ill patients is associated with significant benefit as well as elevated risk of complications. Concomitant use of EEN with vasopressors has been associated with nonocclusive bowel necrosis in critically ill patients with hemodynamic instability. The decision when to initiate enteral nutrition in hemodynamically unstable patients that require vasoactive substances remains a clinical dilemma. This review summarizes the effect of EEN and vasoactive agents on gastrointestinal blood flow and perfusion in critically ill patients, based on current evidence. Animal and clinical data involving simultaneous administration of EEN and vasoactive agents for hemodynamic instability are reviewed, and the factors related to the safety and effectiveness of EEN support in this patient population are analyzed. Moreover, practical recommendations are provided. Additional randomized clinical trials are warranted to provide cutting-edge evidence-based guidance about this issue for practitioners of critical care.

  15. Taking Evidence-Based Practices to School: Using Expert Opinion to Develop a Brief, Evidence-Informed School-Based Mental Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Bruns, Eric J.; Weathers, Ericka S.; Canavas, Nick; Ludwig, Kristy; Vander Stoep, Ann; Cheney, Douglas; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    School-based mental health services offer unparalleled opportunities for providing accessible care to children and adolescents. Research indicates that services available in schools are rarely based on evidence of effectiveness and are typically disconnected from the larger school context. To address these issues, the current paper presents…

  16. Randomised controlled trial of a theoretically grounded tailored intervention to diffuse evidence-based public health practice [ISRCTN23257060

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordheim Lena

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that Norwegian public health physicians do not systematically and explicitly use scientific evidence in their practice. They work in an environment that does not encourage the integration of this information in decision-making. In this study we investigate whether a theoretically grounded tailored intervention to diffuse evidence-based public health practice increases the physicians' use of research information. Methods 148 self-selected public health physicians were randomised to an intervention group (n = 73 and a control group (n = 75. The intervention group received a multifaceted intervention while the control group received a letter declaring that they had access to library services. Baseline assessments before the intervention and post-testing immediately at the end of a 1.5-year intervention period were conducted. The intervention was theoretically based and consisted of a workshop in evidence-based public health, a newsletter, access to a specially designed information service, to relevant databases, and to an electronic discussion list. The main outcome measure was behaviour as measured by the use of research in different documents. Results The intervention did not demonstrate any evidence of effects on the objective behaviour outcomes. We found, however, a statistical significant difference between the two groups for both knowledge scores: Mean difference of 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.6 in the score for knowledge about EBM-resources and mean difference of 0.2 (95% CI: 0.0–0.3 in the score for conceptual knowledge of importance for critical appraisal. There were no statistical significant differences in attitude-, self-efficacy-, decision-to-adopt- or job-satisfaction scales. There were no significant differences in Cochrane library searching after controlling for baseline values and characteristics. Conclusion Though demonstrating effect on knowledge the study failed to provide support for

  17. The science and practice of micronutrient supplementations in nutritional anemia: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Mike, Leigh Ann

    2014-08-01

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia, affecting millions of people in all age groups worldwide. While inadequate access to food and nutrients can lead to anemia, patients with certain health status or medical conditions are also at increased risk of developing nutritional anemia. Iron, cobalamin, and folate are the most recognized micronutrients that are vital for the generation of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency is associated with insufficient production of hemoglobin. Deficiency of cobalamin or folate leads to impaired synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, and cell division. Recent research has demonstrated that the status of copper and zinc in the body can significantly affect iron absorption and utilization. With an increasing number of patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedures, more cases of anemia associated with copper and zinc deficiencies have also emerged. The intestinal absorption of these 5 critical micronutrients are highly regulated and mediated by specific apical transport mechanisms in the enterocytes. Health conditions that persistently alter the histology of the upper intestinal architecture, expression, or function of these substrate-specific transporters, or the normal digestion and flow of these key micronutrients, can lead to nutritional anemia. The focus of this article is to review the science of intestinal micronutrient absorption, discuss the clinical assessment of micronutrient deficiencies in relation to anemia, and suggest an effective treatment plan and monitoring strategies using an evidence-based approach. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Pre-Practicum Training in Professional Psychology to Close the Research-Practice Gap: Changing Attitudes Towards Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Sarah Kate; Wadkins, Melanie; Bailin, Abby; Doctoroff, Greta

    2015-02-01

    Despite the rapid proliferation of mental health interventions with proven benefit for youth, empirically supported interventions (ESIs) are underutilized in most service settings. Treatment outcome studies in these community-based settings suggest that the majority of youth do not show improvement, underscoring the importance of addressing the gap between research and practice. Clinician attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP) may limit the use of ESIs, and efforts to address these attitudes with post-graduate training pose significant challenges. Pre-practicum training in EBP may address these challenges by familiarizing students with the framework of EBP as well as with the current youth treatment evidence base and the theories and strategies of well-supported interventions. We describe a required EBP course within a professional psychology doctoral program. Forty-two students in two class cohorts completed a measure of attitudes toward EBP prior to the first class and after the final class lecture. Students were predominantly Caucasian women with bachelor's degrees. As expected, over the course of the class, student attitudes became significantly more favorable toward EBP. Students who had previously received a master's degree had more favorable attitudes prior to the class, and students with a prior bachelor's degree showed the greatest change in attitude. The results support the use of pre-practicum training in EBP to improve attitudes toward EBP, which may lead to use of effective practices with clients following training.

  19. The Role of Lean Process Improvement in Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Scott, Jennifer; Vilander, Gavin; Marx, Larry; Quirk, Michael; Lindberg, Julie; Koerner, Kelly

    2015-10-01

    To effectively implement evidence-based practices (EBP) in behavioral health care, an organization needs to have operating structures and processes that can address core EBP implementation factors and stages. Lean, a widely used quality improvement process, can potentially address the factors crucial to successful implementation of EBP. This article provides an overview of Lean and the relationship between Lean process improvement steps, and EBP implementation models. Examples of how Lean process improvement methodologies can be used to help plan and carry out implementation of EBP in mental health delivery systems are presented along with limitations and recommendations for future research and clinical application.

  20. Home-based telecommuting and quality of life: further evidence on an employee-oriented human resource practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Severin; Glaser, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    Building on previous research, further evidence for the potential of home-based telecommuting as an employee-oriented human resource practice is provided from a study in the German public administration. Survey data from 1,008 public employees were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Mean age of the sample was 43.6 yr. (SD = 8.8 yr.), and 27.5% (277) of the participants were women. Analysis supported the roles of higher Autonomy and lower Work-Family Conflict as psychological mediators between Telecommunication Intensity and both Job Satisfaction and Quality of Life. Implications for the design of flexible working arrangements are discussed.

  1. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians.

  2. Implementing evidence-based practices for youth in an HMO: the roles of external ratings and market share.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John; Daleiden, Eric; Dopson, Sue

    2011-05-01

    A qualitative study of child clinicians in a non-profit HMO examined implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for anxiety and oppositional defiant disorders using interviews and focus groups with 33 clinicians (97% of participants), and ethnography of emails and meetings. Analysis showed statistical measures of access and service-key elements of rating organizations' "report cards"- were central in creating "pressure" making transition to EBPs difficult. EBPs were secondary to access and service targets. "Research" and "statistics" were perceived as unrealistic, "literature" as lacking authority. Rating organizations should include outcome and fidelity metrics to align market share pressures with children's health.

  3. Teaching Evidence-Based Practice across Curricula-An Overview of a Professional Development Course for Occupational Therapy Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Marta M; DeAngelis, Tina M

    2017-01-01

    A professional development course for occupational therapy educators about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) was developed and piloted. The course was developed to promote increased awareness of resources and methods for teaching EBP that are applicable across entry-level curricula. Participants included full-time faculty (n = 7) from one entry-level occupational therapy program in the New York City area. The results of the pilot informed refinement of the course in preparation for delivery to a wider audience of educators. This paper provides a description of the course, results of the pilot, and implications for future delivery of the course.

