WorldWideScience

Sample records for evidence based patient

  1. Why evidence-based medicine failed in patient care and medicine-based evidence will succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Singer, Burton H

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has succeeded in strengthening the evidence base for population medicine. Where EBM has failed is in answering the practicing doctor's question of what a likely outcome would be when a given treatment is administered to a particular patient with her own distinctive biological and biographical (life experience) profile. We propose Medicine-based evidence (MBE), based on the profiles of individual patients, as the evidence base for individualized or personalized medicine. MBE will build an archive of patient profiles using data from all study types and data sources, and will include both clinical and socio-behavioral information. The clinician seeking guidance for the management of an individual patient will start with the patient's longitudinal profile and find approximate matches in the archive that describes how similar patients responded to a contemplated treatment and alternative treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  4. Evidence-Based Yoga Interventions for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Angela; Fonteyn, Marsha

    2016-04-01

    Introducing patients with cancer to the practice of yoga can be beneficial for coping with the side effects of treatment and the psychological aspects of cancer that are often difficult and distressing for patients. Oncology nurses can learn to use simple yoga techniques for themselves and as interventions with their patients. This article provides details about the development and implementation of a yoga class for patients with cancer and provides details about other ways nurses can integrate yoga into oncology nursing and cancer care. Current research literature was reviewed and synthesized to provide support for the use of yoga as an evidence-based nursing intervention. A detailed approach for implementing yoga into professional practice was delineated. Yoga techniques can be easily integrated into nursing practice and have been shown to be beneficial for patients and nurses.

  5. Evidence-Based Treatment of Delirium in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication seen in patients with cancer, and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Increased health care costs, prolonged hospital stays, and long-term cognitive decline are other well-recognized adverse outcomes of delirium. Improved recognition of delirium and early treatment are important in diminishing such morbidity. There has been an increasing number of studies published in the literature over the last 10 years regarding delirium treatment as well as prevention. Antipsychotics, cholinesterase inhibitors, and alpha-2 agonists are the three groups of medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials in different patient populations. In patients with cancer, the evidence is most clearly supportive of short-term, low-dose use of antipsychotics for controlling the symptoms of delirium, with close monitoring for possible adverse effects, especially in older patients with multiple medical comorbidities. Nonpharmacologic interventions also appear to have a beneficial role in the treatment of patients with cancer who have or are at risk for delirium. This article presents evidence-based recommendations based on the results of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies of the treatment and prevention of delirium. PMID:22412123

  6. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religious acts of the prehistoric era to empirical-rational decisions of the Egyptian civilization, to modern day evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine requires that clinical decisions and health policies on the prevention, diagnosis and ...

  7. Evidence-based nutritional support of the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    The papers included in this section represent the effort of the Task Force on Nutrition of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology to synthetize the evidence-based concepts on nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. In the attempt of presenting a comprehensive overview of the topic, the panel included experts from different specialties: basic researchers, nutritionists, geriatricians, nurses, dieticians, gastroenterologists, oncologists. Cancer in elderly people is a growing problem. Not only in almost every country, the proportion of people aged over 60 years is growing faster than any other age group, but cancer per se is also a disease of old adult-elderly people, hence the oncologists face an increasing number of these patients both now and in the next years. The are several studies on nutrition of elderly subjects and many other on nutrition of cancer patients but relatively few specifically devoted to the nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. However, the awareness that elderly subjects account for a high proportion of the mixed cancer patients population, in some way legitimates us to extend some conclusions of the literature also to the elderly cancer patients. Although the topics of this Experts' Consensus have been written by specialists in different areas of nutrition, the final message is addressed to the oncologists. Not only they should be more directly involved in the simplest steps of the nutritional care (recognition of the potential existence of a "nutritional risk" which can compromise the planned oncologic program, use of some oral supplements, etc.) but, as the true experts of the natural history of their cancer patient, they should also coordinate the process of the nutritional support, integrating this approach in the overall multidisciplinary cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based guides in tracheostomy use in critical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, N; Vial, M R; Calleja, J; Quintero, A; Cortés Alban, A; Celis, E; Pacheco, C; Ugarte, S; Añón, J M; Hernández, G; Vidal, E; Chiappero, G; Ríos, F; Castilleja, F; Matos, A; Rodriguez, E; Antoniazzi, P; Teles, J M; Dueñas, C; Sinclair, J; Martínez, L; Von der Osten, I; Vergara, J; Jiménez, E; Arroyo, M; Rodriguez, C; Torres, J; Fernandez-Bussy, S; Nates, J L

    2017-03-01

    Provide evidence based guidelines for tracheostomy in critically ill adult patients and identify areas needing further research. A task force composed of representatives of 10 member countries of the Pan-American and Iberic Federation of Societies of Critical and Intensive Therapy Medicine and of the Latin American Critical Care Trial Investigators Network developed recommendations based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. The group identified 23 relevant questions among 87 issues that were initially identified. In the initial search, 333 relevant publications were identified of which 226 publications were chosen. The task force generated a total of 19 recommendations: 10 positive (1B=3, 2C=3, 2D=4) and 9 negative (1B=8, 2C=1). A recommendation was not possible in six questions. Percutaneous techniques are associated with a lower risk of infections compared to surgical tracheostomy. Early tracheostomy only seems to reduce the duration of ventilator use but not the incidence of pneumonia, the length of stay, or the long-term mortality rate. The evidence does not support the use of routine bronchoscopy guidance or laryngeal masks during the procedure. Finally, proper prior training is as important or even a more significant factor in reducing complications than the technique used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-Based Chiropractic Education: Are We Equipping Graduates for Clinical Practice with Improved Patient Outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeve, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has emerged as a driving factor in current curriculum development in chiropractic education. This commentary discusses educational strategies incorporating evidence-based practices in the doctor of chiropractic curriculum and explores whether all five steps of the evidence-based process and patient outcomes from evidence-based practice are being assessed.

  10. Towards evidence-based physiotherapy for patients with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peppen, R.P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The first aim of the thesis was to collect and review systematically, and to appraise critically the available evidence stemming from physiotherapy and physiotherapy-related studies in patients with stroke. It can be concluded that the application of physiotherapy improves performance to execute

  11. [Patient preferences versus evidence-based medicine: did the pioneers of evidence-based medicine take the patient's preferences into account?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, C.G.; Weijden, T.T. van der

    2016-01-01

    A patient's values and preferences are one of the three 'pillars' of evidence-based medicine (EBM). How can we explain that this one pillar has hardly been elaborated in the EBM-literature?? Were the EBM pioneers really committed to the patient's preferences, were they not ready yet, or were they

  12. [Evidence-based patient information: the example of immunotherapy for patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, J; Heesen, C; Mühlhauser, I

    2009-01-01

    The article elucidates consideration of scientific criteria for the development and design of evidence-based patient information (EBPI). Immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis serves as an example. Since in EBPI lack of evidence or ambiguities in available evidence are explicitly communicated, processing of EBPI does not necessarily lead to certainty about benefit and harms of medical interventions. However, only if the information is comprehensive in this respect can the EBPI be regarded as a robust basis for an informed choice. EBPI requires substantial developmental efforts. Regarding the growing number of medical interventions and the half-life of information, the question of responsibility for provision of EBPI is crucial. A vision is drafted in which EBPI is driven by demand of the patients and the public and is provided according to a costs-by-cause principle by those who distribute usual information hitherto. Trained patient advocates can appraise quality of information by use of instruments that consider criteria of EBPI. Critical health literacy should evolve early in school and can later on enhance usefulness of EBPI for people concerned with health issues.

  13. Evidence-Based Care of Geriatric Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven E; Peetz, Allan B

    2017-10-01

    The doubling of the geriatric population over the next 20 years will challenge the existing health care system. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be of paramount importance to the health care discussion in America. These patients warrant special consideration because of altered anatomy, physiology, and the resultant decreased ability to tolerate the stresses imposed by traumatic insult. Despite increased risk for worsened outcomes, nearly half of all geriatric trauma patients will be cared for at nondesignated trauma centers. Effective communication is crucial in determining goals of care and arriving at what patients would consider a meaningful outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence-based medicine in a nutshell. A guide to finding and using the best evidence in caring for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, M

    1998-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the use of the best current evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Practicing EBM requires recognition that in most encounters with patients, questions arise that should be answered to provide the patient with the best available medical care. Asking well-built clinical questions that contain 4 elements--a patient or problem, an intervention, a comparison intervention (if necessary), and an outcome--is an important step in practicing EMB. Once appropriate questions have been formulated, the best source for finding most types of best evidence is by searching the MEDLINE database by computer. MEDLINE searches have inherent software and operator limitations that make their reliability quite variable. One should be aware of these limitations and improve one's skills in searching. The Cochrane Collaboration Controlled Clinical Trials Registry contains more than 190,000 controlled clinical trials and is the best source of evidence about treatment. The quality (strength) of evidence is based on a hierarchy of evidence: results of systematic reviews of well-designed clinical studies, results of 1 or more well-designed clinical studies, results of large case series, expert opinion, and personal experience. Once the best evidence has been found, the EBM approach involves critically appraising the quality of the evidence, determining its magnitude and precision, and applying it to the specific patient. Guidelines to critically appraise and apply evidence are available. The clinical question, best evidence, and its critical appraisal should be saved in a format that can be easily retrieved for future use.

  15. Implementation of evidence-based nursing practice for diabetic patients: an Iranian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaei, Shokoh; Salsali, Mahvash; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based nursing is recognized as an indicator of quality in nursing practice, a basis for accountability and the gold standard of professional nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences and perceptions about evidence-based nursing practice in giving care to patients with diabetic foot ulcers. A qualitative research design was adopted, and content analysis was used to analyse data. Semistructured interviews were held with 19 bachelor-degree nurses working in a teaching hospital in an urban area of Iran. During data analysis, two main themes developed: 'structural backgrounds of the organization' and 'empowerment'. Accordingly, it was concluded that successful implementation of evidence-based nursing requires the reconfiguration of the administrative structure in the hospital. In addition, it requires the support of nurse leaders to facilitate the implementation of evidence-based nursing in the practice. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Considering patient experience and evidence-based choice of medicines in medicines optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri; Bellerby, Ann; Kitching, Mike

    2017-06-14

    Medicines optimisation can be used by healthcare professionals to support patients to gain maximum benefit from their medicines, with two of the main principles being understanding the patient experience and ensuring medicines choice is evidence-based. Non-adherence is a significant issue in medicines management. Relational aspects of the patient experience, such as empathetic two-way communication between the healthcare professional and patient, the provision of clear information and shared decision-making, can have a positive influence on whether patients take their medicines as intended. In practice, the degree of influence exerted by evidence-based guidelines may result in tensions between the healthcare professional's choice of medicines and the patient's experience, while the prevalence of multimorbidity may mean that some patients are prescribed medicines from several clinical guidelines. This raises issues in relation to patient morbidity and safety, including the potential for issues with polypharmacy and an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Medication review is an important tool for identifying the patient's medication burden, and deprescribing - the planned reduction of medicines that may no longer be effective - is emerging as a strategy to reduce polypharmacy. Further progress is required to increase patient involvement in the development of guidance for medicines management to enhance the quality of patient care, particularly in relation to their values and preferences. Similarly, further research is necessary to identify how patients make decisions about their medicines use.

  17. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... and electronic patient records for diabetes patients, this paper reports research in progress regarding the prospects and pitfalls of evidence-based development....

  18. Evidence-based radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafslund, Bjorg [Institute of Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, P.O. Box 7030, N-5020 Bergen (Norway)], E-mail: bhaf@hib.no; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica [Centre for Evidence Based Practice, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Bergen (Norway)

    2008-11-15

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain.

  19. Evidence-based and pragmatic steps for pharmacists to improve patient adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tommy Eriksson Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institution of Laboratory Medicine Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Abstract: All strategies and tools to improve the potential outcomes of medications therapy are a waste of time if the clients do not take their medication as prescribed. The aim of this paper is to help pharmacists to help their clients to improve outcomes of medicines based on improving their compliance to evidence-based pharmacotherapy. To reach a good compliance (result, you have to have agreement and concordance (method between the practitioner and the client. Barriers and strategies for this, including identifying compliance problems and reasons for it, methods for improving information and communication, the client's participation, and responsibility for their own health, are presented mainly based on Cochrane reviews. Also some general pragmatic suggestions for how pharmacists can assist their clients the best are given. Keywords: patient adherence, evidence-based medicine, evidence-based pharmacy, Cochrane reviews

  20. Bridging the gap. The separate worlds of evidence-based medicine and patient-centered medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.

    2000-01-01

    Modern medical care is influenced by two paradigms: ‘evidence-based medicine’ and ‘patient-centered medicine’. In the last decade, both paradigms rapidly gained in popularity and are now both supposed to affect the process of clinical decision making during the daily practice of physicians.

  1. Care of the patient with enteral tube feeding: an evidence-based practice protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah J; Goodman, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Care of patients with enteral feeding tubes often is based on tradition and textbook guidance rather than best evidence. Care practices can vary widely both between and within institutions, and this was the case at a northeastern military medical center that served as the site for this evidence-based protocol development and implementation project. The purpose of this study was to describe the development and implementation of an evidence-based clinical protocol for care of patients with enteral feeding tubes. This was an evidence-based implementation project with pretest-posttest measures. Protocol data collection occurred both before and after implementation of the protocol. Data collection tools were based on the literature review and included three domains: (a) documentation of patient procedures, (b) nursing knowledge of each of the specific procedures, and (c) environment of care. Descriptive statistics and data were analyzed using independent samples t tests. Overall staff knowledge of enteral feedings and methods used to unclog both large- and small-bore feeding tubes differed significantly before and after implementation (p tubes. There was a 10% improvement in documentation of patient family education and a 15% improvement in recording fluid flushes during medication administration. After implementation, environment of care data collection showed 100% of patients with head of bed elevated and with functioning suction available, an improvement over levels before implementation. Care must be taken in the interpretation of these findings because it was generally not the same nurses who answered both surveys. High staff turnover within this military hospital also affected sustainment of the protocol implementation. Maintenance activities must be constant and visible within the organization. A champion for evidence-based practice greatly enhances uptake and maintenance of nursing practice change.

  2. Analysis of German nutrition brochures for pregnant women with evidence-based patient information criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küllenberg de Gaudry, Daniela; Grede, Nina; Motschall, Edith; Lins, Sabine

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate nutrition brochures for pregnant women in Germany based on evidence-based patient information (EBPI) criteria. Nutrition brochures for pregnant women in Germany were collected. Brochures addressing the risk of salmonellosis, toxoplasmosis or listeriosis were analyzed by two researchers independently. Fifty brochures reporting any information on the risk of infection were analyzed. Most brochures did not include literature citations and only few brochures gave a risk description, predominantly verbally, which usually leads to an overestimation of the actual risk. Advertisement was present in 22% of the brochures. German nutrition brochures for pregnant women should be adapted to comply with evidence-based patient information (EBPI) criteria for achieving a better quality of the disseminated information. The findings highlight the need of high quality nutrition brochures for pregnant women, which are relevant not only for pregnant women, but also to those responsible for creating brochures, and to physicians in charge of patient information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Case Study: Evidence-Based Interventions Enhancing Diabetic Foot Care Behaviors among Hospitalized DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titis Kurniawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improving diabetic patients’ foot care behaviors is one of the most effective strategies in minimizing diabetic foot ulceration and its further negative impacts, either in diabetic hospitalized patients or outpatients.Purpose: To describe foot care knowledge and behaviors among hospitalized diabetic patients, to apply selected foot care knowledge and behaviors improvement evidence, and to evaluate its effectiveness.Method: Four diabetic patients who were under our care for at least three days and could communicate in Thai language were selected from a surgical ward in a university hospital. The authors applied educational program based on patients’ learning needs, provided diabetic foot care leaflet, and assisted patients to set their goal and action plans. In the third day of treatment, we evaluated patients’ foot care knowledge and their goal and action plan statements in improving foot care behaviors.Result: Based on the data collected among four hospitalized diabetic patients, it was shown that all patients needed foot care behaviors improvement and the educational program improved hospitalized patients’ foot care knowledge and their perceived foot care behaviors. The educational program that combined with goal setting and action plans method was easy, safe, and seemed feasibly applicable for diabetic hospitalized patients.Conclusion: The results of this study provide valuable information for improvement of hospitalized diabetic patients’ foot care knowledge and behaviors. The authors recommend nurses to use this evidence-based practice to contribute in improving the quality of diabetic care.Keywords: Intervention, diabetic foot care, hospitalized diabetic patients

  4. Development of Evidence-Based Disease Education Literature for Pakistani Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Atta Abbas; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Aftab, Muhammad Tariq; Naqvi, Syed Baqir Shyum; Zehra, Fatima; Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmad, Niyaz

    2017-11-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects 0.5% to 1% of the population globally and is one of the most common causes of disability. Patient education plays a key role in improving treatment outcomes. The purpose of this study was to discuss the process involved in designing an evidence-based disease education literature for rheumatoid arthritis patients of Pakistan in Urdu language with culturally relevant illustrations. A study was conducted to develop disease education literature using Delphi consensus, content validity, and patient feedback. A panel of experts comprised of university professors and health care experts, including health practitioners and pharmacists as well as a social scientist, was set up to assess the need. Eight patients were randomly selected and were asked to give their feedback. Their feedback was incorporated in the development process. The entire process was carried out in eight steps. A disease education literature for patients of rheumatoid arthritis was developed and edited in the form of a booklet. The booklet contained evidence-based information that must be provided to patients in both Urdu and English languages with culturally relevant illustrations. The availability of such literature is significant, as it enables the patients to seek knowledge at home at their convenience. This home-based knowledge support is as helpful as any other means of medical care. The developed literature is planned to be used in further studies which will evaluate its impact in improving knowledge of RA patients.

  5. Caring for patients with kidney disease: shifting the paradigm from evidence-based medicine to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Ann M; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Bowling, Christopher Barrett

    2016-03-01

    The last several decades have witnessed the emergence of evidence-based medicine as the dominant paradigm for medical teaching, research and practice. Under an evidence-based approach, populations rather than individuals become the primary focus of investigation. Treatment priorities are largely shaped by the availability, relevance and quality of evidence and study outcomes and results are assumed to have more or less universal significance based on their implications at the population level. However, population-level treatment goals do not always align with what matters the most to individual patients-who may weigh the risks, benefits and harms of recommended treatments quite differently. In this article we describe the rise of evidence-based medicine in historical context. We discuss limitations of this approach for supporting real-world treatment decisions-especially in older adults with confluent comorbidity, functional impairment and/or limited life expectancy-and we describe the emergence of more patient-centered paradigms to address these limitations. We explain how the principles of evidence-based medicine have helped to shape contemporary approaches to defining, classifying and managing patients with chronic kidney disease. We discuss the limitations of this approach and the potential value of a more patient-centered paradigm, with a particular focus on the care of older adults with this condition. We conclude by outlining ways in which the evidence-base might be reconfigured to better support real-world treatment decisions in individual patients and summarize relevant ongoing initiatives. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. The Role of Hyperglycemia in Burned Patients: Evidence-Based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecott, Gabriel A.; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Severely burned patients typically experience a systemic response expressed as increased metabolism, inflammation, alteration of cardiac and immune function, and associated hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Until recently and for many years, hyperglycemia has been expectantly managed and considered a normal and desired response of an organism to stress. However, findings reported from recent studies now suggest beneficial effects of intensive insulin treatment for critically-ill patients. The literature on the management of hyperglycemia in severely burned patients is sparse, with most of the available studies involving only small numbers of burned patients. The purpose of this article is to describe the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia following severe burns and review the available literature on the outcome of intensive insulin treatment and other anti-hyperglycemic modalities in burned patients in an evidence-based-medicine approach. PMID:19503020

  7. Patient-centred hand hygiene information in orthopaedics units: an evidence-based implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Arielle Yi Jia; Tan, Joanne; Yeo, Hui Ling; Goh, Mien Li

    2017-03-01

    This project aimed to improve patients' knowledge on the importance of hand hygiene. It involved providing patients with a patient and family education on the importance of hand hygiene using a patient information leaflet that introduces the rationale of hand hygiene, possible consequences of poor hand hygiene, and the seven steps of hand hygiene. This projected used a preimplementation and postimplementation audit strategy using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research Into Practice programs. The implementation occurred in three phases over a period of 6 months from January 2014 to June 2014. The audits took place in two orthopaedic wards in a large acute care setting tertiary hospital in Singapore and involved a sample size of 54 patients. It involved going through the medical records of the cases, assessment of patient knowledge based on the audit criteria, and checking if the patients received the patient information leaflet on hand hygiene. The postimplementation audit found significant improvements in all three audit criteria. The percentage of patients who demonstrated knowledge in the importance of hand hygiene saw an improvement of 48.1%. There was an improvement of 44.5% in nurses' compliance to the documentation of patient education being carried out. The percentage of patients who received a patient information leaflet on hand hygiene saw an increase of 36.1%. This project demonstrated that a preimplementation and postimplementation audit is a viable method to implement change and translate evidence into practice. Through this project, patients gained an understanding on the importance of hand hygiene and could take better ownership of their well being. This may potentially improve hospitalization experience and benefit health outcomes. The positive results of this project are contributed by the enthusiastic involvement of all the stakeholders, from patients and their caregivers to the bedside

  8. Enhancing requirements engineering for patient registry software systems with evidence-based components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoerfer, Doris; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    Patient registries are instrumental for medical research. Often their structures are complex and their implementations use composite software systems to meet the wide spectrum of challenges. Commercial and open-source systems are available for registry implementation, but many research groups develop their own systems. Methodological approaches in the selection of software as well as the construction of proprietary systems are needed. We propose an evidence-based checklist, summarizing essential items for patient registry software systems (CIPROS), to accelerate the requirements engineering process. Requirements engineering activities for software systems follow traditional software requirements elicitation methods, general software requirements specification (SRS) templates, and standards. We performed a multistep procedure to develop a specific evidence-based CIPROS checklist: (1) A systematic literature review to build a comprehensive collection of technical concepts, (2) a qualitative content analysis to define a catalogue of relevant criteria, and (3) a checklist to construct a minimal appraisal standard. CIPROS is based on 64 publications and covers twelve sections with a total of 72 items. CIPROS also defines software requirements. Comparing CIPROS with traditional software requirements elicitation methods, SRS templates and standards show a broad consensus but differences in issues regarding registry-specific aspects. Using an evidence-based approach to requirements engineering for registry software adds aspects to the traditional methods and accelerates the software engineering process for registry software. The method we used to construct CIPROS serves as a potential template for creating evidence-based checklists in other fields. The CIPROS list supports developers in assessing requirements for existing systems and formulating requirements for their own systems, while strengthening the reporting of patient registry software system descriptions. It may be

  9. Implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy: a community-based participatory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Maya; Wüthrich, Erika; Stauffer, Yvonne; Herczeg, Franziska; Fattinger, Karin; Hirter, Kathrin; Papalini, Marianne; Herrmann, Luzia

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at developing and implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy. The number of persons with chronic diseases who live at home is increasing. They have to manage multiple diseases and complex treatments. One such treatment is oral anticoagulation therapy, a high risk variable dose medication. Adherence to oral anticoagulation therapy is jeopardised by limited information about the medications, their risk and complications, the impact of individual daily routine and the limited inclusion of family members in education. Hence, improved and tailored education is essential for patients and families to manage oral anticoagulation therapy at home. A community-based participatory research design combined with the Precede-Proceed model was used including a systematic literature review, posteducation analysis, an online nurse survey, a documentation analysis and patient/family interviews. The study was conducted between April 2010-December 2012 at a department of general internal medicine in a teaching hospital in Switzerland. Participants were the department's nursing and medical professionals including the patients and their families. The evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy emerged comprising a learning assessment, teaching units, clarification of responsibilities of nurse professionals and documentation guidelines. The inclusion of the whole department has contributed to the development and implementation of this evidence-based patient family education on oral anticoagulation therapy, which encompasses local characteristics and patient preferences. This education is now being used throughout the department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An evidence-based patient-centered method makes the biopsychosocial model scientific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert C; Fortin, Auguste H; Dwamena, Francesca; Frankel, Richard M

    2013-06-01

    To review the scientific status of the biopsychosocial (BPS) model and to propose a way to improve it. Engel's BPS model added patients' psychological and social health concerns to the highly successful biomedical model. He proposed that the BPS model could make medicine more scientific, but its use in education, clinical care, and, especially, research remains minimal. Many aver correctly that the present model cannot be defined in a consistent way for the individual patient, making it untestable and non-scientific. This stems from not obtaining relevant BPS data systematically, where one interviewer obtains the same information another would. Recent research by two of the authors has produced similar patient-centered interviewing methods that are repeatable and elicit just the relevant patient information needed to define the model at each visit. We propose that the field adopt these evidence-based methods as the standard for identifying the BPS model. Identifying a scientific BPS model in each patient with an agreed-upon, evidence-based patient-centered interviewing method can produce a quantum leap ahead in both research and teaching. A scientific BPS model can give us more confidence in being humanistic. In research, we can conduct more rigorous studies to inform better practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival of patients discharged after acute myocardial infarction and evidence-based drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouya, Ghazaleh; Reichardt, Berthold; Ohrenberger, Gerald; Wolzt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    There is consensus that patients should be treated with antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, ACE-inhibitors/ARBs, and lipid lowering drugs for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but this evidence-based pharmacotherapy is underutilized. A quality improvement program was conducted in the Austrian county of Burgenland to emphasize the importance of cardiovascular drug therapy at hospital discharge in patients with AMI. In this prospective cohort study 250 members of a regional health insurance company, Burgenländische Gebietskrankenkasse (BGKK), with AMI during the year 2003 were identified using BGKK database. Discharge prescriptions and pharmacy reimbursement data of all included patients were determined. Overall prescription rate for patients discharged from hospital after AMI (n = 207) was 86% for platelet aggregation inhibitors, 77% for ACE-inhibitors or ARBs, 72% for beta-blockers, and 68% for a lipid lowering agent including statins. The all-cause mortality rate during a mean follow-up period of 552 days was 20%. Hazard ratio (HR) for death of patients with maximum 2 medications vs. those receiving 3 or 4 medications was 2.23 (95% CI: 1.19-4.18; p = 0.012). These data demonstrate that use of evidence-based drug treatment for prevention of mortality in patients with AMI is associated with risk reduction and survival benefit. Continuous quality improvement initiatives serve to improve outcome after AMI.

  12. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Isabelle; Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of information audiologists use when discussing rehabilitation choices with clients, and discuss the findings within the context of evidence-based practice and patient-centered care. To assess the changes that may have occurred over time, this study uses a questionnaire based on one of the few studies of decision-making behavior in audiologists, published in 1989. The present questionnaire was completed by 96 audiologists who attended the World Congress of Audiology in 2014. The responses were analyzed using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Results suggest that audiologists rank clinical test results and client preferences as the most important factors for decision-making. Discussion with colleagues or experts was also frequently reported as an important source influencing decision-making. Approximately 20% of audiologists mentioned utilizing research evidence to inform decision-making when no clear solution was available. Information shared at conferences was ranked low in terms of importance and reliability. This study highlights an increase in awareness of concepts associated with evidence-based practice and patient-centered care within audiology settings, consistent with current research-to-practice dissemination pathways. It also highlights that these pathways may not be sufficient for an effective clinical implementation of these practices.

  13. An evidence-based approach to perioperative nutrition support in the elective surgery patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith R; Wischmeyer, Paul E; Taylor, Beth; McClave, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    In surgical practice, great attention is given to the perioperative management of the elective surgical patient with regard to surgical planning, stratification of cardiopulmonary risk, and postoperative assessment for complication. However, growing evidence supports the beneficial role for implementation of a consistent and literature-based approach to perioperative nutrition therapy. Determining nutrition risk should be a routine component of the preoperative evaluation. As with the above issues, this concept begins with the clinician's first visit with the patient as risk is assessed and the severity of the surgical insult considered. If the patient is an appropriate candidate for benefit from preoperative support, a plan for initiation and reassessment should be implemented. Once appropriate nutrition end points have been achieved, special consideration should be given to beneficial practices the immediate day preceding surgery that may better prepare the patient for the intervention from a metabolic standpoint. In the operating room, consideration should be given to the potential placement of enteral access during the index operation as well as judicious and targeted intraoperative resuscitation. Immediately following the intervention, adequate resuscitation and glycemic control are key concepts, as is an evidence-based approach to the early advancement of an enteral/oral diet in the postoperative patient. Through the implementation of perioperative nutrition therapy plans in the elective surgery setting, outcomes can be improved.

  14. Patient preparation for intravenous urography: are we practising evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Reddicliffe, N; Parker, D A

    2008-02-01

    To identify the current practice of patient preparation prior to intravenous urography (IVU) in England and Wales. Seventy-two hospitals were contacted to request details regarding the duration of fluid restriction, adherence to a low-residue diet, or use of laxatives for patient preparation before IVU examinations. Results showed that out of 45 hospitals that still use IVU, only six (13.3%) did not follow a patient-preparation regime. The vast majority of the hospitals contacted (87.6%), implemented either fluid and/or food restriction, or prescribed laxatives. The duration of fluid and food restriction varied from 2-12 h duration, and some departments advocated 48 h of laxatives. A large proportion of hospitals are not practising evidence-based medicine in relation to IVU, and we suggest that the practice of patient preparation should be abandoned.

  15. Patient preparation for intravenous urography: are we practising evidence-based medicine?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. [Department of Radiology, Wrexham Maelor Hospital (United Kingdom)], E-mail: devsingh74@hotmail.com; Reddicliffe, N. [School of Health Care Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom); Parker, D.A. [Department of Radiology, Wrexham Maelor Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To identify the current practice of patient preparation prior to intravenous urography (IVU) in England and Wales. Methods: Seventy-two hospitals were contacted to request details regarding the duration of fluid restriction, adherence to a low-residue diet, or use of laxatives for patient preparation before IVU examinations. Results: Results showed that out of 45 hospitals that still use IVU, only six (13.3%) did not follow a patient-preparation regime. The vast majority of the hospitals contacted (87.6%), implemented either fluid and/or food restriction, or prescribed laxatives. The duration of fluid and food restriction varied from 2-12 h duration, and some departments advocated 48 h of laxatives. Conclusion: A large proportion of hospitals are not practising evidence-based medicine in relation to IVU, and we suggest that the practice of patient preparation should be abandoned.

  16. Bone Health in Patients with Breast Cancer: Recommendations from an Evidence-Based Canadian Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. G. Paterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss is common in patients with breast cancer. Bone modifying agents (BMAs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, have been shown to reverse or stabilize bone loss and may be useful in the primary and metastatic settings. The purpose of this review is to provide clear evidence-based strategies for the management of bone loss and its symptoms in breast cancer. A systematic review of clinical trials and meta-analyses published between 1996 and 2012 was conducted of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reference lists were hand-searched for additional publications. Recommendations were developed based on the best available evidence. Zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate, and denosumab are recommended for metastatic breast cancer patients; however, no one agent can be recommended over another. Zoledronate or any oral bisphosphonate and denosumab should be considered in primary breast cancer patients who are postmenopausal on aromatase inhibitor therapy and have a high risk of fracture and/or a low bone mineral density and in premenopausal primary breast cancer patients who become amenorrheic after therapy. No one agent can be recommended over another. BMAs are not currently recommended as adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer for the purpose of improving survival, although a major Early Breast Cancer Cooperative Trialists’ Group meta-analysis is underway which may impact future practice. Adverse events can be managed with appropriate supportive care.

  17. [Evidence-based treatments in the rehabilitation of patients with depression--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmaier, Jörg; Krattenmacher, Thomas; Watzke, Birgit; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger; Barghaan, Dina

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the importance of guidelines has increased continuously. This development also occurs in the field of rehabilitative health care, where process guidelines are being designed for various indicational groups to ensure quality standards and improvements. The primary goal of this paper is to collect and evaluate the evidence for various treatment options for depressive disorders in order to establish a basis for the current development of a process guideline for the rehabilitation of patients with depressive disorders. In order to identify evidence based treatment elements, first a comprehensive investigation of national and international guidelines was conducted. Thirteen selected guidelines were then assessed with regard to aspects of methodological quality and evidence-based treatment elements. In a further step, literature searches were conducted for residual treatment elements, which were identified on the basis of the Classification of Therapeutic Services (KTL) 2007. For the literature search, a hierarchical approach was chosen: At first, meta-analyses and systematic reviews were viewed. In case when there was still a lack of evidence for specific, potentially relevant treatment elements, the search was expanded to the level of primary studies. All selected reviews and primary studies then underwent a standardized assessment especially regarding methodological quality and evidence grades were allocated to treatments. Thereby, the following treatment elements with an adequate level of evidence were identified: Psychotherapeutic interventions, marital/couples/family therapy and counselling, inclusion of family members, psycho education and exercise, problem solving therapy, guided self-help, and behavioural activation treatments. On the basis of this complementary literature search, various other evident interventions could be identified within the following areas: relaxation techniques, improvement of social competence, occupational therapy, art

  18. Patient choice and evidence based decisions: The case of complementary therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, Lesley; Shaw, Alison; Sharp, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective  Current government policies simultaneously pursue the development of ‘patient‐led’ and ‘evidence‐based’ approaches to healthcare. The objective of this study was to explore how primary care clinicians and Primary Care Trust (PCT) managers balance these potentially competing tensions when considering popular, controversial treatments, like complementary therapies, in consultations (clinicians) or funding decisions (PCT managers). Setting and participants  We selected two case sites where complementary therapies were offered on NHS premises in England. We interviewed 18 PCT managers and clinicians, conducted an observation of a PCT meeting on complementary therapies and collected documentary data from referral databases and service funding bids. All interviews were taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Interview, observation and documentary data were used to compare reported beliefs and behaviour to observed and documented behaviour. Results  The majority of clinicians and PCT managers claimed that research evidence guided their decisions; those who did not felt increasingly marginalized. However, discrepancies between reported and observed behaviour suggest that perceptions of research evidence, rather than fact based knowledge, predominated when considering complementary therapies. Conclusion  In the case of NHS complementary therapy service provision, patient preference may be largely insignificant in clinician and PCT managerial decisions, with decisions based mainly on ‘evidence rhetoric’ devised from collectively agreed, unchallenged, tacit perceptions of research literature. If a patient‐led NHS is to become a reality, NHS professionals need to cede the power that they wield with evidence rhetoric and acknowledge the legitimacy of patient preferences, views and alternative sources of evidence. PMID:19656225

  19. Levetiracetam (Keppra: Evidence-Based Polypharmacy in Two Patients With Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolou-Ghamari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Epilepsy is a prolonged disorder characterized by repeated violent epileptic seizures. Its managements depend on proper classification of the seizure category and the epileptic pattern. Levetiracetam (Keppra® has been approved as monotherapy or for adjunctive management of partial onset seizures, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Case reporting of levetiracetam polypharmacy shows adverse effects linked to evidence-based clinical and laboratory data in two patients with epilepsy. Case reporting of levetiracetam polypharmacy, based on evidence-based clinical and laboratory data was of interest that investigated. Case Presentation Two cases were studied, one patient was a 32-year-old male and the other was a 14-year-old female. The key words relevant to search topics were surveyed using PubMed (United States national library of medicine. Articles related to the levetiracetam prescription in epileptic patients were selected and considered separately. Pharmacotherapy based on levetiracetam, primidone, phenytoin, and topiramate in a 32-year-old epileptic male showed a decrease in white blood cell count (3400 cells/mcL, red blood cell count (4.4 mil/mm3 hemoglobin (11.8 g/dL and hematocrit (36.7%. The drug regimen for the 14-year-old epileptic female was a levetiracetam polypharmacy in combination with primidone and sodium-valproate simultaneously. In this patient, there was a decrease in hemoglobin (10.4 g/dL and hematocrit (34%. An increase in lymphocyte (84% was also observed. Conclusions Administration of AEDs in general and levetiracetam in particular should be based on attention to pharmacokinetic behavior in terms of monotherapy or polypharmacy.

  20. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence-based Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Eric C.; Sporer, Karl A.; Lemieux, Justin M.; Brown, John F.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.; Gilbert, Greg H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. Methods We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33) of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33) for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33) have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33) of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33) have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33) allow benzodiazepines to be administered

  1. Prehospital Care for the Adult and Pediatric Seizure Patient: Current Evidence Based Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Silverman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS agencies in California. Methods: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. We analyzed the type and route of medication administered, number of additional rescue doses permitted, and requirements for glucose testing prior to medication. The treatment for eclampsia and seizures in pediatric patients were analyzed separately. Results: Protocols across EMS Agencies in California varied widely. We identified multiple drugs, dosages, routes of administration, re-dosing instructions, and requirement for blood glucose testing prior to medication delivery. Blood glucose testing prior to benzodiazepine administration is required by 61% (20/33 of agencies for adult patients and 76% (25/33 for pediatric patients. All agencies have protocols for giving intramuscular benzodiazepines and 76% (25/33 have protocols for intranasal benzodiazepines. Intramuscular midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult dose, 2 to 8 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intranasal midazolam dosages ranged from 2 to 10 mg per single adult or pediatric dose, and 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Intravenous/intrasosseous midazolam dosages ranged from 1 to 6 mg per single adult dose, 1 to 5 mg per single pediatric dose, and 0.05 to 0.1 mg/kg as a weight-based dose. Eclampsia is specifically addressed by 85% (28/33 of agencies. Forty-two percent (14/33 have a protocol for administering magnesium sulfate, with intravenous dosages ranging from 2 to 6 mg, and 58% (19/33 allow benzodiazepines to be

  2. Using standardized patients to evaluate medical students' evidence-based medicine skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Richard; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Keim, Samuel M; Gordon, Paul R

    2015-12-08

    To analyze the effectiveness of an Evidence Based Medicine Objective Structured Clinical Examination (EBM OSCE) with standardized patients for end of third year medical students at our institution. This was a single-center prospective cross-sectional investigation. As part of the eight-station OSCE exam, the authors developed and implemented a new twenty-five-minute EBM OSCE station with the goal of evaluating evidence based medicine skills necessary for daily clinical encounters. The OSCE case involved a highly educated patient with a history of recurrent debilitating migraines who has brought eight specific questions regarding the use of steroids for migraine headaches. Students were provided computer stations equipped to record a log of the searches performed. One hundred and four third-year medical students participated in this study. The average number of search tools used by the students was 4 (SD = 2). The 104 students performed a total of 896 searches. The two most commonly used websites were uptodate.com and google.com. Sixty-nine percent (95% CI, 60% to 78%) of students were able to find a meta-analysis regarding the use of dexamethasone for the prevention of rebound migraines. Fifty-two percent of students were able to explain that patients who took dexamethasone had a moderate RR (0.68 to 0.78) of having a recurrent migraine, and 71% of students were able to explain to the standardized patient that the NNT for dexamethasone was nine. The EBM OSCE was successfully integrated into the existing eight-station OSCE and was able to assess student EBM skills. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating the Principles of Evidence Based Medicine and Evidence Based Public Health: Impact on the Quality of Patient Care and Hospital Readmission Rates in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S. Alyahya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital readmissions impose not only an extra burden on health care systems but impact patient health outcomes. Identifying modifiable behavioural risk factors that are possible causes of potentially avoidable readmissions can lower readmission rates and healthcare costs. Methods: Using the core principles of evidence based medicine and public health, the purpose of this study was to develop a heuristic guide that could identify what behavioural risk factors influence hospital readmissions through adopting various methods of analysis including regression models, t-tests, data mining, and logistic regression. This study was a retrospective cohort review of internal medicine patients admitted between December 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 at King Abdullah University Hospital, in Jordan. Results: 29% of all hospitalized patients were readmitted during the study period. Among all readmissions, 44% were identified as potentially avoidable. Behavioural factors including smoking, unclear follow-up and discharge planning, and being non-compliant with treatment regimen as well as discharge against medical advice were all associated with increased risk of avoidable readmissions. Conclusion: Implementing evidence based health programs that focus on modifiable behavioural risk factors for both patients and clinicians would yield a higher response in terms of reducing potentially avoidable readmissions, and could reduce direct medical costs.

  4. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  5. [Web-based for preanesthesia evaluation record: a structured, evidence-based patient interview to assess the anesthesiological risk profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Sylvia; Lau, Alexandra; Krämer, Michael; Wendler, Olafur Gunnarsson; Müller-Lobeck, Lutz; Scheding, Christoph; Klarhöfer, Manja; Schaffartzik, Walter; Neumann, Tim; Krampe, Henning; Spies, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    At present, providers at an Anesthesia Preoperative Evaluation Clinic (APEC) may have difficulties in gaining access to relevant clinical information, including external medical records, surgical dictations etc. This common occurence makes obtaining an informed consent by the patient after a complete pre-anesthetic assessment difficult. This form of patient information is subject to wide interindividual variations and, thus, represents a challenge for quality assurance. Insufficient or not completed pre-anesthetic assessments can lead to an untimely termination of an elective procedure.A web-based pre-anesthetic evaluation record moves the time point of the first contact to well before the day of admission. The current pre-anesthesia evaluation record is replaced by a structured interview in the form of a complex of questions in a specific hierarchy taking guidelines, standard operating procedures (SOP) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) into consideration. The answers to the complex of questions are then classified according to agreed criteria and possible scoring systems of relevant classifications. The endpoints result in procedural recommendations not only for the informing anesthesiologist but also for the patient. The standardized risk criteria can be used as core process indicators to check the process quality of the anesthesiological risk evaluation. Short-notice cancellations of elective operations due to incomplete premedication procedures will then be avoided with the help of such structured and evidence-based patient interviews with detailed assessment of the anesthesiological risk profile.The web-based anesthesia evaluation record (WAR) corresponds with the recommendations of the DGAI to carry out the staged information in analogy to the staged information of Weissauer. The basic practice is not changed by WACH. By means of WACH, the time point of the first contact with anesthesia is moved forward and occurs within a different framework. WACH has

  6. Tailored implementation of evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wensing

    Full Text Available When designing interventions and policies to implement evidence based healthcare, tailoring strategies to the targeted individuals and organizations has been recommended. We aimed to gather insights into the ideas of a variety of people for implementing evidence-based practice for patients with chronic diseases, which were generated in five European countries.A qualitative study in five countries (Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom was done, involving overall 115 individuals. A purposeful sample of four categories of stakeholders (healthcare professionals, quality improvement officers, healthcare purchasers and authorities, and health researchers was involved in group interviews in each of the countries to generate items for improving healthcare in different chronic conditions per country: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, depression in elderly people, multi-morbidity, obesity. A disease-specific standardized list of determinants of practice in these conditions provided the starting point for these groups. The content of the suggested items was categorized in a pre-defined framework of 7 domains and specific themes in the items were identified within each domain.The 115 individuals involved in the study generated 812 items, of which 586 addressed determinants of practice. These largely mapped onto three domains: individual health professional factors, patient factors, and professional interactions. Few items addressed guideline factors, incentives and resources, capacity of organizational change, or social, political and legal factors. The relative numbers of items in the different domains were largely similar across stakeholder categories within each of the countries. The analysis identified 29 specific themes in the suggested items across countries.The type of suggestions for improving healthcare practice was largely similar across different stakeholder groups, mainly addressing healthcare

  7. Evidence-based practice for pain management for cancer patients in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mona; Kim, Hee Sun; Chung, Su Kyoung; Ahn, Mee Jung; Yoo, Jae Yong; Park, Ok Sun; Woo, So Rah; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Sun Ah; Oh, Eui Geum

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement an evidence utilization project using an audit and feedback approach to improve cancer pain management. A three-phased audit and feedback approach was used. A 46-bed oncology nursing unit in the university's cancer centre was selected as a research site. Nursing records extracted from 137 patients (65 for the baseline assessment and 72 for the follow-up audit) were used to examine nurse compliance with four audit criteria derived from best practice guidelines related to the assessment and management of pain. We observed a significant improvement in compliance from baseline to follow-up for the following criteria: documenting the side effects of opioids (2-83%), use of a formalized pain assessment tool (22-75%), and providing education for pain assessment and management to patients and caregivers (0-47%). The audit and feedback method was applicable to the implementation of clinical practice guidelines for cancer pain management. Leadership from both administrative personnel and staff nurses working together contributes to the spread of an evidence-based practice culture in clinical settings. As it was conducted in a single oncology nursing unit and was implemented over a short period of time, the results should be carefully interpreted. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Are internet sites providing evidence-based information for patients suffering with Trigeminal Neuralgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Andreas K; Alg, Varinder Singh; Hardwidge, Carl

    2014-05-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia has a variety of treatments with variable efficacy. Sufferers present to a spectrum of disciplines. While traditional delivery of medical information has been by oral/printed communication, up to 50-80% patients access the internet for information. Confusion, therefore, may arise when seeking treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. We evaluated the quality of information on the internet for trigeminal neuralgia using the DISCERN© instrument. Only 54% websites had clear objectives; 42% delivered on these. A total of 71% provided relevant information on trigeminal neuralgia, 54% being biased/unbalanced; 71% not providing clear sources of information. No website detailed the side-effect profile of treatments; 79% did not inform patients of the consequences/natural history if no treatment was undertaken; it was unclear if patients could anticipate symptoms settling or when treatment would be indicated. Internet information on trigeminal neuralgia is of variable quality; 83% of sites assessed were of low-to-moderate quality, 29% having 'serious shortcomings.' Only two sites scored highly, only one being in the top 10 search results. Websites on trigeminal neuralgia need to appreciate areas highlighted in the DISCERN© instrument, in order to provide balanced, reliable, evidence-based information. To advise patients who may be misguided from such sources, neurosurgeons should be aware of the quality of information on the internet.

  9. [Palliative care for patients with advanced dementia: Evidence-based practice replaced by values-based practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, R

    2003-10-01

    For the treatment of patients with advanced dementia, we could not find any evidence based guidelines to help in decision making. Individual values and expected quality of life must be the leading goals of any intervention. Symptom control and relieving suffering are core values of palliative care, but the recognition of discomfort needs qualified assessment skills. Pain assessment with common tools like the VAS fails in patients with cognitive impairment and inability to communicate; instruments like Doloplus and ECPA can be helpful to assess behavioral changes as expression of pain. The treatment of acute and chronic pain in advanced dementia is still not sufficient and needs improvement. Oral feeding in advanced dementia becomes more and more difficult. No randomized controlled study has found evidence that tube feeding will reduce the risk of aspiration or prolong life expectancy. Eating may be the only meaningful activity that remains for the patient; artificial feeding cannot serve the same function. All final complications, like pneumonia, call for a decision making process. Those who care for and care about these patients must make decisions. The feelings of the family have to be considered, but the probable will of the patient, his dignity and quality of life must not be overridden.

  10. A quantitative evidence base for population health: applying utilization-based cluster analysis to segment a patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuik, Sabine I; Mayer, Erik; Darzi, Ara

    2016-11-25

    To improve population health it is crucial to understand the different care needs within a population. Traditional population groups are often based on characteristics such as age or morbidities. However, this does not take into account specific care needs across care settings and tends to focus on high-needs patients only. This paper explores the potential of using utilization-based cluster analysis to segment a general patient population into homogenous groups. Administrative datasets covering primary and secondary care were used to construct a database of 300,000 patients, which included socio-demographic variables, morbidities, care utilization, and cost. A k-means cluster analysis grouped the patients into segments with distinct care utilization, based on six utilization variables: non-elective inpatient admissions, elective inpatient admissions, outpatient visits, GP practice visits, GP home visits, and prescriptions. These segments were analyzed post-hoc to understand their morbidity and demographic profile. Eight population segments were identified, and utilization of each care setting was significantly different across all segments. Each segment also presented with different morbidity patterns and demographic characteristics, creating eight distinct care user types. Comparing these segments to traditional patient groups shows the heterogeneity of these approaches, especially for lower-needs patients. This analysis shows that utilization-based cluster analysis segments a patient population into distinct groups with unique care priorities, providing a quantitative evidence base to improve population health. Contrary to traditional methods, this approach also segments lower-needs populations, which can be used to inform preventive interventions. In addition, the identification of different care user types provides insight into needs across the care continuum.

  11. Physician and Patient Predictors of Evidence-Based Prescribing in Heart Failure: A Multilevel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Klimm, Frank; Laux, Gunter; Campbell, Stephen; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Lossnitzer, Nicole; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Remppis, Andrew; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of patients with heart failure (HF) needs to account for changeable and complex individual clinical characteristics. The use of renin angiotensin system inhibitors (RAAS-I) to target doses is recommended by guidelines. But physicians seemingly do not sufficiently follow this recommendation, while little is known about the physician and patient predictors of adherence. Methods To examine the coherence of primary care (PC) physicians' knowledge and self-perceived competencies regarding RAAS-I with their respective prescribing behavior being related to patient-associated barriers. Cross-sectional follow-up study after a randomized medical educational intervention trial with a seven month observation period. PC physicians (n = 37) and patients with systolic HF (n = 168) from practices in Baden-Wuerttemberg. Measurements were knowledge (blueprint-based multiple choice test), self-perceived competencies (questionnaire on global confidence in the therapy and on frequency of use of RAAS-I), and patient variables (age, gender, NYHA functional status, blood pressure, potassium level, renal function). Prescribing was collected from the trials' documentation. The target variable consisted of ≥50% of recommended RAAS-I dosage being investigated by two-level logistic regression models. Results Patients (69% male, mean age 68.8 years) showed symptomatic and objectified left ventricular (NYHA II vs. III/IV: 51% vs. 49% and mean LVEF 33.3%) and renal (GFR<50%: 22%) impairment. Mean percentage of RAAS-I target dose was 47%, 59% of patients receiving ≥50%. Determinants of improved prescribing of RAAS-I were patient age (OR 0.95, CI 0.92–0.99, p = 0.01), physician's global self-confidence at follow-up (OR 1.09, CI 1.02–1.05, p = 0.01) and NYHA class (II vs. III/IV) (OR 0.63, CI 0.38–1.05, p = 0.08). Conclusions A change in physician's confidence as a predictor of RAAS-I dose increase is a new finding that might reflect an

  12. Evidence based orthopaedic manual therapy for patients with nonspecific low back pain: An integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Benjamin

    2016-04-27

    Orthopaedic manual therapy (OMT) should be based not only on the best available evidence but also on patient values and clinician expertise. Low back pain (LBP) is a complex issue as the majority of people who suffer from LBP cannot be given a specific diagnosis based on imaging studies but kinematic analyses appear to be useful to determine dysfunctional patterns. In physical therapy, various forms of OMT are currently used to manage LBP and there is growing evidence for its use. The underlying principles of OMT are to treat neuro-musculo-skeletal disorders, the aim of which is to reduce pain, as well as improve movement and function. Manual physical therapists use a range of treatment approaches including passive techniques (``hands on'') as well as different active techniques (``hands off'') and communication skills. Systems of stratification are available for classification of people with LBP into specific sub-groups (with sub-group specific OMT intervention). This approach has been shown to be more efficient than generic treatment, although subgroups are not mutually exclusive. Various mechanisms of action are reported in the literature concerning OMT effects. These effects may be biomechanical, neurophysiological and psychological. Moreover, it is essential that the treatment, regardless of the concept of OMT, is carried out on the basis of a systematic and valid clinical examination protocol aimed to correctly classify LBP. The use of pain provocative tests during combined movement examination provides confidence that examination findings are valid and can therefore be confidently used in clinical practice to manage patient. The integrative approach presented in this article is a mix of previously developed classification systems (i.e. based on pain mechanisms, prognosis, treatment responsiveness) and new tools, as kinematic analyses for LBP, and a novel validated combined movements examinationCONCLUSION: As LBP is a complex and multidimensional problem, the

  13. Evidence-based drug treatment for special patient populations through model-based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. Krekels (Elke); J.G.C. van Hasselt (Johan); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. Allegaert (Karel); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.A.J. Knibbe (Catherijne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe majority of marketed drugs remain understudied in some patient populations such as pregnant women, paediatrics, the obese, the critically-ill, and the elderly. As a consequence, currently used dosing regimens may not assure optimal efficacy or minimal toxicity in these patients.

