WorldWideScience

Sample records for evidence based medicine

  1. Evidence-Based Medicine: Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew K; Most, Sam P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly prominent in the climate of modern day healthcare. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the integration of the best available evidence with clinical experience and expertise to help guide clinical decision-making. The essential tenets of evidence-based medicine can be applied to both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Current outcome measures in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty, including objective, subjective, and clinician-reported measures, is summarized and the current data is reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Corroborating evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebius, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Proponents of evidence-based medicine (EBM) have argued convincingly for applying this scientific method to medicine. However, the current methodological framework of the EBM movement has recently been called into question, especially in epidemiology and the philosophy of science. The debate has focused on whether the methodology of randomized controlled trials provides the best evidence available. This paper attempts to shift the focus of the debate by arguing that clinical reasoning involves a patchwork of evidential approaches and that the emphasis on evidence hierarchies of methodology fails to lend credence to the common practice of corroboration in medicine. I argue that the strength of evidence lies in the evidence itself, and not the methodology used to obtain that evidence. Ultimately, when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of medical interventions, it is the evidence obtained from the methodology rather than the methodology that should establish the strength of the evidence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. From Evidence Based Medicine to Medicine Based Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Hayes-Conroy, Allison; Caricchio, Roberto; Singer, Burton H

    2017-11-01

    Evidence based medicine, using randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses as the major tools and sources of evidence about average results for heterogeneous groups of patients, developed as a reaction against poorly designed observational treatment research and physician reliance on personal experience with other patients as a guide to decision-making about a patient at hand. However, these tools do not answer the clinician's question: "Will a given therapeutic regimen help my patient at a given point in her/his clinical course?" We introduce fine-grained profiling of the patient at hand, accompanied by comparative evidence of responses from approximate matches to this patient on whom a contemplated treatment has/has not been administered. This represents medicine based evidence that is tuned to decision-making for the particular patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. History of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger L Sur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay reviews the historical circumstances surrounding the introduction and evolution of evidence-based medicine. Criticisms of the approach are also considered. Weaknesses of existing standards of clinical practice and efforts to bring more certainty to clinical decision making were the foundation for evidence-based medicine, which integrates epidemiology and medical research. Because of its utility in designing randomized clinical trials, assessing the quality of the literature, and applying medical research at the bedside, evidence-based medicine will continue to have a strong influence on everyday clinical practice.

  5. Evidence of me” in evidence based medicine?

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Evidence based medicine provides independent, validated advice about treatment options, but does it take sufficient account of individual patients' values to provide them with an optimal health outcome?

  6. What's Wrong with Evidence-Based Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fins, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Medicine in the last decades of the twentieth century was ripe for a data sweep that would bring systematic analysis to treatment strategies that seemingly had stood the test of time but were actually unvalidated. Coalescing under the banner of evidence-based medicine, this process has helped to standardize care, minimize error, and promote patient safety. But with this advancement, something of the art of medicine has been lost. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  7. Evidence-Based Medicine: Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Christopher T; Neinstein, Ryan M; Theodorou, Spero J

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Review the appropriate indications and techniques for suction-assisted lipectomy body contouring surgery. 2. Accurately calculate the patient limits of lidocaine for safe dosing during the tumescent infiltration phase of liposuction. 3. Determine preoperatively possible "red flags" or symptoms and signs in the patient history and physical examination that may indicate a heightened risk profile for a liposuction procedure. 4. Provide an introduction to adjunctive techniques to liposuction such as energy-assisted liposuction and to determine whether or not the reader may decide to add them to his or her practice. With increased focus on one's aesthetic appearance, liposuction has become the most popular cosmetic procedure in the world since its introduction in the 1980s. As it has become more refined with experience, safety, patient selection, preoperative assessment, fluid management, proper technique, and overall care of the patient have been emphasized and improved. For the present article, a systematic review of the relevant literature regarding patient workup, tumescent fluid techniques, medication overview, and operative technique was conducted with a practical approach that the reader will possibly find clinically applicable. Recent trends regarding energy-assisted liposuction and body contouring local anesthesia use are addressed. Deep venous thromboembolism prophylaxis is mentioned, as are other common and less common possible complications. The article provides a literature-supported overview on liposuction techniques with an emphasis on preoperative assessment, medicines used, operative technique, and outcomes.

  8. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine is of vital importance for improving quality of care, promoting public health and health system development. Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine allows using the most powerful information source, which have ever existed in medicine. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching Evidence-Based Medicine, including long-term outcomes of training. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Astana, where the Scientific and Educational Center of Evidence-Based Medicine was established in 2010 with the help of the corresponding project of the World Bank. The participants of the study were the faculty trained in Evidence-Based Medicine at the workshop "Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine" for the period of 2010-2015 years. There were a total of 16 workshops during the period, and 323 employees were trained. All participants were asked to complete our questionnaire two times: before the training - pre-training (to determine the initial level of a listener) and after the training - post-training (to determine the acquired level and get the feedback). Questionnaires were prepared in such a way, that the majority of questions before and after training were identical. Thus, it provided a clear picture of the effectiveness of training. Questions in the survey were open-ended so that the respondents had the opportunity to freely and fully express their views. The main part of the questionnaires included the following questions: "Do you understand what evidence-based medicine is", "how do you understand what the study design means", "what is randomization", "how research is classified", "do you know the steps of decision-making according to Evidence-Based Medicine, list them", "what literature do you prefer to use when searching for information (print, electronic, etc.)", "what resources on the Internet do you prefer to use". Only 30-35% of respondents gave correct answers to the questions on

  9. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Observation, Sherlock Holmes, and Evidence Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John

    2002-01-01

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh between 1876 and 1881 under Doctor Joseph Bell who emphasised in his teaching the importance of observation, deduction and evidence. Sherlock Holmes was modelled on Joseph Bell. The modern notions of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) are not new. A very brief indication of some of the history of EBM is presented including a discussion of the important and usually overlooked contribution of statisticians to the Popperian philosophy of EBM.

  11. Evidence-Based Medicine in Facial Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, William M; Christophel, John Jared; Park, Stephen S

    2017-11-01

    This article provides the reader with a comprehensive review of high-level evidence-based medicine in facial trauma and highlights areas devoid of high-level evidence. The article is organized in the order one might approach a clinical problem: starting with the workup, followed by treatment considerations, operative decisions, and postoperative treatments. Individual injuries are discussed within each section, with an overview of the available high-level clinical evidence. This article not only provides a quick reference for the facial traumatologist, but also allows the reader to identify areas that lack high-level evidence, perhaps motivating future endeavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence based medicine in physical medicine and rehabilitation (English version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Kern

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years the term “Evidence Based Medicine (EBM” has spread into all areas of medicine and is often used for decision-making in the medical and public health sector. It is also used to verify the significance and/or the effectiveness of different therapies. The definition of EBM is to use the physician’s individual expertise, the patient’s needs and the best external evidence for each individual patient. Today, however, the term EBM is often wrongly used as a synonym for best “external evidence”. This leads not only to a misuse of evidence based medicine but suggests a fundamental misunderstanding of the model which was created by Gordon Guyatt, David Sackett and Archibald Cochrane. This problem becomes even greater the more social insurance institutions, public healthcare providers and politicians use external evidence alone as a main guideline for financing therapies in physical medicine and general rehabilitation without taking into account the physician’s expertise and the patient’s needs.The wrong interpretation of EBM can lead to the following problems: well established clinical therapies are either questioned or not granted and are therefore withheld from patients (for example physical pain management. Absence of evidence for individual therapy methods does not prove their ineffectiveness! In this short statement the significance of EBM in physical medicine and general rehabilitation will be analysed and discussed.

  13. Why evidence-based medicine failed in patient care and medicine-based evidence will succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Singer, Burton H

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has succeeded in strengthening the evidence base for population medicine. Where EBM has failed is in answering the practicing doctor's question of what a likely outcome would be when a given treatment is administered to a particular patient with her own distinctive biological and biographical (life experience) profile. We propose Medicine-based evidence (MBE), based on the profiles of individual patients, as the evidence base for individualized or personalized medicine. MBE will build an archive of patient profiles using data from all study types and data sources, and will include both clinical and socio-behavioral information. The clinician seeking guidance for the management of an individual patient will start with the patient's longitudinal profile and find approximate matches in the archive that describes how similar patients responded to a contemplated treatment and alternative treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Eminence-based medicine versus evidence-based medicine: level V evidence in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Ganley, Theodore J; Kapur, Rahul; Kelly, John; Sennett, Brian J; Bernstein, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    cannot replace individual judgment and certainly does not trump the primary medical literature. Yet when better evidence is lacking, expert opinion is valuable for even the staunchest practitioner of evidence-based medicine.

  15. Evidence-based medicine, meer dan evidence alleen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Marlous|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357299817; Bartelink, Marie Louise|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/100449069

    2017-01-01

    Aan de praktijk van evidence-based medicine (EBM) besteden we in de huisartsopleiding te weinig aandacht. Iedere huisarts die de adviezen uit een NHG-Standaard volgt, of ervan afwijkt, doet aan EBM: het wegen van beschikbare evidence met de eigen ervaring en met de voorkeuren van de patiënt.

  16. Evidence based medicine in physical medicine and rehabilitation (German version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Kern

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years the term “Evidence Based Medicine (EBM” has been increasingly applied in all areas of medicine and is often used for decision-making in the medical and public health sector. It is also used to verify the significance and/or the effectiveness of different therapies. The original definition of EBM rests on the following three pillars: the physician’s individual expertise, the patient’s needs and the best external evidence. Today, however, the term EBM is often wrongly used as a synonym for best external evidence, without taking into consideration the other two pillars of the model which was created by Gordon Guyatt, David Sackett and Archibald Cochrane. This problem becomes even greater the more social insurance institutions and politicians use external evidence alone as the main guideline for financing therapies and therapy guidelines in physical medicine and general rehabilitation without taking into account the physician’s expertise and the patient’s needs.The wrong interpretation of EBM can lead to the following problems: well established clinical therapies are either questioned or not granted and are therefore withheld from patients (for example physical pain management. An absence of evidence for individual therapy methods does not prove their ineffectiveness! In this short statement the significance of EBM in Physical Medicine and general rehabilitation will be analysed and discussed.

  17. [Alternative medicines and "Evidence-Based Medicine" a possible reconciliation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherweghem, J-L

    2015-09-01

    The contrast between the efficiency of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a scientific fact, and the popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) is a paradox of the art of healing. EBM is based on the paradigm of positivism and materialism while CAM are based on those of relativism and vitalism. These paradigms are diametrically opposed and the aim of an integrative medicine is aporetic. However, EBM is today in a dead end. The objective proof of a disease according to the rules of EBM is often lacking face to the expectations of patients demanding their illness to be taken into account. EBM and CAM have thus to coexist. Lessons can be drawn from CAM : patient expectations should be given a meaning and be integrated in his or her psychosocial context.

  18. Empirical methods for systematic reviews and evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enst, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Systematic reviews have become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, which is reflected in the position systematic reviews have in the pyramid of evidence-based medicine. Systematic

  19. Underdetermination in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Yee, Benjamin H

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the philosophical implications of evidence-based medicine's (EBM's) epistemology in terms of the problem of underdetermination of theory by evidence as expounded by the Duhem-Quine thesis. EBM hierarchies of evidence privilege clinical research over basic science, exacerbating the problem of underdetermination. Because of severe underdetermination, EBM is unable to meaningfully test core medical beliefs that form the basis of our understanding of disease and therapeutics. As a result, EBM adopts an epistemic attitude that is sceptical of explanations from the basic biological sciences, and is relegated to a view of disease at a population level. EBM's epistemic attitude provides a limited research heuristic by preventing the development of a theoretical framework required for understanding disease mechanism and integrating knowledge to develop new therapies. Medical epistemology should remain pluralistic and include complementary approaches of basic science and clinical research, thus avoiding the limited epistemic attitude entailed by EBM hierarchies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Communication problems in evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Lisbeth

    2002-02-21

    From a humanistic, social scientific perspective, the most complex task in evidence-based medicine lies in the communication of specialized medical knowledge to non-professionals. Information is never simply the neutral transmission of facts, not even when dealing with scientific knowledge and research. It is always interpreted and evaluated from a particular perspective in a specific context. That information can be neutral is thus a myth. In all medical consultations the process of communication is not just a matter of transmitting information from one who knows to one who does not. Knowledge created and formulated in a scientific context is thus recontextualised first in a clinical situation and then as an interpreted version in people's real lives. Furthermore there are difficulties when practice must be based on current research, in a situation in which no prior clinical experience exists and in which results are interpreted and used regardless of the relative certainty of current evidence.

  2. The personalised medicine: a paradigm of evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhavendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of "evidence-based medicine" aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the individualised patient care. The clinical genetics evolved from translational genetics research and contributes to the clinical care of patients and families through evidence-based health care in managing inherited disorders through accurate diagnosis, molecular pathology and assessing phenotypic correlations. Translational genetics and genomics research has led to the development of powerful tools for clinical diagnosis, assessing individual's genomic profile for disease prediction/prevention, high-throughput genome-wide screening for predisposition and/or protection to complex medical conditions, and discovery and development of new drugs and vaccines. Gene mapping and deciphering pathogenic mutations have helped in unravelling the basic biological mechanisms leading to new drug discovery and development. Targeted pharmacotherapy is now possible for managing the highly penetrant multi-system dominantly inherited conditions. Notable examples include rapamycin (sirolimus in suppressing the mTOR pathway associated hamartomas in dominantly inherited cancer family syndromes and angiotensin converting enzyme receptor blockers (ACE-RB in preventing aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome and related familial arteriopathies. The translational genomic research is the essential prerequisite for developing sound evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic clinical protocols for the practice of personalised clinical medicine.

  3. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srihari, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical…

  4. [THE FOUNDATIONS OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasleau, F

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) are the clinical experience, the application of best evidences from research and the consideration of patient expectations. It enabled significant progresses in the management of diseases with a low or multifactorial causality. But it has also led to unintended negative consequences, partly related to conflicts of interest. The objective of this article is to bring the attention back to the scientific rigor that must sustain the medical practice, namely in the occurrence : 1) formulating a question that addresses all the elements of an individual clinical situation; 2) exploring the literature systematically; 3) estimating the degree of confidence in the conclusions of clinical trials. EBM provides intuitive tools to address some uncomfortable concepts of biostatistics and to identify the biases and the embellished data that invalidate many studies. However, it is difficult to decide of the care of a single patient from observations issued from the comparison of'heterogeneous groups. Personalized medicine should help to overcome this difficulty and should facilitate clinical decision making by targeting the patients who are most likely to benefit from an intervention without much inconvenience.

  5. Evidence-based medicine: a commentary on common criticisms

    OpenAIRE

    Straus, Sharon E.; McAlister, Finlay A.

    2000-01-01

    Discussions about evidence-based medicine engender both negative and positive reactions from clinicians and academics. Ways to achieve evidence-based practice are reviewed here and the most common criticisms described. The latter can be classified as ”limitations universal to the practice of medicine,” ”limitations unique to evidence-based medicine” and ”misperceptions of evidence-based medicine.” Potential solutions to the true limitations of evidence-based medicine are discussed and areas f...

  6. Developing Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Era of Evidence-Based Medicine: Current Evidences and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Fung, Foon Yin; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM), by integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research, has in recent years been established as the standard of modern medical practice for greater treatment efficacy and safety. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on the other hand, evolved as a system of medical practice from ancient China more than 2000 years ago based on empirical knowledge as well as theories and concepts which are yet to be mapped by...

  7. Evidence-based medicine in general practice specialty training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Aio’s huisartsgeneeskunde hebben adequate kennis ten aanzien van evidence-based medicine (geneeskunde op basis van bewijs). In de huisartspraktijk is evidence-based gedrag vaak niet direct zichtbaar, maar artsen kunnen wel aangeven op welk aspect van evidence-based medicine de voorgeschreven

  8. Science and Pseudoscience in Medicine: Evidence-Based vs. Evidence-Biased Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, Miro; Ostojić, Ljerka

    2016-12-01

    The concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM), as the highest standard of health care, came into existence in 1990s to promote a systematic approach to helping clinicians in their practice to be guided by the best available scientific evidence. However, there has been an increasing number of warning reports that in modern research, misrepresented, false and unuseful findings may be the majority or even the vast majority of published research claims In spite of the huge scientific progress, pseudoscience and associated evidence biased medicine represent a serious threat to the concept of the EBM. Effective education in medicine, proper research motivation, sound systems and creative thinking and culture of scientific dialogue may significantly contribute to better science and evidence-based medicine. The seven key words of good science, research and publishing are: integrity, motivation, capacity, understanding, knowledge, experience, and creativity.

  9. Evidence-based Medicine Search: a customizable federated search engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bracke, Paul J; Howse, David K; Keim, Samuel M

    2008-01-01

    ...) health sciences programs and to the University Medical Center. Librarians at AHSL collaborated with UA College of Medicine faculty to create an innovative search engine, Evidence-based Medicine (EBM...

  10. Relationship among Translational Medicine, Evidence-Based Medicine and Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-en HUANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Translational medicine is a new concept in international medical field. It integrates experimental research results and clinical guidance into the optimal implementation criteria for promoting the prediction, prevention and treatment of diseases. Based on people’s higher demand for medicine and health, appearance of translational medicine changes the mode of medical research.Evidence-based medicine (EBM refers to cautious and accurate application of the current best research evidence and combination of the clinician’s professional skills and abundant clinical experience to consider the patients willing and value, consequently making the best diagnostic regimens for patients. Recently, some scholars have begun to question why the patients with the same diagnosis, course of disease and pathological condition have different efficacies and prognosis after treatment with the same drug. So far, an accurate answer cannot be given based on the research data of EBM to implement translational medicine. The concept of precision medicine is accepted gradually with the development of disease management model. In this study, practice and enlightenment of translational medicine, effect of EBM on translational medicine, EBM limitations as well as emergence and development trend of precision medicine were all reviewed in order to investigate the relationship among translational medicine, EBM and precision medicine.

  11. Evidence based medicine and the plastic surgery literature in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The principles of evidence-based medicine places case reports in the lower level of the hierarchy of scientific evidence. With the increased advocacy of evidence-based medicine, the survival of the case report has been threatened, prompting several authors to call for its preservation. Materials and methods: ...

  12. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. : What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Bal (Roland)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more

  13. Evidence Based Medicine in Pediatric Practice: Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Akhondian, Javad; Najafi-Sani, Mehri; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Practicing medicine according to the best evidence is gaining popularity in the medical societies. Although this concept, which is usually called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been explained in many resources, it has not been addressed enough in pediatrics. In this review, we briefly explained Evidence Based Medicine approach and its applications in pediatrics in order to help the pediatricians to efficiently integrate EBM into their daily practice. PMID:23056715

  14. Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Fredric M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

  15. Internal Medicine Residents’ Views and Understanding of Evidence Based Medicine in Shiraz Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Moghadami M; Amini M

    2005-01-01

    Background and pupose: Evidence based medicine bas become on increasing important topic in recent years in medical schools. The internal medicine residents as important group in managing patient need evidences for better diagnosis and treatment. Our intension was to investigate view and understanding of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among internal medicine residents. Methods: in 3 teaching hospital in shiraz university of medical school in Iran, a questionnaire was give to internal medicin...

  16. Internal Medicine Residents’ Views and Understanding of Evidence Based Medicine in Shiraz Medical School

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Moghadami; M Amini

    2009-01-01

    Background and pupose: Evidence based medicine bas become on increasing important topic in recent years in medical schools. The internal medicine residents as important group in managing patient need evidences for better diagnosis and treatment. Our intension was to investigate view and understanding of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among internal medicine residents.Methods: in 3 teaching hospital in shiraz university of medical school in Iran, a questionnaire was give to internal medicine re...

  17. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – I. GENERAL PRINCIPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Čuk

    2003-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based medicine is a method that helps physicians find and critically evaluate evidences from the medical literature, and apply the evidences in clinical decision-making. In clinical practice the method supplements core medical skills, clinical experience and emphasizes the importance of clinical research evidence. Evidencebased medicine is characterised by two fundamental principles: first, the scientific evidences alone do not suffice for clinical decision-making, second...

  18. Evidence-based policy as reflexive practice. What can we learn from evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Roland

    2017-04-01

    The call for evidence-based policy is often accompanied by rather uncritical references to the success of evidence-based medicine, leading to often unsuccessful translation attempts. In this paper, I reflect on the practice of evidence-based medicine in an attempt to sketch a more productive approach to translating evidence into the practice of policy making. Discussing three episodes in the history of evidence-based medicine - clinical trials, and the production and use of clinical guidelines - I conclude that the success of evidence-based medicine is based on the creation of reflexive practices in which evidence and practice can be combined productively. In the conclusion, I discuss the prospects of such a practice for evidence-based policy.

  19. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks.

  20. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine. Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    Aim of the review The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its

  1. From evidence based medicine to mechanism based medicine : Reviewing the role of pharmacogenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, Bob; Swen, Jesse; Mulder, Hans; Touw, Daan; Maitland-Van Der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Deneer, Vera

    Aim of the review The translation of evidence based medicine to a specific patient presents a considerable challenge. We present by means of the examples nortriptyline, tramadol, clopidogrel, coumarins, abacavir and antipsychotics the discrepancy between available pharmacogenetic information and its

  2. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application  of  evidence  and  documents.  In  this  study,  criteria  for  evidence-based  practice  in  Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM.

  3. How to understand and conduct evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions regarding the care of individual patients. This concept has gained popularity recently, and its applications have been steadily expanding. Nowadays, the term "evidence-based" is used in numerous situations and conditions, such as evidence-based medicine, evidence-based practice, evidence-based health care, evidence-based social work, evidence-based policy, and evidence-based education. However, many anesthesiologists and their colleagues have not previously been accustomed to utilizing EBM, and they have experienced difficulty in understanding and applying the techniques of EBM to their practice. In this article, the author discusses the brief history, definition, methods, and limitations of EBM. As EBM also involves making use of the best available information to answer questions in clinical practice, the author emphasizes the process of performing evidence-based medicine: generate the clinical question, find the best evidence, perform critical appraisal, apply the evidence, and then evaluate. Levels of evidence and strength of recommendation were also explained. The author expects that this article may be of assistance to readers in understanding, conducting, and evaluating EBM.

  4. Evidence-Based Advances in Rodent Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2017-09-01

    The number of exotic companion pet rodents seen in veterinary practices is growing very rapidly. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association's surveys, more than 2,093,000 pet rodents were kept in US households in 2007 and in 2012 it was more than 2,349,000 animals. This article summarizes the most important evidence-based knowledge in exotic pet rodents (diagnostics of the hyperadrenocorticism in guinea pigs, pituitary tumors in rats, urolithiasis in guinea pigs, use of itopride as prokinetics, use of deslorelin acetate in rodents, cause of dental disease, and prevention of mammary gland tumors in rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence-Based Medicine: Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the key decisions in patient evaluation for cosmetic breast augmentation. 2. Cite key decisions in preoperative planning. 3. Discuss the risks and complications, and key patient education points in breast augmentation. Breast augmentation remains one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The integral information necessary for proper patient selection, preoperative assessment, and surgical approaches are discussed. Current data regarding long term safety and complications are presented to guide the plastic surgeon to an evidence-based approach to the patient seeking breast enhancement to obtain optimal results.

  6. Developing traditional chinese medicine in the era of evidence-based medicine: current evidences and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Foon Yin; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM), by integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research, has in recent years been established as the standard of modern medical practice for greater treatment efficacy and safety. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on the other hand, evolved as a system of medical practice from ancient China more than 2000 years ago based on empirical knowledge as well as theories and concepts which are yet to be mapped by scientific equivalents. Despite the expanding TCM usage and the recognition of its therapeutic benefits worldwide, the lack of robust evidence from the EBM perspective is hindering acceptance of TCM by the Western medicine community and its integration into mainstream healthcare. For TCM to become an integral component of the healthcare system so that its benefits can be rationally harnessed in the best interests of patients, it is essential for TCM to demonstrate its efficacy and safety by high-level evidence in accordance with EBM, though much debate remains on the validity and feasibility of applying the EBM model on this traditional practice. This review aims to discuss the current status of research in TCM, explore the evidences available on its efficacy and safety, and highlight the issues and challenges faced in applying EBM to TCM.

  7. The ethical approach to evidence-based medicine | Kruger | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper will explore the role of evidence-based medicine in ethical practice of health care professionals. It will also address some of its limitations and potential for negative impact on health care.

  8. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Evidence-Based Medicine: Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickrell, Brent B; Hollier, Larry H

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the epidemiology of mandible fractures. 2. Discuss preoperative evaluation of the patient with a mandible fracture. 3. Compare the various modalities of fracture fixation. 4. Identify common complications after fracture repair. In this Maintenance of Certification/Continuing Medical Education article, the reader is provided with a review of the epidemiology, preoperative evaluation, perioperative management, and surgical outcomes of mandible fractures. The objective of this series is to present a review of the literature so that the practicing physician can remain up-to-date on key evidence-based guidelines to enhance management and improve outcomes. The physician can also seek further in-depth study of the topic through the references provided.

  10. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine: A Regional Dissemination Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Wallace, Eleanor Z.; Smith, Lawrence G.; Sullivant, Jean; Dunn, Kathel; McGinn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Described and evaluated an interactive course designed to create a cadre of medical school faculty in New York who could integrate evidence-based medicine into their training programs. Findings for representatives of 30 internal medicine residency programs show the usefulness of the regional dissemination model used. (SLD)

  11. Lost in translation: bibliotherapy and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysart-Gale, Deborah

    2008-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine's (EBM) quantitative methodologies reflect medical science's long-standing mistrust of the imprecision and subjectivity of ordinary descriptive language. However, EBM's attempts to replace subjectivity with precise empirical methods are problematic when clinicians must negotiate between scientific medicine and patients' experience. This problem is evident in the case of bibliotherapy (patient reading as treatment modality), a practice widespread despite its reliance on anecdotal evidence. While EBM purports to replace such flawed practice with reliable evidence-based methods, this essay argues that its aversion to subjective language prevents EBM from effectively evaluating bibliotherapy or making it amenable to clinical and research governance.

  12. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may...

  13. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  14. The challenge of teaching undergraduates evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, R; Brennan, M; Ewers, R; Hudson, C; Daly, J M; Baillie, S; Eisler, M C; Place, E J; Brearley, J; Holmes, M; Handel, I; Shaw, D; McLauchlan, G; McBrearty, A; Cripps, P; Jones, P; Smith, R; Verheyen, K

    2017-09-16

    The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons now lists 'How to evaluate evidence' as a day one competence for newly qualified vets. In this article, representatives from each of the veterinary schools in the UK discuss how the challenge of delivering and assessing the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine in a crowded undergraduate curriculum can be met. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Evidence based medicine, an innovative approach to an old practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a rapidly expanding subject. The aim of this editorial is to give an overview and address some of the practical issues relevant to the developing world. EBM may be defined as the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of ...

  16. Evidence-based medicine: Metacarpal fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob M P; Hammert, Warren C

    2014-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: (1) Determine the need for operative treatment of metacarpal fractures. (2) Describe the position of immobilization for nonoperative treatment of fifth metacarpal fractures. (3) Assess the differences between intramedullary pinning and transverse pinning of displaced metacarpal fractures. (4) Compare the advantages of plating and pinning for treatment of displaced metacarpal fractures. (5) Recognize appropriate timing and treatment of open metacarpal fractures. The body of evidence regarding the treatment of metacarpal fractures continues to grow. Conservative management, closed reduction with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation, intramedullary fixation, and open reduction and internal fixation with plates and/or screws are all accepted treatment modalities. The goal of this review is to highlight the most recent literature and the best evidence available for the management of metacarpal fractures.

  17. Progress in evidence-based medicine: a quarter century on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-07-22

    In response to limitations in the understanding and use of published evidence, evidence-based medicine (EBM) began as a movement in the early 1990s. EBM's initial focus was on educating clinicians in the understanding and use of published literature to optimise clinical care, including the science of systematic reviews. EBM progressed to recognise limitations of evidence alone, and has increasingly stressed the need to combine critical appraisal of the evidence with patient's values and preferences through shared decision making. In another progress, EBM incorporated and further developed the science of producing trustworthy clinical practice guidelines pioneered by investigators in the 1980s. EBM's enduring contributions to clinical medicine include placing the practice of medicine on a solid scientific basis, the development of more sophisticated hierarchies of evidence, the recognition of the crucial role of patient values and preferences in clinical decision making, and the development of the methodology for generating trustworthy recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hemodynamic monitoring in the era of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Perel, Azriel

    2016-12-20

    Hemodynamic instability frequently occurs in critically ill patients. Pathophysiological rationale suggests that hemodynamic monitoring (HM) may identify the presence and causes of hemodynamic instability and therefore may allow targeting therapeutic approaches. However, there is a discrepancy between this pathophysiological rationale to use HM and a paucity of formal evidence (as defined by the strict criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM)) for its use. In this editorial, we discuss that this paucity of formal evidence that HM can improve patient outcome may be explained by both the shortcomings of the EBM methodology in the field of intensive care medicine and the shortcomings of HM itself.

  19. Evidence-based medicine: Dupuytren contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Charles

    2014-05-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: (1) Describe features and clinical importance of Dupuytren diathesis. (2) Explain the difference between the new definition of recurrence used in collagenase studies compared with prior definitions of recurrence. (3) Compare and list the main advantage/main disadvantage of fasciectomy versus minimally invasive treatment (collagenase injection or needle aponeurotomy) of Dupuytren contracture. The large body of existing literature on Dupuytren disease is spread across many journals in many specialties. It is thus a daunting task for practitioners to follow trends and practice recommendations. It is also a testimony to the lack of an acceptable solution to this common problem. Recent publications provide evidence to highlight controversies and challenge some traditional teachings. Literature from 2010 to 2012 was reviewed with the intent of clarifying some of these issues.

  20. Introduction to evidence-based medicine(EBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jae Gol [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-08-01

    EBM is 'the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research.' EBM is the integration of clinical expertise, patient values, and the best evidence into the decision making process for patient care. The practice of EBM is usually triggered by patient encounters which generate questions about the effects of therapy, the utility of diagnostic tests, the prognosis of diseases, or the etiology of disorders. The best evidence is usually found in clinically relevant research that has been conducted using sound methodology. Evidence-based medicine requires new skills of the clinician, including efficient literature-searching, and the application of formal rules of evidence in evaluating the clinical literature. Evidence-based medicine converts the abstract exercise of reading and appraising the literature into the pragmatic process of using the literature to benefit individual patients while simultaneously expanding the clinician's knowledge base. This review will briefly discuss about concepts of evidence medicine and method of critical appraisal of literatures.

  1. Travel medicine research priorities: establishing an evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Elizabeth A; Chen, Lin H; Sanford, Christopher; McCarthy, Anne; Leder, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Travel medicine is the medical subspecialty which promotes healthy and safe travel. Numerous studies have been published that provide evidence for the practice of travel medicine, but gaps exist. The Research Committee of the International Society of Travel Medicine (ISTM) established a Writing Group which reviewed the existing evidence base and identified an initial list of research priorities through an interactive process that included e-mails, phone calls, and smaller meetings. The list was presented to a broader group of travel medicine experts, then was presented and discussed at the Annual ISTM Meeting, and further revised by the Writing Group. Each research question was then subject to literature search to ensure that adequate research had not already been conducted. Twenty-five research priorities were identified and categorized as intended to inform pre-travel encounters, safety during travel, and post-travel management. We have described the research priorities that will help to expand the evidence base in travel medicine. This discussion of research priorities serves to highlight the commitment that the ISTM has in promoting quality travel-related research. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  2. The Outcomes Movement and Evidence Based Medicine in Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Evan.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Evidence based medicine is analyzed from its inception. The authors take the reader through the early formation of ‘scientific medicine’ that has evolved into the multi-purpose tool it has become today. Early proponents and their intentions that sparked evidence base and outcomes are presented: the work of David Sackett, Brian Haynes, Peter Tugwell, and Victor Neufeld is discussed - how they perceived the need for better clinical outcomes that led to a more formalized evidence based practice. The fundamentals are discussed objectively in detail and potential flaws are presented that guide the reader to deeper comprehension. PMID:23506764

  3. Visualization studies on evidence-based medicine domain knowledge (series 3): visualization for dissemination of evidence based medicine information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiantong; Yao, Leye; Li, Youping; Clarke, Mike; Gan, Qi; Li, Yifei; Fan, Yi; Gou, Yongchao; Wang, Li

    2011-05-01

    To identify patterns in information sharing between a series of Chinese evidence based medicine (EBM) journals and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, to determine key evidence dissemination areas for EBM and to provide a scientific basis for improving the dissemination of EBM research. Data were collected on citing and cited from the Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (CJEBM), Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (JEBMc), Chinese Journal of Evidence Based Pediatrics (CJEBP), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Relationships between citations were visualized. High-frequency key words from these sources were identified, to build a word co-occurrence matrix and to map research subjects. CDSR contains a large collection of information of relevance to EBM and its contents are widely cited across many journals, suggesting a well-developed citation environment. The content and citation of the Chinese journals have been increasing in recent years. However, their citation environments are much less developed, and there is a wide variation in the breadth and strength of their knowledge communication, with the ranking from highest to lowest being CJEBM, JEBMc and CJEBP. The content of CDSR is almost exclusively Cochrane intervention reviews examining the effects of healthcare interventions, so it's contribution to EBM is mostly in disease control and treatment. On the other hand, the Chinese journals on evidence-based medicine and practice focused more on areas such as education and research, design and quality of clinical trials, evidence based policymaking, evidence based clinical practice, tumor treatment, and pediatrics. Knowledge and findings of EBM are widely communicated and disseminated. However, citation environments and range of knowledge communication differ greatly between the journals examined in this study. This finds that Chinese EBM has focused mainly on clinical medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, pediatrics, tumor

  4. Evidence-Based and Personalized Medicine. It's [AND] not [OR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhles, Sahar; Takkenberg, Johanna Jm; Treasure, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Good clinical practice is an amalgamation of personalized medicine with evidence-based medicine in the best interests of patient. Hence, our title uses Boolean operators to indicate that it is [AND] not [OR]. This is the syntax of formal searching for systematic reviews, ensuring that all the evidence is found. Comprehensive evidence-based guidance can thus be formulated. Many residents and fellows around the world, and their chiefs, are now exposed to consensus documents, white papers, levels of appropriateness, and guidelines and are in many jurisdictions expected to comply with them. However, they are the summation of many forms of evidence, each of which has its place, and we consider them in turn in this article. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The ethical approach to evidence-based medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based medicine has had a major impact on health care in the last 30 years. This approach has lead to the critical appraisal of therapeutic knowledge. Archie Cochrane, an epidemiologist, gave a series of lectures in 1972 regarding his reflections on the effectiveness and efficiency of health services.1 He ...

  6. Teaching Evidence-based Medicine Using Literature for Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottonen, Merja; Tapanainen, Paivi; Nuutinen, Matti; Rantala, Heikki; Vainionpaa, Leena; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine--the process of using research findings systematically as the basis for clinical decisions--can be taught using problem-solving teaching methods. Evaluates whether it was possible to motivate students to use the original literature by giving them selected patient problems to solve. (Author/ASK)

  7. Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1. ... psychological literature, but these are only available on payment of a subscription. Most of ... 2. Component terms (keywords/phrases) children drug resistant malaria treatment. 3. Alternative terms (synonyms) child drug-resistant resistance multidrug.

  8. Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of evidence based medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the awareness and attitude of hospital resident doctors towards evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their related educational needs. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on a randomly selected sample of 141 hospital resident ...

  9. Peer-teaching of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot; Sinha, Yashashwi; Chitnis, Abhishek; Archer, James; Fotheringham, Victoria; Renwick, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Many medical schools teach the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) as part of their undergraduate curriculum. Medical students perceive that EBM is valuable to their undergraduate and postgraduate career. Students may experience barriers to applying EBM principles, especially when searching for evidence or identifying high-quality resources. The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Evidence Search is a service that enables access to authoritative clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practice through a web-based portal. Evidence-based medicine workshops were organised and delivered by fourth-year medical students, having first received training from NICE to become NICE student champions. The workshops covered the basic principles of EBM and focused on retrieving EBM resources for study through the NICE Evidence Search portal. The scheme was evaluated using a pre-workshop survey and an 8-12 week post-workshop survey. Self-reported confidence in searching for evidence-based resources increased from 29 per cent before the workshop to 87 per cent after the workshop. Only 1 per cent of students rated evidence-based resources as their first preference pre-workshop, compared with 31 per cent post-workshop. The results show that although many students were aware of evidence-based resources, they tended not to use them as their preferred resource. Despite appreciating the value of evidence-based resources, few students were confident in accessing and using such resources for pre-clinical study. A peer-taught workshop in EBM improved students' confidence with, and use of, evidence-based resources. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence.

  11. EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE – II. CLINICAL USE AND CRITICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Čuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence-based medicine employs systematic searching, evaluation and use of current research findings as the basis for clinical decision-making. However, there are some problems and uncertainties hindering introduction and spreading of the use of the method in clinical practice. Physicians often have no time for literature searching and for use of the method in practice. For certain questions in clinical practice there are no answers in medical literature. Most of the evidences in medical literature are only available in English. Introduction of the method is hampered also by the fact that clinical decision-making is complex and does not allow procedures prescribed in advance. Rigidity and universality of decisions resulting from the evidence may appear impersonal and may affect the relationship between the physician and the patient. Trends towards evidence based medicine are followed also by big multinational pharmaceutical corporations. They carry out large and expensive clinical trials using the results for promotional purposes. In this way, they get the competitive advantage and influence the objectivity of physicians’ clinical decision-making.Conclusions. With introduction of evidence based medicine into clinical practice physicians acquire new information and use a new form of continuing education by following new developments in their field. This way, new findings from medical literature get into clinical practice faster and more efficiently. In addition, physicians get more professional satisfaction and quality in clinical practice is higher.

  12. Is evidence-based medicine about democratizing medical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorgård, Keld

    2014-01-01

    The authoritarian standpoint in medicine has been under challenge by various groups and researchers since the 1980s. The challenges have been ethical, political and medical, with patient movements at the forefront. Over the past decade, however, a deep challenge has been posed by evidence-based...... medicine (EBM), which has challenged the entire strategy of medical treatment from the point of view of a self-critical, anti-authoritarian and hereby also (it has been claimed) a more democratic medical practice. Previously, the challenges arose out of the patient rights perspective. EBM, by contrast...