  4. Place shaping to create health and wellbeing using health impact assessment: health geography applied to develop evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Alyson; Curtis, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    In a political milieu where there is pressure towards localised and participative decisionmaking, and an environment of global recession and environmental degradation, it is crucial that population health considerations inform strategic decisions. The paper puts forward 'place shaping to create health and wellbeing' as a strategic tool, drawing on ideas that are fundamental in health geography, and argues that this is an important emerging application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA), as part of evidence-based practice. These views developed primarily from case study work in the North East of England aiming to enhance health and wellbeing in a population with significant health disadvantages. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Laying a Firm Foundation: Embedding Evidence-Based Emergent Literacy Practices Into Early Intervention and Preschool Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Pamela; Watson, Maggie

    2018-04-05

    As part of this clinical forum on curriculum-based intervention, the goal of this tutorial is to share research about the importance of language and literacy foundations in natural environments during emergent literacy skill development, from infancy through preschool. Following an overview of intervention models in schools by Powell (2018), best practices at home, in child care, and in preschool settings are discussed. Speech-language pathologists in these settings will be provided a toolbox of best emergent literacy practices. A review of published literature in speech-language pathology, early intervention, early childhood education, and literacy was completed. Subsequently, an overview of the impact of early home and preschool literacy experiences are described. Research-based implementation of best practice is supported with examples of shared book reading and child-led literacy embedded in play within the coaching model of early intervention. Finally, various aspects of emergent literacy skill development in the preschool years are discussed. These include phonemic awareness, print/alphabet awareness, oral language skills, and embedded/explicit literacy. Research indicates that rich home literacy environments and exposure to rich oral language provide an important foundation for the more structured literacy environments of school. Furthermore, there is a wealth of evidence to support a variety of direct and indirect intervention practices in the home, child care, and preschool contexts to support and enhance all aspects of oral and written literacy. Application of this "toolbox" of strategies should enable speech-language pathologists to address the prevention and intervention of literacy deficits within multiple environments during book and play activities. Additionally, clinicians will have techniques to share with parents, child care providers, and preschool teachers for evidence-based literacy instruction within all settings during typical daily

  6. Teacher Progress Monitoring of Instructional and Behavioral Management Practices: An Evidence-Based Approach to Improving Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A.; Dudek, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    In the era of teacher evaluation and effectiveness, assessment tools that identify and monitor educators' instruction and behavioral management practices are in high demand. The Classroom Strategies Scale (CSS) Observer Form is a multidimensional teacher progress monitoring tool designed to assess teachers' usage of instructional and behavioral…

  7. Recent developments in family psychoeducation as an evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucksted, Alicia; McFarlane, William; Downing, Donna; Dixon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Among potential resources for people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) and their families, professionally delivered family psychoeducation (FPE) is designed to engage, inform, and educate family members, so that they can assist the person with SMI in managing their illness. In this article, we review research regarding FPE outcomes and implementation since 2001, updating the previous review in this journal (McFarlane, Dixon, Lukens, & Lucksted, Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 2003; 29, 223). Research on a range of FPE variations continues to return mostly positive effects for adults with schizophrenia and increasingly, bipolar disorder. More recent studies include functional outcomes as well as the more common relapse and hospitalization. FPE research involving adults with other diagnoses is increasing, as is FPE research outside the United States In both cases, uneven methodologies and multiple FPE variations make drawing conclusions difficult, although the core utility of access to information, skill building, problem solving, and social support often shines though. Since the previous review, several FPE programs for parents of children or youth with mood disorders have also been developed, with limited research showing more positive than null results. Similarly, we review the developing inquiry into early intervention and FPE, short-form FPE, and cost studies involving FPE. The second half of the article updates the paradox of FPE's evidence base versus its persistently low use, via recent implementation efforts. Multiple challenges and facilitating factors across healthcare systems and financing, individual programs and providers, family members, and consumers shape this issue, and we conclude with discussion of the need for empirical evaluation of implementation strategies and models. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  8. Evidence-based practices to increase hand hygiene compliance in health care facilities: An integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Jun Rong Jeffrey; Sagha-Zadeh, Rana; Vielemeyer, Ole; Franklin, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) in health care facilities is a key component to reduce pathogen transmission and nosocomial infections. However, most HH interventions (HHI) have not been sustainable. This review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of recently published evidence-based HHI designed to improve HH compliance (HHC) that will enable health care providers to make informed choices when allocating limited resources to improve HHC and patient safety. The Medline electronic database (using PubMed) was used to identify relevant studies. English language articles that included hand hygiene interventions and related terms combined with health care environments or related terms were included. Seventy-three studies that met the inclusion criteria were summarized. Interventions were categorized as improving awareness with education, facility design, and planning, unit-level protocols and procedures, hospital-wide programs, and multimodal interventions. Past successful HHIs may not be as effective when applied to other health care environments. HH education should be interactive and engaging. Electronic monitoring and reminders should be implemented in phases to ensure cost-effectiveness. To create hospitalwide programs that engage end users, policy makers should draw expertise from interdisciplinary fields. Before implementing the various components of multimodal interventions, health care practitioners should identify and examine HH difficulties unique to their organizations. Future research should seek to achieve the following: replicate successful HHI in other health care environments, develop reliable HHC monitoring tools, understand caregiver-patient-family interactions, examine ways (eg, hospital leadership, financial support, and strategies from public health and infection prevention initiatives) to sustain HHC, and use simulated lab environments to refine study designs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  9. Mediating role of critical thinking disposition in the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ae; Song, Youngshin; Sim, Hee-Sook; Ahn, Eun-Kyong; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of critical thinking in clinical and educational settings, little is known about its role in evidence-based practice (EBP). This study examined whether critical thinking disposition (CTD) mediates the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and EBP in clinical nurses (N=409). A path diagram using structural equation modeling was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of perceived barriers to research use on EBP, controlling for CTD as a mediator. CTD partially mediated the relationship between perceived barriers to research use and EBP. Furthermore, the hypothesized mediation model demonstrated an appropriate fit to the data. Individual and organizational efforts are needed to help nurses further improve their critical thinking skills. CTD is important as research barriers to engage effectively in EBP. Without the skills to evaluate evidence carefully, research utilization may be compromised.

  10. A practical approach to evidence-based dentistry: VIII: How to appraise an article based on a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Joanna E M; Amin, Maryam; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Glick, Michael; Guyatt, Gordon H; Azarpazhooh, Amir

    2015-08-01

    Because of qualitative researchers' abilities to explore social problems and to understand the perspective of patients, qualitative research studies are useful to provide insight about patients' fears, worries, goals, and expectations related to dental care. To benefit fully from such studies, clinicians should be aware of some relevant principles of critical appraisal. In this article, the authors present one approach to critically appraise the evidence from a qualitative research study. Critical appraisal involves assessing whether the results are credible (the selection of participants, research ethics, data collection, data analysis), what are these results, and how they can be applied in clinical practice. The authors also examined how the results could be applied to patient care in terms of offering theory, understanding the context of clinical practice, and helping clinicians understand social interactions in clinical care. By applying these principles, clinicians can consider qualitative studies when trying to achieve the best possible results for their own practices. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea among commercial motor vehicle drivers: using evidence-based practice to identify risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Kimberly; Wolf, Debra

    2013-11-01

    Commercial motor vehicle driving is a hazardous occupation, having the third highest fatality rate among common U.S. jobs. Among the estimated 14 million U.S. commercial motor vehicle drivers, the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea is reported to be 17% to 28%. Despite the identified increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among commercial motor vehicle drivers, federal law does not require that they be screened for obstructive sleep apnea. This article presents an evidence-based practice change project; the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a screening program to identify commercial motor vehicle drivers' risk for obstructive sleep apnea during commercial driver medical examinations. The results of this practice change indicated screening for obstructive sleep apnea during the commercial driver medical examination led to improved identification of obstructive sleep apnea risk among commercial motor vehicle drivers and should be a clinical standard in occupational health clinics. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. An evidence-based analysis of learning practices: the need for pharmacy students to employ more effective study strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel

    Learning is a process of constructing neural connections between what is being learned and what has already been learned. Superficial thought processes associated with memorization produce shallow, short-term learning. Higher-order thought processing (critical thinking) produces deep, long-term learning. Pharmacy students should study in ways that enable them to retain and apply what they learn. Investigators who surveyed the learning practices of pharmacy students have reported that most students resort to cramming in preparation for an upcoming exam. The practice of routinely keeping up with course material through regular study is much less common. Most students highlight or re-read material when studying rather than quizzing themselves, and many multitask or study with distractions such as texting, checking e-mails or using social media. Studies in cognitive psychology and education provide evidence to confirm the efficacy of the following learning practices: plan and manage study time, space out and repeat study, interleave (mix up) topics or methods, incorporate retrieval practice (self-quizzing, deliberative reading, or written paraphrasing), minimize distractions, leverage mistakes, and sleep at least seven hours a night. Pharmacy students need to become proficient, lifelong learners. A superficial, memorization-oriented approach to learning is detrimental to professional growth. Faculty members should guide students to employ more effective evidence-based study strategies, while also exploring how curricular design, course content, academic policy or pedagogy might be predisposing students to pursue suboptimal learning practices. The issue calls for the academy to focus greater attention on how students learn. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to…