  14. Evidence-based patient choice: a prostate cancer decision aid in plain language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohene-Frempong Janet

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision aids (DA to assist patients in evaluating treatment options and sharing in decision making have proliferated in recent years. Most require high literacy and do not use plain language principles. We describe one of the first attempts to design a decision aid using principles from reading research and document design. The plain language DA prototype addressed treatment decisions for localized prostate cancer. Evaluation assessed impact on knowledge, decisions, and discussions with doctors in men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer. Methods Document development steps included preparing an evidence-based DA in standard medical parlance, iteratively translating it to emphasize shared decision making and plain language in three formats (booklet, Internet, and audio-tape. Scientific review of medical content was integrated with expert health literacy review of document structure and design. Formative evaluation methods included focus groups (n = 4 and survey of a new sample of men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer (n = 60, compared with historical controls (n = 184. Results A transparent description of the development process and design elements is reported. Formative evaluation among newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients found the DA to be clear and useful in reaching a decision. Newly diagnosed patients reported more discussions with doctors about treatment options, and showed increases in knowledge of side effects of radiation therapy. Conclusion The plain language DA presenting medical evidence in text and numerical formats appears acceptable and useful in decision-making about localized prostate cancer treatment. Further testing should evaluate the impact of all three media on decisions made and quality of life in the survivorship period, especially among very low literacy men.

  15. Evidence-based dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    We review the scientific evidence behind current dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes and examine the effects of various dietary interventions on glycemic control, serum lipids, and inflammation in individuals with diabetes. Attention is focused on dietary fiber, glycemic index, dietary protein, omega-3 fatty acids, chromium, magnesium, and vitamin E. Practical dietary recommendations for patients with type 2 diabetes are highlighted.

  16. Clinical practice guidelines for evidence-based management of sedoanalgesia in critically ill adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-Rodríguez, E; Birchenall, C; de la Cal, M Á; Castorena Arellano, G; Hernández, A; Ceraso, D; Díaz Cortés, J C; Dueñas Castell, C; Jimenez, E J; Meza, J C; Muñoz Martínez, T; Sosa García, J O; Pacheco Tovar, C; Pálizas, F; Pardo Oviedo, J M; Pinilla, D I; Raffán-Sanabria, F; Raimondi, N; Righy Shinotsuka, C; Suárez, M; Ugarte, S; Rubiano, S

    2013-11-01

    Optimal management of sedation, analgesia and delirium offers comfort and security for the critical care patient, allows support measures to be applied more easily and enables an integral approach of medical care, at the same time that lowers the incidence of complications, wich translates in better patient outcomes. To update the Guía de práctica clínica basada en la evidencia para el manejo de la sedoanalgesia en el paciente adulto críticamente enfermo published in Medicina Intensiva in 2007, and give recommendations for the management of sedation, analgesia, and delirium. A group of 21 intensivists from 9 countries of the Federación Panamericana e Ibérica de Sociedades de Medicina Crítica y Terapia Intensiva, 3 of them also specialists in clinical epidemiology and methodology, gathered for the development of guidelines. Assessment of evidence quality and recommendations were made based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Strength of recommendations was classified as 1=strong, or 2=weak, and quality of evidence as A=high, B=moderate, or C=low. Two authors searched the following databases: MEDLINE through PUBMED, The Cochrane Library and Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud and retrieved pertinent information. Members assigned to the 11 sections of the guidelines, based on the literature review, formulated the recommendations, that were discussed in plenary sessions. Only those recommendations that achieved more than 80% of consensus were approved for the final document. The Colombian Association of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care (AMCI) supported the elaboration of this guidelines. Four hundred sixty-seven articles were included for review. An increase in number and quality of publications was observed. This allowed to generate 64 strong recommendations with high and moderate quality of evidence in contrast to the 28 recommendations of the previous edition. This Guidelines

  17. From Evidence Based Medicine to Medicine Based Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Hayes-Conroy, Allison; Caricchio, Roberto; Singer, Burton H

    2017-11-01

    Evidence based medicine, using randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses as the major tools and sources of evidence about average results for heterogeneous groups of patients, developed as a reaction against poorly designed observational treatment research and physician reliance on personal experience with other patients as a guide to decision-making about a patient at hand. However, these tools do not answer the clinician's question: "Will a given therapeutic regimen help my patient at a given point in her/his clinical course?" We introduce fine-grained profiling of the patient at hand, accompanied by comparative evidence of responses from approximate matches to this patient on whom a contemplated treatment has/has not been administered. This represents medicine based evidence that is tuned to decision-making for the particular patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Decision-Making in Audiology: Balancing Evidence-Based Practice and Patient-Centered Care

    OpenAIRE

    Boisvert, Isabelle; Clemesha, Jennifer; Lundmark, Erik; Crome, Erica; Barr, Caitlin; McMahon, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Health-care service delivery models have evolved from a practitioner-centered approach toward a patient-centered ideal. Concurrently, increasing emphasis has been placed on the use of empirical evidence in decision-making to increase clinical accountability. The way in which clinicians use empirical evidence and client preferences to inform decision-making provides an insight into health-care delivery models utilized in clinical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the sources of ...

  19. Evident cognitive impairments in seemingly recovered patients after midazolam-based light sedation during diagnostic endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hsuan Hsu

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Midazolam-based light sedation induced selective cognitive impairments and prolonged cognitive impairments occurred in patients with advanced age. A longer observation time and further screening were recommended for patients due to their at risk state.

  20. Detection of first relapse in cutaneous melanoma patients : Implications for the formulation of evidence-based follow-up guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francken, Anne Brecht; Shaw, Helen M.; Accortt, Neil A.; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Thompson, John F.

    Background: The value of follow-up surveillance for patients with cutaneous melanoma remains uncertain. In this prospective study the frequency of detection of first melanoma recurrence (FMR) by patient or doctor was analyzed to assist in the future design of evidence-based follow-up guidelines.

  1. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. Objective To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. Methods We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Results Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, p<0.001) compared to controls. 143 (42%) of the patients with MS had tried special MS diets. Important information needs addressed effectiveness of MS diets (44%) and relation between nutrition and MS (43%). A pilot test of our newly developed patient education program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Conclusions Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS. PMID:27764237

  2. Evidence-based cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Khorasani, Ramin [Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    With the advances in the field of oncology, imaging is increasingly used in the follow-up of cancer patients, leading to concerns about over-utilization. Therefore, it has become imperative to make imaging more evidence-based, efficient, cost-effective and equitable. This review explores the strategies and tools to make diagnostic imaging more evidence-based, mainly in the context of follow-up of cancer patients.

  3. Patient Safety in Burn Care: Application of Evidence-based Medicine to Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Elizabeth L; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-07-01

    This article reviews 5 areas in burn care that increasingly use evidence-based medicine to optimize quality and safety: resuscitation protocols, transfusion practices, vascular access, venous thromboembolic prophylaxis, and rational use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using a new evidence-based trauma protocol to improve detection and reduce costs in patients with blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, Ilean; OʼMara, Susan K; Sulo, Suela

    2015-01-01

    Management of blunt cardiac injury is often discussed in trauma literature due to the lack of a "gold standard" for early identification and cost-effective care. The effectiveness of an evidence-based trauma protocol was assessed by comparing patients treated with the new protocol to those managed with prior practice. The data of 80 patients prospectively managed using the new trauma protocol were compared with the medical records of 80 former patients treated according to existing practice. Implementing the new protocol improved detection of abnormal troponin I levels and resulted in cost savings. The length of time inpatients required continuous electrocardiographic monitoring decreased by 4.23 days and echocardiography use dropped by 70%. Implementation of the evidence-based trauma protocol at our facility improved the early identification of patients with blunt cardiac injury and reduced the number of laboratory and diagnostic tests.

  5. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...

  6. Explaining unexplained pain to fibromyalgia patients: finding a narrative that is acceptable to patients and provides a rationale for evidence based interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Hyland, ME; Hinton, C.; Hill, C.; Whalley, B; Jones,RC; Davies, AF

    2016-01-01

    As the cause of fibromyalgia is controversial, communicating with patients can be challenging, particularly if the patient adopts the narrative ‘I am damaged and so I need a more powerful pain killer’. Research shows that providing patients with alternative narratives can be helpful, but it remains unclear what particular narratives are most acceptable to patients and at the same time provide a rationale for evidence based psychological and exercise interventions. This article described the d...

  7. Effect of Increased Intensity of Physiotherapy on Patient Outcomes After Stroke: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2015-01-01

    After stroke, impairment of the upper and lower limb can limit patients' motor function and ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL). Physiotherapy (PT) is an established clinical practice for stroke patients, playing an important role in improving limb function. Recently, several randomized trials have evaluated the effect of higher-intensity physiotherapy (increased duration and/or frequency) on patients' functional ability. Our objective is to investigate whether an increased intensity of PT after stroke results in better outcomes for patients. A literature search was performed on June 7, 2013, for English-language randomized controlled trials published from January 1, 2003, to June 7, 2013. Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews were searched. We reviewed the full text of articles that compared 2 or more levels of PT intensity. Outcomes of interest included motor function, ADL, and quality of life (QOL). High-quality evidence showed that higher-intensity upper-limb PT and higher-intensity lower-limb PT both resulted in significantly greater improvements in motor function. Moderate-quality evidence showed that higher-intensity general PT did not. Moderate-quality evidence showed a significant improvement in ADL performance with higher-intensity upper-limb PT, but no improvement with higher-intensity general PT; no studies reported on ADL outcomes on lower-limb PT specifically. According to moderate-quality evidence, patient QOL did not change significantly after increased intensity of upper-limb, lower-limb, or general PT. When considering the results, one difference should be noted: Compared with the studies examining upper- and lower-limb PT, the studies examining general PT looked at a smaller increase-2 hours or less of additional therapy per week. This analysis is limited to the earlier post-stroke phase and is not

  8. Danish evidence-based clinical guideline for use of nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation of undernourished patients with stable COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Topperup, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Disease-related under-nutrition is a common problem in individuals with COPD. The rationale for nutritional support in pulmonary rehabilitation therefore seems obvious. However there is limited evidence regarding the patient-relevant outcomes i.e. activities of daily living (ADL......) or quality of life. Therefore the topic was included in The Danish Health and Medicines Authority's development of an evidence-based clinical guideline for rehabilitation of patients with stable COPD. Methods The methods were specified by The Danish Health and Medicines Authority as part of a standardized...... approach to evidence-based national clinical practice guidelines. They included formulation of a PICO with pre-defined criteria for the Population, Intervention, Control and Outcomes. Existing guidelines or systematic reviews were used after assessment using the AGREE II tool or AMSTAR, if possible. We...

  9. Utilization of evidence-based treatment in elderly patients with chronic heart failure: using Korean Health Insurance claims database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ju-Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure accounts for a great deal of the morbidity and mortality in the aging population. Evidence-based treatments include angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists. Underutilization of these treatments in heart failure patients were frequently reported, which could lead to increase morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilization of evidence-based treatments and their related factors for elderly patients with chronic heart failure. Methods This is retrospective observational study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. We identified prescription of evidence based treatment to elderly patients who had been hospitalized for chronic heart failure between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006. Results Among the 28,922 elderly patients with chronic heart failure, beta-blockers were prescribed to 31.5%, and ACE-I or ARBs were prescribed to 54.7% of the total population. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that the prescription from outpatient clinic (prevalent ratio, 4.02, 95% CI 3.31–4.72, specialty of the healthcare providers (prevalent ratio, 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12–1.54, residence in urban (prevalent ratio, 1.37, 95% CI, 1.23–1.52 and admission to tertiary hospital (prevalent ratio, 2.07, 95% CI, 1.85–2.31 were important factors associated with treatment underutilization. Patients not given evidence-based treatment were more likely to experience dementia, reside in rural areas, and have less-specialized healthcare providers and were less likely to have coexisting cardiovascular diseases or concomitant medications than patients in the evidence-based treatment group. Conclusions Healthcare system factors, such as hospital type, healthcare provider factors, such as specialty, and patient factors, such as comorbid cardiovascular disease, systemic disease with

  10. Association Between Hospital Case Volume of Sepsis, Adherence to Evidence-Based Processes of Care and Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Ashraf; Walkey, Allan J

    2017-06-01

    We sought to explore potential mechanisms underlying hospital sepsis case volume-mortality associations by investigating implementation of evidence-based processes of care. Retrospective cohort study. We determined associations of sepsis case volume with three evidence-based processes of care (lactate measurement during first hospital day, norepinephrine as first vasopressor, and avoidance of starch-based colloids) and assessed their role in mediation of case volume-mortality associations. Enhanced administrative data (Premier, Charlotte, NC) from 534 U.S. hospitals. A total of 287,914 adult patients with sepsis present at admission between July 2010 and December 2012 of whom 58,045 received a vasopressor for septic shock during the first 2 days of hospitalization. None. Among patients with sepsis, 1.9% received starch, and among patients with septic shock, 68.3% had lactate measured and 64% received norepinephrine as initial vasopressor. Patients at hospitals with the highest case volume were more likely to have lactate measured (adjusted odds ratio quartile 4 vs quartile 1, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.1-3.7) and receive norepinephrine as initial vasopressor (adjusted odds ratio quartile 4 vs quartile 1, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.7). Case volume was not associated with avoidance of starch products (adjusted odds ratio quartile 4 vs quartile 1, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.45-1.2). Adherence to evidence-based care was associated with lower hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.94) but did not strongly mediate case volume-mortality associations (point estimate change ≤ 2%). In a large cohort of U.S. patients with sepsis, select evidence-based processes of care were more likely implemented at high-volume hospitals but did not strongly mediate case volume-mortality associations. Considering processes and case volume when regionalizing sepsis care may maximize patient outcomes.

  11. Diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus: evidence-based management of pediatric patients in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibners, Lara

    2017-02-01

    Diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus are potentially deadly bacterial infections that are largely preventable through vaccination, though they remain in the population. This issue reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and current recommended emergency management of these conditions. Disease-specific medications, as well as treatment of the secondary complications, are examined in light of the best current evidence. Resources include obtaining diphtheria antitoxin from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and best-practice recommendations with regard to testing, involvement of government health agencies, isolation of the patient, and identification and treatment of close contacts. Most importantly, issues regarding vaccination and prevention are highlighted.

  12. Development of an Online, Evidence-Based Patient Information Portal for Congenital Heart Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. G. Etnel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesIn response to an increased need for patient information on congenital heart disease in the Netherlands, we initiated a nationwide initiative to develop an online, evidence-based patient information portal, starting with a pilot project aimed at the subgroup of patients with congenital aortic and pulmonary valve disease.Methods and resultsWe developed an information portal that aims to (1 improve patient knowledge and involvement and to subsequently reduce anxiety and decisional conflict and improve mental quality of life and (2 to support physicians in informing and communicating with their patients. The information portal was developed according to the systematic International Patient Decision Aid Standards development process employing Delphi techniques by a multidisciplinary workgroup of pediatric and adult congenital cardiologists, a congenital cardiothoracic surgeon, a psychologist, an epidemiologist, a patient representative, and web and industrial design experts. First, patients and physicians were surveyed and interviewed to assess the current state of patient information and explore their preferences and needs to determine the focus for the development of the information portal. We found that patient knowledge and numeracy are limited, reliable information is scarce, physicians inform patients selectively and patient involvement is suboptimal, and there is a need for more reliable, tailored, and multi-faceted information. Based on the findings of these surveys and interviews, a patient-tailored information portal was designed that presents evidence-based disease- and age-specific medical and psychosocial information about diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and impact on daily life in a manner that is comprehensible and digestible for patients and that meets the needs expressed by both patients and physicians. The effect of the website on patient outcome is currently being assessed in a multicenter stepped-wedge implementation

  13. Evidence of me” in evidence based medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Evidence based medicine provides independent, validated advice about treatment options, but does it take sufficient account of individual patients' values to provide them with an optimal health outcome?

  14. [Evidence-based practice of fluid restriction in patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Mei-Kuei

    2009-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is prevalent in the aging population. Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies are employed in HF and have yielded significant improvements in survival and quality of life. Body fluid must be maintained at a level sufficient to ensure hemodynamic stability and adequate tissue perfusion, which may decrease neurohormonal activation caused by low cardiac output in patients with HF. However, shortness of breath and peripheral edema caused by fluid overload remain the most common clinical symptoms of HF, causing patient distress. In addition to routine pharmacologic approaches, fluid restriction is frequently suggested in HF management strategies. The purpose of this review of published studies that examined use of fluid/water restriction as an intervention was to determine the optimal fluid intake for HF patients in clinical practice. Four articles describing three clinical trials were identified via PubMed and CINAHL. Their findings suggest that patients with clinically stable HF receiving optimal pharmacological treatment may not benefit from fluid restriction. Patients in these studies had preserved renal function, however, and the trials had no long-term follow-up period. Clinicians choosing to restrict fluid intake for patients with HF should consider an individualized fluid prescription, potentially based on patient body weight, sodium intake, and likelihood of adherence. Further clinical trials are warranted to improve clinical practice in caring for patients with HF.

  15. Evidence-based dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chi Chi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM has become a hot topic in medical practice, education, and research. However, a large number of senior doctors did not have an opportunity to learn EBM in medical schools. Firstly, this article addresses the history of EBM and the principle of practicing EBM, i.e., asking, acquiring, appraisal, application, and auditing. Secondly, this article also provides a brief introduction to evidence-based dermatology and compares the introduction of clinical practice guidelines between Europe, the UK, and the US. Finally, this article addresses the present condition and future perspective of evidence-based dermatology in Taiwan.

  16. Literature review of evidence based physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hg Beurskens, Carien; Al Burgers-Bots, Ingrid; W Kroon, Dineke; Ab Oostendorp, Rob

    2004-01-01

    A variety of physiotherapeutic approaches have been tried out during the past 25 years to alleviate the plight of patients with peripheral facial nerve paresis. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis. Trials were identified by computerised searches of biomedical databases, reference lists, and by contacting investigators. Selection criteria were randomised controlled trials of physiotherapy for the improvement of sequelae of facial nerve paresis, comparing the treatment with either another intervention or no intervention. Two reviewers independently assessed the trials using the PEDro scale. Two physiotherapy randomised controlled studies were identified. Interventions used for treatment of patients with facial nerve paresis in the included studies were relaxation, biofeedback and exercise therapy. Neither of the two randomised controlled studies showed scientific evidence of a physiotherapeutic approach in comparison with a control group. Both studies described benefits of the interventions. Further randomised controlled studies are required to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy in patients with facial nerve paresis.

  17. Patients, evidence and genes: an exploration of GPs' perspectives on gene-based personalized nutrition advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Laura; Te Molder, Hedwig; Hiddink, Gerrit

    2008-12-01

    Nutrigenomics science examines the response of individuals to food compounds using post-genomics technology. It is expected that in the future, personalized nutrition advice can be provided based on information about genetic make-up. Gene-based personalized nutrition advice emerges at the junction of different disciplines and technologies and may directly influence people's lives. Therefore, public concern is to be expected. Because GPs are gatekeepers of health care, their involvement in early stages of the development process is desirable. In 2006, 15 GPs were interviewed to collect their perceived barriers and opportunities towards involvement in gene-based nutrition advice. The interviews were qualitatively analysed with use of Atlas.ti, a qualitative analysis programme. The participants held a mostly critical view towards such personalized nutrition advice. They argued that findings of nutritional studies lacked robustness, were not based on patients' needs and were often equivocal. And that a patient central perspective urges them to question consequences for patients. Participants argued that GPs should be involved in selecting and monitoring patients in nutrigenomics studies. Early involvement of GPs in the development process is needed to allow for the integration of their practical, social and ethical considerations in the technical and scientific agendas. However, the background of their critical attitude towards nutrigenomics-based personalized nutrition, and nutrition advice more generally, has to be explored further. To facilitate a joint learning process and to improve socio-technical decision making with respect to this innovation, initiatives that allow different stakeholders to exchange their perspectives should be organized.

  18. Persuasive Interventions for Controversial Cancer Screening Recommendations: Testing a Novel Approach to Help Patients Make Evidence-Based Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saver, Barry G; Mazor, Kathleen M; Luckmann, Roger; Cutrona, Sarah L; Hayes, Marcela; Gorodetsky, Tatyana; Esparza, Nancy; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate novel decision aids designed to help patients trust and accept the controversial, evidence-based, US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations about prostate cancer screening (from 2012) and mammography screening for women aged 40 to 49 years (from 2009). We created recorded vignettes of physician-patient discussions about prostate cancer screening and mammography, accompanied by illustrative slides, based on principles derived from preceding qualitative work and behavioral science literature. We conducted a randomized crossover study with repeated measures with 27 men aged 50 to 74 years and 35 women aged 40 to 49 years. All participants saw a video intervention and a more traditional, paper-based decision aid intervention in random order. At entry and after seeing each intervention, they were surveyed about screening intentions, perceptions of benefits and harm, and decisional conflict. Changes in screening intentions were analyzed without regard to order of intervention after an initial analyses showed no evidence of an order effect. At baseline, 69% of men and 86% of women reported wanting screening, with 31% and 6%, respectively, unsure. Mean change on a 3-point, yes, unsure, no scale was -0.93 (P = persuasive video interventions significantly changed the screening intentions of substantial proportions of viewers. Our approach needs further testing but may provide a model for helping patients to consider and accept evidence-based, counterintuitive recommendations. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  19. Implementing evidence-based guidelines for managing depression in elderly patients: a Norwegian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakhus, E; Flottorp, S A; Oxman, A D

    2012-09-01

    Depression in the elderly is common and exhibits a distinctive phenomenology, due to neurobiological, physiological, psychological and social changes related to ageing. Most elderly with depression are managed in primary health care. Although the number of scientific publications related to geriatric psychiatry has increased, there are still important gaps. Implementation of evidence-based guidelines for managing depression in primary care has had limited success, but has led to improvements compared to standard care. It is logical that the determinants (barriers and enablers) of implementing depression guidelines can be identified and can guide the selection of more effective implementation strategies that are tailored to address those determinants. We are testing that logic as part of a multinational implementation research project called 'Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases' (TICD). Our focus in Norway is on the management of depression in the elderly in primary care. We will identify the determinants of implementing evidence-based recommendations using various methods and comparing those methods. We will then use different methods to match the implementation interventions to the identified determinants and compare those methods. Finally, we will evaluate the resulting tailored implementation strategy in a randomized trial.

  20. Visually- and motor-based knowledge of letters: evidence from a pure alexic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeo, Paolo; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne Catherine; Chokron, Sylvie; Degos, Jean-Denis

    2002-01-01

    We describe a patient, VSB, whose reading was impaired as a consequence of a left temporal-parietal lesion, whereas writing was relatively preserved. At variance with other pure alexic patients described in the literature, VSB claimed to have become unable to mentally visualise letters and words. Indeed, his performance on a series of tests tapping visual mental imagery for orthographic material was severely impaired. However, performance on the same tests was dramatically ameliorated by allowing VSB to trace each item with his finger. Visual mental imagery for non-orthographic items was comparatively spared. The pattern of dissociation shown by VSB between impaired visual mental imagery and relatively preserved motor-based knowledge for orthographic material lends support to the view that separate codes, respectively based on visual appearance and on motor engrams, may be used to access knowledge of the visual form of letters and words.

  1. Evident cognitive impairments in seemingly recovered patients after midazolam-based light sedation during diagnostic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yen-Hsuan; Lin, Feng-Sheng; Yang, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Chih-Peng; Hua, Mau-Sun; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2015-06-01

    Midazolam is a widely used sedative agent during colonoscopy, with cognitive toxicity. However, the potential cognitive hazard of midazolam-based light sedation has not been sufficiently examined. We aimed to examine the cognitive safety and vulnerability profile under midazolam light sedation, with a particular focus on individual variations. We conducted a prospective case-controlled study in an academic hospital. In total, 30 patients undergoing sedative colonoscopy as part of a health check-up were recruited. Neuropsychological testing on the full cognitive spectrum was evaluated at 15 minutes and 120 minutes after low-dose midazolam administration. The modified reliable change index (RCI) was used for intrapersonal comparisons and controlling for practice effects. Midazolam affected psychomotor speed (48%), memory (40%), learning (32%), working memory (17%), and sustained attention (11%), while sparing orientation and the fluency aspect of executive function at the acute stage. Residual memory (10%) and learning (10%) impairments at 2 hours after administration were evidenced in some patients. The three object recall and digit symbol coding tests can serve as useful screening tools. Midazolam-based light sedation induced selective cognitive impairments and prolonged cognitive impairments occurred in patients with advanced age. A longer observation time and further screening were recommended for patients due to their at risk state. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Evidence-Based Indicators of Neuropsychological Change in the Individual Patient: Relevant Concepts and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Repeated assessments are a relatively common occurrence in clinical neuropsychology. The current paper will review some of the relevant concepts (e.g., reliability, practice effects, alternate forms) and methods (e.g., reliable change index, standardized based regression) that are used in repeated neuropsychological evaluations. The focus will be on the understanding and application of these concepts and methods in the evaluation of the individual patient through examples. Finally, some future directions for assessing change will be described. PMID:22382384

  3. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  4. The Role of Probiotic in Reducing Hepatic Inflammation Among NAFLD Patients: an Evidence-Based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin Nursalim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to know the effectiveness of probiotic in reducing hepatic inflammation among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD patients. Methods: we performed literature searching regarding the potential role of probiotic in reducing hepatic inflammation among NAFLD patients. Results: six articles were finally critically appraised. All six studies had good validity and importance. These studies unanimously reported that probiotic is useful in reducing hepatic inflammation, and liver fat content. However, further evidence is needed to show whether or not probiotic is beneficial reducing cirrhosis progression and liver-related mortality. Conclusion: probiotic owns robust potential to treat NAFLD. Probiotic reduce hepatic inflammation, as shown by the reduction of liver aminotransferase, and inflammatory markers. Based on this evidence based report, probiotic is a promising adjunct therapy for NAFLD.

  5. Contributing to a Quality Patient Experience: Applying Evidence Based Practice to Support Changes in Nursing Dress Code Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Margaret Mary; Wantz, Debra; Campbell, Patricia; Rosler, Greta; Troutman, Dawn; Muthler, Crystal

    2016-01-31

    The public image of nurse professionalism is important. Attributes of a professional nurse, such as caring, attentive, empathetic, efficient, knowledgeable, competent, and approachable, or lack thereof, can contribute positively or negatively to the patient experience. Nurses at a hospital in central northeast Pennsylvania offer their story as they considered the impact of a wide variety of individual uniform and dress choices. This article describes an evidence based practice project and survey created to increase understanding of patient perceptions regarding the professional image of nurses in this facility. Exploring patient perception of nurse image provided insight into what patients view as important. A team approach included the voice of nurses at different levels in the process. Ultimately, this work informed a revision of the health system nursing dress code. The study team also reflects on challenges, next steps in the process, and offers recommendations based on their experiences.

  6. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  7. Outcome analysis of breast cancer patients who declined evidence-based treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kurian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the characteristics and outcomes of women with breast cancer in the Northern Alberta Health Region (NAHR who declined recommended primary standard treatments. Methods A chart review was performed of breast cancer patients who refused recommended treatments during the period 1980 to 2006. A matched pair analysis was performed to compare the survival data between those who refused or received standard treatments. Results A total of 185 (1.2% patients refused standard treatment. Eighty-seven (47% were below the age of 75 at diagnosis. The majority of those who refused standard treatments were married (50.6%, 50 years or older (60.9%, and from the urban area (65.5%. The 5-year overall survival rates were 43.2% (95% CI: 32.0 to 54.4% for those who refused standard treatments and 81.9% (95% CI: 76.9 to 86.9% for those who received them. The corresponding values for the disease-specific survival were 46.2% (95% CI: 34.9 to 57.6% vs. 84.7% (95% CI: 80.0 to 89.4%. Conclusions Women who declined primary standard treatment had significantly worse survival than those who received standard treatments. There is no evidence to support using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as primary cancer treatment.

  8. [Evidence-based physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Tamás

    2013-12-01

    This article on physiotherapy presents some current evidence stating the strengths and weaknesses of the physiotherapeutic procedures. In the area of physiotherapy empirical data obtained during decades were overtaken by evidence from current studies. The author points out the great problem of physiotherapy, namely the heterogeneity of the applied parameters. Knowledge of current evidence may be very important and helpful for the physicians, but the author proposes, from the practical point of view, that physiotherapeutical procedures based on exprience and used for many years should not be entirely neglected. Nowadays physiotherapy plays an important role in the treament of locomotor diseases but its use is increasing in other fields of medicine, as well.

  9. Patients at the Centre: Methodological Considerations for Evaluating Evidence from Health Interventions Involving Patients Use of Web-Based Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Building an evidence base for healthcare interventions has long been advocated as both professionally and ethically desirable. By supporting meaningful comparison amongst different approaches, a good evidence base has been viewed as an important element in optimising clinical decision-making and the safety and quality of care. Unsurprisingly, medical research has put considerable effort into supporting the development of this evidence base, and the randomised controlled trial has become the dominant methodology. Recently however, a body of research has begun to question, not just this methodology per se, but also the extent to which the evidence it produces may marginalise individual patient experiences, priorities and perceptions. Simultaneously, the widespread adoption and utilisation of information systems (IS) in health care has also prompted initiatives to develop a stronger base of evidence about their impacts. These calls have been stimulated both by numerous system failures and research expressing concerns about the limitations of information systems methodologies in health care environments. Alongside the potential of information systems to produce positive, negative and unintended consequences, many measures of success, impact or benefit appear to have little to do with improvements in care, health outcomes or individual patient experiences. Combined these methodological concerns suggest the need for more detailed examination. This is particularly the case, given the prevalence within contemporary clinical and IS discourses on health interventions advocating the need to put the ‘patient at the centre’ by engaging them in their own care and/or ‘empowering’ them through the use of information systems. This paper aims to contribute to these on-going debates by focusing on the socio-technical processes by which patients’ interests and outcomes are measured, defined and evaluated within health interventions that involve them using web-based

  10. Trust in the health-care provider-patient relationship: a systematic mapping review of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Nicola; Barnes, Rebecca; Calnan, Mike; Corrigan, Oonagh; Dieppe, Paul; Entwistle, Vikki

    2013-12-01

    Trust is important for patients and may be used as an indicator and potential 'marker' for how patients evaluate the quality of health care. The review aimed to classify the current evidence base on trust in the patient-provider relationship in order to identify strengths and weaknesses and to point towards areas for future research. Nine electronic databases were searched from 2004 onwards using text and subject heading keywords relating to 'trust' and 'health care' and 'relationships'. Abstracts were identified for empirical studies carried out in health-care settings that explicitly examined trust or reported trust-related findings as a secondary outcome. Data extraction Two review authors assessed the relevance of abstracts and extracted data relating to year published, country of study, clinical speciality, and participants. Five hundred and ninety-six abstracts were included. Most reported on patients' trust in providers; were carried out in the USA; collected data in family care or oncology/palliative care settings; used questionnaires and interviews and elicited patients' perspectives. Only one study explicitly set out to examine providers' trust in patients and patients. Providers' trust in patients remains a neglected area on the trust research agenda. Empirical studies examining the factors that influence providers' trust in patients and how this might affect the quality of care and patient health-related behaviours are urgently needed to readdress this imbalance. Further exploration of this area using observational methods is recommended.

  11. Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in adult patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bethan L; Whittle, Samuel; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Barrett, Claire; Lynch, Nora; Major, Gabor; Littlejohn, Geoffrey; Taylor, Andrew; Zochling, Jane

    2014-09-01

    To develop Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations for pain management by pharmacotherapy in adult patients with optimally treated inflammatory arthritis (IA). Four hundred and fifty-three rheumatologists from 17 countries including 46 rheumatologists from Australia and New Zealand participated in the 2010 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative. Using a formal voting process, rheumatologists from 15 national scientific committees selected 10 clinical questions regarding the use of pain medications in IA. Bibliographic fellows undertook a systematic literature review for each question, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and 2008-09 EULAR/ACR abstracts. Relevant studies were retrieved for data extraction and risk of bias assessment. Rheumatologists from Australia and New Zealand used the evidence to develop a set of national recommendations. These recommendations were then formulated and assessed for agreement and the potential impact on clinical practice. The Oxford Levels of Evidence and Grade of Recommendation were applied to each recommendation. The systematic reviews identified 49 242 references, from which 167 studies which met the pre-specified inclusion criteria. Combining this evidence with expert opinion led to the development of 10 final Australian and New Zealand recommendations. The recommendations relate to pain measurement, and the use of analgesic medications in patients with and without co-morbidities and during pregnancy and lactation. The recommendations reflect the clinical practice of the majority of the participating rheumatologists (mean level of agreement 7.24-9.65). Ten Australian and New Zealand evidence-based recommendations regarding the management of pain by pharmacotherapy in adults with optimally treated IA were developed. They are supported by a large panel of rheumatologists, thus enhancing their utility in everyday clinical practice. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley

  12. Nursing staff's experiences of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room-An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Fredrika; Olausson, Sepideh; Fridh, Isabell; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-12-01

    It has been known for centuries that environment in healthcare has an impact, but despite this, environment has been overshadowed by technological and medical progress, especially in intensive care. Evidence-based design is a concept concerning integrating knowledge from various research disciplines and its application to healing environments. The aim was to explore the experiences of nursing staff of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room. Interviews were carried out with eight critical care nurses and five assistant nurses and then subjected to qualitative content analysis. The experience of working in an evidence-based designed intensive care unit patient room was that the room stimulates alertness and promotes wellbeing in the nursing staff, fostering their caring activities but also that the interior design of the medical and technical equipment challenges nursing actions. The room explored in this study had been rebuilt in order to create and evaluate a healing environment. This study showed that the new environment had a great impact on the caring staffs' wellbeing and their caring behaviour. At a time when turnover in nurses is high and sick leave is increasing, these findings show the importance of interior design ofintensive care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased literacy of the best evidence base optimizes patient-clinician communication in convergent translational health care: Relevance for patient-centered modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Khakshooy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentistry in particular and biomedicine in general have undergone a fundamental transformation over the recent decades, which have been formalized by the Affordable Care Act, 2010. In brief, modern contemporary health care has evolved from procedure-driven and intervention-centered care based on research evidence to the administration and delivery of care that is patient-centered, effectiveness-focused, and that utilizes the best evidence base generated by systematic research synthesis (i.e., evidence-based. The present conceptualization of health care integrates translational research and translational effectiveness, and allows convergence of the multiple specialization fields of biomedicine (e.g., dentistry, internal medicine, and psychiatry as well as the various medical traditions globally (i.e., Western, Ayurvedic, and Chinese medical traditions, etc.. The Hypothesis: Here, we propose the hypothesis that increased literacy of the best evidence base optimizes patient-clinician communication in the current convergent translational health care model including dental care. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: We discuss the salient points of this proposition, and outline the relevance of certain salient convergent patient-centered modalities of health care that intimately intertwine medicine and dentistry.

  14. Translation of an evidence-based therapeutic exercise program for patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dereck L; Whipple, Mary O; Burt, Marsha; Brown, Rebecca J L; Hirsch, Alan; Foley, Christopher; Treat-Jacobson, Diane

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate quality outcomes including referral, enrollment, and completion rates of a new peripheral artery disease (PAD)-specific supervised exercise therapy (SET) program within a preexisting clinical exercise wellness program and to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes derived from 12 weeks of PAD-specific SET. Recruited participants completed an individualized, minimally supervised, PAD-specific SET program based on the AHA-ACC guidelines. Exercise workloads (metabolic equivalents of task [METs]) were tracked and evaluated throughout the program. Short Physical Performance Battery, 6-minute walk test (6MWT) Walking Impairment Questionnaire, Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and Peripheral Artery Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PADQOL) were assessed before and after the program. Paired t-tests were used to examine differences between baseline and follow-up outcome variables. On average, participants (n = 46) attended 23 (standard deviation [SD] 12.9) out of the possible 36 training sessions, for a 64% attendance rate. Among participants who used treadmill walking as the primary mode of exercise (n = 40), the overall mean MET level just prior to program completion was 3.79 (SD 1.49), which represented an increase of 0.92 (34%) METs compared to baseline (P < .001). Total distance on the 6MWT increased 115 (11%) feet (P = .011), which is considered a clinically meaningful improvement. Significant improvements were noted in the PADQOL: symptoms and limitations in physical functioning (P = .007). This study demonstrates that a minimally staffed PAD-specific SET program can improve functional performance in patients with claudication due to PAD and serves as a foundation to help build a clinically effective, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursed PAD-specific rehabilitation program. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-based periodontal therapy: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, R.; Anitha, V.; Ramakrishnan, T.; Sudhakar, Uma

    2008-01-01

    Dentists need to make clinical decisions based on limited scientific evidence. In clinical practice, a clinician must weigh a myriad of evidences every day. The goal of evidence-based dentistry is to help practitioners provide their patients with optimal care. This is achieved by integrating sound research evidence with personal clinical expertise and patient values to determine the best course of treatment. Periodontology has a rich background of research and scholarship. Therefore, efficient use of this wealth of research data needs to be a part of periodontal practice. Evidence-based periodontology aims to facilitate such an approach and it offers a bridge from science to clinical practice. The clinician must integrate the evidence with patient preference, scientific knowledge, and personal experience. Most important, it allows us to care for our patients. Therefore, evidence-based periodontology is a tool to support decision-making and integrating the best evidence available with clinical practice. PMID:20142947

  16. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients' health: retrospective, population based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaney, John J; Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O'Neill, James

    2013-12-12

    To ascertain whether a name can influence a person's health, by assessing whether people with the surname "Brady" have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Retrospective, population based cohort study. One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. People with the surname "Brady" in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. 579 (0.36%) of 161,967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname "Brady." The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health.

  17. Basing information on comprehensive, critically appraised, and up-to-date syntheses of the scientific evidence: a quality dimension of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montori, Victor M; LeBlanc, Annie; Buchholz, Angela; Stilwell, Diana L; Tsapas, Apostolos

    2013-01-01

    Patients and clinicians expect patient decision aids to be based on the best available research evidence. Since 2005, this expectation has translated into a quality dimension of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards. We reviewed the 2005 standards and the available literature on the evidence base of decision aids as well as searched for parallel activities in which evidence is brought to bear to inform clinical decisions. In conducting this work, we noted emerging and research issues that require attention and may inform this quality dimension in the future. This dimension requires patient decision aids to be based on research evidence about the relevant options and the nature and likelihood of their effect on outcomes that matter to patients. The synthesis of evidence should be comprehensive and up-to-date, and the evidence itself subject to critical appraisal. Ethical (informed patient choice), quality-of-care (patient-centered care), and scientific (evidence-based medicine) arguments justify this requirement. Empirical evidence suggests that over two thirds of available decision aids are based on high-quality evidence syntheses. Emerging issues identified include the duties of developers regarding the conduct of systematic reviews, the impact of comparative effectiveness research, their link with guidelines based on the same evidence, and how to present the developers' confidence in the estimates to the end-users. Systematic application of the GRADE system, common in contemporary practice guideline development, could enhance satisfaction of this dimension. While theoretical and practical issues remained to be addressed, high-quality patient decision aids should adhere to this dimension requiring they be based on comprehensive and up-to-date summaries of critically appraised evidence.

  18. Development of a Clinical Framework for Mirror Therapy in Patients with Phantom Limb Pain: An Evidence-based Practice Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgangel, Andreas; Braun, Susy; de Witte, Luc; Beurskens, Anna; Smeets, Rob

    2016-04-01

    To describe the development and content of a clinical framework for mirror therapy (MT) in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) following amputation. Based on an a priori formulated theoretical model, 3 sources of data collection were used to develop the clinical framework. First, a review of the literature took place on important clinical aspects and the evidence on the effectiveness of MT in patients with phantom limb pain. In addition, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were used to analyze clinical experiences and preferences of physical and occupational therapists and patients suffering from PLP regarding the application of MT. All data were finally clustered into main and subcategories and were used to complement and refine the theoretical model. For every main category of the a priori formulated theoretical model, several subcategories emerged from the literature search, patient, and therapist interviews. Based on these categories, we developed a clinical flowchart that incorporates the main and subcategories in a logical way according to the phases in methodical intervention defined by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy. In addition, we developed a comprehensive booklet that illustrates the individual steps of the clinical flowchart. In this study, a structured clinical framework for the application of MT in patients with PLP was developed. This framework is currently being tested for its effectiveness in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Àlex; Wattjes, Mike P; Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of MRI in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has advanced markedly over the past few years. Technical improvements and continuously emerging data from clinical trials and observational studies have contributed to the enhanced performance of this tool for achieving a prompt...... diagnosis in patients with MS. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the implementation of MRI of the brain and spinal cord in the diagnosis of patients who are suspected of having MS. These guidelines are based on an extensive review of the recent literature, as well as on the personal...... of MRI in clinical practice for the diagnosis of MS....

  20. Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into a Therapeutic Exercise Course: Real-Time Patient Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Jennifer K.

    2014-01-01

    Athletic training students need real-time patient experiences in order to transfer the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom into clinical practice. The objective is to present a description of an assignment that could be incorporated into a therapeutic exercise course giving the student an opportunity to evaluate a patient, design a…

  1. Evidence-based nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Mahatnirunkul, Suwat; Srikosai, Soontaree

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand. The initial draft, consisting of 12 categories with 37 subcategories, was then evaluated by experts in the US and Thailand. Hospital records were then utilized to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the indicators. The finalized instrument consisted of 11 categories with 43 items with a validity of .98 and internal consistency of .88. This is the first set of indicators developed to evaluate nursing-sensitivity for patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of depression in Thailand. Having nursing indicators for depressed patients provides nurses with concrete tools to evaluate their work with depressed patients, allowing these staff to assess their work in a very specific, methodical, and consistent manner. When problems are discovered, both the staff and administration can work to address these issues through training, procedural changes, and departmental shifts.

  2. Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-Based Clinical Decision Support System) to AIG Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Mbah, PhD2*, Ambuj Kumar, MD, MPH3, Kim Sehwan, PhD4*, Ronald Schonwetter, MD5* and Benjamin Djulbegovic, MD, PhD6 1Center for Evidence - Based Medicine , University...of South Florida, Tampa, FL 2USF, Tampa, FL 3University of South Florida, College of Medicine, Center for Evidence Based Medicine , Tampa...4HPC healthcare, Tampa, FL 5HPC Healthcare, Tampa, FL 6Center for Evidence - Based Medicine & Health Outcomes Research, University of South

  3. Hyponatremia in the neurocritical care patient: An approach based on current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, W; Aramendi, I; Langlois, P L; Biestro, A

    2015-05-01

    In the neurocritical care setting, hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disorder, which is associated with significant morbimortality. Cerebral salt wasting and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone have been classically described as the 2 most frequent entities responsible of hyponatremia in neurocritical care patients. Nevertheless, to distinguish between both syndromes is usually difficult and useless as volume status is difficult to be determined, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood, fluid restriction is usually contraindicated in these patients, and the first option in the therapeutic strategy is always the same: 3% hypertonic saline solution. Therefore, we definitively agree with the current concept of "cerebral salt wasting", which means that whatever is the etiology of hyponatremia, initially in neurocritical care patients the treatment will be the same: hypertonic saline solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of elderly patients with breast cancer : towards evidence based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Water, Willemien van de

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy diagnosed in women1. The incidence of breast cancer increases with age; currently, in developed countries more than 40% of breast cancer patients is 65 years or older at diagnosis1. In the Netherlands in 2011, 5,441 women aged 65 years or older were

  5. Online information on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients: evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jutta; Senf, Bianca; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Stoll, Christoph; Prott, Franz J; Muenstedt, Karsten; Dennert, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Most websites offering online information on CAM are not helpful for them. We extracted decisive elements for online information on CAM by analyzing the literature on the information needs of cancer patients and on counseling cancer patients on CAM. Key issues for online information on CAM are the qualification of the authors, transparency and accountability of the information, description of the aims, a scientific approach, description of treatment alternatives, support for the patient-physician relationship, individualized information, a summary of the information, disclosure of funding, and the privacy policy. The communicative challenge will be to convey information without destroying hope and motivation. We suggest that CAM topics should be integrated into broader information provided on cancer (etiology, conventional treatment). By also providing information for physicians, such a website could promote shared decision-making. Online information will gain the status of independent expert knowledge if provided by a well-known scientific organization as, e.g., a national cancer society. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Patients, evidence and genes: an exploration of GPs' perspectives on gene-based personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.; Molder, te H.F.M.; Hiddink, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Nutrigenomics science examines the response of individuals to food compounds using post-genomics technology. It is expected that in the future, personalized nutrition advice can be provided based on information about genetic make-up. Objectives. Gene-based personalized nutrition advice

  7. Validity evidence for a patient note scoring rubric based on the new patient note format of the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lineberry, Matthew; Hyderi, Abbas; Bordage, Georges; Riddle, Janet; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    This study examines validity evidence for the Patient Note Scoring Rubric, which was developed for a local graduation competency exam (GCE) to assess patient notes written in the new United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Skills format. The rubric was designed to measure three dimensions: Documentation, justified differential diagnosis (DDX), and Workup. Analyses used GCE data from 170 fourth-year medical students who completed five standardized patient (SP) cases in May 2012. Five physician raters each scored all responses for one case. Internal structure was examined using correlations between dimensions and between cases; a generalizability study was also conducted. Relationship to other variables was examined by correlating patient note scores with SP encounter scores. Consequence was assessed by comparing pass-fail rates between the rubric and the previous global rating. Response process was examined using rater feedback. Correlations between scores from different dimensions ranged between 0.33 and 0.44. Reliability of scores based on the phi coefficient was 0.43; 15 cases were required to reach a phi coefficient of 0.70. Evidence of case specificity was found. Documentation scores were moderately correlated with SP scores for data gathering (r = 0.47, P rubric to score local clinical exams that are based on the new USMLE patient note format.

  8. Patients speak out: development of an evidence-based model for managing orthopaedic postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Pamela; Hardwick, Mary E; Munro, Michelle; May, Laura; Dupies-Rosa, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative pain management after total joint replacement continues to be a concern for orthopaedic nurses. In our institution, the results of routine post-hospital stay surveys had shown below average scores in the area of pain management. This began as a quality management issue, became a pain subcommittee issue, and drew in the research nurses to ask what we can learn from this process. Changing the method of handling pain management is not easy, but it makes a difference in patients' hospital experiences. We learned that cooperation and expertise from multiple departments within the institution and some organizations outside the institution is needed to bring about change. We learned that education of not just staff members but also patients on pain management affected the outcome. This article describes our journey to enhance pain management in our institution.

  9. Evidence-based Status of Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment for Patients with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Miao; Ma, Chiyuan; Yan, Shigui

    2016-04-01

    Review the current evidence-based status of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment for patients with shoulder pain based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to provide a comprehensive analysis and a balanced view of the strengths and weaknesses of this treatment. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science were searched up to July 2014, using the Boolean operators as follows: shoulder pain OR painful shoulder AND pulsed radiofrequency). All prospective randomized controlled trials of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain were retrieved. No limitation of the language or publication year existed in our analysis. Five of 114 studies that involved PRF treatment met the inclusion criteria of this review article. These studies compared the clinical outcomes of PRF with those of other treatments such as intra-articular corticosteroid injection and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. All the studies reported improvements in passive range of motion (PROM), visual analog scale (VAS), and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) in PRF treatment that persisted for at least 12 weeks. In addition, no complications were reported in all trials. The use of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain was observed to result in good clinical efficacy for at least 12 weeks with no complication reported. However, it is still unclear from the currently available publications whether PRF is superior to other treatment techniques such as intra-articular corticosteroid and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Pregnancy related issues in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence base and patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Christian P; Leong, Rupert Wl; Lal, Simon

    2012-06-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects women of childbearing age and can influence fertility, pregnancy and decisions regarding breastfeeding. Women with IBD need to consider the possible course of disease during pregnancy, the benefits and risks associated with medications required for disease management during pregnancy and breastfeeding and the effects of mode of delivery on their disease. When indicated, aminosalicylates and thiopurines can be safely used during pregnancy. Infliximab and Adalimumab are considered probably safe during the first two trimesters. During the third trimester the placenta can be crossed and caution should be applied. Methotrexate is associated with severe teratogenicity due to its folate antagonism and is strictly contraindicated. Women with IBD tend to deliver earlier than healthy women, but can have a vaginal delivery in most cases. Caesarean sections are generally recommended for women with active perianal disease or after ileo-anal pouch surgery.While the impact of disease activity and medication has been addressed in several studies, there are minimal studies evaluating patients' perspective on these issues. Women's attitudes may influence their decision to have children and can positively or negatively influence the chance of conceiving, and their beliefs regarding therapies may impact on the course of their disease during pregnancy and/or breastfeeding. This review article outlines the impact of IBD and its treatment on pregnancy, and examines the available data on patients' views on this subject.

  11. Explaining unexplained pain to fibromyalgia patients: finding a narrative that is acceptable to patients and provides a rationale for evidence based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Michael E; Hinton, Claire; Hill, Charlotte; Whalley, Ben; Jones, Rupert Cm; Davies, Anthony F

    2016-08-01

    As the cause of fibromyalgia is controversial, communicating with patients can be challenging, particularly if the patient adopts the narrative 'I am damaged and so I need a more powerful pain killer'. Research shows that providing patients with alternative narratives can be helpful, but it remains unclear what particular narratives are most acceptable to patients and at the same time provide a rationale for evidence based psychological and exercise interventions. This article described the development of a new narrative and the written comments made about the narrative by fibromyalgia patients. The narrative derives from a complexity theory model and provides an alternative to biogenic and psychogenic models. The model was presented to 15 patients whose comments about comprehensibility led to the final format of the narrative. In the final form, the body is presented as 'a very, very clever computer' where fibromyalgia is caused by a software rather than a hardware problem. The software problem is caused by the body adapting when people have to 'keep going' despite 'stop signals', such as pain and fatigue. The narrative provides a rationale for engaging in psychological and exercise interventions as a way of correcting the body's software. This way of explaining fibromyalgia was evaluated by a further 25 patients attending a 7-week 'body reprogramming' intervention, where the therapy was presented as correcting the body's software, and included both exercise and psychological components. Attendance at the course was 85%. Thematic analysis of written patient feedback collected after each session showed that patients found the model believable and informative, it provided hope and was empowering. Patients also indicated that they had started to implement lifestyle change with perceived benefit. Fibromyalgia patients appear to respond positively to a technology-derived narrative based on the analogy of the body as a computer.