  13. Evidence-Based Advances in Aquatic Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Larrat, Sylvain

    2017-09-01

    Fish and aquatic invertebrates deserve evidence-based medicine. Pharmacologic information is available; most pharmacokinetic studies are derived from the aquaculture industry and extrapolated to ornamental fish. Conversely, advanced diagnostics and information regarding diseases affecting only ornamental fish and invertebrates require more peer-reviewed experimental studies; the examples of carp edema virus, sea star wasting disease, seahorse nutrition, and gas bubble disease of fish under human care are discussed. Antinociception is also a controversial topic of growing interest in aquatic animal medicine. This article summarizes information regarding new topics of interest in companion fish and invertebrates and highlights some future avenues for research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence-based medicine: what it can and cannot do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddi, Goffredo; Romàn-Pumar, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a old hat, a "cookbook" medicine perpetrated by arrogant to serve cost cutters to suppress clinical freedom, a mandatory, deterministic, totalitarian practice of medicine, a way to control cost and to ignore patient preferences, a limit to personal/ humanistic/individual medicine. EBM is a reference of excellence to guide clinical decisions, the integration of own expertise with others' expertise and patient preferences, a way to improve medical practice and limit the variability and errors created when there is not evidence to identify the gold standard and differentiate among alternatives available. But evidences need to be integrated with a new thinking based on Complexity Science. Health care systems operates as complex adaptative systems rather than rigid, linear or mechanical organizations and innovation is a critical outcome of Complexity Science. How does EBM impact drug innovation? New drug approvals are not keeping pace with rising Research and Development spending, clinical approval success rate for new chemical entities (NCEs) is progressively dropping and maybe, through these indicators, we are seeing the worst face of EBM: its limiting, blocking, and controlling side. If that is the case, EBM is the main ally to keep the economy of health systems under control and the great excuse to block the access of the innovation to patients. Certainly not the best way to maximize the benefits of EBM.

  15. Flipped classroom model for learning evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucker SY

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sydney Y Rucker,1 Zulfukar Ozdogan,1 Morhaf Al Achkar2 1School of Education, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 2Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Journal club (JC, as a pedagogical strategy, has long been used in graduate medical education (GME. As evidence-based medicine (EBM becomes a mainstay in GME, traditional models of JC present a number of insufficiencies and call for novel models of instruction. A flipped classroom model appears to be an ideal strategy to meet the demands to connect evidence to practice while creating engaged, culturally competent, and technologically literate physicians. In this article, we describe a novel model of flipped classroom in JC. We present the flow of learning activities during the online and face-to-face instruction, and then we highlight specific considerations for implementing a flipped classroom model. We show that implementing a flipped classroom model to teach EBM in a residency program not only is possible but also may constitute improved learning opportunity for residents. Follow-up work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this model on both learning and clinical practice. Keywords: evidence-based medicine, flipped classroom, residency education

  16. Evidence-based medicine: what it can and cannot do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffredo Freddi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM is not a old hat, a "cookbook" medicine perpetrated by arrogant to serve cost cutters to suppress clinical freedom, a mandatory, deterministic, totalitarian practice of medicine, a way to control cost and to ignore patient preferences, a limit to personal/humanistic/individual medicine. EBM is a reference of excellence to guide clinical decisions, the integration of own expertise with others' expertise and patient preferences, a way to improve medical practice and limit the variability and errors created when there is not evidence to identify the gold standard and differentiate among alternatives available. But evidences need to be integrated with a new thinking based on Complexity Science. Health care systems operates as complex adaptative systems rather than rigid, linear or mechanical organizations and innovation is a critical outcome of Complexity Science. How does EBM impact drug innovation? New drug approvals are not keeping pace with rising Research and Development spending, clinical approval success rate for new chemical entities (NCEs is progressively dropping and maybe, through these indicators, we are seeing the worst face of EBM: its limiting, blocking, and controlling side. If that is the case, EBM is the main ally to keep the economy of health systems under control and the great excuse to block the access of the innovation to patients. Certainly not the best way to maximize the benefits of EBM.

  17. Why evidence-based medicine is a good approach in physical and rehabilitation medicine. Thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, S

    2014-10-01

    According to a good definition, evidence-based medicine (EBM) is: "The explicit, conscientious, and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients (and populations)". More appropriate in a clinical context like that of physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) is looking at evidence based clinical practice (EBCP), whose definition is: "The integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values". In the past the term evidence-based physical and rehabilitation medicine (EBPRM) was also proposed. In this thesis, after some historical notes on EBM and on PRM, we will discuss why in our view EBPRM must be the real foundation of our everyday PRM clinical practice.

  18. Barriers to evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has emerged as an effective strategy to improve health care quality. The aim of this study was to systematically review and carry out an analysis on the barriers to EBM. Different database searching methods and also manual search were employed in this study using the search words ('evidence-based' or 'evidence-based medicine' or 'evidence-based practice' or 'evidence-based guidelines' or 'research utilization') and (barrier* or challenge or hinder) in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane library, Pro Quest, Magiran, SID. Out of 2592 articles, 106 articles were finally identified for study. Research barriers, lack of resources, lack of time, inadequate skills, and inadequate access, lack of knowledge and financial barriers were found to be the most common barriers to EBM. Examples of these barriers were found in primary care, hospital/specialist care, rehabilitation care, medical education, management and decision making. The most common barriers to research utilization were research barriers, cooperation barriers and changing barriers. Lack of resources was the most common barrier to implementation of guidelines. The result of this study shows that there are many barriers to the implementation and use of EBM. Identifying barriers is just the first step to removing barriers to the use of EBM. Extra resources will be needed if these barriers are to be tackled. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Current status of evidence-based sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Erickson, Brandon J; Abrams, Geoffrey D; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Gupta, Anil K; McCormick, Frank M; Bach, Bernard R

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the proportion of sports medicine studies that are labeled as Level I Evidence in 5 journals and compare the quality of surgical and nonsurgical studies using simple quality assessment tools (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials [CONSORT] and Jadad). By use of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines over the prior 2 years in the top 5 (citation and impact factor based) sports medicine journals, only Level I Evidence studies were eligible for inclusion and were analyzed. All study types (therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic, and economic) were analyzed. Study quality was assessed with the level of evidence, Jadad score, and CONSORT 2010 guidelines. Study demographic data were compared among journals and between surgical and nonsurgical studies by use of χ(2), 1-way analysis of variance, and 2-sample Z tests. We analyzed 190 Level I Evidence studies (10% of eligible studies) (119 randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies from the United States were the most common studies published. Sixty-two percent of studies reported a financial conflict of interest. The knee was the most common body part studied, and track-and-field/endurance sports were the most common sports analyzed. Significant differences (P .05) were shown among journals based on the proportion of Level I studies or appropriate randomization. Significant strengths and limitations of RCTs were identified. This study showed that Level I Evidence and RCTs comprise 10% and 6% of contemporary sports medicine literature, respectively. Therapeutic, nonsurgical, single-center studies are the most common publications with Level I Evidence. Significant differences across sports medicine journals were found in study quality. Surgical studies appropriately described randomization, blinding, and patient enrollment significantly more than nonsurgical studies. Level I

  20. [The forgotten capitulation of evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoemaker, Casper G; Smulders, Yvo M

    2015-01-01

    In 1992, the Canadian physician Gordon Guyatt wrote an article that is generally regarded as the starting point of evidence-based medicine (EBM). He described the ideas behind the McMaster residency programme for 'evidence-based practitioners', founded by David Sackett. Eight years later, in 2000, Guyatt concluded that this programme was too ambitious. In a new publication he described most doctors as 'evidence-users'. This editorial marks the transition from an individual to a collective form of EBM, emphasizing the use of evidence-based guidelines. The starting point of this collective form of EBM is not the well-known 1992 paper, but the forgotten editorial in 2000, which was described by Guyatt's colleagues as the capitulation of EBM.

  1. Faculty Training in Evidence-Based Medicine: Improving Evidence Acquisition and Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Laura J.; Warde, Carole M.; Boker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) integrates published clinical evidence with patient values and clinical expertise, the output of which is informed medical decision making. Key skills for evidence-based practice include acquisition and appraisal of clinical information. Faculty clinicians often lack expertise in these skills and are…

  2. Considering patient experience and evidence-based choice of medicines in medicines optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri; Bellerby, Ann; Kitching, Mike

    2017-06-14

    Medicines optimisation can be used by healthcare professionals to support patients to gain maximum benefit from their medicines, with two of the main principles being understanding the patient experience and ensuring medicines choice is evidence-based. Non-adherence is a significant issue in medicines management. Relational aspects of the patient experience, such as empathetic two-way communication between the healthcare professional and patient, the provision of clear information and shared decision-making, can have a positive influence on whether patients take their medicines as intended. In practice, the degree of influence exerted by evidence-based guidelines may result in tensions between the healthcare professional's choice of medicines and the patient's experience, while the prevalence of multimorbidity may mean that some patients are prescribed medicines from several clinical guidelines. This raises issues in relation to patient morbidity and safety, including the potential for issues with polypharmacy and an increased risk of adverse drug reactions. Medication review is an important tool for identifying the patient's medication burden, and deprescribing - the planned reduction of medicines that may no longer be effective - is emerging as a strategy to reduce polypharmacy. Further progress is required to increase patient involvement in the development of guidance for medicines management to enhance the quality of patient care, particularly in relation to their values and preferences. Similarly, further research is necessary to identify how patients make decisions about their medicines use.

  3. Aeromedical Risk Assessment of Pharmaceuticals Using Evidence-Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, Michael B; Ropp, Lincoln G; Sauer, Samual W; LaVan, Joseph T

    2015-09-01

    Using concepts from evidence-based medicine, systems theory, and risk assessment, a standardized model was developed to accept or reject medications for use in flight. The model calculates the risk scores of medications, which can then be compared to an organization's acceptable risk tolerance. Risk scores for each medication were established by summing the products of incidence rates and severity scores for all published side effects. The incidence of each side effect was obtained in an evidence-based manner and each assigned a severity multiplier. Using statistical analysis of the calculated risk scores of approved medications, an acceptance control chart was generated. Range of calculated risk scores of historically approved medications was 10-9140. Six Sigma Acceptance Control Line was calculated at 1.5 SDs above the mean and was 9822. Risk score range of medications generally felt unsafe was 27,010-41,294. Risk score range of medications under consideration for approval was 986-6863. This novel approach to medication approval is the first in aerospace medicine to attempt to combine evidence-based medicine, risk analysis, and control charts to standardize and streamline the medication approval process within an organization. The model was validated by testing against medications generally accepted to be unsafe for use in flight. These medications fell several deviations above the control line. Other medications not yet authorized fall well below the acceptance line and could be considered for approval.

  4. Evidence-based medicine meets goal-directed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W; Hamm, Robert; Scheid, Dewey

    2003-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine and goal-directed, patient-centered health care seem, at times, like parallel universes, though, at a conceptual level, they are perfectly compatible. Part of the problem is that many of the kinds of information required for decision making in primary care are often unavailable or difficult to find. Several case examples are used to illustrate this problem, and reasons and solutions are suggested. The goal-directed health care model could be helpful for directing the search for evidence that is relevant to the decisions that patients and their primary care physicians must make on a regular basis.

  5. Evidence-based Medicine Search: a customizable federated search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, Paul J; Howse, David K; Keim, Samuel M

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports on the development of a tool by the Arizona Health Sciences Library (AHSL) for searching clinical evidence that can be customized for different user groups. The AHSL provides services to the University of Arizona's (UA's) health sciences programs and to the University Medical Center. Librarians at AHSL collaborated with UA College of Medicine faculty to create an innovative search engine, Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) Search, that provides users with a simple search interface to EBM resources and presents results organized according to an evidence pyramid. EBM Search was developed with a web-based configuration component that allows the tool to be customized for different specialties. Informal and anecdotal feedback from physicians indicates that EBM Search is a useful tool with potential in teaching evidence-based decision making. While formal evaluation is still being planned, a tool such as EBM Search, which can be configured for specific user populations, may help lower barriers to information resources in an academic health sciences center.

  6. SANTORIO SANTORIO - THE PIONEER OF EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Gasparini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In everyday clinical practice there is a constant need for valid information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and prevention of a variety of diseases. But there could be a disparity between the physician's diagnostic skills and his clinical judgment if he relies only on traditional sources of information. In the 1992, a group of scientists from the McMaster University in Ontario, Canada attempted to integrate individual clinical expertise with the best external evidence. They propose a process in which systematically finding, appraising and using of contemporaneous research were the base for proper clinical decision. They called this integration of personal clinical knowledge with research evidence - Evidence Based Medicine (EBM and since then interest in this field has growing exponentially. But 400 years before this important concept emerged a young physician from Koper, named Santorio Santorio (1561 - 1636 argued that a doctor should first rely on sense experience, then on reasoning, and only lastly on authority. Beside his numerous medical inventions he was the first to search justification to his practice by using some vital connection between measured parameters and a person's health state. He could be therefore credited as one of the beginners of modern concepts of science or evidence based medicine.

  7. Evidence-based medicine and prejudice-based medicine: the case of homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nelson Filice de; Fiuza, Alessandra Rodrigues

    2014-11-01

    In recent decades an important social movement related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine has been identified worldwide. In Brazil, although homeopathy was recognized as a specialist medical area in 1980, few medical schools offer courses related to it. In a previous study, 176 resident doctors at the University of Campinas Medical School were interviewed and 86 (49%) rejected homeopathy as a subject in the core medical curriculum. Thus, this qualitative study was conducted to understand their reasons for refusing. 20 residents from 15 different specialist areas were interviewed. Very few of them admitted to a lack of knowledge for making a judgment about homeopathy; none of them made a conscientious objection to it; and the majority demonstrated prejudice, affirming that there is not enough scientific evidence to support homeopathy, defending their position based on personal opinion, limited clinical practice and on information circulated in the mass media. Finally, resident doctors' prejudices against homeopathy can be extended to practices other than allopathic medicine.

  8. The information infrastructure that supports evidence-based veterinary medicine: a comparison with human medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    In human medicine, the information infrastructure that supports the knowledge translation processes of exchange, synthesis, dissemination, and application of the best clinical intervention research has developed significantly in the past 15 years, facilitating the uptake of research evidence by clinicians as well as the practice of evidence-based medicine. Seven of the key elements of this improved information infrastructure are clinical trial registries, research reporting standards, systematic reviews, organizations that support the production of systematic reviews, the indexing of clinical intervention research in MEDLINE, clinical search filters for MEDLINE, and point-of-care decision support information resources. The objective of this paper is to describe why these elements are important for evidence-based medicine, the key developments and issues related to these seven information infrastructure elements in human medicine, how these 7 elements compare with the corresponding infrastructure elements in veterinary medicine, and how all of these factors affect the translation of clinical intervention research into clinical practice. A focused search of the Ovid MEDLINE database was conducted for English language journal literature published between 2000 and 2010. Two bibliographies were consulted and selected national and international Web sites were searched using Google. The literature reviewed indicates that the information infrastructure supporting evidence-based veterinary medicine practice in all of the 7 elements reviewed is significantly underdeveloped in relation to the corresponding information infrastructure in human medicine. This lack of development creates barriers to the timely translation of veterinary medicine research into clinical practice and also to the conduct of both primary clinical intervention research and synthesis research.

  9. Evidence Based Validation of Indian Traditional Medicine – Way Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulok K Mukherjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based validation of the ethno-pharmacological claims on traditional medicine (TM is the need of the day for its globalization and reinforcement. Combining the unique features of identifying biomarkers that are highly conserved across species, this can offer an innovative approach to biomarker-driven drug discovery and development. TMs are an integral component of alternative health care systems. India has a rich wealth of TMs and the potential to accept the challenge to meet the global demand for them. Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy (AYUSH medicine are the major healthcare systems in Indian Traditional Medicine. The plant species mentioned in the ancient texts of these systems may be explored with the modern scientific approaches for better leads in the healthcare. TM is the best sources of chemical diversity for finding new drugs and leads. Authentication and scientific validation of medicinal plant is a fundamental requirement of industry and other organizations dealing with herbal drugs. Quality control (QC of botanicals, validated processes of manufacturing, customer awareness and post marketing surveillance are the key points, which could ensure the quality, safety and efficacy of TM. For globalization of TM, there is a need for harmonization with respect to its chemical and metabolite profiling, standardization, QC, scientific validation, documentation and regulatory aspects of TM. Therefore, the utmost attention is necessary for the promotion and development of TM through global collaboration and co-ordination by national and international programme.

  10. Evidence-based medicine in metastatic spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-06-01

    Treatment modalities for metastatic spine disease have significantly expanded over the last two decades. This expansion occurred in many different fields. Improvement in surgical techniques and instrumentation now allow the oncologic spine surgeons to effectively circumferentially decompress the neural elements without compromising stability. Percutaneous techniques, both vertebral augmentation and pre-operative endovascular embolization procedures, also greatly benefit patients suffering from spinal column metastasis. Imaging technology advances has contributed to better pre-operative planning and the development of highly conformational radiation techniques, thus permitting the delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors, while avoiding radiotoxicity to the spinal cord and other vital structures. These new developments, combined with evidence-based stability and disease-specific quality of life scores now allow not only better treatment, but also a solid foundation for high-quality research. Spine oncology literature currently suffers from a lack of high-quality evidence due to low prevalence of the disease and complex methodological issues. However, when following evidence-based medicine principles, which incorporate best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, sound, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding the abovementioned treatment modalities.

  11. How evidence-based medicine biases physicians against nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laurie Endicott

    2013-12-01

    Medical students in the United States are taught little about nutrition and dietetics. Worse yet, their training biases them against the studies that show the power of dietary approaches to managing disease. The current approach to evidence-based medicine encourages physicians to ignore any information that does not come from a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Yet human beings cannot be blinded to a dietary intervention. As a result, physicians are biased toward drug treatments and against dietary interventions for the management of chronic disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T V

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may....... On the other hand, if started too late there is a chance that data may be lost because the technology has already been introduced into the daily clinics and physicians may be unwilling to recruit patients. Or the opposite, that the technique may have been rejected without a proper trial. In this situation...... it has been suggested to perform a so called tracker trial. In such trials protocols are more flexible without prefixed sample size and will require repeated interim analyses. Often, it will be relevant to supplement the clinical trials with data from large clinical databases - in particular when long...

  13. Factors that influence effective evidence-based medicine instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a health care practice is being incorporated into education programs across the spectrum of medical education to develop lifelong learning skills and to enhance the practice of evidence-based health care. Since improving the quality of patient care is the ultimate goal of EBM, EBM learning must be integrated with clinical application, and resulted outcomes must be reflected in learning transfer (or EBM practice) within the context of solving patient problems. Different factors may constitute the context or environment in which EBM is learned, practiced, and sustained. However, these contextual factors are seldom considered and examined in the development, implementation, and evaluation of EBM instruction for learners at different levels. This article will introduce several contextual factors as tips and strategies that affect EBM learning and transfer. Also included in the article are recommended practices for designing effective EBM instruction that would contribute to a sustainable change in learner behavior.

  14. The role of evidence based medicine in neurotrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeybul, S; Ho, K M

    2015-04-01

    The introduction of evidence based medicine de-emphasised clinical experience and so-called "background information" and stressed the importance of evidence gained from clinical research when making clinical decisions. For many years randomised controlled trials have been seen to be the only way to advance clinical practice, however, applying this methodology in the context of severe trauma can be problematic. In addition, it is increasingly recognised that considerable clinical experience is required in order to critically evaluate the quality of the evidence and the validity of the conclusions as presented. A contemporary example is seen when considering the role of decompressive craniectomy in the management of neurotrauma. Although there is a considerable amount of evidence available attesting to the efficacy of the procedure, considerable clinical expertise is required in order to properly interpret the results of these studies and the implications for clinical practice. Given these limitations the time may have come for a redesign of the traditional pyramid of evidence, to a model that re-emphasises the importance of "background information" such as pathophysiology and acknowledges the role of clinical experience such that the evidence can be critically evaluated in its appropriate context and the subsequent implications for clinical practice be clearly and objectively defined. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A population perspective to evidence based medicine: "evidence for population health"

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, R; Page, J

    2002-01-01

    We explore the notion that the public health community could learn lessons from the success of evidence based medicine (EBM) and develop a public health counterpart called "Evidence for Population Health". While EBM focuses on individual patients, its public health counterpart would aim to improve the health of communities effectively and efficiently.

  16. Do short courses in evidence based medicine improve knowledge and skills? Validation of Berlin questionnaire and before and after study of courses in evidence based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, L; Greenhalgh, T; Falck-Ytter, Y; Neumayer, H-H; Kunz, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate an instrument for measuring knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine and to investigate whether short courses in evidence based medicine lead to a meaningful increase in knowledge and skills. Design Development and validation of an assessment instrument and before and after study. Setting Various postgraduate short courses in evidence based medicine in Germany. Participants The instrument was validated with experts in evidence based medicine, postgraduate doctors, and medical students. The effect of courses was assessed by postgraduate doctors from medical and surgical backgrounds. Intervention Intensive 3 day courses in evidence based medicine delivered through tutor facilitated small groups. Main outcome measure Increase in knowledge and skills. Results The questionnaire distinguished reliably between groups with different expertise in evidence based medicine. Experts attained a threefold higher average score than students. Postgraduates who had not attended a course performed better than students but significantly worse than experts. Knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine increased after the course by 57% (mean score before course 6.3 (SD 2.9) v 9.9 (SD 2.8), Pevidence based medicine. An intensive 3 day course in evidence based medicine led to a significant increase in knowledge and skills. What is already known on this topicNumerous observational studies have investigated the impact of teaching evidence based medicine to healthcare professionals, with conflicting resultsMost of the studies were of poor methodological qualityWhat this study addsAn instrument assessing basic knowledge and skills required for practising evidence based medicine was developed and validatedAn intensive 3 day course on evidence based medicine for doctors from various backgrounds and training level led to a clinically meaningful improvement of knowledge and skills PMID:12468485

  17. Teaching evidence-based medicine at complementary and alternative medicine institutions: strategies, competencies, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickey, Heather; Schiffke, Heather; Fleishman, Susan; Haas, Mitch; Cruser, des Anges; LeFebvre, Ron; Sullivan, Barbara; Taylor, Barry; Gaster, Barak

    2014-12-01

    As evidence-based medicine (EBM) becomes a standard in health care, it is essential that practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) become experts in searching and evaluating the research literature. In support of this goal, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) provided R25 funding to nine CAM colleges to develop individual programs focused on teaching EBM. An overarching goal of these research education grants has been to provide CAM faculty and students with the skills they need to apply a rigorous evidence-based perspective to their training and practice. This paper reviews the competencies and teaching strategies developed and implemented to enhance research literacy at all nine R25-funded institutions. While each institution designed approaches suitable for its research culture, the guiding principles were similar: to develop evidence-informed skills and knowledge, thereby helping students and faculty to critically appraise evidence and then use that evidence to guide their clinical practice. Curriculum development and assessment included faculty-driven learning activities and longitudinal curricular initiatives to encourage skill reinforcement and evaluate progress. As the field of integrative medicine matures, the NIH-NCCAM research education grants provide essential training for future clinicians and clinician-researchers. Building this workforce will facilitate multidisciplinary collaborations that address the unique needs for research that informs integrative clinical practice.

  18. Flipped classroom model for learning evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Sydney Y; Ozdogan, Zulfukar; Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2017-01-01

    Journal club (JC), as a pedagogical strategy, has long been used in graduate medical education (GME). As evidence-based medicine (EBM) becomes a mainstay in GME, traditional models of JC present a number of insufficiencies and call for novel models of instruction. A flipped classroom model appears to be an ideal strategy to meet the demands to connect evidence to practice while creating engaged, culturally competent, and technologically literate physicians. In this article, we describe a novel model of flipped classroom in JC. We present the flow of learning activities during the online and face-to-face instruction, and then we highlight specific considerations for implementing a flipped classroom model. We show that implementing a flipped classroom model to teach EBM in a residency program not only is possible but also may constitute improved learning opportunity for residents. Follow-up work is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this model on both learning and clinical practice.

  19. Evidence-based medicine in neurosurgery: an academic publication view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiming; Ni, Ming; Jia, Wang; Wan, Weiqing; Tang, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Although evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been progressively developing for decades in neurosurgery, there remains a lack of data to fully understand this topic. This study was aimed to evaluate extensively EBM related to neurosurgery through the analysis of neurosurgical EBM publications. We searched the Web of Science (WoS) Core Collection database for all EBM publications related to neurosurgery. The number of publications and other information were obtained. Data were extracted from the search results to obtain the following information: document type, countries/territories, funding agencies, organizations, publication year, source of titles, and research area. From among all of the publications, we extracted randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for further analysis at RCT characteristic and funding agencies. According to the search strategy, 6907 publications were related to EBM in neurosurgery. A total of 91 countries/territories participated in neurosurgical EBM publications. English-speaking countries (USA, England, and Canada) contributed most of the publications. "University of Toronto" is the organization which published the most EBM publications. In total, 1654 neurosurgical RCTs were found. We summarize their characteristics and record the highest cited (more than 400) RCTs, which we descript the distribution in different neurosurgical fields and stages. We also found that more than half of the RCTs were directly funded by industrial companies, and government-funded agencies accounted for no more than one fifth of the RCTs. EBM in neurosurgery has a good foundation but also needs to be constantly revised and improved to synchronize with evidence-based medicine development.

  20. Promoting networks between evidence-based medicine and values-based medicine in continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Lifshitz, Alberto; Mora-Magaña, Ignacio; de Hoyos, Adalberto; Avila-Osorio, María Teresa; Quintana-Vargas, Silvia; Aguirre, Jorge A; Méndez, Jorge; Murata, Chiharu; Nava-Diosdado, Rodrigo; Martínez-González, Oscar; Calleja, Elisa; Vargas, Raúl; Mejía-Arangure, Juan Manuel; Cortez-Domínguez, Araceli; Vedrenne-Gutiérrez, Fernand; Sueiras, Perla; Garduño, Juan; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Salamanca, Fabio; Kumate-Rodríguez, Jesús; Reyes-Fuentes, Alejandro

    2013-02-15

    In recent years, medical practice has followed two different paradigms: evidence-based medicine (EBM) and values-based medicine (VBM). There is an urgent need to promote medical education that strengthens the relationship between these two paradigms. This work is designed to establish the foundations for a continuing medical education (CME) program aimed at encouraging the dialogue between EBM and VBM by determining the values relevant to everyday medical activities. A quasi-experimental, observational, comparative, prospective and qualitative study was conducted by analyzing through a concurrent triangulation strategy the correlation between healthcare personnel-patient relationship, healthcare personnel's life history, and ethical judgments regarding dilemmas that arise in daily clinical practice.In 2009, healthcare personnel working in Mexico were invited to participate in a free, online clinical ethics course. Each participant responded to a set of online survey instruments before and after the CME program. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare personnel, focusing on their views and representations of clinical practice. The healthcare personnel's core values were honesty and respect. There were significant differences in the clinical practice axiology before and after the course (P history, ethical discernment and healthcare personnel-patient relation were beneficence, respect and compassion, respectively. The healthcare personnel participating in a CME intervention in clinical ethics improved high-order values: Openness to change (OC) and Self Transcendence (ST), which are essential to fulfilling the healing ends of medicine. The CME intervention strengthened the role of educators and advisors with respect to healthcare personnel. The ethical values developed by healthcare professionals arise from their life history and their professional formation.

  1. Original research in pathology: judgment, or evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James M

    2007-02-01

    Pathology is both a medical specialty and an investigative scientific discipline, concerned with understanding the essential nature of human disease. Ultimately, pathology is accountable as well, as measured by the accuracy of our diagnoses and the resultant patient care outcomes. As such, we must consider the evidence base underlying our practices. Within the realm of Laboratory Medicine, extensive attention has been given to testing accuracy and precision. Critical examination of the evidence base supporting the clinical use of specific laboratory tests or technologies is a separate endeavor, to which specific attention must be given. In the case of anatomic pathology and more specifically surgical pathology, the expertise required to render a diagnosis is derived foremost from experience, both personal and literature-based. In the first instance, knowledge of the linkage between one's own diagnoses and individual patient outcomes is required, to validate the role of one's own interpretations in the clinical course of patients. Experience comes from seeing this linkage first hand, from which hopefully comes wisdom and, ultimately, good clinical judgment. In the second instance, reading the literature and learning from experts is required. Only a minority of the relevant literature is published in pathology journals to which one may subscribe. A substantial portion of major papers relevant to the practice of anatomic pathology are published in collateral clinical specialty journals devoted to specific disease areas or organs. Active effort is therefore required to seek out the literature beyond the domain of pathology journals. In examining the published literature, the essential question then becomes: Does the practice of anatomic pathology fulfill the tenets of 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM)? If the pinnacle of EBM is 'systematic review of randomized clinical trials, with or without meta-analysis', then anatomic pathology falls far short. Our published

  2. Evidence-based medicine and prejudice-based medicine: the case of homeopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Filice de Barros

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades an important social movement related to Complementary and Alternative Medicine has been identified worldwide. In Brazil, although homeopathy was recognized as a specialist medical area in 1980, few medical schools offer courses related to it. In a previous study, 176 resident doctors at the University of Campinas Medical School were interviewed and 86 (49% rejected homeopathy as a subject in the core medical curriculum. Thus, this qualitative study was conducted to understand their reasons for refusing. 20 residents from 15 different specialist areas were interviewed. Very few of them admitted to a lack of knowledge for making a judgment about homeopathy; none of them made a conscientious objection to it; and the majority demonstrated prejudice, affirming that there is not enough scientific evidence to support homeopathy, defending their position based on personal opinion, limited clinical practice and on information circulated in the mass media. Finally, resident doctors’ prejudices against homeopathy can be extended to practices other than allopathic medicine.

  3. Pharmaceutical counseling: Between evidence-based medicine and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, S N; Akhmetova, T

    2015-01-01

    pharmaceutical counseling standards: Article 1.1 "Code of Ethics of the pharmaceutical worker of Russia" states: "The main task of the professional activity of the pharmaceutical worker - protection of human health", Article 1.3 states that a pharmaceutical worker must take professional decisions solely in the interests of a patient [1]. However, the pharmacy is a trade organization, thus as a retailer the pharmacy is directly interested in making profits and increasing sales of pharmaceutical products, including non-prescription medicines. Moreover, while the clinical medicine is monitored for unjustified prescribing and measures are being taken to prevent polypharmacy, for a pharmacist the growing sales of over-the-counter drugs, active promotion of dietary supplements, homeopathic medicines, medical devices, and, consequently, an increase of financial indicators (particularly "average purchase size") - all are characteristics of success [2].Rational use of over-the-counter medicines requires introduction of pharmaceutical counseling standards (pharmaceutical care) according to symptoms - major reasons to visit a pharmacy as part of responsible self-medication (cold, sore throat, headache, diarrhea, etc.). Standards of pharmaceutical counseling should be objective, reliable and up-to-date and contain recommendations for the rational use of over-the-counter drugs as well as indications requiring treatment to the doctor. Standardization of pharmaceutical counseling in terms of Evidence-based Pharmacy would enhance the efficiency, safety and cost-effectiveness of over-the-counter medicines.Currently, the lack of clinical component in the higher pharmaceutical education and the lack of approved standards of pharmaceutical counseling lead to the introduction of cross-selling technologies (which are broadly applied in other areas of trade, for example, the offer of a boot-polish during the sale of shoes) to the pharmaceutical practice [2, 3]. However, drugs belong to a special group

  4. Validation of the colorado psychiatry evidence-based medicine test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Brian; Feinstein, Robert E; Guiton, Gretchen

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become an important part of residency education, yet many EBM curricula lack a valid and standardized tool to identify learners' prior knowledge and assess progress. We developed an EBM examination in psychiatry to measure our effectiveness in teaching comprehensive EBM to residents. We developed a psychiatry EBM test using the validated EBM Fresno Test of Competence for family medicine. The test consists of case scenarios with open-ended questions. We also developed a scoring rubric and obtained reliability with multiple raters. Fifty-seven residents provided test data after completing 3, 6, 25, or 31 EBM sessions. The number of sessions for each resident was based on their length of training in our program. The examination had strong interrater reliability, internal reliability, and item discrimination. Many residents showed significant improvement on their examination scores when data were compared from tests taken before and after a sequence of teaching sessions. Also, a threshold for the level of expert on the examination was established using test data from 5 EBM teacher-experts. We successfully developed a valid and reliable EBM examination for use with psychiatry residents to measure essential EBM skills as part of a larger project to encourage EBM practice for residents in routine patient care. The test provides information on residents' knowledge in EBM from entry level concepts through expert performance. It can be used to place incoming residents in appropriate levels of an EBM curriculum and to monitor the effectiveness of EBM instruction.

  5. Evidence-based medicine is rooted in Protestant exegesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Andreas; Lungen, Markus; Lauterbach, Karl W

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EbM) has been practised for about a decade now. Until now, it has generally been accepted that EbM has its roots in medical thinking of mid-19th century France. Due to the startling fact that France never was a centre of EbM, historical tradition was reconsidered. Since EbM has mainly been flourishing in Protestant countries, a qualitative historical investigation was conducted according to the approach of Max Weber's "The Protestant Ethics". Thus, it could be shown that there are three major prerequisites for EbM to evolve apart from current technical developments, such as the computer and the internet: (1) historical critical exegesis functioned as a methodology to balance contradictory passages; (2) both an equality based relationship among physicians and a Protestant concept that lay people are considered equal in the theologic debate were fundamental to EbM as a new approach of medical thinking; (3) mostly nationally funded health care systems are prone to practise EbM as they are obliged to provide health care which is both fair in access and allocation to the whole population. Against the background of historical exegesis, it has to be taken into account that EbM implies a twist in medicine towards a concept of textual criticism rather than the mere introduction of statistics. Moreover, it both relies upon and enhances a more equal relationship between physicians.

  6. Towards evidence-based critical thinking medicine? Uses of best evidence in flawless argumentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenicek, Milos

    2006-08-01

    Uses of informal logic and critical thinking methodology are increasingly taught, learnt and advantageously applied in such diverse domains as law, the military, business, and education. Health sciences are also following this trend. However, production and critical appraisal of evidence as already practiced in Evidence-Based Medicine must be coupled with equally rigorous uses in order to ensure appropriate health problem understanding and decision-making. Making most proposals and decisions in medicine is the conclusion of an argumentation process that lies behind any communication between health professionals working with patients, performing research or sharing ideas about health problems, their interpretations and solutions with numerous stakeholders in public life. Modern critical thinking and decision making in medicine is not instantly mastered, but is instead a learnt experience as anything else in professional and social interactions. The modern argument as outlined, illustrated and applied to health problems in this essay is an extension of a previously established way of thinking in Evidence-Based Medicine. Ideally, health professionals, their patients and all other stakeholders should speak the same language and it is up to us to make this possible. Evidence and critical thinking - based medicine might be a solution. As modern critical thinkers, we are at the forefront and we must see to it that patients and professional and general communities benefit from this more so even than from other remarkable historical and current contributions to the well-being of those under our care.

  7. Familial hyperlipidemia: Resolving a case using evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Benavides-Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: familial hypercholesterolemia (FH and familial hyperlipidemia combined (HFC are metabolic disorders of lipids associated with increase of the risk for cerebrovascular disease. Clinical case: 8-years-old Indigenous child with HFC presented right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and right central facial paralysis for a cerebral ischemic accident; in addition, he had altered lipid profile and family history of hypercholesterolemia. Methodology: this article used patient`s therapeutic approach using evidence-based medicine (EBM, started from a structured clinical question and PubMED search. Four systematic reviews were included. Discussion: statins are safe in children with HF and HFC are effective in improving lipid profile. EBM methodology could help to solve similar therapeutic problems.

  8. Evidence-based medicine and limits to the literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Robin

    2008-10-01

    Searching the literature, a core requirement of evidence-based medicine has been impossibly oversold. The literature search is supposed to provide evidence independent from expert opinion, which has been deemed to be low on the evidence hierarchy. Yet freedom from expertise is not free. Paradoxically, practitioners are told to search the literature to avoid authority, but because there is too much information and too little time, they are urged to rely on authoritative digests. But the chain of errors inherent in searching literature for decision making, whether in scoping the decision, finding relevant documents, or in the document content, cannot be ignored. This article explores those errors. With examples from signal theory and decision theory, the literature search is analyzed in light of fundamental limits in the nature of informaiton. You can run from expertise but you cannot hide. Expertise is inevitably required to deal with these errors. So do-it-yourself searching is inadequate in the absence of expertise. The best decisions result from collaboration with subject matter experts and decision-making experts.

  9. From Evidence-based Medicine to Human-based Medicine in Psychosomatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalek, Michael

    2016-08-23

    Human-based medicine (HbM), a form of psychiatry that focuses not only on fragments and constructs but on the whole person, no longer finds its theoretical basis in the positivism of the modern era, but rather owes its central maxims to the post-modernist ideal that ultimate truths or objectivity in identifying the final cause of illness remain hidden from us for theoretical reasons alone. Evidence-based medicine (EbM) and HbM are thus not mutually exclusive opposites; rather, despite superficial differences in methods of diagnosis and treatment, EbM must be integrated into HbM as an indispensable component of the latter. Probably the most important difference between EbM and HbM lies in the aims and methods of treatment. In HbM the goal is no longer simply to make illnesses disappear but rather to allow the patient to return to a life that is as autonomous and happy as possible. The human being with all his or her potential and limitations once again becomes the measure of all things. This also implies, however, that the multidimensional diagnostics of HbM are oriented not only towards symptoms, pathogenesis, process and understanding but also to a greater degree towards the patient's resources. Treatment options and forms of therapy do not put the disease construct at the centre of the diagnostic and therapeutic interest, but have as their primary aim the reopening of the possibility of a largely autonomous and joyful life for the patient.

  10. Legacy of Avicenna and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Rashidi, Mohammad Reza; Tubbs, R Shane; Etemadi, Jalal; Abbasnejad, Feridoon; Agutter, Paul S

    2011-08-04

    Although the term 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) is of recent origin, its roots are generally agreed to lie in earlier times. Several writers have suggested that the 11th century CE physician and philosopher Avicenna (Ibn Sina) formulated an approach to EBM that broadly resembles modern-day principles and practice. The aim of this paper is to explore the origins and influence of Avicenna's version of EBM. A survey of the literature suggests that two influences on Avicenna's thought were crucial: the doctrine of Ijma; and Stoic logic, perhaps transmitted via the writings of Galen. In turn, Avicenna is known to have been a major influence on both medical practice and the development of logic in medieval Europe. Through this route, Avicennian logic (notably its inductive aspect) inspired the new style of thought associated with the scientific revolution, which later came to be reflected in 'scientific medicine', and may therefore have been an indirect source of EBM today. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Opinion leaders and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby D; Papay, Frank A; Moores, Neal; Meisler, Eileen; Zins, James E

    2014-01-01

    In health care, it is widely known that evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a significant impact on clinical practice, and opinion leaders can enhance the clinician's application of EBM in various disciplines. In this article, we examine the existence and impact of opinion leaders in craniofacial surgery as well as barriers to evidence-based practice. We compiled the answers of an Internet questionnaire, which was sent to 102 craniofacial surgeons. Our results demonstrate that opinion leaders most definitely can be identified in craniofacial surgery. They are tightly connected to their field's social network and promote EBM. In this survey, 44% of craniofacial surgeons reported that their greatest obstacle to clinical decision making in the management of nonsyndromic synostosis was lack of surgical consensus. In addition, craniofacial surgeons stated that EBM and opinion leaders are the most influential factors that caused them to change their management of craniosynostosis. We expect that the use of opinion leaders can further enhance the uptake of EBM in craniofacial surgery.