  14. A practical, evidence-based, comprehensive (PEC) physical examination for diagnosing pathology of the long head of the biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Samuel; Krill, Michael K; Amoo-Achampong, Kelms; Kwon, KiHyun; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Clinical examination of the shoulder joint has gained attention as clinicians aim to use an evidence-based examination of the biceps tendon, with the desire for a proper diagnosis while minimizing costly imaging procedures. The purpose of this study is to create a decision tree analysis that enables the development of a clinical algorithm for diagnosing long head of biceps (LHB) pathology. A literature review of Level I and II diagnostic studies was conducted to extract characteristics of clinical tests for LHB pathology through a systematic review of PubMed, Medline, Ovid, and Cochrane Review databases. Tests were combined in series and parallel to determine sensitivities and specificities, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined for each combination using a subjective pretest probability. The "gold standard" for diagnosis in all included studies was arthroscopy or arthrotomy. The optimal testing modality was use of the uppercut test combined with the tenderness to palpation of the biceps tendon test. This combination achieved a sensitivity of 88.4% when performed in parallel and a specificity of 93.8% when performed in series. These tests used in combination optimize post-test probability accuracy greater than any single individual test. Performing the uppercut test and biceps groove tenderness to palpation test together has the highest sensitivity and specificity of known physical examinations maneuvers to aid in the diagnosis of LHB pathology compared with diagnostic arthroscopy (practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination). A decision tree analysis aides in the practical, evidence-based, comprehensive examination diagnostic accuracy post-testing based on the ordinal scale pretest probability. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitudes Toward Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice Among Physical Therapists and Social Workers: A Lesson for Interprofessional Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsdottir, Bjorg; Arnadottir, Hervor A; Gudmundsson, Halldor S; Juliusdottir, Sigrun; Arnadottir, Solveig A

    2017-01-01

    Professionals who embrace evidence-based practice (EBP) continually search for research evidence, appraise, and apply it, while interacting with each client in his/her situation. This dynamic learning process takes a substantial commitment from professionals and requires a positive attitude toward EBP. The main objective of this research was to explore the following: 1) distinct dimensions of attitudes toward adoption of EBP among physical therapists and social workers and 2) the relationship between these dimensions of attitudes and selected background characteristics of the compared professions. Cross-sectional web-based surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2013 on a population-based sample from the Icelandic Physical Therapy Association and the Icelandic Association of Social Workers. The participants were 214 physical therapists (76.3% women) and 163 social workers (92.2% women). The Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS) and its four subscales were used to survey dimensions of attitudes toward EBP. Scores on the total EBPAS range from zero to five, with a higher score indicating a more positive attitude toward EBPs. Linear regression was used to explore the relationship between the EBPAS scales and selected background variables. The overall response rate was 39%. Both professions generally held positive attitudes toward adoption of EBP, with an average EBPAS total score of 3.06 (SD = 0.46). The professionals' background characteristics were independently related to at least one dimension of attitudes toward EBP. More positive attitudes were associated with being a physical therapist, a woman, in a younger age group, having a graduate degree, working with individual clients, and having at least five same-profession coworkers. The results may be useful to design continuing education focusing on EBP. Such inventions should be targeted to professional attitudes, background, and other contextual factors.

  16. A survey of Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs about evidence-based practice and their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce F; Stomski, Norman J; Hebert, Jeff J; French, Simon D

    2013-12-17

    Research into chiropractors' use of evidence in clinical practice appears limited to a single small qualitative study. The paucity of research in this area suggests that it is timely to undertake a more extensive study to build a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence chiropractors' adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) principles. This study aimed to identify Australian chiropractors' attitudes and beliefs towards EBP in clinical practice, and also examine their use of research literature and clinical practice guidelines. We used an online questionnaire about attitudes, beliefs and behaviours towards the use of EBP in clinical practice that had been developed to survey physiotherapists and modified it to ensure that it was relevant to chiropractic practice. We endeavoured to survey all registered Australian chiropractors (n = 4378) via email invitation distributed by Australian chiropractic professional organisations and the Chiropractic Board of Australia. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine univariate associations between responses to items measuring attitudes and beliefs with items measuring: age; years since registration; attention to literature; and use of clinical practice guidelines. Questionnaires were returned by 584 respondents (response rate approximately 13%). The respondents' perceptions of EBP were generally positive: most agreed that the application of EBP is necessary (77.9%), literature and research findings are useful (80.2%), EBP helps them make decisions about patient care (66.5%), and expressed an interest in learning or improving EBP skills (74.9%). Almost half of the respondents (45.1%) read between two to five articles a month. Close to half of the respondents (44.7%) used literature in the process of clinical decision making two to five times each month. About half of the respondents (52.4%) agreed that they used clinical practice guidelines, and around half (54.4%) agreed that they were able

  17. Characteristics of physicians and patients who join team-based primary care practices: evidence from Quebec's Family Medicine Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Natalie; Strumpf, Erin; Fiset-Laniel, Julie; Tousignant, Pierre; Roy, Yves

    2014-06-01

    New models of delivering primary care are being implemented in various countries. In Quebec, Family Medicine Groups (FMGs) are a team-based approach to enhance access to, and coordination of, care. We examined whether physicians' and patients' characteristics predicted their participation in this new model of primary care. Using provincial administrative data, we created a population cohort of Quebec's vulnerable patients. We collected data before the advent of FMGs on patients' demographic characteristics, chronic illnesses and health service use, and their physicians' demographics, and practice characteristics. Multivariate regression was used to identify key predictors of joining a FMG among both patients and physicians. Patients who eventually enrolled in a FMG were more likely to be female, reside outside of an urban region, have a lower SES status, have diabetes and congestive heart failure, visit the emergency department for ambulatory sensitive conditions and be hospitalized for any cause. They were also less likely to have hypertension, visit an ambulatory clinic and have a usual provider of care. Physicians who joined a FMG were less likely to be located in urban locations, had fewer years in medical practice, saw more patients in hospital, and had patients with lower morbidity. Physicians' practice characteristics and patients' health status and health care service use were important predictors of joining a FMG. To avoid basing policy decisions on tenuous evidence, policymakers and researchers should account for differential selection into team-based primary health care models. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Mechanisms which help explain implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care facilities: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masso, Malcolm; McCarthy, Grace; Kitson, Alison

    2014-07-01

    The context for the study was a nation-wide programme in Australia to implement evidence-based practice in residential aged care, in nine areas of practice, using a wide range of implementation strategies and involving 108 facilities. The study drew on the experiences of those involved in the programme to answer the question: what mechanisms influence the implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care and how do those mechanisms interact? The methodology used grounded theory from a critical realist perspective, informed by a conceptual framework that differentiates between the context, process and content of change. People were purposively sampled and invited to participate in semi-structured interviews, resulting in 44 interviews involving 51 people during 2009 and 2010. Participants had direct experience of implementation in 87 facilities, across nine areas of practice, in diverse locations. Sampling continued until data saturation was reached. The quality of the research was assessed using four criteria for judging trustworthiness: credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Data analysis resulted in the identification of four mechanisms that accounted for what took place and participants' experiences. The core category that provided the greatest understanding of the data was the mechanism On Common Ground, comprising several constructs that formed a 'common ground' for change to occur. The mechanism Learning by Connecting recognised the ability to connect new knowledge with existing practice and knowledge, and make connections between actions and outcomes. Reconciling Competing Priorities was an ongoing mechanism whereby new practices had to compete with an existing set of constantly shifting priorities. Strategies for reconciling priorities ranged from structured approaches such as care planning to more informal arrangements such as conversations during daily work. The mechanism Exercising Agency bridged the gap between

  19. Challenges and ideas from a research program on high-quality, evidence-based practice in school mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D; Youngstrom, Eric A; Stephan, Sharon; Lever, Nancy; Fowler, Johnathan; Taylor, Leslie; McDaniel, Heather; Chappelle, Lori; Paggeot, Samantha; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the progression of a research program designed to develop, implement, and study the implementation of "achievable" evidence-based practices (EBPs) in schools. We review challenges encountered and ideas to overcome them to enhance this avenue of research. The article presents two federally funded randomized controlled trials involving comparison of a four-component targeted intervention (Quality Assessment and Improvement, Family Engagement and Empowerment, Modular Evidence-Based Practice, Implementation Support) versus a comparison intervention focused on personal wellness. In both studies, primary aims focused on changes in clinician attitudes and behavior, including the delivery of high-quality EBPs and secondary aims focused on student-level impacts. A number of challenges, many not reported in the literature, are reviewed, and ideas for overcoming them are presented. Given the reality that the majority of youth mental health services are delivered in schools and the potential of school mental health services to provide a continuum of mental health care from promotion to intervention, it is critical that the field consider and address the logistical and methodological challenges associated with implementing and studying EBP implementation by clinicians.