  12. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM has become standard approach in medicine. Patients and health authorities increasingly claim active patient roles in decision making. Education to cope with these roles might be useful. We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and possible impact of EBM training courses for patient and consumer representatives. Methods We designed a generic one-week EBM course based on previous experience with EBM courses for non-medical health professionals. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure EBM skills. Formative and summative evaluation of the course comprised: 1 EBM skills; 2 individual learning goals; 3 self-reported implementation after six months using semi-structured interviews; 4 group-based feedback by content analysis. EBM skills' achievement was compared to results gathered by a group of undergraduate University students of Health Sciences and Education who had attended a comparable EBM seminar. Results Fourteen EBM courses were conducted including 161 participants without previous EBM training (n = 54 self-help group representatives, n = 64 professional counsellors, n = 36 patient advocates, n = 7 others; 71% had a higher education degree; all but five finished the course. Most participants stated personal learning goals explicitly related to practicing EBM such as acquisition of critical appraisal skills (n = 130 or research competencies (n = 67. They rated the respective relevance of the course on average with 80% (SD 4 on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100%. Participants passed the competence test with a mean score of 14.7 (SD 3.0, n = 123 out of 19.5 points. The comparison group of students achieved a mean score of 14.4 (SD 3.3, n = 43. Group-based feedback revealed increases of self confidence, empowerment through EBM methodology and statistical literacy, and acquisition of new concepts of patient information and counselling

  13. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bettina; Steckelberg, Anke; Meyer, Gabriele; Kasper, Jürgen; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2010-02-11

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become standard approach in medicine. Patients and health authorities increasingly claim active patient roles in decision making. Education to cope with these roles might be useful. We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and possible impact of EBM training courses for patient and consumer representatives. We designed a generic one-week EBM course based on previous experience with EBM courses for non-medical health professionals. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure EBM skills. Formative and summative evaluation of the course comprised: 1) EBM skills; 2) individual learning goals; 3) self-reported implementation after six months using semi-structured interviews; 4) group-based feedback by content analysis. EBM skills' achievement was compared to results gathered by a group of undergraduate University students of Health Sciences and Education who had attended a comparable EBM seminar. Fourteen EBM courses were conducted including 161 participants without previous EBM training (n = 54 self-help group representatives, n = 64 professional counsellors, n = 36 patient advocates, n = 7 others); 71% had a higher education degree; all but five finished the course. Most participants stated personal learning goals explicitly related to practicing EBM such as acquisition of critical appraisal skills (n = 130) or research competencies (n = 67). They rated the respective relevance of the course on average with 80% (SD 4) on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100%.Participants passed the competence test with a mean score of 14.7 (SD 3.0, n = 123) out of 19.5 points. The comparison group of students achieved a mean score of 14.4 (SD 3.3, n = 43). Group-based feedback revealed increases of self confidence, empowerment through EBM methodology and statistical literacy, and acquisition of new concepts of patient information and counselling. Implementation of EBM skills was reported by 84 of the

  14. An evidence-based approach to managing the anticoagulated patient in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    You start another busy shift with a double row of charts waiting to be seen. Your first patient is an elderly man who fell 1 hour prior to presentation. He did not lose consciousness, but he was dazed for a few minutes. He complains of a mild headache but denies any neck pain. He takes warfarin for valvular heart disease. He looks good and has no focal neurological complaints. His mental status is normal, he has a negative head CT scan, and his INR is 3.9. His family wants to take him home, which would help relieve some of the congestion in the ED, but you wonder what would be best. To observe and repeat imaging? Reverse his anticoagulation? Change his dosing regimen of warfarin? In the next room, you quickly evaluate a 51-year-old obese woman with nonspecific back and abdominal pain that started 24 hours before and has slowly progressed to become intolerable. She denies fever, chills, nausea, or vomiting. She is on the last day of a 5-day course of ciprofloxacin for a UTI. She takes warfarin for a pulmonary embolus that occurred 2 months prior. Her hematocrit is mildly decreased, and her white blood count is normal; however, the INR is 6.8. You wonder if her abdominal pain is related to the UTI, or if it could be somehow related to the prolonged INR. In fact, you wonder why her INR is so prolonged...

  15. Cognitive-behavioral therapy: How medical providers can increase patient and family openness and access to evidence-based multimodal therapy for pediatric migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michelle M.; O’Brien, Hope; Powers, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    While evidence supports the recommendation for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric migraine, few children actually receive this evidence-based intervention. In this article we briefly review the most recent empirical evidence supporting CBT. We then identify both provider/system-related barriers as well as patient-related barriers. Finally, we provide practical solutions to addressing these barriers in the service of facilitating children receiving optimal comprehensive management of their headaches. PMID:26198185

  16. Interdisciplinary evidence-based recommendations for the follow-up of early stage seminomatous testicular germ cell cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hartmann, Michael [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Krege, Susanne [Krankenhaus Maria-Hilf GmbH, Krefeld (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Lorch, Anja [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Mayer, Frank [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Oncology; Santis, Maria de [KFJ-Spital, ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP and LBI-ACR VIEnna-CTO, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Oncology; Gillessen, Silke [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Medical Oncology; Beyer, Joerg [Vivantes Klinikum am Urban, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Cathomas, Richard [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Chur (Switzerland). Medical Oncology

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To provide guidance regarding follow-up procedures after initial treatment of early stage testicular seminoma (clinical stages (CS) I-II A/B) based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Material: An interdisciplinary, multinational working group consisting of urologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists analyzed the published evidence regarding follow-up procedures in various stages of seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular cancers. Focusing on radiooncological aspects, the recommendations contained herein are restricted to early stage seminoma (with radiotherapy being a standard treatment option). In particular, extent, frequency, and duration of imaging at follow-up were analyzed concerning relapse patterns, risk factors, and mode of relapse detection. Results: Active surveillance, adjuvant carboplatin or radiotherapy are equally accepted options for CS I seminoma but they result in different relapse rates and patterns. Usually relapses occur within the first 2(-6) years. Routinely performed follow-up using computerized tomography (CT) after adjuvant treatment yield only low detection rates of recurrences. Therefore, there is no evidence to maintain routine examinations every 3-4 months. After treatment of stage IIA/B, detection rates of relapses or progression identified solely by routinely performed CT during follow-up are low. Conclusion: Considering lifelong cure rates of up to 99% for patients treated for seminoma CS I-IIA/B, the negative impact of unnecessary ionizing radiation exposure has to be considered. The presented recommendations for various follow-up scenarios for early stage seminoma strongly promote the restrictive use of imaging procedures that utilize ionizing radiation (especially CT), due to its potential to induce secondary malignancies. (orig.)

  17. Theory- and evidence-based intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, M.; Hospers, H. J.; van den Borne, H. W.; Kok, G.; Prins, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe and pilot-test a theory- and evidence-based intervention to improve adherence of HIV-infected patients with antiretroviral medication. Twenty-six treatment-experienced patients (> 6 months on treatment) participated in a within-subject comparison design.

  18. Nursing Care of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Families in the Intensive Care Unit: An Evidence-based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda K; Mansfield, Brianne; Mandoza, Jared

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses evidence-based practice related to adult hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients when admitted to the intensive care unit. Specifically, it addresses non-HSCT staff, patient, and family needs and the strategies to address those needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  1. Competence training in evidence-based medicine for patients, patient counsellors, consumer representatives and health care professionals in Austria: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bettina; Gerlach, Anja; Groth, Sylvia; Sladek, Ulla; Ebner, Katharina; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Steckelberg, Anke

    2013-01-01

    Informed and shared decision-making require competences for both partners - healthcare professionals and patients. There is a lack of training courses in evidence-based medicine for patients and counsellors. We investigated feasibility, acceptability and the potential effects of a 2 x 2.5 days training course on critical health competences in patients, patient counsellors, consumer representatives and healthcare professionals in Austria. We adapted a previously developed curriculum for patient and consumer representatives. The adaptation comprised the specific needs of our target group in Austria and was founded on Carl Rogers' theory of person-centred education. For the formative evaluation a questionnaire was applied to address the domains: 1) organisational conditions (time and duration of the course, location, and information given in advance, registration); 2) assistance outside the courses; 3) teaching methods (performance of lecturers, teaching materials, structure of modules and blocks) and 4) satisfaction; 5) subjective assessment of competences. Participants evaluated the course, using a 5-point Likert scale. Long-term implementation was assessed using semi-structured interviews three to six months after the course. To estimate the increase in critical health competences we used the validated Critical Health Competence Test (CHC test). Eleven training courses were conducted including 142 participants: patients (n=21); self-help group representatives (n=17); professional counsellors (n=29); healthcare professionals (n=10); psychologists (n=8); teachers (n=10) and others (n=29). 97 out of 142 (68 %) participants returned the questionnaire. On average, participants strongly agreed or agreed to 1) organisational conditions: 71 % / 23 %; 2) assistance outside the courses: 96 % / 10 %; 3) teaching methods: 60 % / 28 %; and 4) satisfaction: 78 % / 20 %, respectively. Interviews showed that the training course raised awareness, activated and empowered

  2. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  3. The Need for Evidence Based Nutritional Guidelines for Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients: Acute and Long-Term Following Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce L. Owens

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available High survival rates for pediatric leukemia are very promising. With regard to treatment, children tend to be able to withstand a more aggressive treatment protocol than adults. The differences in both treatment modalities and outcomes between children and adults make extrapolation of adult studies to children inappropriate. The higher success is associated with a significant number of children experiencing nutrition-related adverse effects both in the short and long term after treatment. Specific treatment protocols have been shown to deplete nutrient levels, in particular antioxidants. The optimal nutrition prescription during, after and long-term following cancer treatment is unknown. This review article will provide an overview of the known physiologic processes of pediatric leukemia and how they contribute to the complexity of performing nutritional assessment in this population. It will also discuss known nutrition-related consequences, both short and long term in pediatric leukemia patients. Since specific antioxidants have been shown to be depleted as a consequence of therapy, the role of oxidative stress in the pediatric leukemia population will also be explored. More pediatric studies are needed to develop evidence based therapeutic interventions for nutritional complications of leukemia and its treatment.

  4. Extracorporeal lung support technologies - bridge to recovery and bridge to lung transplantation in adult patients: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    inflow or arterial line, and the other as an outflow or venous line. Venovenous ECMO will not provide adequate support if a patient has pulmonary hypertension or right heart failure. Problems associated with cannulation during the procedure include bleeding around the cannulation site and limb ischemia distal to the cannulation site. ILA: Interventional Lung Assist (ILA) is used to remove excess CO(2) from the blood of patients in respiratory failure. The system is characterized by a novel, low-resistance gas exchange device with a diffusion membrane composed of polymethylpentene (PMP) fibres. These fibres are woven into a complex configuration that maximizes the exchange of oxygen and CO(2) by simple diffusion. The system is also designed to operate without the help of an external pump, though one can be added if higher blood flow is required. The device is then applied across an arteriovenous shunt between the femoral artery and femoral vein. Depending on the size of the arterial cannula used and the mean systemic arterial pressure, a blood flow of up to 2.5 L/min can be achieved (up to 5.5 L/min with an external pump). The cannulation is performed after intravenous administration of heparin. Recently, the first commercially available extracorporeal membrane ventilator (NovaLung GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) was approved for clinical use by Health Canada for patients in respiratory failure. The system has been used in more than 2,000 patients with various indications in Europe, and was used for the first time in North America at the Toronto General Hospital in 2006. EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS: The research questions addressed in this report are: Does ILA/ECMO facilitate gas exchange in the lungs of patients with severe respiratory failure?Does ILA/ECMO improve the survival rate of patients with respiratory failure caused by a range of underlying conditions including patients awaiting LTx?What are the possible serious adverse events associated with ILA/ECMO therapy?To address

  5. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature was consi......Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature...

  6. Evidence based medical imaging (EBMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tony [Senior Lecturer in Medical Radiation Science, University Department of Rural Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Locked Bag 9783 NEMSC, Tamworth, NSW 2348 (Australia)], E-mail: tony.smith@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au

    2008-08-15

    Background: The evidence based paradigm was first described about a decade ago. Previous authors have described a framework for the application of evidence based medicine which can be readily adapted to medical imaging practice. Purpose: This paper promotes the application of the evidence based framework in both the justification of the choice of examination type and the optimisation of the imaging technique used. Methods: The framework includes five integrated steps: framing a concise clinical question; searching for evidence to answer that question; critically appraising the evidence; applying the evidence in clinical practice; and, evaluating the use of revised practices. Results: This paper illustrates the use of the evidence based framework in medical imaging (that is, evidence based medical imaging) using the examples of two clinically relevant case studies. In doing so, a range of information technology and other resources available to medical imaging practitioners are identified with the intention of encouraging the application of the evidence based paradigm in radiography and radiology. Conclusion: There is a perceived need for radiographers and radiologists to make greater use of valid research evidence from the literature to inform their clinical practice and thus provide better quality services.

  7. Evidence-Based Medicine: Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew K; Most, Sam P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly prominent in the climate of modern day healthcare. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the integration of the best available evidence with clinical experience and expertise to help guide clinical decision-making. The essential tenets of evidence-based medicine can be applied to both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Current outcome measures in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty, including objective, subjective, and clinician-reported measures, is summarized and the current data is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Corroborating evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebius, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Proponents of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have argued convincingly for applying this scientific method to medicine. However, the current methodological framework of the EBM movement has recently been called into question, especially in epidemiology and the philosophy of science. The debate has focused on whether the methodology of randomized controlled trials provides the best evidence available. This paper attempts to shift the focus of the debate by arguing that clinical reasoning involves a patchwork of evidential approaches and that the emphasis on evidence hierarchies of methodology fails to lend credence to the common practice of corroboration in medicine. I argue that the strength of evidence lies in the evidence itself, and not the methodology used to obtain that evidence. Ultimately, when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of medical interventions, it is the evidence obtained from the methodology rather than the methodology that should establish the strength of the evidence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury: development of an evidence-based care bundle for the Thai emergency department context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damkliang, Jintana; Considine, Julie; Kent, Bridie; Street, Maryann

    2014-11-01

    Thai emergency nurses play a vital role in caring for patients with severe TBI, and are an important part of the healthcare team throughout the resuscitation phase. They are also responsible for continuous physiological monitoring, and detecting deterioration associated with increased intracranial pressure and preventing secondary brain injury. However, there is known variation in Thai nurses' knowledge and care practices for patients with severe TBI. In addition, there are no specific evidence-based practice guidelines available for emergency nursing management of patients with severe TBI. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an evidence-based care bundle for initial emergency nursing management of patients with severe TBI for use in a Thai ED context. An evidence-based care bundle focused on seven major elements: (1) establish a secure airway along with c-spine protection, (2) maintain adequacy of oxygenation and ventilation, (3) maintain circulation and fluid balance, (4) assessment of GCS, and pupil size and reactivity, (5) maintain cerebral venous outflow, (6) management of pain, agitation, and irritability, and (7) administer for urgent CT scan. A care bundle is one method of promoting consistent, evidence-based emergency nursing care of patients with severe TBI, decreasing unnecessary variations in nursing care and reducing the risk of secondary brain injury from suboptimal care. Implementation of this evidence-based care bundle developed specifically for the Thai emergency nursing context has the potential to improve the care of the patients with severe TBI. Copyright © 2014 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-based dermoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Scott W

    2013-10-01

    Dermoscopy has been shown in meta-analyses to improve the diagnostic accuracy of melanoma unequivocally compared with naked eye examination and to reduce excision rates of benign melanocytic lesions in clinical trials. Sequential digital dermoscopy imaging (SDDI) allows the detection of dermoscopic featureless melanoma. When used in high-risk individuals or on individual suspicious melanocytic lesions, it has a gross impact for detecting melanoma in clinical practice, with a range of 34% to 61% of melanomas detected exclusively using SDDI in these patients. Furthermore, SDDI has been shown to reduce the excision of benign lesions when used in combination with dermoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coordinating the norms and values of medical research, medical practice and patient worlds-the ethics of evidence based medicine in orphaned fields of medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, R.; Willems, D.; Houtepen, R.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is rightly at the core of current medicine. If patients and society put trust in medical professional competency, and on the basis of that competency delegate all kinds of responsibilities to the medical profession, medical professionals had better make sure their competency

  12. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    A current ambition in welfare states as diverse as Denmark, the UK, and in the USA is to base political decision making on rigorous research (Cartwright et al 2009; Mulgan 2009; Bason 2010). Sound as this might seem the ambition has nevertheless been problematized by both policy-makers and the re......A current ambition in welfare states as diverse as Denmark, the UK, and in the USA is to base political decision making on rigorous research (Cartwright et al 2009; Mulgan 2009; Bason 2010). Sound as this might seem the ambition has nevertheless been problematized by both policy...... a full account, see Vohnsen 2011). These insights will be relevant for the anthropological researcher of legislative processes who wishes to move beyond a merely discursive approach to the study of policy and politics....

  13. Prevalence of pain in the orofacial regions in patients visiting general dentists in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Orapin V; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Zhou, Lingmei; Manning, Walter; Mancl, Lloyd; DeRouen, Timothy A

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to measure prevalence of pain in the orofacial regions and determine association with demographics, treatment history, and oral health conditions in dental patients visiting clinics in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) research network. Data were recorded in a survey with systematic random sampling of patients (n = 1,668, 18 to 93 years old, 56% female) visiting 100 general dentists in the Northwest PRECEDENT research network. Prevalence ratios (PR) of orofacial pain by each variable were estimated by generalized estimating equations for Poisson regression. The prevalence of orofacial pain during the past year was 16.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-18.9), of which the most prevalent pain locations were dentoalveolar (9.1%; 95% CI, 7.0-11.2) and musculoligamentous tissues (6.6%; 95% CI, 4.5-8.7). Other locations included soft tissues (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8) and nonspecific areas (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.2-1.0). The prevalence of dentoalveolar but not musculoligamentous pain decreased with age. When comparing the 18- to 29-year-old patients, dentoalveolar pain decreased significantly in 45- to 64-year-old patients (PR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) and in those 65 years or older (PR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9). Sex significantly affected the prevalence of musculoligamentous but not dentoalveolar pain. Women (PR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.0-5.1) were more likely to have musculoligamentous pain. The prevalence of dentoalveolar and musculoligamentous pain did not vary significantly by ethnicity. Dentoalveolar pain was reported more frequently in patients who did not receive dental maintenance (PR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.1-4.2) and those visiting community-based public health clinics (PR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.7). One in 6 patients visiting a general dentist had experienced orofacial pain during the past year. Dentoalveolar and musculoligamentous pains were the most prevalent types of pain. Pain in the muscles and

  14. Valganciclovir for cytomegalovirus prevention in solid organ transplant patients: an evidence-based reassessment of safety and efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre C Kalil

    Full Text Available Several anti-viral drugs have demonstrated efficacy in preventing Cytomegalovirus (CMV infections in solid organ transplant (SOT patients. The recently approved valganciclovir is the most commonly used and most expensive drug for CMV prevention. The safety and efficacy data have been drawn from a single trial. We hypothesized that valganciclovir may not be as safe as nor more effective than other therapies for CMV prevention.All experimental and analytical studies that compared valganciclovir with other therapies for prevention of CMV infection after SOT were selected. Based on meta-analytic and multivariate regression methodologies we critically analyzed all available evidence.Nine studies were included (N = 1,831. In trials comparing valganciclovir with ganciclovir, the risk for CMV disease is 0.98 (95% Confidence Interval (95%CI 0.67 to 1.43; P = 0.92; I(2 = 0%. Valganciclovir was significantly associated with the risk of absolute neutropenia (<1,500/mm(3 compared with all therapies (Odds Ratio (OR 3.63 95%CI 1.75 to 7.53; P = 0.001; I(2 = 0%; with ganciclovir only (OR 2.88, 95%CI 1.27 to 6.53; P = 0.01; I(2 = 0%; or with non-ganciclovir therapies (OR 8.30, 95%CI 1.51 to 45.58; P = 0.01; I(2 = 10%. For a neutropenia cut-off of <1,000/mm(3, the risk remained elevated (OR 1.97, 95%CI 1.03 to 3.67; P = 0.04; I(2 = 0%. For every 24 patients who receive valganciclovir prophylaxis, one more will develop neutropenia compared to other therapies. The risk of late-onset CMV disease with valganciclovir was similar to ganciclovir and higher than those with non-ganciclovir therapies (OR 8.95, 95%CI 1.07 to 74.83; P = 0.04; I(2 = 0%]. One more patient will develop late-onset CMV disease for every 25 who receive valganciclovir compared to treatment with non-ganciclovir therapies. The risk of CMV tissue-invasive disease in liver recipients receiving valganciclovir was 4.5 times the risk seen with ganciclovir [95%CI 1.00 to 20.14] (p = 0.04. All results

  15. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  16. Reassessment: neuroimaging in the emergency patient presenting with seizure (an evidence-based review): report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, C L; Huff, J S; Schwartz, T H; Dubinsky, R M; Zimmerman, R D; Weinstein, S; Foltin, J C; Theodore, W H

    2007-10-30

    To reassess the value of neuroimaging of the emergency patient presenting with seizure as a screening procedure for providing information that will change acute management, and to reassess clinical and historical features associated with an abnormal neuroimaging study in these patients. A broad-based panel with topic expertise evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review using a Medline search from 1966 until November 2004. The 15 articles meeting criteria were Class II or III evidence since interpretation was not masked to the patient's clinical presentation; most were series including 22 to 875 patients. There is evidence that for adults with first seizure, cranial CT will change acute management in 9 to 17% of patients. CT in the emergency department for children presenting with first seizure will change acute management in approximately 3 to 8%. There is no clear difference between rates of abnormal emergent CT for patients with chronic seizures vs first. Children seizures have clinically relevant abnormalities on CT scans 50% of the time. Persons with AIDS and first seizure have high rates of abnormalities, and CNS toxoplasmosis is frequently found. Abnormal neurologic examination, predisposing history, or focal seizure onset are probably predictive of an abnormal CT study in this context. Immediate noncontrast CT is possibly useful for emergency patients presenting with seizure to guide appropriate acute management especially where there is an abnormal neurologic examination, predisposing history, or focal seizure onset.

  17. Evidence-based playground design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refshauge, Anne Dahl; Stigsdotter, Ulrika K.; Lamm, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops, explores and evaluates an evidence-based approach to playground design, with a public park playground (playlab Cph) in Copenhagen as a case study. In the increasingly urbanised world, park playgrounds are valuable places that support healthy child development by providing...... opportunities for play, nature exploration and sensory stimulation. As it is increasingly expected that designers base their decisions on research evidence, there is a need to develop approaches to facilitate this, which also applies to playground design. The design of PlayLab Cph was based on relevant evidence...

  18. Evidence-based nursing: the role of the advanced practice registered nurse in the management of heart failure patients in the outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Rachel; Haynes, Donna; Holaday, Bonnie; Parker, Veronica G

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic debilitating illness that affects millions of Americans each year. Patients with HF are faced with chronic physical symptoms, emotional strain, and significant socioeconomic burden. Goals in the management of HF are to slow the disease progression, decrease symptom acuity, and prevent exacerbations that lead to hospital readmission. Management of HF remains a challenge for healthcare providers. There is a fine balance between optimizing patient functioning and minimizing healthcare expenditures. With the incidence of HF increasing annually, it is important to have effective disease management strategies in place. In any disease management program, it is important to follow those guidelines outlined by evidence-based practice. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence-based practice and determine what benefit exists of having an advanced practice registered nurse assist in the management of patients with HF.

  19. Awareness and use of evidence-based medicine information among patients in Croatia: a nation-wide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejašmić, Danijel; Miošić, Ivana; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Permozer Hajdarović, Snježana; Tomičić, Marion; Gmajnić, Rudika; Diminić Lisica, Ines; Sironić Hreljanović, Jelena; Pleh, Vlatka; Cerovečki, Venija; Tomljenović, Anita; Bekić, Sanja; Jerčić, Minka; Tuđa, Karla; Puljak, Livia

    2017-08-31

    To determine the use of evidence-based medicine (EBM) information and the level of awareness and knowledge of EBM among patients in Croatia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 987 patients in 10 family medicine practices in Croatia. Patients from both urban (n=496) and rural (n=482) areas were surveyed. A 27-item questionnaire was used to collect data about sources that patients searched for medical information, patient awareness and use of Cochrane systematic reviews and other EBM resources, and their demographic characteristics. Half of the patients searched for medical information from sources other than physician. Internet was the most common place they searched for information. Very few patients indicated using EBM sources for medical information; one fifth of patients heard of EBM and 4% of the patients heard of the Cochrane Collaboration. Patients considered physician's opinion as the most reliable source of medical information. A logistic regression model showed that educational level and urban vs rural residence were the predictors of awareness about EBM and systematic reviews (P<0.001 for both). Our finding that patients consider a physician's opinion to be the most reliable source of health-related information could be used for promotion of high-quality health information among patients. More effort should be devoted to the education of patients in rural areas and those with less formal education. New avenues for knowledge translation and dissemination of high-quality health information among patients are necessary.

  20. Mouthwashes for the control of supragingival biofilm and gingivitis in orthodontic patients: evidence-based recommendations for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Nogueira HAAS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Properly performed daily mechanical biofilm control is the most important prevention strategy for periodontal diseases. However, proper mechanical biofilm control is not performed effectively by the majority of the population, mainly due to lack of motivation and of manual dexterity. Local biofilm retention factors may aggravate home oral hygiene quality. For this reason, patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances comprise a group that may benefit from the daily use of mouthwashes. The purpose of this review was to perform a systematic search in the literature on antiseptics used to control supragingival biofilm and gingivitis in orthodontic patients. Six studies investigating the effect of chlorhexidine and 5 studies evaluating the effect of the daily use of antiseptics were found. Chlorhexidine showed better results in reducing plaque and gingivitis. However, because of its adverse effects after continuous use, it should not be indicated for long-term periods. Among the agents considered for daily use, the fixed combination of essential oils was the only one evaluated in a clinical trial, in which a comparative group presented a statistically significant clinical impact. There is no direct evidence supporting the indication of antiseptic agents for orthodontic patients other than chlorhexidine and essential oils. It can be concluded that, for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, chlorhexidine should be considered for treating acute gingival inflammation, whereas essential oils should be indicated for long-term daily use in controlling supragingival biofilm.

  1. [Evidence based surgery. A necessary tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Vega, Héctor César

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based surgery is a tool that has been adopted worldwide by surgeons. As all decisions must be current and have a scientific basis, the approach for performing it must be standardised. Five important steps are required to perform surgery based on evidence. Convert the need for information into a question that can be answered, finding the best information to answer that question, critical evaluation of the evidence, and its validity, impact and applicability, integrating the evidence with your own experience, and with the evaluation of the patients. This should take into account their biology, values and specific circumstances, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the execution of steps 1-4 and propose how to improve them. This article presents the main tools to perform surgery properly based on evidence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Empirical methods for systematic reviews and evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enst, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Systematic reviews have become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, which is reflected in the position systematic reviews have in the pyramid of evidence-based medicine. Systematic

  3. A cerebellar role in performance monitoring - evidence from EEG and voxel-based morphometry in patients with cerebellar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterburs, Jutta; Thürling, Markus; Rustemeier, Martina; Göricke, Sophia; Suchan, Boris; Timmann, Dagmar; Bellebaum, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellum applies an internal forward-model to predict the sensory consequences of actions. This forward-model is updated based on on-line performance monitoring. A previous study has shown that performance monitoring is altered in patients with focal vascular cerebellar lesions, but altered neural responses are not paralleled by impaired behaviour, and the critical cerebellar sites have yet to be identified. The present study investigated if saccadic performance monitoring is more severely altered in patients with cerebellar degenerative disease relative to the previously examined patients with focal vascular cerebellar lesions, and which cerebellar regions support performance monitoring. 16 patients and 16 healthy controls performed an antisaccade task while an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Error rates were increased, and the error-related negativity (ERN), an event-related potential (ERP) component associated with error processing/performance monitoring, was reduced while the error positivity (Pe), a later ERP component related to more conscious aspects of error processing, was preserved in patients. Thus, performance monitoring is altered in patients with cerebellar degeneration, confirming a critical role of the cerebellum for fast classification of saccadic accuracy. In contrast to patients with focal lesions, post-acute functional reorganization and compensation presumably is hampered by disease progression, resulting in altered neural processing and impaired behavioural performance. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) indicated the strongest effects for behavioural performance, with correlations between gray matter volume reduction in bilateral posterolateral regions (left Crus II and right lobule VI) and increased error rates. Moreover, somewhat smaller correlations were found for volume loss in left lobule VIIb/VIIIa and right lobule V and ERN amplitude, and in right Crus I and Pe amplitude. The present findings are consistent with involvement

  4. Evidence-based therapy of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerle, S; Kroll, P

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is often misunderstood as 'cookbook medicine with standard recipes' that does not take clinical experience into account. It is, however, supposed to be a basis for decision making in caring for individual patients under consideration of patients' preferences. This seems to be very important, since diabetic retinopathy continues to be the most frequent cause of vision loss in working age adults with negative consequences for patients' quality of life and for health economics. The most important evidence-based therapy for diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy is laser coagulation. Vitrectomy for proliferative stages has also been proven effective by clinical studies. For more recent treatment options like triamcinolone injection and vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema there is a lower level of evidence so far. The Diabetic Retinopathy Study was the first to show the effectiveness of panfundus laser coagulation for a larger group of patients. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study in turn serves as a basis for laser coagulation of retinopathy and maculopathy. The Diabetic Retinopathy Vitrectomy Study could show the advantages of timely vitrectomy. Both the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study could show the value of intensive blood glucose control. Evidence-based medicine on the basis of the studies mentioned above is practiced quite self-evidently in ophthalmo-diabetology. It should be regarded as a helpful tool for special therapeutic situations which still leaves room for one's personal clinical experience to be included. It is somewhat problematic that the term evidence-based medicine seems to be restricted to the results of large randomized studies, because even special problems and very individual, difficult therapeutic questions can be placed on an evidence-based foundation, although at a lower level of evidence, using today's modern means of literature research. Copyright (c

  5. Mechanical ventilation and the role of saline instillation in suctioning adult intensive care unit patients: an evidence-based practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparros, Alyssa Camille S

    2014-01-01

    Saline instillation in suctioning mechanically ventilated patients remains a common practice in the intensive care unit (ICU). Many respiratory therapists and nurses are using saline with suctioning without an adequate knowledge of the current evidence-based research to guide this practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if this routine method is beneficial or harmful to the patients and provide evidence-based practice recommendations that will serve as a guide for practice. This is a comprehensive review on the use of saline instillation in suctioning mechanically ventilated adult ICU patients. Database such as CINAHL, MEDLINE, Cochrane, PsycINFO, and national guidelines are extracted for the review of literature. The study population consists of patients 18 years or older, who are intubated or have a tracheostomy in place, requiring mechanical ventilation, and who are admitted in the ICU. Although most of the evidence suggests not to use saline when suctioning, there are various limitations to the studies such as small sample size, settings, inconsistencies in data collection, or not enough or outdated research clinical trials, which calls for further studies. This study does not support the use of saline instillation when suctioning an artificial airway. Further clinical trials are crucial to effectively determine if saline instillation use with suctioning an artificial airway is deemed harmful, which can be strictly enforced as a mandatory clinical guideline for all hospitals to include in their standardized protocol to not use saline instillation with suctioning.

  6. Evidence-based management reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Anthony R; Rundall, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Reports of medical mistakes have splashed across newspapers and magazines in the United States. At the same time, instances of overuse, underuse, and misuse of management tactics and strategies receive far less attention. The sense of urgency associated with improving the quality of medical care does not exist with respect to improving the quality of management decision making. A more evidence-based approach would improve the competence of the decision-makers and their motivation to use more scientific methods when making a decision. The authors of this article consider a study of 68 U.S. health services managers that found a low level of evidence-based management behaviors. From the findings, four strategies are suggested to increase health systems managers' use of research evidence to improve decision making: focusing evidence-based decision making on strategically important issues, developing committees and other structures to diffuse management research throughout the organization, building a management culture that values research, and training managers in the competencies required to apply research evidence to health services management decisions. To aid the manager in understanding and applying an evidenced-based approach to decision making, the article provides practical tools, techniques, and resources for immediate use.

  7. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline for the Diagnosis of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Catherine; Baird, Lissa C; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Klimo, Paul; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Flannery, Ann Marie

    2016-11-01

    No evidence-based guidelines exist for the imaging of patients with positional plagiocephaly. The objective of this systematic review and evidence-based guideline is to answer the question, Is imaging necessary for infants with positional plagiocephaly to make a diagnosis? The National Library of Medicine Medline database and the Cochrane Library were queried with the use of MeSH headings and key words relevant to imaging as a means to diagnose plagiocephaly. Abstracts were reviewed, and an evidentiary table was assembled summarizing the studies and the quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Based on the quality of the literature, a recommendation was rendered (Level I, II, or III). A total of 42 full-text articles were selected for review. Of these, 10 were eliminated; thus, 32 full-text were manuscripts selected. There was no Class I evidence, but 2 Class II and 30 Class III studies were included. Three-dimensional cranial topographical imaging, ultrasound, skull x-rays, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were investigated. Clinical examination is most often sufficient to diagnose plagiocephaly (quality, Class III; strength, Level III). Within the limits of this systematic review, the evidence suggests that imaging is rarely necessary and should be reserved for cases in which the clinical examination is equivocal. Many of the imaging studies were not designed to address the diagnostic utility of the imaging modality, and authors were actually assessing the utility of the imaging in longitudinal follow-up, not initial diagnosis. For this reason, some of the studies reviewed were downgraded in Level of Evidence. When needed, 3-dimensional cranial topographical photo, skull x-rays, or ultrasound imaging is almost always sufficient for definitive diagnosis. Computed tomography scanning should not be used to diagnose plagiocephaly, but it may be necessary to rule out craniosynostosis. The full guidelines document can be located at https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients

  8. Guidelines: Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline for the Diagnosis of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Catherine; Baird, Lissa C; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Klimo, Paul; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Flannery, Ann Marie

    2016-11-01

    No evidence-based guidelines exist for the imaging of patients with positional plagiocephaly. The objective of this systematic review and evidence-based guideline is to answer the question, Is imaging necessary for infants with positional plagiocephaly to make a diagnosis? The National Library of Medicine Medline database and the Cochrane Library were queried with the use of MeSH headings and key words relevant to imaging as a means to diagnose plagiocephaly. Abstracts were reviewed, and an evidentiary table was assembled summarizing the studies and the quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Based on the quality of the literature, a recommendation was rendered (Level I, II, or III). A total of 42 full-text articles were selected for review. Of these, 10 were eliminated; thus, 32 full-text were manuscripts selected. There was no Class I evidence, but 2 Class II and 30 Class III studies were included. Three-dimensional cranial topographical imaging, ultrasound, skull x-rays, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were investigated. Clinical examination is most often sufficient to diagnose plagiocephaly (quality, Class III; strength, Level III). Within the limits of this systematic review, the evidence suggests that imaging is rarely necessary and should be reserved for cases in which the clinical examination is equivocal. Many of the imaging studies were not designed to address the diagnostic utility of the imaging modality, and authors were actually assessing the utility of the imaging in longitudinal follow-up, not initial diagnosis. For this reason, some of the studies reviewed were downgraded in Level of Evidence. When needed, 3-dimensional cranial topographical photo, skull x-rays, or ultrasound imaging is almost always sufficient for definitive diagnosis. Computed tomography scanning should not be used to diagnose plagiocephaly, but it may be necessary to rule out craniosynostosis. The full guidelines document can be located at https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients

  9. The Evidence Missing from Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Richard B.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. Regrettably, the task force report was largely silent on three critical issues. As a consequence, it omitted much of the evidence necessary for a complete picture of evidence-based…

  10. Evidence-Based Medicine: Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the key decisions in patient evaluation for cosmetic breast augmentation. 2. Cite key decisions in preoperative planning. 3. Discuss the risks and complications, and key patient education points in breast augmentation. Breast augmentation remains one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The integral information necessary for proper patient selection, preoperative assessment, and surgical approaches are discussed. Current data regarding long term safety and complications are presented to guide the plastic surgeon to an evidence-based approach to the patient seeking breast enhancement to obtain optimal results.

  11. Activities performed and treatments conducted before consultation with a spine surgeon: are patients and clinicians following evidence-based clinical practice guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Elliot I; Roffey, Darren M; Coyle, Matthew J; Phan, Philippe; Kingwell, Stephen P; Wai, Eugene K

    2017-09-04

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are designed to ensure that evidence-based treatment is easily put into action. Whether patients and clinicians follow these guidelines is equivocal. The objectives of this study were to examine how many patients complaining of low back pain (LBP) underwent evidence-based medical interventional treatment in line with CPG recommendations before consultation with a spine surgeon, and to evaluate any associations between adherence to CPG recommendations and baseline factors. This is a cross-sectional cohort analysis at a tertiary care center. A total of 229 patients were referred for surgical consultation for an elective lumbar spinal condition. The outcome measures include the number of CPG-recommended treatments undertaken by patients at or before the time of referral, the validated pain score, the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) health status, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score. Questionnaires assessing demographic and functional characteristics as well as overall health-care use were sent to patients immediately after their referral was received by the surgeon's office. Medications were the most common modality before consultation (74.2% of patients), of which 46.3% received opioids. The number of medications taken was significantly related to a higher ODI score (R=0.23, p=.0004), a higher pain score (R=0.15, p=.026), and a lower EQ-5D health status (R=-0.15, p=.024). In contrast, a lower pain score (7.2 vs. 7.7, p=.037) and a lower ODI score (26.6 vs. 29.9, p=.0023) were associated with performing adequate amounts of exercise. There was a significant association between lower numbers of treatments received and higher numerical pain rating scores (R=-0.14, p=.035). The majority (61.1%) of patients received two or less forms of treatment. Evidence-based medical interventional treatments for patients with LBP are not being taken advantage of before spine surgery consultation. If more patients were to undertake CPG

  12. Organizational readiness for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Barbara Van Patter; Schaffer, Marjorie A

    2009-02-01

    This study explored factors that affect the adoption or rejection of evidence-based practice (EBP) changes and differences in nurse manager and staff nurse perceptions about those factors. Roger's Diffusion of Innovations Theory explains relevant organizational strategies for guiding practice change. The primary author developed the Evidence-Based Practice Changes Survey consisting of 12 items, completed by 92 nurses at a level 1 trauma center. Top barriers to EBP were insufficient time, lack of staff, and not having the right equipment and supplies. Top reasons to adopt EBP were having personal interest in the practice change, avoiding risk of negative consequences to the patient, and personally valuing the evidence. Several statistically significant differences emerged for demographic variables. Planning for EBP change must address barriers and facilitators to practice change and emphasize the benefit for patients and value of the practice change to nurses.

  13. Systematic review of current guidelines, and their evidence base, on risk of lactic acidosis after administration of contrast medium for patients receiving metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goergen, Stacy K; Rumbold, Gregory; Compton, Gregory; Harris, Claire

    2010-01-01

    To systematically review evidence about the relationship between metformin administration and the use of iodinated contrast medium and risk of lactic acidosis (LA) and to assess the quality of five current guidelines for use of contrast medium in patients who are taking metformin. A search strategy was developed by using search termsrelated to metformin, contrast media, and LA. Searches were conducted in MEDLINE (Ovid), all Evidence-based Medicine Reviews (Ovid), EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases and were augmented with searches for evidence-based guidelines on radiology and evidence-based medicine Web sites by using the Google Internet search engine. Guidelines were appraised by two independent reviewers by using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation Collaboration Instrument. Other studies were appraised by using structured appraisal checklists. Five guidelines were identified and five empirical studies met inclusion criteria. All guidelines had poor scores on some Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration criteria; poorer scores tended to occur in relation to objective assessment of rigor of guideline development, editorial independence, and applicability of the guideline to clinical practice. Lack of agreement was observed among guidelines about the need to stop taking metformin after contrast medium is administered, risk of LA in patients with normal renal function before contrast medium injection, recommended method of measuring renal function, and values used to define abnormal function. The evidence that was used as a basis for determining the guidelines for metformin administration, use of contrast medium, and risk of LA consisted of a limited number of observational studies, including case reports, summaries of case reports, and case series (National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia level IV-V evidence). More important, it was not apparent that a systematic search strategy had been used to

  14. Symptom management in patients with lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoff, Michael J; Lally, Brian; Slade, Mark G; Goldberg, Wendy G; Lee, Pyng; Michaud, Gaetane C; Wahidi, Momen M; Chawla, Mohit

    2013-05-01

    Many patients with lung cancer will develop symptoms related to their disease process or the treatment they are receiving. These symptoms can be as debilitating as the disease progression itself. To many physicians these problems can be the most difficult to manage. A detailed review of the literature using strict methodologic review of article quality was used in the development of this article. MEDLINE literature reviews, in addition to Cochrane reviews and other databases, were used for this review. The resulting article lists were then reviewed by experts in each area for quality and finally interpreted for content. We have developed recommendations for the management of many of the symptom complexes that patients with lung cancer may experience: pain, dyspnea, airway obstruction, cough, bone metastasis, brain metastasis, spinal cord metastasis, superior vena cava syndrome, hemoptysis, tracheoesophageal fistula, pleural effusions, venous thromboembolic disease, depression, fatigue, anorexia, and insomnia. Some areas, such as dyspnea, are covered in considerable detail in previously created high-quality evidence-based guidelines and are identified as excellent sources of reference. The goal of this guideline is to provide the reader recommendations based on evidence supported by scientific study. Improved understanding and recognition of cancer-related symptoms can improve management strategies, patient compliance, and quality of life for all patients with lung cancer.

  15. Evidence-based dentistry and esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, B W

    2000-01-01

    Separating hype from the truth in dental marketing can be frustrating and it is difficult at best for the average dentist to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new products and techniques. Keynote clinicians are presenting information and influencing other dentists without the scientific evidence to support their claims. For the benefit of our patients, the system needs to change. It will not come soon, but until more evidence-based testing is commonplace and made readily available to the practicing dentist, most dentists will continue tradition-based practices.

  16. System barriers to the evidence-based care of acute coronary syndrome patients in China: qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Isuru; Rong, Ye; Du, Xin; Wang, Yangfang; Gao, Runlin; Patel, Anushka; Wu, Yangfeng; Iedema, Rick; Hao, Zhixin; Hu, Dayi; Turnbull, Fiona

    2014-03-01

    Organizational and wider health system factors influence the implementation and success of interventions. Clinical Pathways in Acute Coronary Syndromes 2 is a cluster randomized trial of a clinical pathway-based intervention to improve acute coronary syndrome care in hospitals in China. We performed a qualitative evaluation to examine the system-level barriers to implementing clinical pathways in the dynamic healthcare environment of China. A qualitative descriptive analysis of 40 in-depth interviews with health professionals conducted in a sample of 10 hospitals purposively selected to explore barriers to implementation of the intervention. Qualitative data were analyzed using the Framework method. In-depth interviews identified 5 key system-level barriers to effective implementation: (1) leadership support for implementing quality improvement, (2) variation in the capacity of clinical services and quality improvement resources, (3) fears of patient disputes and litigation, (4) healthcare funding constraints and high out-of-pocket expenses, and (5) patient-related factors. System-level barriers affect the ability of acute coronary syndrome clinical pathways to change practice. Addressing these barriers in the context of current and planned national health system reform will be critical for future improvements in the management of acute coronary syndromes, and potentially other hospitalized conditions, in China. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au/default.aspx. Register. Unique identifier: ACTRN12609000491268.

  17. Knee surgery and its evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Hasan, K; Carter, A; Zaidi, R; Cro, S; Briggs, T; Goldberg, A

    2016-03-01

    Evidence driven orthopaedics is gaining prominence. It enables better management decisions and therefore better patient care. The aim of our study was to review a selection of the leading publications pertaining to knee surgery to assess changes in levels of evidence over a decade. Articles from the years 2000 and 2010 in The Knee, the Journal of Arthroplasty, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) and the Bone and Joint Journal were analysed and ranked according to guidelines from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The intervening years (2003, 2005 and 2007) were also analysed to further define the trend. The percentage of high level evidence (level I and II) studies increased albeit without reaching statistical significance. Following a significant downward trend, the latter part of the decade saw a major rise in levels of published evidence. The most frequent type of study was therapeutic. Although the rise in levels of evidence across the decade was not statistically significant, there was a significant drop and then rise in these levels in the interim. It is therefore important that a further study is performed to assess longer-term trends. Recent developments have made clear that high quality evidence will be having an ever increasing influence on future orthopaedic practice. We suggest that journals implement compulsory declaration of a published study's level of evidence and that authors consider their study designs carefully to enhance the quality of available evidence.

  18. Implementing an evidence-based computerized decision support system to improve patient care in a general hospital: the CODES study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Polo Friz, Hernan; Capobussi, Matteo; Kwag, Koren; Banzi, Rita; Ruggiero, Francesca; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Mangia, Massimo; Nyberg, Peter; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Cimminiello, Claudio; Vighi, Giuseppe; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2016-07-07

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are information technology-based software that provide health professionals with actionable, patient-specific recommendations or guidelines for disease diagnosis, treatment, and management at the point-of-care. These messages are intelligently filtered to enhance the health and clinical care of patients. CDSSs may be integrated with patient electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of patient-specific, evidence-based reminders generated at the point-of-care by a multi-specialty decision support system on clinical practice and the quality of care. We will include all the patients admitted to the internal medicine department of one large general hospital. The primary outcome is the rate at which medical problems, which are detected by the decision support software and reported through the reminders, are resolved (i.e., resolution rates). Secondary outcomes are resolution rates for reminders specific to venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention, in-hospital all causes and VTE-related mortality, and the length of hospital stay during the study period. The adoption of CDSSs is likely to increase across healthcare systems due to growing concerns about the quality of medical care and discrepancy between real and ideal practice, continuous demands for a meaningful use of health information technology, and the increasing use of and familiarity with advanced technology among new generations of physicians. The results of our study will contribute to the current understanding of the effectiveness of CDSSs in primary care and hospital settings, thereby informing future research and healthcare policy questions related to the feasibility and value of CDSS use in healthcare systems. This trial is seconded by a specialty trial randomizing patients in an oncology setting (ONCO-CODES). ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2

  19. Use of Evidence-Based Decision-Making in Comprehensive Dental Treatment of a Patient with Meth Mouth-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hazzani, Saad A

    2017-06-01

    This case report illustrates the use of evidence-based practice in formulating a comprehensive dental treatment plan for a patient who presented himself with signs of oral health debilitation accompanying methamphetamine (MA) abuse called "meth mouth" with the goal of providing dental care practitioners in Saudi Arabia with an insight into the global problem of MA abuse and its impact on oral health. This report documents the case of a 22-year-old male patient who reported to the clinic with rampant caries caused due to MA abuse exacerbated by poor oral hygiene and smoking habit. The treatment plan of this present case was formulated on the lines of the evidence-based dentistry approach. A clinical question was composed based on the Problem, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome format to identify past studies and case reports on meth mouth. A standard search was conducted on PubMed Central. Standard guidelines on the treatment of meth mouth were extracted from the Web site of the American Dental Association. A total of 2 systematic reviews, 7 review articles, 4 epidemiologic studies, 5 case reports, and 1 American Dental Association guideline were found. Accelerated dental decay leading to rampant caries in young and middle-aged adults is a characteristic oral finding in MA abusers. The most important factor that affects the prognosis of dental care is complete cessation of MA use by the patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiovascular risk in relation to body mass index and use of evidence-based preventive medications in patients with or at risk of atherothrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Boris; Roussel, Ronan; Elbez, Yedid; Marre, Michel; Krempf, Michel; Ikeda, Yasuo; Eagle, Kim A; Elisaf, Moses; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Ph Gabriel

    2015-10-21

    Explore the relation between body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular disease, and the influence of optimal medical therapy (OMT) on this relationship. Patients from the REACH cohort, an international, prospective cohort of patients with or at high risk of atherosclerosis with documentation of potential confounders, including treatments and risk factors, were followed up to 4 years (n = 54 285). Patients were categorized according to baseline BMI (ranging from underweight to Grade III obesity). Optimal medical therapy was defined as the use of the four cardioprotective medication classes (statins, ACE inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor blockers, β-blockers, and antiplatelet agents). The main outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) mortality, and CV events. In primary and secondary prevention, a reverse J-shaped curve best described the relationship between BMI categories and the incidence of the various outcomes. In secondary prevention, the highest adjusted risks were observed for underweight patients (1.97, P obese patients (0.73, P obesity persisted in patients receiving OMT. An obesity paradox was observed in both primary and secondary CV prevention patients. The intensity of use of evidence-based preventive medications does not account for the paradoxical CV protection associated with obesity. At extremes of BMI, further interventions beyond OMT may be needed to reduce CV risk. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Leading change: evidence-based transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brennan; Allen, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a framework for evidence-based transition of patient populations within an acute care pediatric institution. Transition within a hospital is foreseeable, given the ever-changing needs of the patients within an evolving healthcare system. These changes include moving patient populations because of expansion, renovation, or cohorting similar patient diagnoses to provide care across a continuum. Over the past 1 to 2 years, Children's Health Children's Medical Center Dallas has experienced a wide variety of transition. To provide a smooth transition for patients and families into new care areas resulting in a healthy work environment for all team members. The planning phase for patient population moves, and transition should address key aspects to include physical location and care flow, supplies and equipment, staffing model and human resources (HR), education and orientation, change process and integrating teams, and family preparation. It is imperative to consider these aspects in order for transitions within a healthcare system to be successful. During a time of such transitions, the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is a highly valuable team member offering a unique perspective and methodological approach, which is central to the new initiative's overall success. The themes addressed in this article on evidence-based transition are organized according to the CNS spheres of influence: system/organization, patient/family, and nursing. An evidence-based transition plan was developed and implemented successfully with the support from the CNS for 3 patient populations. Organizational leadership gained an increased awareness of the CNS role at the conclusion of each successful transition. The CNS plays a pivotal role as clinical experts and proponents of evidence-based practice and effects change in the system/organization, nursing, and patient/family spheres of influence. While transitions can be a source of stress for leaders

  2. Faculty Training in Evidence-Based Medicine: Improving Evidence Acquisition and Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Laura J.; Warde, Carole M.; Boker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) integrates published clinical evidence with patient values and clinical expertise, the output of which is informed medical decision making. Key skills for evidence-based practice include acquisition and appraisal of clinical information. Faculty clinicians often lack expertise in these skills and are…

  3. Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence.

  4. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Klimo, Paul; Flannery, Ann Marie; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Mazzola, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Evidence-based guidelines are not currently available for the treatment of positional plagiocephaly and, in particular, for the use of physical therapy for treatment. To answer the question: "does physical therapy provide effective treatment for positional plagiocephaly?" Treatment recommendations are created based on the available evidence. The PubMed and the Cochrane Library were queried using MeSH headings and key words relevant to the objective of this systematic review. Abstracts were reviewed, after which studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected and graded according to their quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Evidentiary tables were constructed that summarized pertinent study results, and recommendations were made based on the quality of the literature (Levels I-III). Three studies met criteria for inclusion. Two randomized, controlled trials (Class I and Class II) and 1 prospective study assessing plagiocephaly as a secondary outcome measure (Class III) were included. Within the limits of this systematic review, physical therapy is significantly more effective than repositioning education as a treatment for positional plagiocephaly. There is no significant difference between physical therapy and a positioning pillow as a treatment for positional plagiocephaly. However, given the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation against soft pillows in cribs to ensure a safe sleeping environment for infants, physical therapy must be recommended over the use of a positioning pillow. The full guidelines document can be located at https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-positional-plagiocephaly/Chapter_4.

  5. Guidelines: Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Lissa C; Klimo, Paul; Flannery, Ann Marie; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Mazzola, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Evidence-based guidelines are not currently available for the treatment of positional plagiocephaly and, in particular, for the use of physical therapy for treatment. To answer the question: "does physical therapy provide effective treatment for positional plagiocephaly?" Treatment recommendations are created based on the available evidence. The PubMed and the Cochrane Library were queried using MeSH headings and key words relevant to the objective of this systematic review. Abstracts were reviewed, after which studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected and graded according to their quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Evidentiary tables were constructed that summarized pertinent study results, and recommendations were made based on the quality of the literature (Levels I-III). Three studies met criteria for inclusion. Two randomized, controlled trials (Class I and Class II) and 1 prospective study assessing plagiocephaly as a secondary outcome measure (Class III) were included. Within the limits of this systematic review, physical therapy is significantly more effective than repositioning education as a treatment for positional plagiocephaly. There is no significant difference between physical therapy and a positioning pillow as a treatment for positional plagiocephaly. However, given the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation against soft pillows in cribs to ensure a safe sleeping environment for infants, physical therapy must be recommended over the use of a positioning pillow. The full guidelines document can be located at https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-positional-plagiocephaly/Chapter_4.