  12. Curriculum for Evidence Based Medicine for MBBS II phase Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine is the training of health care professionals to access, assess and apply the best scientific evidence to clinical practice. EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence along with clinical expertise and patient values in making decisions about the case of individual patients. The current undergraduate curriculum of health profession is based on past knowledge accumulated for years. The scientific relevance of the mostly outdated information has never been questioned. The students passively absorb this available knowledge and apply it in their future professional life. There is no active learning on their part, by way of positive enquiry and critical analysis of the curriculum imposed on them. This has an undesirable impact on their competency as health professionals and the quality of the health care imparted by them. Hence there is need for emphasis on the teaching of EBM skills in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education programs. Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. The EBM course is planned to introduce in the curriculum of medical undergraduates at the beginning of second phase when they enter clinical posting. Total number of student would be 100 per batch and the course duration will be of 1 year. Educational methods program incorporates multiple teaching methods like lectures, discussion sessions, demonstration, case based learning, timely feedback, real life exposure, role modeling and peer evaluation.

  13. Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Clegg, Peter; Vandenput, Sandrine; Gustin, Pascal; Saegerman, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Online tools for teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael; Crabb, Nicholas P; Moore, Lynda J; Reyher, Kristen K; Baillie, Sarah; Eisler, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is of interest and relevance to veterinary practitioners. Consequently, veterinary schools take responsibility for teaching students how to appraise scientific articles and for equipping them with the skills needed to obtain and evaluate the best evidence and to apply this approach to their own cases. As part of our farm animal clinical rotation, we train students in qualitative and quantitative EBVM methods using an e-learning environment, online teaching materials, a wiki (a Web site that allows its users to edit its content via a Web browser), and face-to-face tutorials that support learning. Students working in small groups use a wiki to record details of the history, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, herd data, and management plans for their chosen farm animal clinical cases. Using a standardized patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) format, each group formulates a patient question based on either a proposed intervention or diagnostic procedure for the case and conducts an online scientific literature database search. The students appraise the articles retrieved using EBVM approaches and record the information in the wiki. The summation of this body of work, the group's critically appraised topic (CAT), includes the original PICO, a standardized table of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention or diagnostic procedure, a summary statement in the form of a clinical bottom line, and their reflections upon the CAT. At the end of the rotation, students take part in a structured "CAT Club" where they present and discuss their findings with fellow students and clinicians.

  15. Evidence, discovery and justification: the case of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Rodolfo; Gentile, Nelida

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop some thoughts on philosophical issues surrounding evidence-based medicine (EBM), especially related to its epistemological dimensions. After considering the scope of several philosophical concepts that are relevant to the discussion, and drawing some distinctions among different aspects of EBM, we evaluate the status of EBM and suggest that EBM is mainly a meta-methodology. Then, we outline an evaluation of the thesis that EBM is a 'new paradigm' in the practice of medicine. We argue that EBM does not seem to have arisen in the way Kuhn imagined paradigms to arise but as a conscious, deliberate proposal, more as programme than as a reality. Furthermore, there is something paradoxical about appealing to evidence or to the best evidence as a way of promoting a new paradigm. For the proposal seems to assume that there is something that by its own virtue is the best evidence for a given time. But this idea would have been rejected by Kuhn. If EBM involves a genuine new alternative in the field of medicine and shows a way in which the discipline will endure henceforth, this indicates that it is not what Kuhn once called a 'paradigm' and even, paradoxically, it is good evidence that scientific paradigms do not exist, at least in medicine. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Improving data retrieval quality: Evidence based medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, M; Dobrynin, V; Balykina, J; Kolbin, A; Verbitskaya, E; Kasimova, M

    2015-01-01

    The actively developing approach in modern medicine is the approach focused on principles of evidence-based medicine. The assessment of quality and reliability of studies is needed. However, in some cases studies corresponding to the first level of evidence may contain errors in randomized control trials (RCTs). Solution of the problem is the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Studies both in the fields of medicine and information retrieval are conducted for developing search engines for the MEDLINE database [1]; combined techniques for summarization and information retrieval targeted to solving problems of finding the best medication based on the levels of evidence are being developed [2]. Based on the relevance and demand for studies both in the field of medicine and information retrieval, it was decided to start the development of a search engine for the MEDLINE database search on the basis of the Saint-Petersburg State University with the support of Pavlov First Saint-Petersburg State Medical University and Tashkent Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education. Novelty and value of the proposed system are characterized by the use of ranking method of relevant abstracts. It is suggested that the system will be able to perform ranking based on studies level of evidence and to apply GRADE criteria for system evaluation. The assigned task falls within the domain of information retrieval and machine learning. Based on the results of implementation from previous work [3], in which the main goal was to cluster abstracts from MEDLINE database by subtypes of medical interventions, a set of algorithms for clustering in this study was selected: K-means, K-means ++, EM from the sklearn (http://scikit-learn.org) and WEKA (http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/~ml/weka/) libraries, together with the methods of Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) [4] choosing the first 210 facts and the model "bag of words" [5] to represent clustered documents

  17. Effectiveness of national evidence-based medicine competition in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Competition and education are intimately related and can be combined in many ways. The role of competition in medical education of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has not been investigated. In order to enhance the dissemination and implementation of EBM in Taiwan, EBM competitions have been established among healthcare professionals. This study was to evaluate the impact of competition in EBM learning. Methods The EBM competition used PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome) queries to examine participants’ skills in framing an answerable question, literature search, critical appraisal and clinical application among interdisciplinary teams. A structured questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate EBM among participants in the years of 2009 and 2011. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire survey at three months prior to the competition and finished the same questionnaire right after the competition. Results Valid questionnaires were collected from 358 participants, included 162 physicians, 71 nurses, 101 pharmacists, and 24 other allied healthcare professionals. There were significant increases in participants’ knowledge of and skills in EBM (p evidence-based retrieval databases, including the Cochrane Library (p < 0.001), MD Consult (p < 0.001), ProQuest (p < 0.001), UpToDate (p = 0.001), CINAHL (p = 0.001), and MicroMedex (p = 0.024). Conclusions The current study demonstrates a method that successfully enhanced the knowledge of, skills in, and behavior of EBM. The data suggest competition using PICO queries may serve as an effective way to facilitate the learning of EBM. PMID:23651869

  18. Evidence-Based Medicine and the Practicing Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Finlay A; Graham, Ian; Karr, Gerald W; Laupacis, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the attitudes of practicing general internists toward evidence-based medicine (EBM—defined as the process of systematically finding, appraising, and using contemporaneous research findings as the basis for clinical decisions) and their perceived barriers to its use. DESIGN Cross-sectional, self-administered mail questionnaire conducted between June and October 1997. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS Questionnaires were sent to all 521 physician members of the Canadian Society of Internal Medicine with Canadian mailing addresses; 296 (60%) of 495 eligible physicians responded. Exclusion of two incomplete surveys resulted in a final sample size of 294. MAIN RESULTS Mean age of respondents was 46 years, 80% were male, and 52% worked in large urban medical centers. Participants reported using EBM in their clinical practice always (33, 11%), often (173, 59%), sometimes (80, 27%), or rarely/never (8, 3%). There were no significant differences in demographics, training, or practice types or locales on univariate or multivariate analyses between those who reported using EBM often or always and those who did not. Both groups reported high usage of traditional (non-EBM) information sources: clinical experience (93%), review articles (73%), the opinion of colleagues (61%), and textbooks (45%). Only a minority used EBM-related information sources such as primary research studies (45%), clinical practice guidelines (27%), or Cochrane Collaboration Reviews (5%) on a regular basis. Barriers to the use of EBM cited by respondents included lack of relevant evidence (26%), newness of the concept (25%), impracticality for use in day-to-day practice (14%), and negative impact on traditional medical skills and “the art of medicine” (11%). Less than half of respondents were confident in basic skills of EBM such as conducting a literature search (46%) or evaluating the methodology of published studies (34%). However, respondents demonstrated a high level of interest

  19. Evidence-based medicine teaching in UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meats, Emma; Heneghan, Carl; Crilly, Mike; Glasziou, Paul

    2009-04-01

    It is recognized that clinicians need training in evidence-based medicine (EBM), however there is considerable variation in the content and methods of the EBM curriculum in UK medical schools. To determine current practice and variation in EBM undergraduate teaching in UK medical schools and inform the strategy of medical schools and the National Knowledge Service. We contacted all 32 medical schools in the UK and requested that the person primarily responsible for EBM undergraduate teaching complete a short online survey and provide their EBM curriculum. The survey was completed by representatives from 20 (63%) medical schools and curriculum details were received from 5 (16%). There is considerable variation in the methods and content of the EBM curriculum. Although the majority of schools teach core EBM topics, relatively few allow students to practice the skills or assess such skills. EBM teaching is restricted by lack of curriculum time, trained tutors and teaching materials. Key elements to progress include the integration of EBM with clinical specialties, tutor training and the availability of high-quality teaching resources. The development of a national undergraduate EBM curriculum may help in promoting progress in EBM teaching and assessment in UK medical schools.

  20. Extending the Reach of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Proposed Categorization of Lower-Level Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank C; Gould, Michael K; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Patel, Sheena

    2018-02-01

    Clinical practice involves making many treatment decisions for which only limited formal evidence exists. While the methodology of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has evolved tremendously, there is a need to better characterize lower-level evidence. This should enhance the ability to appropriately weigh the evidence against other considerations, and counter the temptation to think it is more robust than it actually is. A framework to categorize lower-level evidence is proposed, consisting of nonrandomized comparisons, extrapolation using indirect evidence, rationale, and clinical experience (ie, an accumulated general impression). Subtypes are recognized within these categories, based on the degree of confounding in nonrandomized comparisons, the uncertainty involved in extrapolation from indirect evidence, and the plausibility of a rationale. Categorizing the available evidence in this way can promote a better understanding of the strengths and limitations of using such evidence as the basis for treatment decisions in clinically relevant areas that are devoid of higher-level evidence. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Query-oriented evidence extraction to support evidence-based medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abeed; Mollá, Diego; Paris, Cecile

    2016-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine practice requires medical practitioners to rely on the best available evidence, in addition to their expertise, when making clinical decisions. The medical domain boasts a large amount of published medical research data, indexed in various medical databases such as MEDLINE. As the size of this data grows, practitioners increasingly face the problem of information overload, and past research has established the time-associated obstacles faced by evidence-based medicine practitioners. In this paper, we focus on the problem of automatic text summarisation to help practitioners quickly find query-focused information from relevant documents. We utilise an annotated corpus that is specialised for the task of evidence-based summarisation of text. In contrast to past summarisation approaches, which mostly rely on surface level features to identify salient pieces of texts that form the summaries, our approach focuses on the use of corpus-based statistics, and domain-specific lexical knowledge for the identification of summary contents. We also apply a target-sentence-specific summarisation technique that reduces the problem of underfitting that persists in generic summarisation models. In automatic evaluations run over a large number of annotated summaries, our extractive summarisation technique statistically outperforms various baseline and benchmark summarisation models with a percentile rank of 96.8%. A manual evaluation shows that our extractive summarisation approach is capable of selecting content with high recall and precision, and may thus be used to generate bottom-line answers to practitioners' queries. Our research shows that the incorporation of specialised data and domain-specific knowledge can significantly improve text summarisation performance in the medical domain. Due to the vast amounts of medical text available, and the high growth of this form of data, we suspect that such summarisation techniques will address the time

  2. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU.

  3. Evidence-Based Medicine; Climbing a Mountain for a Better Decision-Making

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen, Mona O.; Malki, Ahmed M.; Abdel-Aziz, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-Based Medicine is a relatively new term used in medical sittings and Health Information Technology (HIT). It is a form of medicine that integrates practitioners’ expertise with the best available practical evidences to improve better patient care. Evidence-Based Medicine has increasingly been used and incorporated into daily medical practices to overcome the shortcomings in the conventional standard care. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the importance of Evidenc...

  4. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackerman Michael

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. Methods We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. Results The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. Conclusion In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality.

  5. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Sergio A; Fontelo, Paul; Green, Linda; Ackerman, Michael; Liu, Fang

    2007-02-21

    This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices) to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality.

  6. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Research literacy and the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). A survey with 17 close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all four years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree of interest in, and support for the value of research. However, increasing years (one to four years) in the program was associated with lower interest in post-graduation research participation and entering the doctoral program, and the fourth year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research in Chinese medicine. Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research, and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Students and Lecturers Toward Evidence-Based Medicine: Evidence from Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The application of diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic evidence in day-to-day management of patients has been in constant focus during the last two decades. This study is an attempt to investigate attitude and knowledge of post-graduated medical students and lecturers towards evidence-based medicine (EBM and assess their preferences to clinical practice guidelines.Methods: The designed questionnaire was posted to the randomly selected post-graduated medical students and lecturers of medical department at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.Results: There were one hundred sixty subjects (60% who answered the questionnaire. Sixty nine percent were male, 46.3% were lecturers, and 53.2% were post-graduated medical students.About 66% of the respondents have heard of the term of EBM. Only 7.8% of the respondents have already attended to a course to learn the skills of EBM and one hundred twenty five (78.1% like to attend a course to learn the skills of EBM. The most common perceived reason for use of EBM was lack of enough motivation.Conclusion: They have not yet integrated the use of EBM into their practices widely. Their knowledge is at a high risk of becoming out of data. Education of EBM should be a hot topic among educationalplanning programmers until it becomes a part of university educational curriculum in Iran.Keywords: POST-GRADUATED MEDICAL STUDENT, LECTURER, KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE, IRAN.

  8. Guidelines and evidence based medicine. The importance of stakeholder involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Massoni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the depenalization of professional conduct of the physician in case of adherence to the guidelines proposed by L. 189/2012 the discussion on the quality of the available guidelines in the literature has led the authors to a review with particular regard to stakeholder involvement in the elaboration process. Evident critical points arise in the accessible studies that have used as an assessment tool a scientifically validated questionnaire (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation – AGREE. As a result the solution of the legislature, although useful to contain the phenomenon of defensive medicine, may be useless and ineffective in criminal cases where fundamental and absolute rights, as the right to life and health of patients, are involved.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v5i3.893

  9. Rising to the challenges of evidence-based medicine: a way forward for acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Evidence-based medicine offers important opportunities and poses critical challenges to the acupuncture profession. Having a clear understanding of what evidence-based medicine is and what it is not is necessary to understanding how the acupuncture field might benefit by adopting evidence-based medicine as its paradigm. This article discusses the need for the acupuncture field to retool its professional, academic, and clinical apparatuses to produce, critically appraise, and use high-quality scientific evidence in order to develop acupuncture as an evidence-based procedure. Development of evidence-based acupuncture procedures, practice guidelines, and research directives may help acupuncture become a standard therapeutic procedure rather than a complement or alternative to conventional medicine.

  10. How to teach evidence-based medicine to urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Mostafaie, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is to help develop, disseminate, and evaluate resources that can be used to practice and teach EBM for urology residents and continuing education of urologists to reduce the gap between research and clinical practice. Urology departments should build capacity for residents to shape the future of quality and safety in healthcare through translating evidence into practice. Cutting edge approaches require knowing how to teach Evidence-based urology, to make Bio-statistics easy to understanding and how to lead improvement at every level. The authors shared their experience about ‘what works’ in a surgical department to building an Evidence-based environment and high quality of cares. PMID:22279316

  11. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and precision medicine in the era of big data: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Jacques S; Lew, Daniel

    2016-12-19

    This era of groundbreaking scientific developments in high-resolution, high-throughput technologies is allowing the cost-effective collection and analysis of huge, disparate datasets on individual health. Proper data mining and translation of the vast datasets into clinically actionable knowledge will require the application of clinical bioinformatics. These developments have triggered multiple national initiatives in precision medicine-a data-driven approach centering on the individual. However, clinical implementation of precision medicine poses numerous challenges. Foremost, precision medicine needs to be contrasted with the powerful and widely used practice of evidence-based medicine, which is informed by meta-analyses or group-centered studies from which mean recommendations are derived. This "one size fits all" approach can provide inadequate solutions for outliers. Such outliers, which are far from an oddity as all of us fall into this category for some traits, can be better managed using precision medicine. Here, we argue that it is necessary and possible to bridge between precision medicine and evidence-based medicine. This will require worldwide and responsible data sharing, as well as regularly updated training programs. We also discuss the challenges and opportunities for achieving clinical utility in precision medicine. We project that, through collection, analyses and sharing of standardized medically relevant data globally, evidence-based precision medicine will shift progressively from therapy to prevention, thus leading eventually to improved, clinician-to-patient communication, citizen-centered healthcare and sustained well-being.

  12. Self-perception and knowledge of evidence based medicine by physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre-Raya, Karen A.; Castilla-Pe?n, Mar?a F.; Barajas-Nava, Leticia A.; Torres-Rodr?guez, Violeta; Mu?oz-Hern?ndez, Onofre; Gardu?o-Espinosa, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence, legitimacy and application of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) in the world is growing as a tool that integrates, the best available evidence to decision making in patient care. Our goal was to identify the relationship between self-perception about the relevance of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and the degree of basic knowledge of this discipline in a group of physicians. Methods A survey was carried out in a third level public hospital in Mexico City. Self-perception ...

  13. Evidence based medicine: teaching, learning and practice: results of a cross-sectional study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ummu Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Cansever, Zeliha; Acemoglu, Hamit; Cayir, Yasemin; Khan, Abdul Sattar

    2014-07-01

    To assess the level of understanding related to the significance of evidence-based medicine among physicians. The cross-sectional study was conducted between March and October 2012 using an online questionnaire that was sent out to physicians and academics working as faculty at training hospitals across Turkey. The questionnaire consisted of questions about the knowledge, attitude and behaviour towards evidence-based medicine. Seven of the questions pertained to the learning of evidence-based medicine, six were about teaching evidence-based medicine, and six were about its practice. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analyses. The questionnaire was returned duly filled by 79 physicians. Of them, 41 (51.9%) were males; and 57 (72.2%) were part of the faculty. Only 1(1.2%) participant had attended a course about evidence-based medicine during undergraduate education, while 19 (24.05)had attended one after graduation. Besides, 26 (32.9%) academics were teaching some concepts of evidence-based medicine, and 21 (26.6%) were giving some information about clinical guidelines. The study found that levels of learning and teaching of evidence-based medicine among physicians were inadequate. They should be emphasised at both pre- and post-graduate tiers.

  14. Evidence-Based Medicine in Aesthetic Surgery: The Significance of Level to Aesthetic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrich, Rod J; Cho, Min-Jeong

    2017-05-01

    Since its popularization in the 1980s, evidence-based medicine has become the cornerstone of American health care. Many specialties rapidly adapted to the paradigm shift of health care by delivering treatment using the evidence-based guidelines. However, the field of plastic surgery has been slow to implement evidence-based medicine compared with the other specialties because of the challenges of performing randomized controlled trials, such as funding, variability in surgical skills, and difficulty with standardization of techniques. To date, aesthetic surgery has been at the forefront of evidence-based medicine in plastic surgery by having the most randomized controlled trials. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of these studies has not been previously performed. In this article, the level I and II articles of aesthetic surgery are discussed to increase awareness of high-quality evidence-based medicine in aesthetic surgery.

  15. Introduction to the history and current status of evidence-based korean medicine: a unique integrated system of allopathic and holistic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chang Shik; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Korean medicine, an integrated allopathic and traditional medicine, has developed unique characteristics and has been active in contributing to evidence-based medicine. Recent developments in Korean medicine have not been as well disseminated as traditional Chinese medicine. This introduction to recent developments in Korean medicine will draw attention to, and facilitate, the advancement of evidence-based complementary alternative medicine (CAM). Methods and Results. The history of and recent developments in Korean medicine as evidence-based medicine are explored through discussions on the development of a national standard classification of diseases and study reports, ranging from basic research to newly developed clinical therapies. A national standard classification of diseases has been developed and revised serially into an integrated classification of Western allopathic and traditional holistic medicine disease entities. Standard disease classifications offer a starting point for the reliable gathering of evidence and provide a representative example of the unique status of evidence-based Korean medicine as an integration of Western allopathic medicine and traditional holistic medicine. Conclusions. Recent developments in evidence-based Korean medicine show a unique development in evidence-based medicine, adopting both Western allopathic and holistic traditional medicine. It is expected that Korean medicine will continue to be an important contributor to evidence-based medicine, encompassing conventional and complementary approaches.

  16. Strategies for Teaching Evidence-Based Management: What Management Educators Can Learn from Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, April L.; Middleton, Stuart; Greenfield, Geoffrey; Williams, Julian; Brazil, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based management (EBMgt) is a growing literature stream in management education which contends that management decision making should be informed by the best available scientific evidence (Rousseau, 2006). Encouraged by the success of evidence-based practice in the field of medicine, advocates of EBMgt have increasingly called for…

  17. Ten essential papers for the practice of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David; O'Sullivan, Jack; Heneghan, Carl; Pluddemann, Annette; Aronson, Jeffrey; Mahtani, Kamal

    2017-12-01

    In this article we signpost readers to 10 papers we consider essential reading for anyone starting out on an evidence-based medicine journey. We have considered papers consisting a mix of old and new, seminal and cutting-edge that offer insight into what evidence-based medicine is, where it came from, why it matters and what it has achieved. This is balanced against some of the common criticisms of evidence-based medicine and efforts to tackle them. We have also highlighted papers acknowledging the importance of teaching and learning of the principles of evidence-based medicine and how health professionals can better use evidence in clinical decisions with patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Asian traditional medicine (ATM): recent progress based on scientific evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideyuki; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Han, Jing-Yan

    2006-01-01

    Asian traditional medicine (ATM) (herbal medicine, acupuncture or moxibution) has gained some popularity among communities in Asia. Some therapies employed in ATM have been verified using modern techniques, but the significance of ATM has still remained unclear. This symposium was focused on experimental data obtained recently.

  19. A Systematic Review of Postgraduate Teaching in Evidence-Based Medicine and Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomarasamy, Aravinthan; Taylor, Rod; Khan, Khalid S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of evidence-based medicine and critical appraisal teaching at the postgraduate level. Conducts a comprehensive search and identifies 17 studies. Shows a significant improvement in knowledge but not in attitude, skills, or behavior. (Author/KHR)

  20. [Patient preferences versus evidence-based medicine: did the pioneers of evidence-based medicine take the patient's preferences into account?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, C.G.; Weijden, T.T. van der

    2016-01-01

    A patient's values and preferences are one of the three 'pillars' of evidence-based medicine (EBM). How can we explain that this one pillar has hardly been elaborated in the EBM-literature?? Were the EBM pioneers really committed to the patient's preferences, were they not ready yet, or were they

  1. [Challenge of evidence-based medicine: sense and non-sense of diagnostic tests in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehouli, J; Stengel, D; Hindenburg, J; Camara, O; Porzsolt, F; Lichtenegger, W

    2001-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the synthesis of internal evidence (experience) and best external evidence (literature) aiming to solve a particular clinical problem. This paper gives an overview on different tools to appraise rationales and results of diagnostic tests such as CA-125 monitoring in patients with ovarian cancer.

  2. Hijacked evidence-based medicine: stay the course and throw the pirates overboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-04-01

    The article discusses a number of criticisms that have been raised against evidence-based medicine, such as focusing on benefits and ignoring adverse events; being interested in averages and ignoring the wide variability in individual risks and responsiveness; ignoring clinician-patient interaction and clinical judgement; leading to some sort of reductionism; and falling prey to corruption from conflicts of interest. I argue that none of these deficiencies are necessarily inherent to evidence-based medicine. In fact, work in evidence-based medicine has contributed a lot towards minimizing these deficiencies in medical research and medical care. However, evidence-based medicine is paying the price of its success: having become more widely recognized, it is manipulated and misused to support subverted or perverted agendas that are hijacking its reputation value. Sometimes the conflicts behind these agendas are so strong that one worries about whether the hijacking of evidence-based medicine is reversible. Nevertheless, evidence-based medicine is a valuable conceptual toolkit and it is worth to try to remove the biases of the pirates who have hijacked its ship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Big data analysis and evidence-based medicine: controversy or cooperation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinzu; Hu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    The development of evidence-based medicince should be an important milestone from the empirical medicine to the evidence-driving modern medicine. With the outbreak in biomedical data, the rising big data analysis can efficiently solve exploratory questions or decision-making issues in biomedicine and healthcare activities. The current problem in China is that big data analysis is still not well conducted and applied to deal with problems such as clinical decision-making, public health policy, and should not be a debate whether big data analysis can replace evidence-based medicine or not. Therefore, we should clearly understand, no matter whether evidence-based medicine or big data analysis, the most critical infrastructure must be the substantial work in the design, constructure and collection of original database in China.

  4. Evidence-based practice method of integrative Chinese and Western medicine based on literature retrieval through PICO question and complementary and alternative medicine topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiu-feng; Ni, Qing; Wei, Jun-ping; Xu, Hao

    2010-12-01

    An evidence-based practice method according to literature retrieval through PICO (Patients, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) questions and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) topics, which can obtain helpful evidence for guiding clinical practice, was introduced with a practical example in this paper. The knowledge of diseases and Western medicine treatment can be acquired by literature retrieval through PICO question, while searching by CAM topics may provide evidence for Chinese medicine (CM). Thus the author held that literature retrieval through both PICO question and CAM topics was an ideal evidence-based practice method for integrative Chinese and Western medicine (ICWM). However, since the standard in CM evidence hierarchy is still under study, the value of the CAM thematic retrieval method remains very limited. In the future, studies on the definition and hierarchy of CM evidences and the herb-drug interaction between Western and Chinese medicine during a combination therapy should be strengthened to improve the status of ICWM evidence-based practice.

  5. Evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology, part 2: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Rauch, Steven D; Wasserman, Jared; Coblens, Orly; Randolph, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    What is the current state of evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology? This question inquires about the state of our literature, our attitudes and capabilities, and our patients' desires. Thus, this installment of "Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology" focuses on these 3 topics. First, the authors consider the literature relative to benchmarks for study design. Second, the data regarding otolaryngologists' and other surgical specialists' attitudes and understanding of clinical data are discussed. Third, patient-based efforts to promote and participate in evidence-based practice are explored. In addition, a discussion of the relevant supportive efforts made by our professional organizations is included.

  6. CONFLICT OF INTERESTS AS A PROBLEM OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpent'eva, M P

    The role of ideology (principles) of evidence-based medicine in prophylaxis and correction of con?flict of interests in various spheres of medicine and socio-medical assistance is considered. Professional ethics formed in the course of education and undergoing modification under conditions of real practical work is a main sphere of medical and related edological practices associated with conflicts of interests. Of special importance are principles of bioethics based on the requiremnents of evidence- based medicine. The role of evidence-based medicine in prophylaxis and resolution of conflicts of interests is related to the training and re-training of specialists, prevention and correction of their professional degradation and deformation in the course ofpractical clinical work. Analysis of prima, y and secondary motives underlying occupational out. activities and their role in the formation of the conflict of interests was carried.

  7. Flipped classroom model for learning evidence-based medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rucker SY; Ozdogan Z; Al Achkar M

    2017-01-01

    .... A flipped classroom model appears to be an ideal strategy to meet the demands to connect evidence to practice while creating engaged, culturally competent, and technologically literate physicians...

  8. Evidence-based medicine meets democracy: the role of evidence-based public health guidelines in local government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M P; Atkins, L; Littleford, C; Leng, G; Michie, S

    2017-12-01

    In 2013, many public health functions transferred from the National Health Service to local government in England. From 2006 NICE had produced public health guidelines based on the principles of evidence-based medicine. This study explores how the guidelines were received in the new environment in local government and related issues raised relating to the use of evidence in local authoritites. In depth, interviews with 31 elected members and officers, including Directors of Public Health, from four very different local government organizations ('local authorities'). Participants reported that (i) there were tensions between evidence-based, and political decision-making; (ii) there were differences in views about what constituted 'good' evidence and (iii) that organizational life is an important mediator in the way evidence is used. Democratic political decision-making does not necessarily naturally align with decision-making based on evidence from the international scientific literature, and local knowledge and local evidence are very important in the ways that public health decisions are made.

  9. Practical Biostatistics A Friendly Step-by-Step Approach for Evidence-based Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Suchmacher, Mendel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine aims to apply the best available evidence gained from the scientific method to medical decision making. It is a practice that uses statistical analysis of scientific methods and outcomes to drive further experimentation and diagnosis. The profusion of evidence-based medicine in medical practice and clinical research has produced a need for life scientists and clinical researchers to assimilate biostatistics into their work to meet efficacy and practical standards. Practical Biostatistics provides researchers, medical professionals, and students with a friendly, practica

  10. The warp of evidence-based medicine: lessons from dutch maternity care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devries, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    Most critiques of evidence-based medicine (EBM) focus on the scientific shortcomings of the technique. Social scientists are more likely to criticize EBM for its ideological biases, a criticism that makes sociological sense but is difficult to substantiate. Using evidence from the scientific debate

  11. Educating physicians in evidence based medicine: current practices and curricular strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” The practice of EBM is an expectation of professional healthcare and requisite component in many medical school curricula. Yet, despite

  12. Barriers Facing Physicians Practicing Evidence-Based Medicine in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Almaie, Sameeh M.; Al-Baghli, Nadira

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Tremendous advances in health care have been made through the development of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Studies show that physicians face barriers in practice, preventing the effective use of the best evidence available. Insight into these barriers should pave the way for an action plan to remove them. The aim of this study was…

  13. Adjuvant cancer biotherapy by Viscum album extract Isorel: overview of evidence based medicine findings.

    OpenAIRE

    Borović Šunjić, Suzana; Čipak Gašparović, Ana; Vuković, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Sussman Weiss, Elisabeth; Soldo, Ivo; Đaković, Nikola; Žarković, Tomislav; Žarković, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidenc...

  14. Ask the right question: a critical step for practicing evidence-based laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of laboratory medicine is to facilitate better decision making in clinical practice and healthcare delivery. Decision making implies an unresolved issue, problem or unmet need. The most important criterion for any investigation to be of value in clinical practice is that it addresses an unmet need. The different ways in which laboratory investigations are utilized in patient care can be represented in the form of questions. It is important that these questions are articulated to highlight the variables that will impact on the effectiveness of the investigation in the scenario being considered. These variables include the characteristics of the patient (or population) and clinical setting, the nature of the decision and action taken on receipt of the test result and the expected outcome. Asking a question is the first step of the evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) cycle, the other steps being acquiring the evidence, critically appraising the evidence, applying the evidence and auditing use of the evidence. Getting the question right determines the quality of the whole process, thus, defines the quality in practice of laboratory medicine. Whilst the main focus of the EBLM cycle is to provide a strong evidence base for use in clinical practice, it is clear that the five steps are equally applicable in commissioning, delivery and audit (performance management) of services. Asking the right question is crucial to improving the quality of evidence, and practice, in laboratory medicine, and should be used in routine laboratory medicine practice and management throughout healthcare.

  15. An Evidence-Based Medicine Approach to Antihyperglycemic Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus to Overcome Overtreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Anil N; Nguyen, Oanh K

    2017-01-10

    Overtreatment is pervasive in medicine and leads to potential patient harms and excessive costs in health care. Although evidence-based medicine is often derided as practice by rote algorithmic medicine, the appropriate application of key evidence-based medicine principles in clinical decision making is fundamental to preventing overtreatment and promoting high-value, individualized patient-centered care. Specifically, this article discusses the importance of (1) using absolute rather than relative estimates of benefits to inform treatment decisions; (2) considering the time horizon to benefit of treatments; (3) balancing potential harms and benefits; and (4) using shared decision making by physicians to incorporate the patient's values and preferences into treatment decisions. Here, we illustrate the application of these principles to considering the decision of whether or not to recommend intensive glycemic control to patients to minimize microvascular and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Through this lens, this example will illustrate how an evidence-based medicine approach can be used to individualize glycemic goals and prevent overtreatment, and can serve as a template for applying evidence-based medicine to inform treatment decisions for other conditions to optimize health and individualize patient care. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Care for children and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sege, Robert D; De Vos, Edward

    2008-03-01

    Child healthcare sits between two worlds: in the past, with a focus on the prevention and treatment of infectious and chronic disease and the current more expansive view of child health and our role in child health promotion. As a result, disagreements concerning the evidence basis for our work have also arisen. Clinicians may stay on track by considering multiple sources of evidence in making clinical decisions. In doing so, it helps to consider each activity from the perspective of the child, family, and community. Screening and intervention may look for existing problems, for risk and resilience factors, and for opportunities to optimize each child's developmental potential. Integration of these various concerns underlies the art of modern practice, provides the assistance that families want, and leads to continued professional satisfaction.

  17. From cumulative cultural transmission to evidence-based medicine: evolution of medicinal plant knowledge in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonti, Marco; Staub, Peter O; Cabras, Stefano; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Casu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In Mediterranean cultures written records of medicinal plant use have a long tradition. This written record contributed to building a consensus about what was perceived to be an efficacious pharmacopeia. Passed down through millennia, these scripts have transmitted knowledge about plant uses, with high fidelity, to scholars and laypersons alike. Herbal medicine's importance and the long-standing written record call for a better understanding of the mechanisms influencing the transmission of contemporary medicinal plant knowledge. Here we contextualize herbal medicine within evolutionary medicine and cultural evolution. Cumulative knowledge transmission is approached by estimating the causal effect of two seminal scripts about materia medica written by Dioscorides and Galen, two classical Greco-Roman physicians, on today's medicinal plant use in the Southern Italian regions of Campania, Sardinia, and Sicily. Plant-use combinations are treated as transmissible cultural traits (or "memes"), which in analogy to the biological evolution of genetic traits, are subjected to mutation and selection. Our results suggest that until today ancient scripts have exerted a strong influence on the use of herbal medicine. We conclude that the repeated empirical testing and scientific study of health care claims is guiding and shaping the selection of efficacious treatments and evidence-based herbal medicine.

  18. From cumulative cultural transmission to evidence-based medicine: evolution of medicinal plant knowledge in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonti, Marco; Staub, Peter O.; Cabras, Stefano; Castellanos, Maria Eugenia; Casu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In Mediterranean cultures written records of medicinal plant use have a long tradition. This written record contributed to building a consensus about what was perceived to be an efficacious pharmacopeia. Passed down through millennia, these scripts have transmitted knowledge about plant uses, with high fidelity, to scholars and laypersons alike. Herbal medicine's importance and the long-standing written record call for a better understanding of the mechanisms influencing the transmission of contemporary medicinal plant knowledge. Here we contextualize herbal medicine within evolutionary medicine and cultural evolution. Cumulative knowledge transmission is approached by estimating the causal effect of two seminal scripts about materia medica written by Dioscorides and Galen, two classical Greco-Roman physicians, on today's medicinal plant use in the Southern Italian regions of Campania, Sardinia, and Sicily. Plant-use combinations are treated as transmissible cultural traits (or “memes”), which in analogy to the biological evolution of genetic traits, are subjected to mutation and selection. Our results suggest that until today ancient scripts have exerted a strong influence on the use of herbal medicine. We conclude that the repeated empirical testing and scientific study of health care claims is guiding and shaping the selection of efficacious treatments and evidence-based herbal medicine. PMID:26483686

  19. Clinicians’ perceptions and the relevant computer-based information needs towards the practice of evidence based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Endoh, Akira; Sakurai, Tsunetaro

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a survey among 100 clinicians in a university hospital to determine the clinician’s attitudes and the relevant computer-based information needs towards the practice of evidence-based medicine in outpatient setting. PMID:14728387

  20. Can evidence-based medicine change toilet-training practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    To assess the evidence showing that a specific method of toilet training (TT) is more effective than others, as any method of TT recommended by a physician faces obstacles because parents rarely request advice on TT from physicians, and TT practices vary tremendously across cultures and socioeconomic levels. Reports on the natural course of urinary incontinence in children and different methods of TT, published in English between 1946 and 2012, were reviewed. Specifically investigated were historical recommendations on TT, the prevalence of urinary incontinence during childhood, the outcome of TT methods, and the effect of culture and socioeconomic status on the choice of TT method and timing. TT now occurs at later ages than it did previously. This progression reflects changing ideas about normal childhood physiology and psychology. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in European countries progressively decreased in children aged between 6-7 years and 16-17 years old. TT methods change with increasing socioeconomic levels to 'child-centred' techniques applied at older ages, but the prevalence of urinary incontinence after 'parent-centred' techniques of TT at younger ages has not been studied. There is currently no evidence that a specific timing or method of TT is more effective or prevents voiding dysfunction. Follow-up studies of urinary continence in children toilet trained at 6-12 months of age might provide evidence for whether a given method or timing of TT is beneficial to prevent voiding dysfunction. The recommendations of physicians might be more readily adopted if they fit culturally accepted ideas of good parenting techniques.

  1. Evidence-based medicine in plastic surgery: where did it come from and where is it going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Joseph A; Desai, Naman S

    2014-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine, particularly randomized controlled trials, influence many of the daily decisions within plastic surgery as well as nearly every other medical specialty, and will continue to play a larger role in medicine in the future. Even though it is certainly not a new idea, evidence-based medicine continues to remain a hot topic among members of the healthcare community. As evidence-based medicine continues to grow and evolve, it is becoming more important for all physicians to understand the fundamentals of evidence-based medicine: how evidence-based medicine has changed, and how to successfully incorporate it into the daily practice of medicine. Admittedly, the wide acceptance and implementation of evidence-based medicine has been slower in surgical fields such as plastic surgery given the difficulty in performing large scale blinded randomized controlled trials due to the inherent nature of a surgical intervention as a treatment modality. Despite these challenges, the plastic surgery literature has recently begun to respond to the demand for more evidence-based medicine. Today's plastic surgeons are making a concerted embrace evidence-based medicine by increasing the amount of out of high-level clinical evidence and should be encouraged to continue to further their endeavors in the field of evidence-based medicine in the future. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. An Evidence-Based Study on Medicinal Plants for Hemorrhoids in Medieval Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Khademi, Fatemeh; Rahmanifard, Maryam; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2017-10-01

    Hemorrhoids is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases. There are several therapeutic options associated with some complications. Therefore, researchers look for traditional medicines as a potential resource for introduction of new natural drugs. The current study reports an evidence-based review of herbal remedies for hemorrhoids in traditional Persian medicine. A comprehensive survey about hemorrhoids on the most important manuscripts of traditional Persian medicine was done. Then, scientific data banks were searched for possible related properties of each herb in the conventional medicine. We reported some historical aspects of traditional Persian medicine view on classification, examination, and predisposing factors of hemorrhoids. In addition, we have reported 105 medicinal plants belonging to 51 families. More than half of the reported herbs exhibited anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Although lack of human studies regarding the mentioned herbs is noted, positive results from experimental findings can be considered for new drug discovery supported by traditional and medieval experiences.

  3. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Civilization stress, cardiovascular risk, evidence-based medicine, guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Kornél

    2009-05-10

    Cardiovascular diseases have the pole-position on the list of morbidity and mortality statistics. Despite the great advances have been made in management of cardiovascular diseases, prevalence of these disorders increases worldwide, and even younger and younger ages are threatened. This phenomenon is strongly related to obesity and type 2 diabetes pandemic, which shows an unequivocal association with expansion of modernized life-style. The pathomechanism proposed to have central role is the chronic stress induced by civilized life-conduct. The authors criticizes the everyday practice suggested for management of cardiovascular diseases, focusing on normalization of cardiovascular risk factors, instead of fighting against the primary cause ie. chronic stress. There is growing evidence, that achieving the target values defined in guide-lines will not necessarily result in improvement of patient related clinical outcomes. The statistical approach generally practiced in randomized clinical trials is primarily striving for the drug-sale, instead of discovering novel pathophysiological relations. Pharmaceutical industry having decisive role in research and patient-care is mainly interested in profit-sharing, therefore patients' interest can not be optimally realized, and costs are unnecessarily augmented. Separation of patient-, and business-oriented medical care is an ethical question of fundamental importance.