  20. Factors affecting implementation of an evidence-based practice in the Veterans Health Administration: Illness management and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Alan B; Salyers, Michelle P; White, Dominique A; Gilbride, Daniel J; White, Laura M; Kean, Jacob; Kukla, Marina

    2015-12-01

    Illness management and recovery (IMR) is an evidence-based practice that assists consumers in managing their illnesses and pursuing personal recovery goals. Although research has examined factors affecting IMR implementation facilitated by multifaceted, active roll-outs, the current study attempted to elucidate factors affecting IMR implementation outside the context of a research-driven implementation. Semi-structured interviews with 20 local recovery coordinators and 18 local IMR experts were conducted at 23 VA medical centers. Interviews examined perceived and experienced barriers and facilitators to IMR implementation. Data were analyzed via thematic inductive/deductive analysis in the form of crystallization/immersion. Six factors differed between sites implementing IMR from those not providing IMR: awareness of IMR, importer-champions, autonomy-supporting leadership, veteran-centered care, presence of a sensitive period, and presence of a psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery center. Four factors were common in both groups: recovery orientation, evidence-based practices orientation, perceived IMR fit within program structure, and availability of staff time. IMR can be adopted in lieu of active implementation support; however, knowledge dissemination appears to be key. Future research should examine factors affecting the quality of implementation. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Impact of Online Education on Nurses' Delivery of Smoking Cessation Interventions With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialous, Stella A; Sarna, Linda; Wells, Marjorie J; Brook, Jenny K; Kralikova, Eva; Pankova, Alexandra; Zatoński, Witold; Przewozniak, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in Europe and worldwide. Nurses, if properly educated, can contribute to decreasing the burden of tobacco use in the region by helping smokers quit smoking. To assess: (a) the feasibility of an online program to educate nurses in Czech Republic and Poland on evidence-based smoking cessation interventions for patients and (b) self-reported changes in practices related to consistently (usually or always) providing smoking cessation interventions to smokers, before and 3 months after participation in the program. A prospective single-group pre-post design. A total of 280 nurses from Czech Republic and 156 from Poland completed baseline and follow-up surveys. At 3 months, nurses were significantly more likely to provide smoking cessation interventions to patients who smoke and refer patients for cessation services (p Nurses significantly improved their views about the importance of nursing involvement in tobacco control. Education about tobacco control can make a difference in clinical practice, but ongoing support is needed to maintain these changes. Health system changes can also facilitate the expectation that delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions should be routine nursing care. Educating nurses on cessation interventions and tobacco control is pivotal to decrease tobacco-related disparities, disease, and death. Online methods provide an accessible way to reach a large number of nurses. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. 2015 EAL evidence-based nutrition practice guildeline for the management of hypertension in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertension (HTN) or high blood pressure (BP) is one of the most prevalent forms of cardiovascular disease and occurs in approximately one of every three adults in the United States. Nutrition therapy is an important component of treatment. The purpose of this Evidence Analysis Library (EAL) gui...

  3. Promoting an Inclusive Image of Scientists among Students: Towards Research Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Tosun, Ozge; Turgut, Sebnem; Orenler, Sefika; Sengul, Kubra; Top, Gokce

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effects of a teaching intervention, the design of which is informed by evidence from educational theories and research data, on students' images of scientists. A quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent pre-test-post-test control group (CG) was used to compare the outcomes of the intervention. The…

  4. Capturing Complex Realities: Understanding Efforts to Achieve Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine E.; Joyce, Kerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Studies exploring how and why evidence informs decisions (or not) often focus on perceived cultural, communicative and institutional gaps between research producers and users. More recently, there has been a growing interest in exploring how political differences between competing "policy networks" might shape research utilisation.…

  5. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  6. Enhancing the Impact of Evidence-Based Publications on K-12 ESL Teacher Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Marilyn L.; Lee, Kent; Rossiter, Marian J.

    2017-01-01

    The reading of current research-informed publications is an essential component of teacher professional development that has the potential to lead to or reinforce the implementation of effective instructional practices. To our knowledge, no studies have examined kindergarten to grade 12 (K-12) ESL teacher engagement in professional reading related…

  7. Caries preventive measures used in orthodontic practices: an evidence-based decision?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Katsaros, C.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although it is well known that treatment with fixed appliances increases the risk of enamel demineralization, little information is available about preventive measures that orthodontists actually use. This study was executed to survey measures used in orthodontic practices to prevent

  8. Leadership, Innovation Climate, and Attitudes toward Evidence-Based Practice during a Statewide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Leadership is important in practice change, yet there are few studies addressing this issue in mental health and social services. This study examined the differential roles of transformational (i.e., charismatic) leadership and leader-member exchange (i.e., the relationship between a supervisor and their direct service providers) on…

  9. Information literacy as the foundation for evidence-based practice in graduate nursing education: a curriculum-integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan; Rosenfeld, Peri; Haber, Judith

    2003-01-01

    As part of a system-wide initiative to advance evidence-based practice among clinicians, graduate students, and educators, the New York University Division of Nursing embarked on a curricular initiative to integrate components of information literacy in all core courses of the master's program. Increasing competency in information literacy is the foundation for evidence-based practice and provides nursing professionals with the skills to be literate consumers of information in an electronic environment. Competency in information literacy includes an understanding of the architecture of information and the scholarly process; the ability to navigate among a variety of print and electronic tools to effectively access, search, and critically evaluate appropriate resources; synthesize accumulated information into an existing body of knowledge; communicate research results clearly and effectively; and appreciate the social issues and ethical concerns related to the provision, dissemination, and sharing of information. In collaboration with the New York University Division of Libraries' Health Sciences Librarian, instructional modules in information literacy relevant to each of the 5 core nursing master's courses were developed, complemented by a Web-based tutorial: http://library.nyu.edu/research/health/tutorial. The Web site is multifaceted, with fundamentals for the beginner, as well as more complex content for the advanced user. Course assignments were designed to promote specific competencies in information literacy and strategies for evaluating the strength of the evidence found. A survey of information literacy competencies, which assessed students' knowledge, misconceptions, and use of electronic information resources, was administered when students entered the program and at 1-year intervals thereafter.

  10. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-10

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional development (CPD) courses that train clinical trainers to teach EBM through on-the-job training by demonstration of applied EBM real time in clinical practice. We developed such a course to encourage clinically relevant teaching of EBM in post-graduate education in various clinical environments. We devised an e-learning course targeting trainers with EBM knowledge to impart educational methods needed to teach application of EBM teaching in commonly used clinical settings. The curriculum development group comprised experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions in seven European countries. The e-learning sessions were designed to allow participants (teachers) to undertake the course in the workplace during short breaks within clinical activities. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. The curriculum defined specific learning objectives for teaching EBM by exploiting educational opportunities in six different clinical settings. The e-modules incorporated video clips that demonstrate practical and effective methods of EBM teaching in everyday clinical practice. The course encouraged focussed teaching activities embedded within a trainer's personal learning plan and documentation in a CPD portfolio for reflection. This curriculum will help senior clinicians to identify and make the best use of available opportunities in everyday practice in clinical situations to teach various steps of EBM and demonstrate their

  11. Depression Care for the Elderly: Reducing Barriers to Evidence Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ell, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of five key bodies of evidence identifying: 1) Characteristics of depression among older adults - its prevalence, risk factors and illness course, and impact on functional status, mortality, use of health services, and health care costs; 2) Effective Interventions, including pharmacologic, psychotherapies, care management, and combined intervention models; 3) Known Barriers to depression care including patient, provider and service system barriers; 4) Effective...

  12. Searching for Elements of Evidence-based Practices in Children’s Usual Care and Examining their Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ann F.; Accurso, Erin C.; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Roesch, Scott; Zhang, Jin Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Most of the knowledge generated to bridge the research - practice gap has been derived from experimental studies implementing specific treatment models. Alternatively, this study uses observational methods to generate knowledge about community-based treatment processes and outcomes. Aims are to (1) describe outcome trajectories for children with disruptive behavior problems (DBPs), and (2) test how observed delivery of a benchmark set of practice elements common in evidence-based (EB) treatments may be associated with outcome change, while accounting for potential confounding variables. Method Participants included 190 children ages 4–13 with DBPs and their caregivers, plus 85 psychotherapists, recruited from six clinics. All treatment sessions were video-taped and a random sample of four sessions in the first four months of treatment was reliably coded for intensity on 27 practice elements (benchmark set and others). Three outcomes (child symptom severity, parent discipline, and family functioning) were assessed by parent report at intake, four, and eight months. Data were collected on several potential covariates including child, parent, therapist, and service use characteristics. Multi-level modeling was used to assess relationships between observed practice and outcome slopes, while accounting for covariates. Results Children and families demonstrated improvements in all three outcomes, but few significant associations between treatment processes and outcome change were identified. Families receiving greater intensity on the benchmark practice elements did demonstrate greater improvement in the parental discipline outcome. Conclusion Observed changes in outcomes for families in community care were generally not strongly associated with the type or amount of treatment received. PMID:24555882

  13. Current thinking in qualitative research: evidence-based practice, moral philosophies, and political struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Christina; Magasi, Susan; Frank, Gelya

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue on current thinking in qualitative research and occupational therapy and science, the authors focus on the importance of rigorous qualitative research to inform occupational therapy practice. The authors chosen for this special issue reflect a "second generation of qualitative researchers" who are critical, theoretically sophisticated, methodologically productive, and politically relevant to show that working with disabled clients is political work. Three themes emerged across the articles included in this special issue: (1) recognizing and addressing social justice issues; (2) learning from clients' experiences; and (3) critically reframing occupational therapy's role. These themes can inform occupational therapy practice, research, and education to reflect a more client-centered and politically engaging approach. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Systematic review: probiotics in the management of lower gastrointestinal symptoms in clinical practice – an evidence-based international guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungin, A P S; Mulligan, C; Pot, B; Whorwell, P; Agréus, L; Fracasso, P; Lionis, C; Mendive, J; Philippart de Foy, J-M; Rubin, G; Winchester, C; Wit, N