  6. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix 1. The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhys Williams, William Herman, Ann-Louise Kinmonth...

  7. Evidence-based librarianship: searching for the needed EBL evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges of finding evidence needed to implement Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL). Focusing first on database coverage for three health sciences librarianship journals, the article examines the information contents of different databases. Strategies are needed to search for relevant evidence in the library literature via these databases, and the problems associated with searching the grey literature of librarianship. Database coverage, plausible search strategies, and the grey literature of library science all pose challenges to finding the needed research evidence for practicing EBL. Health sciences librarians need to ensure that systems are designed that can track and provide access to needed research evidence to support Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL).

  8. Impact of chronic kidney disease on use of evidence-based therapy in stable coronary artery disease: a prospective analysis of 22,272 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Kalra

    Full Text Available To assess the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD, define the associated demographics, and evaluate its association with use of evidence-based drug therapy in a contemporary global study of patients with stable coronary artery disease.22,272 patients from the ProspeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease (CLARIFY were included. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was calculated (CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration formula and patients categorised according to CKD stage: >89, 60-89, 45-59 and <45 mL/min/1.73 m2.Mean (SD age was 63.9±10.4 years, 77.3% were male, 61.8% had a history of myocardial infarction, 71.9% hypertension, 30.4% diabetes and 75.4% dyslipidaemia. Chronic kidney disease (eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was seen in 22.1% of the cohort (6.9% with eGFR<45 mL/min/1.73 m2; lower eGFR was associated with increasing age, female sex, cardiovascular risk factors, overt vascular disease, other comorbidities and higher systolic but lower diastolic blood pressure. High use of secondary prevention was seen across all CKD stages (overall 93.4% lipid-lowering drugs, 95.3% antiplatelets, 75.9% beta-blockers. The proportion of patients taking statins was lower in patients with CKD. Antiplatelet use was significantly lower in patients with CKD whereas oral anticoagulant use was higher. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use was lower (52.0% overall and inversely related to declining eGFR, whereas angiotensin-receptor blockers were more frequently prescribed in patients with reduced eGFR.Chronic kidney disease is common in patients with stable coronary artery disease and is associated with comorbidities. Whilst use of individual evidence-based medications for secondary prevention was high across all CKD categories, there remains an opportunity to improve the proportion who take all three classes of preventive therapies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were used less frequently

  9. Evidence based practice: perspectives of Iranian urologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Sadeghi-Ghyassi, Fatemeh; Olfati, Nahid; Dastgiri, Saeed; Maghbouli, Leili

    2014-01-04

    To determine the attitudes and beliefs of Iranian urologists toward Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and investigation of the barriers of evidence based practice (EBP). A self- administrated, Likert scale questionnaire designed in Persian and filled up by censuses selected urologist from Iranian Urology Association (IUA). Data were entered to Predictive Analytics Soft Ware version 18.0 and descriptive statistics were obtained for all parts of the questionnaire. A total of 111 out of 500 Iranian urologists who attended in IUA annual meeting, responded to the questionnaires. Mean attitude score of respondents was 30.4 (SD: 5.7, range 16-40). Attitude score showed statistically significant association to previous participation in EBM workshops (P = .01). Of participants 96% believed EBP will improve patient care and 76.2% of them appreciated the impact of use of research utilization and application of evidence based guidelines on clinical decision making and the outcome of surgery. The main barriers to EBP stated as lack of time (64.8%), facilities (53.4%), and training in EBM (29.4%). The urologists have positive attitudes towards EBP. However, regarding lack of time, pre-appraised databases or EBP guidelines can be helpful. Evidence based workshops and familiarity with evidence databases is recommended for Iranian urologists. In addition, health care system and policy makers could play a major role to provide a culture of EBP.

  10. CAGS and ACS Evidence Based Reviews in Surgery. 34: effects of ß-blockers in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Tara M; Aarts, Mary-Anne; Cassivi, Stephen D; Garcia, Santiago A; McLean, Richard F; McFalls, Edward O

    2010-10-01

    Do ß-blockers have an effect on the 30-day risk of major cardiovascular events in patients with or at risk of atherosclerotic disease undergoing noncardiac surgery? Randomized controlled trial. Multicentre trial in 190 hospitals in 23 countries. In total, 8351 patients with or at risk of atherosclerotic disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. Patients were randomly assigned by a computerized 24-hour phone service to receive extended-release metoprolol succinate 200 mg (n = 4174) or placebo (n = 4177). Treatment was started 2-4 hours before surgery and continued for 30 days. Cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and nonfatal cardiac arrest. Of those randomized, 8331 (99.8%) patients completed the 30-day follow-up. Fewer patients in the metoprolol group than in the placebo group had an MI (176 [4.2%] v. 239 [5.7%] patients; hazard ratio [HR] 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.089, p = 0.0017). However, there were more deaths in the metoprolol group than in the placebo group (129 [3.1%] v. 97 [2.3%] patients; HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.03-1.74, p = 0.0317). More patients in the metoprolol group than in the placebo group had a stroke (41 [1.0%] v. 19 [0.5%] patients; HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.26-3.74, p = 0.0053). A perioperative ß-blocker regimen results in fewer MIs but is associated with an increased risk of stroke and perioperative death in patients with or at risk for atherosclerotic disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. Patients are unlikely to accept the risks associated with perioperative extended-release metoprolol use.

  11. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  12. What's Wrong with Evidence-Based Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Medicine in the last decades of the twentieth century was ripe for a data sweep that would bring systematic analysis to treatment strategies that seemingly had stood the test of time but were actually unvalidated. Coalescing under the banner of evidence-based medicine, this process has helped to standardize care, minimize error, and promote patient safety. But with this advancement, something of the art of medicine has been lost. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  13. Screening for coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: An evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chopra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. CAD is often asymptomatic in these patients, until the onset of myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death. Consequently, proper screening and diagnosis of CAD is crucial for the prevention and early treatment of coronary events. This review deals with selection of the sub group of patients who have type 2 diabetes, who are at high risk for developing CAD and need to be screened for the same. The various diagnostic modalities which can be used in the screening process for enhancing risk stratification and management are also discussed.

  14. Joint development of evidence-based medical record by doctors and patients through integrated Chinese and Western medicine on digestive system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Gao, Hong-yang; Gao, Rui; Zhao, Ying-pan; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Tang, Xu-dong; Shang, Hong-cai

    2016-02-01

    Building the clinical therapeutic evaluation system by combing the evaluation given by doctors and patients can form a more comprehensive and objective evaluation system. A literature search on the practice of evidence-based evaluation was conducted in key biomedical databases, i.e. PubMed, Excerpt Medica Database, China Biology Medicine disc and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. However, no relevant study on the subjects of interest was identified. Therefore, drawing on the principles of narrative medicine and expert opinion from systems of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, we propose to develop and pilot-test a novel evidence-based medical record format that captures the perspectives of both patients and doctors in a clinical trial. Further, we seek to evaluate a strategic therapeutic approach that integrates the wisdom of Chinese medicine with the scientific basis of Western medicine in the treatment of digestive system disorders. Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of remedies under the system of Chinese medicine is an imperative ongoing research. The present study intends to identify a novel approach to assess the synergistic benefits achievable from an integrated therapeutic approach combining Chinese and Western system of medicine to treat digestive system disorders.

  15. START (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment)--an evidence-based screening tool to detect prescribing omissions in elderly patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, P J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescribing encompasses acts of commission i.e. giving drugs that are contraindicated or unsuitable, and acts of omission i.e. failure to prescribe drugs when indicated due to ignorance of evidence base or other irrational basis e.g. ageism. There are considerable published data on the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing; however, there are no recent published data on the prevalence of acts of omission. The aim of this study was to calculate the prevalence of acts of prescribing omission in a population of consecutively hospitalised elderly people. METHODS: A screening tool (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment acronym, START), devised from evidence-based prescribing indicators and arranged according to physiological systems was prepared and validated for identifying prescribing omissions in older adults. Data on active medical problems and prescribed medicines were collected in 600 consecutive elderly patients admitted from the community with acute illness to a teaching hospital. On identification of an omitted medication, the patient\\'s medical records were studied to look for a valid reason for the prescribing omission. RESULTS: Using the START list, we found one or more prescribing omissions in 57.9% of patients. In order of prevalence, the most common prescribing omissions were: statins in atherosclerotic disease (26%), warfarin in chronic atrial fibrillation (9.5%), anti-platelet therapy in arterial disease (7.3%) and calcium\\/vitamin D supplementation in symptomatic osteoporosis (6%). CONCLUSION: Failure to prescribe appropriate medicines is a highly prevalent problem among older people presenting to hospital with acute illness. A validated screening tool (START) is one method of systematically identifying appropriate omitted medicines in clinical practice.

  16. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities...... as patient-centred outcomes may occur decennia into the future. The methodologies and regulations for drug trials are, however, applicable to nutrition trials. CONCLUSIONS: Research on clinical nutrition should start by collecting clinical data systematically in databases and registries. Measurable patient...

  17. Promoting evidence-based practice in pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toklu HZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hale Zerrin Toklu Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Evidence-based medicine aims to optimize decision-making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. The concept of reliable evidence is essential, since the number of electronic information resources is increasing in parallel to the increasing number and type of drugs on the market. The decision-making process is a complex and requires an extensive evaluation as well as the interpretation of the data obtained. Different sources provide different levels of evidence for decision-making. Not all the data have the same value as the evidence. Rational use of medicine requires that the patients receive “medicines appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and their community.” Pharmacists have a crucial role in the health system to maintain the rational use of medicine and provide pharmaceutical care to patients, because they are the drug experts who are academically trained for this purpose. The rational use of the pharmacist's workforce will improve the outcome of pharmacotherapy as well as decreasing the global health costs. Keywords: pharmacist, rational use of medicine, pharmacotherapy, pharmaceutical, outcome

  18. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education Programmes in the Management of Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Education Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop guidelines and recommendations on patient education programmes of any type, targeted specially to individuals with OA and which were designed to improve the clinical effectiveness of managing OA. Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group contacted specialized organizations that focus on management for…

  19. Royal College of Physicians Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party evidence-based guidelines for the nutritional support of patients who have had a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, F; Hookway, C; Weekes, C E

    2014-04-01

    Stroke affects 15 million people each year worldwide and is one of the world's leading causes of death and physical disability. Stroke can result in a decline in nutritional status and this is associated with increased mortality and poor outcomes. The present work aimed to systematically review key aspects of the nutritional support of stroke patients at risk of malnutrition and to provide evidence-based guidelines for use in clinical practice. The work was conducted as part of the process to develop the 4th edition of the Royal College of Physicians' (RCP) 'National Clinical Guideline (NCG) for Stroke'. Questions were generated by the search team, together with contributions from members of the Virtual Stroke Group and the RCP Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party Guideline Development Group. Six questions covering several areas of nutritional support after stroke were defined and searches were conducted through to 31 October 2011 using five electronic databases (Embase, Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Web of Science). All included studies were assessed for quality and risk of bias using the van Tulder criteria for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the Quorum criteria for systematic reviews. In total, 4215 abstracts were identified, 24 papers were reviewed and 13 systematic reviews and RCTs were included to provide evidence for the nutritional support components of the guidelines. For each question, evidence statements, recommendations and practical considerations were developed. This systematic review process has resulted in the development of evidence-based guidelines for use in clinical practice and has identified areas for further research. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Evidence Searching for Evidence-based Psychology Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Falzon, Louise; Davidson, Karina W.; Bruns, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased awareness of evidence-based methodology among psychologists, but little exists in the literature about how to access the research. Moreover, the prohibitive cost of this information combined with limited time are barriers to the identification of evidence to answer clinical questions. This article presents an example of a question worked though in an evidence-based way. Methods are highlighted, including distinguishing background and foreground questions, breaking down q...

  1. Evidence-based Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, D.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will describe a concrete strategy for bridging the gap between the *science* of science communication and the practice of it. In recent years, social scientists have made substantial progress in identifying the psychological influences that shape public receptivity to scientific information relating to climate change and other public policy issues. That work, however, has consisted nearly entirely of laboratory experiments and public opinion surveys; these methods identify general mechanisms of information processing but do not yield concrete prescriptions for communication in field settings. In order to integrate the findings of the science of science communication with the practice of it, field communication must now be made into a meaningful site of science communication research. "Evidence-based science communication" will involve collaborative work between social scientists and practitioners aimed at formulating and testing scientifically informed communication strategies in real-world contexts.

  2. Pharmaceutical pictograms for low-literate patients: Understanding, risk of false confidence, and evidence-based design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Mara M; Land-Zandstra, Anne M; Bos, Mark J W; van den Broek, Jos M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to (1) evaluate ten pharmaceutical pictograms for low-literate patients on understandability, (2) assess the risk of false confidence in understanding, and (3) identify how the design can be improved to increase understandability. Interviews were conducted with n=197 pharmacy visitors in the Netherlands. Additional qualitative discussions were held with n=30 adequately and n=25 low-literate participants (assessed with REALM-D). Qualitative data were analysed using the Thematic Framework approach. Half of the pictograms reached 67% understanding (31.0%-98.5%); two did in the low-literate group. Three pictograms showed a risk for false confidence. Pictograms appeared to be most effective when people were familiar with their visual elements and messages. Low-literate people have more difficulty understanding pictograms than people with adequate literacy. While the risk of false confidence is low, for critical safety information, 67% understanding might not be sufficient. Design strategies for pharmaceutical pictograms should focus on familiarity, simplicity, and showing the intake and effect of medicine. Health professionals should go over the meaning of pictograms when providing drug information to patients to increase patients' familiarity with the message and to ensure that all pictograms are sufficiently understood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A feasibility study of expert patient and community mental health team led bipolar psychoeducation groups: implementing an evidence based practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Group psychoeducation is a cost effective intervention which reduces relapse and improves functioning in bipolar disorder but is rarely implemented. The aim of this study was to identify the acceptability and feasibility of a group psychoeducation programme delivered by community mental health teams (CMHTs) and peer specialist (PS) facilitators. Organisational learning was used to identify and address systematically barriers and enablers, at organisational, health professional and patient levels, to its implementation into a routine service. Methods A systematic examination of barriers and enablers to a three day training process informed the delivery of a first treatment group and a similar process informed the delivery of the second treatment group. Triangulation of research methods improved its internal validity: direct observation of training, self-rated surveys of participant experiences, group discussion, and thematically analysed individual participant and facilitator interviews were employed. Results Barriers and enablers were identified at organisational, educational, treatment content, facilitator and patient levels. All barriers under the control of the research team were addressed with subsequent improvements in patient knowledge about the condition and about local service. In addition, self-management, agency and altruism were enhanced. Barriers that could not be addressed required senior clinical and education leadership outside the research team’s control. PS and professional facilitators were successfully trained and worked together to deliver groups which were generally reported as being beneficial. Conclusion Psychoeducation groups involving CMHT and PS facilitators is acceptable and feasible but their sustainment requires senior leadership within and outside the organisation that control finance and education services. PMID:24215655

  4. Point-of-Care International Normalized Ratio (INR) Monitoring Devices for Patients on Long-term Oral Anticoagulation Therapy: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    SUBJECT OF THE EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS: The purpose of this evidence based analysis report is to examine the safety and effectiveness of point-of-care (POC) international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring devices for patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT). TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Long-term OAT is typically required by patients with mechanical heart valves, chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial occlusion. It is estimated that approximately 1% of the population receives anticoagulation treatment and, by applying this value to Ontario, there are an estimated 132,000 patients on OAT in the province, a figure that is expected to increase with the aging population. Patients on OAT are regularly monitored and their medications adjusted to ensure that their INR scores remain in the therapeutic range. This can be challenging due to the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin and variation in individual responses. Optimal INR scores depend on the underlying indication for treatment and patient level characteristics, but for most patients the therapeutic range is an INR score of between 2.0 and 3.0. The current standard of care in Ontario for patients on long-term OAT is laboratory-based INR determination with management carried out by primary care physicians or anticoagulation clinics (ACCs). Patients also regularly visit a hospital or community-based facility to provide a venous blood samples (venipuncture) that are then sent to a laboratory for INR analysis. Experts, however, have commented that there may be under-utilization of OAT due to patient factors, physician factors, or regional practice variations and that sub-optimal patient management may also occur. There is currently no population-based Ontario data to permit the assessment of patient care, but recent systematic reviews have estimated that less that 50% of patients receive OAT on a routine basis and that patients

  5. Validity and clinical utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa: results from a multisite sample of patients who received evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Bartoli, Francesco; Caslini, Manuela; Crocamo, Cristina; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    A new "severity specifier" for bulimia nervosa (BN), based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours (IWCBs), was added to the DSM-5 as a means of documenting heterogeneity and variability in the severity of the disorder. Yet, evidence for its validity in clinical populations, including prognostic significance for treatment outcome, is currently lacking. Existing data from 281 treatment-seeking patients with DSM-5 BN, who received the best available treatment for their disorder (manual-based cognitive behavioural therapy; CBT) in an outpatient setting, were re-analysed to examine whether these patients subgrouped based on the DSM-5 severity levels would show meaningful and consistent differences on (a) a range of clinical variables assessed at pre-treatment and (b) post-treatment abstinence from IWCBs. Results highlight that the mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity groups were statistically distinguishable on 22 variables assessed at pre-treatment regarding eating disorder pathological features, maintenance factors of BN, associated (current) and lifetime psychopathology, social maladjustment and illness-specific functional impairment, and abstinence outcome. Mood intolerance, a maintenance factor of BN but external to eating disorder pathological features (typically addressed within CBT), emerged as the primary clinical variable distinguishing the severity groups showing a differential treatment response. Overall, the findings speak to the concurrent and predictive validity of the new DSM-5 severity criterion for BN and are important because a common benchmark informing patients, clinicians, and researchers about severity of the disorder and allowing severity fluctuation and patient's progress to be tracked does not exist so far. Implications for future research are outlined.

  6. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACLreconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1 Bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB reconstruction or hamstring reconstruction (HR; 2 Double bundle or single bundle; 3 Allograft or authograft; 4 Early or late reconstruction; 5 Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6 Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analysesfocused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.

  7. [Evidence-based TEP technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köckerling, F

    2017-04-01

    The guidelines of all international hernia societies recommend as procedures of choice the laparoendoscopic techniques total extraperitoneal patch plasty (TEP) and transabdominal preperitoneal patch plasty (TAPP) as well as the open Lichtenstein operation for elective inguinal hernia repair. The learning curve associated with the laparoendoscopic techniques, in particular TEP, is longer than that for the open Lichtenstein technique due to the complexity of the procedures. Accordingly, for laparoendoscopic techniques it is particularly important that the operations are conducted in a standardized manner in compliance with the evidence-based recommendations given for the technical details. When procedures are carried out in strict compliance with the guidelines of the international hernia societies, low rates of perioperative complications, complication-related reoperations, recurrences and chronic pain can be expected for TEP. Compliance with the guidelines can also positively impact mastery of the learning curve for TEP. The technical guidelines on TEP are based on study results and on the experiences of numerous experts; therefore, it is imperative that they are implemented in routine surgical practice.

  8. Evidence Searching for Evidence-based Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzon, Louise; Davidson, Karina W.; Bruns, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased awareness of evidence-based methodology among psychologists, but little exists in the literature about how to access the research. Moreover, the prohibitive cost of this information combined with limited time are barriers to the identification of evidence to answer clinical questions. This article presents an example of a question worked though in an evidence-based way. Methods are highlighted, including distinguishing background and foreground questions, breaking down questions into searchable statements, and adapting statements to suit both the question being asked and the resource being searched. A number of free, evidence-based resources are listed. Knowing how and where to access this information will enable practitioners to more easily use an evidence-based approach to their practice. PMID:21503266

  9. Toward an evidence-based patient-provider communication in rehabilitation: linking communication elements to better rehabilitation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Silva, Isabel Lopes

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing interest in linking aspects of patient-provider communication to rehabilitation outcomes. However, the field lacks a conceptual understanding on: (a) 'how' rehabilitation outcomes can be improved by communication; and (b) through 'which' elements in particular. This article elaborates on the conceptual developments toward informing further practice and research. Existing models of communication in healthcare were adapted to rehabilitation, and its outcomes through a comprehensive literature review. After depicting mediating mechanisms and variables (e.g. therapeutic engagement, adjustment toward disability), this article presents the '4 Rehab Communication Elements' deemed likely to underpin rehabilitation outcomes. The four elements are: (a) knowing the person and building a supportive relationship; (b) effective information exchange and education; (c) shared goal-setting and action planning; and (d) fostering a more positive, yet realistic, cognitive and self-reframing. This article describes an unprecedented, outcomes-oriented approach toward the design of rehabilitation communication, which has resulted in the development of a new intervention model: the '4 Rehab Communication Elements'. Further trials are needed to evaluate the impact of this whole intervention model on rehabilitation outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline on the Management of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Lingo, Patrick Ryan; Baird, Lissa C; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Mazzola, Catherine; Flannery, Ann Marie

    2016-11-01

    Plagiocephaly, involving positional deformity of the calvarium in infants, is one of the most common reasons for pediatric neurosurgical consultation. To answer the question: "what is the evidence for the effectiveness of repositioning for positional plagiocephaly?" Treatment recommendations are provided based on the available evidence. The National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database and the Cochrane Library were queried using MeSH headings and key words relevant to repositioning as a means to treat plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Abstracts were reviewed to identify which studies met the inclusion criteria. An evidentiary table was assembled summarizing the studies and the quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Based on the quality of the literature, a recommendation was rendered (Level I, II, or III). There were 3 randomized trials (Class I), 1 prospective cohort study (Class II), and 6 retrospective cohort studies (Class III). Repositioning education was found to be equal to a repositioning device and inferior to a physical therapy program. Five of the 7 cohort studies comparing repositioning with a helmet reported helmets to be better and take less time. Within the limits of this systematic review, repositioning education is effective in affording some degree of correction in virtually all infants with positional plagiocephaly or brachycephaly. Most studies suggest that a molding helmet corrects asymmetry more rapidly and to a greater degree than repositioning education. In a Class I study, repositioning education was as effective as repositioning education in conjunction with a repositioning wrap/device. Another Class I study demonstrated that a bedding pillow was superior to physical therapy for some infants. However, in keeping with the American Academy of Pediatrics' warning against the use of soft positioning pillows in the sleeping environment, the Task Force recommends physical therapy over any positioning device. The full guidelines document can be

  11. Guidelines: Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guideline on the Management of Patients With Positional Plagiocephaly: The Role of Repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Lingo, Patrick Ryan; Baird, Lissa C; Bauer, David F; Beier, Alexandra; Durham, Susan; Lin, Alexander Y; McClung-Smith, Catherine; Mitchell, Laura; Nikas, Dimitrios; Tamber, Mandeep S; Tyagi, Rachana; Mazzola, Catherine; Flannery, Ann Marie

    2016-11-01

    Plagiocephaly, involving positional deformity of the calvarium in infants, is one of the most common reasons for pediatric neurosurgical consultation. To answer the question: "what is the evidence for the effectiveness of repositioning for positional plagiocephaly?" Treatment recommendations are provided based on the available evidence. The National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database and the Cochrane Library were queried using MeSH headings and key words relevant to repositioning as a means to treat plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Abstracts were reviewed to identify which studies met the inclusion criteria. An evidentiary table was assembled summarizing the studies and the quality of evidence (Classes I-III). Based on the quality of the literature, a recommendation was rendered (Level I, II, or III). There were 3 randomized trials (Class I), 1 prospective cohort study (Class II), and 6 retrospective cohort studies (Class III). Repositioning education was found to be equal to a repositioning device and inferior to a physical therapy program. Five of the 7 cohort studies comparing repositioning with a helmet reported helmets to be better and take less time. Within the limits of this systematic review, repositioning education is effective in affording some degree of correction in virtually all infants with positional plagiocephaly or brachycephaly. Most studies suggest that a molding helmet corrects asymmetry more rapidly and to a greater degree than repositioning education. In a Class I study, repositioning education was as effective as repositioning education in conjunction with a repositioning wrap/device. Another Class I study demonstrated that a bedding pillow was superior to physical therapy for some infants. However, in keeping with the American Academy of Pediatrics' warning against the use of soft positioning pillows in the sleeping environment, the Task Force recommends physical therapy over any positioning device. The full guidelines document can be

  12. Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The evidence-based practice movement has become an important feature of health care systems and health care policy. Within this context, the APA 2005 Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice defines and discusses evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP). In an integration of science and practice, the Task Force's report describes…

  13. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Medico-Chirurgiche, Unita di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Via Morandi 30, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy); Hunink, Myriam G. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Harvard School of Public Health, Program for Health Decision Science, Boston, MA (United States); Gilbert, Fiona J. [University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Biomedical Imaging Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Krestin, Gabriel P. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  14. How to understand and conduct evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions regarding the care of individual patients. This concept has gained popularity recently, and its applications have been steadily expanding. Nowadays, the term "evidence-based" is used in numerous situations and conditions, such as evidence-based medicine, evidence-based practice, evidence-based health care, evidence-based social work, evidence-based policy, and evidence-based education. However, many anesthesiologists and their colleagues have not previously been accustomed to utilizing EBM, and they have experienced difficulty in understanding and applying the techniques of EBM to their practice. In this article, the author discusses the brief history, definition, methods, and limitations of EBM. As EBM also involves making use of the best available information to answer questions in clinical practice, the author emphasizes the process of performing evidence-based medicine: generate the clinical question, find the best evidence, perform critical appraisal, apply the evidence, and then evaluate. Levels of evidence and strength of recommendation were also explained. The author expects that this article may be of assistance to readers in understanding, conducting, and evaluating EBM.

  15. A patient-centered primary care practice approach using evidence-based quality improvement: rationale, methods, and early assessment of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa V; Stockdale, Susan E; Sapir, Negar; Altman, Lisa; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Vivell, Susan; Ovretveit, John; Hamilton, Alison B; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Healthcare systems and their primary care practices are redesigning to achieve goals identified in Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) models such as Veterans Affairs (VA)'s Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT). Implementation of these models, however, requires major transformation. Evidence-Based Quality Improvement (EBQI) is a multi-level approach for supporting organizational change and innovation spread. To describe EBQI as an approach for promoting VA's PACT and to assess initial implementation of planned EBQI elements. Descriptive. Regional and local interdisciplinary clinical leaders, patient representatives, Quality Council Coordinators, practicing primary care clinicians and staff, and researchers from six demonstration site practices in three local healthcare systems in one VA region. EBQI promotes bottom-up local innovation and spread within top-down organizational priorities. EBQI innovations are supported by a research-clinical partnership, use continuous quality improvement methods, and are developed in regional demonstration sites. We developed a logic model for EBQI for PACT (EBQI-PACT) with inputs, outputs, and expected outcomes. We describe implementation of logic model outputs over 18 months, using qualitative data from 84 key stakeholders (104 interviews from two waves) and review of study documents. Nearly all implementation elements of the EBQI-PACT logic model were fully or partially implemented. Elements not fully achieved included patient engagement in Quality Councils (4/6) and consistent local primary care practice interdisciplinary leadership (4/6). Fourteen of 15 regionally approved innovation projects have been completed, three have undergone initial spread, five are prepared to spread, and two have completed toolkits that have been pretested in two to three sites and are now ready for external spread. EBQI-PACT has been feasible to implement in three participating healthcare systems in one VA region. Further development of methods for

  16. Practice Patterns Compared with Evidence-based Strategies for the Management of Androgen Deprivation Therapy-Induced Side Effects in Prostate Cancer Patients: Results of a European Web-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultijnck, Renée; Surcel, Cristian; Ploussard, Guillaume; Briganti, Alberto; De Visschere, Pieter; Fütterer, Jurgen; Ghadjar, Pirus; Giannarini, Gianluca; Isbarn, Hendrik; Massard, Christophe; Sooriakumaran, Prasanna; Valerio, Massimo; van den Bergh, Roderick; Ost, Piet

    2016-12-01

    Evidence-based recommendations are available for the management of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT)-induced side effects; however, there are no data on the implementation of the recommendations into daily practice patterns. To compare practice patterns in the management of ADT-induced side effects with evidence-based strategies. A European Web-based survey was conducted from January 16, 2015, to June 24, 2015. The 25-item questionnaire was designed with the aid of expert opinion and covered general respondent information, ADT preference per disease stage, patient communication on ADT-induced side effects, and strategies to mitigate side effects. All questions referred to patients with long-term ADT use. Reported practice patterns were compared with available evidence-based strategies. Following data collection, descriptive statistics were used for analysis. Frequency distributions were compiled and compared using a generalised chi-square test. In total, 489 eligible respondents completed the survey. Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone-agonist with or without an antiandrogen was the preferred method of ADT in different settings. Patients were well informed about loss of libido (90%), hot flushes (85%), fatigue (67%), and osteoporosis (63%). An osteoporotic and metabolic risk assessment prior to commencing ADT was done by one-quarter of physicians. The majority (85%) took preventive measures and applied at least one evidence-based strategy. Exercise was recommended by three-quarters of physicians who advocate its positive effects; however, only 25% of physicians had access to exercise programmes. Although the minimum sample size was set at 400 participants, the current survey remains susceptible to volunteer and nonresponder bias. Patients were well informed about several ADT-induced complications but uncommonly underwent an osteoporotic and metabolic risk assessment. Nevertheless, physicians partially provided evidence-based strategies for the management of the

  17. Evidence-based medicine, meer dan evidence alleen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Marlous|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357299817; Bartelink, Marie Louise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100449069

    2017-01-01

    Aan de praktijk van evidence-based medicine (EBM) besteden we in de huisartsopleiding te weinig aandacht. Iedere huisarts die de adviezen uit een NHG-Standaard volgt, of ervan afwijkt, doet aan EBM: het wegen van beschikbare evidence met de eigen ervaring en met de voorkeuren van de patiënt.

  18. [Treatment recommendations based on best evidences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Hugo N; Mella, José M

    2009-01-01

    The fact of making recommendations about treatments demands for a systematic analysis of the different variables involved. The direction of these variables will become a recommendation into a strong one, when the benefits outweigh the harms, or into a weak one, when profits and losses are balanced. In this way, evidence based medicine analyzes this variables: 1) the quality of the literature; 2) the importance of clinical effect; 3) the magnitude of the effect; 4) the risks of the disease to treat; 5) the risks of treatment; 6) the costs; 7) the preferences of the patients; 8) the inconvenience to patients; 9) the minimum and maximum effect and 10 ) if the recommendation is strong or weak. This ten steps strategy will lead us to the construction of a scientifically based recommendation.

  19. What is the evidence based public health?

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández F., Luis J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence based Public Health is the execution and evaluation of the efficiency of interventions, plans, programs, projects and politics in public health through the application of the scientific principles of reasoning, including the systematic use of information and information systems. Evidence based public health involves the use of methodologies similar to those applied in evidence-based clinical medicine, but differs in its contents. In public health two types of evidence are described. ...

  20. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Geum Oh, PhD, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR, a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings.

  1. Evidence Corner: Evidence-based Care for Malignant Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Malignant fungating wounds occur in 5% to 10% of individuals with cancer.1 They arise "when malignant tumour cells infiltrate and erode through the skin."2 Guidelines for treating these malignant wounds (MW) often lack randomized, clinical trial (RCT) evidence supporting local wound care interventions that meet patients' physical or psychosocial needs or facilitate healing.3 The rarity of RCTs exploring healing of MWs likely results from their very low expectation of complete closure.1 Affected patients and their professional and family caregivers rate pain, infection, and odor management among the most important challenges in minimizing distress.4-6 Though a recently updated Cochrane review3 reminds us that evidence remains insufficient for firm conclusions supporting management of MW, it does cite 2 recent RCTs described herein7,8 that can serve as "current best evidence"9 to inform clinical decisions for alleviating some aspects of these patients' distress.

  2. Leveraging Evidence-Based Practice through Partnerships Based on Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Lysandra

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is among the most influential and compelling reforms in contemporary education. Despite their potential to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities, adoption and implementation of evidence-based reforms have been disappointing, with the gap between research and practice remaining wide. Practice-based evidence…

  3. Under the narrative medicine theory to establish the evidence-based medical record written by doctors and patients through integrated therapy of traditional Chinese and western on digestive system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article was to discuss the theory of doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record and set up the preliminary frame of the doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record following the concept of narrative evidence-based medicine. Methods: The information was searched from Pubmed, Embase, CBMdisc, CNKI. A preliminary agreement was reached by referring to the principles of narrative medicine and advises given by experts of digestive system and evidence-based medicine in both Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine. Result: This research is a useful attempt to discuss the establishment of doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record guided by the direction of narrative evidence-based medicine. Reflection and outlook: Doctor-patient co-operated medical record can be a key factor of the curative effect evaluation methodology system of integrated therapy of Tradition Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine on spleen and stomach diseases.

  4. Evidence-based Paradigm In Orthodontics | Ajayi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need to integrate the accrued scientific evidence into clinical orthodontic practice is amongst the challenges facing orthodontists in the 21st century. The evidence-based health care approach aims to improve patient care based upon informed decision-making. This article therefore highlights the importance and ...

  5. Dementia priority setting partnership with the James Lind Alliance: using patient and public involvement and the evidence base to inform the research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sarah; Lafortune, Louise; Hart, Nicola; Cowan, Katherine; Fenton, Mark; Brayne, Carol

    2015-11-01

    The James Lind Alliance (JLA) created an approach to elicit the views of those under-represented in research priority exercises. Building on this, the JLA Dementia Priority Setting Partnership was set up as an independent and evidence-based project to identify and prioritise unanswered questions ('uncertainties') about prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care relating to dementia. A survey was widely disseminated to stakeholders with an interest in the needs of the older population. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the large amount of questions collected from which research questions were developed using PICO framework (Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome). Each question was checked against an extensive evidence base of high-quality systematic reviews to verify whether they were true uncertainties. One thousand five hundred and sixty-three questionnaires were received, from people with dementia, carers/relatives, and health and care professionals; 85 uncertainties were identified from other sources. Questions were refined and formatted iteratively into 146 unique uncertainties. An interim prioritisation process involving diverse organisations identified the top 25 ranked questions. At a final face-to-face prioritisation workshop, 18 people representing the above constituencies arrived by consensus at the top 10 priority questions. The impact of patient and public involvement on the priorities is discussed. The long (146 questions) and top 10 lists of dementia research priorities provide a focus for researchers, funders and commissioners. They highlight a need for more research into care for people with dementia and carers, and a need for high-quality effectiveness trials in all aspects of dementia research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  6. Skull base chondrosarcoma: evidence-based treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Orin; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are indolent but invasive chondroid malignancies that can form in the skull base. Standard management of chondrosarcoma involves surgical resection and adjuvant radiation therapy. This review evaluates evidence from the literature to assess the importance of the surgical approach and extent of resection on outcomes for patients with skull base chondrosarcoma. Also evaluated is the ability of the multiple modalities of radiation therapy, such as conventional fractionated radiotherapy, proton beam, and stereotactic radiosurgery, to control tumor growth. Finally, emerging therapies for the treatment of skull-base chondrosarcoma are discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Toward More Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Childbirth educators are responsible for providing expectant parents with evidence-based information. In this column, the author suggests resources where educators can find evidence-based research for best practices. Additionally, the author describes techniques for childbirth educators to use in presenting research-based information in their classes. A sample of Web sites and books that offer evidence-based resources for expectant parents is provided.

  8. Lost in translation: bibliotherapy and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysart-Gale, Deborah

    2008-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine's (EBM) quantitative methodologies reflect medical science's long-standing mistrust of the imprecision and subjectivity of ordinary descriptive language. However, EBM's attempts to replace subjectivity with precise empirical methods are problematic when clinicians must negotiate between scientific medicine and patients' experience. This problem is evident in the case of bibliotherapy (patient reading as treatment modality), a practice widespread despite its reliance on anecdotal evidence. While EBM purports to replace such flawed practice with reliable evidence-based methods, this essay argues that its aversion to subjective language prevents EBM from effectively evaluating bibliotherapy or making it amenable to clinical and research governance.

  9. Principles of evidence-based dental practice (EBDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Hoda; Dechow, Paul C; Jones, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to improve patient care, there has been a growing trend across the nation and the world to embed the principles of evidence-based dentistry into mainstream care delivery by private practicing dentists. Evidence-based dentistry is an essential tool that is used to improve the quality of care and to reduce the gap between what we know, what is possible, and what we do. An evidence-based health care practice is one that includes the decision maker's ability to find, assess, and incorporate high-quality, valid information in diagnosis and treatment. The evidence is considered in conjunction with the clinician's experience and judgment, and the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances. This article introduces the basic skills of evidence-based dentistry. Their practice requires a discipline of lifelong learning in which recent and relevant scientific evidence are translated into practical clinical applications.

  10. Switching From Age-Based Stimulus Dosing to Dose Titration Protocols in Electroconvulsive Therapy: Empirical Evidence for Better Patient Outcomes With Lower Peak and Cumulative Energy Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill-Kerr, Alex; Yassin, Anhar; Rogers, Stephen; Cornish, Janie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the proposition that adoption of a dose titration protocol may be associated with better patient outcomes, at lower treatment dose, and with comparable cumulative dose to that in patients treated using an age-based stimulus dosing protocol. This was an analysis of data assembled from archived records and based on cohorts of patients treated respectively on an age-based stimulus dosing protocol and on a dose titration protocol in the National Health Service in England. We demonstrated a significantly better response in the patient cohort treated with dose titration than with age-based stimulus dosing. Peak doses were less and the total cumulative dose was less in the dose titration group than in the age-based stimulus dosing group. Our findings are consistent with superior outcomes in patients treated using a dose titration protocol when compared with age-based stimulus dosing in a similar cohort of patients.

  11. Belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in kidney transplant patients: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardinger KL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Karen L Hardinger, Daniel Sunderland, Jennifer A Wiederrich Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Background: Belatacept is a novel immunosuppressive therapy designed to improve clinical outcomes associated with kidney transplant recipients while minimizing use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs. Methods: We searched for clinical trials related to administration of belatacept to kidney transplant patients compared to various immunosuppression regimens, as well as for studies that utilized data from belatacept trials to validate new surrogate measures. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the published evidence of belatacept’s effectiveness and safety in renal transplant recipients to better elucidate its place in clinical practice. Results: Analysis of the results from the Belatacept Evaluation of Nephroprotection and Efficacy as First-Line Immunosuppressive Trial (BENEFIT study, a de novo trial that compared cyclosporine (CsA-based therapy to belatacept-based therapy in standard criteria donors, found a significant difference in mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 13–15 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 23–27 mL/min/1.73 m2 at 1 year and 7 years, respectively. The BENEFIT-EXT study was similarly designed with the exception that it included extended criteria donors. Renal function improved significantly for the more intensive belatacept group in all years of the BENEFIT-EXT study; however, it was not significant in the less intensive group until 5 years after transplant. Belatacept regimens resulted in lower blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplant compared to CsA-based regimens. Results from conversion of CNIs to belatacept therapy, dual therapy of belatacept with sirolimus, and belatacept with corticosteroid avoidance therapy are also included in this article. Conclusion: The evidence reviewed in

  12. [THE FOUNDATIONS OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasleau, F

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) are the clinical experience, the application of best evidences from research and the consideration of patient expectations. It enabled significant progresses in the management of diseases with a low or multifactorial causality. But it has also led to unintended negative consequences, partly related to conflicts of interest. The objective of this article is to bring the attention back to the scientific rigor that must sustain the medical practice, namely in the occurrence : 1) formulating a question that addresses all the elements of an individual clinical situation; 2) exploring the literature systematically; 3) estimating the degree of confidence in the conclusions of clinical trials. EBM provides intuitive tools to address some uncomfortable concepts of biostatistics and to identify the biases and the embellished data that invalidate many studies. However, it is difficult to decide of the care of a single patient from observations issued from the comparison of'heterogeneous groups. Personalized medicine should help to overcome this difficulty and should facilitate clinical decision making by targeting the patients who are most likely to benefit from an intervention without much inconvenience.

  13. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered...

  14. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based

  15. From evidence-based to evidence-reflected practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    , cost-efficiency and measurable quality. Thus, today, evidence-based practice has become an expectation and fashion, often used to emphasize the grounding of practice in research based knowledge that provides measurable evidence for best practice. But at the same time, there is a growing distrust......“Knowledge” is of the utmost significance for professional practice and learning. Today, though, the established knowledge base is changing in all areas of the labour market (Alvesson, 2004). Work and society are dominated by commitment to demands for high levels of demonstrable accountability...

  16. Embedding trials in evidence-based clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Rengerink, K

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of research projects centred on ‘evidence-based medicine’. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on improving recruitment of the necessary number of patients in clinical trials, as this is the major problem while evaluating the effectiveness of interventions in health care. To improve our understanding of patient recruitment we tried to identify obstacles and facilitators for successful recruitment. Part 2 focuses on improving integration of evidence-based dec...

  17. A population perspective to evidence based medicine: "evidence for population health"

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, R; Page, J

    2002-01-01

    We explore the notion that the public health community could learn lessons from the success of evidence based medicine (EBM) and develop a public health counterpart called "Evidence for Population Health". While EBM focuses on individual patients, its public health counterpart would aim to improve the health of communities effectively and efficiently.

  18. Building the capacity for evidence-based clinical nursing leadership: the role of executive co-coaching and group clinical supervision for quality patient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Jo; Jumaa, Mansour Olawale

    2007-03-01

    The general aims of this article were to facilitate primary care nurses (District Nurse Team Leaders) to link management and leadership theories with clinical practice and to improve the quality of the service provided to their patients. The specific aim was to identify, create and evaluate effective processes for collaborative working so that the nurses' capacity for clinical decision-making could be improved. This article, part of a doctoral study on Clinical Leadership in Nursing, has wider application in the workplace of the future where professional standards based on collaboration will be more critical in a world of work that will be increasingly complex and uncertain. This article heralds the type of research and development activities that the nursing and midwifery professions should give premier attention to, particularly given the recent developments within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. The implications of: Agenda for Change, the Knowledge and Skills Framework, 'Our Health, Our Care, Our Say' and the recent proposals from the article 'Modernising Nursing Career', to name but a few, are the key influences impacting on and demanding new ways of clinical supervision for nurses and midwives to improve the quality of patient management and services. The overall approach was based on an action research using a collaborative enquiry within a case study. This was facilitated by a process of executive co-coaching for focused group clinical supervision sessions involving six district nurses as co-researchers and two professional doctoral candidates as the main researchers. The enquiry conducted over a period of two and a half years used evidence-based management and leadership interventions to assist the participants to develop 'actionable knowledge'. Group clinical supervision was not practised in this study as a form of 'therapy' but as a focus for the development of actionable knowledge, knowledge needed for effective clinical management and

  19. Evidence-Based Neurocritical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Diana J.; Kumar, Monisha A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocritical care is a pioneering subspecialty dedicated to the treatment of patients with life-threatening neurological illnesses, postoperative neurosurgical complications, and neurological manifestations of systemic disease. The care of these patients requires specialized neurological monitoring and specific clinical expertise and has generated a body of literature commensurate with the expansion of the field. This article reviews landmark studies over the last 10 years in the management ...

  20. Evidence-Based Medicine: Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Christopher T; Neinstein, Ryan M; Theodorou, Spero J

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Review the appropriate indications and techniques for suction-assisted lipectomy body contouring surgery. 2. Accurately calculate the patient limits of lidocaine for safe dosing during the tumescent infiltration phase of liposuction. 3. Determine preoperatively possible "red flags" or symptoms and signs in the patient history and physical examination that may indicate a heightened risk profile for a liposuction procedure. 4. Provide an introduction to adjunctive techniques to liposuction such as energy-assisted liposuction and to determine whether or not the reader may decide to add them to his or her practice. With increased focus on one's aesthetic appearance, liposuction has become the most popular cosmetic procedure in the world since its introduction in the 1980s. As it has become more refined with experience, safety, patient selection, preoperative assessment, fluid management, proper technique, and overall care of the patient have been emphasized and improved. For the present article, a systematic review of the relevant literature regarding patient workup, tumescent fluid techniques, medication overview, and operative technique was conducted with a practical approach that the reader will possibly find clinically applicable. Recent trends regarding energy-assisted liposuction and body contouring local anesthesia use are addressed. Deep venous thromboembolism prophylaxis is mentioned, as are other common and less common possible complications. The article provides a literature-supported overview on liposuction techniques with an emphasis on preoperative assessment, medicines used, operative technique, and outcomes.

  1. Evidence-based genomic diagnosis characterized chromosomal and cryptic imbalances in 30 elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rachana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the clinical validity of genome-wide oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH for detecting somatic abnormalities, we have applied this genomic analysis to 30 cases (13 MDS and 17 AML with clonal chromosomal abnormalities detected in more than 50% of analyzed metaphase cells. Results The aCGH detected all numerical chromosomal gains and losses from the mainline clones and 113 copy number alterations (CNAs ranging from 0.257 to 102.519 megabases (Mb. Clinically significant recurrent deletions of 5q (involving the RPS14 gene, 12p12.3 (ETV6 gene, 17p13 (TP53 gene, 17q11.2 (NF1 gene and 20q, double minutes containing the MYC gene and segmental amplification involving the MLL gene were further characterized with defined breakpoints and gene contents. Genomic features of microdeletions at 17q11.2 were confirmed by FISH using targeted BAC clones. The aCGH also defined break points in a derivative chromosome 6, der(6t(3;6(q21.3;p22.2, and an isodicentric X chromosome. However, chromosomally observed sideline clonal abnormalities in five cases were not detected by aCGH. Conclusions Our data indicated that an integrated cytogenomic analysis will be a better diagnostic scheme to delineate genomic contents of chromosomal and cryptic abnormalities in patients with MDS and AML. An evidence-based approach to interpret somatic genomic findings was proposed.

  2. Opioid-Related Constipation in Patients With Non-cancer Pain Syndromes: a Review of Evidence-Based Therapies and Justification for a Change in Nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Darren M; Stern, Emily; Cash, Brooks D

    2017-03-01

    Opioids are a mainstay in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain syndromes, but their analgesic benefits come at a cost as opioid-related constipation occurs in 40-80% of individuals taking chronic opioids. Furthermore, as 10-20% of the population suffers from constipation at baseline, it should be expected that while a proportion of individuals will develop constipation as a direct consequence of opioids (OIC), others will experience it as an exacerbation of their baseline constipation (OEC). Herein, we review the evidence-based data for treatments directed at opioid-related constipation focusing on individuals with non-cancer pain syndromes and provide a template for the development of differentiated treatment algorithms for OIC and OEC. Historical and current treatment protocols recommend traditional laxatives, but these are ineffective in up to 50%, due in part to the heterogeneous pathogenesis of constipation. Therapeutic decisions must be tailored to account for this overlapping pathogenesis. OIC and OEC are distinct entities. As such, additional research and guidelines should address these as different patient populations.

  3. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  4. Prescrição de terapias baseadas em evidências para pacientes de alto risco cardiovascular: estudo REACT Evidence-based therapy prescription in high-cardiovascular risk patients: the REACT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Berwanger

    2013-03-01

    practice of outpatient care in patients at high cardiovascular risk in Brazil, regarding the prescription of evidence-based therapies. METHODS: Prospective registry that documented the ambulatory clinical practice in individuals at high cardiovascular risk, which was defined as the presence of the following factors: coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular diseases, diabetes, or those with at least three of the following factors: hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, age > 70 years, family history of coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease or asymptomatic carotid artery disease. Basal characteristics were assessed and the rate of prescription of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 2364 consecutive patients were included, of which 52.2% were males, with a mean age of 66.0 years (± 10.1. Of these, 78.3% used antiplatelet agents, 77.0% used statins and of patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 58.0% received beta-blockers. Concomitant use of these three classes of drugs was 34%; 50.9% of hypertensive, 67% of diabetic and 25.7% of dyslipidemic patients did not achieve the goals recommended by guidelines. The main predictors of prescription therapies with proven benefit were centers with a cardiologist and history of coronary artery disease. CONCLUSION: This national and representative registry identified important gaps in the incorporation of therapies with proven benefit, offering a realistic outlook of patients at high cardiovascular risk.

  5. Introduction to evidence-based medicine(EBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jae Gol [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-08-01

    EBM is 'the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research.' EBM is the integration of clinical expertise, patient values, and the best evidence into the decision making process for patient care. The practice of EBM is usually triggered by patient encounters which generate questions about the effects of therapy, the utility of diagnostic tests, the prognosis of diseases, or the etiology of disorders. The best evidence is usually found in clinically relevant research that has been conducted using sound methodology. Evidence-based medicine requires new skills of the clinician, including efficient literature-searching, and the application of formal rules of evidence in evaluating the clinical literature. Evidence-based medicine converts the abstract exercise of reading and appraising the literature into the pragmatic process of using the literature to benefit individual patients while simultaneously expanding the clinician's knowledge base. This review will briefly discuss about concepts of evidence medicine and method of critical appraisal of literatures.

  6. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  7. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to summarise the available evidence in the wound management of diabetic foot ulcers to promote cost-effective evidence-based practice. Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a.

  8. Diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-based wound management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to summarise the available evidence in the wound management of diabetic foot ulcers to promote cost-effective evidence-based practice. Diabetic foot ulcers have a significant impact on the individual patient's quality of life, potential morbidity and even mortality. Diabetic foot ulcers also consume a ...

  9. Towards Evidence Based Usability in Health Informatics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcilly, Romaric; Peute, Linda W.; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Jaspers, Monique W.

    2015-01-01

    In a Health Information Technology (HIT) regulatory context in which the usability of this technology is more and more a critical issue, there is an increasing need for evidence based usability practice. However, a clear definition of evidence based usability practice and how to achieve it is still

  10. [Strategy for promoting evidence-based nursing practice in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Tang, Lee-Chun; Chou, Shin-Shang

    2013-10-01

    Evidence-based practice has been demonstrated to improve quality of care, increase patients' satisfaction, and reduce the costs of medical care. Therefore, evidence-based practice is now central to the clinical decision-making process and to achieving better quality of care. Today, it is one of the important indicators of core competences for healthcare providers and accreditation for healthcare and educational systems. Further, evidence-based practice encourages in-school and continuous education programs to integrate evidence-based elements and concepts into curricula. Healthcare facilities and professional organizations proactively host campaigns and encourage healthcare providers to participate in evidence-based related training courses. However, the clinical evidence-based practice progress is slow. The general lack of a model for organizational follow-up may be a key factor associated with the slow adoption phenomenon. The authors provide a brief introduction to the evidence-based practice model, then described how it may be successfully translated through a staged process into the evidence-based practices of organizational cultures. This article may be used as a reference by healthcare facilities to promote evidence-based nursing practice.

  11. Evidence-Based Medicine: Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Brent B; Hollier, Larry H

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the epidemiology of mandible fractures. 2. Discuss preoperative evaluation of the patient with a mandible fracture. 3. Compare the various modalities of fracture fixation. 4. Identify common complications after fracture repair. In this Maintenance of Certification/Continuing Medical Education article, the reader is provided with a review of the epidemiology, preoperative evaluation, perioperative management, and surgical outcomes of mandible fractures. The objective of this series is to present a review of the literature so that the practicing physician can remain up-to-date on key evidence-based guidelines to enhance management and improve outcomes. The physician can also seek further in-depth study of the topic through the references provided.

  12. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  13. Current clinical evidence for remote patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédon-Moreau, Laurence; Mabo, Philippe; Kacet, Salem

    2013-06-01

    Pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) patients are ideally suited to remote management in the form of remote follow-up as well as of remote monitoring, which are both acts of telemedicine. Large randomized trials, such as TRUST, COMPAS, CONNECT, ECOST and EVOLVO, and the huge ALTITUDE registry provided a high level of evidence for the multiple advantages of remote management. These trials demonstrated the capability of early detection of events, the ability to reduce the incidence of inappropriate shocks and also of all charged shocks and this despite fewer in-clinic visits for the patients. The studies also demonstrated the safety of remote management of ICD and PM patients and moreover its positive impact on the survival of patients. Thereby, remote monitoring is clinically much more effective and efficient than conventional follow-up.