  5. Evidence-based complementary and alternative veterinary medicine--a contradiction in terms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Sebastian; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) like acupuncture, herbal medicine and homeopathy is increasingly used in the treatment of human and animal disease. On the other hand, CAM is discussed controversially, especially in the context of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine (EBVM). This paper provides a balanced analysis of the currently available data on CAM in human and veterinary medicine. In conclusion, little rigorous research data concerning the efficacy and safety of CAM has been published. However, acupuncture is gaining increasing acceptance in academic medicine, based on several metaanalyses that show efficacy for specific conditions. In practice, decisions concerning CAM therapies should also be based on the best available evidence provided by scientifically valid data. This implies that CAM interventions must be validated by stringent high quality research to obtain an objective and replicable overview of efficacy and safety. Nevertheless, trials should be designed according to important aspects of CAM therapies (e.g. individual treatment). In conclusion, Evidence-Based Alternative Veterinary Medicine is not a contradiction in terms.

  6. Randomised trials in context: practical problems and social aspects of evidence-based medicine and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Warren; Raman, Sujatha; Turner, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Randomised trials can provide excellent evidence of treatment benefit in medicine. Over the last 50 years, they have been cemented in the regulatory requirements for the approval of new treatments. Randomised trials make up a large and seemingly high-quality proportion of the medical evidence-base. However, it has also been acknowledged that a distorted evidence-base places a severe limitation on the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). We describe four important ways in which the evidence from randomised trials is limited or partial: the problem of applying results, the problem of bias in the conduct of randomised trials, the problem of conducting the wrong trials and the problem of conducting the right trials the wrong way. These problems are not intrinsic to the method of randomised trials or the EBM philosophy of evidence; nevertheless, they are genuine problems that undermine the evidence that randomised trials provide for decision-making and therefore undermine EBM in practice. Finally, we discuss the social dimensions of these problems and how they highlight the indispensable role of judgement when generating and using evidence for medicine. This is the paradox of randomised trial evidence: the trials open up expert judgment to scrutiny, but this scrutiny in turn requires further expertise.

  7. From cumulative cultural transmission to evidence-based medicine: Evolution of medicinal plant knowledge in Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLeonti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean cultures written records of medicinal plant use have a long tradition. This written record contributed to building a consensus about what was perceived to be an efficacious pharmacopoeia. Passed down through millennia, these scripts have transmitted knowledge about plant uses, with high fidelity, to scholars and laypersons alike. Herbal medicine’s importance and the long-standing written record call for a better understanding of the mechanisms influencing the transmission of contemporary medicinal plant knowledge. Here we contextualize herbal medicine within evolutionary medicine and cultural evolution. Cumulative knowledge transmission is approached by estimating the causal effect of two seminal scripts about materia medica written by Dioscorides and Galen, two classical Greco-Roman physicians, on today’s medicinal plant use in the Southern Italian regions of Campania, Sardinia and Sicily. Plant-use combinations are treated as transmissible cultural traits (or memes, which in analogy to the biological evolution of genetic traits, are subjected to mutation and selection. Our results suggest that until today ancient scripts have exerted a strong influence on the use of herbal medicine. We conclude that the repeated empirical testing and scientific study of health care claims is guiding and shaping the selection of efficacious treatments and evidence-based herbal medicine.

  8. Herbal traditional Chinese medicine and its evidence base in gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Schulze, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat several ailments, but its efficiency is poorly documented and hence debated, as opposed to modern medicine commonly providing effective therapies. The aim of this review article is to present a practical reference guide on the role of herbal TCM in managing gastrointestinal disorders, supported by systematic reviews and evidence based trials. A literature search using herbal TCM combined with terms for gastrointestinal disorders in Pu...

  9. [Evidence-based medicine as a fundamental principle of health care management for workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, N Kh; Fatkhutdinova, L M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based principles in occupational medicine should include prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation. Specific feature of occupational medicine is necessity to prove cause-effect relationships between occupational factor and the disease emerged. Important place is occupied by cohort and intervention studies, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Information obtained by scientific society should be presented to practical specialists and put into everyday activities.

  10. A review on reporting guidelines of clinical research in evidence based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xing; Wang, Gui-qian; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-07-01

    Good clinical practice should be based on evidence. Evidence quality should be based on critical appraisal in evidence based medicine (EBM). Evaluation of evidence quality plays an important role in evidence level clarifying, which is the core of EBM. Different recommendations for clinical practice often derive from evidence levels. Thus evidence quality evaluation is the first and most important step in EBM. There are lots of standards to evaluate evidence quality in the world. However there are two aspects of the evaluation, one is methodological evaluation and the other is reporting evaluation. This article collected a series of standards for clinical trials quality evaluation according to different research designs. It is hoped that the resource and introduction about the quality evaluation of clinical trials be helpful for medical researchers in China. Only being familiar with all kinds of standards of methodology and reporting, researchers could publish high quality scientific papers.

  11. Courting Apocalypse: Creating a Zombie-Themed Evidence-Based Medicine Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Amy E; Kiscaden, Elizabeth; Bengtson, Jason

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, two librarians at the Hardin Library for the Health Sciences at the University of Iowa turned their dreams into a reality and secured funding to build a zombie-themed evidence-based medicine game. The game features a "choose your own adventure" style that takes students through a scenario where a disease outbreak is taking place and a resident is asked to use evidence-based medicine skills to select a screening and diagnostic tool to use on potentially infected patients. Feedback on the game has been positive, and future plans include building additional modules on therapy, harm, and prognosis.

  12. Bridging the gap. The separate worlds of evidence-based medicine and patient-centered medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.

    2000-01-01

    Modern medical care is influenced by two paradigms: ‘evidence-based medicine’ and ‘patient-centered medicine’. In the last decade, both paradigms rapidly gained in popularity and are now both supposed to affect the process of clinical decision making during the daily practice of physicians.

  13. Toward evidence-based Chinese medicine: Status quo, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Long; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Li; Li, Bo; Wu, Chuan-Hong; Mu, Wei; Wang, Jia-Ying; Yang, Ke-Hu; Li, You-Ping; Chen, Chiehfeng; Wang, Yong-Yan; Wang, Chen; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Shang, Hong-Cai

    2018-01-16

    How to test the treatments of Chinese medicine (CM) and make them more widely accepted by practitioners of Western medicine and the international healthcare community is a major concern for practitioners and researchers of CM. For centuries, various approaches have been used to identify and measure the efficacy and safety of CM. However, the high-quality evidence related to CM that produced in China is still rare. Over the recent years, evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been increasingly applied to CM, strengthening its theoretical basis. This paper reviews the past and present state of CM, analyzes the status quo, challenges and opportunities of basic research, clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines and clinical pathways and evidence-based education developed or conducted in China, pointing out how EBM can help to make CM more widely used and recognized worldwide.

  14. Integration of evidence based medicine into the clinical years of a medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Ferwana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM helps medical students to develop their decision making skills based on current best evidence, especially when it is taught in a clinical context. Few medical schools integrate Evidence Based Medicine into undergraduate curriculum, and those who do so, do it at the academic years only as a standalone (classroom teaching but not at the clinical years. The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences was established in January 2004. The college adopted a four-year Problem Based Learning web-based curriculum. The objective of this paper is to present our experience in the integration of the EBM in the clinical phase of the medical curriculum. We teach EBM in 3 steps: first step is teaching EBM concepts and principles, second is teaching the appraisal and search skills, and the last step is teaching it in clinical rotations. Teaching EBM at clinical years consists of 4 student-centered tutorials. In conclusion, EBM may be taught in a systematic, patient centered approach at clinical rounds. This paper could serve as a model of Evidence Based Medicine integration into the clinical phase of a medical curriculum.

  15. Evidence-Based Perioperative Medicine comes of age: the Perioperative Quality Initiative (POQI)

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Timothy E.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Mythen, Michael G; Gan, Tong J

    2016-01-01

    The 1st POQI Consensus Conference occurred in Durham, NC, on March 4?5, 2016, and was supported by the American Society of Enhanced Recovery (ASER) and Evidence-Based Perioperative Medicine (EBPOM). The conference focused on enhanced recovery for colorectal surgery and discussed four topics?perioperative analgesia, perioperative fluid management, preventing nosocomial infection, and measurement and quality in enhanced recovery pathways.

  16. How learning style affects evidence-based medicine : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, Sandra E.; van Dijk, Nynke; Verhoeven, Anita A. H.; de Ruijter, Wouter; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2011-01-01

    Background: Learning styles determine how people manage new information. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves the management of information in clinical practice. As a consequence, the way in which a person uses EBM can be related to his or her learning style. In order to tailor EBM education to

  17. How learning style affects evidence-based medicine: a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, Sandra E.; van Dijk, Nynke; Verhoeven, Anita A. H.; de Ruijter, Wouter; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2011-01-01

    Learning styles determine how people manage new information. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves the management of information in clinical practice. As a consequence, the way in which a person uses EBM can be related to his or her learning style. In order to tailor EBM education to the individual

  18. Barriers to the use of evidence-based medicine: knowledge and skills, attitude, and external factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwolsman, Sandra E.; van Dijk, Nynke; te Pas, Ellen; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2013-01-01

    Although efforts are made to integrate evidence-based medicine (EBM) into clinical practice, physicians experience significant barriers to its implementation. The aim of this study is to quantify the barriers that general practice (GP) trainees experience when using EBM in practice. In September

  19. Patient Safety in Burn Care: Application of Evidence-based Medicine to Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Elizabeth L; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-07-01

    This article reviews 5 areas in burn care that increasingly use evidence-based medicine to optimize quality and safety: resuscitation protocols, transfusion practices, vascular access, venous thromboembolic prophylaxis, and rational use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How are "teaching the teachers" courses in evidence based medicine evaluated? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Gabrys, Elzbieta; Kloc, Krzysztof; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodores N.; Horvath, Andrea R.; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Burnand, Bernard; Arditi, Chantal; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Harry, Gee; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Teaching of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become widespread in medical education. Teaching the teachers (TTT) courses address the increased teaching demand and the need to improve effectiveness of EBM teaching. We conducted a systematic review of assessment tools for EBM

  1. Information demands of occupational health physicians and their attitude towards evidence-based medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Frederieke; Hulshof, Carel; van Dijk, Frank; Verbeek, Jos

    2004-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the extent and nature of information demands among occupational health physicians and their attitude towards the application of evidence-based medicine in occupational health. Methods A questionnaire survey was carried out among a random sample of 159 physicians

  2. An epistemological shift: from evidence-based medicine to epistemological responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baalen, Sophie Jacobine; Boon, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    In decision making concerning the diagnosis and treatment of patients, doctors have a responsibility to do this to the best of their abilities. Yet we argue that the current paradigm for best medical practice – evidence-based medicine (EBM) – does not always support this responsibility. EBM was

  3. THE BISOPROLOL — A HIGH SELECTIVE BETA-BLOCKER ACCORDING TO EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of the evidence based medicine about bisoprolol treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases (arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, chronic heart failure, rhythm disorders are presented. Implementation of bisoprolol generics as well as bisoprolol usage in smoking cardiovascular patients is also discussed.

  4. [Martin Heidegger, beneficence, health, and evidence based medicine--contemplations regarding ethics and complementary and alternative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Gropp, Cornelius

    2015-03-01

    Beneficence is considered a core principle of medical ethics. Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is used almost synonymously with beneficence and has become the gold standard of efficiency of conventional medicine. Conventional modern medicine and EBM in particular are based on what Heidegger called calculative thinking, whereas complementary medicine (CM) is often based on contemplative thinking according to Heidegger's distinction of different thinking processes. A central issue of beneficence is the striving for health and wellbeing. EBM is little concerned directly with wellbeing, though it does claim to aim at improving quality of life by correcting pathological processes and conditions like infectious diseases, ischemic heart disease but also hypertension and hyperlipidemia. On the other hand, wellbeing is central to therapeutic efforts of CM. Scientific methods to gauge results of EBM are quantitative and based on calculative thinking, while results of treatments with CM are expressed in a qualitative way and based on meditative thinking. In order to maximize beneficence it seems important and feasible to use both approaches, by combining EBM and CM in the best interest of the individual patient.

  5. Practice and application of problem-based learning in evidence-based medicine teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Ao Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect of problem-based learning(PBLused in the teaching of medical students' evidence-based medicine(EBM.METHODS: Five classes(total 147 studentswere randomly selected as experimental(PBLgroup, at the same time, another 5 classes(total 149 studentswere also randomly selected as control group, using traditional teaching method(lecture-based learning, LBLin 2010 grade. The final examination scores of the experimental group were compared with control at the end of term. In addition, all students were interviewed using self-administered questionnaire to obtain their evaluation for PBL practice. SPSS13.0 software was used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: The homogeneity test in baseline survey showed that the basic characteristics between the two groups of students were no significant differences, and were comparable(P>0.05. Final exam results showed that in addition to the scores of the EBM basic knowledge indicated no significant difference between two groups of students(P>0.05, for the 5 steps of EBM procedure, namely, asking questions, finding the best evidence, evaluating the evidence, using and practicing the evidence, re-evaluating the evidence, and the total scores between the two groups, there were significant statistically differences(PP>0.05in aspects of better understanding classroom knowledge, improving language expression ability, and writing skill exercises. And other residual items had a significant difference(PPCONCLUSION:PBL teaching mode can effectively improve teaching effectiveness and the quality of EBM teaching, so the this teaching mode is worth further popularizing.

  6. Evidence-based Medicine in Facial Plastic Surgery: Current State and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedhia, Raj; Hsieh, Tsung-Yen; Tollefson, Travis T; Ishii, Lisa E

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) encompasses the evaluation and application of best available evidence, incorporation of clinical experience, and emphasis on patient preference and values. Different scales are used to rate levels of evidence. Translating available data for interventions to clinical practice guidelines requires an assessment of both the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendation. Essential to the practice of EBM is evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention through outcome measures. This article discusses principles essential to EBM, resources commonly used in EBM practice, and the strengths and limitations of EBM in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementing evidence-based medicine in general practice: a focus group based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aertgeerts Bert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years concerns are rising about the use of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM in health care. The calls for an increase in the practice of EBM, seem to be obstructed by many barriers preventing the implementation of evidence-based thinking and acting in general practice. This study aims to explore the barriers of Flemish GPs (General Practitioners to the implementation of EBM in routine clinical work and to identify possible strategies for integrating EBM in daily work. Methods We used a qualitative research strategy to gather and analyse data. We organised focus groups between September 2002 and April 2003. The focus group data were analysed using a combined strategy of 'between-case' analysis and 'grounded theory approach'. Thirty-one general practitioners participated in four focus groups. Purposeful sampling was used to recruit participants. Results A basic classification model documents the influencing factors and actors on a micro-, meso- as well as macro-level. Patients, colleagues, competences, logistics and time were identified on the micro-level (the GPs' individual practice, commercial and consumer organisations on the meso-level (institutions, organisations and health care policy, media and specific characteristics of evidence on the macro-level (policy level and international scientific community. Existing barriers and possible strategies to overcome these barriers were described. Conclusion In order to implement EBM in routine general practice, an integrated approach on different levels needs to be developed.

  8. Evidence-based toxicity evaluation and scheduling of Chinese herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ellie J Y; Chen, Yuling; Huang, Johnson Q; Li, Kong M; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Poon, Josiah; Chan, Kelvin; Roufogalis, Basil D; McLachlan, Andrew J; Mo, Sui-Lin; Yang, Depo; Yao, Meicun; Liu, Zhaolan; Liu, Jianping; Li, George Q

    2013-03-07

    While there is an increasing number of toxicity report cases and toxicological studies on Chinese herbal medicines, the guidelines for toxicity evaluation and scheduling of Chinese herbal medicines are lacking. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on potentially toxic Chinese herbal medicines, and to develop a scheduling platform which will inform an evidence-based regulatory framework for these medicines in the community. The Australian and Chinese regulations were used as a starting point to compile a list of potentially toxic herbs. Systematic literature searches of botanical and pharmaceutical Latin name, English and Chinese names and suspected toxic chemicals were conducted on Medline, PubMed and Chinese CNKI databases. Seventy-four Chinese herbal medicines were identified and five of them were selected for detailed study. Preclinical and clinical data were summarised at six levels. Based on the evaluation criteria, which included risk-benefit analysis, severity of toxic effects and clinical and preclinical data, four regulatory classes were proposed: Prohibited for medicinal usage, which are those with high toxicity and can lead to injury or death, e.g., aristolochia; Restricted for medicinal usage, e.g., aconite, asarum, and ephedra; Required warning label, e.g., coltsfoot; and Over-the-counter herbs for those herbs with a safe toxicity profile. Chinese herbal medicines should be scheduled based on a set of evaluation criteria, to ensure their safe use and to satisfy the need for access to the herbs. The current Chinese and Australian regulation of Chinese herbal medicines should be updated to restrict the access of some potentially toxic herbs to Chinese medicine practitioners who are qualified through registration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Are the Contraceptive Recommendations of Family Medicine Educators Evidence-Based? A CERA Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Justine P; Gundersen, Daniel A; Pickle, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Our study aims were to: (1) describe the scope of contraceptive methods provided by US family medicine educators and (2) assess the extent to which US family medicine educators' recommendations regarding eligibility criteria for contraceptive methods are consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. We contributed survey items as part of the 2014 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) omnibus survey, which is distributed annually to a national cohort of US family medicine educators. We created two summary scales, comprised of clinical scenarios, to assess the extent to which provider recommendations regarding eligibility criteria for oral contraceptive pills (OCPs, six scenarios) and the intrauterine device (IUD, eight scenarios) were consistent with CDC guidelines. Among the 1,054 respondents (33% response rate), 98% prescribe OCPs and 66% insert IUDs. The OCP scale mean was 4.6 ± SD 1.6 (range 0-6), and the IUD scale mean was 4.8 SD ± 2.3 (range 0-8). These scores reflect that 23% of providers' OCP recommendations and 40% of their IUD recommendations were inconsistent with CDC guidelines. The contraceptive recommendations of this cohort of family medicine educators only partially reflected evidence-based guidelines. More misconceptions were noted regarding eligibility criteria for the IUD than for OCPs. To avoid denying safe and effective contraception to otherwise appropriate candidates and putting women at risk of unintended pregnancy, evidence-based contraceptive recommendations must be improved among family medicine educators.

  10. Integrating evidence based medicine into undergraduate medical education: combining online instruction with clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Stephen C; Evans, Barry; Fleece, David; Lyons, Paul; Kaplan, Lawrence; Rojas, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    Incorporation of evidence based medicine into the undergraduate curriculum varies from school to school. The purpose of this study was to determine if an online course in evidence based medicine run concurrently with the clinical clerkships in the 3rd year of undergraduate medical education provided effective instruction in evidence based medicine (EBM). During the first 18 weeks of the 3rd year, students completed 6 online, didactic modules. Over the next 24 weeks, students developed questions independently from patients seen during clerkships and then retrieved and appraised relevant evidence. Online, faculty mentors reviewed student assignments submitted throughout the course to monitor progress. Mastery of the skills of EBM was assessed prior to and at the conclusion of the course using the Fresno test of competency. Paired data were available from 139 students. Postcourse test scores (M= 77.7; 95% CI = 59-96.4) were significantly higher than precourse scores (M= 66.6; 95% CI = 46.5-86.7), pevaluations demonstrated an average improvement of 11.1 +/- 20.0 points. All of the students submitted 4 independently derived questions and successfully retrieved and appraised evidence. Medical students successfully acquired and independently applied EBM skills following extended, online, faculty mentored instruction. This method of instruction provided uniform instruction across geographic sites and medical specialties and permitted efficient use of faculty time.

  11. Major achievements of evidence-based traditional Chinese medicine in treating major diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jung; Dai, Yuntao; Verpoorte, Robert; Lam, Wing; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Pao, Li-Heng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Shilin

    2017-09-01

    A long history of use and extensive documentation of the clinical practices of traditional Chinese medicine resulted in a considerable number of classical preparations, which are still widely used. This heritage of our ancestors provides a unique resource for drug discovery. Already, a number of important drugs have been developed from traditional medicines, which in fact form the core of Western pharmacotherapy. Therefore, this article discusses the differences in drug development between traditional medicine and Western medicine. Moreover, the article uses the discovery of artemisinin as an example that illustrates the "bedside-bench-bedside" approach to drug discovery to explain that the middle way for drug development is to take advantage of the best features of these two distinct systems and compensate for certain weaknesses in each. This article also summarizes evidence-based traditional medicines and discusses quality control and quality assessment, the crucial steps in botanical drug development. Herbgenomics may provide effective tools to clarify the molecular mechanism of traditional medicines in the botanical drug development. The totality-of-the-evidence approach used by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for botanical products provides the directions on how to perform quality control from the field throughout the entire production process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Evidence-Based Review on medicinal value of clays in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Montaseri, Hashem; Hosamo, Ammar; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-10-07

    The use of earths and clays for medical purposes dates back to antiquity. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in researches on traditional remedies in the hope of discovering new drug. Iran is an ancient country with a medical backbone acquired from the experiences of ancient Persian scholars, who had made a great contribution to the development of the medical sciences. Many medical and pharmaceutical books by early Persian scientists still exist and may have the potential of leading researchers to new drug discoveries. Owing to the emergence of new and antimicrobial-resistant infections, present-day medicine has recently begun focusing on medicinal earths and clays especially as mineral antimicrobials. The current study is, therefore, aimed at gathering information regarding medicinal clays in traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Five main Persian materia medica with the key word 'tin' (clay) and current databases such as PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched by key words 'white, green, red, maroon, violet, black, grey and pink clays' and 'pharmacological effects'. Twenty three clays were found in Persian manuscripts. Although their mineralogical compositions are unknown, different pharmacological properties have been attributed to these mineral medicaments. Clay's properties were widely used in medieval times for the treatment of infections to poisoning. They were also used in compound formulations, possibly for their pharmaceutical formulation modifying effects. Modern scientific proofs have also been found of many of the medicinal clays reported in Persian manuscripts. Although many of reported clays are still unknown, their characterization may lead to new medicinal developments. Novel analytical methods available today makes it possible to elucidate the chemical compositions of these minerals as parameters responsible for their medicinal effects.

  13. Strategies for Translating Evidence-Based Medicine in Lung Cancer into Community Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stephen A; Baschnagel, Andrew M; Bagley, Stephen J; Housri, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    The landscape of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment has rapidly evolved over the past decade. This is exemplified by the use of molecular targeted agents, immunotherapies, and newer technologies such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). As the translation of preclinical discoveries into clinical practice continues, the effective dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatment of NSCLC will remain a foremost challenge for oncologists. To further extend evidence-based medicine into the community setting, community oncologists are being engaged on multiple fronts including leadership and participation in national clinical trials and utilization of internet-based resources.

  14. Evidence-based medicine - an appropriate tool for evidence-based health policy? A case study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Bjelland, Anne Karen; Elvbakken, Kari Tove

    2016-03-05

    Evidence-based policy (EBP), a concept modelled on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM), is widely used in different areas of policymaking. Systematic reviews (SRs) with meta-analyses gradually became the methods of choice for synthesizing research evidence about interventions and judgements about quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Critics have argued that the relation between research evidence and service policies is weak, and that the notion of EBP rests on a misunderstanding of policy processes. Having explored EBM standards and knowledge requirements for health policy decision-making, we present an empirical point of departure for discussing the relationship between EBM and EBP. In a case study exploring the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC), an independent government unit, we first searched for information about the background and development of the NOKC to establish a research context. We then identified, selected and organized official NOKC publications as an empirical sample of typical top-of-the-line knowledge delivery adhering to EBM standards. Finally, we explored conclusions in this type of publication, specifically addressing their potential as policy decision tools. From a total sample of 151 SRs published by the NOKC in the period 2004-2013, a purposive subsample from 2012 (14 publications) advised major caution about their conclusions because of the quality or relevance of the underlying documentation. Although the case study did not include a systematic investigation of uptake and policy consequences, SRs were found to be inappropriate as universal tools for health policy decision-making. The case study demonstrates that EBM is not necessarily suited to knowledge provision for every kind of policy decision-making. Our analysis raises the question of whether the evidence-based movement, represented here by an independent government organization, undertakes too broad a range of commissions using

  15. Claude Bernard was a 19th century proponent of medicine based on evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2006-11-01

    The French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878) has the unfair reputation of being ferociously opposed to the use of probabilities and statistics in medicine. In the 19th century, he would have been included among those who opposed the emergence of what would eventually become clinical epidemiology. The truth is that Bernard valued the role of medical statistics in clinical medicine but viewed it as potentially misleading in laboratory-based physiology. He posited that clinical medicine had to be guided by probabilistic evidence as long as physiological mechanisms remained unknown. Bernard praised the clinical researches of Pierre Louis aiming to assess the efficacy of bloodletting in the treatment of pneumonitis. The real objects of Bernard's contempt were the physicians who pretended that medicine was an art strictly based on intuition and tact and who pretended that comparative trials and statistics were useless for clinical medicine. Overall, Bernard was a strong and explicit proponent of the importance of scientific evidence in medical knowledge, be it from experiments or from comparative trials.

  16. [Evidence-based medicine: can we trust the results of well-designed randomized trials?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, A; Benaglio, C

    2014-10-01

    Evidence based medicine assists in clinical decision-making by integrating critically appraised information with patient's values and preferences within an existing clinical context. A fundamental concept in this paradigm is the hierarchy of information. The randomized clinical trial is recognized as one of the designs that is less prone to bias and therefore of higher methodological quality. Clinical guidelines are one of the principal tools that evidence based medicine uses to transfer scientific information to clinical practice and many of their recommendations are based on these type of studies. In this review we present some of the limitations that the results can have, in even well designed and executed randomized clinical trials. We also discuss why valid results in these types of studies could not necessarily be extrapolated to the general population. Although the randomized clinical trial continues to be one of the best methodological designs, we suggest that the reader be careful when interpreting its results.

  17. Evidence-based medicine and contemporary certification: Analysis of the American Board of Vascular Medicine endovascular board examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovut, David Paul; Gray, Bruce H; Saiar, Amin; Bates, Mark C

    2017-08-01

    Since 2005, the American Board of Vascular Medicine (ABVM) endovascular examination has been used to certify vascular practitioners. Annual rigorous review has confirmed it is psychometrically valid and reliable. However, the evidence basis underlying the examination items has not been studied systematically. The aim of this study was to adjudicate class of recommendation (COR) and level of evidence (LOE) for the 2015 ABVM endovascular examination and establish an additional feedback mechanism for examination improvement based on contemporary evidence-based guidelines. We performed a pooled consensus process to classify each of the 110 items in the 2015 ABVM endovascular examination by COR and LOE as detailed in the current guideline statements. We added additional categories for items that were not eligible for assignment using traditional current evidence-based metrics: 'COR X', cannot be determined, not applicable, or simple recognition; and 'LOE X', cannot be determined or not applicable. COR classifications were assigned in the following proportion: Class I=15%, Class II=40%, Class III=3%, COR X=42%. LOE classifications were assigned in the following proportion: Level A=12%, Level B=34%, Level C=32%, LOE X=22%. Our analysis showed that nearly half of the 2015 ABVM endovascular examination items were supported by strong scientific evidence or fact-based knowledge. COR and LOE analysis yielded notably different results. Use of alternate classification schema may be powerful tools for improving certification exams in healthcare.

  18. Evidence-Based Medicine: A Genealogy of the Dominant Science of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemaayer, Ariane

    2016-12-01

    Debates about how knowledge is made and valued in evidence-based medicine (EBM) have yet to understand what discursive, social, and historical conditions allowed the EBM approach to stabilize and proliferate across western medical education. This paper uses a genealogical approach to examine the epistemological tensions that emerged as a result of various problematizations of uncertainty in medical practice. I explain how the problematization of uncertainty in the literature and the contingency of specific social, political, economic, and historical relations allowed the EBM approach to become a programmatic and pedagogical focus of the Faculty of Medicine at McMaster University and beyond.

  19. A Cross-Sectional Study of Medical Student Knowledge of Evidence-Based Medicine as Measured by the Fresno Test of Evidence-Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy B; Semler, Lauren; Rehman, Elizabeth A; Haddad, Zachary G; Ahmadzadeh, Katie L; Crellin, Steven J; Falkowska, Katarzyna; Kendig, Kalif A; Steinweg, Brent H; Dusza, Stephen W; Glenn-Porter, Bernadette; Kane, Bryan G

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been included in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) milestones project as a required component during emergency medicine (EM) residency training. Milestone Level One states that graduating medical students must be able to "describe basic principles of EBM." We sought to identify the EBM skills of third- and fourth-year medical students. Our institution, a network with 17 different residencies, hosts U.S. osteopathic and allopathic medical students. As a part of orientation, students are required to complete an entry Fresno Test of EBM (FTEBM). Retrospectively, medical student FTEBM scores from 2011 were assessed using descriptive statistics. Four hundred seventeen FTEBM scores were analyzed. Participants represented 40 medical schools, including 17 allopathic (MD) and 23 osteopathic (DO) schools. Fifty percent of participants (n = 210) were female, and 51.6% (n = 215) were from a DO medical school. Overall mean performance for the FTEBM was 47.2%. Exploring the results by individual question were (individual EBM question topics are in parentheses): 1A (study question), 62.0%; 1B (study question), 64.4%: 2 (sources of evidence), 67.6%; 3 (study design), 57.1%; 4 (search strategies), 53.2%; 5 (relevance), 41.2%; 6 (internal validity), 43.6%; 7 (magnitude), 37.8%; 8 (two-by-two grids), 30.0%; 9 (number needed to treat), 16.9%; 10 (confidence intervals), 34.3%; 11 (diagnosis), 5.0%; and 12 (prognosis), 43.4%. As measured by the FTEBM, senior medical students demonstrate understanding of about half of EBM. EM residencies can anticipate the need to instruct their residents in EBM concepts in order to meet ACGME/ABEM milestone requirements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Introducing Evidence-Based Medicine and guidelines for maternal and newborn care in the Republic of Moldova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacci, A; Wyn Huws, D; Baltag, V

    2005-01-01

    Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there.......Familiarity with Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) concepts is low amongst key maternal and newborn care clinicians in Moldova. Simple interventions can increase the knowledge of EBM concepts there....

  1. [Prevention in general practice between evidence- and narrative-based medicine: squaring the circle?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    In the German healthcare system, general practitioners (GPs) play an important role with regard to individualised prevention, as they are often the first contact for patients seeking advice. Additionally, there is a great need for preventive counselling from the patient's perspective. However, there is no clear evidence for the effectiveness of the prevention programmes established in Germany. Future prevention models need to be developed according to evidence-based criteria. Narrative-based medicine is seen as a promising complementary approach to strengthen individualised prevention in primary care. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. A systematic review on barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude toward evidence-based medicine in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM is the ability and skill in using and integration of the best up-to-date evidences. The aim of this study was a systematic review of barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude of EBM in Iran. Methods: In this study, database and manual search was used with keywords such as, "evidence-based, EBM, evidence-based nursing, evidence-based practice, evidence-based care, evidence-based activities, evidence-based education" and their combination with the keywords of the barrier, facilitator, attitude, awareness, prospective, knowledge, practice and Iran. The databases of SID (Scientific information database, Magiran, MEDLIB, PubMed, Google scholar, IranMedex and CINAHL (Cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature were used for data collection. Results: Finally, 28 papers were included in this study. The lack of facilities, time and skill in research methodology were the most important barriers to EBM. The most and least important factors were orderly creating ample opportunity and detecting needs and problems. The degree of familiarity with the terminology of evidence-based performance was low (44.2%. The textbooks have been considered as the most significant source of obtaining information. The level of awareness, knowledge, and evidence-based performance was less than 50.0%. Conclusion: There are many various barriers in use of EBM and healthcare providers despite the positive attitude toward EBM had a low level knowledge in EBM setting. Consideration of the importance of EBM proper planning and effective intervention are necessary to removing the barriers and increase the knowledge of healthcare providers.

  3. Herbal traditional Chinese medicine and its evidence base in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Eickhoff, Axel; Schulze, Johannes

    2015-04-21

    Herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is used to treat several ailments, but its efficiency is poorly documented and hence debated, as opposed to modern medicine commonly providing effective therapies. The aim of this review article is to present a practical reference guide on the role of herbal TCM in managing gastrointestinal disorders, supported by systematic reviews and evidence based trials. A literature search using herbal TCM combined with terms for gastrointestinal disorders in PubMed and the Cochrane database identified publications of herbal TCM trials. Results were analyzed for study type, inclusion criteria, and outcome parameters. Quality of placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials was poor, mostly neglecting stringent evidence based diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. Accordingly, appropriate Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses were limited and failed to support valid, clinically relevant evidence based efficiency of herbal TCM in gastrointestinal diseases, including gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric or duodenal ulcer, dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease. In conclusion, the use of herbal TCM to treat various diseases has an interesting philosophical background with a long history, but it received increasing skepticism due to the lack of evidence based efficiency as shown by high quality trials; this has now been summarized for gastrointestinal disorders, with TCM not recommended for most gastrointestinal diseases. Future studies should focus on placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trials, herbal product quality and standard criteria for diagnosis, treatment, outcome, and assessment of adverse herb reactions. This approach will provide figures of risk/benefit profiles that hopefully are positive for at least some treatment modalities of herbal TCM. Proponents of modern herbal TCM best face these promising challenges of pragmatic modern medicine by bridging the gap

  4. Measurement of perceptions of educational environment in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Grimbeek, Jackie; May, Win; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Khan, Khalid S; Kulier, Regina; Pattinson, Robert C

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in measuring perceptions regarding different aspects of the medical educational environment. A reliable tool was developed for measuring perceptions of the educational environment as it relates to evidence-based medicine as part of a multicountry randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinically integrated evidence-based medicine course. Participants from 10 specialties completed the questionnaire. A working dataset of 518 observations was available. Two independent subsets of data were created for conducting an exploratory factor analysis (n=244) and a confirmatory factor analysis (n=274), respectively. The exploratory factor analysis yielded five 67-item definitive instruments, with five to nine dimensions; all resulted in acceptable explanations of the total variance (range 56.6-65.9%). In the confirmatory factor analysis phase, all goodness of-fit measures were acceptable for all models (root mean square error of approximation ≤ 0.047; comparative fit index ≥ 0.980; normed χ(2) ≤ 1.647; Bentler-Bonett normed fit index ≥ 0.951). The authors selected the factorisation with seven dimensions (factor-7 instrument) as the most useful on pragmatic grounds and named it Evidence-Based Medicine Educational Environment Measure 67 (EBMEEM-67). Cronbach's α for subscales ranged between 0.81 and 0.93. The subscales are: 'Knowledge and learning materials'; 'Learner support'; 'General relationships and support'; 'Institutional focus on EBM'; 'Education, training and supervision'; 'EBM application opportunities'; and 'Affirmation of EBM environment'. The EBMEEM-67 can be a useful diagnostic and benchmarking tool for evaluating the perceptions of residents of the environment in which evidence-based medicine education takes place.

  5. Evidence-Based Medicine in Managed Care: A Survey of Current and Emerging Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keckley, Paul H

    2004-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine is the “conscientious application of scientific best practice by clinicians in concert with patient understanding and values.”[1] Recent studies by the Institute of Medicine, RAND, and others have called attention to the gap between scientifically supported approaches to care and day-to-day practice by clinicians. Compounding the problem of non-adherence by providers, researchers have observed that patient compliance also falls short. As a result, avoidable costs from inappropriate variability in practice patterns coupled with patient noncompliance are a significant focus of managed care. Managed care plans play a key role in the selection of providers by consumers and in the design of benefits programs by employers. Avoidable costs from misuse, overuse, and under-use of care from clinicians is a strategic focus for health plans. The evidence upon which a plan makes coverage decisions and the incorporation of evidence in programs targeting providers, employers, and consumers was a focus of this study. Methodology A Delphi survey and 2-day interactive sessions with 128 clinical program directors and medical officers from 89 health plans were the primary methods used in this descriptive analysis. To test participant applications of evidence-based medicine in health plan medical management strategy, 3 conditions were used for illustrative purpose: managing rheumatoid arthritis, increasing remission in depression, and reducing heart disease among diabetics. Each provided a unique challenge to plans in terms of condition prevalence, strength of evidence, and cost. Key Findings Health plans incorporate evidence-based medicine in 5 areas overseen by medical management: (1) coverage decisions wherein improvements in pharmaceutical and therapeutic review processes are sought, (2) disease management efforts wherein increased attention to secondary prevention is desirable, (3) provider profiling wherein increased use of adherence

  6. Evidence-based medicine: the design and interpretation of noninferiority clinical trials in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, K J; Lin, T-L; Fan, T M; Recta, V; Clark, T P

    2013-01-01

    Noninferiority trials are clinical studies designed to demonstrate that an investigational drug is at least as effective as an established treatment within a predetermined margin. They are conducted, in part, because of ethical concerns of administering a placebo to veterinary patients when an established effective treatment exists. The use of noninferiority trial designs has become more common in veterinary medicine with the increasing number of established veterinary therapeutics and the desire to eliminate potential pain or distress in a placebo-controlled study. Selecting the appropriate active control and an a priori noninferiority margin between the investigational and active control drug are unique and critical design factors for noninferiority studies. Without reliable historical knowledge of the disease response in the absence of treatment and of the response to the selected active control drug, proper design and interpretation of a noninferiority trial is not possible. Despite the appeal of conducting noninferiority trials to eliminate ethical concerns of placebo-controlled studies, there are real limitations and possible ethical conundrums associated with noninferiority trials. The consequences of incorrect study conclusions because of poor noninferiority trial design need careful attention. Alternative trial designs to typical noninferiority studies exist, but these too have limitations and must also be carefully considered. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. From medical gaze to statistical person: Historical reflections on evidence-based and personalised medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Hallam

    2016-09-01

    The nineteenth century saw the rise of what historians of medicine have termed the 'medical gaze'. Physicians used instrumentation and trained senses to locate the site of disease within the patient's body. This change in practice went alongside changes in the physician's power and how diseases were understood. In the twenty-first century, the rise of high-throughput biomedical experiments, especially in genomics, is leading to equally dramatic shifts in medicine. Increasingly, clinical decisions may be made on the basis of data and statistical associations rather than the particularities of the case at hand. The aim of this commentary iso re-evaluate the status of precision and evidence-based medicine in light of the social, political and economic shifts they entail. Increasingly, the statistical view of diseases and people threatens to take judgment and expertise out of medical decision making. It threatens the centrality of the physician in the relationship between patient and disease.

  8. Knowledge, skills and attitude of evidence-based medicine among obstetrics and gynaecology trainees: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeve, Yadava Bapurao; Doshani, Angi; Singhal, Tanu; Konje, Justin

    2013-12-01

    To determine current evidence-based medicine skills and practice among trainees. Questionnaire study. Electronic survey was sent to all obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in East Midlands South Deanery, and responses collected were anonymous. All obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in East Midland South Deanery. Self-reported attitude, skills and knowledge in various components of evidence-based medicine. 69 trainees were included in the study of which 35 responded. Among all respondents, almost 72% of trainees use non-evidence-based methods to find answers for their clinical questions, whereas only 18% use appropriate evidence-based medicine practice for such queries. Just 35% of trainees have minimum skills of literature searching. Most of the trainees struggle to understand various components of evidence-based medicine. Nearly 80% of trainees do not have formal education or training with regard to evidence-based medicine. This study highlights the inadequacy of evidence-based medicine skills among trainees and urges that evidence-based medicine be incorporated in formal training along with specialty study modules.