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundEvidence suggests that the gut microbiota play an important role in gastrointestinal problems. AimTo give clinicians a practical reference guide on the role of specified probiotics in managing particular lower gastrointestinal symptoms/problems by means of a systematic review-based consensus. MethodsSystematic literature searching identified randomised, placebo-controlled trials in adults; evidence for each symptom/problem was graded and statements developed (consensus process; 10-member panel). As results cannot be generalised between different probiotics, individual probiotics were identified for each statement. ResultsThirty seven studies were included; mostly on irritable bowel syndrome [IBS; 19 studies; treatment responder rates: 18–80% (specific probiotics), 5–50% (placebo)] or antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD; 10 studies). Statements with 100% agreement and ‘high’ evidence levels indicated that: (i) specific probiotics help reduce overall symptom burden and abdominal pain in some IBS patients; (ii) in patients receiving antibiotics/Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, specified probiotics are helpful as adjuvants to prevent/reduce the duration/intensity of AAD; (iii) probiotics have favourable safety in patients in primary care. Items with 70–100% agreement and ‘moderate’ evidence were: (i) specific probiotics help relieve overall symptom burden in some patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS, and reduce bloating/distension and improve bowel movement frequency/consistency in some IBS patients and (ii) with some probiotics, improved symptoms have led to improvement in quality of life. ConclusionsSpecified probiotics can provide benefit in IBS and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea; relatively few studies in other indications suggested benefits warranting further research. This study provides practical guidance on which probiotic to select for a specific problem. PMID:23981066

  15. Simulation in resuscitation teaching and training, an evidence based practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sandeep; Lata, Indu

    2010-10-01

    In the management of a patient in cardiac arrest, it is sometimes the least experienced provider giving chest compressions, intubating the patient, and running the code during the most crucial moment in that patient's life. Traditional methods of educating residents and medical students using lectures and bedside teaching are no longer sufficient. Today's generation of trainees grew up in a multimedia environment, learning on the electronic method of learning (online, internet) instead of reading books. It is unreasonable to expect the educational model developed 50 years ago to be able to adequately train the medical students and residents of today. One area that is difficult to teach is the diagnosis and management of the critically ill patient, specifically who require resuscitation for cardiac emergencies and cardiac arrest. Patient simulation has emerged as an educational tool that allows the learner to practice patient care, away from the bedside, in a controlled and safe environment, giving the learner the opportunity to practice the educational principles of deliberate practice and self-refection. We performed a qualitative literature review of the uses of simulators in resuscitation training with a focus on their current and potential applications in cardiac arrest and emergencies.

  16. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Practice and Innovation in Physical Therapy Using the IDEAL-Physio Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, David; Hamilton, David; Davies, Loretta; Cook, Jonathan; Hirst, Allison; McCulloch, Peter; Paez, Arsenio

    2018-02-01

    The IDEAL framework is an established method for initial and ongoing evaluations of innovation and practice for complex health care interventions. First derived for surgical sciences and embedded at a global level for evaluating surgery/surgical devices, the IDEAL framework is based on the principle that innovation and evaluation in clinical practice can, and should, evolve together in an ordered manner: from conception to development and then to validation by appropriate clinical studies and, finally, longer-term follow-up. This framework is highly suited to other complex, nonpharmacological interventions, such as physical therapist interventions. This perspective outlines the application of IDEAL to physical therapy in the new IDEAL-Physio framework. The IDEAL-Physio framework comprises 5 stages. In stage 1, the idea phase, formal data collection should begin. Stage 2a is the phase for iterative improvement and adjustment with thorough data recording. Stage 2b involves the onset of formal evaluation using systematically collected group or cohort data. Stage 3 is the phase for formal comparative assessment of treatment, usually involving randomized studies. Stage 4 involves long-term follow-up. The IDEAL-Physio framework is recommended as a method for guiding and evaluating both innovation and practice in physical therapy, with the overall goal of providing better evidence-based care. © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  17. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Hagigi, Fred; Parker, Louise E; Yano, Elizabeth M; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E

    2009-09-28

    Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems.

  18. Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for therapeutic exercise in the management of hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A; Pugh, Arlanna G; Smith, Christine Am; Rahman, Prinon; Àlvarez Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Toupin-April, Karine; Loew, Laurianne; De Angelis, Gino; Cavallo, Sabrina; Taki, Jade; Marcotte, Rachel; Fransen, Marlene; Hernandez-Molina, Gabriela; Kenny, Glen P; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Brooks, Sydney; Laferriere, Lucie; McLean, Linda; Longchamp, Guy

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective is to identify effective land-based therapeutic exercise interventions and provide evidence-based recommendations for managing hip osteoarthritis. A secondary objective is to develop an Ottawa Panel evidence-based clinical practice guideline for hip osteoarthritis. The search strategy and modified selection criteria from a Cochrane review were used. Studies included hip osteoarthritis patients in comparative controlled trials with therapeutic exercise interventions. An Expert Panel arrived at a Delphi survey consensus to endorse the recommendations. The Ottawa Panel hierarchical alphabetical grading system (A, B, C+, C, D, D+, or D-) considered the study design (level I: randomized controlled trial and level II: controlled clinical trial), statistical significance (p osteoarthritis. Strength training exercises displayed the greatest improvements for pain (Grade A), disability (Grades A and C+), physical function (Grade A), stiffness (Grade A), and range of motion (Grade A) within a short time period (8-24 weeks). Stretching also greatly improved physical function (Grade A), and flexibility exercises improved pain (Grade A), range of motion (Grade A), physical function (Grade A), and stiffness (Grade C+). The Ottawa Panel recommends land-based therapeutic exercise, notably strength training, for management of hip osteoarthritis in reducing pain, stiffness and self-reported disability, and improving physical function and range of motion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A social marketing approach to implementing evidence-based practice in VHA QUERI: the TIDES depression collaborative care model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative care models for depression in primary care are effective and cost-effective, but difficult to spread to new sites. Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES) is an initiative to promote evidence-based collaborative care in the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Social marketing applies marketing techniques to promote positive behavior change. Described in this paper, TIDES used a social marketing approach to foster national spread of collaborative care models. TIDES social marketing approach The approach relied on a sequential model of behavior change and explicit attention to audience segmentation. Segments included VHA national leadership, Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) regional leadership, facility managers, frontline providers, and veterans. TIDES communications, materials and messages targeted each segment, guided by an overall marketing plan. Results Depression collaborative care based on the TIDES model was adopted by VHA as part of the new Primary Care Mental Health Initiative and associated policies. It is currently in use in more than 50 primary care practices across the United States, and continues to spread, suggesting success for its social marketing-based dissemination strategy. Discussion and conclusion Development, execution and evaluation of the TIDES marketing effort shows that social marketing is a promising approach for promoting implementation of evidence-based interventions in integrated healthcare systems. PMID:19785754

  20. Teaching tools in Evidence Based Practice: evaluation of reusable learning objects (RLOs for learning about Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wharrad Heather

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All healthcare students are taught the principles of evidence based practice on their courses. The ability to understand the procedures used in systematically reviewing evidence reported in studies, such as meta-analysis, are an important element of evidence based practice. Meta-analysis is a difficult statistical concept for healthcare students to understand yet it is an important technique used in systematic reviews to pool data from studies to look at combined effectiveness of treatments. In other areas of the healthcare curricula, by supplementing lectures, workbooks and workshops with pedagogically designed, multimedia learning objects (known as reusable learning objects or RLOs we have shown an improvement in students' perceived understanding in subjects they found difficult. In this study we describe the development and evaluation of two RLOs on meta-analysis. The RLOs supplement associated lectures and aim to improve students' understanding of meta-analysis in healthcare students. Methods Following a quality controlled design process two RLOs were developed and delivered to two cohorts of students, a Master in Public Health course and Postgraduate diploma in nursing course. Students' understanding of five key concepts of Meta-analysis were measured before and after a lecture and again after RLO use. RLOs were also evaluated for their educational value, learning support, media attributes and usability using closed and open questions. Results Students rated their understanding of meta-analysis as improved after a lecture and further improved after completing the RLOs (Wilcoxon paired test, p Conclusions Meta-analysis RLOs that are openly accessible and unrestricted by usernames and passwords provide flexible support for students who find the process of meta-analysis difficult.