  14. No Sting Barrier Film to Protect Skin in Adult Patients: Findings From a Scoping Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Chiara; Palese, Alvisa; Canzan, Federica; Ambrosi, Elisa

    2017-10-01

    In the industrialized world, approximately 1-1.5% of the population has received treatments for skin lesions. In the 1990s, a polymeric barrier film called the No Sting Barrier Film (NSBF) was developed as an alternative to petrolatum-based ointments and zinc oxide formulas. To date, few studies have explored the effectiveness of NSBF in protecting skin integrity. To map the methods, fields and outcomes used to produce evidence on NSBF effectiveness. A scoping review was performed in 2015. A search strategy for identifying relevant studies was designed and performed. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and comparative studies for all types of interventions were included; research conducted in any clinical context was eligible for inclusion. Studies were selected by two reviewers; data extraction and analysis also was performed by two reviewers and disagreements were discussed. Six studies were included. NSBF's potential as a skin protector was investigated with respect to (a) chronic wounds (pressure ulcers or vascular leg ulcers); (b) urinary or fecal incontinence; and (c) post-mastectomy irradiation. The principal clinical outcomes investigated were, respectively: (a) wound healing, wound exudates and erythema control; (b) incidence of incontinence-associated dermatitis and skin reactions; and (c) intensity of pruritus and skin reactions. Pain and comfort were measured in all clinical applications. The main process outcomes investigated were: (a) ease of application, (b) application and removal time, and (c) costs. Zinc oxide and petroleum formulations were the most common comparison interventions in research on chronic ulcers and incontinence; sorbolene cream and topical corticosteroids were the most frequent comparisons in the context of post-mastectomy irradiation. NBSF may be used for peri-wound skin protection in patients with chronic wounds, with urinary or fecal incontinence and for women undergoing

  15. Self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with diabetes who do not use insulin--are guidelines evidence-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, K M; Watine, J; Bunting, P S; Sandberg, S; Oosterhuis, W P

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate if clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with diabetes not using insulin follow the principles of evidence-based medicine. After a search from 1999 to 2011, 18 clinical practice guidelines were included. Recommendations regarding self-monitoring of blood glucose were graded on a scale from one (strongly against self-monitoring) to four (strongly in favour of self-monitoring) and compared with the similarly graded conclusions of systematic reviews that were cited by the clinical practice guidelines. We also investigated how clinical practice guideline characteristics, for example funding sources, and quality of references cited could be related to the guideline recommendations. The clinical practice guidelines cited in total 15 systematic reviews, 14 randomized controlled trials, 33 non-randomized controlled trials papers and 18 clinical practice guidelines or position statements. The clinical practice guideline recommendations had an average grade of 3.4 (range 2.0-4.0). Higher grades were seen for clinical practice guidelines that acknowledged industry funding (mean value 4.0) or were issued by organizations depending on private funding (mean value 3.6 vs. 3.0 for governmental funding). The conclusions of the 15 systematic reviews had a mean grade of 2.2 (range 1.0-3.8). Systematic reviews with low grades were less cited. In total, 21 randomized controlled trials were included in the systematic reviews. Approximately half of these evaluated an educational intervention where the effect of self-monitoring of blood glucose could not be clearly isolated. Clinical practice guidelines were more in favour of self-monitoring use than the systematic reviews that were cited. The citation practice was non-systematic and industry funding seemingly led to a more positive attitude towards use of self-monitoring of blood glucose. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  16. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. : What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more

  17. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more productive approach to translating evidence into the practice of policy making. Discussing three episodes in the history of evidence-based medicine - clinical trials, and the production and use of clinical guidelines - I conclude that the success of evidence-based medicine is based on the creation of reflexive practices in which evidence and practice can be combined productively. In the conclusion, I discuss the prospects of such a practice for evidence-based policy.

  18. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Surgical Resection for the Treatment of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Carlson, Matthew L; Link, Michael J; Rayan, Tarek A; Parish, John; Atkins, Tyler; Asher, Anthony L; Dunn, Ian F; Corrales, C Eduardo; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Sughrue, Michael; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-20

    What surgical approaches for vestibular schwannomas (VS) are best for complete resection and facial nerve (FN) preservation when serviceable hearing is present? There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of either the middle fossa (MF) or the retrosigmoid (RS) approach for complete VS resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is present. Which surgical approach (RS or translabyrinthine [TL]) for VS is best for complete resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is not present? There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of either the RS or the TL approach for complete VS resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is not present. Does VS size matter for facial and vestibulocochlear nerve preservation with surgical resection? Level 3: Patients with larger VS tumor size should be counseled about the greater than average risk of loss of serviceable hearing. Should small intracanalicular tumors (<1.5 cm) be surgically resected? There are insufficient data to support a firm recommendation that surgery be the primary treatment for this subclass of VSs. Is hearing preservation routinely possible with VS surgical resection when serviceable hearing is present? Level 3: Hearing preservation surgery via the MF or the RS approach may be attempted in patients with small tumor size (<1.5 cm) and good preoperative hearing. When should surgical resection be the initial treatment in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2)? There is insufficient evidence that surgical resection should be the initial treatment in patients with NF2. Does a multidisciplinary team, consisting of neurosurgery and neurotology, provides the best outcomes of complete resection and facial/vestibulocochlear nerve preservation for patients undergoing resection of VSs? There is insufficient evidence to support stating that a multidisciplinary team, usually consisting of a neurosurgeon and a neurotologist, provides superior outcomes compared

  19. Case studies and evidence based nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical nutrition case study is a neglected area of activity and publication. This may be in part because it is not regarded as a serious contributor to evidence-based nutrition (EBN). Yet it can play a valuable part in hypothesis formulation and in the cross-checking of evidence. Most of all, it is usually a point at which the operationalisation of nutrition evidence is granted best current practice status.

  20. A care pathway analysis of tuberculosis patients in benin: Highlights on direct costs and critical stages for an evidence-based decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Laokri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Free tuberculosis control fail to protect patients from substantial medical and non-medical expenditure, thus a greater degree of disaggregation of patient cost is needed to fully capture their context and inform policymaking. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of six health districts of Southern Benin. From August 2008 to February 2009, we recruited all smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients treated under the national strategy in the selected districts. Direct out-of-pocket costs associated with tuberculosis, time delays, and care-seeking pattern were collected from symptom onset to end of treatment. RESULTS: Population description and outcome data were reported for 245 patients of whom 153 completed their care pathway. For them, the median overall direct cost was USD 183 per patient. Payments to traditional healers, self-medication drugs, travel, and food expenditures contributed largely to this cost burden. Patient, provider, and treatment delays were also reported. Pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment stages were the most critical stages, with median expenditure of USD 43 per patient and accounting for 38% and 29% of the overall direct cost, respectively. However, financial barriers differed depending on whether the patient lived in urban or rural areas. CONCLUSIONS: This study delivers new evidence about bottlenecks encountered during the TB care pathway. Financial barriers to accessing the free-of-charge tuberculosis control strategy in Benin remain substantial for low-income households. Irregular time delays and hidden costs, often generated by multiple visits to various care providers, impair appropriate patient pathways. Particular attention should be paid to pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment. Cost assessment and combined targeted interventions embodied by a patient-centered approach on the specific critical stages would likely deliver better program outcomes.

  1. A care pathway analysis of tuberculosis patients in benin: Highlights on direct costs and critical stages for an evidence-based decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laokri, Samia; Amoussouhui, Arnaud; Ouendo, Edgard M; Hounnankan, Athanase Cossi; Anagonou, Séverin; Gninafon, Martin; Kassa, Ferdinand; Tawo, Léon; Dujardin, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Free tuberculosis control fail to protect patients from substantial medical and non-medical expenditure, thus a greater degree of disaggregation of patient cost is needed to fully capture their context and inform policymaking. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of six health districts of Southern Benin. From August 2008 to February 2009, we recruited all smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients treated under the national strategy in the selected districts. Direct out-of-pocket costs associated with tuberculosis, time delays, and care-seeking pattern were collected from symptom onset to end of treatment. Population description and outcome data were reported for 245 patients of whom 153 completed their care pathway. For them, the median overall direct cost was USD 183 per patient. Payments to traditional healers, self-medication drugs, travel, and food expenditures contributed largely to this cost burden. Patient, provider, and treatment delays were also reported. Pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment stages were the most critical stages, with median expenditure of USD 43 per patient and accounting for 38% and 29% of the overall direct cost, respectively. However, financial barriers differed depending on whether the patient lived in urban or rural areas. This study delivers new evidence about bottlenecks encountered during the TB care pathway. Financial barriers to accessing the free-of-charge tuberculosis control strategy in Benin remain substantial for low-income households. Irregular time delays and hidden costs, often generated by multiple visits to various care providers, impair appropriate patient pathways. Particular attention should be paid to pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment. Cost assessment and combined targeted interventions embodied by a patient-centered approach on the specific critical stages would likely deliver better program outcomes.

  2. History of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger L Sur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay reviews the historical circumstances surrounding the introduction and evolution of evidence-based medicine. Criticisms of the approach are also considered. Weaknesses of existing standards of clinical practice and efforts to bring more certainty to clinical decision making were the foundation for evidence-based medicine, which integrates epidemiology and medical research. Because of its utility in designing randomized clinical trials, assessing the quality of the literature, and applying medical research at the bedside, evidence-based medicine will continue to have a strong influence on everyday clinical practice.

  3. Disparity between dorsal and ventral networks in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: Evidence revealed by graph theoretical analysis based on cortical thickness from MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most widely accepted neuroanatomical models on OCD, it has been hypothesized that imbalance between an excitatory direct (ventral pathway and an inhibitory indirect (dorsal pathway in cortico-striato-thalamic circuit underlies the emergence of OCD. Here we examine the structural network in drug-free patients with OCD in terms of graph theoretical measures for the first time. We used a measure called efficiency which quantifies how a node transfers information efficiently. To construct brain networks, cortical thickness was automatically estimated using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. We found that the network of the OCD patients was as efficient as that of healthy controls so that the both networks were in the small-world regime. More importantly, however, disparity between the dorsal and the ventral networks in the OCD patients was found, suggesting a positive evidence to the imbalance theory on the underlying pathophysiology of OCD.

  4. No evidence for thrombophilia in patients with retinal venous occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Heegaard, Steffen; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    was to evaluate the evidence for thrombophilia investigation in patients presenting with retinal venous occlusion. Eligible studies were identified by a MESH-based search in PubMed 11–13 of March 2015. The level of evidence was stated according to the guidelines published by the GRADE working group using three...... levels for quality of evidence: high, moderate and low. A total of 118 studies relating to the study question were identified. After excluding case stories, commentaries, cross-sectional studies and reviews/expert opinions, 28 original papers and two meta-analyses were included in the final qualitative...... synthesis. The majority of studies were small case–control studies, and only one large cohort study was identified. No randomized controlled trials were retrieved. All the studies were categorized as low quality of evidence. Systematic thrombophilia screening in patients presenting with retinal venous...

  5. Contemporary use of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndrome : insights from Swedish Web System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)

    OpenAIRE

    Sahlen, Anders; Varenhorst, Christoph; Lagerqvist, Bo; Renlund, Henrik; Wallentin, Lars; James, Stefan K.; Jernberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The platelet inhibitor ticagrelor is strongly recommended during 12 months post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in European guidelines. We analysed clinical characteristics of patients given ticagrelor for ACS in the real world. We studied the use of ticagrelor in patients admitted for ACS in Sweden between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 who were enrolled in the Swedish Web system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended The...

  6. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration...... medicine. Thus, evidence-based guidelines do change practice patterns unless they are counteracted by the reimbursement system....... likely to prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops and to not prescribe topical antibiotic eye drops after the guideline was published. Other parameters, most notably the use of toric IOLs and use of postoperative examinations were more guided by reimbursement standards than by evidence-based...

  7. Organizational change strategies for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Robin P; Dearholt, Sandi; Poe, Stephanie; Pugh, Linda C; White, Kathleen M

    2007-12-01

    Evidence-based practice, a crucial competency for healthcare providers and a basic force in Magnet hospitals, results in better patient outcomes. The authors describe the strategic approach to support the maturation of The Johns Hopkins Nursing evidence-based practice model through providing leadership, setting expectations, establishing structure, building skills, and allocating human and material resources as well as incorporating the model and tools into undergraduate and graduate education at the affiliated university.

  8. Evidence-Based Medicine in Facial Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, William M; Christophel, John Jared; Park, Stephen S

    2017-11-01

    This article provides the reader with a comprehensive review of high-level evidence-based medicine in facial trauma and highlights areas devoid of high-level evidence. The article is organized in the order one might approach a clinical problem: starting with the workup, followed by treatment considerations, operative decisions, and postoperative treatments. Individual injuries are discussed within each section, with an overview of the available high-level clinical evidence. This article not only provides a quick reference for the facial traumatologist, but also allows the reader to identify areas that lack high-level evidence, perhaps motivating future endeavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. Evidence-Based Definition and Classification: A Commentary . . . . . . Steve O'Rahilly 37 PART II: PREVENTION OF DIABETES 4. Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes...

  10. Evidence based policy-making: A review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, FW

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised....

  11. Practice-Based Evidence: Delivering What Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Many methods claim to be Evidence-Based Practices. Yet success comes not from a particular practice, but principles that underlie all effective helping. This article uses the principle of consilience to tap knowledge from science, values, and practical experience.

  12. Evidence-based librarianship: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-10-01

    To demonstrate how the core characteristics of both evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based health care (EBHC) can be adapted to health sciences librarianship. Narrative review essay involving development of a conceptual framework. The author describes the central features of EBM and EBHC. Following each description of a central feature, the author then suggests ways that this feature applies to health sciences librarianship. First, the decision-making processes of EBM and EBHC are compatible with health sciences librarianship. Second, the EBM and EBHC values of favoring rigorously produced scientific evidence in decision making are congruent with the core values of librarianship. Third, the hierarchical levels of evidence can be applied to librarianship with some modifications. Library researchers currently favor descriptive-survey and case-study methods over systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other higher levels of evidence. The library literature nevertheless contains diverse examples of randomized controlled trials, controlled-comparison studies, and cohort studies conducted by health sciences librarians. Health sciences librarians are confronted with making many practical decisions. Evidence-based librarianship offers a decision-making framework, which integrates the best available research evidence. By employing this framework and the higher levels of research evidence it promotes, health sciences librarians can lay the foundation for more collaborative and scientific endeavors.

  13. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work.

  14. Hemodynamic monitoring in the era of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Perel, Azriel

    2016-12-20

    Hemodynamic instability frequently occurs in critically ill patients. Pathophysiological rationale suggests that hemodynamic monitoring (HM) may identify the presence and causes of hemodynamic instability and therefore may allow targeting therapeutic approaches. However, there is a discrepancy between this pathophysiological rationale to use HM and a paucity of formal evidence (as defined by the strict criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM)) for its use. In this editorial, we discuss that this paucity of formal evidence that HM can improve patient outcome may be explained by both the shortcomings of the EBM methodology in the field of intensive care medicine and the shortcomings of HM itself.

  15. No Clinical or Biochemical Evidence for Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency in Home Patients Who Depend on Long-Term Mixed Olive Oil- and Soybean Oil-Based Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, Evelyn D; Roelofs, Hennie M J; Fisk, Helena L; Calder, Philip C; Wanten, Geert J A

    2016-09-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients depend on lipid emulsions as part of their parenteral nutrition regimen to provide essential fatty acids (EFAs). Mixed-oil sources are used in modern lipid emulsions to decrease the amount of proinflammatory EFAs, mainly linoleic acid, which is present in large amounts in soybean oil. It is unknown whether patients who fully depend on such mixed lipids have adequate EFA supply. We therefore evaluated whether HPN patients who depend on mixed olive oil- and soybean oil-based HPN show clinical or biochemical evidence of EFA deficiency. Fatty acid status was assessed in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 patients receiving mixed olive oil- and soybean oil-based HPN (>3 months, ≥5 times per week) and 30 healthy controls. Innate immune cell functions were evaluated by assessing expression of surface membrane molecules, and reactive oxygen species, and cytokine production. None of the patients or controls showed clinical evidence (skin rash) or biochemical evidence (increased Holman index [>0.2]) for EFA deficiency. The Holman index in plasma PC (median [25th-75th percentile]) was significantly higher in patients (0.019 [0.015-0.028]) compared with controls (0.015 [0.011-0.017]). No differences were found in innate immune cell functions between groups, except for a 3.6-fold higher tumor necrosis factor-α production in patients. We found no clinical or biochemical evidence that HPN patients who fully and long-term depend on mixed olive oil- and soybean oil-based lipids have an increased risk for EFA deficiency. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  17. The implications of a growing evidence base for drug use in elderly patients. Part 4. Vitamin D and bisphosphonates for fractures and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhesi, J K; Allain, T J; Mangoni, A A; Jackson, S H D

    2006-05-01

    Fractures are common in elderly subjects, disabling and occasionally fatal. Their incidence increases exponentially with age, with the commonest affected sites being the wrist, vertebrae, hip and humerus. Of these, hip fractures are the most relevant in terms of morbidity and financial cost. The increase in fracture rate with age is believed to result predominantly from age-related increases in the incidence of osteoporosis and falls. This article reviews the evidence for the use of vitamin D and bisphosphonates for the prevention of bone fractures and osteoporosis in elderly patients.

  18. New Graduate Nurses' Developmental Trajectories for Capability Beliefs Concerning Core Competencies for Healthcare Professionals: A National Cohort Study on Patient-Centered Care, Teamwork, and Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Anna; Gustavsson, Petter; Wallin, Lars; Boström, Anne-Marie; Rudman, Ann

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to describe the developmental trajectories of registered nurses' capability beliefs during their first 3 years of practice. The focus was on three core competencies for health professionals-patient-centered care, teamwork, and evidence-based practice. A national cohort of registered nurses (n = 1,205) was recruited during their nursing education and subsequently surveyed yearly during the first 3 years of working life. The survey included 16 items on capability beliefs divided into three subscales for the assessment of patient-centered care, teamwork, and evidence-based practice, and the data were analyzed with linear latent growth modeling. The nurses' capability beliefs for patient-centered care increased over the three first years of working life, their capability beliefs for evidence-based practice were stable over the 3 years, and their capability beliefs for teamwork showed a downward trend. Through collaboration between nursing education and clinical practice, the transition to work life could be supported and competence development in newly graduated nurses could be enhanced to help them master the core competencies. Future research should focus on determining which factors impact the development of capability beliefs in new nurses and how these factors can be developed by testing interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  19. [Evidence-based treatment of canine demodicosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R S

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly reviews pathogenesis, clinics and diagnosis of canine demodicosis and summarizes treatment options for this disease based on published evidence. The disease is caused by excessive proliferation of Demodex mites in the hair follicles that may be due to genetic factors or immunosuppressive diseases or treatments. The disease is characterized by alopecia, papules, pustules and crusts. Diagnosis is confirmed by detection of several mites in deep skin scrapings or trichograms. Based on published studies, licensed successful treatments for many patients are weekly amitraz rinses in a concentration of 0.05% and (in dogs with mild to moderate clinical signs) weekly spot-ons containing moxidectin. In severe, treatment-resistant cases, daily oral macrocyclic lactones such as milbemycin oxim (1-2 mg/kg), ivermectin or moxidectin (0.3 mg/kg after daily gradual dose increases from 0.05mg/kg) may be used. Doramectin orally or subcutaneously at 0.6 mg/kg has also been reported as successful therapy. Secondary bacterial skin infections are common and should be treated with antimicrobial shampoos and possibly oral antibiotics.

  20. Evidence based demonstration of the concept of 'field cancerization' by p53 expression in mirror image biopsies of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma - an immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, Alka H; Mohite, Deepali P; Chaudhary, Minal S; Patel, Mimansha; Agarwal, Priyanka; Bohra, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    The main rationale for treatment failure and death of the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is loco-regional recurrence, development of second primary tumor (SPT) and metastasis, which could be well explained by concept of field cancerization. Identification of patients at high risk for development of SPT is an important part of research for cancer management. This study was designed keeping this aspect in mind and utilizing the increased expression of p53 as an indicator of existence of altered fields in mirror image biopsies of OSCC patients. Forty clinically diagnosed oral cancer patients were included in the study. Biopsy tissue samples from clinically diagnosed oral cancer patients (Group A) and the mirror image, clinically normal looking mucosa at corresponding contralateral anatomical site (Group B) were studied for histopathological evaluation and p53 immunoexpression. Tissue alterations were observed in Groups A and B. There was statistically significant (chi-square value - 126.6, p=0.0001) difference in grades of epithelial dysplasia and p53 immunoexpression in Group B. Spearman's Rank Correlation Coefficient shows non-significant positive correlation between epithelial dysplasia and p53 (r=0.28, p=0.05) in Group B. Evidence of presence of field cancerization, evaluated by histopathological alterations and enhanced p53 expression was observed in mirror image biopsies of OSCC patients. This could predict the altered state of oral mucosa secondary to carcinogen exposure. The realization of a genetically altered field as a cancer risk factor provides a new paradigm. It would be prudent to keep these patients under close observation and to advice them chemotherapeutic regimes.

  1. An Evidence-Based Model of Multidisciplinary Care for Patients and Families Affected by Classical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B. Wisniewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2002 a consensus statement pertaining to the management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency was jointly produced by the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology. One of the recommendations of this consensus was that centers should maintain multidisciplinary teams for providing care and support to these patients and their families. However, the specifics for how this should be accomplished were not addressed in the original consensus statement. Here we interpret and translate the 2002 consensus statement recommendations into medical, surgical and mental health protocols. Additionally, we provide preliminary evidence that such protocols result in improved care and support for patients and families.

  2. An Evidence-Based Model of Multidisciplinary Care for Patients and Families Affected by Classical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmers LauraJ

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2002 a consensus statement pertaining to the management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency was jointly produced by the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology. One of the recommendations of this consensus was that centers should maintain multidisciplinary teams for providing care and support to these patients and their families. However, the specifics for how this should be accomplished were not addressed in the original consensus statement. Here we interpret and translate the 2002 consensus statement recommendations into medical, surgical and mental health protocols. Additionally, we provide preliminary evidence that such protocols result in improved care and support for patients and families.

  3. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  4. Evidence of physiotherapeutic interventions for acute LBP patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Louw

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the current evidence for acute low back pain (LBP treatment techniques and to amalgamate this information into a clinically applicable algorithm for South African physiotherapists.Study design: Systematic review.Methods: Computerized bibliographical databases were systematically searched during September 2006 and October 2006 for primary and secondary research reporting on the efficacy of various physiotherapeutic treatment techniques for acute LBP. A search for clinical guidelines regarding acute LBP was also undertaken. Evidence levels were allocated to the primary and secondary research retrieved. Results: Twenty-one systematic reviews, four randomized controlled trials and eleven clinical guidelines were included in this review. There is Level 1 evidence that advice to stay active, McKenzie preferential exercises and spinal manipulative therapy (up to six weeks is beneficial in the initial treatment of acute LBP. There is level 2 evidence that stability exercises, dry needling, heat wrap with exercises, cognitive behavioural therapy, printed patient education, massage (with education and exercises, and lifestyle modification might be potentially beneficial in the treatment of acute LBP. There is level 1 evidence that bed rest should not be recommended for simple acute LBP.  Should a patient not resolve in six weeks, red and yellow flags should be re-assessed, or patient should be referred to a specialist. Outcome: Based on the current evidence, a composite algorithm was developed to assist South African physiotherapists when making treatment decisions for acute LBP. Conclusion: There seems to be a lack of evidence for the efficacy of common treatment techniques used by physiotherapists in the management of acute LBP, indicating an urgent need for physiotherapy-specific, high-quality clinical trials. It is suggested that the evidence-based algorithm that has been developed, be used in the management of acute LBP to

  5. Progress in evidence-based medicine: a quarter century on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-07-22

    In response to limitations in the understanding and use of published evidence, evidence-based medicine (EBM) began as a movement in the early 1990s. EBM's initial focus was on educating clinicians in the understanding and use of published literature to optimise clinical care, including the science of systematic reviews. EBM progressed to recognise limitations of evidence alone, and has increasingly stressed the need to combine critical appraisal of the evidence with patient's values and preferences through shared decision making. In another progress, EBM incorporated and further developed the science of producing trustworthy clinical practice guidelines pioneered by investigators in the 1980s. EBM's enduring contributions to clinical medicine include placing the practice of medicine on a solid scientific basis, the development of more sophisticated hierarchies of evidence, the recognition of the crucial role of patient values and preferences in clinical decision making, and the development of the methodology for generating trustworthy recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EPO or not-EPO? An evidence based informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezza, E; Piccoli, G B; Pacitti, A; Soragna, G; Bermond, F; Burdese, M; Gai, M; Motta, D; Jeantet, A; Merletti, F; Vineis, P; Segoloni, G P

    2004-04-01

    Informed consent is crucial in therapeutic choices; however, the forms presented to patients are often locally developed and information may not be homogeneous. To prepare an evidence-based model for informed consent, applied in the case of erythropoietin therapy (EPO) as a teaching tool for medical students. Methodological tools of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) were developed within the EBM Course in the Medical School of Torino, Italy, as problem solving and patient information tools (5th year students work in small groups under the supervision of statisticians, epidemiologists and experts of internal medicine--nephrology in this case). Methodological and ethical problems were identified: in the pre-dialysis field, evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCT) is scant; how to use evidence gathered in dialysis? How to deal with implementation? How with the mass media? Do we need to discuss the drug choice with the patients? How to deal with rare and severe side effects?). The "evidence" was searched for on Medline/Embase, by using key-words and free terms. About 680 papers were retrieved and screened. Forms available on the Internet were retrieved and a general scheme was drawn: it included 5 areas: title, aim and targets (patients and family physicians); search strategies and updating; pros and cons of therapy; alternative options; open questions. EBM may offer valuable tools for systematically approaching patient information; the inclusion of this kind of exercise in the Medical School EBM courses may help enhance the awareness of future physicians of the correct communication with patients.

  7. Theory- and evidence-based Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a model for assessment and intervention is presented. This model explains how to perform theory- and evidence-based as well as practice-based assessment and intervention. The assessment model applies a holistic approach to treatment planning which includes recognition...

  8. Evidence-Based Practices and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special…

  9. Likelihood ratio-based differentiation of nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients with sonographically evident diffuse hashimoto thyroiditis: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Xia, Yu; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Dai, Qing; Li, Xiao-Yi

    2012-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of sonography for discriminating nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis from papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients with sonographically evident diffuse Hashimoto thyroiditis. This study included 20 patients with 24 surgically confirmed Hashimoto thyroiditis nodules and 40 patients with 40 papillary thyroid carcinoma nodules; all had sonographically evident diffuse Hashimoto thyroiditis. A retrospective review of the sonograms was performed, and significant benign and malignant sonographic features were selected by univariate and multivariate analyses. The combined likelihood ratio was calculated as the product of each feature's likelihood ratio for papillary thyroid carcinoma. We compared the abilities of the original sonographic features and combined likelihood ratios in diagnosing nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma by their sensitivity, specificity, and Youden index. The diagnostic capabilities of the sonographic features varied greatly, with Youden indices ranging from 0.175 to 0.700. Compared with single features, combinations of features were unable to improve the Youden indices effectively because the sensitivity and specificity usually changed in opposite directions. For combined likelihood ratios, however, the sensitivity improved greatly without an obvious reduction in specificity, which resulted in the maximum Youden index (0.825). With a combined likelihood ratio greater than 7.00 as the diagnostic criterion for papillary thyroid carcinoma, sensitivity reached 82.5%, whereas specificity remained at 100.0%. With a combined likelihood ratio less than 1.00 for nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis, sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% and 92.5%, respectively. Several sonographic features of nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis and papillary thyroid carcinoma in a background of diffuse Hashimoto thyroiditis were significantly different. The combined likelihood ratio may be superior to original sonographic features for

  10. Evidence-based management of recurrent miscarriages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadava B Jeve

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent miscarriages are postimplantation failures in natural conception; they are also termed as habitual abortions or recurrent pregnancy losses. Recurrent pregnancy loss is disheartening to the couple and to the treating clinician. There has been a wide range of research from aetiology to management of recurrent pregnancy loss. It is one of the most debated topic among clinicians and academics. The ideal management is unanswered. This review is aimed to produce an evidence-based guidance on clinical management of recurrent miscarriage. The review is structured to be clinically relevant. We have searched electronic databases (PubMed and Embase using different key words. We have combined the searches and arranged them with the hierarchy of evidences. We have critically appraised the evidence to produce a concise answer for clinical practice. We have graded the evidence from level I to V on which these recommendations are based.

  11. Searching for evidence-based geriatrics: Tips and tools for finding evidence in the medical literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, B. C.; van de Glind, E. M. M.; Hooft, L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Information to treat geriatric patients evidence-based is hard to find. Recently, a sensitive and a specific search filter to improve searching for literature relevant to geriatric medicine were developed in a research setting. The aim of this study is to determine whether these

  12. Evidence-based history taking under "time constraint"

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Moayyeri; Akbar Soltani; Hamideh Moosapour; Mohsin Raza

    2011-01-01

    Physicians all through the world visit patients under time limitations. The most important troubled clinical skill under ?time constraint? is the diagnostic approach. In this situation, clinicians need some diagnostic approaches to reduce both diagnostic time and errors. It seems that highly experienced physicians utilize some special tactics in this regard. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a relatively new paradigm for clinical practice stresses on using research evidences in diagnostic eval...

  13. The rational clinical examination. Is this patient allergic to penicillin? An evidence-based analysis of the likelihood of penicillin allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkind, A R; Cuddy, P G; Foxworth, J W

    2001-05-16

    Clinicians frequently withhold antibiotics that contain penicillin based on patients' self-reported clinical history of an adverse reaction to penicillin and the clinicians' own misunderstandings about the characteristics of a true penicillin allergy. To determine the likelihood of true penicillin allergy with consideration of clinical history and to evaluate the diagnostic value added by appropriate skin testing. MEDLINE was searched for relevant English-language articles dated 1966 to October 2000. Bibliographies were searched to identify additional articles. We included original studies describing the precision of skin testing in diagnosis of penicillin allergy. We excluded studies that did not use both minor and major determinants, provide an explicit definition of penicillin allergy, or list the specific criteria necessary for a positive skin test result. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Three authors independently reviewed and abstracted data from all articles and reached consensus about any discrepancies. Patients' self-reported history has low accuracy for diagnosis of true penicillin allergy. By evaluating studies comparing clinical history to the skin test for penicillin allergy among patients with and without a positive history for penicillin allergy, positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated. History of penicillin allergy had a positive likelihood ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-2.5), while absence of history of penicillin allergy had a negative likelihood ratio of 0.5 (95% CI, 0.4-0.6). Only 10% to 20% of patients reporting a history of penicillin allergy are truly allergic when assessed by skin testing. Taking a detailed history of a patient's reaction to penicillin may allow clinicians to exclude true penicillin allergy, allowing these patients to receive penicillin. Patients with a concerning history of type I penicillin allergy who have a compelling need for a drug containing penicillin should undergo skin

  14. The fallacy of evidence based policy

    CERN Document Server

    Saltelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of science for policy is at the core of a perfect storm generated by the insurgence of several concurrent crises: of science, of trust, of sustainability. The modern positivistic model of science for policy, known as evidence based policy, is based on dramatic simplifications and compressions of available perceptions of the state of affairs and possible explanations (hypocognition). This model can result in flawed prescriptions. The flaws become more evident when dealing with complex issues characterized by concomitant uncertainties in the normative, descriptive and ethical domains. In this situation evidence-based policy may concur to the fragility of the social system. Science plays an important role in reducing the feeling of vulnerability of humans by projecting a promise of protection against uncertainties. In many applications quantitative science is used to remove uncertainty by transforming it into probability, so that mathematical modelling can play the ritual role of haruspices. This epistem...

  15. Queer challenges to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay; Grant, Alec

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to queer evidence-based practice by troubling the concepts of evidence, knowledge and mental illness. The evidence-based narrative that emerged within biomedicine has dominated health care. The biomedical notion of 'evidence' has been critiqued extensively and is seen as exclusive and limiting, and even though the social constructionist paradigm attempts to challenge the authority of biomedicine to legitimate what constitutes acceptable evidence or knowledge for those experiencing mental illness, biomedical notions of evidence appear to remain relatively intact. Queer theory offers theoretical tools to disrupt biomedical norms and challenges biomedical normativity to indicate how marginalisation occurs when normative truths about mental health classify those who differ from the norm as 'ill' or 'disordered'. Queer theory's emphasis on normativity serves the political aim to subvert marginalisation and bring about radical social and material change. Reference will be made to mental health subjects within each discourse by indicating how the body acts as a vehicle for knowing. Deleuzian notions of the rhizome are used as metaphor to suggest a relational approach to knowledge that does away with either/or positions in either biomedical, or queer knowledge to arrive at a both/and position where the biomedical, constructionist and queer are interrelated and entangled in needing the other for their own evolution. However, queer does not ask for assimilation but celebrates difference by remaining outside to disrupt that which is easily overlooked, assumed to be natural or represented as the norm. The task of queer knowledge is to do justice to the lives lived in the name of evidence-based practice and demands that we consider the relations of power where knowledge is produced. This pursuit creates different knowledge spaces where we identify new intersections that allow for socially just understandings of knowing or evidence to emerge. © 2013 John Wiley

  16. Efficacy of Curcumin as Adjuvant Therapy to Induce or Maintain Remission in Ulcerative Colitis Patients: an Evidence-based Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: treatment guidelines for ulcerative colitis (UC not yet established. Currently, mesalazine, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators are treatment options for UC. However, they are known to have unpleaseant side effects such as nausea, vomiting, headaches, hepatitis, and male infertility. Curcumin is found in Turmeric plants (Curcuma longa L., which possesses both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study aimed to determine whether curcumin as adjuvant therapy can induce or maintain remission in UC patients. Methods: structured search in three database (Cochrane, PubMed, Proquest using “Curcumin”, “remission” and “Ulcerative Colitis” as keywords. Inclusion criteria is randomized controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analysis, or systematic review using curcumin as adjuvant therapy in adult UC patients. Results: we found 49 articles. After exclusion, three RCTs were reviewed; two examined curcumin efficacy to induce remission and one for remision maintenance in UC. Curcumin was significantly more effective than placebo in all RCTs. The efficacy of curcumin could be explained by its anti-inflammatory properties, which inhibit NF-kB pathway. Regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance can modify the release of cytokines. However, methods varied between RCTs. Therefore, they cannot be compared objectively. Futhermore, the sample size were small (n= 50, 45, 89 therefore the statistical power was not enough to generate representative results in all UC patients. Conclusion: Available evidence showed that curcumin has the potential to induce and maintain remission in UC patients with no serious side effects. However, further studies with larger sample size are needed to recommend it as adjuvant therapy of ulcerative colitis.

  17. Evidence of improved fluid management in patients receiving haemodialysis following a self-affirmation theory-based intervention: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wileman, Vari; Chilcot, Joseph; Armitage, Christopher J; Farrington, Ken; Wellsted, David M; Norton, Sam; Davenport, Andrew; Franklin, Gail; Da Silva Gane, Maria; Horne, Robert; Almond, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Haemodialysis patients are at risk of serious health complications; yet, treatment non-adherence remains high. Warnings about health risks associated with non-adherence may trigger defensive reactions. We studied whether an intervention based on self-affirmation theory reduced resistance to health-risk information and improved fluid treatment adherence. In a cluster randomised controlled trial, 91 patients either self-affirmed or completed a matched control task before reading about the health-risks associated with inadequate fluid control. Patients' perceptions of the health-risk information, intention and self-efficacy to control fluid were assessed immediately after presentation of health-risk information. Interdialytic weight gain (IDWG), excess fluid removed during haemodialysis, is a clinical measure of fluid treatment adherence. IDWG data were collected up to 12 months post-intervention. Self-affirmed patients had significantly reduced IDWG levels over 12 months. However, contrary to predictions derived from self-affirmation theory, self-affirmed participants and controls did not differ in their evaluation of the health-risk information, intention to control fluid or self-efficacy. A low-cost, high-reach health intervention based on self-affirmation theory was shown to reduce IDWG over a 12-month period, but the mechanism by which this apparent behaviour change occurred is uncertain. Further work is still required to identify mediators of the observed effects.

  18. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine. Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    Aim of the review The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its

  19. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine : Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van Der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    Aim of the review The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its

  20. Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Fredric M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

  1. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine is of vital importance for improving quality of care, promoting public health and health system development. Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine allows using the most powerful information source, which have ever existed in medicine. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching Evidence-Based Medicine, including long-term outcomes of training. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Astana, where the Scientific and Educational Center of Evidence-Based Medicine was established in 2010 with the help of the corresponding project of the World Bank. The participants of the study were the faculty trained in Evidence-Based Medicine at the workshop "Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine" for the period of 2010-2015 years. There were a total of 16 workshops during the period, and 323 employees were trained. All participants were asked to complete our questionnaire two times: before the training - pre-training (to determine the initial level of a listener) and after the training - post-training (to determine the acquired level and get the feedback). Questionnaires were prepared in such a way, that the majority of questions before and after training were identical. Thus, it provided a clear picture of the effectiveness of training. Questions in the survey were open-ended so that the respondents had the opportunity to freely and fully express their views. The main part of the questionnaires included the following questions: "Do you understand what evidence-based medicine is", "how do you understand what the study design means", "what is randomization", "how research is classified", "do you know the steps of decision-making according to Evidence-Based Medicine, list them", "what literature do you prefer to use when searching for information (print, electronic, etc.)", "what resources on the Internet do you prefer to use". Only 30-35% of respondents gave correct answers to the questions on

  2. Evidence based practice of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management.

  3. Shared decision making in chronic care in the context of evidence based practice in nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen-Storms, J.H.; Bours, G.J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Beurskens, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the decision-making environment of evidence-based practice, the following three sources of information must be integrated: research evidence of the intervention, clinical expertise, and the patient's values. In reality, evidence-based practice usually focuses on research evidence (which may be

  4. Teaching Evidence-based Medicine Using Literature for Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottonen, Merja; Tapanainen, Paivi; Nuutinen, Matti; Rantala, Heikki; Vainionpaa, Leena; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine--the process of using research findings systematically as the basis for clinical decisions--can be taught using problem-solving teaching methods. Evaluates whether it was possible to motivate students to use the original literature by giving them selected patient problems to solve. (Author/ASK)

  5. Developing evidence-based guidelines for referral for short stature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Dommelen, P. van; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.; Buuren, S. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish evidence based guidelines for growth monitoring on a population basis. Study design: Several auxological referral criteria were formulated and applied to longitudinal growth data from four different patient groups, as well as three samples from the general population.

  6. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  7. Embedding trials in evidence-based clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Rengerink, K.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a number of research projects centred on ‘evidence-based medicine’. It consists of two parts. Part 1 focuses on improving recruitment of the necessary number of patients in clinical trials, as this is the major problem while evaluating the effectiveness of interventions in

  8. Evidence-based care and the curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winning, T.; Needleman, I.; Rohlin, M.; Carrassi, A.; Chadwick, B.; Eaton, K.; Hardwick, K.; Ivancakova, R.; Jallaludin, R.L.; Johnsen, D.; Kim, J.G.; Lekkas, D.; Li, D.; Onisei, D.; Pissiotis, A.; Reynolds, P.; Tonni, I.; Vanobbergen, J.; Vassileva, R.; Virtanen, J.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wilson, N.

    2008-01-01

    An evidence-based (EB) approach has been a significant driver in reforming healthcare over the past two decades. This change has extended across a broad range of health professions, including oral healthcare. A key element in achieving an EB approach to oral healthcare is educating our

  9. Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Spek; M. Wieringa-de Waard; C. Lucas; N. van Dijk

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to

  10. Inpatient Trauma-Focused Treatment for Veterans: Implementation and Evaluation of Patient Perceptions and Outcomes of an Integrated Evidence-Based Treatment Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menefee, Deleene S; Leopoulos, Wendy S; Tran, Jana K; Teng, Ellen; Wanner, Jill; Wilde, Elisabeth; McCauley, Stephen; Day, Susan X

    2016-11-01

    Practice guidelines for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment suggest that inpatient care may be warranted when the severity of the clinical presentation is marred with significant concerns about suicidality and psychiatric comorbidity. Yet, limited guidance exists on conducting trauma-focused treatment in acute hospital settings beyond the traditional medical or stabilization model. The purpose of this current article is to describe and evaluate the integration of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for PTSD implemented in two gender-specific, Veterans Affairs inpatient programs. The theoretical underpinnings of these trauma-focused programs are elucidated in this article, and program delivery is explained. The concurrent versus sequential delivery of multiple EBTs over the course of a 30-day, cohorted admission is explained. Paired sample t tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of these programs on PTSD and depressive symptom severity, and clinically significant reductions in symptoms were found. The characteristics of 584 Veterans (men = 290 and women = 284) who were voluntarily admitted for intensive, trauma-focused work are presented. Treatment completion among the men was 74.8% and 92.4% among the women. Participants' perceptions of treatment acceptability were examined and presented. These preliminary results offer promising evidence for interventions that concurrently provide strategies for increasing coping skills, suicidal disruption, and emotion dysregulation while providing EBTs for PTSD. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Balloon kyphoplasty: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    To review the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). Vertebral compression fractures are one of the most common types of osteoporotic fractures. They can lead to chronic pain and spinal deformity. They are caused when the vertebral body (the thick block of bone at the front of each vertebra) is too weak to support the loads of activities of daily living. Spinal deformity due to a collapsed vertebral body can substantially affect the quality of life of elderly people, who are especially at risk for osteoporotic fractures due to decreasing bone mass with age. A population-based study across 12 European centres recently found that VCFs have a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Complications associated with VCFs are pulmonary dysfunction, eating disorders, loss of independence, and mental status change due to pain and the use of medications. Osteoporotic VCFs also are associated with a higher rate of death. VCFs affect an estimated 25% of women over age 50 years and 40% of women over age 80 years. Only about 30% of these fractures are diagnosed in clinical practice. A Canadian multicentre osteoporosis study reported on the prevalence of vertebral deformity in Canada in people over 50 years of age. To define the limit of normality, they plotted a normal distribution, including mean and standard deviations (SDs) derived from a reference population without any deformity. They reported a prevalence rate of 23.5% in women and a rate of 21.5% in men, using 3 SDs from the mean as the limit of normality. When they used 4 SDs, the prevalence was 9.3% and 7.3%, respectively. They also found the prevalence of vertebral deformity increased with age. For people older than 80 years of age, the prevalence for women and men was 45% and 36%, respectively, using 3 SDs as the limit of normality. About 85% of VCFs are due to primary osteoporosis. Secondary osteoporosis and

  12. Recent evidence on early mobilization in critical-Ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuest, Kristina; Schaller, Stefan J

    2018-01-17

    To examine the benefits of early mobilization and summarize the results of most recent clinical studies examining early mobilization in critically ill patients followed by a presentation of recent developments in the field. Early mobilization of ICU patients, defined as mobilization within 72 h of ICU admission, is still uncommon. In medical and surgical critically ill patients, mobilization is well tolerated even in intubated patients. In neurocritical care, evidence to support early mobilization is either lacking (aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage), or the results are inconsistent (e.g. stroke). Successful implementation of early mobilization requires a cultural change; preferably based on an interprofessional approach with clearly defined responsibilities and including a mobilization scoring system. Although the evidence for the majority of the technical tools is still limited, the use of a bed cycle ergometer and a treadmill with strap system has been promising in smaller trials. Early mobilization is well tolerated and feasible, resulting in improved outcomes in surgical and medical ICU patients. Implementation of early mobilization can be challenging and may need a cultural change anchored in an interprofessional approach and integrated in a patient-centered bundle. Scoring systems should be integrated to define daily goals and used to verify patients' achievements or identify barriers immediately.

  13. Evidence-based medicine meets goal-directed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W; Hamm, Robert; Scheid, Dewey

    2003-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine and goal-directed, patient-centered health care seem, at times, like parallel universes, though, at a conceptual level, they are perfectly compatible. Part of the problem is that many of the kinds of information required for decision making in primary care are often unavailable or difficult to find. Several case examples are used to illustrate this problem, and reasons and solutions are suggested. The goal-directed health care model could be helpful for directing the search for evidence that is relevant to the decisions that patients and their primary care physicians must make on a regular basis.

  14. Evidence-based smoking cessation and the family doctor

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Malta smoking is widespread and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Family doctors are well-placed to provide smoking cessation advice to their patients. Objective The aim of this review is to assist family doctors in helping their patients quit smoking by informing them of evidence-based therapies. Method The online Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews within the Cochrane Library was searched for metaanalyses and systematic reviews related to various smoking...

  15. Evidence Based Practice: Science? Or Art? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP is a strategy to bridge research and practice. Generally EBLIP is seen as a movement to encourage and give practitioners the means to incorporate research into their practice, where it previously may have been lacking. The widely accepted definition of EBLIP (Booth, 2000 stresses three aspects that contribute to a practice that is evidence based: 1 "the best available evidence;" 2 "moderated by user needs and preferences;" 3 "applied to improve the quality of professional judgements." The area that the EBLIP movement has focused on is how to create and understand the best available research evidence. CE courses, critical appraisal checklists, and many articles have been written to address a need for librarian education in this area, and it seems that strides have been made.But very little in the EBLIP literature talks about how we make professional judgements, or moderate evidence based on our user needs and preferences. Likewise, how do we make good evidence based decisions when our evidence base is weak. These things seem to be elements we just take for granted or can’t translate into words. It is in keeping with tacit knowledge that librarians just seem to have or acquire skills with education and on the job experience. Tacit knowledge is "knowledge that is not easily articulated, and frequently involves knowledge of how to do things. We can infer its existence only by observing behaviour and determining that this sort of knowledge is a precondition for effective performance" (Patel, Arocha, & Kaufman, 1999, p.78. It is something that is difficult to translate into an article or guideline for how we work. I think of this area as the "art" of evidence based practice. And the art is crucial to being an evidence based practitioner.Science = systematized knowledge, explicit research, methodological examination, investigation, dataArt = professional knowledge of your craft, intuition

  16. Observation, Sherlock Holmes, and Evidence Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John

    2002-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh between 1876 and 1881 under Doctor Joseph Bell who emphasised in his teaching the importance of observation, deduction and evidence. Sherlock Holmes was modelled on Joseph Bell. The modern notions of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) are not new. A very brief indication of some of the history of EBM is presented including a discussion of the important and usually overlooked contribution of statisticians to the Popperian philosophy of EBM.

  17. Evidence Based Education: un quadro storico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vivanet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, nel pensiero pedagogico anglosassone, si è affermata una cultura dell’evidenza cui ci si riferisce con l’espressione “evidence based education” (EBE. Secondo tale prospettiva, le decisioni in ambito educativo dovrebbero essere assunte sulla base delle conoscenze che la ricerca empirica offre in merito alla minore o maggiore efficacia delle differenti opzioni didattiche. Si tratta di un approccio (denominato “evidence based practice” che ha origine in ambito medico e che in seguito ha trovato applicazione in differenti domini delle scienze sociali. L’autore presenta un quadro introduttivo all’EBE, dando conto delle sue origini e dei differenti significati di cui è portatrice.

  18. Bariatric surgery: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    economic analysis. Bariatric surgery generally is effective for sustained weight loss of about 16% for people with BMIs of at least 40 kg/m(2) or at least 35 kg/m(2) with comorbid conditions (including diabetes, high lipid levels, and hypertension). It also is effective at resolving the associated comorbid conditions. This conclusion is largely based on level 3a evidence from the prospectively designed Swedish Obese Subjects study, which recently published 10-year outcomes for patients who had bariatric surgery compared with patients who received nonsurgical treatment. (1)Regarding specific procedures, there is evidence that malabsorptive techniques are better than other banding techniques for weight loss and resolution of comorbid illnesses. However, there are no published prospective, long-term, direct comparisons of these techniques available.Surgery for morbid obesity is considered an intervention of last resort for patients who have attempted first-line forms of medical management, such as diet, increased physical activity, behavioural modification, and drugs. In the absence of direct comparisons of active nonsurgical intervention via caloric restriction with bariatric techniques, the following observations are made:A recent systematic review examining the efficacy of major commercial and organized self-help weight loss programs in the United States concluded that the evidence to support the use of such programs was suboptimal, except for one trial on Weight Watchers. Furthermore, the programs were associated with high costs, attrition rates, and probability of regaining at least 50% of the lost weight in 1 to 2 years. (2)A recent randomized controlled trial reported 1-year outcomes comparing weight loss and metabolic changes in severely obese patients assigned to either a low-carbohydrate diet or a conventional weight loss diet. At 1 year, weight loss was similar for patients in each group (mean, 2-5 kg). There was a favourable effect on triglyceride levels and

  19. Towards evidence-based critical thinking medicine? Uses of best evidence in flawless argumentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenicek, Milos

    2006-08-01

    Uses of informal logic and critical thinking methodology are increasingly taught, learnt and advantageously applied in such diverse domains as law, the military, business, and education. Health sciences are also following this trend. However, production and critical appraisal of evidence as already practiced in Evidence-Based Medicine must be coupled with equally rigorous uses in order to ensure appropriate health problem understanding and decision-making. Making most proposals and decisions in medicine is the conclusion of an argumentation process that lies behind any communication between health professionals working with patients, performing research or sharing ideas about health problems, their interpretations and solutions with numerous stakeholders in public life. Modern critical thinking and decision making in medicine is not instantly mastered, but is instead a learnt experience as anything else in professional and social interactions. The modern argument as outlined, illustrated and applied to health problems in this essay is an extension of a previously established way of thinking in Evidence-Based Medicine. Ideally, health professionals, their patients and all other stakeholders should speak the same language and it is up to us to make this possible. Evidence and critical thinking - based medicine might be a solution. As modern critical thinkers, we are at the forefront and we must see to it that patients and professional and general communities benefit from this more so even than from other remarkable historical and current contributions to the well-being of those under our care.

  20. Evidence-Based and Personalized Medicine. It's [AND] not [OR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, Sahar; Takkenberg, Johanna Jm; Treasure, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Good clinical practice is an amalgamation of personalized medicine with evidence-based medicine in the best interests of patient. Hence, our title uses Boolean operators to indicate that it is [AND] not [OR]. This is the syntax of formal searching for systematic reviews, ensuring that all the evidence is found. Comprehensive evidence-based guidance can thus be formulated. Many residents and fellows around the world, and their chiefs, are now exposed to consensus documents, white papers, levels of appropriateness, and guidelines and are in many jurisdictions expected to comply with them. However, they are the summation of many forms of evidence, each of which has its place, and we consider them in turn in this article. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Underdetermination in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin H

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the philosophical implications of evidence-based medicine's (EBM's) epistemology in terms of the problem of underdetermination of theory by evidence as expounded by the Duhem-Quine thesis. EBM hierarchies of evidence privilege clinical research over basic science, exacerbating the problem of underdetermination. Because of severe underdetermination, EBM is unable to meaningfully test core medical beliefs that form the basis of our understanding of disease and therapeutics. As a result, EBM adopts an epistemic attitude that is sceptical of explanations from the basic biological sciences, and is relegated to a view of disease at a population level. EBM's epistemic attitude provides a limited research heuristic by preventing the development of a theoretical framework required for understanding disease mechanism and integrating knowledge to develop new therapies. Medical epistemology should remain pluralistic and include complementary approaches of basic science and clinical research, thus avoiding the limited epistemic attitude entailed by EBM hierarchies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Evidence-based policymaking: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nortje

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of facilitating the uptake of evidence, for example, scientific research findings, into the policymaking process is multifaceted and thus complex. It is therefore important for scientists to understand this process in order to influence it more effectively. Similarly, policymakers need to understand the complexities of the scientific process to improve their interaction with the scientific sphere. This literature review addresses those factors that influence the uptake of scientific evidence into policymaking, the barriers to using science in policymaking, as well as recommendations for improved science–policymaking interaction. A visual diagram of the gears of a car is used to convey the message of the complexities around the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised.