  9. Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine: a student-selected component at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanien MA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Ahmed HassanienMedical Education and Clinical Biochemistry Departments, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Evidence-based medicine (EBM involves approaching a clinical problem using a four-step method: (1 formulate a clear clinical question from a patient's problem, (2 search the literature for relevant clinical articles, (3 evaluate (critically appraise the evidence for its validity and usefulness, (4 implement useful findings into clinical practice. EBM has now been incorporated as an integral part of the medical curriculum in many faculties of medicine around the world. The Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, started its process of curriculum reform and introduction of the new curriculum 4 years ago. One of the most characteristic aspects of this curriculum is the introduction of special study modules and electives as a student-selected component in the fourth year of study; the Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine course was included as one of these special study modules. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the EBM skills of medical students after completing the course and their perceptions of the faculty member delivering the course and organization of the course.Materials and methods: The EBM course was held for the first time as a special study module for fourth-year medical students in the first semester of the academic year 2009–2010. Fifteen students were enrolled in this course. At the end of the course, students anonymously evaluated aspects of the course regarding their EBM skills and course organization using a five-point Likert scale in response to an online course evaluation questionnaire. In addition, students' achievement was evaluated with regard to the skills and competencies taught in the course.Results: Medical students generally gave high scores to all aspects of the EBM course, including course organization, course delivery, methods of

  10. How evidence-based medicine is failing due to biased trials and selective publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Howick, Jeremy

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) was announced in the early 1990s as a 'new paradigm' for improving patient care. Yet there is currently little evidence that EBM has achieved its aim. Since its introduction, health care costs have increased while there remains a lack of high-quality evidence suggesting EBM has resulted in substantial population-level health gains. In this paper we suggest that EBM's potential for improving patients' health care has been thwarted by bias in the choice of hypotheses tested, manipulation of study design and selective publication. Evidence for these flaws is clearest in industry-funded studies. We argue EBM's indiscriminate acceptance of industry-generated 'evidence' is akin to letting politicians count their own votes. Given that most intervention studies are industry funded, this is a serious problem for the overall evidence base. Clinical decisions based on such evidence are likely to be misinformed, with patients given less effective, harmful or more expensive treatments. More investment in independent research is urgently required. Independent bodies, informed democratically, need to set research priorities. We also propose that evidence rating schemes are formally modified so research with conflict of interest bias is explicitly downgraded in value. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Teaching Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine in the US and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtz, Suzanne; Fajt, Virginia; Heyns, Erla P; Norton, Hannah F; Weingart, Sandra

    There is no comprehensive review of the extent to which evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is taught in AVMA-accredited colleges of veterinary medicine in the US and Canada. We surveyed teaching faculty and librarians at these institutions to determine what EBVM skills are currently included in curricula, how they are taught, and to what extent librarians are involved in this process. Librarians appear to be an underused resource, as 59% of respondents did not use librarians/library resources in teaching EBVM. We discovered that there is no standard teaching methodology nor are there common learning activities for EBVM among our survey respondents, who represent 22 institutions. Respondents reported major barriers to inclusion such as a perceived shortage of time in an already-crowded course of study and a lack of high-quality evidence and point-of-care tools. Suggestions for overcoming these barriers include collaborating with librarians and using new EBVM online teaching resources.

  12. [FROM EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE TO PERSONALIZED MEDICINE: THE EXEMPLE OF TYPE 2 DIABETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquot, N

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes represents a major medical and public health problem due to its huge heterogeneity, the alarming rise of its incidence worldwide and its associated vascular complications, which impair quality of life and reduce life expectancy. At the present time, a patient-centered approach is recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes patients. However, these recommendations are not easy to implement because we only have little objective evidences to establish individualized strategies. Following the recent introduction of new drug classes, a large number of combinations is offered to clinicians, but we do not have high quality interventional studies comparing these different therapeutic possibilities. Moreover, the response to pharmacological treatment can vary greatly from one subject to the other. Pharmacogenetics might be a useful tool to better characterize the patient. However, despite some progress, the evidence we now have is very preliminary and should not allow to improve significantly the individual management of type 2 diabetes in the near future.

  13. Evidence-Based Medicine in judicial decisions concerning right to healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Eduardo Rocha; da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze, from the examination of decisions issued by Brazilian courts, how Evidence-Based Medicine was applied and if it led to well-founded decisions, searching the best scientific knowledge. Methods The decisions made by the Federal Courts were searched, with no time limits, at the website of the Federal Court Council, using the expression “Evidence-Based Medicine”. With regard to decisions issued by the court of the State of São Paulo, the search was done at the webpage and applying the same terms and criterion as to time. Next, a qualitative analysis of the decisions was conducted for each action, to verify if the patient/plaintiff’s situation, as well as the efficacy or inefficacy of treatments or drugs addressed in existing protocols were considered before the court granted the provision claimed by the plaintiff. Results In less than one-third of the decisions there was an appropriate discussion about efficacy of the procedure sought in court, in comparison to other procedures available in clinical guidelines adopted by the Brazilian Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde) or by private health insurance plans, considering the individual situation. The majority of the decisions involved private health insurance plans (n=13, 68%). Conclusion The number of decisions that did consider scientific evidence and the peculiarities of each patient was a concern. Further discussion on Evidence-Based Medicine in judgments involving public healthcare are required. PMID:27074226

  14. The influence of evidence-based medicine training on decision-making in relation to over-the-counter medicines: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Hughes, Carmel

    2012-12-01

    To explore the role of evidence of effectiveness when making decisions about over-the-counter (OTC) medication and to ascertain whether evidence-based medicine training raised awareness in decision-making. Additionally, this work aimed to complement the findings of a previous study because all participants in this current study had received training in evidence-based medicine (unlike the previous participants). Following ethical approval and an e-mailed invitation, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with newly registered pharmacists (who had received training in evidence-based medicine as part of their MPharm degree) to discuss the role of evidence of effectiveness with OTC medicines. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Following transcription, all data were entered into the NVivo software package (version 8). Data were coded and analysed using a constant comparison approach. Twenty-five pharmacists (7 males and 18 females; registered for less than 4 months) were recruited and all participated in the study. Their primary focus with OTC medicines was safety; sales of products (including those that lack evidence of effectiveness) were justified provided they did no harm. Meeting patient expectation was also an important consideration and often superseded evidence. Despite knowledge of the concept, and an awareness of ethical requirements, an evidence-based approach was not routinely implemented by these pharmacists. Pharmacists did not routinely utilize evidence-based resources when making decisions about OTC medicines and some felt uncomfortable discussing the evidence-base for OTC products with patients. The evidence-based medicine training that these pharmacists received appeared to have limited influence on OTC decision-making. More work could be conducted to ensure that an evidence-based approach is routinely implemented in practice. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Evidence-based medicine in a nutshell. A guide to finding and using the best evidence in caring for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, M

    1998-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the use of the best current evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Practicing EBM requires recognition that in most encounters with patients, questions arise that should be answered to provide the patient with the best available medical care. Asking well-built clinical questions that contain 4 elements--a patient or problem, an intervention, a comparison intervention (if necessary), and an outcome--is an important step in practicing EMB. Once appropriate questions have been formulated, the best source for finding most types of best evidence is by searching the MEDLINE database by computer. MEDLINE searches have inherent software and operator limitations that make their reliability quite variable. One should be aware of these limitations and improve one's skills in searching. The Cochrane Collaboration Controlled Clinical Trials Registry contains more than 190,000 controlled clinical trials and is the best source of evidence about treatment. The quality (strength) of evidence is based on a hierarchy of evidence: results of systematic reviews of well-designed clinical studies, results of 1 or more well-designed clinical studies, results of large case series, expert opinion, and personal experience. Once the best evidence has been found, the EBM approach involves critically appraising the quality of the evidence, determining its magnitude and precision, and applying it to the specific patient. Guidelines to critically appraise and apply evidence are available. The clinical question, best evidence, and its critical appraisal should be saved in a format that can be easily retrieved for future use.

  16. Extracting physician group intelligence from electronic health records to support evidence based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin M Weber

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine employs expert opinion and clinical data to inform clinical decision making. The objective of this study is to determine whether it is possible to complement these sources of evidence with information about physician "group intelligence" that exists in electronic health records. Specifically, we measured laboratory test "repeat intervals", defined as the amount of time it takes for a physician to repeat a test that was previously ordered for the same patient. Our assumption is that while the result of a test is a direct measure of one marker of a patient's health, the physician's decision to order the test is based on multiple factors including past experience, available treatment options, and information about the patient that might not be coded in the electronic health record. By examining repeat intervals in aggregate over large numbers of patients, we show that it is possible to 1 determine what laboratory test results physicians consider "normal", 2 identify subpopulations of patients that deviate from the norm, and 3 identify situations where laboratory tests are over-ordered. We used laboratory tests as just one example of how physician group intelligence can be used to support evidence based medicine in a way that is automated and continually updated.

  17. Evidence-based medicine in primary care: qualitative study of family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas Guilherme

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of this study were: a to examine physician attitudes to and experience of the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM in primary care; b to investigate the influence of patient preferences on clinical decision-making; and c to explore the role of intuition in family practice. Method Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews of 15 family physicians purposively selected from respondents to a national survey on EBM mailed to a random sample of Canadian family physicians. Results Participants mainly welcomed the promotion of EBM in the primary care setting. A significant number of barriers and limitations to the implementation of EBM were identified. EBM is perceived by some physicians as a devaluation of the 'art of medicine' and a threat to their professional/clinical autonomy. Issues regarding the trustworthiness and credibility of evidence were of great concern, especially with respect to the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Attempts to become more evidence-based often result in the experience of conflicts. Patient factors exert a powerful influence on clinical decision-making and can serve as trumps to research evidence. A widespread belief that intuition plays a vital role in primary care reinforced views that research evidence must be considered alongside other factors such as patient preferences and the clinical judgement and experience of the physician. Discussion Primary care physicians are increasingly keen to consider research evidence in clinical decision-making, but there are significant concerns about the current model of EBM. Our findings support the proposed revisions to EBM wherein greater emphasis is placed on clinical expertise and patient preferences, both of which remain powerful influences on physician behaviour.

  18. Rural Doctors’ Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Ranita; Liew, Su May; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Mohd Nor, Kamaliah; Osman, Iskandar Firzada; Ho, Gah Juan; Hamzah, Nurazira; Glasziou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice. Aim This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors’ about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting. Methods Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach. Results Key themes identified were: (1) doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2) reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3) doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4) information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5) there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings. Conclusion The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is

  19. Rural Doctors' Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Ranita; Liew, Su May; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Mohd Nor, Kamaliah; Osman, Iskandar Firzada; Ho, Gah Juan; Hamzah, Nurazira; Glasziou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice. This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors' about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting. Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach. Key themes identified were: (1) doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2) reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3) doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4) information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5) there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings. The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is recommended to develop and evaluate

  20. Rural Doctors' Views on and Experiences with Evidence-Based Medicine: The FrEEDoM Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranita Hisham

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise, best external evidence and patient values which was introduced more than two decades ago. Yet, primary care physicians in Malaysia face unique barriers in accessing scientific literature and applying it to their clinical practice.This study aimed to explore the views and experiences of rural doctors' about evidence-based medicine in their daily clinical practice in a rural primary care setting.Qualitative methodology was used. The interviews were conducted in June 2013 in two rural health clinics in Malaysia. The participants were recruited using purposive sampling. Four focus group discussions with 15 medical officers and three individual in-depth interviews with family medicine specialists were carried out. All interviews were conducted using a topic guide and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, checked and analyzed using a thematic approach.Key themes identified were: (1 doctors viewed evidence-based medicine mainly as statistics, research and guidelines, (2 reactions to evidence-based medicine were largely negative, (3 doctors relied on specialists, peers, guidelines and non-evidence based internet sources for information, (4 information sources were accessed using novel methods such as mobile applications and (5 there are several barriers to evidence-based practice, including doctor-, evidence-based medicine-, patient- and system-related factors. These included inadequacies in knowledge, attitude, management support, time and access to evidence-based information sources. Participants recommended the use of online services to support evidence-based practice in the rural settings.The level of evidence-based practice is low in the rural setting due to poor awareness, knowledge, attitude and resources. Doctors use non-evidence based sources and access them through new methods such as messaging applications. Further research is recommended to develop and evaluate

  1. Formats of responsibility: elective surgery in the era of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducey, Ariel; Nikoo, Shoghi

    2018-01-03

    This article illustrates what pragmatic sociology refers to as investments in form, by examining the formats created and used by a group of surgeons to determine when elective surgery for pelvic floor disorders could be responsibly undertaken. Drawing upon ethnographic observations of surgical consultations at an academic medical centre in Canada, we show how two specific formats - that the patient is sufficiently bothered and the patient accepts the risks of surgery - allow for justifiable action in conditions of uncertainty and contingency and in light of the demands of dominant imperatives in medicine and health care, especially evidence-based medicine (EBM). We argue that an analytic of justification is necessary for understanding when and how surgery is offered and elected for, and for considering how surgical consultations might be improved. © 2018 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  2. Applying Evidence-Based Medicine in Telehealth: An Interactive Pattern Recognition Approximation

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    Fernández-Llatas, Carlos; Meneu, Teresa; Traver, Vicente; Benedi, José-Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Born in the early nineteen nineties, evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a paradigm intended to promote the integration of biomedical evidence into the physicians daily practice. This paradigm requires the continuous study of diseases to provide the best scientific knowledge for supporting physicians in their diagnosis and treatments in a close way. Within this paradigm, usually, health experts create and publish clinical guidelines, which provide holistic guidance for the care for a certain disease. The creation of these clinical guidelines requires hard iterative processes in which each iteration supposes scientific progress in the knowledge of the disease. To perform this guidance through telehealth, the use of formal clinical guidelines will allow the building of care processes that can be interpreted and executed directly by computers. In addition, the formalization of clinical guidelines allows for the possibility to build automatic methods, using pattern recognition techniques, to estimate the proper models, as well as the mathematical models for optimizing the iterative cycle for the continuous improvement of the guidelines. However, to ensure the efficiency of the system, it is necessary to build a probabilistic model of the problem. In this paper, an interactive pattern recognition approach to support professionals in evidence-based medicine is formalized. PMID:24185841

  3. Correlation of self-assessment with attendance in an evidence-based medicine course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Beatriz U

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, correlations between attendance and grades in lectures have given variable results and, when statistically significant, the correlation has been weak. In some studies, a sex effect has been reported. Lectures are a teacher-centered learning activity. Therefore, it appeared interesting to evaluate if a stronger correlation between attendance and grades would occur in a face-to-face "evidence-based medicine" course with few lectures and more time dedicated to active learning methods. Small-group work and peer learning were used to foster deep learning and to engage students in their own learning process. Most of the time, students worked in small groups solving contextualized problems and critically analyzing the quality of published medical literature. Peer learning was also developed in collaborative evaluations, and constant feedback was provided. Therefore, it was hypothesized that high attenders would develop a higher self-perception of learning and obtain higher marks than low attenders. Student self-perceptions of their capacity to apply evidence-based medicine were measured by the application of an online self-assessment survey, and objective learning was measured as the grades obtained in a final accumulative individual test. It was found that male students obtained higher grades and were more confident in their achievements than their female peers, despite male and female student attendance being similar. In addition, attendance was correlated with the perceived capacity to apply evidence-based medicine only in male students and was not correlated with academic outcome. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Evidence-based medicine teaching requirements in the USA: taxonomy and themes.

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    Shaughnessy, Allen F; Torro, John R; Frame, Kara A; Bakshi, Munish

    2016-05-01

    In the USA, recent changes to oversight of residency training codify the requirements for teaching evidence-based medicine and information mastery (lifelong learning) knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The goal of this project is to determine current requirements for teaching of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and information mastery (IM) in specialty residency education in the USA. The project was a qualitative thematic analysis using content analysis. The source of the requirements for EBM and IM were the "milestone" statements for all 28 major specialties and transition year programs. Milestone descriptors related to EBM/IM were extracted and codes were developed and applied to each descriptor by four researchers. The resulting codes were coalesced into themes and tested against the milestone descriptors. The coding process identified 15 content areas comprising five themes. Two themes related to the knowledge and skills of EBM and three themes related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of IM. EBM themes encompassed basic critical appraisal skills and knowledge of clinical epidemiology principles and statistics. IM themes centered on identifying one's information needs for patient-specific information, using information sources, and using current awareness services to remain abreast of changes in medicine. In general, they align well with the Sicily Statement on Evidence-Based Practice. No specialty required competence in all areas. New training requirements for specialties in the USA require the development of both classic EBM skills as well as skills for managing information. However, there is marked variation in the requirements among specific specialties. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Adjuvant Cancer Biotherapy by Viscum Album Extract Isorel: Overview of Evidence Based Medicine Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunjic, Suzana Borovic; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Vukovic, Tea; Weiss, Thomas; Weiss, Elisabeth Sussman; Soldo, Ivo; Djakovic, Nikola; Zarkovic, Tomislav; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-09-01

    Within the integrative medicine one of the most frequently used adjuvant cancer biotherapies is based on aqueous mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts. Tumor growth inhibition, stimulation of host immune response and improvement of the quality of life are the positive effects of mistletoe therapy described in several preclinical and clinical studies. However, cumulative results of the evidence based medicine findings on such treatments are rarely given. Therefore, this paper evaluates the evidence based findings describing effects of the Viscum album extract Isorel in cancer therapy with respect to the type of therapy, stage and type of illness. This study presents cumulated data for 74 patients with different types and stages of cancer treated by Viscum album extract as adjuvant treatment to different conventional therapies, mostly combined surgery and radiotherapy. The biotherapy effectiveness was evaluated according to the outcome as (1) no major therapeutic improvement (15% of patients), (2) prevention of tumor recurrence (47% of patients) and (3) regression of cancer (38% of patients). Notably, there was no obvious health worsening during the follow up period at all. Thus, the results obtained for conventional anticancer therapies combined with adjuvant biotherapy based on Viscum album extract seem to be beneficial for the majority of cancer patients (85%) without serious side effects.

  6. Evidence-based medicine has been hijacked: a report to David Sackett.

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    Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-05-01

    This is a confession building on a conversation with David Sackett in 2004 when I shared with him some personal adventures in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the movement that he had spearheaded. The narrative is expanded with what ensued in the subsequent 12 years. EBM has become far more recognized and adopted in many places, but not everywhere, for example, it never acquired much influence in the USA. As EBM became more influential, it was also hijacked to serve agendas different from what it originally aimed for. Influential randomized trials are largely done by and for the benefit of the industry. Meta-analyses and guidelines have become a factory, mostly also serving vested interests. National and federal research funds are funneled almost exclusively to research with little relevance to health outcomes. We have supported the growth of principal investigators who excel primarily as managers absorbing more money. Diagnosis and prognosis research and efforts to individualize treatment have fueled recurrent spurious promises. Risk factor epidemiology has excelled in salami-sliced data-dredged articles with gift authorship and has become adept to dictating policy from spurious evidence. Under market pressure, clinical medicine has been transformed to finance-based medicine. In many places, medicine and health care are wasting societal resources and becoming a threat to human well-being. Science denialism and quacks are also flourishing and leading more people astray in their life choices, including health. EBM still remains an unmet goal, worthy to be attained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coordinating the norms and values of medical research, medical practice and patient worlds-the ethics of evidence based medicine in orphaned fields of medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, R.; Willems, D.; Houtepen, R.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is rightly at the core of current medicine. If patients and society put trust in medical professional competency, and on the basis of that competency delegate all kinds of responsibilities to the medical profession, medical professionals had better make sure their competency

  8. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  9. Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine: a student-selected component at the Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Mohammed Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves approaching a clinical problem using a four-step method: (1) formulate a clear clinical question from a patient's problem, (2) search the literature for relevant clinical articles, (3) evaluate (critically appraise) the evidence for its validity and usefulness, (4) implement useful findings into clinical practice. EBM has now been incorporated as an integral part of the medical curriculum in many faculties of medicine around the world. The Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, started its process of curriculum reform and introduction of the new curriculum 4 years ago. One of the most characteristic aspects of this curriculum is the introduction of special study modules and electives as a student-selected component in the fourth year of study; the Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine course was included as one of these special study modules. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the EBM skills of medical students after completing the course and their perceptions of the faculty member delivering the course and organization of the course. The EBM course was held for the first time as a special study module for fourth-year medical students in the first semester of the academic year 2009-2010. Fifteen students were enrolled in this course. At the end of the course, students anonymously evaluated aspects of the course regarding their EBM skills and course organization using a five- point Likert scale in response to an online course evaluation questionnaire. In addition, students' achievement was evaluated with regard to the skills and competencies taught in the course. Medical students generally gave high scores to all aspects of the EBM course, including course organization, course delivery, methods of assessment, and overall. Scores were also high for students' self-evaluation of skill level and EBM experience. The results of a faculty member's evaluation of the students' achievement showed an average total

  10. Evidence-based medicine: what has happened in the past 50 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Although the phrase 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) was used for the first time in the medical literature less than 25 years ago, the history of EBM goes back for centuries. What is remarkable is how popular and how globally accepted the EBM movement has become in such a short time. Many famous, past clinicians have played major roles in the disciplines that preceded EBM, particularly 'clinical epidemiology'. It soon became clear to the early EBM champions that 'evidence' was only part of the clinical decision-making process. Consequently, both clinical expertise and the patient's values and preferences were rapidly incorporated into the concept we now know as 'EBM'. The current need for high-quality, easily accessible 'evidence-based summaries' for busy clinicians is now apparent, as traditional EBM requires both considerable time and skill. Consequently, there is a progressive move away from the primary literature (such as randomised controlled trials) to systematic reviews and other 'evidence-based summaries'. The future of EBM will almost certainly involve widespread utilisation of 'clinical (computer)-based decision support systems'. © 2014 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Evidence-based therapies of Chinese medicine for chronic urticaria: Where do we stand and where are we going?

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    Wang, Yong-Ming; Du, Lin; Zhu, Yuan-Jie

    2017-08-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is characterized by repeated occurrence of wheals or itching for more than 6 weeks. When urticaria symptoms repeatedly occur despite taking Western medicines such as antihistamines, Chinese medicine (CM) has been shown to relieve symptoms and prevent recurrence. However, the lack of robust evidence from the evidence-based medicine perspective is hindering acceptance of CM by the Western medicine community. In recent years, more and more evidence-based studies of CU treatment by CM were report in English literatures, including acupuncture, herbs, and food, although some of evidence is still with low quality. These progress in CM treatment of CU will inspire high quality evidences via randomized, controlled trials assessing effificacy and safety of CM treatment of CU.

  12. Evidence-based medicine was bound to fail: a report to Alvan Feinstein.

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    Fava, Giovanni A

    2017-04-01

    John Ioannidis has provided a lucid account, in the form of a report to David Sackett, of how evidence-based medicine (EBM) was hijacked to serve vested interests: major randomized controlled trials are largely done by and for the benefit of the industry; meta-analyses and guidelines are flooded with conflicts of interest; national and federal research funds are unable to address basic clinical questions. Nonetheless, EBM would remain a worthwhile goal. In this paper, in the form of a report to Alvan Feinstein, it is argued that current developments were largely predictable. EBM certainly gave an important contribution to questioning unsubstantiated therapeutic claims. Time has come, however, to become aware of its considerable limitations, including overall reductionism and insufficient consideration of problems related to financial conflicts of interest. EBM does not represent the scientific approach to medicine: it is only a restrictive interpretation of the scientific approach to clinical practice. EBM drives the prescribing clinician to an overestimated consideration of potential benefits, paying little attention to the likelihood of responsiveness and to potential vulnerabilities in relations to the adverse effects of treatment. It is time to substitute the fashionable popularity of a strategy developed outside of clinical medicine with models and research based on the insights of clinical judgment and patient-doctor interaction, as Feinstein had outlined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence-based medicine meets person-centred care: a collaborative perspective on the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Amy I; Djulbegovic, Ben; Biswas, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-12-01

    In a recent list-serve, the way forward for evidence-based medicine was discussed. The purpose of this paper was to share the reflections and multiple perspectives discussed in this peer-to-peer encounter and to invite the reader to think with a mind for positive change in the practice of health care. Let us begin with a simple question. What if we dared to look at evidence-based medicine (EBM) and informed shared decision making like two wheels on a bike? They both need to be full of substance, well connected, lubricated and working in balance, propelled and guided by a competent driver, with good vision to get the bike where we want it to go. We need all the tools in the toolkit for the bike to stay operational and to meet the needs of the driver. By the same rationale, evidence alone is necessary but not sufficient for decision making; values are necessary and if neglected, may default to feelings based on social pressures and peer influence. Medical decisions, even shared ones, lack focus without evidence and application. Just as a bike may need a tune up from time to time to maintain optimal performance, EBM may benefit from a tune up where we challenge ourselves to move away from general assumptions and traditions and instead think clearly about the issues we face and how to ask well-formed, specific questions to get the answers to meet the needs we face in health care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A supervised approach to quantifying sentence similarity: with application to evidence based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Hassanzadeh

    Full Text Available Following the Evidence Based Medicine (EBM practice, practitioners make use of the existing evidence to make therapeutic decisions. This evidence, in the form of scientific statements, is usually found in scholarly publications such as randomised control trials and systematic reviews. However, finding such information in the overwhelming amount of published material is particularly challenging. Approaches have been proposed to automatically extract scientific artefacts in EBM using standardised schemas. Our work takes this stream a step forward and looks into consolidating extracted artefacts-i.e., quantifying their degree of similarity based on the assumption that they carry the same rhetorical role. By semantically connecting key statements in the literature of EBM, practitioners are not only able to find available evidence more easily, but also can track the effects of different treatments/outcomes in a number of related studies. We devise a regression model based on a varied set of features and evaluate it both on a general English corpus (the SICK corpus, as well as on an EBM corpus (the NICTA-PIBOSO corpus. Experimental results show that our approach performs on par with the state of the art on the general English and achieves encouraging results on the biomedical text when compared against human judgement.

  15. An evidence-based approach to medicinal plants for the treatment of sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine.

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    Tahvilzadeh, M; Hajimahmoodi, M; Toliyat, T; Karimi, M; Rahimi, R

    2016-10-01

    Infertility is defined as inability of a sexually active couple to conceive after 1 year of regular intercourse without contraception. Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility. The aim of this study was to review medicinal plants that proposed to improve sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine. For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, GoogleScholar and Cochrane library were explored for medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine for sperm abnormalities to obtain studies giving any evidence for their efficacy and pharmacological mechanisms related to male infertility. Data were collected for the years 1966 to March 2015. For some of them, including Chlorophytum borivilianum, Crocus sativus, Nigella sativa, Sesamum indicum, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Withania somnifera, more reliable evidence was found. The mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of medicinal plants in sperm abnormalities are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and venotonic activity as well as containing precursors for sperm production and increasing blood testosterone level. Various phytochemical categories including saponins, phytosterols, carotenoids, oxygenated volatile compounds, phenolic compounds and alkaloids seem to be responsible for these beneficial effects. Further studies are recommended for obtaining more conclusive results about the efficacy and safety of the mentioned medicinal plants. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Registries and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is a vital process for maintaining and improving quality and value in health care. However, evidence-based practice is most limited by the availability of research and outcomes data. Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been identified by numerous research organizations as the criterion standard for research methodology (eg, "level I evidence"), the execution of well-designed RCTs has proved either challenging or impossible in many surgical fields and with rare disease conditions. In particular, craniofacial and plastic surgery has been noted to be lacking in both the number and quality of RCTs. Many reasons are discussed for this dearth of research including inadequate sample size and challenges in randomization, blinding, and clinical equipoise. Yet, data for outcomes assessment are highly valued by surgeons and by consumers and payers. Therefore, alternative and more practical means for research and data collection must be sought. Observational studies of clinical practice are particularly useful for outcomes assessment despite relegation to a lower tier of evidence (eg, "level II evidence"). Functional databases with well-defined processes for data collection, called medical data registries, are an essential informatics tool to collect and store outcomes data and produce high-quality observational, practice-based research studies. A properly designed and implemented registry can provide surgeons with an abundance of data to perform research and quality improvement projects. In fact, registries may be superior in many ways to RCTs for craniofacial and plastic surgeons both pragmatically and functionally. In this commentary, we discuss the production of such registries in the framework of evidence-based practice and the relevant studies in craniofacial surgery.

  17. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 1: evidence-based emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttner, Björn; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The judgement process in evidence-based medicine and health technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P; Moore, Tessa A

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the judgements used to interpret evidence in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health technology assessment (HTA). It outlines the methods and processes of EBM and HTA. Respectively, EBM and HTA are approaches to medical clinical decision making and efficient allocation of scarce health resources. At the heart of both is a concern to review and synthesise evidence, especially evidence derived from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of clinical effectiveness. The driver of the approach of both is a desire to eliminate, or at least reduce, bias. The hierarchy of evidence, which is used as an indicator of the likelihood of bias, features heavily in the process and methods of EBM and HTA. The epistemological underpinnings of EBM and HTA are explored with particular reference to the distinction between rationalism and empiricism, developed by the philosopher David Hume and elaborated by Immanuel Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason. The importance of Humian and Kantian principles for understanding the projects of EBM and HTA is considered and the ways in which decisions are made in both, within a judgemental framework originally outlined by Kant, are explored. PMID:23226973

  19. The judgement process in evidence-based medicine and health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P; Moore, Tessa A

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the judgements used to interpret evidence in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and health technology assessment (HTA). It outlines the methods and processes of EBM and HTA. Respectively, EBM and HTA are approaches to medical clinical decision making and efficient allocation of scarce health resources. At the heart of both is a concern to review and synthesise evidence, especially evidence derived from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of clinical effectiveness. The driver of the approach of both is a desire to eliminate, or at least reduce, bias. The hierarchy of evidence, which is used as an indicator of the likelihood of bias, features heavily in the process and methods of EBM and HTA. The epistemological underpinnings of EBM and HTA are explored with particular reference to the distinction between rationalism and empiricism, developed by the philosopher David Hume and elaborated by Immanuel Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason. The importance of Humian and Kantian principles for understanding the projects of EBM and HTA is considered and the ways in which decisions are made in both, within a judgemental framework originally outlined by Kant, are explored.

  20. Study on the methodology of developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines of Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng-guang; Luo, Hui; Xu, Shan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Shou-chuan

    2015-11-01

    At present, evidence-based clinical practice guideline (EBCPG) is the main mode of developing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in the world, but in China, most of CPGs of Chinese medicine (CM) are still guidelines based on expert consensus. The objective of this study is to construct initially the methodology of developing EBCPGs of CM and to promote the development of standardization of CM. Based on the development of "Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Pediatric Diseases in CM", the methodology of developing EBCPG of CM was explored by analyzing the pertinent literature and considering the characteristics of CM. In this study, the key problem was to put forward the suggestion and strategies. However, due to the methodology study of developing EBCPG of CM is still in the initial stage, there are still some problems which need further study.

  1. Utilizing DMAIC six sigma and evidence-based medicine to streamline diagnosis in chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Thomas, Kory M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the difference between the current process flow model for a typical patient workup for chest pain and development of a new process flow model that incorporates DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) Six Sigma and evidence-based medicine in a best practices model for diagnosis and treatment. The first stage, DMAIC Six Sigma, is used to highlight areas of variability and unnecessary tests in the current process flow for a patient presenting to the emergency department or physician's clinic with chest pain (also known as angina). The next stage, patient process flow, utilizes DMAIC results in the development of a simulated model that represents real-world variability in the diagnosis and treatment of a patient presenting with angina. The third and final stage is used to analyze the evidence-based output and quantify the factors that drive physician diagnosis accuracy and treatment, as well as review the potential for a broad national evidence-based database. Because of the collective expertise captured within the computer-oriented evidence-based model, the study has introduced an innovative approach to health care delivery by bringing expert-level care to any physician triaging a patient for chest pain anywhere in the world. Similar models can be created for other ailments as well, such as headache, gastrointestinal upset, and back pain. This updated way of looking at diagnosing patients stemming from an evidence-based best practice decision support model may improve workflow processes and cost savings across the health care continuum.

  2. Systematic review of evidence-based medicine tests for family physician residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E; Kreptul, Dennis

    2015-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is increasingly important in resident education, and reliable and valid tests of competence for family medicine residents are needed. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ERIC, ERC, and the Research & Development Resource Base (University of Toronto) were searched from inception to June 2014 to identify competence tests of family medicine and general practice residents in EBM. Two authors independently assessed all titles, abstracts, and full texts and abstracted data. Three EBM courses were evaluated by the Fresno test. Seven other authors designed EBM interventions and individual tests to evaluate them. Content validity was assessed by nine studies, construct validity by five, face validity by three, and concurrent validity by one. Internal reliability was reported by seven studies, inter-rater by four, item difficult and item discrimination by two, and intra-rater by one. Eight studies reported that knowledge scores increased significantly after the intervention. Content validity and internal reliability were the most frequently assessed measures. The basic EBM activities of identifying Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, and Study Design (PICOS questions) and computing sensitivity, specificity, and number needed to treat (NNT) are unlikely to change. However, guidelines are often used in EBM courses, and they are updated regularly, which will involve new clinical scenarios, PICOS questions, and statistical computations. The Fresno test has been evaluated with three groups of family medicine residents, has the best documentation of validity and reliability, and is the best candidate for future development. Evaluation tools also need to be developed to measure if care received by patients is EBM.

  3. Clinical Teachers' Attitudes toward the Efficacy of Evidence-Based Medicine Workshop and Self-Reported Ability in Evidence-Based Practice in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhpayehzadeh, Jalil; Baradaran, Hamid; Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Knill-Jones, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been introduced in medical schools worldwide, but there is little known about effective methods for teaching EBM skills, particularly in developing countries. This study assesses the impact of an EBM workshop on clinical teachers' attitudes and use of EBM skills. Methods: Seventy-two clinical…

  4. Pediatric Online Evidence-Based Medicine Assignment Is a Novel Effective Enjoyable Undergraduate Medical Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Magd A.; Elmahdy, Hesham Nabeh; Khalifa, Nour El Deen Mahmoud; El-Deen, Mohamed Hamed Nasr; Lotfi, Mohamed Amr N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is delivered through a didactic, blended learning, and mixed models. Students are supposed to construct an answerable question in PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework, acquire evidence through search of literature, appraise evidence, apply it to the clinical case scenario, and assess the evidence in relation to clinical context. Yet these teaching models have limitations especially those related to group work, for example, handling uncooperative students, students who fail to contribute, students who domineer, students who have personal conflict, their impact upon progress of their groups, and inconsistent individual acquisition of required skills. At Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, we designed a novel undergraduate pediatric EBM assignment online system to overcome shortcomings of previous didactic method and aimed to assess its effectiveness by prospective follow-up during academic years 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. The novel web-based online interactive system was tailored to provide sequential single and group assignments for each student. Single assignment addressed a specific case scenario question, while group assignment was teamwork that addressed different questions of same case scenario. Assignment comprised scholar content and skills. We objectively analyzed students’ performance by criterion-based assessment and subjectively by anonymous student questionnaire. A total of 2879 were enrolled in 5th year Pediatrics Course consecutively, of them 2779 (96.5%) logged in and 2554 (88.7%) submitted their work. They were randomly assigned to 292 groups. A total of 2277 (89.15%) achieved ≥80% of total mark (4/5), of them 717 (28.1%) achieved a full mark. A total of 2178 (85.27%) and 2359 (92.36%) made evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in single and group assignment, respectively (P < 0.001). A total of 1102 (43.1%) answered student questionnaire

  5. Epistemology and ethics of evidence-based medicine: putting goal-setting in the right place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestini, Piersante

    2010-04-01

    While evidence-based medicine (EBM) is often accused on relying on a paradigm of 'absolute truth', it is in fact highly consistent with Karl Popper's criterion of demarcation through falsification. Even more relevant, the first three steps of the EBM process are closely patterned on Popper's evolutionary approach of objective knowledge: (1) recognition of a problem; (2) generation of solutions; and (3) selection of the best solution. This places the step 1 of the EBM process (building an answerable question) in a pivotal position for the understanding of the whole process, and underscores a few aspects which are often overlooked in EBM courses. First in this step internal evidence (including personal expertise) must be appraised and integrated in the problem. Second, issues of applicability of the possible solution should be anticipated. Third, and possibly more important, the goal of the intervention should be set at this stage (typically by choosing the outcome in a PICO question). Depending whether or not goals depend on the goals of others, and whether they concern others' voluntary behaviour, goals may be classified as self-serving, moral, altruistic or moralistic. Thus, delicate ethical questions must be addressed at this stage, which means that patient preferences and values must be carefully sought, so that empathy, counselling and narrative medicine must be mastered to be able to formulate correctly an answerable question. The need to modify the current description of the EBM process to increase the recognition of implicit assumptions and increase the consistency of this model is discussed.

  6. An Evidence-Based Review on Wound Healing Herbal Remedies From Reports of Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Falahatzadeh, Maryam; Raoofi, Elahe; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-06-20

    Research on wound healing agents is a developing area in biomedical sciences. Traditional Persian medicine is one of holistic systems of medicine providing valuable information on natural remedies. To collect the evidences for wound-healing medicaments from traditional Persian medicine sources, 5 main pharmaceutical manuscripts in addition to related contemporary reports from Scopus, PubMed, and ScienceDirect were studied. The underlying mechanisms were also saved and discussed. Totally, 65 herbs used in traditional Persian medicine for their wound healing properties was identified. Related anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and wound-healing activities of those remedies were studied. Forty remedies had at least one of those properties and 10 of the filtered plants possessed all effects. The medicinal plants used in wound healing treatment in traditional Persian medicine could be a good topic for further in vivo and clinical research. This might lead to development of effective products for wound treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Barriers to GPs' use of evidence-based medicine: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolsman, Sandra; te Pas, Ellen; Hooft, Lotty; Waard, Margreet Wieringa-de; van Dijk, Nynke

    2012-01-01

    Background GPs report various barriers to the use and practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM). A review of research on these barriers may help solve problems regarding the uptake of evidence in clinical outpatient practice. Aim To determine the barriers encountered by GPs in the practice of EBM and to come up with solutions to the barriers identified. Design A systematic review of the literature. Method The following databases were searched: MEDLINE® (PubMed®), Embase, CINAHL®, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library, until February 2011. Primary studies (all methods, all languages) that explore the barriers that GPs encounter in the practice of EBM were included. Results A total of 14 700 articles were identified, of which 22 fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Of the latter, nine concerned qualitative, 12 concerned quantitative, and one concerned both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The barriers described in the articles cover the categories: evidence (including the accompanying EBM steps), the GP’s preferences (experience, expertise, education), and the patient’s preferences. The particular GP setting also has important barriers to the use of EBM. Barriers found in this review, among others, include lack of time, EBM skills, and available evidence; patient-related factors; and the attitude of the GP. Conclusion Various barriers are encountered when using EBM in GP practice. Interventions that help GPs to overcome these barriers are needed, both within EBM education and in clinical practice. PMID:22781999

  8. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the care of whole persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W Scott

    2017-04-01

    In this issue of the Journal, Dr. Fava posits that evidence-based medicine (EBM) was bound to fail. I share some of the concerns he expresses, yet I see more reasons for optimism. Having been on rounds with both Drs. Engel and Sackett, I reckon they would have agreed more than they disagreed. Their central teaching was the compassionate and well-informed care of sick persons. The model that emerged from these rounds was that patient care could be both person-centered and evidence-based, that clinical judgment was essential to both, and the decisions could and should be shared. Both clinicians and patients can bring knowledge from several sources into the shared decision making process in the clinical encounter, including evidence from clinical care research. I thank Dr. Fava for expressing legitimate doubts and providing useful criticism, yet I am cautiously optimistic that the model of EBM described here is robust enough to meet the challenges and is not doomed to fail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing and using a rubric for evaluating evidence-based medicine point-of-care tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtz, Suzanne; Foster, Margaret J

    2011-07-01

    The research sought to establish a rubric for evaluating evidence-based medicine (EBM) point-of-care tools in a health sciences library. The authors searched the literature for EBM tool evaluations and found that most previous reviews were designed to evaluate the ability of an EBM tool to answer a clinical question. The researchers' goal was to develop and complete rubrics for assessing these tools based on criteria for a general evaluation of tools (reviewing content, search options, quality control, and grading) and criteria for an evaluation of clinical summaries (searching tools for treatments of common diagnoses and evaluating summaries for quality control). Differences between EBM tools' options, content coverage, and usability were minimal. However, the products' methods for locating and grading evidence varied widely in transparency and process. As EBM tools are constantly updating and evolving, evaluation of these tools needs to be conducted frequently. Standards for evaluating EBM tools need to be established, with one method being the use of objective rubrics. In addition, EBM tools need to provide more information about authorship, reviewers, methods for evidence collection, and grading system employed.