  1. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: Turnover rates and their association with client outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Modisette, Kathryn C.; Ihnes, Pamela C.; Godley, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (n=249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. Additionally, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:22154040

  2. A Reflection on Research, Theory, Evidence-based Practice, and Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eesa Mohammadi

    2016-04-01

    While each process is associated with its unique characteristics, overlaps are likely to appear between each of the two processes. For instance, in the EBP process, if one discovers (theory that evidence is inadequate to implement a certain intervention, it highlights the need for research on that specific subject. Similarly, QI may lead to the identification of new questions, which could be used for research purposes. All the discussed processes, as well as their scientific and professional dimensions, are essential to nursing disciplines in healthcare systems.

  3. Evidence based workplace interventions to promote breastfeeding practices among Pakistani working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali; Karmaliani, Rozina

    2013-03-01

    Breastfeeding is an essential source of nutrition for young babies; however, it is challenging for employed mothers to continue breastfeeding with employment, especially if workplace support is minimal or missing. In Pakistan, from 1983 to 2008, the prevalence of breastfeeding at 6 months has decreased from 96% to 31%. In this region, workplace barriers have been reported as one of the reasons that result in early cessation of breastfeeding among working mothers. This paper aims at reviewing global literature to explore workplace interventions that can promote the breastfeeding practices among working mothers in Pakistan. A literature search of peer reviewed databases, including CINHAL (1980-2009), MEDLINE (1980-2009), Pub Med (1980-2009), Springer Link (1980-2008), and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (3rd quarter, 2008), was undertaken. Considering the pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria, out of more than 500 literature sources, 50 were shortlisted and reviewed. A review of global literature revealed that in order to promote breastfeeding practices among employed mothers, the most powerful workplace interventions include: educating working mothers about management of breastfeeding with employment; enhancing employers' awareness about benefits of breastfeeding accommodation at workplace; arranging physical facilities for lactating mothers (including privacy, childcare facilities, breast pumps, and breast milk storage facilities); providing job-flexibility to working mothers; and initiating mother friendly policies at workplace that support breastfeeding. In Pakistani workplace settings, where little attention is paid to sustain breastfeeding practices among working mothers, there is a need to initiate lactation support programmes. These programmes can be made effective by implementing composite interventions at the level of breastfeeding working mothers, employers, and workplace. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier

  4. Japanese Resident Physicians' Attitudes, knowledge, and Perceived Barriers on the Practice of Evidence Based Medicine: a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emura Sei SE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine plays a crucial role as a tool that helps integrate research evidence into clinical practice. However, few reports have yet to examine its application in daily practice among resident physicians in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes towards and knowledge of EBM among resident physicians in Japanese and determine perceived barriers to its use. Findings A cross-sectional, self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 60 resident staffs at Saga University Hospital in Japan. Forty residents completed and returned the questionnaire. Fifty four percent of respondents understood the basic terminology of EBM, 3% could explain this to others, and 41% indicated they would like to understand the terminology more. Thirteen percent admitted having a good understanding of EBM basic skills. Fifty respondents indicated having read EBM sources, but only 3% indicated that they use these sources in clinical decision making. The most prominent barriers of EBM application revealed in this study were insufficient time to access the sources, a lack of native language references, and insufficient basic EBM skills, but not scepticism about the EBM concept. Conclusions In general, respondents positively welcomed EBM, and moderately understood and knew basic EBM skill; however, barriers in its application were shown to exist.

  5. Practical Issues in Evidence-Based Use of Performance Supplements: Supplement Interactions, Repeated Use and Individual Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M

    2017-03-01

    Current sports nutrition guidelines recommend that athletes only take supplements following an evidence-based analysis of their value in supporting training outcomes or competition performance in their specific event. While there is sound evidence to support the use of a few performance supplements under specific scenarios (creatine, beta-alanine, bicarbonate, caffeine, nitrate/beetroot juice and, perhaps, phosphate), there is a lack of information around several issues needed to guide the practical use of these products in competitive sport. First, there is limited knowledge around the strategy of combining the intake of several products in events in which performance benefits are seen with each product in isolation. The range in findings from studies involving combined use of different combinations of two supplements makes it difficult to derive a general conclusion, with both the limitations of individual studies and the type of sporting event to which the supplements are applied influencing the potential for additive, neutral or counteractive outcomes. The repeated use of the same supplement in sports involving two or more events within a 24-h period is of additional interest, but has received even less attention. Finally, the potential for individual athletes to respond differently, in direction and magnitude, to the use of a supplement seems real, but is hard to distinguish from normal day to day variability in performance. Strategies that can be used in research or practice to identify whether individual differences are robust include repeat trials, and the collection of data on physiological or genetic mechanisms underpinning outcomes.

  6. Undergraduate physiotherapy students' competencies, attitudes and perceptions after integrated educational pathways in evidence-based practice: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolan, M; Simoni, G; Balboni, M; Fiorini, F; Bombardi, S; Bertin, N; Da Roit, M

    2014-11-01

    This mixed methods study aimed to explore perceptions/attitudes, to evaluate knowledge/ skills, to investigate clinical behaviours of undergraduate physiotherapy students exposed to a composite education curriculum on evidence-based practice (EBP). Students' knowledge and skills were assessed before and after integrated learning activities, using the Adapted Fresno test, whereas their behaviour in EBP was evaluated by examining their internship documentation. Students' perceptions and attitudes were explored through four focus groups. Sixty-two students agreed to participate in the study. The within group mean differences (A-Fresno test) were 34.2 (95% CI 24.4 to 43.9) in the first year and 35.1 (95% CI 23.2 to 47.1) in the second year; no statistically significant change was observed in the third year. Seventy-six percent of the second year and 88% of the third year students reached the pass score. Internship documentation gave evidence of PICOs and database searches (95-100%), critical appraisal of internal validity (25-75%) but not of external validity (5-15%). The correct application of these items ranged from 30 to 100%. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups indicated students valued EBP, but perceived many barriers, with clinicians being both an obstacle and a model. Key elements for changing students' behaviours seem to be internship environment and possibility of continuous practice and feedback.

  7. Prerequisites for data-based decision making in the classroom: Research evidence and practical illustrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, Inge; Schildkamp, Kim; van der Kleij, Fabienne; Heitink, Maaike Christine; Kippers, Wilma Berdien; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Dijkstra, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Data-based decision making can lead to increased student learning. The desired effects of increased student learning can only be realized if data-based decision making is implemented successfully. Therefore, a systematic literature review was conducted to identify prerequisites of such successful

  8. School Leaders' Engagement with the Concept of Evidence-Based Practice as a Management Tool for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Mary K.; Sharples, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that encourage direct linkage and exchange between researchers and practitioners are more likely to support changes in educational practice informed by research evidence. Nevertheless, significant challenges remain in linking effectiveness education research to real-world practice: addressing the knowing-doing gap. The paper describes…

  9. Can a simulation-based training program impact the use of evidence based routine practices at birth? Results of a hospital-based cluster randomized trial in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Fritz

    Full Text Available In Mexico, although the majority of births are attended in hospitals, reports have emerged of obstetric violence, use of unsafe practices, and failure to employ evidence-based practices (EBP. Recent attention has refocused global efforts towards provision of quality care that is both patient-centered and evidence-based. Scaling up of local interventions should rely on strong evidence of effectiveness.To perform a secondary analysis to evaluate the impact of a simulation and team-training program (PRONTO on the performance of EBP in normal births.A pair-matched cluster randomized controlled trial of the intervention was designed to measure the impact of the program (PRONTO intervention on a sample of 24 hospitals (12 hospitals received the PRONTO training and 12 served as controls in the states of Chiapas, Guerrero, and Mexico. We estimated the impact of receiving the intervention on the probability of birth practices performance in a sample of 641 observed births of which 318 occurred in the treated hospitals and 323 occurred in control hospitals. Data was collected at 4 time points (baseline, 4th, 8th and 12th months after the training. Women were blinded to treatment allocation but observers and providers were not. Estimates were obtained by fitting difference-in-differences logistic regression models considering confounding variables. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov: # NCT01477554.Significant changes were found following the intervention. At 4 months post-intervention an increase of 20 percentage points (p.p. for complete Active Management of Third Stage of Labor (AMTSL (p = 0.044, and 16 p.p. increase for Skin-to-Skin Contact (p = 0.067; at 12 months a 25 p.p. increase of the 1st step of AMTSL (p = 0.026 and a 42 p.p. increase of Delayed Cord Clamping (p = 0.004; at 4 months a 30 (p = 0.001 and at 8 months a 22 (p = 0.010 p.p. decrease for Uterine Sweeping.The intervention has an impact on adopting EBP at birth, contributing to

  10. Bridging the Gap of Practice and Research: A Preliminary Investigation of Evidence-based Practice for Library and Information Science Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    吳寂絹 Chi-Chuan Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gap between practice and research is commonly found in disciplines with both ofprofessional practitioners and academic researchers. How to bridge the gap is also acontinuing concern in the field of Library and Information Studies. This article describes therecent development of Evidence-based Practice for Library and Information ScienceResearch (EBLIP, and provides analysis of the journal EBLIP including its authors’backgrounds, methods, and topics. The results show that the United States and Canadaare the two major nations of contributors; more than 70% of first authors are librarians; 76%of the articles were contributed by one single institute, co-authorship by cross-nationinstitutes were rarely seen, and demonstrates local research interests; type of co-authoredagency is primarily among libraries; 60% methods employed include questionnaires,interviews and content analysis; the coverage of topics is rather broad, and the top threecategories of research topics include Information Literacy & Instruction, Information Needs& Seeking Behavior, and Reference Services / Digital Reference Services (15%, 10%, and8%; many datasets were obtained from real library practice, and 72% of articles provide specific implications for applications which highlight the value of implementation. Manylibrarians have the research capability, and this article serves as a purpose to introduce theevidence-based research and encourage more such research done in Taiwan. Hopefully itmay benefit and further enhance the quality of library decision-making and their professionalimage.