  3. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  4. Proposing an Evidence-Based Strategy for Software Requirements Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoerfer, Doris; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses an evidence-based approach to software requirements engineering. The approach is called evidence-based, since it uses publications on the specific problem as a surrogate for stakeholder interests, to formulate risks and testing experiences. This complements the idea that agile software development models are more relevant, in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing cross-functional teams. The strategy is exemplified and applied to the development of a Software Requirements list used to develop software systems for patient registries.

  5. The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ross

    2008-01-01

    School Library Journal's 2007 Leadership Summit, "Where's the Evidence? Understanding the Impact of School Libraries," focused on the topic of evidence-based practice. Evidence-based school librarianship is a systematic approach that engages research-derived evidence, school librarian-observed evidence, and user-reported evidence in the processes…

  6. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  7. An Evidence-based Guideline for prehospital analgesia in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Brown, Kathleen M; Oliver, Zoë J; Sasson, Comilla; Dayan, Peter S; Eschmann, Nicholas M; Weik, Tasmeen S; Lawner, Benjamin J; Sahni, Ritu; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Wright, Joseph L; Todd, Knox; Lang, Eddy S

    2014-01-01

    The management of acute traumatic pain is a crucial component of prehospital care and yet the assessment and administration of analgesia is highly variable, frequently suboptimal, and often determined by consensus-based regional protocols. To develop an evidence-based guideline (EBG) for the clinical management of acute traumatic pain in adults and children by advanced life support (ALS) providers in the prehospital setting. Methods. We recruited a multi-stakeholder panel with expertise in acute pain management, guideline development, health informatics, and emergency medical services (EMS) outcomes research. Representatives of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (sponsoring agency) and a major children's research center (investigative team) also contributed to the process. The panel used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology to guide the process of question formulation, evidence retrieval, appraisal/synthesis, and formulation of recommendations. The process also adhered to the National Prehospital Evidence-Based Guideline (EBG) model process approved by the Federal Interagency Council for EMS and the National EMS Advisory Council. Four strong and three weak recommendations emerged from the process; two of the strong recommendations were linked to high- and moderate-quality evidence, respectively. The panel recommended that all patients be considered candidates for analgesia, regardless of transport interval, and that opioid medications should be considered for patients in moderate to severe pain. The panel also recommended that all patients should be reassessed at frequent intervals using a standardized pain scale and that patients should be re-dosed if pain persists. The panel suggested the use of specific age-appropriate pain scales. GRADE methodology was used to develop an evidence-based guideline for prehospital analgesia in trauma. The panel issued four strong recommendations regarding patient

  8. Evidence-based recommendation on toothpaste use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Aparecido Cury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toothpaste can be used as a vehicle for substances to improve the oral health of individuals and populations. Therefore, it should be recommended based on the best scientific evidence available, and not on the opinion of authorities or specialists. Fluoride is the most important therapeutic substance used in toothpastes, adding to the effect of mechanical toothbrushing on dental caries control. The use of fluoride toothpaste to reduce caries in children and adults is strongly based on evidence, and is dependent on the concentration (minimum of 1000 ppm F and frequency of fluoride toothpaste use (2'/day or higher. The risk of dental fluorosis due to toothpaste ingestion by children has been overestimated, since there is no evidence that: 1 fluoride toothpaste use should be postponed until the age of 3-4 or older, 2 low-fluoride toothpaste avoids fluorosis and 3 fluorosis has a detrimental effect on the quality of life of individuals exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Among other therapeutic substances used in toothpastes, there is evidence that triclosan/copolymer reduce dental biofilm, gingivitis, periodontitis, calculus and halitosis, and that toothpastes containing stannous fluoride reduce biofilm and gingivitis.

  9. Creative teaching an evidence-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an evidence-based pedagogic guide to enable any motivated teaching/training professional to be able to teach effectively and creatively. It firstly summarises the extensive research field on human psychological functioning relating to learning and how this can be fully utilised in the design and facilitation of quality learning experiences. It then demonstrates what creativity actually 'looks like' in terms of teaching practices, modelling the underpinning processes of creative learning design and how to apply these in lesson planning. The book, having established an evidence-based and pedagogically driven approach to creative learning design, extensively focuses on key challenges facing teaching professionals today. These include utilising information technologies in blended learning formats, differentiating instruction, and developing self-directed learners who can think well. The main purpose of the book is to demystify what it means to teach creatively, explicitly demonstrating the pr...

  10. [Communication problems in evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Lisbeth

    2002-02-21

    From a humanistic, social scientific perspective, the most complex task in evidence-based medicine lies in the communication of specialized medical knowledge to non-professionals. Information is never simply the neutral transmission of facts, not even when dealing with scientific knowledge and research. It is always interpreted and evaluated from a particular perspective in a specific context. That information can be neutral is thus a myth. In all medical consultations the process of communication is not just a matter of transmitting information from one who knows to one who does not. Knowledge created and formulated in a scientific context is thus recontextualised first in a clinical situation and then as an interpreted version in people's real lives. Furthermore there are difficulties when practice must be based on current research, in a situation in which no prior clinical experience exists and in which results are interpreted and used regardless of the relative certainty of current evidence.

  11. Evidence-based hypnotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy (CH) is a comprehensive evidence-based hypnotherapy for clinical depression. This article describes the major components of CH, which integrate hypnosis with cognitive-behavior therapy as the latter provides an effective host theory for the assimilation of empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various theoretical models of psychotherapy and psychopathology. CH meets criteria for an assimilative model of psychotherapy, which is considered to be an efficacious model of psychotherapy integration. The major components of CH for depression are described in sufficient detail to allow replication, verification, and validation of the techniques delineated. CH for depression provides a template that clinicians and investigators can utilize to study the additive effects of hypnosis in the management of other psychological or medical disorders. Evidence-based hypnotherapy and research are encouraged; such a movement is necessary if clinical hypnosis is to integrate into mainstream psychotherapy.

  12. Evidence-based management of central cord syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdaleh, Nader S; Lawton, Cort D; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y; Nixon, Alexander T; El Tecle, Najib E; Oh, Sanders; Fessler, Richard G; Smith, Zachary A

    2013-07-01

    Evidence-based medicine is used to examine the current treatment options, timing of surgical intervention, and prognostic factors in the management of patients with traumatic central cord syndrome (TCCS). A computerized literature search of the National Library of Medicine database, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar was performed for published material between January 1966 and February 2013 using key words and Medical Subject Headings. Abstracts were reviewed and selected, with the articles segregated into 3 main categories: surgical versus conservative management, timing of surgery, and prognostic factors. Evidentiary tables were then assembled, summarizing data and quality of evidence (Classes I-III) for papers included in this review. The authors compiled 3 evidentiary tables summarizing 16 studies, all of which were retrospective in design. Regarding surgical intervention versus conservative management, there was Class III evidence to support the superiority of surgery for patients presenting with TCCS. In regards to timing of surgery, most Class III evidence demonstrated no difference in early versus late surgical management. Most Class III studies agreed that older age, especially age greater than 60-70 years, correlated with worse outcomes. No Class I or Class II evidence was available to determine the efficacy of surgery, timing of surgical intervention, or prognostic factors in patients managed for TCCS. Hence, there is a need to perform well-controlled prospective studies and randomized controlled clinical trials to further investigate the optimal management (surgical vs conservative) and timing of surgical intervention in patients suffering from TCCS.

  13. The Evidence Base of Czech Health Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Klusáček; Marie Klusáčková

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the evidence base of health policy in the Czech Republic. It focuses on articles published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals. It builds on a quantitative analysis of articles published between 2005 and 2010 in scholarly journals in the fields of social science, management and administration, public health and other relevant fields. The main finding is that almost half of the 161 articles with potential use for health policy were published in a single journal, Zdravotn...

  14. Evidence-based medicine in metastatic spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-06-01

    Treatment modalities for metastatic spine disease have significantly expanded over the last two decades. This expansion occurred in many different fields. Improvement in surgical techniques and instrumentation now allow the oncologic spine surgeons to effectively circumferentially decompress the neural elements without compromising stability. Percutaneous techniques, both vertebral augmentation and pre-operative endovascular embolization procedures, also greatly benefit patients suffering from spinal column metastasis. Imaging technology advances has contributed to better pre-operative planning and the development of highly conformational radiation techniques, thus permitting the delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors, while avoiding radiotoxicity to the spinal cord and other vital structures. These new developments, combined with evidence-based stability and disease-specific quality of life scores now allow not only better treatment, but also a solid foundation for high-quality research. Spine oncology literature currently suffers from a lack of high-quality evidence due to low prevalence of the disease and complex methodological issues. However, when following evidence-based medicine principles, which incorporate best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, sound, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding the abovementioned treatment modalities.

  15. Evidence-based health information and risk competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Albrecht, Martina; Steckelberg, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Consumers and patients want to be included in decisions regarding their own health and have an ethically justified claim on informed decisions. Therefore, sound information is required, but health information is often misleading and based on different interests. The risks of disease and the benefits of medical interventions tend to be overestimated, whereas harm is often underestimated. Evidence-based health information has to fulfil certain criteria, for instance, it should be evidence-based, independent, complete, true as well as understandable. The aim of a medical intervention has to be explained. The different therapeutic options including the option not to intervene have to be delineated. The probabilities for success, lack of success and unwanted side effects have to be communicated in a numerical and understandable manner. Patients have the right to reject medical interventions without any sanctions.

  16. [Acupressure and Evidence-Based Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Li; Lin, Jun-Dai

    2015-12-01

    Acupressure is a traditional Chinese medicine approach to disease prevention and treatment that may be operated by nurses independently. Therefore, acupressure is being increasingly applied in clinical nursing practice and research. Recently, the implementation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) in clinical practice has been encouraged to promote nursing quality. Evidence-based nursing is a method-ology and process of implementation that applies the best-available evidence to clinical practice, which is acquired through the use of empirical nursing research. Therefore, in this paper, we address the topic of acupressure within the context of empirical nursing practice. We first introduce the current status of acupressure research and provide the locations of common acupoints in order to guide future empirical nursing research and to help nurses use these acupoints in clinical practice. Finally, we describe the steps that are necessary to apply the current empirical information on acupressure as well as provide suggestions to promote safety and efficacy in order to guide nurses in the accurate application of acupressure in nursing practice.

  17. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Hearing Preservation Outcomes in Patients With Sporadic Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Matthew L; Vivas, Esther X; McCracken, D Jay; Sweeney, Alex D; Neff, Brian A; Shepard, Neil T; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2018-02-01

    What is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. Among patients with AAO-HNS (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery hearing classification) class A or GR (Gardner-Robertson hearing classification) grade I hearing at baseline, what is the overall probability of maintaining serviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery, utilizing modern dose planning, at 2, 5, and 10 yr following treatment? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled that there is a high probability (>75%-100%) of hearing preservation at 2 yr, moderately high probability (>50%-75%) of hearing preservation at 5 yr, and moderately low probability (>25%-50%) of hearing preservation at 10 yr. What patient- and tumor-related factors influence progression to nonserviceable hearing following stereotactic radiosurgery using ≤13 Gy to the tumor margin? Level 3: Individuals who meet these criteria and are considering stereotactic radiosurgery should be counseled regarding the probability of successful hearing preservation based on the following prognostic data: the most consistent prognostic features associated with maintenance of serviceable hearing are good preoperative word recognition and/or pure tone thresholds with variable cut-points reported, smaller tumor size, marginal tumor dose ≤12 Gy, and cochlear dose ≤4 Gy. Age and sex are not strong predictors of hearing preservation outcome. What is the overall probability of maintaining

  18. Evidence-Based Interactive Management of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Fleischmann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based interactive management of change means hands-on experience of modified work processes, given evidence of change. For this kind of pro-active organizational development support we use an organisational process memory and a communication-based representation technique for role-specific and task-oriented process execution. Both are effective means for organizations becoming agile through interactively modelling the business at the process level and re-constructing or re-arranging process representations according to various needs. The tool allows experiencing role-specific workflows, as the communication-based refinement of work models allows for executable process specifications. When presenting the interactive processes to individuals involved in the business processes, changes can be explored interactively in a context-sensitive way before re-implementing business processes and information systems. The tool is based on a service-oriented architecture and a flexible representation scheme comprising the exchange of message between actors, business objects and actors (roles. The interactive execution of workflows does not only enable the individual reorganization of work but also changes at the level of the entire organization due to the represented interactions.

  19. Cellulite: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2015-08-01

    Cellulite is a multifactorial condition that is present in 80-90 % of post-pubertal women. Despite its high prevalence, it remains a major cosmetic concern for women. A wide range of products and treatments for cellulite reduction is available; however, no systematic review has been performed so far to evaluate the efficacy of the available treatment options for cellulite. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatments for cellulite reduction. This systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Only original articles in English or German reporting data on the efficacy of cellulite treatments from in vivo human studies were considered. In total, 67 articles were analyzed for the following information: therapy, presence of a control group, randomization, blinding, sample size, description of statistical methods, results, and level of evidence. Most of the evaluated studies, including laser- and light-based modalities, radiofrequency, and others had important methodological flaws; some did not use cellulite severity as an endpoint or did not provide sufficient statistical analyses. Of the 67 studies analyzed in this review, only 19 were placebo-controlled studies with randomization. Some evidence for potential benefit was only seen for acoustic wave therapy (AWT) and the 1440 nm Nd:YAG minimally invasive laser. This article provides a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatment for cellulite reduction. No clear evidence of good efficacy could be identified in any of the evaluated cellulite treatments.

  20. [Acute bronchiolitis: evaluation of evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, F; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Martinón Sánchez, J M

    2001-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and produces significant morbidity. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of this disease and, in many cases, the therapy employed is controversial and mainly based on general recommendations and not on evidence-based strategies. This report uses evidence-based methodology to provide a critical review of the data available on the treatment of acute bronchiolitis (understood as the first episode of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in a previously healthy infant). After this analysis, we conclude that the only justifiable therapeutic interventions in these patients are supportive treatment, nebulized epinephrine and mechanical ventilation. Other therapies such us physiotherapy, nebulization, heliox, anticholinergics or exogenous surfactant, among others, require further randomized controlled trials to determine their utility. No evidence supports the routine use of corticosteroids, beta-adrenergic drugs, antibiotics, immunoglobulins, interferon, vitamin A or ribavirin in these patients. Finally, we consider that a national consensus review for the implementation of evidence-based clinical practical guidelines on the management of acute bronchiolitis would be of great interest.

  1. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: combined multimarker screening and randomised patient treatment with ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Neil; Wright, David; Rolnik, Daniel L; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Poon, Liona C

    2016-06-28

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) affects 2-3% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin in women at risk for PE may substantially reduce the prevalence of the disease. Effective screening for PE requiring delivery before 37 weeks (preterm PE) can be provided by a combination of maternal factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor at 11-13 weeks' gestation, with a detection rate of 75% at a false-positive rate of 10%. We present a protocol (V.6, date 25 January 2016) for the ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE) trial, which is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial (RCT) that uses an effective PE screening programme to determine whether low-dose aspirin given to women from 11 to 13 weeks' gestation will reduce the incidence of preterm PE. All eligible women attending for their first trimester scan will be invited to participate in the screening study for preterm PE. Those found to be at high risk of developing preterm PE will be invited to participate in the RCT. Further scans will be conducted for assessment of fetal growth and biomarkers. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes will be collected and analysed. The first enrolment for the pilot study was in April 2014. As of April 2016, 26 670 women have been screened and 1760 recruited to the RCT. The study is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry. ISRCTN13633058. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on the Role of Imaging in the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ian F; Bi, Wenya Linda; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Delman, Bradley N; Parish, John; Atkins, Tyler; Asher, Anthony L; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-20

    associated with rapid growth, lower rates of complete resection, and facial nerve outcomes that may be inferior in the immediate postoperative period but similar to noncystic schwannomas over time. Should the extent of lateral internal auditory canal involvement be considered by treating physicians? Adult patients with vestibular schwannomas. Level 3: The degree of lateral internal auditory canal involvement by tumor adversely affects facial nerve and hearing outcomes and should be emphasized when interpreting imaging for preoperative planning. How should patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and vestibular schwannoma be imaged and over what follow-up period? Adult patients with NF2 and vestibular schwannomas. Level 3: In general, vestibular schwannomas associated with NF2 should be imaged (similar to sporadic schwannomas) with the following caveats: 1. More frequent imaging may be adopted in NF2 patients because of a more variable growth rate for vestibular schwannomas, and annual imaging may ensue once the growth rate is established. 2. In NF2 patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas, growth rate of a vestibular schwannoma may increase after resection of the contralateral tumor, and therefore, more frequent imaging may be indicated, based on the nonoperated tumor's historical rate of growth. 3. Careful consideration should be given to whether contrast is necessary in follow-up studies or if high-resolution T2 (including CISS or FIESTA-type sequences) MRI may adequately characterize changes in lesion size instead. How long should vestibular schwannomas be imaged after surgery, including after gross-total, near-total, and subtotal resection? Adult patients with vestibular schwannomas followed after surgery. Level 3: For patients receiving gross total resection, a postoperative MRI may be considered to document the surgical impression and may occur as late as 1 yr after surgery. For patients not receiving gross total resection, more frequent surveillance scans

  3. [Transformative Care Rooted in Evidence-Based Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Liao, Mei-Nan

    2017-02-01

    As clinical scientists on the interdisciplinary healthcare team, nurses use the art and science of current nursing knowledge to provide evidence-based healthcare to each patient and his/her family. Nurses not only comprise the largest contingent of medical personnel and provide 24-hour patient care but are also professional scientists that develop unique nursing knowledge through reflective practice. Five strategies for expanding the body of current evidence-based nursing scientific knowledge include: (1) reflecting empirically on the practice-service domain, (2) developing nursing knowledge using rigorous methodology, (3) emancipating nursing knowledge using innovative transformation, (4) using collaborative interdisciplinary healthcare that is based in patient-centered care, and (5) initiating innovative transformation in nursing education. Nurses are critical healthcare providers that make important contributions to today's healthcare system. Nursing scientists provide frontline, evidence-based transforming care that deserves to be respected and valued on an equal basis with the care and services that are provided by other medical personnel.

  4. Evidence based medicine in physical medicine and rehabilitation (English version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Kern

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years the term “Evidence Based Medicine (EBM” has spread into all areas of medicine and is often used for decision-making in the medical and public health sector. It is also used to verify the significance and/or the effectiveness of different therapies. The definition of EBM is to use the physician’s individual expertise, the patient’s needs and the best external evidence for each individual patient. Today, however, the term EBM is often wrongly used as a synonym for best “external evidence”. This leads not only to a misuse of evidence based medicine but suggests a fundamental misunderstanding of the model which was created by Gordon Guyatt, David Sackett and Archibald Cochrane. This problem becomes even greater the more social insurance institutions, public healthcare providers and politicians use external evidence alone as a main guideline for financing therapies in physical medicine and general rehabilitation without taking into account the physician’s expertise and the patient’s needs.The wrong interpretation of EBM can lead to the following problems: well established clinical therapies are either questioned or not granted and are therefore withheld from patients (for example physical pain management. Absence of evidence for individual therapy methods does not prove their ineffectiveness! In this short statement the significance of EBM in physical medicine and general rehabilitation will be analysed and discussed.

  5. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence base for add-on treatment for patients with major depressive disorder who have not responded to antidepressant treatment: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Pauline; Kantaria, Rakesh; Young, Allan H

    2014-02-01

    Previous comparative reviews of add-on therapies for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with an inadequate response to antidepressants have not used meta-analytic techniques to compare different drug classes and have included non-licensed therapies. This meta-analysis reviewed all published peer-reviewed evidence for the efficacy of EU-licensed therapies in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to antidepressant monotherapy. Papers concerning randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were identified using criteria from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Add-on therapies reviewed were antidepressants, quetiapine XR, lithium, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe). Seven RCTs that reported response and remission in a way that allowed quantitative analysis were included in this meta-analysis. Comparison of the different drug classes indicated that most interventions had similar efficacy. The likelihood of response was significantly greater with SAMe versus placebo and lithium and with quetiapine XR versus placebo. Most add-on interventions demonstrated comparable efficacy in patients with MDD and an inadequate response to initial antidepressants. However, there is currently a paucity of high-quality data regarding the use of add-on treatments in patients with MDD who are inadequate responders to antidepressants, with quetiapine XR presenting the most comprehensive evidence base to date.

  6. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper......The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care......, postoperative detection of delirium and management of delirious patients. The scope of this guideline is not to cover ICU delirium. Considering that many medical disciplines are involved in the treatment of surgical patients, a team-based approach should be implemented into daily practice. This guideline...

  7. Evidence based medicine (EBM) and evidence based radiology (EBR) in the follow-up of the patients after surgery for lung and colon-rectal carcinoma; Medicina basata sulle evidenze (EMB) e radiologia basata sulle evidenze (EBR) nel follow-up dei pazienti operati per tumore del polmone e del colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovagnoni, Andrea; Ottaviani, Letizia; Mensa' , Anna; Durastanti, Martina; Floriani, Irene; Cascinu, Stefano [Marche Univ., Ancona (Italy). Azienda ospedaliera Umberto I, Istituto di radiologia, oncologia clinica

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: a) To define the role of diagnostic imaging modalities in the follow-up of patients after surgery for solid cancer, using an Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) approach; b) to asses the possible discrepancies between the theoretical model and the clinical protocols currently used for the follow-up of treated patients; c) to compare the real costs of the radiological examinations performed in a group of cancer patients followed up after surgery and the theoretical costs that would have been incurred had the patients been followed up according to the theoretical (evidence-based) follow-up programme. Materials and methods: We searched traditional and secondary databases for research papers and guidelines by international scientific societies published in the last 10 years and concerning the clinical impact of follow-up programs in patients operated on for colorectal and lung carcinoma. The papers were selected based on level of evidence using the systematic review approach of EBM. In each paper selected, we considered the overall survival and disease-free survival, quality of life, side and toxic effects of therapy, cost and psychological aspects to formulate a judgement on the usefulness the radiological tests. Subsequently, the clinical and imaging follow-up of 40 patients who had undergone surgical resection for colorectal cancer (20 patients) and lung cancer (20 patients) between 1998 and 2004 were retrospectively reviewed, and the costs of the follow-up programs for the two groups, were analysed and compared with those of the theoretical evidence-based programmes. Results: Of the 41 papers selected after systematic review only nine datasets were considered for our final analysis. The majority of papers (7 out of 9) and all the guidelines published by International Scientific Societies agreed on the poor value of closed imaging in the follow-up of patients who have undergone surgery for colorectal and lung cancer. A significant difference was found between the

  8. Evidence-Based Advances in Rodent Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2017-09-01

    The number of exotic companion pet rodents seen in veterinary practices is growing very rapidly. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association's surveys, more than 2,093,000 pet rodents were kept in US households in 2007 and in 2012 it was more than 2,349,000 animals. This article summarizes the most important evidence-based knowledge in exotic pet rodents (diagnostics of the hyperadrenocorticism in guinea pigs, pituitary tumors in rats, urolithiasis in guinea pigs, use of itopride as prokinetics, use of deslorelin acetate in rodents, cause of dental disease, and prevention of mammary gland tumors in rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A conceptual model for growing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vratny, Amy; Shriver, Deb

    2007-01-01

    Nursing administration at a small medical center is developing and implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) model of care to support a culture of quality care, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. The purpose of this article is to describe a conceptual model for EBP that addresses how to overcome barriers to implementation. Clinician expertise and values, experience, patient preference and expectation, and caring become grounded in a practice environment that must strive to become rooted in clinical research to evolve into a practice that is evidence-based. Education helps to nourish EBP, but leadership, enthusiasm, mentorship, clinical inquiry, and reflective practice make EBP thrive. The EBP ambassadors branch out to each department to grow journal clubs, EBP Web pages, EBP projects, research utilization projects, and staff-led practice reviews. The fruits are quality patient care and outcomes, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth.

  12. Factors that influence effective evidence-based medicine instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a health care practice is being incorporated into education programs across the spectrum of medical education to develop lifelong learning skills and to enhance the practice of evidence-based health care. Since improving the quality of patient care is the ultimate goal of EBM, EBM learning must be integrated with clinical application, and resulted outcomes must be reflected in learning transfer (or EBM practice) within the context of solving patient problems. Different factors may constitute the context or environment in which EBM is learned, practiced, and sustained. However, these contextual factors are seldom considered and examined in the development, implementation, and evaluation of EBM instruction for learners at different levels. This article will introduce several contextual factors as tips and strategies that affect EBM learning and transfer. Also included in the article are recommended practices for designing effective EBM instruction that would contribute to a sustainable change in learner behavior.

  13. Patients' Perceptions of a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Care Bundle in Hospital: A Qualitative Descriptive Study to Guide Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; Wallis, Marianne; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Banks, Merrilyn; Ball, Lauren; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-10-01

    Pressure ulcers place a significant burden on patients and hospitals. Our team developed and tested a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle (PUPCB) in a cluster randomized trial. As part of the process evaluation conducted alongside the trial, we explored patients' perceptions of the intervention. To identify patients' perceptions and experiences of a PUPCB in hospital. This qualitative descriptive study explored the perceptions of a subset of patients who participated in a trial testing the PUPCB across four intervention hospitals. A trained interviewer conducted semistructured interviews, which were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Nineteen patients were interviewed across the four hospitals. Three main themes emerged: (a) importance of personal contact in PUPCB delivery; (b) understanding pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) enhances participation; and (c) individual factors impact patients' engagement in PUP. The extent to which patients adopted the intervention appeared to be influenced by the complexity of education materials, compatibility with patients' existing knowledge and beliefs, and perceived advantage of the intervention; ability for human interaction; and patient-related facilitators and barriers to participating in PUP care. This study found patients accepted a PUPCB that encouraged participation in care, particularly as it involved personal and positive interactions with nurses and provision of information that was easy to understand and resonated with patients. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  14. Translating Clinical Evidence-Based Medicine into the Real World: Single-Center Experience with Cabazitaxel in Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriceau, Guillaume; Guillot, Aline; Pacaut, Cécile; Méry, Benoîte; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Collard, Olivier; De Laroche, Guy; Fournel, Pierre; Merrouche, Yacine; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and safety of cabazitaxel in unselected real-life patients. We retrospectively investigated all patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) treated with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 i.v. every 3 weeks combined with oral prednisolone (10 mg once daily) after first-line docetaxel chemotherapy. Study issues were to report patient characteristics and cabazitaxel data in terms of tolerance and efficacy. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All data were compared with TROPIC results. From 2011 to 2014, 41 patients received cabazitaxel; 15 patients (37%) had a performance status (PS) ≥2 versus 7% (p cabazitaxel cycles was 5 (1-10) versus 6 (3-10) in TROPIC. Five patients completed 10 cycles of cabazitaxel (12%) versus 28% in TROPIC (p = 0.03). Toxicities were anemia (12 patients, 29%), diarrhea (9 patients, 22%), nausea (7 patients, 17%), pain (6 patients, 15%), sepsis (4 patients, 10%), neutropenia (3 patients, 7%) and urinary tract infection (1 patient, 2%). The tumor response rate was 19.5 versus 14.4% in TROPIC (nonsignificant). PFS was 4.5 months (95% CI 3.3-6.4) in our analysis and 2.8 months (95% CI 2.4-3.0) in TROPIC. OS was 12.1 months (95% CI 9.2 to not reached) and 15.1 months (95% CI 14.1-16.3), respectively. In our unselected mPC patients with poorer baseline clinical conditions and aggressive disease, cabazitaxel seems efficient and not more toxic than in the TROPIC study. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The personalised medicine: a paradigm of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhavendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of "evidence-based medicine" aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the individualised patient care. The clinical genetics evolved from translational genetics research and contributes to the clinical care of patients and families through evidence-based health care in managing inherited disorders through accurate diagnosis, molecular pathology and assessing phenotypic correlations. Translational genetics and genomics research has led to the development of powerful tools for clinical diagnosis, assessing individual's genomic profile for disease prediction/prevention, high-throughput genome-wide screening for predisposition and/or protection to complex medical conditions, and discovery and development of new drugs and vaccines. Gene mapping and deciphering pathogenic mutations have helped in unravelling the basic biological mechanisms leading to new drug discovery and development. Targeted pharmacotherapy is now possible for managing the highly penetrant multi-system dominantly inherited conditions. Notable examples include rapamycin (sirolimus in suppressing the mTOR pathway associated hamartomas in dominantly inherited cancer family syndromes and angiotensin converting enzyme receptor blockers (ACE-RB in preventing aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome and related familial arteriopathies. The translational genomic research is the essential prerequisite for developing sound evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic clinical protocols for the practice of personalised clinical medicine.

  16. Developing traditional chinese medicine in the era of evidence-based medicine: current evidences and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Foon Yin; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM), by integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research, has in recent years been established as the standard of modern medical practice for greater treatment efficacy and safety. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on the other hand, evolved as a system of medical practice from ancient China more than 2000 years ago based on empirical knowledge as well as theories and concepts which are yet to be mapped by scientific equivalents. Despite the expanding TCM usage and the recognition of its therapeutic benefits worldwide, the lack of robust evidence from the EBM perspective is hindering acceptance of TCM by the Western medicine community and its integration into mainstream healthcare. For TCM to become an integral component of the healthcare system so that its benefits can be rationally harnessed in the best interests of patients, it is essential for TCM to demonstrate its efficacy and safety by high-level evidence in accordance with EBM, though much debate remains on the validity and feasibility of applying the EBM model on this traditional practice. This review aims to discuss the current status of research in TCM, explore the evidences available on its efficacy and safety, and highlight the issues and challenges faced in applying EBM to TCM.

  17. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Stiggelbout AM, De Haes J. Patient preference for cancer therapy: an overview of measurement approaches. Journal of Clinical Oncology . 2001;19(1):220-30...life hospital costs in cancer patients : do advance directive or routes of hospital admission make a difference? Oncology 2011;80:118–22. 4...found in the following collections Ethics (33 articles) Geriatric medicine (94 articles) Health services research (491 articles) Palliative care (28 articles) Patient -centred medicine (151 articles)

  18. Information provision in medical libraries: An evidence based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined information provision in special libraries such as medical libraries. It provides an overview of evidence based practice as a concept for information provision by librarians. It specifically proffers meaning to the term evidence as used in evidence based practice and to evidence based medicine from where ...

  19. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This first of three articles on evidence-based dental practice discusses the historical background of evidence-based medicine/evidence-based dentistry, how to formulate clear clinical questions and how to track down (search) the available evidence in the literature databases. Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine ...

  20. Evaluation of an evidence-based guideline for bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlstein, P H; Kotagal, U R; Bolling, C; Steele, R; Schoettker, P J; Atherton, H D; Farrell, M K

    1999-12-01

    To describe the effect of implementing an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the inpatient care of infants with bronchiolitis at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. A multidisciplinary team generated the guideline for infants first-time episode of typical bronchiolitis. The guideline was implemented January 15, 1997, and data on all patients admitted with bronchiolitis from that date through March 27, 1997, were compared with data on similar patients admitted in the same periods in the years 1993 through 1996. Data were extracted from hospital charts and clinical and financial databases. They included LOS and use and costs of resources ancillary to bed occupancy. After implementation of the guideline, admissions decreased 29% and mean LOS decreased 17%. Nasopharyngeal washings for respiratory syncytial virus were obtained in 52% fewer patients. Twenty percent fewer chest radiographs were ordered. There were significant reductions in the use of all respiratory therapies, with a 30% decrease in the use of at least 1 beta-agonist inhalation therapy. In addition, 51% fewer repeated inhalations were administered. Mean costs for all resources ancillary to bed occupancy decreased 37%. Mean costs for respiratory care services decreased 77%. An evidence-based clinical practice guideline for managing bronchiolitis was highly successful in modifying care during its first year of implementation.guideline, bronchiolitis, evidence-based medicine, pediatrics, outcome research.

  1. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – II. CLINICAL USE AND CRITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Čuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence-based medicine employs systematic searching, evaluation and use of current research findings as the basis for clinical decision-making. However, there are some problems and uncertainties hindering introduction and spreading of the use of the method in clinical practice. Physicians often have no time for literature searching and for use of the method in practice. For certain questions in clinical practice there are no answers in medical literature. Most of the evidences in medical literature are only available in English. Introduction of the method is hampered also by the fact that clinical decision-making is complex and does not allow procedures prescribed in advance. Rigidity and universality of decisions resulting from the evidence may appear impersonal and may affect the relationship between the physician and the patient. Trends towards evidence based medicine are followed also by big multinational pharmaceutical corporations. They carry out large and expensive clinical trials using the results for promotional purposes. In this way, they get the competitive advantage and influence the objectivity of physicians’ clinical decision-making.Conclusions. With introduction of evidence based medicine into clinical practice physicians acquire new information and use a new form of continuing education by following new developments in their field. This way, new findings from medical literature get into clinical practice faster and more efficiently. In addition, physicians get more professional satisfaction and quality in clinical practice is higher.

  2. Barriers to compliance with evidence-based care in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nadine; Barnes, Sunni; Fleming, Neil; Kudyakov, Rustam; Ballard, David; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-03-01

    We have preciously demonstrated that trauma patients receive less than two-thirds of the care recommended by evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this study was to identify patients least likely to receive optimal care. Records of a random sample of 774 patients admitted to a Level I trauma center (2006-2008) with moderate to severe injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3) were reviewed for compliance with 25 trauma-specific processes of care (T-POC) endorsed by Advanced Trauma Life Support, Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Brain Trauma Foundation, Surgical Care Improvement Project, and the Glue Grant Consortium based on evidence or consensus. These encompassed all aspects of trauma care, including initial evaluation, resuscitation, operative care, critical care, rehabilitation, and injury prevention. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify patients likely to receive recommended care. Study patients were eligible for a total of 2,603 T-POC, of which only 1,515 (58%) were provided to the patient. Compliance was highest for T-POC involving resuscitation (83%) and was lowest for neurosurgical interventions (17%). Increasing severity of head injuries was associated with lower compliance, while intensive care unit stay was associated with higher compliance. There was no relationship between compliance and patient demographics, socioeconomic status, overall injury severity, or daily volume of trauma admissions. Little over half of recommended care was delivered to trauma patients with moderate to severe injuries. Patients with increasing severity of traumatic brain injuries were least likely to receive optimal care. However, differences among patient subgroups are small in relation to the overall gap between observed and recommended care. II.

  3. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Emerging Therapies for the Treatment of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gompel, Jamie J; Agazzi, Siviero; Carlson, Matthew L; Adewumi, Dare A; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Uhm, Joon H; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-20

    Adults with histologically proven or suspected vestibular schwannomas with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). What is the role of bevacizumab in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannomas? Level 3: It is recommended that bevacizumab be administered in order to radiographically reduce the size or prolong tumor stability in patients with NF2 without surgical options. Level 3: It is recommended that bevacizumab be administered to improve hearing or prolong time to hearing loss in patients with NF2 without surgical options. Is there a role for lapatinib, erlotinib, or everolimus in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannomas? Level 3: Lapatinib may be considered for use in reducing vestibular schwannoma size and improvement in hearing in NF2. Level 3: Erlotinib is not recommended for use in reducing vestibular schwannoma size or improvement in hearing in patients with NF2. Level 3: Everolimus is not recommended for use in reducing vestibular schwannoma size or improvement in hearing in NF2. What is the role of aspirin, to augment inflammatory response, in the treatment of patients with vestibular schwannomas? Any patient with a vestibular schwannoma undergoing observation. Level 3: It is recommended that aspirin administration may be considered for use in patients undergoing observation of their vestibular schwannomas. Is there a role for treatment of vasospasm, ie, nimodipine or hydroxyethyl starch, perioperatively to improve facial nerve outcomes in patients with vestibular schwannomas? Adults with histologically proven or suspected vestibular schwannomas. Level 3: Perioperative treatment with nimodipine (or with the addition of hydroxyethyl starch) should be considered to improve postoperative facial nerve outcomes and may improve hearing outcomes. Is there a role for preoperative vestibular rehab or vestibular ablation with gentamicin for patients surgically treated for vestibular schwannomas? Adults with histologically proven or suspected

  4. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  5. Is evidence-based medicine about democratizing medical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorgård, Keld

    2014-01-01

    The authoritarian standpoint in medicine has been under challenge by various groups and researchers since the 1980s. The challenges have been ethical, political and medical, with patient movements at the forefront. Over the past decade, however, a deep challenge has been posed by evidence-based...... medicine (EBM), which has challenged the entire strategy of medical treatment from the point of view of a self-critical, anti-authoritarian and hereby also (it has been claimed) a more democratic medical practice. Previously, the challenges arose out of the patient rights perspective. EBM, by contrast...

  6. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  7. Treating PTSD in patients with psychosis: a within-group controlled feasibility study examining the efficacy and safety of evidence-based PE and EMDR protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Paul A J M; van Minnen, Agnes; de Jongh, Ad

    2013-12-01

    The present study uses a within-group controlled design to examine the efficacy and safety of two psychological approaches to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 10 patients with a concurrent psychotic disorder. Patients were randomly assigned either to prolonged exposure (PE; N=5) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR; N=5). Before, during, and after treatment, a total of 20 weekly assessments of PTSD symptoms, hallucinations, and delusions were carried out. Twelve weekly assessments of adverse events took place during the treatment phase. PTSD diagnosis, level of social functioning, psychosis-prone thinking, and general psychopathology were assessed pretreatment, posttreatment, and at three-month follow-up. Throughout the treatment, adverse events were monitored at each session. An intention-to-treat analysis of the 10 patients starting treatment showed that the PTSD treatment protocols of PE and EMDR significantly reduced PTSD symptom severity; PE and EMDR were equally effective and safe. Eight of the 10 patients completed the full intervention period. Seven of the 10 patients (70%) no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD at follow-up. No serious adverse events occurred, nor did patients show any worsening of hallucinations, delusions, psychosis proneness, general psychopathology, or social functioning. The results of this feasibility trial suggest that PTSD patients with comorbid psychotic disorders benefit from trauma-focused treatment approaches such as PE and EMDR. © 2013.

  8. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: Best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 1: Coagulopathy as a risk factor in warfarinised head injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendell, Simon

    2014-04-01

    A short-cut review was carried out to determine whether the International Normalised Ratio (INR) value was a predictor of the risk of intracranial haemorrhage in patients taking warfarin after head injury. 796 papers were found using the reported search, of which eighteen were directly relevant. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses are shown in the accompanying table. It is concluded that level of the INR correlates poorly with the risk of haemorrhage and that the risk of haemorrhage remains significant even in patients with a sub-therapeutic INR.

  9. Validating evidence based decision making in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüssler, Emil Karl; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær; Håkonsson, Dorthe Døjbak

    Surgeons who perform prolapse surgeries face the dilemma of choosing to use mesh, with its assumed benefits, and the risks associated with mesh. In this paper, we examine whether decisions to use mesh is evidence based. Based on data of 30,398 patients from the Swedish National Quality Register...... of Gynecological Surgery we examine factors related to decisions to use mesh. Our results indicate that decisions to use mesh are not evidence based, and cannot be explained neither by FDA safety communications, nor by medical conditions usually assumed to predict its usage. Instead, decisions to use mesh...... are highly influenced by the geographical placement of surgeons. Therfore, decisions to use mesh are boundedly rationality, rather than rational....

  10. The implications of a growing evidence base for drug use in elderly patients. Part 4. Vitamin D and bisphosphonates for fractures and osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dhesi, J K; Allain, T J; Mangoni, A A; Jackson, S H D

    2006-01-01

    Fractures are common in elderly subjects, disabling and occasionally fatal. Their incidence increases exponentially with age, with the commonest affected sites being the wrist, vertebrae, hip and humerus. Of these, hip fractures are the most relevant in terms of morbidity and financial cost. The increase in fracture rate with age is believed to result predominantly from age-related increases in the incidence of osteoporosis and falls. This article reviews the evidence for the use of vitamin D...

  11. Evidence-based resources and the role of librarians in developing evidence-based practice curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Mary L; Weiss, Patricia M

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) requires acquisition and use of a complex set of skills, including the ability to locate and critically evaluate clinically relevant research literature. In this article, we discuss information resources and tools that may be of value to educators faced with the task of teaching students to search for and evaluate research-based evidence. In addition, we discuss how health sciences librarians, with the use of new models of information instruction and delivery, can work with nursing faculty in developing curricula for training students in EBP.

  12. Evidence-based medicine: what it can and cannot do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddi, Goffredo; Romàn-Pumar, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a old hat, a "cookbook" medicine perpetrated by arrogant to serve cost cutters to suppress clinical freedom, a mandatory, deterministic, totalitarian practice of medicine, a way to control cost and to ignore patient preferences, a limit to personal/ humanistic/individual medicine. EBM is a reference of excellence to guide clinical decisions, the integration of own expertise with others' expertise and patient preferences, a way to improve medical practice and limit the variability and errors created when there is not evidence to identify the gold standard and differentiate among alternatives available. But evidences need to be integrated with a new thinking based on Complexity Science. Health care systems operates as complex adaptative systems rather than rigid, linear or mechanical organizations and innovation is a critical outcome of Complexity Science. How does EBM impact drug innovation? New drug approvals are not keeping pace with rising Research and Development spending, clinical approval success rate for new chemical entities (NCEs) is progressively dropping and maybe, through these indicators, we are seeing the worst face of EBM: its limiting, blocking, and controlling side. If that is the case, EBM is the main ally to keep the economy of health systems under control and the great excuse to block the access of the innovation to patients. Certainly not the best way to maximize the benefits of EBM.

  13. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  14. Evidence-based medicine: what it can and cannot do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffredo Freddi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM is not a old hat, a "cookbook" medicine perpetrated by arrogant to serve cost cutters to suppress clinical freedom, a mandatory, deterministic, totalitarian practice of medicine, a way to control cost and to ignore patient preferences, a limit to personal/humanistic/individual medicine. EBM is a reference of excellence to guide clinical decisions, the integration of own expertise with others' expertise and patient preferences, a way to improve medical practice and limit the variability and errors created when there is not evidence to identify the gold standard and differentiate among alternatives available. But evidences need to be integrated with a new thinking based on Complexity Science. Health care systems operates as complex adaptative systems rather than rigid, linear or mechanical organizations and innovation is a critical outcome of Complexity Science. How does EBM impact drug innovation? New drug approvals are not keeping pace with rising Research and Development spending, clinical approval success rate for new chemical entities (NCEs is progressively dropping and maybe, through these indicators, we are seeing the worst face of EBM: its limiting, blocking, and controlling side. If that is the case, EBM is the main ally to keep the economy of health systems under control and the great excuse to block the access of the innovation to patients. Certainly not the best way to maximize the benefits of EBM.

  15. Nurses' Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and the Role of Evidence-Based Practice Mentors at University Hospitals in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Hannele; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2017-02-01

    Although systematic implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential to effectively improve patient outcomes, quality, and value of care, nurses do not consistently use evidence in practice. Uptake is hampered by lack of nurses' readiness for EBP, including nurses' EBP beliefs and lack of EBP mentors. Favorable EBP beliefs are foundational to Registered Nurses' (RNs) use and integration of best evidence into clinical decision making, whereas EBP mentors are in a key role for strengthening RNs' beliefs in the value of EBP and confidence in their ability to implement EBP. Although nurses' EBP beliefs and role of BP mentors have been widely studied in countries leading the EBP movement, less is known about them in the non-English-speaking world. To determine RNs EBP beliefs and the role of EBP mentors at Finnish university hospitals and to explore the associations between RNs' EBP beliefs and sociodemographic factors. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in November-December 2014 at every university hospital in Finland with a convenience sample (n = 943) of practicing RNs. The data were collected via an electronic survey, and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. RNs reported low levels of EBP beliefs in the degree to which they believed that clinical nursing practice and their own practice were based on evidence. EBP mentors worked in many professional nursing roles. Several significant differences were found between RN's EBP beliefs and sociodemographic variables. Although RNs were familiar with and believed in the value of EBP in improving care quality and patient outcomes, their ratings were low about the degree to which they believed that clinical nursing practice and their own practice were based on evidence, indicating a modest level of individual EBP readiness among Finnish RNs required for integrating best evidence into clinical care delivery. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Evidence-based pharmacogenetics: Is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, D A; Malova, E U

    2015-01-01

    interest not only among scientists, but also among practitioners. However evidence that is actually available on some key topics may not be of sufficiently high quality to support confident conclusions. As a rule, retrospective cohort studies, also known as historical cohort studies, are carried out. The number of randomized, prospective studies is not large, though in recent years, there has been an increase in their number. However, surrogate outcomes are commonly used in the mentioned studies as trial end points. The main reason for this is the lack of sponsorship. Quite often studies are not interesting for pharmaceutical companies and are carried out within the confines of the small grants. Nevertheless, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of some pharmacogenetic tests provide the high level of evidence (pharmacogenetic testing for clopidogrel, abacavir and antineoplastic drugs) so they appear even in clinical guidelines with the evidence level IIb. It is important to mention that for certain drugs FDA has already approved pharmacogenetic testing [5]. Evidence is often inconsistent. This leads to the fact that clinical use of pharmacogenetic testing seems to be most appropriate for the management of patients with high risk of adverse drug reactions.

  17. Evidence of subannular and left ventricular morphological differences in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve stenosis: magnetic resonance imaging-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disha, Kushtrim; Dubslaff, Georg; Rouman, Mina; Fey, Beatrix; Borger, Michael A; Barker, Alex J; Kuntze, Thomas; Girdauskas, Evaldas

    2017-03-01

    Prospective analysis of left ventricular (LV) morphological/functional parameters in patients with bicuspid versus tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) stenosis undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery. A total of 190 consecutive patients with BAV ( n  = 154) and TAV stenosis ( n  = 36) (mean age 61 ± 8 years, 65% male) underwent AVR ± concomitant aortic surgery from January 2012 through May 2015. All patients underwent preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in order to evaluate: (i) left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dimensions, (ii) length of anterior mitral leaflet (AML), (iii) end-systolic and end-diastolic LV wall thickness, (iv) LV area, (v) LV end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters (LVESD, LVEDD), (vi) LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes (LVEDV, LVESV) and (vii) maximal diameter of aortic root. These parameters were compared between the two study groups. The LVOT diameter was significantly larger in BAV patients (21.7 ± 3 mm in BAV vs 18.9 ± 3 mm in TAV, P  < 0.001). Moreover, BAV patients had significantly longer AML (24 ± 3 mm in BAV vs 22 ± 4 mm in TAV, P  = 0.009). LVEDV and LVESV were significantly larger in BAV patients (LVEDV: 164.9 ± 68.4 ml in BAV groups vs 126.5 ± 53.1 ml in TAV group, P  = 0.037; LVESV: 82.1 ± 57.9 ml in BAV group vs 52.9 ± 25.7 ml in TAV group, P  = 0.008). A strong linear correlation was found between LVOT diameter and aortic annulus diameter in BAV patients ( r  = 0.7, P  < 0.001), whereas significantly weaker correlation was observed in TAV patients ( r  = 0.5, P  = 0.006, z  = 1.65, P  = 0.04). Presence of BAV morphology was independently associated with larger LVOT diameters (OR 9.0, 95% CI 1.0-81.3, P  = 0.04). We found relevant differences in LV morphological/functional parameters between BAV and TAV stenosis patients. Further investigations are warranted in order to determine the

  18. Evidence Base Update for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tristram; Iadarola, Suzannah

    2015-01-01

    This evidence base update examines the level of empirical support for interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) younger than 5 years old. It focuses on research published since a previous review in this journal (Rogers & Vismara, 2008 ). We identified psychological or behavioral interventions that had been manualized and evaluated in either (a) experimental or quasi-experimental group studies or (b) systematic reviews of single-subject studies. We extracted data from all studies that met these criteria and were published after the previous review. Interventions were categorized across two dimensions. First, primary theoretical principles included applied behavior analysis (ABA), developmental social-pragmatic (DSP), or both. Second, practice elements included scope (comprehensive or focused), modality (individual intervention with the child, parent training, or classrooms), and intervention targets (e.g., spoken language or alternative and augmentative communication). We classified two interventions as well-established (individual, comprehensive ABA and teacher-implemented, focused ABA + DSP), 3 as probably efficacious (individual, focused ABA for augmentative and alternative communication; individual, focused ABA + DSP; and focused DSP parent training), and 5 as possibly efficacious (individual, comprehensive ABA + DSP; comprehensive ABA classrooms; focused ABA for spoken communication; focused ABA parent training; and teacher-implemented, focused DSP). The evidence base for ASD interventions has grown substantially since 2008. An increasing number of interventions have some empirical support; others are emerging as potentially efficacious. Priorities for future research include improving outcome measures, developing interventions for understudied ASD symptoms (e.g., repetitive behaviors), pinpointing mechanisms of action in interventions, and adapting interventions for implementation with fidelity by community providers.

  19. Evidence-Based Guidelines to Eliminate Repetitive Laboratory Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kevin P; Levy, Kathryn; Soong, Christine; Pahwa, Amit K; Petrilli, Christopher; Ziemba, Justin B; Cho, Hyung J; Alban, Rodrigo; Blanck, Jaime F; Parsons, Andrew S

    2017-10-16

    Routine daily laboratory testing of hospitalized patients reflects a wasteful clinical practice that threatens the value of health care. Choosing Wisely initiatives from numerous professional societies have identified repetitive laboratory testing in the face of clinical stability as low value care. Although laboratory expenditure often represents less than 5% of most hospital budgets, the impact is far-reaching given that laboratory tests influence nearly 60% to 70% of all medical decisions. Excessive phlebotomy can lead to hospital-acquired anemia, increased costs, and unnecessary downstream testing and procedures. Efforts to reduce the frequency of laboratory orders can improve patient satisfaction and reduce cost without negatively affecting patient outcomes. To date, numerous interventions have been deployed across multiple institutions without a standardized approach. Health care professionals and administrative leaders should carefully strategize and optimize efforts to reduce daily laboratory testing. This review presents an evidence-based implementation blueprint to guide teams aimed at improving appropriate routine laboratory testing among hospitalized patients.