  10. Methods of teaching medical trainees evidence-based medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Maloney, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    The principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) provide clinicians with the ability to identify, source, appraise and integrate research evidence into medical decision making. Despite the mantra of EBM encouraging the use of evidence to inform practice, there appears little evidence available on how best to teach EBM to medical trainees. A systematic review was performed to identify what type of educational method is most effective at increasing medical trainees' competency in EBM. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. Electronic searches were performed across three databases. Two reviewers independently searched, extracted and reviewed the articles. The quality of each study was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. In total, 177 citations were returned, from which 14 studies were RCTs and examined for full text. Nine of the studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Learner competency in EBM increased post-intervention across all studies. However, no difference in learner outcomes was identified across a variety of educational modes, including lecture versus online, direct versus self-directed, multidisciplinary versus discipline-specific groups, lecture versus active small group facilitated learning. The body of evidence available to guide educators on how to teach EBM to medical trainees is small, albeit of a good quality. The major limitation in assessing risk of bias was the inability to blind participants to an educational intervention and lack of clarity regarding certain aspects within studies. Further evidence, and transparency in design, is required to guide the development and implementation of educational strategies in EBM, including modes of teaching and the timing of delivering EBM content within the broader medical curriculum. Further research is required to determine the effects of timing, content and length of EBM courses and teaching methods. © 2014

  11. Evidence-Based Medicine and State Health Care Coverage: The Washington Health Technology Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, David J; Blackwood, Kristy L; Adair, Whitney; Rothman, Sheila M

    2017-12-03

    To evaluate the Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program (WHTAP). Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program proceedings in Seattle, Washington. We assessed the program through observation of its proceedings over a 5-year period, 2009-2014. We conducted detailed analyses of the documents it produced and reviewed relevant literature. Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program is unique compared to other state and federal programs. It has successfully applied evidence-based medicine to health care decision making, limited by the strength of available data. It claims cost savings, but they are not substantiated. Washington State Health Technology Assessment Program is a useful model for other states considering implementation of technology assessment programs. We provide key lessons for improving WHTAP's process. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. "Evidence"-based medicine in eating disorders research: The problem of "confetti p values".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura Kraemer, Helena

    2017-03-01

    Eating disorders hold a unique place among mental health disorders, in that salient symptoms can be objectively observed and measured rather than determined only from patient interviews or subjective evaluations. Because of this measurement advantage alone, evidence-based medicine would be expected there to make the most rapid strides. However, conclusions in Eating Disorders research, as in all medical research literature, often continue to be misleading or ambiguous. One major and long-known source of such problems is the misuse and misinterpretation of "statistical significance", with "p values" strewn throughout research papers like so much confetti, a problem that has become systemic, that is, enforced, rather than corrected, by the peer-review system. This discussion attempts to clarify the issues, and to suggest how readers might deal with this issue in processing the research literature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Patient preparation for intravenous urography: are we practising evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Reddicliffe, N; Parker, D A

    2008-02-01

    To identify the current practice of patient preparation prior to intravenous urography (IVU) in England and Wales. Seventy-two hospitals were contacted to request details regarding the duration of fluid restriction, adherence to a low-residue diet, or use of laxatives for patient preparation before IVU examinations. Results showed that out of 45 hospitals that still use IVU, only six (13.3%) did not follow a patient-preparation regime. The vast majority of the hospitals contacted (87.6%), implemented either fluid and/or food restriction, or prescribed laxatives. The duration of fluid and food restriction varied from 2-12 h duration, and some departments advocated 48 h of laxatives. A large proportion of hospitals are not practising evidence-based medicine in relation to IVU, and we suggest that the practice of patient preparation should be abandoned.

  14. [Evidence-based medicine and real world study in clinical study of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ronglin; Hu, Ling; Wu, Zijian

    2015-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been widely applied in clinical study of acupuncture and moxibustion, and the real-world study (RWS) has gradually become an important way of clinical research in the world in recent years. It is worthy of our in-depth study and discussion that how to evaluate the advantages and limitations of EBM and RWS as well as their reasonable application in clinical study of acupuncture and moxibustion. The characteristics and difference between RWS and EBM, and the situation of acupuncture clinical research methods are discussed in this paper. It is proposed that we should understand the advantages of RWS in acupuncture clinical research, fully realize the limitations of EBM and RWS, recognize the complexity and particularity of RWS, and apply EBM and RWS into acupuncture clinical research. Meanwhile acupuncture clinical manipulation standardization should be further promoted, which is benefit to develop clinical study, improve clinical efficacy and promote the popularization of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  15. Medicina basada en evidencias: Controversias actuales Evidence-based medicine: current controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz Novás

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available La medicina basada en evidencias procura dar respuesta a las múltiples interrogantes surgidas en la práctica médica. Como toda nueva idea no está exenta de contradicciones y opiniones divergentes. En el presente trabajo se presentan criterios diversos sobre este nuevo modelo. Las consideraciones finales exponen los puntos de vista que creemos más apropiados sobre el tema.Evidence-based medicine tries to give an answer to many questions that appear in medical practice. As every new idea, it is not exempt from contradictions and different opinions, Diverse criteria on this new model are presented in this paper. The final considerations expose the views we consider more appropriate on this topic.

  16. Patient preparation for intravenous urography: are we practising evidence-based medicine?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. [Department of Radiology, Wrexham Maelor Hospital (United Kingdom)], E-mail: devsingh74@hotmail.com; Reddicliffe, N. [School of Health Care Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor (United Kingdom); Parker, D.A. [Department of Radiology, Wrexham Maelor Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Aim: To identify the current practice of patient preparation prior to intravenous urography (IVU) in England and Wales. Methods: Seventy-two hospitals were contacted to request details regarding the duration of fluid restriction, adherence to a low-residue diet, or use of laxatives for patient preparation before IVU examinations. Results: Results showed that out of 45 hospitals that still use IVU, only six (13.3%) did not follow a patient-preparation regime. The vast majority of the hospitals contacted (87.6%), implemented either fluid and/or food restriction, or prescribed laxatives. The duration of fluid and food restriction varied from 2-12 h duration, and some departments advocated 48 h of laxatives. Conclusion: A large proportion of hospitals are not practising evidence-based medicine in relation to IVU, and we suggest that the practice of patient preparation should be abandoned.

  17. [Application and thinking of evidence-based medicine in clinical acupuncture-moxibustion research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ling; Cai, Rong-Lin; Wu, Zi-Jian

    2010-07-01

    The importance of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in clinical acupuncture-moxibustion research is discussed in the paper. The application of EBM and problems in clinical acupuncture-moxibustion research are reviewed. It is put forward that thinking and assumptions of the combination of the evaluation of clinical effectiveness and EBM. The characteristics of acupuncture-moxibustion theory determine that the design of clinical research of acupuncture cannot completely apply the methods of EBM. Future efforts should be made to explore the integrated research design which is adhering to the guidelines of clinical practice of acupuncture. The features and advantages of traditional therapeutic practices should be preserved, and the advanced methods in EBM should be applied. It is great to improve the reliability and repeatability of clinical acupuncture-moxibustion research and to improve the standard and the evaluation system of clinical acupuncture.

  18. Medical management of myxomatous mitral valve disease: An evidence-based veterinary medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Richard K; Schoeman, Johan

    2014-10-22

    Myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common heart disease of dogs. The current management of MMVD in dogs is mostly pharmacological, and the recommendations for treatment are based on a number of veterinary studies. Notwithstanding the current consensus regarding the medical management of MMVD, there remains active debate as to which drugs are the most effective. In order to understand how recommendations are constructed in the pharmacological management of diseases, the veterinarian needs to understand the concept of evidence-based veterinary medicine, and how the findings of these studies can be applied in their own practices. This review summarises the current veterinary literature and explains how the consensus regarding the management of MMVD has been reached. This review highlights the limitations of veterinary studies in order to provide veterinary practitioners with a sense of the difficulty there is in establishing the benefit of one treatment over the other. Veterinarians should therefore apply treatment recommendations based on the best evidence, integrated with a pathomechanistic understanding of the disease process and clinical experience.

  19. Training evidence-based veterinary medicine by collaborative development of critically appraised topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Sebastian P; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In current veterinary education, skills such as retrieving, critically appraising, interpreting, and applying the results of published scientific studies are rarely taught. In this study, the authors tested the concept of team-based development of critically appraised topics (CATs) in training students in evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). The 116 participants were in their fifth year and attending the clinical rotation at the Clinic for Animal Reproduction. Students developed 18 CATs of varying quality on topics of their choice. Preparing the CATs in teams stimulated discussion on the topic and the quality of the retrieved papers. Evaluation of the project revealed that more than 90% of the students endorsed training in critical appraisal of information in veterinary education. In addition, more than 90% considered the development of CATs an effective exercise for assessing the quality of scientific literature. A provided literature evaluation form was perceived as a useful tool for systematically summarizing a publication's quality. In conclusion, team-based development of CATs during clinical rotations is highly valuable for training in EBVM. Learning and intrinsic motivation seem to be enhanced by creating a situation similar to veterinary practice because the task is embedded into an authentic clinical problem. This approach to clinical training helps to prepare students to integrate evidence from literature into practice.

  20. Introducing evidence based medicine to the journal club, using a structured pre and post test: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Martin C

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Journal Club at a University-based residency program was restructured to introduce, reinforce and evaluate residents understanding of the concepts of Evidence Based Medicine. Methods Over the course of a year structured pre and post-tests were developed for use during each Journal Club. Questions were derived from the articles being reviewed. Performance with the key concepts of Evidence Based Medicine was assessed. Study subjects were 35 PGY2 and PGY3 residents in a University based Family Practice Program. Results Performance on the pre-test demonstrated a significant improvement from a median of 54.5 % to 78.9 % over the course of the year (F 89.17, p Conclusions Following organizational revision, the introduction of a pre-test/post-test instrument supported achievement of the learning objectives with a better understanding and utilization of the concepts of Evidence Based Medicine.

  1. Using standardized patients to evaluate medical students' evidence-based medicine skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Richard; Hernandez, Nicholas C; Keim, Samuel M; Gordon, Paul R

    2015-12-08

    To analyze the effectiveness of an Evidence Based Medicine Objective Structured Clinical Examination (EBM OSCE) with standardized patients for end of third year medical students at our institution. This was a single-center prospective cross-sectional investigation. As part of the eight-station OSCE exam, the authors developed and implemented a new twenty-five-minute EBM OSCE station with the goal of evaluating evidence based medicine skills necessary for daily clinical encounters. The OSCE case involved a highly educated patient with a history of recurrent debilitating migraines who has brought eight specific questions regarding the use of steroids for migraine headaches. Students were provided computer stations equipped to record a log of the searches performed. One hundred and four third-year medical students participated in this study. The average number of search tools used by the students was 4 (SD = 2). The 104 students performed a total of 896 searches. The two most commonly used websites were uptodate.com and google.com. Sixty-nine percent (95% CI, 60% to 78%) of students were able to find a meta-analysis regarding the use of dexamethasone for the prevention of rebound migraines. Fifty-two percent of students were able to explain that patients who took dexamethasone had a moderate RR (0.68 to 0.78) of having a recurrent migraine, and 71% of students were able to explain to the standardized patient that the NNT for dexamethasone was nine. The EBM OSCE was successfully integrated into the existing eight-station OSCE and was able to assess student EBM skills. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the ability of hospital information systems to establish evidence-based medicine in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangraz Jeddi, Fatemeh; Abazari, Fatemeh; Moravveji, Alireza; Nadjafi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the correct use of the best evidences in clinical decision making for patient care. Hospital Information Systems (HIS) can act as a bridge between medical data and medical knowledge through context-sensitive merging and filtering of patient data, individual clinical knowledge and external evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of HISs to establish EBM in Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on HISs of 30 hospitals from March 2011 to October 2011. Data were collected using a researcher-constructed checklist including applicant's background information as well as information based on research objectives: clinical decision support system (CDSS), reference databases, contextual and case-specific information, clinical and administrative data repositories and Internet-based health information. Face and content validity of the checklist were assessed by the qualified specialists and then the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. The results of the study revealed that the HISs lacked the essential components to providing access to CDSS, reference databases and Internet-based health information in 19, 16 and 20 hospitals were 63.3 %, 53.3 % and 66.7, respectively. Twenty-two hospitals (70 %) had more than two-thirds of the essential components to access clinical and administrative data repositories; 23 hospitals (76.7 %) had at least one essential component to access contextual and case-specific information. It can be concluded that the ability of the HISs to establish EBM in providing access to the clinical and administrative data repositories is better than other research objectives. Furthermore, more attention should be paid to other related objectives.

  3. The evolving role of the librarian in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, C S; Dorsch, J L

    1999-07-01

    Librarians' participation in evidence-based medicine (EBM) is rooted in past practices, most notably in clinical medical librarianship. EBM extends the librarians' role beyond identification of the literature to involvement in practicing and teaching quality filtering and critical appraisal of the literature. These activities require librarians to acquire new knowledge and develop new skills. A professional development program for librarians at the Library of the Health Sciences (LHS) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) is described. The program's goals are to increase librarians' skills and support the EBM curricular initiative at the UIC College of Medicine (COM). The unique program has been a collaborative effort of the LHS and the COM. The locally developed classes provide librarians with instruction in clinical study designs, statistical concepts, and critical appraisal of the literature. Other interventions such as an EBM round table are also described. The programs' success is measured by librarians' growing involvement in EBM medical curricula, journal clubs, and morning reports. Additionally, librarians gained competence in new skills and professional satisfaction from working collegially with COM students, residents, and faculty.

  4. Inappropriate emergency laboratory test ordering: defensive or peer evidence shared based medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Descovich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The laboratory overuse is widely prevalent in hospital practice, mostly in the emergency care. Reasons for excessive and inappropriate test-ordering include defensive behaviour and fear or uncertainty, lack of experience, the misuse of protocols and guidelines, “routine” and local attitudes, inadequate educational feedback and clinician’s unawareness about the cost of examinations and their related implications. AIM OF THE STUDY AND METHODS The primary target of our working group was to reduce inappropriate ordering on a urgent basis test, implementing further examinations not yet previewed in the hospital panel of the available urgencies, according to the evidence based diagnosis concept. The secondary goal was to indicate strategies of re-engineering of the processes, improving turnaround time in the laboratory management of emergencies. After evaluating, as first intervention, the more reliable sources for practice guidelines, systematic reviews and RCTs, the committee further discussed main topics with in-hospital stakeholders, selected from Emergency, Internal Medicine and Surgery Depts. The working group, in many subsequent audits, tried to obtain a systematic feed back with all involved professionals. RESULTS After reviewing literature’s evidence, the board constrained testing options by defining the basic emergency laboratory panel tests (blood type, hemogram, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolarity, CRP, bicarbonate, CPK, creatine phosphokinase-MB, myoglobin, troponin, BNP and NT-proBNP, PT-INR, PTT, D-dimer, beta- HCG, biochemical urinalysis etc.. As final result, the proposed tests reduced the overall number of inappropriate investigations and increased, with newer and updated tests, the available panel for critical patients. DISCUSSION A collegiate review of data reporting, in-hospital deepening of problems and the inter- professional discussion of the evidences

  5. Evaluation of an Evidence-based Medicine Educational Program for Pharmacists and Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tadashi; Ueda, Masahiro; Toyoyama, Mikoto; Ohmori, Shiho; Takagaki, Nobumasa

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational program on EBM-related knowledge and skills of pharmacists and pharmacy students. Our preliminary educational program included the following four sessions: 1) ice breaker, 2) formulation of answerable clinical questions from virtual clinical scenario using the PICO criteria, 3) critical appraisal of the literature using a checklist, and 4) critical appraisal of the results and integrating the evidence with experience and patients values. Change in knowledge and skills related to EBM were evaluated using pre- and post-seminar 4-point scale questionnaires comprising of 14 questions. A total of 23 pharmacists, 1 care manager, and 5 pharmacy students participated in our EBM educational seminar. Knowledge and skills related to several variables improved significantly post-seminar (pre-seminar 2.80 versus 3.26 post-seminar; p<0.001). Specifically, the skills of formulating answerable clinical questions from virtual clinical scenario and critical appraisal of the literature using a checklist improved. Our findings suggested that EBM educational program using problem-based learning was effective in improving EBM-related knowledge and skills of pharmacists and pharmacy students.

  6. Effectiveness of training in evidence-based medicine skills for healthcare professionals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Lars; Buhse, Susanne; Meyer, Gabriele

    2016-04-04

    Basic skills in evidence-based medicine (EbM) are indispensable for healthcare professionals to promote consumer-centred, evidence-based treatment. EbM training courses are complex interventions - a fact that has not been methodologically reflected by previous systematic reviews. This review evaluates the effects of EbM training for healthcare professionals as well as the quality of reporting of such training interventions. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ERIC, Campbell Library and PsycINFO up to 9/2014. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials as well as before-after trials were included. Authors were contacted in order to obtain missing data. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We reviewed 14.507 articles; n = 61 appeared potentially eligible; n = 13 involving 1,120 participants were included. EbM training shows some impact on knowledge and skills, whereas the impact on practical EbM application remains unclear. Risk of bias of included trials raises uncertainty about the effects. Description of complex interventions was poor. EbM training has some positive effects on knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals. Appropriate methods for development, piloting, evaluation, reporting and implementation of the training should be applied.

  7. Student peer assessment in evidence-based medicine (EBM) searching skills training: an experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Jonathan D; Bear, David G; Wayne, Sharon J; Perea, Paul P

    2013-10-01

    Student peer assessment (SPA) has been used intermittently in medical education for more than four decades, particularly in connection with skills training. SPA generally has not been rigorously tested, so medical educators have limited evidence about SPA effectiveness. Seventy-one first-year medical students were stratified by previous test scores into problem-based learning tutorial groups, and then these assigned groups were randomized further into intervention and control groups. All students received evidence-based medicine (EBM) training. Only the intervention group members received SPA training, practice with assessment rubrics, and then application of anonymous SPA to assignments submitted by other members of the intervention group. Students in the intervention group had higher mean scores on the formative test with a potential maximum score of 49 points than did students in the control group, 45.7 and 43.5, respectively (P = 0.06). SPA training and the application of these skills by the intervention group resulted in higher scores on formative tests compared to those in the control group, a difference approaching statistical significance. The extra effort expended by librarians, other personnel, and medical students must be factored into the decision to use SPA in any specific educational context. SPA has not been rigorously tested, particularly in medical education. Future, similarly rigorous studies could further validate use of SPA so that librarians can optimally make use of limited contact time for information skills training in medical school curricula.

  8. Using artificial intelligence to bring evidence-based medicine a step closer to making the individual difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, B; Gray, W A; Bater, A; Morrey, D

    2007-03-01

    The vision of evidence-based medicine is that of experienced clinicians systematically using the best research evidence to meet the individual patient's needs. This vision remains distant from clinical reality, as no complete methodology exists to apply objective, population-based research evidence to the needs of an individual real-world patient. We describe an approach, based on techniques from machine learning, to bridge this gap between evidence and individual patients in oncology. We examine existing proposals for tackling this gap and the relative benefits and challenges of our proposed, k-nearest-neighbour-based, approach.

  9. The Mastery Rubric for Evidence-Based Medicine: Institutional Validation via Multidimensional Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tractenberg, Rochelle E; Gushta, Matthew M; Weinfeld, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    CONSTRUCT: In this study we describe a multidimensional scaling (MDS) exercise to validate the curricular elements composing a new Mastery Rubric (MR) for a curriculum in evidence-based medicine (EBM). This MR-EBM comprises 10 elements of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) representing our institutional learning goals of career-spanning engagement with EBM. An MR also includes developmental trajectories for each KSA, beginning with medical school coursework, including residency training, and outlining the qualifications of individuals to teach and mentor in EBM. The development was not part of the validation effort, as our curriculum is focused at a single stage (undergraduate medical students). An MR comprises the desired KSAs for an entire curriculum, together with descriptions of a learner's performance and/or capabilities as they develop from novice to proficiency of the curricular target(s). The MR construct is intended to support curriculum development or refinement by capturing the KSAs that support the articulation of concrete learning goals; it also promotes assessment that demonstrates development in the target KSAs and encourages reflection and self-directed learning throughout the learner's career. Two other MRs have been published, and this is the first one specific to teaching and learning in medicine; this is also the first one created specifically to evaluate an existing curriculum. To validate the dispersion of the elements of the EBM curriculum, the nine clinical instructors in the EBM two-course curriculum completed an MDS exercise, rating the similarities of the 10 curricular elements. MDS is a mathematical approach to understanding relationships among concepts/objects when these relationships are difficult to quantify. Eliciting similarity ratings biased the responses toward the null hypothesis (that the elements are not different). MDS results suggested that the MR represents 10 different, although related, facets of the construct

  10. An epistemological shift: from evidence-based medicine to epistemological responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baalen, Sophie; Boon, Mieke

    2015-06-01

    In decision making concerning the diagnosis and treatment of patients, doctors have a responsibility to do this to the best of their abilities. Yet we argue that the current paradigm for best medical practice - evidence-based medicine (EBM) - does not always support this responsibility. EBM was developed to promote a more scientific approach to the practice of medicine. This includes the use of randomized controlled trials in the testing of new treatments and prophylactics and rule-based reasoning in clinical decision making. But critics of EBM claim that such a scientific approach does not always work in the clinic. In this article, we build on this critique and argue that rule-based reasoning and the use of general guidelines as promoted by EBM does not accommodate the complex reasoning of doctors in clinical decision making. Instead, we propose that a new medical epistemology is needed that accounts for complex reasoning styles in medical practice and at the same time maintains the quality usually associated with 'scientific'. The medical epistemology we propose conforms to the epistemological responsibility of doctors, which involves a specific professional attitude and epistemological skills. Instead of deferring part of the professional responsibility to strict clinical guidelines, as EBM allows for, our alternative epistemology holds doctors accountable for epistemic considerations in clinical decision making towards the diagnosis and treatment plan of individual patients. One of the key intellectual challenges of doctors is the ability to bring together heterogeneous pieces of information to construct a coherent 'picture' of a specific patient. In the proposed epistemology, we consider this 'picture' as an epistemological tool that may then be employed in the diagnosis and treatment of a specific patient. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. How learning style affects evidence-based medicine: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolsman, Sandra E; van Dijk, Nynke; Verhoeven, Anita A H; de Ruijter, Wouter; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet

    2011-10-08

    Learning styles determine how people manage new information. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) involves the management of information in clinical practice. As a consequence, the way in which a person uses EBM can be related to his or her learning style. In order to tailor EBM education to the individual learner, this study aims to determine whether there is a relationship between an individual's learning style and EBM competence (knowledge/skills, attitude, behaviour). In 2008, we conducted a survey among 140 novice GP trainees in order to assess their EBM competence and learning styles (Accommodator, Diverger, Assimilator, Converger, or mixed learning style). The trainees' EBM knowledge/skills (scale 0-15; mean 6.8; 95%CI 6.4-7.2) were adequate and their attitudes towards EBM (scale 0-100; mean 63; 95%CI 61.3-64.3) were positive. We found no relationship between their knowledge/skills or attitudes and their learning styles (p = 0.21; p = 0.19). Of the trainees, 40% used guidelines to answer clinical questions and 55% agreed that the use of guidelines is the most appropriate way of applying EBM in general practice. Trainees preferred using evidence from summaries to using evidence from single studies. There were no differences in medical decision-making or in EBM use (p = 0.59) for the various learning styles. However, we did find a link between having an Accommodating or Converging learning style and making greater use of intuition. Moreover, trainees with different learning styles expressed different ideas about the optimal use of EBM in primary care. We found that EBM knowledge/skills and EBM attitudes did not differ with respect to the learning styles of GP trainees. However, we did find differences relating to the use of intuition and the trainees' ideas regarding the use of evidence in decision-making.

  12. Self-perception and knowledge of evidence based medicine by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Raya, Karen A; Castilla-Peón, María F; Barajas-Nava, Leticia A; Torres-Rodríguez, Violeta; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan

    2016-06-29

    The influence, legitimacy and application of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) in the world is growing as a tool that integrates, the best available evidence to decision making in patient care. Our goal was to identify the relationship between self-perception about the relevance of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and the degree of basic knowledge of this discipline in a group of physicians. A survey was carried out in a third level public hospital in Mexico City. Self-perception was measured by means of a structured scale, and the degree of knowledge through parameter or "rubrics" methodology. A total of 320 questionnaires were given to 55 medical students (17 %); 45 pre-graduate medical interns (14 %); 118 medical residents (37 %) and 102 appointed physicians of different specialties (32 %). Self-perception of EBM: The majority of those surveyed (n = 274, 86 %) declared that they were very or moderately familiar with EBM. The great majority (n = 270, 84 %) believe that EBM is very important in clinical practice and 197 physicians (61 %) said that they implement it always or usually. The global index of self-perception was 75 %. Knowledge of EBM: Definition of EBM; Seven of those surveyed (2 %) included 3 of the 4 characteristics of the definition, 82 (26 %) mentioned only two characteristics of the definition, 152 (48 %) mentioned only one characteristic and 79 (25 %) did not include any characteristic of EBM. Phases of the EBM process: The majority of those surveyed (n = 218, 68 %) did not include the steps that characterize the practice of EBM, of which 79 participants (25 %) mentioned elements not related to it. The global index of knowledge was 19 %. The majority of the surveyed physicians have a high self-perception of the relevance of EBM. In spite of this, the majority of them did not know the characteristics that define the EBM and phases of the process for its practice. A major discrepancy was found between self-perception and the

  13. Evidence-based medicine works best when there is evidence: challenges in palliative medicine when randomized controlled trials are not possible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Ulf E; Werner, Mads U

    2009-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials provide the best evidence for the safety and effectiveness of interventions. However, the reliance on this study design as the only criterion for credible evidence is not possible in all areas of palliative medicine. Although we must exercise caution in making definit...... definitive claims from uncontrolled trial data, limitations in performing controlled trials should neither preclude the use of findings from well-designed nonrandomized controlled trials nor, more importantly, deprive patients of potentially effective treatments....

  14. Critical thinking and attitude of physicians toward evidence-based medicine in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Gihan M; Zaki, Adel; Dowidar, Nabil L; El Sayed, Iman

    2015-09-01

    Evidence-based practice is important for developing countries and is expected to thrive in a questioning culture. Experienced physicians differ in the making of clinical judgements, which are often not based on evidence. Although this topic is of paramount importance to the quality of care provided in the university hospitals in Alexandria, little research has been done about attitudes towards evidence-based medicine (EBM), and the extent of physicians' skills to access and interpret evidence. This study aimed to investigate the relation between the attitude towards EBM and the indicators for questioning mind and critical appraisal skills among physicians in Alexandria, Egypt. In a cross-sectional study, physicians (N=549) were randomly selected from different clinical departments in three of the university hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt using the stratified proportionate random sampling technique. A self-administrated questionnaire modified from the questionnaire used by McColl and colleagues was used. A high percentage of physicians (83%) had positive attitude towards EBM. Feeling knowledge gap every day was reported by 34.2% of the physicians while 55.6% felt knowledge gap less frequently. The percentage of physicians who understood the meaning of different measures used to assess the importance of results and quality of evidence in meta-analysis studies ranged from 10.8 to 24.2%. Higher frequency of feeling knowledge gap in clinical practice and the ability to correctly answer different questions reflecting critical reading skills were all significantly associated with positive attitude towards EBM (Pcritical reading of literature. This study has identified a significant relation between critical thinking skills and having a positive attitude towards EBM among physicians in the university hospitals in Alexandria. The study supported the hypothesis that strategies that encouraging critical thinking in medical education could improve the attitude of physicians

  15. Dolor lumbar: enfoque basado en la evidencia Low back pain and evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Alonso Salinas Durán

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El dolor lumbar es un motivo muy común de consulta médica; debido a la amplia oferta de opciones terapéuticas, es importante recurrir a los conceptos de la medicina basada en la evidencia para seleccionar las mejores. Las intervenciones que cuentan con evidencias más sólidas en la literatura son: mantenerse activo, hacer ejercicio durante los cuadros subagudo y crónico así como después de la cirugía, los antiinflamatorios no esteroides (AINE y los antidepresivos. Low back pain is a very common reason for consultation in general practice; due to the wide offer of treatment options, it is important, in order to select the best, to resort to the concepts of evidence-based medicine. The interventions that have more solid evidence in the literature are: to keep being active, to prescribe therapeutic exercises during the subacute and chronic periods, as well as after surgery, and to use nonsteroidal antiinflammatories and antidepressants.

  16. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  17. The Awareness of the International Veterinary Profession of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine and Preferred Methods of Training

    OpenAIRE

    Huntley, Selene J.; Dean, Rachel S.; Brennan, Marnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVM) is an evolving discipline in veterinary medicine so it is important to periodically “benchmark” opinion about EVM across the profession. An international survey to assess veterinarians’ awareness of EVM was conducted. Veterinarians were surveyed via an online questionnaire (all countries) or a postal questionnaire (UK only). Participants were asked whether they had heard of EVM, where they had first heard the term, and their preferences of method for r...

  18. Using tablet computers to teach evidence-based medicine to pediatrics residents: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, David B; Homme, Jason H; Jacobson, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine if tablet computers-supported by a laboratory experience focused upon skill-development-would improve not only evidence-based medicine (EBM) knowledge but also skills and behavior. We conducted a prospective cohort study where we provided tablet computers to our pediatric residents and then held a series of laboratory sessions focused on speed and efficiency in performing EBM at the bedside. We evaluated the intervention with pre- and postintervention tests and surveys based on a validated tool available for use on MedEdPORTAL. The attending pediatric hospitalists also completed surveys regarding their observations of the residents' behavior. All 38 pediatric residents completed the preintervention test and the pre- and postintervention surveys. All but one completed the posttest. All 7 attending pediatric hospitalists completed their surveys. The testing, targeted to assess EBM knowledge, revealed a median increase of 16 points out of a possible 60 points (P computer and laboratory sessions designed to teach the quick and efficient application of EBM at the bedside. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An instrument to characterize the environment for residents' evidence-based medicine learning and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Moseley, James L; Green, Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Many residency programs offer training in evidence-based medicine (EBM). However, these curricula often fail to achieve optimal learning outcomes, perhaps because they neglect various contextual factors in the learning environment. We developed and validated an instrument to characterize the environment for EBM learning and practice in residency programs. An EBM Environment Scale was developed following scale development principles. A survey was administered to residents across six programs in primary care specialties at four medical centers. Internal consistency reliability was analyzed with Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing predetermined subscales with the survey's internal structure as assessed via factor analysis. Scores were also compared for subgroups based on residency program affiliation and residency characteristics. Out of 262 eligible residents, 124 completed the survey (response rate 47%). The overall mean score was 3.89 (standard deviation=0.56). The initial reliability analysis of the 48-item scale had a high reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.94). Factor analysis and further item analysis resulted in a shorter 36-item scale with a satisfactory reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.86). Scores were higher for residents with prior EBM training in medical school (4.14 versus 3.62) and in residency (4.25 versus 3.69). If further testing confirms its properties, the EBM Environment Scale may be used to understand the influence of the learning environment on the effectiveness of EBM training. Additionally, it may detect changes in the EBM learning environment in response to programmatic or institutional interventions.

  20. Undergraduate medical student perceptions and use of Evidence Based Medicine: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Forbes, Kristian

    2010-08-19

    Many medical schools teach the principles of Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) as a subject within their medical curriculum. Few studies have explored the barriers and enablers that students experience when studying medicine and attempting to integrate EBM in their clinical experience. The aim of this study was to identify undergraduate medical student perceptions of EBM, including their current use of its principles as students and perceived future use as clinicians. Third year medical students were recruited via email to participate in focus group discussions. Four focus groups were conducted separately across four hospital sites. All focus groups were conducted by the same facilitator. All discussions were transcribed verbatim, and analysed independently by the two authors according to the principles of thematic analysis. Focus group discussions were conducted with 23 third-year medical students, representing three metropolitan and one rural hospital sites. Five key themes emerged from the analysis of the transcripts: (1) Rationale and observed use of EBM in practice, (2) Current use of EBM as students, (3) Perceived use of EBM as future clinicians, (4) Barriers to practicing EBM, and (5) Enablers to facilitate the integration of EBM into clinical practice. Key facilitators for promoting EBM to students include competency in EBM, mentorship and application to clinical disciplines. Barriers to EBM implementation include lack of visible application by senior clinicians and constraints by poor resourcing. The principles and application of EBM is perceived by medical students to be important in both their current clinical training and perceived future work as clinicians. Future research is needed to identify how medical students incorporate EBM concepts into their clinical practice as they gain greater clinical exposure and competence.

  1. [Evidence-based medicine teaching activities in the German-speaking area: a survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberschock, Tobias; Dörr, Joshua; Valipour, Arash; Strametz, Reinhard; Meyer, Gabriele; Lühmann, Dagmar; Steurer, Johann; Horvath, Karl; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Forster, Johannes; Sauder, Karsta; Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-01-01

    In the last 15 years Evidence-based Medicine (EbM) has gained much publicity in the German-speaking countries, but it is currently difficult to conclude how much the contents of EbM with its five steps according to Sackett have spread. Data from the year 2006 show that less than half of all medical faculties in Germany have introduced EbM into undergraduate teaching and that there is a shortage in EbM teaching activities for graduates in the German-speaking countries as well. The goal of this survey is to display the undergraduate and graduate Evidence-based Practice teaching activities in the German-speaking countries. In a two-step survey, we first sent out a total of 551 letters to medical faculties, colleges, boards of physicians, the German Hospital Association, the associations of statutory health insurance physicians in Germany, the Medical Service of the German health insurances and asked the 30 participants of the 2011 EbM Academy as key informants in writing to give details about potential providers of EbM teaching activities. Via email we also consulted the members of the German-speaking colleges of general practitioners and family medicine and the German Network for EBM, course participants and contact persons of familiar teaching activities. In a second step a pre-tested detailed questionnaire with 36 items in the five categories framework and structure, participant characterisation, contents and didactics, evaluation and publication, and planning and publicity was sent to potential providers. Altogether 185 teaching activities were identified, 80 % of which were located in Germany, 13 % in Austria and 7 % in Switzerland. In 82.6 % of the cases it was either a seminar, a course or a workshop with a median of 20 participants and an average duration of 17.9hours. The teaching activities mainly addressed students (63.2 %), physicians (37.8 %), caregivers and members of other health care professions with little or no prior knowledge of EbM. The first

  2. Implementation of evidence-based medicine in a health promotion teaching block for Thai medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Suntharasaj, Thitima; Sangsupawanich, Pasuree; Kongkamol, Chanon; Pornsawat, Panumad

    2017-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is well known in medical practice. Although health promotion (HP) is promoted worldwide, there is still some debate as to whether EBM is needed or useful in the teaching of health promotion. To assess the perceived usefulness of EBM in the teaching of HP among medical students and faculty members. A comparative study was conducted between two groups of fourth-year medical students in the academic year 2012 during the five-week Health Promotion Teaching Block at Prince of Songkla University, southern Thailand. A one-week EBM course was conducted with half the students in the first week of the block and the other half of the students in the last week of the block. All activities in the HP block were similar except for the different periods of the one-week of EBM teaching. The effect on knowledge, ability and perceived application of EBM in future practice was assessed by student self-evaluations before versus after taking the EBM course, and by faculty member evaluation of the students' end-of-block presentations. All evaluation items were rated from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). Data were analyzed using a t-test or Wilcoxon test, as appropriate. The students' self-evaluations of knowledge and ability on EBM between the two groups were similar. The perception that teaching EBM is beneficial in health promotion and future practice increased significantly ( phigher scores for the first group than the second group, although the rating differences were not at the level of significance. Ninety percent of the students believed that EBM was a useful addition to the teaching of HP. Medical students and faculty members perceived that EBM is useful in the HP context. Future studies to evaluate the effect of using evidence-based teaching for health promotion are needed.

  3. Non-conventional practice versus evidence-based medicine. A scientific and ethical analysis of the Italian regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patuzzo, Sara; Ciliberti, Rosagemma

    2017-08-23

    The current lack of scientific validation of non-conventional treatments in medicine, whose epistemological foundations lie in scientific evidence and experimentation, raises significant questions regarding the costs and benefits of alternative-treatment forms. Nonetheless, in the last few decades non-conventional treatments have been increasingly recognised by the Italian medical profession, with one regional healthcare administration adopting some non-conventional practices as part of its conventional healthcare services. The Authors aim to analyse non-conventional treatments in medicine from an epistemological, cultural, ethical, political and economic point of view, in order to highlight criticalities and incongruities, especially when these treatments are approved by a public healthcare system, which should be grounded on the "evidence-based medicine" principle. Non-conventional treatments in medicine are constituted by meta-theories, i.e. philosophical, religious and ideological concepts that conflict with contemporary rational, empirical medicine. In the interest of patients and society, the paper stresses the incongruity of a healthcare system which, despite being grounded on the "evidence-based medicine" principle, allows the development of non conventional treatments. Having said that, medical science should address not only the biological domain of illness but also its existential implications. Awareness and respect for the individual experience can undoubtedly lead to a new medical model that allows for a more effective therapeutic intervention.

  4. Adopting a blended learning approach to teaching evidence based medicine: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Hart, William; Fiddes, Patrick; Misso, Marie; Villanueva, Elmer

    2013-12-17

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a core unit delivered across many medical schools. Few studies have investigated the most effective method of teaching a course in EBM to medical students. The objective of this study was to identify whether a blended-learning approach to teaching EBM is more effective a didactic-based approach at increasing medical student competency in EBM. A mixed-methods study was conducted consisting of a controlled trial and focus groups with second year graduate medical students. Students received the EBM course delivered using either a didactic approach (DID) to learning EBM or a blended-learning approach (BL). Student competency in EBM was assessed using the Berlin tool and a criterion-based assessment task, with student perceptions on the interventions assessed qualitatively. A total of 61 students (85.9%) participated in the study. Competency in EBM did not differ between the groups when assessed using the Berlin tool (p = 0.29). Students using the BL approach performed significantly better in one of the criterion-based assessment tasks (p = 0.01) and reported significantly higher self-perceived competence in critical appraisal skills. Qualitative analysis identified that students had a preference for the EBM course to be delivered using the BL approach. Implementing a blended-learning approach to EBM teaching promotes greater student appreciation of EBM principles within the clinical setting. Integrating a variety of teaching modalities and approaches can increase student self-confidence and assist in bridging the gap between the theory and practice of EBM.