  11. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services

  12. Physical therapy in the 21st century (Part II): evidence-based practice within the context of evidence-informed practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Part II of this two-part introduction to this Special Issue on physical therapy practice in the 21st century outlines a health-focused strategy for physical therapists to lead in the assault on lifestyle conditions, global health care priorities, described in Part I. Consistent with contemporary definitions of physical therapy, its practice, professional education, and research, physical therapy needs to reflect 21st-century health priorities and be aligned with global and regional public health strategies. A proposed focus on health emphasizes clinical competencies, including assessments of health, lifestyle health behaviors, and lifestyle risk factors; and the prescription of interventions to promote health and well-being in every client or patient. Such an approach is aimed to increase the threshold for chronic conditions over the life cycle and reduce their rate of progression, thereby preventing, delaying, or minimizing the severity of illness and disability. The 21st-century physical therapist needs to be able to practice such competencies within the context of a culturally diverse society to effect positive health behavior change. The physical therapist is uniquely positioned to lead in health promotion and prevention of the lifestyle conditions, address many of their causes, as well as manage these conditions. Physical therapists need to impact health globally through public and social health policy as well as one-on-one care. This role is consistent with contemporary definitions of physical therapy as the quintessential noninvasive health care practitioner, and the established efficacy and often superiority of lifestyle and lifestyle change on health outcomes compared with invasive interventions, namely, drugs and surgery. A concerted commitment by physical therapists to health and well-being and reduced health risk is consistent with minimizing the substantial social and economic burdens of lifestyle conditions globally.

  13. Effective Evidence-Based Interventions for Emotional Well-Being: Lessons for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Tracey; Sharples, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    School-based programmes developed to promote social and emotional well-being aims to reduce the risk of academic failure and other negative outcomes, such as antisocial behaviour and mental health problems. This article maps the British political trajectory from understanding the importance of social and emotional well-being, to delivering…

  14. Diversification of School Psychology: Developing an Evidence Base from Current Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jamilia J.; Graves, Scott; Newell, Markeda; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2016-01-01

    Why is there a need to increase the racial/ethnic diversity of faculty in school psychology? Chiefly, school psychologists serve the most racially/ethnically diverse population: children in US schools. Therefore, developing a knowledge base that is inclusive of this wide range of perspective as well as growing a workforce that is reflective of…

  15. Supporting User Involvement in Child Welfare Work: A Way of Implementing Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Karin; Hyvönen, Ulf; Karlsson, Per-Åke; Larsson, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The article describes and analyses some preliminary working methods for user involvement in child welfare. The models are based on the results of a national project in Sweden where children and young people have been involved as informants. How experiences and viewpoints from children and young people can be a source of knowledge in child welfare…

  16. International dissemination of evidence-based practice, open access and the IACAPAP textbook of child and adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Joseph M; Omigbodun, Olayinka Olusola

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic changes have occurred in both publishing and teaching in the last 20 years stemming from the digital and Internet revolutions. Such changes are likely to grow exponentially in the near future aided by the trend to open access publishing. This revolution has challenged traditional publishing and teaching methods that-largely but not exclusively due to cost-are particularly relevant to professionals in low and middle income countries. The digital medium and the Internet offer boundless opportunities for teaching and training to people in disadvantaged regions. This article describes the development of the IACAPAP eTextbook of child and adolescent mental health, its use, accessibility, and potential impact on the international dissemination of evidence-based practice.

  17. EVIDENCE-BASED DATA ON EFFECTIVENESS OF LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS GG AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS ВB-12 IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Andreyeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of prebiotics in treatment of different disorders is used very often nowadays. However, this kind of a treatment confirmed its efficacy in only several diseases. The review presents the data on efficacy of two probiotic microorganisms (L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 in pediatric practice. Author summarizes and analyzes existing evidence-based data on efficacy of probiotics in treatment of acute diarrhea, prophylaxis of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and nosocomial infections. L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 have their own place in prophylaxis of infections of airways and gastrointestinal tract. Administration of probiotics for treatment and prophylaxis of allergic and other diseases is reviewed. Safety of probiotics is described as well.

  18. The Perfect Storm: Collision of the Business of Mental Health and the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Rebecca E; Adams, Danielle R; Mandell, David S; Hadley, Trevor R; Evans, Arthur C; Rubin, Ronnie; Erney, Joan; Neimark, Geoffrey; Hurford, Matthew O; Beidas, Rinad S

    2016-02-01

    Financing has been hypothesized to be an important driver of the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs), yet there has been little systematic investigation of financing as a factor in EBP implementation. This column presents findings from a qualitative study of the effects of financial factors on the implementation of EBPs in a large urban publicly funded mental health system. Interviews with 33 agency leaders and 16 policy makers identified financial distress in community mental health agencies, leading to concerns about complex and expensive implementation of EBPs. Stakeholders agreed that the cost of EBP implementation should be shared between the agencies and the system; however, the stakeholders did not agree on how EBPs should be financed.

  19. Moving evidence-based drug abuse prevention programs from basic science to practice: "bridging the efficacy-effectiveness interface".

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, Gerald J; Winters, Ken C; Realmuto, George M; Tarter, Ralph; Perry, Cheryl; Hektner, Joel M

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the challenges faced by developers of youth drug abuse prevention programs in transporting scientifically proven or evidence-based programs into natural community practice systems. Models for research on the transfer of prevention technology are described with specific emphasis given to the relationship between efficacy and effectiveness studies. Barriers that impede the successful integration of efficacy methods within effectiveness studies (e.g., client factors, practitioner factors, intervention structure characteristics, and environmental and organizational factors) are discussed. We present a modified model for program development and evaluation that includes a new type of research design, the hybrid efficacy-effectiveness study that addresses program transportability. The utility of the hybrid study is illustrated in the evaluation of the Early Risers "Skills for Success" prevention program.

  20. Evolution of Functional Family Therapy as an Evidence-Based Practice for Adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael S; Alexander, James F; Turner, Charles W; Hollimon, Amy

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of functional family therapy (FFT) based upon four decades of clinical practice and scientific scrutiny through research evidence. FFT research has evolved from an initial focus upon clinical process research, which examined sequential exchanges between therapists and family members. A key element of this research has been an examination of the way in which clinicians acquire, consolidate, and maintain the skills needed to implement FFT effectively with youth and families. Many randomized efficacy and effectiveness studies have evaluated the impact of FFT across diverse clinical populations. Subsequent research investigated factors that influence the effectiveness of implementation across more than 300 clinical settings in which more than 2,500 trained clinicians have provided service to nearly 400,000 families. Another important set of investigations concerned the cost-effectiveness of the interventions. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  1. Exploring multi-level system factors facilitating educator training and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBP): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Schetter, Patricia L; McGee Hassrick, Elizabeth

    2018-01-08

    This study examines how system-wide (i.e., region, district, and school) mechanisms such as leadership support, training requirements, structure, collaboration, and education affect the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in schools and how this affects the outcomes for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Despite growing evidence for the positive effects of EBPs for ASD, these practices are not consistently or effectively used in schools. Although special education programs are mandated to use EBPs, there are very few evidence-based methods for selecting, implementing, and sustaining EBPs. Research focuses primarily on teacher training, without attention to contextual factors (e.g., implementation climate, attitudes toward EBPs, resource allocation, and social networks) that may impact outcomes. Using an implementation science framework, this project will prospectively examine relations between system-wide factors and teachers' use of EBPs and student education outcomes. Survey data will be collected from approximately 85 regional special education directors, 170 regional program specialists, 265 district special education directors, 265 behavior specialists, 925 school principals, 3538 special education teachers, and 2700 paraprofessionals. Administrative data for the students with ASD served by participating teachers will be examined. A total of 79 regional-, district-, and school-level personnel will also participate in social network interviews. Mixed methods, including surveys, administrative data, and observational checklists, will be used to gather in-depth information about system-wide malleable factors that relate to positive teacher implementation of EBPs and student outcomes. Multi-level modeling will be used to assess system-wide malleable factors related to EBP implementation which will be linked to the trainer, teacher, and student outcomes and examined based on moderators (e.g., district size, Special Education Local Plan Area structure