  20. Can facts trump unconditional trust? Evidence-based information halves the influence of physicians' non-evidence-based cancer screening recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Wagner, Gert G; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Informed decision making in medicine, defined as basing one's decision on the best current medical evidence, requires both informed physicians and informed patients. In cancer screening, however, studies document that these prerequisites are not yet met. Many physicians do not know or understand the medical evidence behind screening tests, do not adequately counsel (asymptomatic) people on screening, and make recommendations that conflict with existing guidelines on informed choice. Consistent with this situation, nation-wide studies showed that the general public misperceives the contribution of cancer screening but that understanding considerably improves when evidence-based information is provided. However, can evidence-based patient information about cancer screening make people also less likely to simply follow a physician's non-evidence-based advice? A national sample of 897 German citizens, surveyed in face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews, received either evidence-based (e.g., absolute risks on benefits and harms; n = 451) or non-evidence-based (e.g., relative risks on benefits only; n = 446) patient information about a cancer screening test and were then asked to make their initial cancer screening choice. Thereafter, participants received a hypothetical physician's recommendation, which was non-evidence-based in terms of existing guidelines on informed decision making (i.e., reporting either benefits or harms but not both; no provision of numbers). When provided with non-evidence-based patient information (n = 446), a mean of 33.1% of 235 participants whose initial screening choice contradicted the hypothetical physician's non-evidence-based recommendation adjusted their choice in deference to that recommendation (95% CI: 27.4 to 39.4%), whereas with evidence-based patient information (n = 451), only half as many, a mean of 16.0% of 225 (95% CI: 11.8 to 21.4%), modified their choice. Thus, evidence-based patient information makes people less

  1. Can facts trump unconditional trust? Evidence-based information halves the influence of physicians' non-evidence-based cancer screening recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Wegwarth

    Full Text Available Informed decision making in medicine, defined as basing one's decision on the best current medical evidence, requires both informed physicians and informed patients. In cancer screening, however, studies document that these prerequisites are not yet met. Many physicians do not know or understand the medical evidence behind screening tests, do not adequately counsel (asymptomatic people on screening, and make recommendations that conflict with existing guidelines on informed choice. Consistent with this situation, nation-wide studies showed that the general public misperceives the contribution of cancer screening but that understanding considerably improves when evidence-based information is provided. However, can evidence-based patient information about cancer screening make people also less likely to simply follow a physician's non-evidence-based advice? A national sample of 897 German citizens, surveyed in face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews, received either evidence-based (e.g., absolute risks on benefits and harms; n = 451 or non-evidence-based (e.g., relative risks on benefits only; n = 446 patient information about a cancer screening test and were then asked to make their initial cancer screening choice. Thereafter, participants received a hypothetical physician's recommendation, which was non-evidence-based in terms of existing guidelines on informed decision making (i.e., reporting either benefits or harms but not both; no provision of numbers. When provided with non-evidence-based patient information (n = 446, a mean of 33.1% of 235 participants whose initial screening choice contradicted the hypothetical physician's non-evidence-based recommendation adjusted their choice in deference to that recommendation (95% CI: 27.4 to 39.4%, whereas with evidence-based patient information (n = 451, only half as many, a mean of 16.0% of 225 (95% CI: 11.8 to 21.4%, modified their choice. Thus, evidence-based patient information makes

  2. A model for adapting evidence-based behavioral interventions to a new culture: HIV prevention for psychiatric patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Milton L; McKinnon, Karen; Mattos, Paulo E; Pinto, Diana; Mann, Claudio Gruber; de Oliveira, Claudia Simone Dos Santos; de Oliveira, Suely Broxado; Remien, Robert H; Elkington, Katherine S; Cournos, Francine

    2007-11-01

    As in other countries worldwide, adults with severe mental illness in Brazil have elevated rates of HIV infection relative to the general population. However, no HIV prevention interventions have been tested for efficacy with psychiatric patients in Brazil. We conducted participatory research with local providers, community leaders, patient advocates, and patients using an intervention adaptation process designed to balance fidelity to efficacious interventions developed elsewhere with fit to a new context and culture. Our process for adapting these interventions comprised four steps: (1) optimizing fidelity; (2) optimizing fit; (3) balancing fidelity and fit; and (4) pilot testing and refining the intervention. This paper describes how these steps were carried out to produce a Brazilian HIV prevention intervention for people with severe mental illness. Our process may serve as a model for adapting existing efficacious interventions to new groups and cultures, whether at a local, national, or international level.

  3. Patient adherence to evidence-based pharmacotherapy in systolic heart failure and the transition of follow-up from specialized heart failure outpatient clinics to primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Anne; Schou, Morten; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    used in the HFCs combined with prescription data from the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics. A total of 8792 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 68 years; with a mean LVEF of 30%, and 72% were males. Long-term adherence to treatment was high for the patients who...... initiated renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and beta-blockers. Adherence after 1 year was 93% for RAS inhibitors, 92% for beta-blockers, and 86% for spironolactone. After 3 years, it was 90% for RAS inhibitors, 88% for beta-blockers, and 74% for spironolactone. For patients referred back...... to their general practitioner (GP), adherence 1 year after they left the HFC was 89% for RAS inhibitors, 89% for beta-blockers, and 72% for spironolactone. CONCLUSION: In specialized outpatient HFCs, long-term adherence to RAS inhibitors and beta-blockers is close to optimal. Importantly, adherence was maintained...

  4. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  5. Evidence of susceptibility to lamivudine-based HAART and genetic stability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV co-infected patients: A South African longitudinal HBV whole genome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amponsah-Dacosta, Edina; Rakgole, J Nare; Gededzha, Maemu P; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Blackard, Jason T; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Reports on the concomitant impact of HIV co-infection and long term highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) on the genetic stability and molecular evolution of HBV are limited in sub-Saharan Africa. This retrospective study investigated the molecular evolution of chronic HBV in HIV co-infected patients on lamivudine (3TC)-based HAART over a 5year period. Four HIV co-infected patients, consecutively recruited and followed-up, were screened for hepatitis B serological markers, and their viral loads determined. The HBV genome was amplified from longitudinal samples and characterized by Bayesian inference, mutational analysis, and identification of immune selection pressure. All patients exhibited persistent chronic HBV infection at baseline, as well as over the course of follow-up despite exposure to 3TC-based HAART. The polymerase gene in all isolates was relatively variable prior to HAART initiation at baseline and during the course of follow-up, although primary drug resistance mutations were not detected. All but one patient were infected with HBV subgenotype A1. The divergence rates between baseline and the last follow-up sequences ranged from 0 to 2.0×10(-3) substitutions per site per year (s/s/y). Positive selection pressure was evident within the surface and core genes. Despite persistent HBV infection in the HIV co-infected patients exposed to long term 3TC-based HAART, the molecular evolution of HBV over a 5year period was unremarkable. In addition, HBV exhibited minimal genetic variability overtime. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of a modern neuroscience approach versus usual care evidence-based physiotherapy on pain, disability and brain characteristics in chronic spinal pain patients: protocol of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphens, Mieke; Nijs, Jo; Cagnie, Barbara; Meeus, Mira; Roussel, Nathalie; Kregel, Jeroen; Malfliet, Anneleen; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-05-08

    Among the multiple conservative modalities, physiotherapy is a commonly utilized treatment modality in managing chronic non-specific spinal pain. Despite the scientific progresses with regard to pain and motor control neuroscience, treatment of chronic spinal pain (CSP) often tends to stick to a peripheral biomechanical model, without targeting brain mechanisms. With a view to enhance clinical efficacy of existing physiotherapeutic treatments for CSP, the development of clinical strategies targeted at 'training the brain' is to be pursued. Promising proof-of-principle results have been reported for the effectiveness of a modern neuroscience approach to CSP when compared to usual care, but confirmation is required in a larger, multi-center trial with appropriate evidence-based control intervention and long-term follow-up.The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a modern neuroscience approach, compared to usual care evidence-based physiotherapy, for reducing pain and improving functioning in patients with CSP. A secondary objective entails examining the effectiveness of the modern neuroscience approach versus usual care physiotherapy for normalizing brain gray matter in patients with CSP. The study is a multi-center, triple-blind, two-arm (1:1) randomized clinical trial with 1-year follow-up. 120 CSP patients will be randomly allocated to either the experimental (receiving pain neuroscience education followed by cognition-targeted motor control training) or the control group (receiving usual care physiotherapy), each comprising of 3 months treatment. The main outcome measures are pain (including symptoms and indices of central sensitization) and self-reported disability. Secondary outcome measures include brain gray matter structure, motor control, muscle properties, and psychosocial correlates. Clinical assessment and brain imaging will be performed at baseline, post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Web-based questionnaires will be completed at

  7. Efficacy of a modern neuroscience approach versus usual care evidence-based physiotherapy on pain, disability and brain characteristics in chronic spinal pain patients: protocol of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the multiple conservative modalities, physiotherapy is a commonly utilized treatment modality in managing chronic non-specific spinal pain. Despite the scientific progresses with regard to pain and motor control neuroscience, treatment of chronic spinal pain (CSP) often tends to stick to a peripheral biomechanical model, without targeting brain mechanisms. With a view to enhance clinical efficacy of existing physiotherapeutic treatments for CSP, the development of clinical strategies targeted at ‘training the brain’ is to be pursued. Promising proof-of-principle results have been reported for the effectiveness of a modern neuroscience approach to CSP when compared to usual care, but confirmation is required in a larger, multi-center trial with appropriate evidence-based control intervention and long-term follow-up. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a modern neuroscience approach, compared to usual care evidence-based physiotherapy, for reducing pain and improving functioning in patients with CSP. A secondary objective entails examining the effectiveness of the modern neuroscience approach versus usual care physiotherapy for normalizing brain gray matter in patients with CSP. Methods/Design The study is a multi-center, triple-blind, two-arm (1:1) randomized clinical trial with 1-year follow-up. 120 CSP patients will be randomly allocated to either the experimental (receiving pain neuroscience education followed by cognition-targeted motor control training) or the control group (receiving usual care physiotherapy), each comprising of 3 months treatment. The main outcome measures are pain (including symptoms and indices of central sensitization) and self-reported disability. Secondary outcome measures include brain gray matter structure, motor control, muscle properties, and psychosocial correlates. Clinical assessment and brain imaging will be performed at baseline, post-treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Web-based

  8. [Alternative medicines and "Evidence-Based Medicine" a possible reconciliation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherweghem, J-L

    2015-09-01

    The contrast between the efficiency of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a scientific fact, and the popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) is a paradox of the art of healing. EBM is based on the paradigm of positivism and materialism while CAM are based on those of relativism and vitalism. These paradigms are diametrically opposed and the aim of an integrative medicine is aporetic. However, EBM is today in a dead end. The objective proof of a disease according to the rules of EBM is often lacking face to the expectations of patients demanding their illness to be taken into account. EBM and CAM have thus to coexist. Lessons can be drawn from CAM : patient expectations should be given a meaning and be integrated in his or her psychosocial context.

  9. Evidence-Based Reform in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Education policies should support the use of programs and practices with strong evidence of effectiveness. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) contains evidence standards and incentives to use programs that meet them. This provides a great opportunity for evidence to play a stronger role in decisions about education programs and practices.…

  10. An Australian general practice based strategy to improve chronic disease prevention, and its impact on patient reported outcomes: evaluation of the preventive evidence into practice cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark Fort; Parker, Sharon M; Litt, John; van Driel, Mieke; Russell, Grant; Mazza, Danielle; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Smith, Jane; Del Mar, Chris; Lane, Riki; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth

    2017-09-08

    Implementing evidence-based chronic disease prevention with a practice-wide population is challenging in primary care. PEP Intervention practices received education, clinical audit and feedback and practice facilitation. Patients (40‑69 years) without chronic disease from trial and control practices were invited to participate in baseline and 12 month follow up questionnaires. Patient-recalled receipt of GP services and referral, and the proportion of patients at risk were compared over time and between intervention and control groups. Mean difference in BMI, diet and physical activity between baseline and follow up were calculated and compared using a paired t-test. Change in the proportion of patients meeting the definition for physical activity diet and weight risk was calculated using McNemar's test and multilevel analysis was used to determine the effect of the intervention on follow-up scores. Five hundred eighty nine patients completed both questionnaires. No significant changes were found in the proportion of patients reporting a BP, cholesterol, glucose or weight check in either group. Less than one in six at-risk patients reported receiving lifestyle advice or referral at baseline with little change at follow up. More intervention patients reported attempts to improve their diet and reduce weight. Mean score improved for diet in the intervention group (p = 0.04) but self-reported BMI and PA risk did not significantly change in either group. There was no significant change in the proportion of patients who reported being at-risk for diet, PA or weight, and no changes in PA, diet and BMI in multilevel linear regression adjusted for patient age, sex, practice size and state. There was good fidelity to the intervention but practices varied in their capacity to address changes. The lack of measurable effect within this trial may be attributable to the complexities around behaviour change and/or system change. This trial highlights some of the challenges

  11. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Birgitta; Fogelberg-Dahm, Marie; Wadensten, Barbro

    2010-01-01

    To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction.

  13. Eminence-based medicine versus evidence-based medicine: level V evidence in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Ganley, Theodore J; Kapur, Rahul; Kelly, John; Sennett, Brian J; Bernstein, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    cannot replace individual judgment and certainly does not trump the primary medical literature. Yet when better evidence is lacking, expert opinion is valuable for even the staunchest practitioner of evidence-based medicine.

  14. An evidence-based approach to medication preparation for the surgical patient at risk for latex allergy: is it time to stop being stopper poppers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, James W; Bader, Stephen O

    2010-09-01

    The prevalence of latex allergy is increasing in surgical patient populations. Avoidance of exposure to the allergen is essential to minimizing perioperative complications in patients suspected to be at risk. Natural rubber latex has historically been ubiquitous in medical devices containing rubber. In 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began to require the labeling of medical devices made from natural rubber latex; since that time substantial progress has been made in identifying latex-free alternatives. However, the rubber stoppers commonly found in pharmaceutical vial closures are exempt from FDA labeling requirements. Examination of the clinical and basic science literature regarding pharmaceutical vial closures supports limiting the rubber stopper to a single needle puncture as a safer practice, with the caveat that no strategy exists for the complete elimination of risk as long as stoppers made from natural rubber latex are used in pharmaceutical vials intended for human use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T V

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may....... On the other hand, if started too late there is a chance that data may be lost because the technology has already been introduced into the daily clinics and physicians may be unwilling to recruit patients. Or the opposite, that the technique may have been rejected without a proper trial. In this situation...... it has been suggested to perform a so called tracker trial. In such trials protocols are more flexible without prefixed sample size and will require repeated interim analyses. Often, it will be relevant to supplement the clinical trials with data from large clinical databases - in particular when long...

  16. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  17. [Challenge of evidence-based medicine: sense and non-sense of diagnostic tests in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehouli, J; Stengel, D; Hindenburg, J; Camara, O; Porzsolt, F; Lichtenegger, W

    2001-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the synthesis of internal evidence (experience) and best external evidence (literature) aiming to solve a particular clinical problem. This paper gives an overview on different tools to appraise rationales and results of diagnostic tests such as CA-125 monitoring in patients with ovarian cancer.

  18. Time Trends in Lifestyle, Risk Factor Control, and Use of Evidence-Based Medications in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease in Europe: Results From 3 EUROASPIRE Surveys, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotseva, Kornelia; De Bacquer, Dirk; Jennings, Catriona; Gyberg, Viveca; De Backer, Guy; Rydén, Lars; Amouyel, Philippe; Bruthans, Jan; Cifkova, Renata; Deckers, Jaap W; De Sutter, Johan; Fraz, Zlatko; Graham, Ian; Keber, Irena; Lehto, Seppo; Moore, David; Pajak, Andrzej; Wood, David

    2017-12-01

    The EUROASPIRE (European Action on Secondary and Primary Prevention by Intervention to Reduce Events) cross-sectional surveys describe time trends in lifestyle and risk factor control among coronary patients between 1999 and 2013 in Belgium, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia, and the United Kingdom as part of the EuroObservational Research Programme under the auspices of European Society of Cardiology. This study sought to describe time trends in lifestyle, risk factor control, and the use of evidence-based medication in coronary patients across Europe. The EUROASPIRE II (1999 to 2000), III (2006 to 2007), and IV (2012 to 13) surveys were conducted in the same geographical areas and selected hospitals in each country. Consecutive patients (≤70 years) after coronary artery bypass graft, percutaneous coronary intervention, or an acute coronary syndrome identified from hospital records were interviewed and examined ≥6 months later with standardized methods. Of 12,775 identified coronary patients, 8,456 (66.2%) were interviewed. Proportion of current smokers was similar across the 3 surveys. Prevalence of obesity increased by 7%. The prevalence of raised blood pressure (≥140/90 mm Hg or ≥140/80 mm Hg with diabetes) dropped by 8% from EUROASPIRE III to IV, and therapeutic control of blood pressure improved with 55% of patients below target in IV. The prevalence of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥2.5 mmol/l decreased by 44%. In EUROASPIRE IV, 75% were above the target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol III surveys, but did not change between the III and IV surveys. Lifestyle habits have deteriorated over time with increases in obesity, central obesity, and diabetes and stagnating rates of persistent smoking. Although blood pressure and lipid management improved, they are still not optimally controlled and the use of evidence-based medications appears to have stalled apart from the increased use of high

  19. Informing evidence-based decision-making for patients with comorbidity: availability of necessary information in clinical trials for chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M Boyd

    Full Text Available The population with multiple chronic conditions is growing. Prior studies indicate that patients with comorbidities are frequently excluded from trials but do not address whether information is available in trials to draw conclusions about treatment effects for these patients.We conducted a literature survey of trials from 11 Cochrane Reviews for four chronic diseases (diabetes, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and stroke. The Cochrane Reviews systematically identified and summarized trials on the effectiveness of diuretics, metformin, anticoagulants, longacting beta-agonists alone or in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, lipid lowering agents, exercise and diet. Eligible studies were reports of trials included in the Cochrane reviews and additional papers that described the methods of these trials. We assessed the exclusion and inclusion of people with comorbidities, the reporting of comorbidities, and whether comorbidities were considered as potential modifiers of treatment effects. Overall, the replicability of both the inclusion criteria (mean [standard deviation (SD]: 6.0 (2.1, range (min-max: 1-9.5 and exclusion criteria (mean(SD: 5.3 (2.1, range: 1-9.5 was only moderate. Trials excluded patients with many common comorbidities. The proportion of exclusions for comorbidities ranged from 0-42 percent for heart failure, 0-55 percent for COPD, 0-44 percent for diabetes, and 0-39 percent for stroke. Seventy of the 161 trials (43.5% described the prevalence of any comorbidity among participants with the index disease. The reporting of comorbidities in trials was very limited, in terms of reporting an operational definition and method of ascertainment for the presence of comorbidity and treatments for the comorbidity. It was even less common that the trials assessed whether comorbidities were potential modifiers of treatment effects.Comorbidities receive little attention in chronic disease trials. Given the public

  20. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-Based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    34survival"[All Fields] OR "survival"[ MeSH Terms]). To retrieve RCTs in PubMed , we employed strategies suggested by Haynes14 with the following...Decision Curve Analysis: An application to hospice referral for terminal patients. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2011 Dec 23;11(1):77. PubMed PMID...for eliciting decision makers’ preferences and decision-making. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2010;10:51. PubMed PMID: 20846413. Pubmed Central PMCID

  1. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

  2. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical…

  3. E-Learning and Evidence Based Practice in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quong, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    JCTIC has used open source software to develop a unique school online environment that has made evidence based practice viable in their school. In this paper the proposition is made that eLearning enables evidence based practice which in turn leads to improved student outcomes. Much has been written about evidence based practice in schools, but…

  4. Evidence-based medicine in general practice specialty training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Aio’s huisartsgeneeskunde hebben adequate kennis ten aanzien van evidence-based medicine (geneeskunde op basis van bewijs). In de huisartspraktijk is evidence-based gedrag vaak niet direct zichtbaar, maar artsen kunnen wel aangeven op welk aspect van evidence-based medicine de voorgeschreven

  5. Evidence based medicine in physical medicine and rehabilitation (German version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Kern

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years the term “Evidence Based Medicine (EBM” has been increasingly applied in all areas of medicine and is often used for decision-making in the medical and public health sector. It is also used to verify the significance and/or the effectiveness of different therapies. The original definition of EBM rests on the following three pillars: the physician’s individual expertise, the patient’s needs and the best external evidence. Today, however, the term EBM is often wrongly used as a synonym for best external evidence, without taking into consideration the other two pillars of the model which was created by Gordon Guyatt, David Sackett and Archibald Cochrane. This problem becomes even greater the more social insurance institutions and politicians use external evidence alone as the main guideline for financing therapies and therapy guidelines in physical medicine and general rehabilitation without taking into account the physician’s expertise and the patient’s needs.The wrong interpretation of EBM can lead to the following problems: well established clinical therapies are either questioned or not granted and are therefore withheld from patients (for example physical pain management. An absence of evidence for individual therapy methods does not prove their ineffectiveness! In this short statement the significance of EBM in Physical Medicine and general rehabilitation will be analysed and discussed.

  6. Transforming Patient-Centered Care: Development of the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer E; Titler, Marita G; Kane Low, Lisa; Dalton, Vanessa K; Sampselle, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    In response to the passage of the Affordable Care Act in the United States, clinicians and researchers are critically evaluating methods to engage patients in implementing evidence-based care to improve health outcomes. However, most models on implementation only target clinicians or health systems as the adopters of evidence. Patients are largely ignored in these models. A new implementation model that captures the complex but important role of patients in the uptake of evidence may be a critical missing link. Through a process of theory evaluation and development, we explore patient-centered concepts (patient activation and shared decision making) within an implementation model by mapping qualitative data from an elective induction of labor study to assess the model's ability to capture these key concepts. The process demonstrated that a new, patient-centered model for implementation is needed. In response, the Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model is presented. We conclude that, by fully integrating women into an implementation model, outcomes that are important to both the clinician and patient will improve. In the interest of providing evidence-based care to women during pregnancy and childbirth, it is essential that care is patient centered. The inclusion of concepts discussed in this article has the potential to extend beyond maternity care and influence other clinical areas. Utilizing the newly developed Evidence Informed Decision Making through Engagement Model provides a framework for utilizing evidence and translating it into practice while acknowledging the important role that women have in the process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The "evidence-based practice inventory": reliability and validity was demonstrated for a novel instrument to identify barriers and facilitators for Evidence Based Practice in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, N.M.; Swennen, M.H.J.; van Wijk, A.J.; Kalkman, C.J.; van Rheenen, N.; van der Graaf, Y.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To design and validate a practical questionnaire for clinicians, to identify barriers and facilitators for evidence-based practice (EBP), that is, the use of research evidence in patient care. The inventory is ultimately intended for departments to assess local conditions for EBP, to aim

  8. The "evidence-based practice inventory" : reliability and validity was demonstrated for a novel instrument to identify barriers and facilitators for Evidence Based Practice in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, Nina M; Swennen, Maartje H J; van Wijk, Arjen J; Kalkman, Cor J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078251818; van Rheenen, Nanda; van der Graaf, Yolanda|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072825847; van der Heijden, Geert J M G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To design and validate a practical questionnaire for clinicians, to identify barriers and facilitators for evidence-based practice (EBP), that is, the use of research evidence in patient care. The inventory is ultimately intended for departments to assess local conditions for EBP, to aim

  9. How Well Are Pulses Measured? Practice-Based Evidence from an Observational Study of Acutely Ill Medical Patients During Hospital Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opio, Martin Otyek; Kellett, John

    2017-07-01

    Although taking a radial pulse is considered to be an essential clinical skill, there have been few reports on how well it is measured in clinical practice, and how its accuracy and precision are influenced by rate, rhythm, and blood pressure. This study is a retrospective quality audit carried out as part of a larger ongoing prospective observational trial. The radial pulse rates recorded by 2 research nurses were compared with the electrocardiogram (ECG) heart rates measured on acutely ill medical patients during their admission to a resource-poor hospital in sub-Saharan Africa. There were 619 ECGs performed on 231 patients while they were in the hospital. The median interval between measuring the vital signs and obtaining an ECG was 12.6 minutes (mean 62.3, SD 104.3 minutes). The correlation coefficient between the pulse rate recorded and ECG heart rate was 0.54. The bias between the pulse rate and the ECG heart rate was 1.34, SD 13.51 beats per minute (ie, limits of agreement 26.5 beats per minute). Bias and variance were not influenced by blood and pulse pressure. However, tachycardia increased the variance and was the only independent predictor of a pulse deficit (odds ratio 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-3.51; chi-squared 17.21; P pulse and the ECG heart rate, and that tachycardia increases the variance and is the only independent predictor of a pulse deficit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health economics analysis of insulin aspart vs. regular human insulin in type 2 diabetes patients, based on observational real life evidence from general practices in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, A; Seitz, L; Palmer, A J

    2014-10-01

    A retrospective analysis of German general practice data demonstrated that insulin aspart (IA) was associated with a significantly reduced incidence of macrovascular events (MVE: stroke, myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease or coronary heart disease) vs. regular human insulin (RHI) in type 2 diabetes patients. Economic implications, balanced against potential improvements in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) resulting from lower risks of complications with IA in this setting have not yet been explored. A decision analysis model was developed utilizing 3-year initial MVE rates for each comparator, combined with published German-specific insulin and MVE costs and health utilities to calculate number needed to treat (NNT) to avoid any MVE, incremental costs and QALYs gained/ person for IA vs. RHI. A 3-year time horizon and German 3(rd)-party payer perspective were used. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed, sampling from distributions of key parameters. Additional sensitivity analyses were performed. NNT over a 3 year period to avoid any MVE was 8 patients for IA vs. RHI. Due to lower MVE rates, IA dominated RHI with 0.020 QALYs gained (95% confidence interval: 0.014-0.025) and cost savings of EUR 1 556 (1 062-2 076)/person for IA vs. RHI over the 3-year time horizon. Sensitivity analysis revealed that IA would still be overall cost saving even if the cost of IA was double the cost/unit of RHI. From a health economics perspective, IA was the superior alternative for the insulin treatment of type 2 diabetes, with lower incidence of MVE events translating to improved QALYs and lower costs vs. RHI within a 3-year time horizon. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. [Searching for evidence-based data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, J-C; Mancini, J; Fieschi, M

    2009-08-01

    The foundation of evidence-based medicine is critical analysis and synthesis of the best data available concerning a given health problem. These factual data are accessible because of the availability on the Internet of web tools specialized in research for scientific publications. A bibliographic database is a collection of bibliographic references describing the documents indexed. Such a reference includes at least the title, summary (or abstract), a set of keywords, and the type of publication. To conduct a strategically effective search, it is necessary to formulate the question - clinical, diagnostic, prognostic, or related to treatment or prevention - in a form understandable by the research engine. Moreover, it is necessary to choose the specific database or databases, which may have particular specificity, and to analyze the results rapidly to refine the strategy. The search for information is facilitated by the knowledge of the standardized terms commonly used to describe the desired information. These come from a specific thesaurus devoted to document indexing. The most frequently used is MeSH (Medical Subject Heading). The principal bibliographic database whose references include a set of describers from the MeSH thesaurus is Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline), which has in turn become a subpart of a still more vast bibliography called PubMed, which indexes an additional 1.4 million references. Numerous other databases are maintained by national or international entities. These include the Cochrane Library, Embase, and the PASCAL and FRANCIS databases.

  13. Original research in pathology: judgment, or evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James M

    2007-02-01

    Pathology is both a medical specialty and an investigative scientific discipline, concerned with understanding the essential nature of human disease. Ultimately, pathology is accountable as well, as measured by the accuracy of our diagnoses and the resultant patient care outcomes. As such, we must consider the evidence base underlying our practices. Within the realm of Laboratory Medicine, extensive attention has been given to testing accuracy and precision. Critical examination of the evidence base supporting the clinical use of specific laboratory tests or technologies is a separate endeavor, to which specific attention must be given. In the case of anatomic pathology and more specifically surgical pathology, the expertise required to render a diagnosis is derived foremost from experience, both personal and literature-based. In the first instance, knowledge of the linkage between one's own diagnoses and individual patient outcomes is required, to validate the role of one's own interpretations in the clinical course of patients. Experience comes from seeing this linkage first hand, from which hopefully comes wisdom and, ultimately, good clinical judgment. In the second instance, reading the literature and learning from experts is required. Only a minority of the relevant literature is published in pathology journals to which one may subscribe. A substantial portion of major papers relevant to the practice of anatomic pathology are published in collateral clinical specialty journals devoted to specific disease areas or organs. Active effort is therefore required to seek out the literature beyond the domain of pathology journals. In examining the published literature, the essential question then becomes: Does the practice of anatomic pathology fulfill the tenets of 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM)? If the pinnacle of EBM is 'systematic review of randomized clinical trials, with or without meta-analysis', then anatomic pathology falls far short. Our published

  14. Current status of evidence-based sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Erickson, Brandon J; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Gupta, Anil K; McCormick, Frank M; Bach, Bernard R

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the proportion of sports medicine studies that are labeled as Level I Evidence in 5 journals and compare the quality of surgical and nonsurgical studies using simple quality assessment tools (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials [CONSORT] and Jadad). By use of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines over the prior 2 years in the top 5 (citation and impact factor based) sports medicine journals, only Level I Evidence studies were eligible for inclusion and were analyzed. All study types (therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic, and economic) were analyzed. Study quality was assessed with the level of evidence, Jadad score, and CONSORT 2010 guidelines. Study demographic data were compared among journals and between surgical and nonsurgical studies by use of χ(2), 1-way analysis of variance, and 2-sample Z tests. We analyzed 190 Level I Evidence studies (10% of eligible studies) (119 randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies from the United States were the most common studies published. Sixty-two percent of studies reported a financial conflict of interest. The knee was the most common body part studied, and track-and-field/endurance sports were the most common sports analyzed. Significant differences (P .05) were shown among journals based on the proportion of Level I studies or appropriate randomization. Significant strengths and limitations of RCTs were identified. This study showed that Level I Evidence and RCTs comprise 10% and 6% of contemporary sports medicine literature, respectively. Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies are the most common publications with Level I Evidence. Significant differences across sports medicine journals were found in study quality. Surgical studies appropriately described randomization, blinding, and patient enrollment significantly more than nonsurgical studies. Level I

  15. Pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing: an evidence based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Michael J; Warning, William J

    2015-10-01

    The scope of pharmacist services for patients with pulmonary disease has primarily focused on drug related outcomes; however pharmacists have the ability to broaden the scope of clinical services by performing diagnostic testing including quality spirometry testing. Studies have demonstrated that pharmacists can perform quality spirometry testing based upon international guidelines. The primary aim of this review was to assess the published evidence of pharmacists performing quality spirometry testing based upon American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) guidelines. In order to accomplish this, the description of evidence and type of outcome from these services were reviewed. A literature search was conducted using five databases [PubMed (1946-January 2015), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews] with search terms including pharmacy, spirometry, pulmonary function, asthma or COPD was conducted. Searches were limited to publications in English and reported in humans. In addition, Uniform Resource Locators and Google Scholar searches were implemented to include any additional supplemental information. Eight studies (six prospective multi-center trials, two retrospective single center studies) were included. Pharmacists in all studies received specialized training in performing spirometry testing. Of the eight studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 8 (100%) demonstrated acceptable repeatability of spirometry testing based upon standards set by the ATS/ERS guidelines. Acceptable repeatability of seven studies ranged from 70 to 99% consistent with published data. Available evidence suggests that quality spirometry testing can be performed by pharmacists. More prospective studies are needed to add to the current evidence of quality spirometry testing performed by

  16. The current state of evidence-based pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of medical care in the United States has become intensely scrutinized with expectations from patients, families, payors, lawmakers, and, currently, the President. The most effective vehicle to bring more efficient care is the employment of evidence-based medicine whenever possible. Evidence-based medicine is dependent on best evidence, and best evidence is generated from prospective trials. To evaluate current state of evidence based practice in pediatric surgery we reviewed the literature for trials conducted in our field the past 10 years. All randomized controlled trials from January 1999 through December 2009 published in the English literature were identified through a literature search using PubMed (www.pubmed.com). We included only those in pediatric general surgery excluding transplant, oncology, and the other nongeneral subspecialties. The search criteria produced 56 manuscripts, of which 51 described appropriate randomization techniques. A definitive trial design with a sample size calculation was utilized in only 19 studies (34%). A statistically significant difference between treatment arms was identified in 29 of the 56 (52%) trials. There were 26 different journals of publication, with the Journal of Pediatric Surgery being most common (20) followed by Pediatric Surgery International (7). The combined total publications from January 1999 through December 2009 for the 26 journals these randomized trials represent 0.04% of all publications. Appendicitis was the most common condition that was studied (n = 10) followed by pyloric stenosis (n = 4). Trials originated in 19 different countries led by the United States (28%), United Kingdom (14%), and Turkey (12%). There was a generally progressive increase in published trials from 1999 to 2009, however, the percentage of prospective articles published in pediatric surgery was similar to a previous review published in 1999. The current state of evidence-based surgery in pediatric surgery has

  17. Evidence-based medicine: a commentary on common criticisms

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, Sharon E.; McAlister, Finlay A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussions about evidence-based medicine engender both negative and positive reactions from clinicians and academics. Ways to achieve evidence-based practice are reviewed here and the most common criticisms described. The latter can be classified as ”limitations universal to the practice of medicine,” ”limitations unique to evidence-based medicine” and ”misperceptions of evidence-based medicine.” Potential solutions to the true limitations of evidence-based medicine are discussed and areas f...

  18. [Evidence based medicine (EBM) in health care system and treatment of individual patient. Part iii. Teaching of epidemiological methodology and statistics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Włodzimierz

    2009-01-01

    The question arises--what role the doctor will meet in the web society. Is it going to be a creative person in the assessment of knowledge and application at the bedside of the patient, disciplined executor of he clinical guidelines, or a loyal client of pharmaceutical companies. Medical theories are usually at the high degree of complexity, so the evaluation of the validity of the research questions, the adequacy ot models, appraisal of clinical trials, and the use of statistical analysis requires new teaching. Teaching epidemiology and statistics for EBM is designed to prepare doctors for applyinig scientific advances in clinical practice, skills in appraisal and use of the publicated results. Effects of teaching on courses organised by CMKP shows that the barrier in learning of statistical concepts are caused by defective curricula and their faulty implementation, and not by narrow perception of physicians. According to the author, such teaching should also be applied during graduated medical studies, as optional. After co-ordination with the physiology, genetics, biochemistry, informatics EBM oriented teaching would be particularly attractive for students who have a view on the work of research and research careers. Bearing in mind the time needed for implementation, it is urgent need to start this work as soon as possible.

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Students and Lecturers Toward Evidence-Based Medicine: Evidence from Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The application of diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic evidence in day-to-day management of patients has been in constant focus during the last two decades. This study is an attempt to investigate attitude and knowledge of post-graduated medical students and lecturers towards evidence-based medicine (EBM and assess their preferences to clinical practice guidelines.Methods: The designed questionnaire was posted to the randomly selected post-graduated medical students and lecturers of medical department at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.Results: There were one hundred sixty subjects (60% who answered the questionnaire. Sixty nine percent were male, 46.3% were lecturers, and 53.2% were post-graduated medical students.About 66% of the respondents have heard of the term of EBM. Only 7.8% of the respondents have already attended to a course to learn the skills of EBM and one hundred twenty five (78.1% like to attend a course to learn the skills of EBM. The most common perceived reason for use of EBM was lack of enough motivation.Conclusion: They have not yet integrated the use of EBM into their practices widely. Their knowledge is at a high risk of becoming out of data. Education of EBM should be a hot topic among educationalplanning programmers until it becomes a part of university educational curriculum in Iran.Keywords: POST-GRADUATED MEDICAL STUDENT, LECTURER, KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE, IRAN.

  20. The establishment of evidence-based practice competencies for practicing registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in real-world clinical settings: proficiencies to improve healthcare quality, reliability, patient outcomes, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Gallagher-Ford, Lynn; Long, Lisa English; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen

    2014-02-01

    Although it is widely known that evidence-based practice (EBP) improves healthcare quality, reliability, and patient outcomes as well as reduces variations in care and costs, it is still not the standard of care delivered by practicing clinicians across the globe. Adoption of specific EBP competencies for nurses and advanced practice nurses (APNs) who practice in real-world healthcare settings can assist institutions in achieving high-value, low-cost evidence-based health care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of clear EBP competencies for both practicing registered nurses and APNs in clinical settings that can be used by healthcare institutions in their quest to achieve high performing systems that consistently implement and sustain EBP. Seven national EBP leaders developed an initial set of competencies for practicing registered nurses and APNs through a consensus building process. Next, a Delphi survey was conducted with 80 EBP mentors across the United States to determine consensus and clarity around the competencies. Two rounds of the Delphi survey resulted in total consensus by the EBP mentors, resulting in a final set of 13 competencies for practicing registered nurses and 11 additional competencies for APNs. Incorporation of these competencies into healthcare system expectations, orientations, job descriptions, performance appraisals, and clinical ladder promotion processes could drive higher quality, reliability, and consistency of healthcare as well as reduce costs. Research is now needed to develop valid and reliable tools for assessing these competencies as well as linking them to clinician and patient outcomes. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Strengths and Limitations of Evidence-Based Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also

  2. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Evidence based abreactive ego state therapy for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, Arreed

    2013-07-01

    A single 5-6 hours manualized abreactive ego state therapy session has recently been subjected to two placebo-controlled investigations meeting evidence-based criteria. Ego state therapy was found to be a highly effective and durable treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Apparently, ego state therapy works because it is emotion focused, activates sub-cortical structures, and because the supportive, interpretive therapist reconstructs the patient's personality to be resilient and adaptive. In this article the author reviews the treatment procedures and presents the findings of both studies.

  4. Sustainability and evidence-based design in the healthcare estate

    CERN Document Server

    Phiri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to deepen our understanding of the role played by technical guidelines and tools for the design, construction and operation of healthcare facilities, ultimately establishing the impact of the physical environment on staff and patient outcomes. Using case studies largely drawn from the UK, Europe, China and Australasia, design approaches such as sustainability (e.g. targets for energy efficiency, carbon neutrality, reduction of waste), evidence-based design (EBD), and Post-Project Evaluation (PPE) are examined in order to identify policies, mechanisms and strategies that can promote an integrated learning environment that in turn supports innovation in healthcare.

  5. Toward a Transdisciplinary Model of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Jason M; Spring, Bonnie; Brownson, Ross C; Mullen, Edward J; Newhouse, Robin P; Walker, Barbara B; Whitlock, Evelyn P

    2009-01-01

    Context This article describes the historical context and current developments in evidence-based practice (EBP) for medicine, nursing, psychology, social work, and public health, as well as the evolution of the seminal “three circles” model of evidence-based medicine, highlighting changes in EBP content, processes, and philosophies across disciplines. Methods The core issues and challenges in EBP are identified by comparing and contrasting EBP models across various health disciplines. Then a unified, transdisciplinary EBP model is presented, drawing on the strengths and compensating for the weaknesses of each discipline. Findings Common challenges across disciplines include (1) how “evidence” should be defined and comparatively weighted; (2) how and when the patient's and/or other contextual factors should enter the clinical decision-making process; (3) the definition and role of the “expert”; and (4) what other variables should be considered when selecting an evidence-based practice, such as age, social class, community resources, and local expertise. Conclusions A unified, transdisciplinary EBP model would address historical shortcomings by redefining the contents of each model circle, clarifying the practitioner's expertise and competencies, emphasizing shared decision making, and adding both environmental and organizational contexts. Implications for academia, practice, and policy also are discussed. PMID:19523122

  6. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions to Promote Secure Attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Edginton, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Various interventions are used in clinical practice to address insecure or disorganized attachment patterns and attachment disorders. The most common of these are parenting interventions, but not all have a robust empirical evidence base. We undertook a systematic review of randomized trials comparing a parenting intervention with a control, where these used a validated attachment instrument, in order to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve attachment in children with severe attachment problems (mean age parenting interventions included in our systematic review that were clinically effective in promoting secure attachment. For completeness, we also briefly discuss other interventions without randomized controlled trial evidence, identified in Patient Public Involvement workshops and expert groups at the point our review was completed as being used or recommended. We outline the key implications of our findings for clinical practice and future research. PMID:27583298

  8. Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions to Promote Secure Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Wright MD, FRCPsych

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Various interventions are used in clinical practice to address insecure or disorganized attachment patterns and attachment disorders. The most common of these are parenting interventions, but not all have a robust empirical evidence base. We undertook a systematic review of randomized trials comparing a parenting intervention with a control, where these used a validated attachment instrument, in order to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions aiming to improve attachment in children with severe attachment problems (mean age <13 years. This article aims to inform clinicians about the parenting interventions included in our systematic review that were clinically effective in promoting secure attachment. For completeness, we also briefly discuss other interventions without randomized controlled trial evidence, identified in Patient Public Involvement workshops and expert groups at the point our review was completed as being used or recommended. We outline the key implications of our findings for clinical practice and future research.

  9. Evidence based medicine and the plastic surgery literature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The principles of evidence-based medicine places case reports in the lower level of the hierarchy of scientific evidence. With the increased advocacy of evidence-based medicine, the survival of the case report has been threatened, prompting several authors to call for its preservation. Materials and methods: ...

  10. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine Skills through a Residency-Developed Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, John; Smucny, John; Patil, Anita; Tudiver, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Describes a curriculum intended to culminate in a resident-produced, evidence-based guideline for the care of patients with diabetes. Evaluation of the curriculum showed that learners appreciated the skills and knowledge gained in devising guidelines in an evidence-based manner but were uncertain that their searches were complete. Clinical…

  11. Evidence-based strategies in weight-loss mobile apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Schneider, Kristin; Jojic, Mirjana; DeBiasse, Michele; Mann, Devin

    2013-11-01

    Physicians have limited time for weight-loss counseling, and there is a lack of resources to which they can refer patients for assistance with weight loss. Weight-loss mobile applications (apps) have the potential to be a helpful tool, but the extent to which they include the behavioral strategies included in evidence-based interventions is unknown. The primary aims of the study were to determine the degree to which commercial weight-loss mobile apps include the behavioral strategies included in evidence-based weight-loss interventions, and to identify features that enhance behavioral strategies via technology. Thirty weight-loss mobile apps, available on iPhone and/or Android platforms, were coded for whether they included any of 20 behavioral strategies derived from an evidence-based weight-loss program (i.e., Diabetes Prevention Program). Data on available apps were collected in January 2012; data were analyzed in June 2012. The apps included on average 18.83% (SD=13.24; range=0%-65%) of the 20 strategies. Seven of the strategies were not found in any app. The most common technology-enhanced features were barcode scanners (56.7%) and a social network (46.7%). Weight-loss mobile apps typically included only a minority of the behavioral strategies found in evidence-based weight-loss interventions. Behavioral strategies that help improve motivation, reduce stress, and assist with problem solving were missing across apps. Inclusion of additional strategies could make apps more helpful to users who have motivational challenges. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  12. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  13. Evidence-based health care: A roadmap for knowledge translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yu Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based health care informs clinicians of choices regarding the most effective care based on the best available research evidence. However, concepts or instruments of evidence-based medicine are still fragmented for most clinicians. Substantial gaps between evidence and clinical practice remain. A knowledge translation roadmap may help clinicians to improve the quality of care by integration of various concepts in evidence-based health care. Improving research transparency and accuracy, conducting an updated systematic review, and shared decision making are the key points to diminish the gaps between research and practice.

  14. School Librarianship and Evidence Based Practice: Progress, Perspectives, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J. Todd

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper provides an overview of progress and developments surrounding evidence based practice in school librarianship, and seeks to provide a picture of current thinking about evidence based practice as it relates to the field. It addresses current issues and challenges facing the adoption of evidence based practice in school librarianship.Methods – The paper is based on a narrative review of a small but growing body of literature on evidence based practice in school librarianship, set within a broader perspective of evidence based education. In addition, it presents the outcomes of a collaborative process of input from 200 school libraries leaders collected at a School Library summit in 2007 specifically to address the emerging arena of evidence based practice in this field.Results – A holistic model of evidence based practice for school libraries is presented, centering on three integrated dimensions of evidence: evidence for practice, evidence in practice, and evidence of practice.Conclusion – The paper identifies key challenges ahead if evidence based school librarianship is to develop further. These include: building research credibility within the broader educational environment; the need for ongoing review and evaluation of the diverse body of research in education, librarianship and allied fields to make quality evidence available in ways that can enable practicing school librarians to build a culture of evidence based practice; development of tools, strategies, and exemplars to use to facilitate evidence based decision-making; and, ensuring that the many and diverse advances in education and librarianship become part of the practice of school librarianship.

  15. Evaluation of evidence-based methods used to teach nursing students to critically appraise evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Strøm, Hilde; Nortvedt, Monica W

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated whether students can learn to critically appraise a scientific article through evidence-based teaching methods. The course trains students in three steps of evidence-based practice--formulating a question, searching the evidence, and critically appraising the evidence. We gave the students two scientific articles. The articles were divided into sections, and 1 to 2 days were spent on each section. Every day had the same structure: a brief lecture on the relevant part of the article, group work, and interactive plenary discussions. At the end of the course, the students had a group examination in which they critically appraised a new scientific article. Most students reported that having learned steps one, two, and three involved in evidence-based practice was useful in critically appraising a scientific article. The results from the examination supported this. Knowledge about evidence-based practice can increase students' critical attitudes toward the evidence and their own practice.

  16. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Čuk

    2003-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based medicine is a method that helps physicians find and critically evaluate evidences from the medical literature, and apply the evidences in clinical decision-making. In clinical practice the method supplements core medical skills, clinical experience and emphasizes the importance of clinical research evidence. Evidencebased medicine is characterised by two fundamental principles: first, the scientific evidences alone do not suffice for clinical decision-making, second...

  17. 3. Neurological & Psychiatric Society of Zambia's Evidence-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ”. No evidence provided. Not evidence-based and impractical for a resource .... European Federation of. Neurological Sciences. Task Force[18]. Non-acute headache. EEG is not routinely indicated in the diagnostic evaluation of headache.

  18. Evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology, part 2: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Rauch, Steven D; Wasserman, Jared; Coblens, Orly; Randolph, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    What is the current state of evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology? This question inquires about the state of our literature, our attitudes and capabilities, and our patients' desires. Thus, this installment of "Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology" focuses on these 3 topics. First, the authors consider the literature relative to benchmarks for study design. Second, the data regarding otolaryngologists' and other surgical specialists' attitudes and understanding of clinical data are discussed. Third, patient-based efforts to promote and participate in evidence-based practice are explored. In addition, a discussion of the relevant supportive efforts made by our professional organizations is included.

  19. Adaptation of evidence-based surgical wound care algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Yeon; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to adapt a surgical wound care algorithm that is used to provide evidence-based surgical wound care in a critical care unit. This study used, the 'ADAPTE process', an international clinical practice guideline development method. The 'Bonnie Sue wound care algorithm' was used as a draft for the new algorithm. A content validity index (CVI) targeting 135 critical care nurses was conducted. A 5-point Likert scale was applied to the CVI test using a statistical criterion of .75. A surgical wound care algorithm comprised 9 components: wound assessment, infection control, necrotic tissue management, wound classification by exudates and depths, dressing selection, consideration of systemic factors, wound expected outcome, reevaluate non-healing wounds, and special treatment for non-healing wounds. All of the CVI tests were ≥.75. Compared to existing wound care guidelines, the new wound care algorithm provides precise wound assessment, reliabilities of wound care, expands applicability of wound care to critically ill patients, and provides evidence and strength of recommendations. The new surgical wound care algorithm will contribute to the advancement of evidence-based nursing care, and its use is expected as a nursing intervention in critical care.

  20. Evidence-Based Redesign of the COMLEX-USA Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, John R; Horber, Dorothy; Sandella, Jeanne M; Knebl, Janice A; Thornburg, John E

    2017-04-01

    To ensure that the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA) reflects the evolving practice of osteopathic medicine, the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners has developed new content and format specifications for an enhanced, competency-based examination program to be implemented with COMLEX-USA Level 3 in 2018. This article summarizes the evidence-based design processes that served as the foundation for blueprint development and the evidence supporting its validity. An overview is provided of the blueprint's 2 dimensions: Competency Domains and Clinical Presentations. The authors focus on the evidence that supports interpretation of test scores for the primary and intended purpose of COMLEX-USA, which is osteopathic physician licensure. Important secondary uses and the educational and catalytic effect of assessments are also described. This article concludes with the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners' plans to ensure that the COMLEX-USA series remains current and meets the needs of its stakeholders-the patients who seek care from osteopathic physicians.

  1. Curriculum for Evidence Based Medicine for MBBS II phase Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine is the training of health care professionals to access, assess and apply the best scientific evidence to clinical practice. EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence along with clinical expertise and patient values in making decisions about the case of individual patients. The current undergraduate curriculum of health profession is based on past knowledge accumulated for years. The scientific relevance of the mostly outdated information has never been questioned. The students passively absorb this available knowledge and apply it in their future professional life. There is no active learning on their part, by way of positive enquiry and critical analysis of the curriculum imposed on them. This has an undesirable impact on their competency as health professionals and the quality of the health care imparted by them. Hence there is need for emphasis on the teaching of EBM skills in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education programs. Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. The EBM course is planned to introduce in the curriculum of medical undergraduates at the beginning of second phase when they enter clinical posting. Total number of student would be 100 per batch and the course duration will be of 1 year. Educational methods program incorporates multiple teaching methods like lectures, discussion sessions, demonstration, case based learning, timely feedback, real life exposure, role modeling and peer evaluation.

  2. Implementing an evidence-based computerized decision support system linked to electronic health records to improve care for cancer patients: the ONCO-CODES study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Passardi, Alessandro; Capobussi, Matteo; Banzi, Rita; Ruggiero, Francesca; Kwag, Koren; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Mangia, Massimo; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Cinquini, Michela; Vespignani, Roberto; Colamartini, Americo; Di Iorio, Valentina; Massa, Ilaria; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Nyberg, Peter; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Bonovas, Stefanos; Nanni, Oriana

    2016-11-25

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are computer programs that provide doctors with person-specific, actionable recommendations, or management options that are intelligently filtered or presented at appropriate times to enhance health care. CDSSs might be integrated with patient electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. The Computerized DEcision Support in ONCOlogy (ONCO-CODES) trial is a pragmatic, parallel group, randomized controlled study with 1:1 allocation ratio. The trial is designed to evaluate the effectiveness on clinical practice and quality of care of a multi-specialty collection of patient-specific reminders generated by a CDSS in the IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) hospital. We hypothesize that the intervention can increase clinician adherence to guidelines and, eventually, improve the quality of care offered to cancer patients. The primary outcome is the rate at which the issues reported by the reminders are resolved, aggregating specialty and primary care reminders. We will include all the patients admitted to hospital services. All analyses will follow the intention-to-treat principle. The results of our study will contribute to the current understanding of the effectiveness of CDSSs in cancer hospitals, thereby informing healthcare policy about the potential role of CDSS use. Furthermore, the study will inform whether CDSS may facilitate the integration of primary care in cancer settings, known to be usually limited. The increasing use of and familiarity with advanced technology among new generations of physicians may support integrated approaches to be tested in pragmatic studies determining the optimal interface between primary and oncology care. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02645357.

  3. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steenhof N

    2014-06-01

    prescriptions were largely responsible for improved guideline adherence with antiplatelets and statins, most of the apparent improvement in ACE inhibitor and ARB use was the result of identifying an acceptable reason for not having them prescribed. Conclusion: This hypothesis generating pilot study supports the findings of others that there is suboptimal prescription of pharmacologic risk reduction therapies in the PAD population. Admission to a vascular service increases these rates. Nevertheless, some patients are still not receiving evidence-based treatment at discharge even after consideration of acceptable reasons. Strategies are needed to improve PAD guideline adherence in both the community at large and the vascular surgery service. Keywords: guideline adherence, vascular protection, risk reduction

  4. Familial hyperlipidemia: Resolving a case using evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Benavides-Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and familial hyperlipidemia combined (HFC are metabolic disorders of lipids associated with increase of the risk for cerebrovascular disease. Clinical case: 8-years-old Indigenous child with HFC presented right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and right central facial paralysis for a cerebral ischemic accident; in addition, he had altered lipid profile and family history of hypercholesterolemia. Methodology: this article used patient`s therapeutic approach using evidence-based medicine (EBM, started from a structured clinical question and PubMED search. Four systematic reviews were included. Discussion: statins are safe in children with HF and HFC are effective in improving lipid profile. EBM methodology could help to solve similar therapeutic problems.