  5. Case Reports, Case Series - From Clinical Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Jerry W; Toklu, Hale Z; Ye, Fan; Mazza, Joseph; Yale, Steven

    2017-08-07

    Case reports and case series or case study research are descriptive studies that are prepared for illustrating novel, unusual, or atypical features identified in patients in medical practice, and they potentially generate new research questions. They are empirical inquiries or investigations of a patient or a group of patients in a natural, real-world clinical setting. Case study research is a method that focuses on the contextual analysis of a number of events or conditions and their relationships. There is disagreement among physicians on the value of case studies in the medical literature, particularly for educators focused on teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) for student learners in graduate medical education. Despite their limitations, case study research is a beneficial tool and learning experience in graduate medical education and among novice researchers. The preparation and presentation of case studies can help students and graduate medical education programs evaluate and apply the six American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies in the areas of medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, professionalism, systems-based practice, and communication. A goal in graduate medical education should be to assist residents to expand their critical thinking, problem-solving, and decision-making skills. These attributes are required in the teaching and practice of EBM. In this aspect, case studies provide a platform for developing clinical skills and problem-based learning methods. Hence, graduate medical education programs should encourage, assist, and support residents in the publication of clinical case studies; and clinical teachers should encourage graduate students to publish case reports during their graduate medical education.

  6. Adopting a blended learning approach to teaching evidence based medicine: a mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is a core unit delivered across many medical schools. Few studies have investigated the most effective method of teaching a course in EBM to medical students. The objective of this study was to identify whether a blended-learning approach to teaching EBM is more effective a didactic-based approach at increasing medical student competency in EBM. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted consisting of a controlled trial and focus groups with second year graduate medical students. Students received the EBM course delivered using either a didactic approach (DID) to learning EBM or a blended-learning approach (BL). Student competency in EBM was assessed using the Berlin tool and a criterion-based assessment task, with student perceptions on the interventions assessed qualitatively. Results A total of 61 students (85.9%) participated in the study. Competency in EBM did not differ between the groups when assessed using the Berlin tool (p = 0.29). Students using the BL approach performed significantly better in one of the criterion-based assessment tasks (p = 0.01) and reported significantly higher self-perceived competence in critical appraisal skills. Qualitative analysis identified that students had a preference for the EBM course to be delivered using the BL approach. Conclusions Implementing a blended-learning approach to EBM teaching promotes greater student appreciation of EBM principles within the clinical setting. Integrating a variety of teaching modalities and approaches can increase student self-confidence and assist in bridging the gap between the theory and practice of EBM. PMID:24341502

  7. Comprehensive Evidence-Based Assessment and Prioritization of Potential Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants: A Case Study from Canadian Eastern James Bay Cree Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre S. Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canadian Aboriginals, like others globally, suffer from disproportionately high rates of diabetes. A comprehensive evidence-based approach was therefore developed to study potential antidiabetic medicinal plants stemming from Canadian Aboriginal Traditional Medicine to provide culturally adapted complementary and alternative treatment options. Key elements of pathophysiology of diabetes and of related contemporary drug therapy are presented to highlight relevant cellular and molecular targets for medicinal plants. Potential antidiabetic plants were identified using a novel ethnobotanical method based on a set of diabetes symptoms. The most promising species were screened for primary (glucose-lowering and secondary (toxicity, drug interactions, complications antidiabetic activity by using a comprehensive platform of in vitro cell-based and cell-free bioassays. The most active species were studied further for their mechanism of action and their active principles identified though bioassay-guided fractionation. Biological activity of key species was confirmed in animal models of diabetes. These in vitro and in vivo findings are the basis for evidence-based prioritization of antidiabetic plants. In parallel, plants were also prioritized by Cree Elders and healers according to their Traditional Medicine paradigm. This case study highlights the convergence of modern science and Traditional Medicine while providing a model that can be adapted to other Aboriginal realities worldwide.

  8. Midurethral slings: evidence-based medicine vs the medicolegal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nager, Charles W

    2016-06-01

    Midurethral sling procedures are minimally invasive surgeries for stress urinary incontinence that use a trocar system to place a narrow ribbon of polypropylene mesh under the midurethra. The peer-reviewed scientific literature on these procedures is abundant and midurethral slings are the most well-studied incontinence procedure ever. Systematic reviews of the literature demonstrate that midurethral slings are safer and more (or equally) effective as traditional procedures. The midurethral sling is the worldwide standard for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence and >3 million procedures have been performed. The Food and Drug Administration and international scientific review agencies have consistently differentiated transvaginal mesh for stress urinary incontinence from transvaginal mesh for prolapse. In the recruitment of patients to participate in transvaginal mesh litigation, plaintiff lawyers have not made the distinction between stress urinary incontinence and prolapse procedures because more women have received midurethral slings than transvaginal mesh for prolapse by an order of magnitude. The litigation costs of defending their products have forced several companies that manufactured midurethral slings to leave the marketplace. It is not inconceivable that midurethral slings could become absent from the US market. If that happens, then US women with stress urinary incontinence will be harmed because they will not have access in this country to the best and safest stress urinary incontinence surgical procedure ever developed. It may be time for the Institute of Medicine or another comparable national agency to provide evidence-based recommendations on the midurethral sling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using educational prescriptions to teach medical students evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umscheid, Craig A; Maenner, Matthew J; Mull, Nikhil; Veesenmeyer, Angela F; Farrar, John T; Goldfarb, Stanley; Morrison, Gail; Albanese, Mark A; Frohna, John G; Feldstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate feasibility and impact of evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational prescriptions (EPs) in medical student clerkships. Students answered clinical questions during clerkships using EPs, which guide learners through the "four As" of EBM. Epidemiology fellows graded EPs using a rubric. Feasibility was assessed using descriptive statistics and student and fellow end-of-study questionnaires, which also measured impact. In addition, for each EP, students reported patient impact. Impact on EBM skills was assessed by change in EP scores over time and scores on an EBM objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) that were compared to controls from the prior year. 117 students completed 402 EPs evaluated by 24 fellows. Average score was 7.34/9.00 (SD 1.58). 69 students (59%) and 21 fellows (88%) completed questionnaires. Most students thought EPs improved "Acquiring" and "Appraising". Almost half thought EPs improved "Asking" and "Applying". Fellows did not value grading EPs. For 18% of EPs, students reported a "change" or "potential change" in treatment. 56% "confirmed" treatment. EP scores increased by 1.27 (95% CI: 0.81-1.72). There were no differences in OSCE scores between cohorts. Integrating EPs into clerkships is feasible and has impact, yet OSCEs were unchanged, and research fellows had limitations as evaluators.

  10. Who's afraid of EBM? Medical professionalism from the perspective of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine

    2017-03-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) and medical professionalism are two prominent notions in current medical debates. However, proponents of professionalism fear a restriction in doctors' freedom to make their best decisions for individual patients caused by the influence of EBM and highly standardised decision procedures. The challenge which EBM allegedly poses to physicians' discretion forms the starting point for an analysis of the relationship between professionalism, as an inherent value system of medical practice, and EBM, as an approach to optimise the decision-making for individual patients. The analysis starts with a brief conceptual clarification of the ambiguous term "professionalism". It then focuses on three key aspects of medical professionalism which may come into conflict with the basic tenets of EBM. The potential tensions between (a) professional autonomy and clinical practice guidelines, (b) individualised care and standardisation, and (c) esoteric authority and public accountability are analysed and a suggestion for reconcilement regarding each point is made. The article closes with a summary on how a better reflection on medical professionalism may help towards a fuller understanding of EBM and vice versa.

  11. An electronic thesaurus of Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine hematological and biochemical diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorizzi, R M; Maconi, M; Giavarina, D; Loza, G; Aman, M; Moreira, J; Bisoffi, Z; Gennuso, C

    2009-10-01

    The adoption of Evidence Based Laboratory Medicine (EBLM) has been hampered until today by the lack of effective tools. The SIMeL EBLM e-Thesaurus (on-line Repertoire of the diagnostic effectiveness of the laboratory, radiology and cardiology test) provides a useful support to clinical laboratory professionals and to clinicians for the interpretation of the diagnostic tests. The e-Thesaurus is an application developed using Microsoft Active Server Pages technology and carried out with Web Server Microsoft Internet Information Server and is available at the SIMeL website using a browser running JavaScript scripts (Internet Explorer is recommended). It contains a database (in Italian, English and Spanish) of the sensitivity and specificity (including the 95% confidence interval), the positive and negative likelihood ratios, the Diagnostic Odds Ratio and the Number Needed to Diagnose of more than 2000 diagnostic (most laboratory but also cardiology and radiology) tests. The e-Thesaurus improves the previous SIMeL paper and CD Thesaurus; its main features are a three languages search and a continuous and an easy updating capability.

  12. METEOR: An Enterprise Health Informatics Environment to Support Evidence-Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puppala, Mamta; He, Tiancheng; Chen, Shenyi; Ogunti, Richard; Yu, Xiaohui; Li, Fuhai; Jackson, Robert; Wong, Stephen T C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose the design and implementation of next-generation enterprise analytics platform developed at the Houston Methodist Hospital (HMH) system to meet the market and regulatory needs of the healthcare industry. For this goal, we developed an integrated clinical informatics environment, i.e., Methodist environment for translational enhancement and outcomes research (METEOR). The framework of METEOR consists of two components: the enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and a software intelligence and analytics (SIA) layer for enabling a wide range of clinical decision support systems that can be used directly by outcomes researchers and clinical investigators to facilitate data access for the purposes of hypothesis testing, cohort identification, data mining, risk prediction, and clinical research training. Data and usability analysis were performed on METEOR components as a preliminary evaluation, which successfully demonstrated that METEOR addresses significant niches in the clinical informatics area, and provides a powerful means for data integration and efficient access in supporting clinical and translational research. METEOR EDW and informatics applications improved outcomes, enabled coordinated care, and support health analytics and clinical research at HMH. The twin pressures of cost containment in the healthcare market and new federal regulations and policies have led to the prioritization of the meaningful use of electronic health records in the United States. EDW and SIA layers on top of EDW are becoming an essential strategic tool to healthcare institutions and integrated delivery networks in order to support evidence-based medicine at the enterprise level.

  13. A survey study of evidence-based medicine training in US and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Maria A; Capello, Carol F; Dorsch, Josephine L; Perry, Gerald; Zanetti, Mary L

    2014-07-01

    The authors conducted a survey examining (1) the current state of evidence-based medicine (EBM) curricula in US and Canadian medical schools and corresponding learning objectives, (2) medical educators' and librarians' participation in EBM training, and (3) barriers to EBM training. A survey instrument with thirty-four closed and open-ended questions was sent to curricular deans at US and Canadian medical schools. The survey sought information on enrollment and class size; EBM learning objectives, curricular activities, and assessment approaches by year of training; EBM faculty; EBM tools; barriers to implementing EBM curricula and possible ways to overcome them; and innovative approaches to EBM education. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used for data analysis. Measurable learning objectives were categorized using Bloom's taxonomy. One hundred fifteen medical schools (77.2%) responded. Over half (53%) of the 900 reported learning objectives were measurable. Knowledge application was the predominant category from Bloom's categories. Most schools integrated EBM into other curricular activities; activities and formal assessment decreased significantly with advanced training. EBM faculty consisted primarily of clinicians, followed by basic scientists and librarians. Various EBM tools were used, with PubMed and the Cochrane database most frequently cited. Lack of time in curricula was rated the most significant barrier. National agreement on required EBM competencies was an extremely helpful factor. Few schools shared innovative approaches. Schools need help in overcoming barriers related to EBM curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Findings can provide a starting point for discussion to develop a standardized competency framework.

  14. Summary of evidence-based guideline: Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Bever, Christopher; Bowen, James; Bowling, Allen; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Cameron, Michelle; Bourdette, Dennis; Gronseth, Gary S.; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop evidence-based recommendations for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We searched the literature (1970–March 2011; March 2011−September 2013 MEDLINE search), classified articles, and linked recommendations to evidence. Results and recommendations: Clinicians might offer oral cannabis extract for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level A). Clinicians might offer tetrahydrocannabinol for spasticity symptoms and pain (excluding central neuropathic pain) (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity (short-term)/tremor (Level B) and possibly effective for spasticity and pain (long-term) (Level C). Clinicians might offer Sativex oromucosal cannabinoid spray (nabiximols) for spasticity symptoms, pain, and urinary frequency (Level B). Clinicians should counsel patients that these agents are probably ineffective for objective spasticity/urinary incontinence (Level B). Clinicians might choose not to offer these agents for tremor (Level C). Clinicians might counsel patients that magnetic therapy is probably effective for fatigue and probably ineffective for depression (Level B); fish oil is probably ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, MRI lesions, and quality of life (QOL) (Level B); ginkgo biloba is ineffective for cognition (Level A) and possibly effective for fatigue (Level C); reflexology is possibly effective for paresthesia (Level C); Cari Loder regimen is possibly ineffective for disability, symptoms, depression, and fatigue (Level C); and bee sting therapy is possibly ineffective for relapses, disability, fatigue, lesion burden/volume, and health-related QOL (Level C). Cannabinoids may cause adverse effects. Clinicians should exercise caution regarding standardized vs nonstandardized cannabis extracts and overall CAM quality control/nonregulation. Safety/efficacy of other CAM

  15. Multiple strategy peer-taught evidence-based medicine course in a poor resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouni, Ammar; Bdaiwi, Yamama; Janoudi, Saad L; Namous, Lubaba O; Turk, Tarek; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Abbas, Fatima; Yafi, Ruba Zuhri

    2017-05-04

    Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is becoming a priority in the healthcare process. For undergraduates, it has been proved that integrating multiple strategies in teaching EBM yields better results than a single, short-duration strategy. However, there is a lack of evidence on applying EBM educational interventions in developing countries. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a multiple strategy peer-taught online course in improving EBM awareness and skills among medical students in two developing countries, Syria and Egypt. We conducted a prospective study with pre- and post- course assessment of 84 medical students in three universities, using the Berlin questionnaire and a set of self-reported questions which studied the students' EBM knowledge, attitude and competencies. The educational intervention was a peer-taught online course consisting of six sessions (90 min each) presented over six weeks, and integrated with assignments, group discussions, and two workshops. The mean score of pre- and post-course Berlin tests was 3.5 (95% CI: 2.94-4.06) and 5.5 (95% CI: 4.74-6.26) respectively, increasing by 2 marks (95% CI: 1.112-2.888; p-value <0.001), which indicates a statistically significant increase in students' EBM knowledge and skill, similar to a previous expert-taught face to face contact course. Self-reported confidences also increased significantly. However, our course did not have a major effect on students' attitudes toward EBM (1.9-10.8%; p-value: 0.12-0.99). In developing countries, multiple strategy peer-taught online courses may be an effective alternative to face to face expert-taught courses, especially in the short term.

  16. Identifying scientific artefacts in biomedical literature: the Evidence Based Medicine use case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamed; Groza, Tudor; Hunter, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) provides a framework that makes use of the current best evidence in the domain to support clinicians in the decision making process. In most cases, the underlying foundational knowledge is captured in scientific publications that detail specific clinical studies or randomised controlled trials. Over the course of the last two decades, research has been performed on modelling key aspects described within publications (e.g., aims, methods, results), to enable the successful realisation of the goals of EBM. A significant outcome of this research has been the PICO (Population/Problem-Intervention-Comparison-Outcome) structure, and its refined version PIBOSO (Population-Intervention-Background-Outcome-Study Design-Other), both of which provide a formalisation of these scientific artefacts. Subsequently, using these schemes, diverse automatic extraction techniques have been proposed to streamline the knowledge discovery and exploration process in EBM. In this paper, we present a Machine Learning approach that aims to classify sentences according to the PIBOSO scheme. We use a discriminative set of features that do not rely on any external resources to achieve results comparable to the state of the art. A corpus of 1000 structured and unstructured abstracts - i.e., the NICTA-PIBOSO corpus - is used for training and testing. Our best CRF classifier achieves a micro-average F-score of 90.74% and 87.21%, respectively, over structured and unstructured abstracts, which represents an increase of 25.48 percentage points and 26.6 percentage points in F-score when compared to the best existing approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of dietary supplementation with Agaricales mushrooms and other medicinal fungi on breast cancer: evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho Garbi; Valadares, Fabiana; Reis, Mariana Campos; Gonçalves, Daniella Rodrigues; Menezes, Marilia da Cunha

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women. The most frequent therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disease are chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, and surgery. Conventional pharmacological treatments cause many harmful side effects in patients. To improve the quality of life of breast cancer patients, researchers have sought alternative adjuvant treatment strategies. To assess the effects of fungi and other basidiomycetes Agaricales on the co-adjuvant treatment of breast cancer, we conducted a literary review of the available scientific evidence. We selected articles published in refereed journals from 1990 to 2011 in Medline, Lilacs, CAPES, Scielo, and Pubmed. Articles written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed. We used the following descriptors: Agaricales, medicinal mushroom/fungus, breast cancer, dietary supplementation, synonyms, and related terms. The pharmacological effects of nutritional and medicinal mushrooms have been reported in several experimental clinical studies and have shown promising results in the adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Adjuvant treatment with mushrooms is associated with improvements in the immunological and hematologic parameters of breast cancer, as well as in the quality of life of these patients. Randomized clinical studies are needed to elucidate the possible mechanisms of action and clinical benefits of these fungi with respect to survival time, disease progression, and metastasis in breast cancer.

  18. Harmonising evidence-based medicine teaching: a study of the outcomes of e-learning in five European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulier, Regina; Hadley, Julie; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berrit; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R.; Nagy, Eva; Emparanza, Jose I.; Coppus, Sjors F. P. J.; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B.; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karen; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We developed and evaluated the outcomes of an e-learning course for evidence based medicine (EBM) training in postgraduate medical education in different languages and settings across five European countries. METHODS: We measured changes in knowledge and attitudes with well-developed

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Children and Adolescents: An Evidence-Based Medicine Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Scott N.; March, John S.; Brent, David; Albano, Anne Marie; Weersing, V. Robin; Curry, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on the cognitive-behavioral treatment of children and adolescents with anxiety and depressive disorders within the conceptual framework of evidence-based medicine. Method: The psychiatric and psychological literature was systematically searched for controlled trials applying cognitive-behavioral treatment to…

  20. Hospital doctors' self-rated skills in and use of evidence-based medicine - a questionnaire survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveri, Roberto S; Gluud, Christian; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2004-01-01

    Problems in understanding basic aspects of evidence-based medicine (EBM) may form barriers to its implementation into clinical practice. We examined hospital doctors' skills in EBM terms and related these skills to their use of information sources, critical appraisal, and implementation of EBM...

  1. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Horvath, Andrea R.; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However,

  2. Acquiring evidence-based medicine and research skills in the undergraduate medical curriculum: three different didactical formats compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, M.; de Boer, M.; Jaarsma, A. D. C.

    2014-01-01

    Medical schools have recently witnessed a call for authentic research activities that equip students with the skills required for evidence-based medicine (EBM) and research. Because it is not always possible to make such activities available as a part of the curriculum, evaluating the effectiveness

  3. Problems faced by evidence-based medicine in evaluating lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlato, Giuseppe; Giacopuzzi, Simone; Bencivenga, Maria; Morgagni, Paolo; De Manzoni, Giovanni

    2014-09-28

    Gastric cancer surgical management differs between Eastern Asia and Western countries. Extended lymphadenectomy (D2) is the standard of care in Japan and South Korea since decades, while the majority of United States patients receive at most a limited lymphadenectomy (D1). United States and Northern Europe are considered the scientific leaders in medicine and evidence-based procedures are the cornerstone of their clinical practice. However, surgeons in Eastern Asia are more experienced, as there are more new cases of gastric cancer in Japan (107898 in 2012) than in the entire European Union (81592), or in South Korea (31269) than in the entire United States (21155). For quite a long time evidence-based medicine (EBM) did not solve the question whether D2 improves long-term prognosis with respect to D1. Indeed, eastern surgeons were reluctant to perform D1 even in the frame of a clinical trial, as their patients had a very good prognosis after D2. Evidence-based surgical indications provided by Western trials were questioned, as surgical procedures could not be properly standardized. In the present study we analyzed indications about the optimal extension of lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer according to current scientific literature (2008-2012) and surgical guidelines. We searched PubMed for papers using the key words "lymphadenectomy or D1 or D2" AND "gastric cancer" from 2008 to 2012. Moreover, we reviewed national guidelines for gastric cancer management. The support to D2 lymphadenectomy increased progressively from 2008 to 2012: since 2010 papers supporting D2 have achieved a higher overall impact factor than the other papers. Till 2011, D2 was the procedure of choice according to experts' opinion, while three meta-analyses found no survival advantage after D2 with respect to D1. In 2012-2013, however, two meta-analyses reported that D2 improves prognosis with respect to D1. D2 lymphadenectomy was proposed as the standard of care for advanced gastric cancer by

  4. Pulmonary artery catheters in the critically ill. An overview using the methodology of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A B; Doig, G S; Sibbald, W J

    1996-10-01

    Evidence-based approaches to assessing the clinical literature are used increasingly in issues relating to critical care medicine. As we discussed previously, this approach attempts to provide a logical and convenient framework from which the quality and relevance of clinical studies may be assessed in an unbiased manner. An evidence-based approach also allows the reader to differentiate between solid evidence and evidence that is based on a presumed mechanism, standard practice, or conventional wisdom. Evidence-based medicine that deemphasizes intuition, unsystemic clinical experience, and pathophysiologic rationale is sufficient grounds for clinical decision making and stresses the examination of evidence from clinical research. Importantly, it is the objective nature by which the evidence-based medicine paradigm approaches the questions of "What are we doing" and "How can we do better," that causes health care providers and funding agencies to increasingly adopt this paradigm as a primary principle. The role of evidence-based medicine, therefore, is not to discount expert opinion but, wherever possible, to require that recommendations be based on the results of rigorous and controlled scientific study. We introduced this article by highlighting the growing imbalance between resources and patient needs in the critical care environment. At the level of diagnostic technology and therapeutic care plans, critical care professionals increasingly are asked to identify strategies to improve efficiencies-approaches with rigorous costs that at the same time promote better patient care. Formalized technology assessment is one of the mechanisms to accomplish this. Using critical appraisal within the context of evidence-based medicine is one of the mechanisms by which data can be synthesized to describe technology assessment. In this example, we used controversies surrounding use of pulmonary artery catheterization in critically ill patients to highlight some of the

  5. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA KARIMIAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researchermade questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001. The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001. However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones. Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should

  6. Numeracy among trainees: are we preparing physicians for evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy V; Abbasi, Ammara; Schoenberg, Evan D; Kellum, Rachel; Speake, Lisa DeAnn; Spiker, Christopher; Foust, Anna; Kreps, Alexandra; Ritenour, Chad W M; Brawley, Otis W; Master, Viraj A

    2014-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based medicine, all physicians who communicate with patients need numerical literacy (numeracy). Single-institution studies suggest imperfect numeracy among medical students. Therefore, we sought to examine numeracy and understanding of risk analysis among medical students and surgical residents at several institutions. Following a validated 3-item numeracy questionnaire, 308 medical students and 50 surgical residents from 4 institutions were asked whether they would recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for a patient based on presented survival data. Main outcome measures included numeracy, understanding of risk with a question requiring simple calculation of risk reduction, and confidence in understanding risk reduction using a Likert score (0 = no confidence and 7 = complete confidence). Binary logistic regression analysis identified predictors of misunderstanding of risk and Pearson correlation coefficients measured differences in confidence by level of training and numeracy. Students across institutions did not differ demographically and were grouped by educational level. Of all participants, 69.0% had perfect basic numeracy (score = 3), with no significant difference in numeracy across training levels (p = 0.433). Mean (standard deviation) confidence in recommending treatment increased from 4.5 (1.6) for first-year medical students to 4.8 (1.1) for fourth-year medical students, and 4.9 (1.5) for surgical residents (p = 0.580). Controlling for other demographics, poorly numerate students had a 7-fold increased likelihood (odds ratio: 7.330; 95% confidence interval: 1.384-38.809) of misunderstanding risk compared with more numerate students. A significant number of students at various levels of medical training lack numeracy skills, which increases misunderstanding and miscommunication of risk that can be communicated to patients and families. This deficiency could potentially affect patient safety and care. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  7. Teaching of evidence-based medicine to medical students in Mexico: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Mendiola Melchor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is an important competency for the healthcare professional. Experimental evidence of EBM educational interventions from rigorous research studies is limited. The main objective of this study was to assess EBM learning (knowledge, attitudes and self-reported skills in undergraduate medical students with a randomized controlled trial. Methods The educational intervention was a one-semester EBM course in the 5th year of a public medical school in Mexico. The study design was an experimental parallel group randomized controlled trial for the main outcome measures in the 5th year class (M5 EBM vs. M5 non-EBM groups, and quasi-experimental with static-groups comparisons for the 4th year (M4, not yet exposed and 6th year (M6, exposed 6 months to a year earlier groups. EBM attitudes, knowledge and self-reported skills were measured using Taylor’s questionnaire and a summative exam which comprised of a 100-item multiple-choice question (MCQ test. Results 289 Medical students were assessed: M5 EBM=48, M5 non-EBM=47, M4=87, and M6=107. There was a higher reported use of the Cochrane Library and secondary journals in the intervention group (M5 vs. M5 non-EBM. Critical appraisal skills and attitude scores were higher in the intervention group (M5 and in the group of students exposed to EBM instruction during the previous year (M6. The knowledge level was higher after the intervention in the M5 EBM group compared to the M5 non-EBM group (pd=0.88 with Taylor's instrument and 3.54 with the 100-item MCQ test. M6 Students that received the intervention in the previous year had a knowledge score higher than the M4 and M5 non-EBM groups, but lower than the M5 EBM group. Conclusions Formal medical student training in EBM produced higher scores in attitudes, knowledge and self-reported critical appraisal skills compared with a randomized control group. Data from the concurrent groups add validity evidence to the

  8. Teaching of evidence-based medicine to medical students in Mexico: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important competency for the healthcare professional. Experimental evidence of EBM educational interventions from rigorous research studies is limited. The main objective of this study was to assess EBM learning (knowledge, attitudes and self-reported skills) in undergraduate medical students with a randomized controlled trial. Methods The educational intervention was a one-semester EBM course in the 5th year of a public medical school in Mexico. The study design was an experimental parallel group randomized controlled trial for the main outcome measures in the 5th year class (M5 EBM vs. M5 non-EBM groups), and quasi-experimental with static-groups comparisons for the 4th year (M4, not yet exposed) and 6th year (M6, exposed 6 months to a year earlier) groups. EBM attitudes, knowledge and self-reported skills were measured using Taylor’s questionnaire and a summative exam which comprised of a 100-item multiple-choice question (MCQ) test. Results 289 Medical students were assessed: M5 EBM=48, M5 non-EBM=47, M4=87, and M6=107. There was a higher reported use of the Cochrane Library and secondary journals in the intervention group (M5 vs. M5 non-EBM). Critical appraisal skills and attitude scores were higher in the intervention group (M5) and in the group of students exposed to EBM instruction during the previous year (M6). The knowledge level was higher after the intervention in the M5 EBM group compared to the M5 non-EBM group (p<0.001, Cohen's d=0.88 with Taylor's instrument and 3.54 with the 100-item MCQ test). M6 Students that received the intervention in the previous year had a knowledge score higher than the M4 and M5 non-EBM groups, but lower than the M5 EBM group. Conclusions Formal medical student training in EBM produced higher scores in attitudes, knowledge and self-reported critical appraisal skills compared with a randomized control group. Data from the concurrent groups add validity evidence to the study

  9. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine Skills through a Residency-Developed Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, John; Smucny, John; Patil, Anita; Tudiver, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Describes a curriculum intended to culminate in a resident-produced, evidence-based guideline for the care of patients with diabetes. Evaluation of the curriculum showed that learners appreciated the skills and knowledge gained in devising guidelines in an evidence-based manner but were uncertain that their searches were complete. Clinical…

  10. Get the Diagnosis: an evidence-based medicine collaborative Wiki for diagnostic test accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Kohlberg, Gavriel D

    2017-04-01

    Despite widespread calls for its use, there are challenges to the implementation of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in clinical practice. In response to the challenges of finding timely, pertinent information on diagnostic test accuracy, we developed an online, crowd-sourced Wiki on diagnostic test accuracy called Get the Diagnosis (GTD, http://www.getthediagnosis.org). Since its launch in November 2008 till October 2015, GTD has accumulated information on 300 diagnoses, with 1617 total diagnostic entries. There are a total of 1097 unique diagnostic tests with a mean of 5.4 tests (range 0-38) per diagnosis. 73% of entries (1182 of 1617) have an associated sensitivity and specificity and 89% of entries (1432 of 1617) have associated peer-reviewed literature citations. Altogether, GTD contains 474 unique literature citations. For a sample of three diagnoses, the search precision (percentage of relevant results in the first 30 entries) in GTD was 100% as compared with a range of 13.3%-63.3% for PubMed and between 6.7% and 76.7% for Google Scholar. GTD offers a fast, precise and efficient way to look up diagnostic test accuracy. On three selected examples, GTD had a greater precision rate compared with PubMed and Google Scholar in identifying diagnostic test information. GTD is a free resource that complements other currently available resources. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. The effect of an evidence-based medicine course on medical student critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Danhua; Chen, Yanling; Zhou, Qin; Xie, Hong; Chen, Jin; Li, Youping

    2017-11-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) was designed to foster student critical thinking (CT) while conveying knowledge to them. Chinese medical schools have adopted EBM to a varying degree but studies to examine its intended effect are few. This study evaluates the effect of an EBM course on Chinese medical student CT. A total of 158 medical students at a Chinese medical school took a seven-category Chinese version of the critical thinking disposition inventory (CTDI-CV) before and after taking an EBM course. Two-tailed, paired t-test measured the course effect. Undergraduate (BS) students showed a significant mean difference (MD) in confidence (MD = 1.43, P = 0.025), inquisitiveness (MD = 1.23, P = 0.041), and overall score (MD = 3.45, P = 0.000). Graduate (MS) students showed a more significant mean difference in confidence (MD = 2.72, P = 0.006). Moreover, BS student course grade was correlated with truth-seeking (r = 0.214, P = 0.029) and open-mindedness (r = 0.246, P = 0.012) while that of MS student was correlated with systematicity (r = 0.295, P = 0.031) and overall score (r = 0.290, P = 0.033). The results indicate some positive effect of an EBM course on student CT due to embedded CT elements in delivering the content. The discrepancy between a higher admission test score and weaker confidence shown by MS students reveals a drawback of the test centered Chinese education system. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Factors associated with medical student clinical reasoning and evidence based medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Kamei, Robert; Chan, Kenneth; Goh, Sok-Hong; Lek, Ngee

    2015-11-08

    To identify the factors associated with medical students' clinical reasoning (CR) use and evidence-based medicine (EBM) use in the clinical setting. Our cross-sectional study surveyed 44 final-year medical students at an emerging academic medical center in Singapore. We queried the students' EBM and CR value and experiences in the classroom and clinical settings. We compared this to their perceptions of supervisors' value and experiences using t-tests. We developed measures of teaching culture and practice culture by combining relevant questions into summary scores. Multivariate linear regression models were applied to identify factors associated with the students' CR and EBM clinical use. Eighty-nine percent of students responded (n=39). Students reported valuing CR (p=0.03) and EBM (p=0.001) more than their supervisors, but practiced these skills similarly (p=0.83; p=0.82). Clinical practice culture and classroom CR experience were independently associated with students' CR clinical use (p=0.05; p=0.04), and classroom EBM experience was independently associated with students' EBM clinical use (p=0.03). Clinical teaching culture was not associated with students' CR and EBM clinical use. Our study found that medical students' classroom experience and the clinical practice culture influenced their CR and EBM use. The clinical teaching culture did not. These findings suggest that in order to increase student CR and EBM use, in addition to providing classroom experience, medical educators may need to change the hospital culture by encouraging supervisors to use these skills in their clinical practice.

  13. Experiences with a clinical reasoning and evidence-based medicine course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthi, Arpana; Lek, Ngee; Chan, Kenneth; Kamei, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical reasoning (CR) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) are taught in some medical schools, the curricular details and students' clinical use of these skills are unknown. A detailed description of, and student experiences with, a practical CR and EBM curriculum delivering recommended content and pedagogy in an emerging academic environment may be broadly informative. To describe and characterise student experiences with a CR and EBM curriculum at a newly formed Academic Medical Centre (AMC). Applying expert recommended content and pedagogy, we developed a CR and EBM curriculum for final-year medical students delivered by existing clinical faculty members. We evaluated the course content by delineating the CR elements and EBM steps taught, and characterised student CR and EBM classroom and clinical experiences using a self-reported survey (1, strongly disagree; 5, strongly agree). Clinical faculty members, presenting real cases using active learning techniques, delivered all six recommended CR elements and three EBM steps throughout the course. Thirty-nine (89%) students completed a survey and agreed that the course added value to their clinical practice (3.90). Students agreed that they practised CR in the classroom (3.93) and in the clinical setting (3.78) similarly (p = 0.21). Their agreement differed for EBM practice (classroom 3.78, clinical 3.35; p = 0.002). Exploring factors that inhibit the application of EBM in a clinical setting [is] important Our curriculum addressed recommended CR and EBM elements, used clinical faculty members efficiently and was valued by students. Although our students practised these skills in the classroom and the clinical setting, exploring factors that inhibit the application of EBM in a clinical setting will be important in optimising both student learning and patient care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Evaluating primary care doctors' evidence-based medicine skills in a busy clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Shachak, Aviv; Linn, Shai; Brezis, Mayer; Reis, Shmuel

    2007-08-01

    To date, primary care doctors' (PCDs) evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills have rarely been studied. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate PCDs' practical EBM skills and to determine risk markers associated with these skills. The study sample consisted of 70 PCDs (70.7% response rate) practising in a busy urban setting from a large health maintenance organization. Participants were given a short validated questionnaire gauging attitudes, barriers, online medical resources utilization, as well as demographic and personal characteristics. Additionally, doctors completed an online and written exam evaluating their ability to formulate clinical questions, and retrieve medical information efficiently. Data analysis was performed using both bivariate and multivariate analysis (linear regression). PCDs found it difficult to formulate clinical questions both in the written and online exam, mostly neglecting to mention the Patient and Comparison components of PICO (patient, intervention, comparison and outcome). Search strategies primarily dispensed with the use of MeSH terms, ignoring appropriate limits. Doctors final scores were low (score = 41.5/100, SD = 16.2). In bivariate analysis clinical experience was negatively correlated with the final score (r = -0.36, P = 0.01), and specialists' scores were significantly higher than general practitioners' scores (46.7/100 and 31.5/100 respectively, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, doctors specialization was the only statistically significant predictor of the final score (B = 12.74, P = 0.002), while controlling for participating in a prior EBM course. This study emphasizes the need for enhancing PCDs practical EBM skills. Future research and interventions should focus on this population emphasizing the specific needs of subpopulations (i.e. general practitioners and doctors without previous EBM training).

  15. Knowledge and Attitudes of Oman Medical Specialty Board Residents towards Evidence-Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Wahaibi, Aiman; Adawi, Saada Al; Shehhi, Wafa Al; Rizvi, Syed Gauhar A; Al-Kemyani, Nasser; Al-Amrani, Khalfan; Al-Khabori, Murtadha

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of Oman Medical Specialty Board (OMSB) residents towards Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). This cross sectional study was conducted on all OMSB residents through a self-administered online questionnaire between October 2012 and March 2013. An electronic survey was designed to identify and determine residents' knowledge and attitudes toward the use of EBM. The survey was completed by 93 (21%) OMSB residents, 76 (82%) of whom took part in continuing education courses and 50 (54%) belonged to professional practice-oriented organizations. On average, the residents were reportedly involved in patient care for approximately 70% (Standard Deviation [SD] 17%) of their time, while 14% (SD 12%) participated in research activities. The results showed that 53 respondents (57%) were competent users of medical search engines compared to 23 residents (25%) who rated their skills as neutral. Sixteen percent of the respondents strongly agreed and 46% only agreed that the facility supports the use of current research in practice. Fourteen percent strongly agreed and fifty-three percent only agreed that the foundation of EBM is part of OMSB academic preparation. On the other hand, 17% of the respondents thought that insufficient time is always a barrier against EBM, while another 27% perceived insufficient time as a usual barrier. The lack of information resources was reported to always be a barrier in 11% of the respondents while 32% thought that it usually acts as a barrier. Time constraints and skills in EBM were found to be the two major obstacles. This study was, however, limited by the low response rate of the survey; thus larger studies with a previously validated questionnaire should be conducted in the future.

  16. The first center for evidence-based medicine in Lithuania: an opportunity to change culture and improve clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinortas, Tumas; Bauza, Karolis; Howick, Jeremy; Nunan, David; Mahtani, Kamal Ram

    2015-05-01

    In post-Soviet countries, where medical practice largely relies on experience alone, the incorporation of the best research evidence in clinical practice is limited. In order to promote the awareness and utilization of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among Lithuanian doctors, we organized EBM conferences in each of the two Lithuanian medical schools. More than 500 medical professionals and students attended the conferences in Vilnius (2013) and Kaunas (2014) demonstrating that there is a high demand for formal EBM teaching. Building on the success of these seminal conferences, and to start addressing the lack of EBM practice in the country, the first Lithuanian Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine was established at Vilnius University Medical Faculty in 2014. The Centre will focus on the implementation of EBM teaching in medical school curriculum, formulating management guidelines, writing systematic reviews and supporting Lithuanian authors in doing so. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support evidence-based practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I R; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Sluiter, Judith K; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2009-01-30

    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs) to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM practice. Thirty-six OPs from ten countries, planning to attend an EBM course and to a large extent recruited via the European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM), participated in a cross-sectional study. Research and development institutes, and knowledge products and tools are used by respectively more than 72% and more than 80% of the OPs and they are rated as being important for EBM practice (more than 65 points (range 0-100)). Conventional knowledge access facilities, like traditional libraries, are used often (69%) but are rated as less important (46.8 points (range 0-100)) compared to the use of more novel facilities, like question-and-answer facilities (25%) that are rated as more important (48.9 points (range 0-100)). To solve cases, OPs mostly use non evidence-based sources. However, they regard the evidence-based sources that are not often used, e.g. the Cochrane library, as important enablers for practising EBM. The main barriers are lack of time, payment for full-text articles, language barrier (most texts are in English), and lack of skills and support. This first exploratory study shows that OPs use many knowledge infrastructure facilities and rate them as being important for their EBM practice. However, they are not used to use evidence-based sources in their practice and face many barriers that are comparable to the barriers physicians face in primary health care.