  2. Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge, Attitude, Access and Confidence: A comparison of dental hygiene and dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Victoria; Cardenas, Melissa; Charles, Anne Laure; Hernandez, Estefany; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Kwon, So Ran

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether current educational strategies at a dental institution in the United States made a difference in dental hygiene (DNHY) and dental students' (D3) learning outcomes in the four domains of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, attitude, accessing evidence, and confidence (KACE), following a 12-week research design course. Methods: All participants DNHY (n=19) and D3 (n=96) enrolled in the research design course at Loma Linda University completed a paper KACE survey distributed on the first day of class. Students completed the KACE survey once more at the end of the 12-week course. Pre- and post-survey results were compared both within and between the DNHY and D3 student groups to identify the learning outcomes in the four domains of EBP; knowledge, attitude, accessing evidence, and confidence in EBP. Descriptive statistics were conducted to profile all variables in the study; the level of significance was set at α=0.05. Results: All DNHY students (n=19) completed the pre and post KACE surveys; of the D3 (n=96) students enrolled in the course 82% (n=79) competed the post-survey. Comparison of the survey results showed that both DNHY and D3 students demonstrated statistically significant increases in their level of knowledge and attitude (p 0.05). Conclusion: DNHY and D3 students increased their knowledge and developed more positive attitudes towards EBP following a 12-week research design course. Study results identify improvement areas for EBP knowledge acquisition including determining levels of evidence, analysis of study results, and evaluating the appropriateness of research study designs through the use of validated EBP survey instrument. Copyright © 2018 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  3. Developing evidence-based ethical policies on the migration of health workers: conceptual and practical challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Orvill

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is estimated that in 2000 almost 175 million people, or 2.9% of the world's population, were living outside their country of birth, compared to 100 million, or 1.8% of the total population, in 1995. As the global labour market strengthens, it is increasingly highly skilled professionals who are migrating. Medical practitioners and nurses represent a small proportion of highly skilled workers who migrate, but the loss of health human resources for developing countries can mean that the capacity of the health system to deliver health care equitably is compromised. However, data to support claims on both the extent and the impact of migration in developing countries is patchy and often anecdotal, based on limited databases with highly inconsistent categories of education and skills. The aim of this paper is to examine some key issues related to the international migration of health workers in order to better understand its impact and to find entry points to developing policy options with which migration can be managed. The paper is divided into six sections. In the first, the different types of migration are reviewed. Some global trends are depicted in the second section. Scarcity of data on health worker migration is one major challenge and this is addressed in section three, which reviews and discusses different data sources. The consequences of health worker migration and the financial flows associated with it are presented in section four and five, respectively. To illustrate the main issues addressed in the previous sections, a case study based mainly on the United Kingdom is presented in section six. This section includes a discussion on policies and ends by addressing the policy options from a broader perspective.

  4. Evidence-based Practice. Findings from the Section on Education and Consumer Health Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staccini, P; Douali, N

    2013-01-01

    To provide an overview of outstanding current research conducted in Education and Consumer Informatics. Synopsis of the articles on education and consumer health informatics published in 2012 and selected for the IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2013. Architecture of monitoring or telehealth information systems for patients with chronic disease must include wireless devices to aid in the collection of personal data. Data acquisition technologies have an impact on patients' willingness to participate in telehealth programmes. Patients are more likely to prefer mobile applications over web-based applications. Social media is widely used by clinicians. Especially younger clinicians use it for personal purposes and for reference materials retrieval. Questions remain on optimal training requirements and on the effects on clinician behavior and on patient outcomes. A high level of e-Health literacy by patients will promote increased adoption and utilization of personal health records. The selected articles highlight the need for training of clinicians to become aware of existing telehealth systems, in order to correctly inform and guide patients to take part in telehealth systems and adopt personal healthcare records (PHR).

  5. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Phelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ with a history of repeated falls or fall-related healthcare use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79±8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged 6 primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety to 78% (for vitamin D. An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21% and home safety (24%. Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall risk factors (P=0.003. Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p=.04 and perform more fall risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p=.007 than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  6. Hepatocellular carcinoma: From clinical practice to evidence-based treatment protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galun, Danijel; Basaric, Dragan; Zuvela, Marinko; Bulajic, Predrag; Bogdanovic, Aleksandar; Bidzic, Nemanja; Milicevic, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignant diseases in many healthcare systems. The growing number of new cases diagnosed each year is nearly equal to the number of deaths from this cancer. Worldwide, HCC is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, as it is the fifth most common cancer and the third most important cause of cancer related death in men. Among various risk factors the two are prevailing: viral hepatitis, namely chronic hepatitis C virus is a well-established risk factor contributing to the rising incidence of HCC. The epidemic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, not only in the United States but also in Asia, tend to become the leading cause of the long-term rise in the HCC incidence. Today, the diagnosis of HCC is established within the national surveillance programs in developed countries while the diagnosis of symptomatic, advanced stage disease still remains the characteristic of underdeveloped countries. Although many different staging systems have been developed and evaluated the Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer staging system has emerged as the most useful to guide HCC treatment. Treatment allocation should be decided by a multidisciplinary board involving hepatologists, pathologists, radiologists, liver surgeons and oncologists guided by personalized -based medicine. This approach is important not only to balance between different oncologic treatments strategies but also due to the complexity of the disease (chronic liver disease and the cancer) and due to the large number of potentially efficient therapies. Careful patient selection and a tailored treatment modality for every patient, either potentially curative (surgical treatment and tumor ablation) or palliative (transarterial therapy, radioembolization and medical treatment, i.e., sorafenib) is mandatory to achieve the best treatment outcome. PMID:26380652

  7. Reaching Agreement in Uncertain Circumstances: The Practice of Evidence-Based Policy in the Case of the Swedish National Guidelines for Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Nathalie; Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte; Janzon, Magnus; Levin, Lars-Åke

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the practice of evidence-based policy in a Swedish healthcare context. The study focused on how policymakers in the specific working group, the Priority-Setting Group (PSG), handled the various forms of evidence and values and their competing rationalities, when producing the Swedish National Guidelines for heart diseases that…

  8. Training Community Mental Health Therapists to Deliver a Package of Evidence-Based Practice Strategies for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren I.; Drahota, Amy; Stadnick, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Research on moving evidence-based practice (EBP) intervention strategies to community service settings for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is urgently needed. The current pilot study addresses this need by examining the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary outcomes of training therapists practicing in community mental health…

  9. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP): validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, B.; Wieringa-de Waard, M.; Lucas, C.; van Dijk, N.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the

  10. Translating evidence-based guidelines into practice: a survey of practices of commissioners and managers of the English stop smoking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Máirtín S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The English National Health Service’s (NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSSs constitute one of the most highly developed behavioural support programmes in the world. However, there is significant variation in success rates across the approximately 150 services, some of which may be due to variation in practice. This study aimed to assess these differences in practice. Methods Two online surveys were administered. All commissioners (people who purchase services for the NHS and managers (those who run the services of NHS SSSs in England were invited to participate. Items included details of current practices and services provided, what informed the commissioning of SSSs, what targets were included within service specifications and whether the types of treatment model to be delivered were specified. Results Both surveys had a response rate of 35%, with 50 commissioners and 58 managers participating. There were no significant differences between the characteristics of the Primary Care Trusts (PCTs from which commissioners and managers responded to this survey and those PCTs from which there was no response. Managers reported that the treatment model most frequently offered by SSSs was one-to-one (98%. A total of 16% of managers reported that some approved medications were not available as first-line treatments. Just over one third (38% of commissioners reported consulting national guidelines or best evidence to inform local commissioning. Almost one third (30% of commissioners reported that they specified the types of stop smoking interventions to be delivered by the providers. Conclusions A substantial part of commissioning of Stop Smoking Services in England appears to take place without adequate consultation of evidence-based guidelines or specification of the service to be provided. This may account for at least some of the variation in success rates.

  11. Translating evidence-based guidelines into practice: a survey of practices of commissioners and managers of the English stop smoking services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Máirtín S; Thomson, Heather; West, Robert; Kenyon, Jennifer A M; McEwen, Andy

    2012-05-23

    The English National Health Service's (NHS) Stop Smoking Services (SSSs) constitute one of the most highly developed behavioural support programmes in the world. However, there is significant variation in success rates across the approximately 150 services, some of which may be due to variation in practice. This study aimed to assess these differences in practice. Two online surveys were administered. All commissioners (people who purchase services for the NHS) and managers (those who run the services) of NHS SSSs in England were invited to participate. Items included details of current practices and services provided, what informed the commissioning of SSSs, what targets were included within service specifications and whether the types of treatment model to be delivered were specified. Both surveys had a response rate of 35%, with 50 commissioners and 58 managers participating. There were no significant differences between the characteristics of the Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) from which commissioners and managers responded to this survey and those PCTs from which there was no response. Managers reported that the treatment model most frequently offered by SSSs was one-to-one (98%). A total of 16% of managers reported that some approved medications were not available as first-line treatments. Just over