  5. Decision support for health care: the PROforma evidence base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fox

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer Research UK has developed PROforma, a formal language for modelling clinical processes, along with associated tools for creating decision support, care planning, clinical workflow management and other applications. The PROforma method has been evaluated in a variety of settings: in primary health care (prescribing, referral of suspected cancer patients, genetic risk assessment and in specialist care of patients with breast cancer, leukaemia, HIV infection and other conditions. About nine years of experience have been gained with PROforma technologies. Seven trials of decision support applications have been published or are in preparation. Each of these has shown significant positive effects on a variety of measures of quality and/or outcomes of care. This paper reviews the evidence base for the clinical effectiveness of these PROforma applications, and previews the CREDO project _a multi-centre trial of a complex PROforma application for supporting integrated breast cancer care across primary and secondary care settings.

  6. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-09-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by 'gold standard' randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient's physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a 'mixed methods approach' are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes.

  7. Fast-track Orthognathic Surgery: An Evidence-based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Joel Joshi; Detriche, Olivier; Mommaerts, Maurice Yves

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a fast-track protocol for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery (OGS). Fast-track surgery (FTS) is a multidisciplinary approach where the pre-, intra-, and postoperative management is focusing maximally on a quick patient recovery and early discharge. To enable this, the patients’ presurgical stress and postsurgical discomfort should be maximally reduced. Both referral patterns and expenses within the health-care system are positively influenced by FTS. University hospital-literature review through Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (January 2000–July 2016) using the following words – “fast track, enhanced recovery, multimodal, and perioperative care” – to define a protocol evidence based for OGS, as well as evidenced-based medicine search of every term added to the protocol during the same period. The process has resulted in an OGS protocol that may improve the outcome of the patient through several nonoperative and operative measures such as preoperative patient education and intra/postoperative measures that should improve overall patient satisfaction, decrease morbidity such as postoperative nausea, headache, dizziness, pain, and intubation discomfort, and shorten hospital stay. A literature review allowed us to fine-tune a fast-track protocol for uncomplicated OGS that can be prospectively studied against currently applied ones. PMID:29264281

  8. Internal Medicine Residents’ Views and Understanding of Evidence Based Medicine in Shiraz Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Moghadami M; Amini M

    2005-01-01

    Background and pupose: Evidence based medicine bas become on increasing important topic in recent years in medical schools. The internal medicine residents as important group in managing patient need evidences for better diagnosis and treatment. Our intension was to investigate view and understanding of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among internal medicine residents. Methods: in 3 teaching hospital in shiraz university of medical school in Iran, a questionnaire was give to internal medicin...

  9. Internal Medicine Residents’ Views and Understanding of Evidence Based Medicine in Shiraz Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Moghadami; M Amini

    2009-01-01

    Background and pupose: Evidence based medicine bas become on increasing important topic in recent years in medical schools. The internal medicine residents as important group in managing patient need evidences for better diagnosis and treatment. Our intension was to investigate view and understanding of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among internal medicine residents.Methods: in 3 teaching hospital in shiraz university of medical school in Iran, a questionnaire was give to internal medicine re...

  10. Evidence-Based Medicine; Climbing a Mountain for a Better Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen, Mona O.; Malki, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Aziz, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is a relatively new term used in medical sittings and Health Information Technology (HIT). It is a form of medicine that integrates practitioners’ expertise with the best available practical evidences to improve better patient care. Evidence-Based Medicine has increasingly been used and incorporated into daily medical practices to overcome the shortcomings in the conventional standard care. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the importance of Evidenc...

  11. Self-perception and knowledge of evidence based medicine by physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre-Raya, Karen A.; Castilla-Pe?n, Mar?a F.; Barajas-Nava, Leticia A.; Torres-Rodr?guez, Violeta; Mu?oz-Hern?ndez, Onofre; Gardu?o-Espinosa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence, legitimacy and application of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) in the world is growing as a tool that integrates, the best available evidence to decision making in patient care. Our goal was to identify the relationship between self-perception about the relevance of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and the degree of basic knowledge of this discipline in a group of physicians. Methods A survey was carried out in a third level public hospital in Mexico City. Self-perception ...

  12. Changing tides: increasing evidence to embrace a patient classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The effective use of a patient classification system (PCS) in a way that provides value to all health care organizations has yet to be realized given the challenging developmental pathway of these systems. As the science and technology of workforce management emerges along with evidence to support the relationships between nurse work and patient care needs, it is no longer appropriate to rely on systems that provide aggregated and minimal data to address the need for safer patient care and retention of nurses. Specificity about patient care needs in a valid and reliable PCS is essential on our pathway to improved resource utilization, improved decision making, integration of nurse cognitive and knowledge work, and management of variances from planned resource use. Advancements with technology, the ability to create and monitor equitable nurse-patient assignments, conceptual clarity, evidence, regulatory requirements, and professional role development point to a new receptiveness for PCSs.

  13. The Relationship Among Evidence-Based Practice and Client Dyspnea, Pain, Falls, and Pressure Ulcer Outcomes in the Community Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Doran, Diane; Lefebre, Nancy; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Estabrook, Carole A; White, Peggy; Carryer, Jennifer; Sun, Winnie; Qian, Gan; Bai, Yu Qing; Li, Mingyang

    2014-01-01

    Background There are gaps in knowledge about the extent to which home care nurses’ practice is based on best evidence and whether evidence-based practice impacts patient outcomes. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between evidence-based practice and client pain, dyspnea, falls, and pressure ulcer outcomes in the home care setting. Evidence-based practice was defined as nursing interventions based on best practice guidelines. Methods The Nursing Role Effectivene...

  14. Toward evidence and theory-based skin care in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendaas, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Dermatitis is a distressing symptom of radiation therapy, and current care guidelines often lack evidence. Using an evidence-based practice (EBP) model, a multidisciplinary group in an academic medical center reviewed the literature to create departmental patient education materials related to skin care that were grounded in evidence. Recommendations not supported by evidence from randomized, controlled trials were viewed within a stress-reduction framework. Until evidence related to the prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis is more fully developed, skin care recommendations for patients with cancer who receive radiation may need to be based on evidence and theory. In addition, care for patients with radiation dermatitis should encompass strategies aimed at physical and psychosocial stressors.

  15. Justifying Physical Education Based on Neuroscience Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that exercise improves cognitive function and psychological traits that influence behavior (e.g., mood, level of motivation). The evidence in the literature also shows that physical education may enhance learning or that academic performance is at least maintained despite a reduction in classroom time in order to increase time…

  16. Evidence Based Complementary Intervention for Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Dr. Hassen H.; Bracha, Adam S.; Bracha, Dr. Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Increasing scientific evidence point to a non-pharmacological complementary treatment for insomnia: white noise. Its presentation has been shown to induce sleep in human neonates and adults, probably by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of ambient sound. White noise may be a simple, safe, cost-effective alternative to hypnotic medication in many psychiatric disorders, especially acute stress disorder and PTSD.

  17. Evidence based complementary intervention for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Hassan H; Bracha, Adam S; Bracha, H Stefan

    2002-09-01

    Increasing scientific evidence point to a non-pharmacological complementary treatment for insomnia: white noise. Its presentation has been shown to induce sleep in human neonates and adults, probably by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of ambient sound. White noise may be a simple, safe, cost-effective alternative to hypnotic medication in many psychiatric disorders, especially acute stress disorder and PTSD.

  18. An evidence-based view on hyperbilirubinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Hulzebos, Christian V.

    Introduction: We conducted a review of the evidence which contributes to the current care of jaundiced newborn infants. Methods: Literature was searched for reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Results: Six Cochrane reviews and eight other reviews and eighteen recent RCTs are discussed.

  19. Evidence of dental screening for oral foci of infection in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment dental screening of, amongst others, head-and-neck-cancer and hematology patients aims to identify and eliminate oral foci of infection to prevent oral problems during or post-treatment. The efficacy of dental screening in these patients is yet not evidence based. In particular in high

  20. Clinicians adopting evidence based guidelines: a case study with thromboprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous Thromboembolism (VTE is a cause of hospital mortality and managing its morbidity is associated with significant expenditure. Uptake of evidenced based guideline recommendations intended to prevent VTE in hospital settings is sub-optimal. This study was conducted to explore clinicians' attitudes and the clinical environment in which they work to understand their reluctance to adopt VTE prophylaxis guidelines. Methods Between February and November 2009, 40 hospital employed doctors from 2 Australian metropolitan hospitals were interviewed in depth. Qualitative data were analysed according to thematic methodology. Results Analysis of interviews revealed that barriers to evidence based practice include i the fragmented system of care delivery where multiple members of teams and multiple teams are responsible for each patient's care, and in the case of VTE, where everyone shares responsibility and no-one in particular is responsible; ii the culture of practice where team practice is tailored to that of the team head, and where medicine is considered an 'art' in which guidelines should be adapted to each patient rather than applied universally. Interviewees recommend clear allocation of responsibility and reminders to counteract VTE risk assessment being overlooked. Conclusions Senior clinicians are the key enablers for practice change. They will need to be convinced that guideline compliance adds value to their patient care. Then with the support of systems in the organisation designed to minimize the effects of care fragmentation, they will drive practice changes in their teams. We believe that evidence based practice is only possible with a coordinated program that addresses individual, cultural and organisational constraints.

  1. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients.......To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients....

  2. Strengthening the evidence-policy interface for patient safety: enhancing global health through hospital partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Dadwal, Viva; Storr, Julie; Riley, Pamela; Rutter, Paul; Hightower, Joyce D; Gooden, Rachel; Kelley, Edward; Pittet, Didier

    2013-10-16

    Strengthening the evidence-policy interface is a well-recognized health system challenge in both the developed and developing world. Brokerage inherent in hospital-to-hospital partnerships can boost relationships between "evidence" and "policy" communities and move developing countries towards evidence based patient safety policy. In particular, we use the experience of a global hospital partnership programme focused on patient safety in the African Region to explore how hospital partnerships can be instrumental in advancing responsive decision-making, and the translation of patient safety evidence into health policy and planning. A co-developed approach to evidence-policy strengthening with seven components is described, with reflections from early implementation. This rapidly expanding field of enquiry is ripe for shared learning across continents, in keeping with the principles and spirit of health systems development in a globalized world.

  3. Online tools for teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael; Crabb, Nicholas P; Moore, Lynda J; Reyher, Kristen K; Baillie, Sarah; Eisler, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is of interest and relevance to veterinary practitioners. Consequently, veterinary schools take responsibility for teaching students how to appraise scientific articles and for equipping them with the skills needed to obtain and evaluate the best evidence and to apply this approach to their own cases. As part of our farm animal clinical rotation, we train students in qualitative and quantitative EBVM methods using an e-learning environment, online teaching materials, a wiki (a Web site that allows its users to edit its content via a Web browser), and face-to-face tutorials that support learning. Students working in small groups use a wiki to record details of the history, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, herd data, and management plans for their chosen farm animal clinical cases. Using a standardized patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) format, each group formulates a patient question based on either a proposed intervention or diagnostic procedure for the case and conducts an online scientific literature database search. The students appraise the articles retrieved using EBVM approaches and record the information in the wiki. The summation of this body of work, the group's critically appraised topic (CAT), includes the original PICO, a standardized table of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention or diagnostic procedure, a summary statement in the form of a clinical bottom line, and their reflections upon the CAT. At the end of the rotation, students take part in a structured "CAT Club" where they present and discuss their findings with fellow students and clinicians.

  4. Novel Evidence-Based Classification of Cavernous Venous Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ram A; Rawal, Bhupendra; Li, Zhuo; Broderick, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    The primary aim of our study was to determine whether an evidence-based rationale could categorize cavernous venous occlusive disease into mild, moderate and severe erectile dysfunction. A total of 863 patients underwent color duplex Doppler ultrasound from January 2010 to June 2013 performed by a single urologist. We identified a cohort of 75 patients (8.7%) with a diagnosis of cavernous venous occlusive disease based on a unilateral resistive index less than 0.9, and right and left peak systolic velocity 35 cm per second or less after visual sexual stimulation. At a median followup of 13 months patients were evaluated for treatment efficacy. A total of 75 patients with a median age of 60 years (range 19 to 83) and a mean body mass index of 26.3 kg/m(2) (range 19.0 to 39.3) satisfied the criteria of cavernous venous occlusive disease. When substratified into tertiles, resistive index cutoffs were obtained, including mild cavernous venous occlusive disease-81.6 to 94.0, moderate disease-72.6 to 81.5 and severe disease-59.5 to 72.5. Using these 3 groups the phosphodiesterase type 5-inhibitor failure rate (p = 0.017) and SHIM (Sexual Health Inventory for Men) score categories (1 to 10 vs 11 to 20, p = 0.030) were statistically significantly different for mild, moderate and severe cavernous venous occlusive disease. Treatment satisfaction was also statistically significantly different. Penile prosthetic placement was a more common outcome among patients with erectile dysfunction and more severe cavernous venous occlusive disease. Our retrospective analysis supports a correlation between the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor failure rate, SHIM score and the rate of surgical intervention using resistive index values. Our data further suggest that an evidence-based classification of cavernous venous occlusive disease by color Doppler ultrasound is possible and can triage patients to penile prosthetic placement. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association

  5. Evidence conflict measure based on OWA operator in open world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wen Jiang; Shiyu Wang; Xiang Liu; Hanqing Zheng; Boya Wei

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, a new method which combines generalized conflict coefficient, generalized evidence distance, and generalized interval correlation coefficient based on ordered weighted averaging (OWA...

  6. Evidence-based medicine: Metacarpal fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob M P; Hammert, Warren C

    2014-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: (1) Determine the need for operative treatment of metacarpal fractures. (2) Describe the position of immobilization for nonoperative treatment of fifth metacarpal fractures. (3) Assess the differences between intramedullary pinning and transverse pinning of displaced metacarpal fractures. (4) Compare the advantages of plating and pinning for treatment of displaced metacarpal fractures. (5) Recognize appropriate timing and treatment of open metacarpal fractures. The body of evidence regarding the treatment of metacarpal fractures continues to grow. Conservative management, closed reduction with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation, intramedullary fixation, and open reduction and internal fixation with plates and/or screws are all accepted treatment modalities. The goal of this review is to highlight the most recent literature and the best evidence available for the management of metacarpal fractures.

  7. Where Words Fail, Music Speaks: A Mixed Method Study of an Evidence-Based Music Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Ruby A; Torres, David; Reeser, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous studies documenting the benefits of music, hospice social workers are often unfamiliar with evidence-based music practices that may improve end of life care. This mixed method study tested an intervention to teach hospice social workers and chaplains (N = 10) an evidence-based music protocol. Participants used the evidence-based practice (EBP) for 30 days, recording 226 journal entries that described observations of 84 patients and their families. There was a significant increase in EBP knowledge (35%). Prompting behavioral and emotional responses, music was described frequently as a catalyst that facilitated deeper dialogue between patients, families, social workers, and chaplains.

  8. Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lecomte

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial interventions are an essential part of the treatment for people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The criteria regarding what makes an intervention “evidence-based” along with a current list of evidence-based interventions are presented. Although many evidence-based interventions exist, implementation studies reveal that few, if any, are ever implemented in a given setting. Various theories and approaches have been developed to better understand and overcome implementation obstacles. Among these, merging two evidence-based interventions, or offering an evidence-based intervention within an evidence-based service, are increasingly being reported and studied in the literature. Five such merges are presented, along with their empirical support: cognitive behavior therapy (CBT with skills training; CBT and family psychoeducation; supported employment (SE and skills training; SE and cognitive remediation; and SE and CBT.

  9. Evidence-Based Practice: On the Function of Evidence in Practical Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Kvernbekk

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a vast literature on evidence-based practice (EBP in education. What function does evidence have in practical deliberations toward decisions about what to do? Most writers on EBP seem to think of evidence largely as quantitative data, serving as a foundation from which practice could and should be directly derived. In this paper I argue that we are better served by according a different and more indirect function to evidence in practical reasoning. To establish this claim I employ Toulmin’s model of argumentation. On this model the evidence-as-foundation view amounts to evidence as data/grounds. The model also offers a different function for evidence, as backing of the warrant, and I argue in this paper that this is a more adequate understanding of the function of evidence in practical reasoning

  10. Perception Of Nursing Middle Managers About The Evidence-Based Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilza Carla Spiri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comprehend the experience of nursing middle managers of an accredited public hospital, from São Paulo state, about the evidence-based management. Method: case study and analysis of thematic content in the stages of unity of meaning, condensed meaning unity, interpretation of the underlying meaning, sub-theme and theme. Nine manager nurses participated. The data collection was done through a script with questions that, according to the convenience of the participants, were answered by electronic mail. The data were analyzed in the light of the theoretical reference of the managerial process in nursing and the evidence-based management. Results: six themes were revealed: Evidence-based management and management process; Evidence-based management strengths; Evidence-based management challenges; the leader and the Evidence-based management; Hospital accreditation and evidence-based management and Experiences with the evidence-based management. Conclusion: the scientific knowledge and the experiences in the work are sources of evidences that interfere, positively, in the quality and safety of the patient. Leadership training, planning, team empowerment and involvement are essential for the development of this practice. Strategies need to be discussed and implemented so that the management process is based on evidences.

  11. [Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai

    2009-03-01

    Evidence-based management of medical disposable materials pays attention to collect evidence comprehensively and systematically, accumulate and create evidence through its own work and also evaluate evidence strictly. This can be used as a function to guide out job. Medical disposable materials evidence system contains product register qualification, product quality certification, supplier's behavior, internal and external communication evidence. Managers can find different ways in creating and using evidence referring to specific inside and outside condition. Evidence-based management can help accelerating the development of management of medical disposable materials from traditional experience pattern to a systematic and scientific pattern. It also has the very important meaning to improve medical quality, control the unreasonable growth of medical expense and make purchase and supply chain be more efficient.

  12. Evidence-based guideline update: Treatment of essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, T.A.; Elble, R.J.; Louis, E.D.; Gronseth, G.S.; Ondo, W.G.; Dewey, R.B.; Okun, M.S.; Sullivan, K.L.; Weiner, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This evidence-based guideline is an update of the 2005 American Academy of Neurology practice parameter on the treatment of essential tremor (ET). Methods: A literature review using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and CINAHL was performed to identify clinical trials in patients with ET published between 2004 and April 2010. Results and Recommendations: Conclusions and recommendations for the use of propranolol, primidone (Level A, established as effective); alprazolam, atenolol, gabapentin (monotherapy), sotalol, topiramate (Level B, probably effective); nadolol, nimodipine, clonazepam, botulinum toxin A, deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy (Level C, possibly effective); and gamma knife thalamotomy (Level U, insufficient evidence) are unchanged from the previous guideline. Changes to conclusions and recommendations from the previous guideline include the following: 1) levetiracetam and 3,4-diaminopyridine probably do not reduce limb tremor in ET and should not be considered (Level B); 2) flunarizine possibly has no effect in treating limb tremor in ET and may not be considered (Level C); and 3) there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of pregabalin, zonisamide, or clozapine as treatment for ET (Level U). PMID:22013182

  13. Identifying Challenges to Building an Evidence Base for Restoration Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumza Ntshotsho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global acknowledgement of ecological restoration, as an important tool to complement conservation efforts, requires an effort to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions. Evidence-based practice is purported to promote effectiveness. A central tenet of this approach is decision making that is based on evidence, not intuition. Evidence can be generated experimentally and in practice but needs to be linked to baseline information collection, clear goals and monitoring of impact. In this paper, we report on a survey conducted to assess practitioners’ perceptions of the evidence generated in restoration practice in South Africa, as well as challenges encountered in building this evidence base. Contrary to a recent assessment of this evidence base which found weaknesses, respondents viewed it as adequate and cited few obstacles to its development. Obstacles cited were mostly associated with planning and resource availability. We suggest that the disparity between practitioners’ perceptions and observed weaknesses in the evidence base could be a challenge in advancing evidence-based restoration. We explore opportunities to overcome this disparity as well as the obstacles listed by practitioners. These opportunities involve a shift from practitioners as users of scientific knowledge and evidence, to practitioners involved in the co-production of evidence needed to increase the effectiveness of restoration interventions.

  14. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kusano, Motoyasu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Joh, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Nakada, Koji; Nagahara, Akihito; Futagami, Seiji; Manabe, Noriaki; Inui, Akio; Haruma, Ken; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Yakabi, Koji; Hongo, Michio; Uemura, Naomi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-02-01

    General interest in functional gastrointestinal disorders is increasing among Japanese doctors as well as patients. This increase can be attributed to a number of factors, including recent increased interest in quality of life and advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. Japan recently became the world's first country to list "functional dyspepsia" as a disease name for national insurance billing purposes. However, recognition and understanding of functional dyspepsia (FD) remain poor, and no standard treatment strategy has yet been established. Accordingly, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for FD, consisting of five sections: concept, definition, and epidemiology; pathophysiology; diagnosis; treatment; and prognosis and complications. This article summarizes the Japanese guideline, with particular focus on the treatment section. Once a patient is diagnosed with FD, the doctor should carefully explain the pathophysiology and benign nature of this condition, establish a good doctor-patient relationship, and then provide advice for daily living (diet and lifestyle modifications, explanations, and reassurance). The proposed pharmacological treatment is divided into two steps: initial treatment including an acid inhibitory drug (H2RA or PPI) or prokinetics, (strong recommendation); second-line treatment including anxiolytics, antidepressants, and Japanese traditional medicine (weak recommendation). H. pylori eradication, strongly recommended with a high evidence level, is positioned separately from other treatment flows. Conditions that do not respond to these treatment regimens are regarded as refractory FD. Patients will be further examined for other organic disorders or will be referred to specialists using other approaches such as psychosomatic treatment.

  15. Guidelines for revascularization: The evidence base matures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert O. Bonow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial revascularization procedures continue to represent important treatment options for patients with acute and chronic coronary artery disease (CAD and also represent a major source of health care expenditures. For the past decade, the indications for revascularization in patients with chronic CAD, and the indications for surgical versus percutaneous revascularization, have been the subject of considerable discussion, debate, and controversy. The guidelines from the American College of Cardiology Foundation / American Heart Association (ACCF/AHA and the European Society of Cardiology / European Association for Cardiothoracic S (ESC/EACTS have made major inroads in resolving these issues and have provided the standards for care for interventional cardiologists, surgeons, and the physicians who refer patients for these procedures. The transatlantic guidelines have also been remarkably concordant in their overall recommendations.

  16. Evidence-based evaluation of treatment strategy for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Meng-qiu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for multiple sclerosis (MS patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Key words were defined as multiple sclerosis, immunomodulatory therapy and therapy, etc. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang data bases for Scientific Journals in China and National Knowledge Infrastructure for Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Additionally, we applied manual searching and screened out conference paper and academic dissertation, etc, from various references. After that we obtained and evaluated by Jadad scales on systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and observational study cases about glucocorticoids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod. Results After screening, all seventeen selected resources included systematic reviews 6 articles, randomized controlled trials 7 articles, controlled clinical trials 2 articles, observational study cases 2 articles, among which fifteen articles were proved to be high quality (according to Jadad scoring system, five score 4, six score 5, four score 7, two chapters were judged to be low quality scoring 3. Finally, we summerize that: 1 The first choice of treatment for acute relapses is glucocorticoids and we suggest that plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin may be tried as an alternative therapy in acute MS relapse, especially in case of contraindications to intravenous methylprednisolone. 2 Immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment (IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab can be an option to prevent new relapses and progression of disability. 3 Fingolimod is an oral treatment for multiple sclerosis to improve treatment adherence. Conclusion Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide us best clinical evidence on MS treatment.

  17. Collaborating across services to advance evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah J; Richard, Maggie L; Ceniceros, Xochitl; Blaize, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Military medical treatment facilities offer a unique environment in which to develop a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP). Distinctive issues arise in the context of changed patient care demographics because of a war-injured population. These issues offer an opportunity to enhance the quality of care through the use and adaptation of research findings in this special nursing environment. In addition, the colocation of two military medical centers offers the prospect of collaborative efforts to create a regional culture for nursing EBP. The purposes of this study were to describe the processes of a collaborative project to train nurses in EBP and to share resources in developing and implementing evidence-based clinical nursing guidelines in two large military medical centers in the Northeastern United States and to discuss the collective efforts of nurse researchers, leadership, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses in each hospital to facilitate the EBP process. A description of the organizational structure and the climate for EBP of each facility is provided followed by discussion of training efforts and the inculcation of an organizational culture for EBP. Contextual barriers and facilitators were encountered throughout the project. The two nurse researchers leading the projects were able to overcome the barriers and capitalize on opportunities to promote EBP. Three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were developed at each facility and are currently in various stages of implementation. Despite the barriers, EBP continues to be at the forefront of military nursing practice in the U.S. National Capital Region. Clear communication and regular meetings were essential to the success of the collaborative project within and between the two military hospitals. Military-specific barriers to EBP included high team attrition and turnover because of the war mission and the usual high staff turnover at military hospitals. Military facilitators included a

  18. Evidence-based interventions of threatened miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Threatened miscarriage is the commonest complication of early pregnancy and affects about 20% of pregnancies. It presents with vaginal bleeding with or without abdominal cramps. Increasing age of women, smoking, obesity or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and a previous history of miscarriage are risk factors for threatened miscarriage. The pathophysiology has been associated with changes in levels of cytokines or maternal immune dysfunction. Clinical history and examination, maternal serum biochemistry and ultrasound findings are important to determine the treatment options and provide valuable information for the prognosis. Bed rest is the commonest advice, but there is little evidence of its value. Other options include progesterone, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG and muscle relaxants. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies such as acupuncture and Chinese herbs have also been tried. There is some evidence from clinical studies indicating that CAM therapies may reduce the rate of miscarriage, but the quality of studies is poor. Thus, further double-blind, randomized-controlled trials are necessary to confirm its effectiveness, especially acupuncture and Chinese herbs.

  19. Evidence-based indications for hindfoot endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spennacchio, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Randelli, Pietro S.; van Dijk, Niek C.

    2016-01-01

    The 2-portal hindfoot endoscopic technique with the patient in prone position, first introduced by van Dijk et al. (Arthroscopy 16:871-876, 2000), is currently the most used by foot and ankle surgeons to address endoscopically pathologies located in the hindfoot. This article aims to review the

  20. An evidence based blunt trauma protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, R. van; Kool, D.R.; Lubeek, S.F.K.; Dekker, H.M.; Brink, M.; Deunk, J.; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently CT is rapidly implemented in the evaluation of trauma patients. In anticipation of a large international multicentre trial, this study's aim was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a new diagnostic protocol, used for the primary radiological evaluation in adult blunt

  1. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  2. A Learning Object Approach To Evidence based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabin Visram

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the philosophy, development and framework of the body of elements formulated to provide an approach to evidence-based learning sustained by Learning Objects and web based technology Due to the demands for continuous improvement in the delivery of healthcare and in the continuous endeavour to improve the quality of life, there is a continuous need for practitioner's to update their knowledge by accomplishing accredited courses. The rapid advances in medical science has meant increasingly, there is a desperate need to adopt wireless schemes, whereby bespoke courses can be developed to help practitioners keep up with expanding knowledge base. Evidently, without current best evidence, practice risks becoming rapidly out of date, to the detriment of the patient. There is a need to provide a tactical, operational and effective environment, which allows professional to update their education, and complete specialised training, just-in-time, in their own time and location. Following this demand in the marketplace the information engineering group, in combination with several medical and dental schools, set out to develop and design a conceptual framework which form the basis of pioneering research, which at last, enables practitioner's to adopt a philosophy of life long learning. The body and structure of this framework is subsumed under the term Object oriented approach to Evidence Based learning, Just-in-time, via Internet sustained by Reusable Learning Objects (The OEBJIRLO Progression. The technical pillars which permit this concept of life long learning are pivoted by the foundations of object oriented technology, Learning objects, Just-in-time education, Data Mining, intelligent Agent technology, Flash interconnectivity and remote wireless technology, which allow practitioners to update their professional skills, complete specialised training which leads to accredited qualifications. This paper sets out to develop and

  3. Evidence Based Medicine in Pediatric Practice: Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Akhondian, Javad; Najafi-Sani, Mehri; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Practicing medicine according to the best evidence is gaining popularity in the medical societies. Although this concept, which is usually called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been explained in many resources, it has not been addressed enough in pediatrics. In this review, we briefly explained Evidence Based Medicine approach and its applications in pediatrics in order to help the pediatricians to efficiently integrate EBM into their daily practice. PMID:23056715

  4. Dutch evidence statement for pelvic physical therapy in patients with anal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghmans, L C M; Groot, J A M; van Heeswijk-Faase, I C; Bols, E M J

    2015-04-01

    To promote agreement among and support the quality of pelvic physiotherapists' skills and clinical reasoning in The Netherlands, an Evidence Statement Anal Incontinence (AI) was developed based on the practice-driven problem definitions outlined. We present a summary of the current state of knowledge and formulate recommendations for a methodical assessment and treatment for patients with AI, and place the evidence in a broader perspective of current developments. Electronic literature searches were conducted in relevant databases with regard to prevalence, incidence, costs, etiological and prognostic factors, predictors of response to therapy, prevention, assessment, and treatment. The recommendations have been formulated on the basis of scientific evidence and where no evidence was available, recommendations were consensus-based. The evidence statement incorporates a practice statement with corresponding notes that clarify the recommendations, and accompanying flowcharts, describing the steps and recommendations with regard to the diagnostic and therapeutic process. The diagnostic process consists of history-taking and physical examination supported by measurement instruments. For each problem category for patients with AI, a certain treatment plan can be distinguished dependent on the presence of pelvic floor dysfunction, awareness of loss of stools, comorbidity, neurological problems, adequate anorectal sensation, and (in)voluntary control. Available evidence and expert opinion support the use of education, pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, and electrostimulation in selected patients. The evidence statement reflects the current state of knowledge for a methodical and systematic physical therapeutic assessment and treatment for patients with AI.

  5. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  6. Evidence-based decision-making: when it is worthwhile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Neuman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Every day health professionals have to make dozens of decisions regarding patient care and management. It is not easy to integrate scientific evidence in this process. The primary ability we need in order to achieve successful results is learning how to recognize the circumstances in which evidence arising from results of scientific trials may help.

  7. Evidence-based Practice in libraries - Principles and discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2012-01-01

    The article examines problems concerning the introduction and future implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in libraries. It includes important conceptual distinctions and definitions, and it reviews the more controversial aspects of EBP, primarely based on experiences from Denmark...

  8. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  9. Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking…

  10. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may...

  11. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders : International comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings: Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The

  12. Evidence-Based Practice in Education. Conducting Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Richard; Thomas, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The book begins with an explication of evidence-based practice. Some of the ideas of its proponents are discussed, including the Campbell Collaboration, and the application to education of Cochrane-style reviews and meta-analyses. The thinking behind evidence-based practice has been the subject of much criticism, particularly in education, and…

  13. Managing Scalp Psoriasis: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-02-01

    Scalp psoriasis is commonly the initial presentation of psoriasis, and almost 80 % of patients with psoriasis will eventually experience it. Although several systematic reviews and guidelines exist, an up-to-date evidence-based review including more recent progress on the use of biologics and new oral small molecules was timely. Of the 475 studies initially retrieved from PubMed and the 845 from Embase (up to May 2016), this review includes 27 clinical trials, four papers reporting pooled analyses of other clinical trials, ten open-label trials, one case series, and two case reports after excluding non-English literature. To our knowledge, few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conducted specifically in scalp psoriasis. Topical corticosteroids provide good effects and are usually recommended as first-line treatment. Calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate is well tolerated and more effective than either of its individual components. Localized phototherapy is better than generalized phototherapy on hair-bearing areas. Methotrexate, cyclosporine, fumaric acid esters, and acitretin are well-recognized agents in the treatment of psoriasis, but we found no published RCTs evaluating these agents specifically in scalp psoriasis. Biologics and new small-molecule agents show excellent effects on scalp psoriasis, but the high cost of these treatments mean they may be limited to use in extensive scalp psoriasis. More controlled studies are needed for an evidence-based approach to scalp psoriasis.

  14. Evidence-based medicine: Dupuytren contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Charles

    2014-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: (1) Describe features and clinical importance of Dupuytren diathesis. (2) Explain the difference between the new definition of recurrence used in collagenase studies compared with prior definitions of recurrence. (3) Compare and list the main advantage/main disadvantage of fasciectomy versus minimally invasive treatment (collagenase injection or needle aponeurotomy) of Dupuytren contracture. The large body of existing literature on Dupuytren disease is spread across many journals in many specialties. It is thus a daunting task for practitioners to follow trends and practice recommendations. It is also a testimony to the lack of an acceptable solution to this common problem. Recent publications provide evidence to highlight controversies and challenge some traditional teachings. Literature from 2010 to 2012 was reviewed with the intent of clarifying some of these issues.

  15. Evidence theory and differential evolution based uncertainty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gap Theory: Decisions under severe uncertainty, Second edition. London: Academic Press. Byeng D Y, Choi K, Liu D and David G 2007 Integration of possibility-based optimization to robust design for epistemic uncertainty. ASME J. Mech. Des.

  16. Starting Strong: Evidence-­Based Early Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Katrin; Beauchat, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Four evidence-based instructional approaches create an essential resource for any early literacy teacher or coach. Improve your teaching practices in all areas of early literacy. Use four proven instructional approaches--standards based, evidenced based, assessment based, and student based--to improve their teaching practice in all areas of early…

  17. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks.

  18. Mutual altruism: evidence from Alzheimer patients and their spouse caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Markus; Pfarr, Christian; Zweifel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Preferences of both Alzheimer patients and their spouse caregivers are related to a willingness-to-pay (WTP) measure which is used to test for the presence of mutual (rather than conventional unilateral) altruism. Contingent valuation experiments were conducted in 2000-2002, involving 126 Alzheimer patients and their caregiving spouses living in the Zurich metropolitan area (Switzerland). WTP values for three hypothetical treatments of the demented patient were elicited. The treatment Stabilization prevents the worsening of the disease, bringing dementia to a standstill. Cure restores patient health to its original level. In No burden, dementia takes its normal course while caregiver's burden is reduced to its level before the disease. The three different types of therapies are reflected in different WTP values of both caregivers and patients, suggesting that moderate levels of Alzheimer's disease still permit clear expression of preference. According to the WTP values found, patients do not rank Cure higher than No burden, implying that their preferences are entirely altruistic. Caregiving spouses rank Cure before Burden, reflecting less than perfect altruism which accounts for some 40 percent of their total WTP. Still, this constitutes evidence of mutual altruism. VALUE: The evidence suggests that WTP values reflect individuals' preferences even in Alzheimer patients. The estimates suggest that an economically successful treatment should provide relief to caregivers, with its curative benefits being of secondary importance.

  19. Extending the Reach of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Proposed Categorization of Lower-Level Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank C; Gould, Michael K; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Patel, Sheena

    2018-02-01

    Clinical practice involves making many treatment decisions for which only limited formal evidence exists. While the methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has evolved tremendously, there is a need to better characterize lower-level evidence. This should enhance the ability to appropriately weigh the evidence against other considerations, and counter the temptation to think it is more robust than it actually is. A framework to categorize lower-level evidence is proposed, consisting of nonrandomized comparisons, extrapolation using indirect evidence, rationale, and clinical experience (ie, an accumulated general impression). Subtypes are recognized within these categories, based on the degree of confounding in nonrandomized comparisons, the uncertainty involved in extrapolation from indirect evidence, and the plausibility of a rationale. Categorizing the available evidence in this way can promote a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of using such evidence as the basis for treatment decisions in clinically relevant areas that are devoid of higher-level evidence. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Peer-teaching of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot; Sinha, Yashashwi; Chitnis, Abhishek; Archer, James; Fotheringham, Victoria; Renwick, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Many medical schools teach the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) as part of their undergraduate curriculum. Medical students perceive that EBM is valuable to their undergraduate and postgraduate career. Students may experience barriers to applying EBM principles, especially when searching for evidence or identifying high-quality resources. The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Evidence Search is a service that enables access to authoritative clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practice through a web-based portal. Evidence-based medicine workshops were organised and delivered by fourth-year medical students, having first received training from NICE to become NICE student champions. The workshops covered the basic principles of EBM and focused on retrieving EBM resources for study through the NICE Evidence Search portal. The scheme was evaluated using a pre-workshop survey and an 8-12 week post-workshop survey. Self-reported confidence in searching for evidence-based resources increased from 29 per cent before the workshop to 87 per cent after the workshop. Only 1 per cent of students rated evidence-based resources as their first preference pre-workshop, compared with 31 per cent post-workshop. The results show that although many students were aware of evidence-based resources, they tended not to use them as their preferred resource. Despite appreciating the value of evidence-based resources, few students were confident in accessing and using such resources for pre-clinical study. A peer-taught workshop in EBM improved students' confidence with, and use of, evidence-based resources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evidence-based clinical management and utilization of new technology in European neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Clemens; Jakola, Asgeir S; Gulati, Sasha; Nygaard, Oystein P; Solheim, Ole

    2013-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become one of the pillars of modern patient care. However, neurosurgery has always been an experience-based and technology-driven discipline, and it remains unknown to which extent European neurosurgeons follow high-level evidence-based recommendations. We conducted a Web-based survey with a 15-item questionnaire about evidence-based clinical management and utilization of new technology among European neurosurgeons. Two different sum scores were calculated from the questions concerning clinical practice; evidence-based treatment score and new technology score. A high evidence-based treatment score means that more clinical conditions (i.e., study questions) were managed in compliance with the available highest levels of evidence from published clinical trials. A high new technology score reflects the use of a high number of modern tools in neurosurgical practice. A total of 239 neurosurgeons from 30 different European countries answered the questionnaire. There were large variations among European neurosurgeons in providing evidence-based care and in utilization of various modern tools. There were significant regional differences in evidence-based treatment scores and modern technology scores with higher scores in northern and western Europe. High-volume institutions were not associated with better evidence-based treatment scores, but had significantly higher new technology scores. There were significantly higher new technology scores at university hospitals and a trend towards higher evidence-based treatment scores compared to other hospitals. Clinical management in neurosurgery does not always comply with the best available evidence and there are large regional differences in clinical management and in utilization of various modern tools. The position of evidence-based medicine in European neurosurgery seems weak and this may be a threat to the quality of care.

  2. Nutrition in the ICU: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Svetang V; McClave, Stephen A; Rice, Todd W

    2014-05-01

    Providing artificial nutrition is an important part of caring for critically ill patients. However, because of a paucity of robust data, the practice has been highly variable and often based more on dogma than evidence. A number of studies have been published investigating many different aspects of critical care nutrition. Although the influx of data has better informed the practice, the results have often been conflicting or counter to prevailing thought, resulting in discordant opinions and different interpretations by experts in the field. In this article, we review and summarize the data from a number of the published studies, including studies investigating enteral vs parenteral nutrition, supplementing enteral with parenteral nutrition, and use of immunonutrition. In addition, published studies informing the practice of how best to provide enteral nutrition will be reviewed, including the use of trophic feedings, gastric residual volumes, and gastric vs postpyloric tube placement.

  3. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  4. Evidence-based acute bronchitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Kimberly L; Atkins, Aaron

    2012-12-01

    Acute bronchitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the large airways within the lung accompanied by a cough lasting from 1 to 3 weeks. The inflammation occurs as a result of an airway infection or environmental trigger, with viral infections accounting for an estimated 89% to 95% of cases. Symptomatic treatment of cough is primarily required for patients, though in most cases the condition is self-limiting. Therapy consists of both nonpharmacological and pharmacological options to include antibiotics and antivirals, antitussive agents, protussive agents, and beta-2-agonists. This article reviews the treatment options for acute bronchitis and recommends criteria for use.

  5. Evidence Based Conservative Management of Patello-femoral Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is defined as pain surrounding the patella when sitting with bent knees for prolonged periods of time or when performing activities like ascending or descending stairs, squatting or   athletic activities. Patella dislocation is not included in PFPS.     Purpose:   This review analyzes the evidence based conservative management of PFPS.   Methods:   A Cochrane Library search related to PFPS was performed until 18 January 2014. The key words were: patellofemoral pain syndrome. Eight papers were found, of which three were reviewed because they were focused   on the topic of the article. We also searched the PubMed using the following keywords: evidence based conservative   management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Twelve articles were found, of which seven were reviewed because   they were focused on the topic of the article. Overall ten articles were analyzed.     Results:   Different treatments can be tried for PFPS, including pharmacotherapy, therapeutic ultrasound, exercise therapy, and taping and braces.     Conclusions:   Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may reduce pain in the short term, but pain does not improve after three months. Therapeutic ultrasound appears not to have a clinically important effect on pain relief for   patients with PFPS. The evidence that exercise therapy is more effective in treating PFPS than no exercise is limited   with respect to pain reduction, and conflicting with respect to functional improvement. No significant difference has   been found between taping and non-taping. The role of knee braces is still controversial. More well-designed studies are needed.

  6. Evidence Based Conservative Management of Patello-femoral Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is defined as pain surrounding the patella when sitting with bent knees for prolonged periods of time or when performing activities like ascending or descending stairs, squatting or   athletic activities. Patella dislocation is not included in PFPS.     Purpose:   This review analyzes the evidence based conservative management of PFPS.   Methods:   A Cochrane Library search related to PFPS was performed until 18 January 2014. The key words were: patellofemoral pain syndrome. Eight papers were found, of which three were reviewed because they were focused   on the topic of the article. We also searched the PubMed using the following keywords: evidence based conservative   management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Twelve articles were found, of which seven were reviewed because   they were focused on the topic of the article. Overall ten articles were analyzed.     Results:   Different treatments can be tried for PFPS, including pharmacotherapy, therapeutic ultrasound, exercise therapy, and taping and braces.     Conclusions:   Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may reduce pain in the short term, but pain does not improve after three months. Therapeutic ultrasound appears not to have a clinically important effect on pain relief for   patients with PFPS. The evidence that exercise therapy is more effective in treating PFPS than no exercise is limited   with respect to pain reduction, and conflicting with respect to functional improvement. No significant difference has   been found between taping and non-taping. The role of knee braces is still controversial. More well-designed studies are needed.    

  7. Is there still an indication for nursing patients with prolonged neutropenia in protective isolation? An evidence-based nursing and medical study of 4 years experience for nursing patients with neutropenia without isolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mank, Arno; van der Lelie, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Patients with severe neutropenia due to high-dose chemotherapy and/or total-body irradiation are at risk of serious infections and are frequently nursed in strict protective isolation. This is a costly procedure and results in a psychological burden for the patient and its significance has been

  8. How to proceed when evidence-based practice is required but very little evidence available?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Lanlo, Olivier; Walker, Bruce F

    2013-01-01

    All clinicians of today know that scientific evidence is the base on which clinical practice should rest. However, this is not always easy, in particular in those disciplines, where the evidence is scarce. Although the last decades have brought an impressive production of research that is of inte...

  9. Using artificial intelligence to bring evidence-based medicine a step closer to making the individual difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, B; Gray, W A; Bater, A; Morrey, D

    2007-03-01

    The vision of evidence-based medicine is that of experienced clinicians systematically using the best research evidence to meet the individual patient's needs. This vision remains distant from clinical reality, as no complete methodology exists to apply objective, population-based research evidence to the needs of an individual real-world patient. We describe an approach, based on techniques from machine learning, to bridge this gap between evidence and individual patients in oncology. We examine existing proposals for tackling this gap and the relative benefits and challenges of our proposed, k-nearest-neighbour-based, approach.

  10. Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice: Revisions and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Cullen, Laura; Hanrahan, Kirsten; Kleiber, Charmaine; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Rakel, Barbara; Steelman, Victoria; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Tucker, Sharon

    2017-06-01

    The Iowa Model is a widely used framework for the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). Changes in health care (e.g., emergence of implementation science, emphasis on patient engagement) prompted the re-evaluation, revision, and validation of the model. A systematic multi-step process was used capturing information from the literature and user feedback via an electronic survey and live work groups. The Iowa Model Collaborative critically assessed and synthesized information and recommendations before revising the model. Survey participants (n = 431) had requested access to the Model between years 2001 and 2013. Eighty-eight percent (n = 379) of participants reported using the Iowa Model and identified the most problematic steps as: topic priority, critique, pilot, and institute change. Users provided 587 comments with rich contextual rationale and insightful suggestions. The revised model was then evaluated by participants (n = 299) of the 22nd National EBP Conference in 2015. They validated the model as a practical tool for the EBP process across diverse settings. Specific changes in the model are discussed. This user driven revision differs from other frameworks in that it links practice changes within the system. Major model changes are expansion of piloting, implementation, patient engagement, and sustaining change. The Iowa Model-Revised remains an application-oriented guide for the EBP process. Intended users are point of care clinicians who ask questions and seek a systematic, EBP approach to promote excellence in health care. © 2017 University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Why evidence-based medicine is a good approach in physical and rehabilitation medicine. Thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, S

    2014-10-01

    According to a good definition, evidence-based medicine (EBM) is: "The explicit, conscientious, and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients (and populations)". More appropriate in a clinical context like that of physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) is looking at evidence based clinical practice (EBCP), whose definition is: "The integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values". In the past the term evidence-based physical and rehabilitation medicine (EBPRM) was also proposed. In this thesis, after some historical notes on EBM and on PRM, we will discuss why in our view EBPRM must be the real foundation of our everyday PRM clinical practice.

  12. Treatment of neuromyelitis optica: an evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by severe optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. Aquaporin-4 antibody is positive in a high percentage of NMO patients and it is directed against this water channel richly expressed on foot processes of astrocytes. Due to the severity of NMO attacks and the high risk for disability, treatment should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed. There is increasing evidence that NMO patients respond differently from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, and, therefore, treatments for MS may not be suitable for NMO. Acute NMO attacks usually are treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroid pulse and plasmapheresis. Maintenance therapy is also required to avoid further attacks and it is based on low-dose oral corticosteroids and non-specific immunosuppressant drugs, like azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. New therapy strategies using monoclonal antibodies like rituximab have been tested in NMO, with positive results in open label studies. However, there is no controlled randomized trial to confirm the safety and efficacy for the drugs currently used in NMO.

  13. Preparing Dental Students and Residents to Overcome Internal and External Barriers to Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Brandon G; Johnson, Thomas M; Erley, Kenneth J; Topolski, Richard; Rethman, Michael; Lancaster, Douglas D

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, evidence-based dentistry has become the ideal for research, academia, and clinical practice. However, barriers to implementation are many, including the complexity of interpreting conflicting evidence as well as difficulties in accessing it. Furthermore, many proponents of evidence-based care seem to assume that good evidence consistently exists and that clinicians can and will objectively evaluate data so as to apply the best evidence to individual patients' needs. The authors argue that these shortcomings may mislead many clinicians and that students should be adequately prepared to cope with some of the more complex issues surrounding evidence-based practice. Cognitive biases and heuristics shape every aspect of our lives, including our professional behavior. This article reviews literature from medicine, psychology, and behavioral economics to explore the barriers to implementing evidence-based dentistry. Internal factors include biases that affect clinical decision making: hindsight bias, optimism bias, survivor bias, and blind-spot bias. External factors include publication bias, corporate bias, and lack of transparency that may skew the available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. Raising awareness of how these biases exert subtle influence on decision making and patient care can lead to a more nuanced discussion of addressing and overcoming barriers to evidence-based practice.

  14. Evidence-based programs registry: blueprints for Healthy Youth Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Elliott, Delbert S

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing demand for evidence-based programs to promote healthy youth development, but this growth has been accompanied by confusion related to varying definitions of evidence-based and mixed messages regarding which programs can claim this designation. The registries that identify evidence-based programs, while intended to help users sift through the findings and claims regarding programs, has oftentimes led to more confusion with their differing standards and program ratings. The advantages of using evidence-based programs and the importance of adopting a high standard of evidence, especially when taking programs to scale,are described. One evidence-based registry is highlighted--Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development hosted at the University of Colorado Boulder. Unlike any previous initiative of its kind, Blueprints established unmatched standards for identifying evidence-based programs and has acted in a way similar to the FDA--evaluating evidence, data and research to determine which programs meet their high standard of proven efficacy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. [Device-based remote monitoring : Current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, David; Michalski, Roman; Müller-Leisse, Johanna; Zormpas, Christos; König, Thorben; Veltmann, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Telemedicine is increasingly used in clinical cardiology. It offers early detection of arrhythmias, technical device follow-up and support of heart failure management. Regarding technical device follow-up, remote monitoring significantly reduces usage of the health care system. Furthermore, remote monitoring is associated with a significantly reduced time from device malfunction to physician's perception of the event. Using remote monitoring, inappropriate ICD (implantable cardioverter defibrillator) shocks can be significantly reduced compared to routine in-office follow-up. In retrospective studies and meta-analyses a prognostic benefit with respect to mortality has been shown. Device-based detection of atrial fibrillation and atrial high rate episodes is feasible. However, clinical relevance is currently studied in prospective randomized clinical trials. Heart failure management based on surrogate parameters has not been shown to significantly improve outcome. However, therapeutic management based on pulmonary artery pressure has been shown to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. This review offers a comprehensive overview on the role of remote monitoring in heart failure management, technical device follow-up and detection of atrial fibrillation and atrial high rate episodes.

  16. 2015 Evidence Analysis Library Evidence-Based Nutrition Practice Guideline for the Management of Hypertension in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Shannon L; DellaValle, Diane M; Rodder, Susan G; Prest, Melissa; Sinley, Rachel C; Hoy, M Katherine; Papoutsakis, Constantina

    2017-09-01

    Hypertension (HTN) or high blood pressure (BP) is among the most prevalent forms of cardiovascular disease and occurs in approximately one of every three adults in the United States. The purpose of this Evidence Analysis Library (EAL) guideline is to provide an evidence-based summary of nutrition therapy for the management of HTN in adults aged 18 years or older. Implementation of this guideline aims to promote evidence-based practice decisions by registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs), and other collaborating health professionals to decrease or manage HTN in adults while enhancing patient quality of life and taking into account individual preferences. The systematic review and guideline development methodology of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics were applied. A total of 70 research studies were included, analyzed, and rated for quality by trained evidence analysts (literature review dates ranged between 2004 and 2015). Evaluation and synthesis of related evidence resulted in the development of nine recommendations. To reduce BP in adults with HTN, there is strong evidence to recommend provision of medical nutrition therapy by an RDN, adoption of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary pattern, calcium supplementation, physical activity as a component of a healthy lifestyle, reduction in dietary sodium intake, and reduction of alcohol consumption in heavy drinkers. Increased intake of dietary potassium and calcium as well as supplementation with potassium and magnesium for lowering BP are also recommended (fair evidence). Finally, recommendations related to lowering BP were formulated on vitamin D, magnesium, and the putative role of alcohol consumption in moderate drinkers (weak evidence). In conclusion, the present evidence-based nutrition practice guideline describes the most current recommendations on the dietary management of HTN in adults intended to support the practice of RDNs and other health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Academy of

  17. Developing Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Era of Evidence-Based Medicine: Current Evidences and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Foon Yin; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM), by integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research, has in recent years been established as the standard of modern medical practice for greater treatment efficacy and safety. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on the other hand, evolved as a system of medical practice from ancient China more than 2000 years ago based on empirical knowledge as well as theories and concepts which are yet to be mapped by...

  18. Evidence Based Nursing. A new perspective for Greek Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Ouzouni; Konstantinos Nakakis

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that nursing research has been developed in Greece, nevertheless the provision of nursing care is not based on current research findings, but rather on the knowledge gained by nurses during their undergraduate education. The transition of medicine in the last decade towards evidence based practice had definitely an impact on the nursing profession.The aim of this article is to briefly present evidence based nursing as a process and perspective to Greek nurses.Method: A litera...

  19. Recommendations on evidence needed to support measurement equivalence between electronic and paper-based patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures: ISPOR ePRO Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Stephen Joel; Gwaltney, Chad J; Hays, Ron D; Lundy, J Jason; Sloan, Jeff A; Revicki, Dennis A; Lenderking, William R; Cella, David; Basch, Ethan

    2009-06-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are the consequences