  18. Do knowledge infrastructure facilities support Evidence-Based Practice in occupational health? An exploratory study across countries among occupational physicians enrolled on Evidence-Based Medicine courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dijk Frank JH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is an important method used by occupational physicians (OPs to deliver high quality health care. The presence and quality of a knowledge infrastructure is thought to influence the practice of EBM in occupational health care. This study explores the facilities in the knowledge infrastructure being used by OPs in different countries, and their perceived importance for EBM practice. Methods Thirty-six OPs from ten countries, planning to attend an EBM course and to a large extent recruited via the European Association of Schools of Occupational Medicine (EASOM, participated in a cross-sectional study. Results Research and development institutes, and knowledge products and tools are used by respectively more than 72% and more than 80% of the OPs and they are rated as being important for EBM practice (more than 65 points (range 0–100. Conventional knowledge access facilities, like traditional libraries, are used often (69% but are rated as less important (46.8 points (range 0–100 compared to the use of more novel facilities, like question-and-answer facilities (25% that are rated as more important (48.9 points (range 0–100. To solve cases, OPs mostly use non evidence-based sources. However, they regard the evidence-based sources that are not often used, e.g. the Cochrane library, as important enablers for practising EBM. The main barriers are lack of time, payment for full-text articles, language barrier (most texts are in English, and lack of skills and support. Conclusion This first exploratory study shows that OPs use many knowledge infrastructure facilities and rate them as being important for their EBM practice. However, they are not used to use evidence-based sources in their practice and face many barriers that are comparable to the barriers physicians face in primary health care.

  19. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  20. Evidence-based policymaking is not like evidence-based medicine, so how far should you go to bridge the divide between evidence and policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Paul; Oliver, Kathryn

    2017-04-26

    There is extensive health and public health literature on the 'evidence-policy gap', exploring the frustrating experiences of scientists trying to secure a response to the problems and solutions they raise and identifying the need for better evidence to reduce policymaker uncertainty. We offer a new perspective by using policy theory to propose research with greater impact, identifying the need to use persuasion to reduce ambiguity, and to adapt to multi-level policymaking systems.We identify insights from secondary data, namely systematic reviews, critical analysis and policy theories relevant to evidence-based policymaking. The studies are drawn primarily from countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. We combine empirical and normative elements to identify the ways in which scientists can, do and could influence policy.We identify two important dilemmas, for scientists and researchers, that arise from our initial advice. First, effective actors combine evidence with manipulative emotional appeals to influence the policy agenda - should scientists do the same, or would the reputational costs outweigh the policy benefits? Second, when adapting to multi-level policymaking, should scientists prioritise 'evidence-based' policymaking above other factors? The latter includes governance principles such the 'co-production' of policy between local public bodies, interest groups and service users. This process may be based primarily on values and involve actors with no commitment to a hierarchy of evidence.We conclude that successful engagement in 'evidence-based policymaking' requires pragmatism, combining scientific evidence with governance principles, and persuasion to translate complex evidence into simple stories. To maximise the use of scientific evidence in health and public health policy, researchers should recognise the tendency of policymakers to base judgements on their beliefs, and shortcuts based on their emotions

  1. A randomised controlled trial of a blended learning education intervention for teaching evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Nordin, Rusli Bin; Glasziou, Paul; Tilson, Julie K; Villanueva, Elmer

    2015-03-10

    Few studies have been performed to inform how best to teach evidence-based medicine (EBM) to medical trainees. Current evidence can only conclude that any form of teaching increases EBM competency, but cannot distinguish which form of teaching is most effective at increasing student competency in EBM. This study compared the effectiveness of a blended learning (BL) versus didactic learning (DL) approach of teaching EBM to medical students with respect to competency, self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviour toward EBM. A mixed methods study consisting of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and qualitative case study was performed with medical students undertaking their first clinical year of training in EBM. Students were randomly assigned to receive EBM teaching via either a BL approach or the incumbent DL approach. Competency in EBM was assessed using the Berlin questionnaire and the 'Assessing Competency in EBM' (ACE) tool. Students' self-efficacy, attitudes and behaviour was also assessed. A series of focus groups was also performed to contextualise the quantitative results. A total of 147 students completed the RCT, and a further 29 students participated in six focus group discussions. Students who received the BL approach to teaching EBM had significantly higher scores in 5 out of 6 behaviour domains, 3 out of 4 attitude domains and 10 out of 14 self-efficacy domains. Competency in EBM did not differ significantly between students receiving the BL approach versus those receiving the DL approach [Mean Difference (MD)=-0.68, (95% CI-1.71, 0.34), p=0.19]. No significant difference was observed between sites (p=0.89) or by student type (p=0.58). Focus group discussions suggested a strong student preference for teaching using a BL approach, which integrates lectures, online learning and small group activities. BL is no more effective than DL at increasing medical students' knowledge and skills in EBM, but was significantly more effective at increasing student

  2. Comparison of residents' approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Zahra; Kojuri, Javad; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Mahboudi, Ali; Saber, Mahboobeh; Amini, Mitra; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one's experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researcher-made questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents' viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals' viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents' decision-making approaches (pbased, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (pevidence-based ones.  To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should develop more in the medical departments.

  3. Medical School Librarians Need More Training to Support their Involvement in Evidence Based Medicine Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn Conway

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe the self-perceived role of librarians in developing evidence based medicine (EBM curricula and identify their current and desired level of training to support these activities. Design – Multi-institutional qualitative study. Setting – Nine medical schools in Canada and the United States of America. Subjects – Nine librarians identified by medical school faculty as central to the provision of EBM training for medical students at their institution. Methods – The researchers designed a semi-structured interview schedule based on a review of the literature and their own experiences as librarians teaching EBM. The topics covered were; librarians’ perceptions of their roles in relation to the curriculum, the training required to enable them to undertake these roles, and their professional development needs. The interviews were conducted by telephone and then audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The authors present five main themes; curricular design, curricular deployment, curricular assessment, educational training, and professional development. Profiles were developed for each participant based on the latter two themes and from this information common characteristics were identified. Main Results – The participants described the importance of collaboration with faculty and student bodies when designing a curriculum. Information literacy instruction and specifically literature searching and forming a research question were taught by all of the participants to facilitate curricular deployment. Some of the librarians were involved or partly involved in curricular assessment activities such as formulating exam questions or providing feedback on assignments. Educational training of participants varied from informal observation to formal workshops offered by higher education institutions. All librarians indicated a willingness to partake in professional development focused on teaching and EBM. The subjects

  4. What kind of evidence is it that Evidence-Based Medicine advocates want health care providers and consumers to pay attention to?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes R Brian

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1992, Evidence-Based Medicine advocates proclaimed a "new paradigm", in which evidence from health care research is the best basis for decisions for individual patients and health systems. Hailed in New York Times Magazine in 2001 as one of the most influential ideas of the year, this approach was initially and provocatively pitted against the traditional teaching of medicine, in which the key elements of knowing for clinical purposes are understanding of basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease coupled with clinical experience. This paper reviews the origins, aspirations, philosophical limitations, and practical challenges of evidence-based medicine. Discussion EBM has long since evolved beyond its initial (misconception, that EBM might replace traditional medicine. EBM is now attempting to augment rather than replace individual clinical experience and understanding of basic disease mechanisms. EBM must continue to evolve, however, to address a number of issues including scientific underpinnings, moral stance and consequences, and practical matters of dissemination and application. For example, accelerating the transfer of research findings into clinical practice is often based on incomplete evidence from selected groups of people, who experience a marginal benefit from an expensive technology, raising issues of the generalizability of the findings, and increasing problems with how many and who can afford the new innovations in care. Summary Advocates of evidence-based medicine want clinicians and consumers to pay attention to the best findings from health care research that are both valid and ready for clinical application. Much remains to be done to reach this goal.

  5. Oral examination and charting: setting the basis for evidence-based medicine in the oral examination of equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert

    2013-08-01

    The oral examination is performed in equids to assess and monitor oral health status, provide diagnoses, and determine efficacy of treatments. While there is currently insufficient scientific material of adequate quality to enable evidence-based medicine in equine dentistry, this by no means negates the clinician's responsibility to provide oral health care in a scientific and ethical manner. To do so requires that the clinician be knowledgable and skilled in dentistry and general medicine, that each case upholds the principles of scientific method, and that data is gathered and appraised in an objective, precise, consistent, uniform, and reliable manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integrating the Principles of Evidence Based Medicine and Evidence Based Public Health: Impact on the Quality of Patient Care and Hospital Readmission Rates in Jordan

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    Mohammad S. Alyahya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital readmissions impose not only an extra burden on health care systems but impact patient health outcomes. Identifying modifiable behavioural risk factors that are possible causes of potentially avoidable readmissions can lower readmission rates and healthcare costs. Methods: Using the core principles of evidence based medicine and public health, the purpose of this study was to develop a heuristic guide that could identify what behavioural risk factors influence hospital readmissions through adopting various methods of analysis including regression models, t-tests, data mining, and logistic regression. This study was a retrospective cohort review of internal medicine patients admitted between December 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 at King Abdullah University Hospital, in Jordan. Results: 29% of all hospitalized patients were readmitted during the study period. Among all readmissions, 44% were identified as potentially avoidable. Behavioural factors including smoking, unclear follow-up and discharge planning, and being non-compliant with treatment regimen as well as discharge against medical advice were all associated with increased risk of avoidable readmissions. Conclusion: Implementing evidence based health programs that focus on modifiable behavioural risk factors for both patients and clinicians would yield a higher response in terms of reducing potentially avoidable readmissions, and could reduce direct medical costs.

  7. Caring for patients with kidney disease: shifting the paradigm from evidence-based medicine to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Ann M; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Bowling, Christopher Barrett

    2016-03-01

    The last several decades have witnessed the emergence of evidence-based medicine as the dominant paradigm for medical teaching, research and practice. Under an evidence-based approach, populations rather than individuals become the primary focus of investigation. Treatment priorities are largely shaped by the availability, relevance and quality of evidence and study outcomes and results are assumed to have more or less universal significance based on their implications at the population level. However, population-level treatment goals do not always align with what matters the most to individual patients-who may weigh the risks, benefits and harms of recommended treatments quite differently. In this article we describe the rise of evidence-based medicine in historical context. We discuss limitations of this approach for supporting real-world treatment decisions-especially in older adults with confluent comorbidity, functional impairment and/or limited life expectancy-and we describe the emergence of more patient-centered paradigms to address these limitations. We explain how the principles of evidence-based medicine have helped to shape contemporary approaches to defining, classifying and managing patients with chronic kidney disease. We discuss the limitations of this approach and the potential value of a more patient-centered paradigm, with a particular focus on the care of older adults with this condition. We conclude by outlining ways in which the evidence-base might be reconfigured to better support real-world treatment decisions in individual patients and summarize relevant ongoing initiatives. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. RELM: developing a serious game to teach evidence-based medicine in an academic health sciences setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2015-01-01

    Gaming as a means of delivering online education continues to gain in popularity. Online games provide an engaging and enjoyable way of learning. Gaming is especially appropriate for case-based teaching, and provides a conducive environment for adult independent learning. With funding from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Pacific Northwest Region (NN/LM PNR), the University of Washington (UW) Health Sciences Library, and the UW School of Medicine are collaborating to create an interactive, self-paced online game that teaches players to employ the steps in practicing evidence-based medicine. The game encourages life-long learning and literacy skills and could be used for providing continuing medical education.

  9. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...

  10. Pattern Search in Multi-structure Data: A Framework for the Next-Generation Evidence-based Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Ainsworth, Keela C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledge-bases) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and address the following questions (i) How can we jointly analyze both qualitative and quantitative data ? (ii) Is the fusion of multi-structure data expected to provide better insights than either of them individually ? We present experiments on two bio-medical data sets - mammography and traumatic brain studies to demonstrate architectures and tools for evidence-pattern search.

  11. TarNet: An Evidence-Based Database for Natural Medicine Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Hu

    Full Text Available Complex diseases seriously threaten human health. Drug discovery approaches based on "single genes, single drugs, and single targets" are limited in targeting complex diseases. The development of new multicomponent drugs for complex diseases is imperative, and the establishment of a suitable solution for drug group-target protein network analysis is a key scientific problem that must be addressed. Herbal medicines have formed the basis of sophisticated systems of traditional medicine and have given rise to some key drugs that remain in use today. The search for new molecules is currently taking a different route, whereby scientific principles of ethnobotany and ethnopharmacognosy are being used by chemists in the discovery of different sources and classes of compounds.In this study, we developed TarNet, a manually curated database and platform of traditional medicinal plants with natural compounds that includes potential bio-target information. We gathered information on proteins that are related to or affected by medicinal plant ingredients and data on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. TarNet includes in-depth information on both plant-compound-protein relationships and PPIs. Additionally, TarNet can provide researchers with network construction analyses of biological pathways and protein-protein interactions (PPIs associated with specific diseases. Researchers can upload a gene or protein list mapped to our PPI database that has been manually curated to generate relevant networks. Multiple functions are accessible for network topological calculations, subnetwork analyses, pathway analyses, and compound-protein relationships.TarNet will serve as a useful analytical tool that will provide information on medicinal plant compound-affected proteins (potential targets and system-level analyses for systems biology and network pharmacology researchers. TarNet is freely available at http://www.herbbol.org:8001/tarnet, and detailed tutorials on the

  12. [Evidence-based Medicine online for young doctors - a randomised controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergold, Martin; Strametz, Reinhard; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Khan, Khalid S; Zamora, Javier; Moll, Peter; Weberschock, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Medicine (EbM) was originally developed as a teaching tool for young doctors, but in Germany the last surveys among residents in 2009 and 2011 demonstrated that, across all topics, the largest deficits were seen in the field of EbM. One reason may be a deficit in customised offers for continuing medical education in EbM. In a randomised controlled trial with a wait-control design we investigated a possible gain in knowledge and the acceptance of an online course in EbM for first-year residents. All first-year residents at the Hospital of the Goethe University in Frankfurt received the offer to voluntarily take part in an online EbM course. The tutored course consisted of five modules according to the five steps of EbM, each module being complemented by practical tasks. The participants were randomised via telephone to the course right away or after a three-month waiting period. The primary endpoint (i.e., knowledge) was tested via two sets of 13 multiple choice questions before and after the course and after 6 and 12 months. The participants were asked to subjectively evaluate the course by using an A-F grading system and to semiquantitatively assess its level of difficulty; they were also asked to evaluate the usefulness of its content in their clinical setting. 114 out of the 120 randomised participants took part. After 3 months the immediate intervention group (n=58) achieved a median of 10 (95 % confidence interval 10 to 11) correct answers following the course, whereas the waiting intervention group only received a median of 4 (95% confidence interval 4 to 5) correct answers after the three month waiting period (p ≤ 0.0001). The median gain in knowledge for both groups throughout the course was 5 correct answers (p ≤ 0.0001), and this proved to remain constant within a twelve month period. Six months after the course, this course was rated as clinically useful by 96.4 % of the participants, and 38.1% stated that they would volunteer

  13. The Precautionary Principle, Evidence-Based Medicine, and Decision Theory in Public Health Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alastair J.; Ghelardi, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The precautionary principle (PP) has been used in the evaluation of the effectiveness and/or cost-effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent future harms in a range of activities, particularly in the area of the environment. Here, we provide details of circumstances under which the PP can be applied to the topic of harm reduction in Public Health. The definition of PP that we use says that the PP reverses the onus of proof of effectiveness between an intervention and its comparator when the intervention has been designed to reduce harm. We first describe the two frameworks used for health-care evaluation: evidence-based medicine (EBM) and decision theory (DT). EBM is usually used in treatment effectiveness evaluation, while either EBM or DT may be used in evaluating the effectiveness of the prevention of illness. For cost-effectiveness, DT is always used. The expectation in Public Health is that interventions employed to reduce harm will not actually increase harm, where “harm” in this context does not include opportunity cost. That implies that an intervention’s effectiveness can often be assumed. Attention should therefore focus on its cost-effectiveness. This view is consistent with the conclusions of DT. It is also very close to the PP notion of reversing the onus of proof, but is not consistent with EBM as normally practiced, where the onus is on showing a new practice to be superior to usual practice with a sufficiently high degree of certainty. Under our definitions, we show that where DT and the PP differ in their evaluation is in cost-effectiveness, but only for decisions that involve potential catastrophic circumstances, where the nation-state will act as if it is risk-averse. In those cases, it is likely that the state will pay more, and possibly much more, than DT would allow, in an attempt to mitigate impending disaster. That is, the rules that until now have governed all cost-effectiveness analyses are shown not to apply to catastrophic

  14. Automated confidence ranked classification of randomized controlled trial articles: an aid to evidence-based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, Neil R; McDonagh, Marian S; Yu, Clement; Adams, Clive E; Davis, John M; Yu, Philip S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: For many literature review tasks, including systematic review (SR) and other aspects of evidence-based medicine, it is important to know whether an article describes a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Current manual annotation is not complete or flexible enough for the SR process. In this work, highly accurate machine learning predictive models were built that include confidence predictions of whether an article is an RCT. Materials and Methods: The LibSVM classifier was used with forward selection of potential feature sets on a large human-related subset of MEDLINE to create a classification model requiring only the citation, abstract, and MeSH terms for each article. Results: The model achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.973 and mean squared error of 0.013 on the held out year 2011 data. Accurate confidence estimates were confirmed on a manually reviewed set of test articles. A second model not requiring MeSH terms was also created, and performs almost as well. Discussion: Both models accurately rank and predict article RCT confidence. Using the model and the manually reviewed samples, it is estimated that about 8000 (3%) additional RCTs can be identified in MEDLINE, and that 5% of articles tagged as RCTs in Medline may not be identified. Conclusion: Retagging human-related studies with a continuously valued RCT confidence is potentially more useful for article ranking and review than a simple yes/no prediction. The automated RCT tagging tool should offer significant savings of time and effort during the process of writing SRs, and is a key component of a multistep text mining pipeline that we are building to streamline SR workflow. In addition, the model may be useful for identifying errors in MEDLINE publication types. The RCT confidence predictions described here have been made available to users as a web service with a user query form front end at: http://arrowsmith.psych

  15. The paradox of non-evidence based, publicly funded complementary alternative medicine in the English National Health Service: An explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Maria K

    2015-10-01

    Despite the unproven effectiveness of many practices that are under the umbrella term 'complementary alternative medicine' (CAM), there is provision of CAM within the English National Health Service (NHS). Moreover, although the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was established to promote scientifically validated medicine in the NHS, the paradox of publicly funded, non-evidence based CAM can be explained as linked with government policy of patient choice and specifically patient treatment choice. Patient choice is useful in the political and policy discourse as it is open to different interpretations and can be justified by policy-makers who rely on the traditional NHS values of equity and universality. Treatment choice finds expression in the policy of personalised healthcare linked with patient responsibilisation which finds resonance in the emphasis CAM places on self-care and self-management. More importantly, however, policy-makers also use patient choice and treatment choice as a policy initiative with the objective of encouraging destabilisation of the entrenched healthcare institutions and practices considered resistant to change. This political strategy of system reform has the unintended, paradoxical consequence of allowing for the emergence of non-evidence based, publicly funded CAM in the NHS. The political and policy discourse of patient choice thus trumps evidence based medicine, with patients that demand access to CAM becoming the unwitting beneficiaries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 'A local habitation and a name': how narrative evidence-based medicine transforms the translational research paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Rishi K; Charon, Rita; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Fullilove, Mindy T; Devlin, Michael J; Falzon, Louise; Wyer, Peter C

    2008-10-01

    We propose narrative evidence-based medicine as a necessary elaboration of the NIH translational research roadmap. The roadmap defined two complex obstacles, T1 and T2, to the progress of research from the 'bench' or basic laboratory science to the 'bedside' or clinical application, the traversal of which requires emergence of complex transformative relationships between the parties and stakeholders. It fails to encompass patient interactions, hesitancies and alliances with medical care. We suggest a third transformative or translational step, T3, that begins at the point that practitioners have themselves elected to adopt and recommend strategies and interventions based on high-level evidence and guidelines. In our model, T3 encompasses all aspects of care that converge on the practitioner-patient relationship and ultimately determine what therapies and choices patients actually make regarding their care. Learning from the biopsychosocial model, patient-centred care and shared decision making while attending to the ethical injunction of Emmanuel Levinas to know the other, we have developed a medical practice and theory that unites the local and specific concerns of narrative medicine with the generalizability and power of evidence-based medicine. We offer innovative approaches to study, teach and improve the therapeutic intimacy and integrative effectiveness of the practitioner-patient relationship.

  17. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  18. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Radiotherapy for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatani, Masashi [Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Radiation therapy is the first choice of treatment for early pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, especially those of the glotic larynx and nasopharynx. For advanced lesions without distant metastasis, more intensive treatments, i.e., chemoradiotherapy, multiple fractions per day, and conformal radiotherapy are introduced to improve local control and survival. However, the level of evidence-based medicine is different for each treatment modality. In this review, recent reports of radiotherapy for pharyngeal and laryngeal cancer are introduced from the point of view of the evidence level. (author)

  19. Ethics and evidence-based medicine: fallibility and responsibility in clinical science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Kenneth W

    2003-01-01

    ... to their "clinical judgment." This tension- between efforts to make medical practice more scientific and the suspicions of many clinicians- has caused one of the greatest practical and ethical challenges in the history of the health professions. This incisive book reviews the history and conceptual origins of evidence-based practice and discusses ...

  20. Clinical Epidemiology (CE) and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) in the Asia Pacific region (Round Table Forum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Bulgiba, Awang M; Sampatanukul, Pichet; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Chang, Peter; Tharyan, Prathap; Lin, Vivian; Wong, Yut Lin

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Epidemiology (CE) and Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) have become increasingly important in an era of rising costs, patient safety concerns and evidence-based health care. CE and EBM research in the Asia Pacific region have grown significantly. However, there are three main challenges such as linking evidence to practice and policy; developing a strong collaborative network; and a need for resources and technical expertise to produce evidence. The Cochrane Collaboration is a possible solution to resolve above challenges identified, particularly the challenge of transforming evidence to practice. In addition, training can be carried out to enhance technical expertise in the region and there is also the promising potential that collaborations could extend beyond systematic reviews. To improve the adoption of evidence-based health policy, selection of the best evidence for the right audience and focusing on the relevant issues through appropriate methodology are essential. Information on effectiveness and cost effectiveness needs to be highlighted for policy makers. The way forward to strengthen research and capacity building is to establish the Asia Pacific Consortium for CE and EBM. The consortium would help to create mutually rewarding scientific research and collaborations that will augur well for advances in CE and EBM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Marketing authorisation of new medicines in the EU: towards evidence-based improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putzeist, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314570500

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of continuous development of new medicines is publicly recognized, but the development of new medicines requires increasing efforts and costs. Despite regulatory initiatives to enhance marketing authorisation such as the orphan regulation and the scientific advice procedure, current

  2. Increasing utilization of Internet-based resources following efforts to promote evidence-based medicine: a national study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Hao; Kuo, Ken N; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lo, Heng-Lien; Shih, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chiehfeng; Chiu, Ya-Wen

    2013-01-07

    Since the beginning of 2007, the National Health Research Institutes has been promoting the dissemination of evidence-based medicine (EBM). The current study examined longitudinal trends of behaviors in how hospital-based physicians and nurses have searched for medical information during the spread of EBM. Cross-sectional postal questionnaire surveys were conducted in nationally representative regional hospitals of Taiwan thrice in 2007, 2009, and 2011. Demographic data were gathered concerning gender, age, working experience, teaching appointment, academic degree, and administrative position. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors and changes over time. Data from physicians and nurses were collected in 2007 (n = 1156), 2009 (n = 2975), and 2011 (n = 3999). There were significant increases in the use of four Internet-based resources - Web portals, online databases, electronic journals, and electronic books - across the three survey years among physicians and nurses (p < 0.001). Access to textbooks and printed journals, however, did not change over the 4-year study period. In addition, there were significant relationships between the usage of Internet-based resources and users' characteristics. Age and faculty position were important predictors in relation to the usage among physicians and nurses, while academic degree served as a critical factor among nurses only. Physicians and nurses used a variety of sources to look for medical information. There was a steady increase in use of Internet-based resources during the diffusion period of EBM. The findings highlight the importance of the Internet as a prominent source of medical information for main healthcare professionals.

  3. Increasing the public health impact of evidence-based interventions in behavioral medicine: new approaches and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Janke, E Amy; Kugler, Kari C; Duffecy, Jenna; Mielenz, Thelma J; St George, Sara M; Sheinfeld Gorin, Sherri N

    2017-02-01

    The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based behavioral medicine interventions into real world practice has been limited. The purpose of this paper is to discuss specific limitations of current behavioral medicine research within the context of the RE-AIM framework, and potential opportunities to increase public health impact by applying novel intervention designs and data collection approaches. The MOST framework has recently emerged as an alternative approach to development and evaluation that aims to optimize multicomponent behavioral and bio-behavioral interventions. SMART designs, imbedded within the MOST framework, are an approach to optimize adaptive interventions. In addition to innovative design strategies, novel data collection approaches that have the potential to improve the public-health dissemination include mHealth approaches and considering environment as a potential data source. Finally, becoming involved in advocacy via policy related work may help to improve the impact of evidence-based behavioral interventions. Innovative methods, if increasingly implemented, may have the ability to increase the public health impact of evidence-based behavioral interventions to prevent disease.

  4. The first ever Cochrane event in Russia and Russian speaking countries - Cochrane Russia Launch - Evidence-based medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziganshina, Liliya Eugenevna; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's second International Conference QiQUM 2015 on Cochrane evidence for health policy, which was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical or other health industry, bringing together 259 participants from 11 countries and 13 regions of the Russian Federation. The Conference...... was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in Evidence-based medicine, health and pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation, and the World Health Organization. Participants discussed the professional and social problems arising from biased health information, unethical pharmaceutical promotion......, misleading reporting of clinical trials with consequent flaws in health care delivery and the role of Cochrane evidence for informed decisions and better health. The first in history Cochrane workshop, facilitated jointly by experts from Cochrane and the WHO, with 40 participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan...

  5. The necessity for clinical reasoning in the era of evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniderman, Allan D; LaChapelle, Kevin J; Rachon, Nikodem A; Furberg, Curt D

    2013-10-01

    Clinical decisions are increasingly driven by evidence-based recommendations of guideline groups, which aim to be based on the highest quality knowledge-randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. Although RCTs provide the best assessment of the overall value of a therapy, high-quality evidence from RCTs is often incomplete, contradictory, or absent even in areas that have been most exhaustively studied. Moreover, the likelihood of the success or failure of a therapy is not identical in all the individuals treated in any trial because therapy is not the only determinant of outcome. Therefore, the overall results of a trial cannot be assumed to apply to any particular individual, not even someone who corresponds to all the entry criteria for the trial. In addition, the potential for bias due to financial conflicts remains in many guideline groups. Guidelines are key sources of knowledge. Nevertheless, limitations in the extent, quality, generalizability, and transferability of evidence mean that we clinicians must still reason through the best choices for an individual because even in the absence of full and secure knowledge, clinical decisions must still be made. Clinical reasoning is the pragmatic, tried-and-true process of expert clinical problem solving that does value mechanistic reasoning and clinical experience as well as RCTs and observational studies. Clinicians must continue to value clinical reasoning if our aim is the best clinical care for all the individuals we treat. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Meta-analysis as the core of evidence-based behavioral medicine: tools and pitfalls of a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Kriston, Levente; Rief, Winfried

    2010-03-01

    Meta-analyses have a significant impact on clinical decision-making. In behavioral medicine, they are regularly used to derive clinical practice guidelines. Owing to an increasing complexity of data integration methods used, their interpretation has become a challenge to clinicians and researchers. This review aims to provide an accessible introduction to recent advances in the methodology and reporting style of quantitative reviews within the field of behavioral medicine. Meta-analytical findings are sensitive to the precise methods used. State-of-the-art criteria for reporting of clinical trials and meta-analyses have been put forward. Further adaptations of these criteria result from recent meta-analyses of the placebo effect in clinical trials. There is a need to carefully develop and evaluate methods to deal with patient dropout and missing data. Useful methods to evaluate diagnostic test accuracy and meta-analytically evaluate direct and indirect treatment comparisons have recently been developed. In the interdisciplinary field of behavioral medicine, meta-analyses are applied to evaluate interventions, diagnostic instruments, and procedures, and to derive evidence-based treatment recommendations. Criteria to improve reporting quality and methods to control for potential biases have been adapted to meet the requirements of research in behavioral medicine today.

  7. Evidence Based Medicine; Positive and Negative Likelihood Ratios of Diagnostic Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baratloo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the previous two parts of educational manuscript series in Emergency, we explained some screening characteristics of diagnostic tests including accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. In the 3rd  part we aimed to explain positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR as one of the most reliable performance measures of a diagnostic test. To better understand this characteristic of a test, it is first necessary to fully understand the concept of sensitivity and specificity. So we strongly advise you to review the 1st part of this series again. In short, the likelihood ratios are about the percentage of people with and without a disease but having the same test result. The prevalence of a disease can directly influence screening characteristics of a diagnostic test, especially its sensitivity and specificity. Trying to eliminate this effect, LR was developed. Pre-test probability of a disease multiplied by positive or negative LR can estimate post-test probability. Therefore, LR is the most important characteristic of a test to rule out or rule in a diagnosis. A positive likelihood ratio > 1 means higher probability of the disease to be present in a patient with a positive test. The further from 1, either higher or lower, the stronger the evidence to rule in or rule out the disease, respectively. It is obvious that tests with LR close to one are less practical. On the other hand, LR further from one will have more value for application in medicine. Usually tests with 0.1 < LR > 10 are considered suitable for implication in routine practice.

  8. The Second American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Evidence-Based Medicine Assessment of Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joseph M; Brull, Richard; Horn, Jean-Louis; Liu, Spencer S; McCartney, Colin J L; Perlas, Anahi; Salinas, Francis V; Tsui, Ban Chi-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 and again in 2012, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine assembled an expert panel to assess the evidence basis for ultrasound guidance as a nerve localization tool for regional anesthesia. The 2012 panel reviewed evidence from the first advisory but focused primarily on new information that had emerged since 2009. A new section was added regarding the accuracy and reliability of ultrasound for determining needle-to-nerve proximity. Jadad scores are used to rank study quality. Grades of recommendations consistent with their level of evidence are provided. The panel offers recommendations based on synthesis and analysis of literature related to (1) the technical capabilities of ultrasound equipment and its operators, (2) comparison of ultrasound to other methods of nerve localization with regard to block characteristics, (3) comparison of block techniques where ultrasound is the sole nerve localization modality, and (4) major complications. Assessment of evidence strength and recommendations are made for upper- and lower-extremity, truncal, neuraxial, and pediatric blocks. Scientific evidence from the past 5 years has clarified and strengthened our understanding of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia as a nerve localization tool. High-level evidence supports ultrasound guidance contributing to superior characteristics with selected blocks, although absolute differences with the comparator technique are often relatively small (especially for upper-extremity blocks). The clinical meaningfulness of these differences is likely of variable importance to individual practitioners. The use of ultrasound significantly reduces the risk of local anesthetic systemic toxicity as well as the incidence and intensity of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, but has no significant effect on the incidence of postoperative neurologic symptoms. WHAT'S NEW IN THIS UPDATE?: This evidence-based assessment of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia reviews findings

  9. [Web, workshops, e-learning for Quality improvement. An Evidence-based Medicine educational programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabensteiner, Veronika; Hofer, Brigitte; Meier, Horand; De Fiore, Luca

    2007-03-01

    EBM is 15 years old. At present the main challenge seems to be to overcome the problems that prevent EBM from being widely adopted by physicians, nurses, and health managers. Several methods for teaching and learning EBM have been evaluated and an open debate on their efficacy is underway. EBM teaching must be considered as a preliminary step to the continuing medical education process and a prerequisite of continuing professional development aimed to making learning relational, ethical, and managerial skills easier. The Continuing Medical Education Office of the Autonomous Province of Bozen, Italy, started an educational programme aimed at disseminating the evidence-based approach in healthcare. Hospital doctors, general practitioners, nurses, psychologists and health managers must gain, apply, integrate, and share evidence-based knowledge in order to improve patient health. This paper reports the encouraging preliminary results of the Project, and explains the relevance of sharing and accessing a virtual medical library, integrated by consistent e-learning courses and by a series of educational meetings among a small number of participants. It also describes the next steps for completing the educational project.

  10. Vulvar postoperative care, gestalt or evidence based medicine? A comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Alon D; Robinson, Christine

    2017-05-01

    This paper reviews all current literature for vulvar postoperative care, and forms a summary of evidence based practice. Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINHAL, Web of Science Core Collection, PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, clinicaltrials.gov and Medline databases were searched. Various combinations of key-terms were used to identify relevant articles. All identified primary research articles and review articles were then examined with their references in order to identify further relevant studies. The literature was examined within gynecology, gynecologic oncology, surgical oncology, urology, plastic surgery and dermatology. A total of 199 studies were reviewed and 80 were included in this paper. All relevant studies pertaining to the subject were included. Studies were excluded if there was no relevance to the review as deemed by both authors. There remains much room for improvement to minimize postoperative stay, decrease the chances of morbidity and improve patient outcome and satisfaction, while establishing standardized care pathways. Further research and clinical trials are needed in this area to help us to provide evidence-based care to our postoperative vulvar patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Navigation Guide—Evidence-Based Medicine Meets Environmental Health: Integration of Animal and Human Evidence for PFOA Effects on Fetal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustas, Erica; Sutton, Patrice; Johnson, Paula I.; Atchley, Dylan S.; Sen, Saunak; Robinson, Karen A.; Axelrad, Daniel A.; Woodruff, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Navigation Guide is a novel systematic review method to synthesize scientific evidence and reach strength of evidence conclusions for environmental health decision making. Objective: Our aim was to integrate scientific findings from human and nonhuman studies to determine the overall strength of evidence for the question “Does developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affect fetal growth in humans?” Methods: We developed and applied prespecified criteria to systematically and transparently a) rate the quality of the scientific evidence as “high,” “moderate,” or “low”; b) rate the strength of the human and nonhuman evidence separately as “sufficient,” “limited,” “moderate,” or “evidence of lack of toxicity”; and c) integrate the strength of the human and nonhuman evidence ratings into a strength of the evidence conclusion. Results: We identified 18 epidemiology studies and 21 animal toxicology studies relevant to our study question. We rated both the human and nonhuman mammalian evidence as “moderate” quality and “sufficient” strength. Integration of these evidence ratings produced a final strength of evidence rating in which review authors concluded that PFOA is “known to be toxic” to human reproduction and development based on sufficient evidence of decreased fetal growth in both human and nonhuman mammalian species. Conclusion: We concluded that developmental exposure to PFOA adversely affects human health based on sufficient evidence of decreased fetal growth in both human and nonhuman mammalian species. The results of this case study demonstrate the application of a systematic and transparent methodology, via the Navigation Guide, for reaching strength of evidence conclusions in environmental health. Citation: Lam J, Koustas E, Sutton P, Johnson PI, Atchley DS, Sen S, Robinson KA, Axelrad DA, Woodruff TJ. 2014. The Navigation Guide—evidence-based medicine meets environmental health

  12. Exploring use of images in clinical articles for decision support in evidence-based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Li, Jiang; Srinivasan, Balaji V.; Thoma, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Essential information is often conveyed pictorially (images, illustrations, graphs, charts, etc.) in biomedical publications. A clinician's decision to access the full text when searching for evidence in support of clinical decision is frequently based solely on a short bibliographic reference. We seek to automatically augment these references with images from the article that may assist in finding evidence. In a previous study, the feasibility of automatically classifying images by usefulness (utility) in finding evidence was explored using supervised machine learning and achieved 84.3% accuracy using image captions for modality and 76.6% accuracy combining captions and image data for utility on 743 images from articles over 2 years from a clinical journal. Our results indicated that automatic augmentation of bibliographic references with relevant images was feasible. Other research in this area has determined improved user experience by showing images in addition to the short bibliographic reference. Multi-panel images used in our study had to be manually pre-processed for image analysis, however. Additionally, all image-text on figures was ignored. In this article, we report on developed methods for automatic multi-panel image segmentation using not only image features, but also clues from text analysis applied to figure captions. In initial experiments on 516 figure images we obtained 95.54% accuracy in correctly identifying and segmenting the sub-images. The errors were flagged as disagreements with automatic parsing of figure caption text allowing for supervised segmentation. For localizing text and symbols, on a randomly selected test set of 100 single panel images our methods reported, on the average, precision and recall of 78.42% and 89.38%, respectively, with an accuracy of 72.02%.

  13. An evidence-based medicine audit of the ophthalmic emergency services unit of King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel; AlRajeh, Mohammed; Gikandi, Priscilla; Mousa, Ahmed

    2017-10-10

    To improve the interventions provided for patients presenting with acute ophthalmic conditions to the ophthalmic emergency unit through applying the best available evidences from quality literature for managing such conditions. A retrospective cohort study at a tertiary eye care university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, involving a two-phase audit of diagnosis-intervention was conducted. The first phase was done retrospectively for the duration from April 1 to May 30, 2014, after disseminating the results of the first phase to King Abdulaziz University Hospital ophthalmology department staff, and the second phase was done retrospectively for the duration from November 1 to December 30, 2015. The validity of outcomes was assessed through a literature search using Medline and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The participants were masked on the study objectives to avoid Hawthorne's phenomenon (prescribing bias). In the first part of the audit, 73.2% out of 355 interventions were found to be evidence based. There was notable improvement of 80.9% in the number of evidence-based interventions in the second part of the audit. This improvement was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Evidence-based medicine audit can be a helpful tool to assess the performance and can lead to quality improve of the provided care by reducing the number of medical errors and refining medical decisions and interventions.

  14. Tips for Teachers of Evidence-based Medicine: Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) and Estimating Pretest Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Thomas; Jervis, Ramiro; Wisnivesky, Juan; Keitz, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinical prediction rules (CPR) are tools that clinicians can use to predict the most likely diagnosis, prognosis, or response to treatment in a patient based on individual characteristics. CPRs attempt to standardize, simplify, and increase the accuracy of clinicians’ diagnostic and prognostic assessments. The teaching tips series is designed to give teachers advice and materials they can use to attain specific educational objectives. Educational Objectives In this article, we present 3 teaching tips aimed at helping clinical learners use clinical prediction rules and to more accurately assess pretest probability in every day practice. The first tip is designed to demonstrate variability in physician estimation of pretest probability. The second tip demonstrates how the estimate of pretest probability influences the interpretation of diagnostic tests and patient management. The third tip exposes learners to various examples and different types of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPR) and how to apply them in practice. Pilot Testing We field tested all 3 tips with 16 learners, a mix of interns and senior residents. Teacher preparatory time was approximately 2 hours. The field test utilized a board and a data projector; 3 handouts were prepared. The tips were felt to be clear and the educational objectives reached. Potential teaching pitfalls were identified. Conclusion Teaching with these tips will help physicians appreciate the importance of applying evidence to their every day decisions. In 2 or 3 short teaching sessions, clinicians can also become familiar with the use of CPRs in applying evidence consistently in everyday practice. PMID:18491194

  15. What sort of bioethical values are the evidence-based medicine and the GRADE approaches willing to deal with?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watine, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    The concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been invented by physicians mostly from English Canada, mostly from McMaster University, Ontario, Canada. The term EBM first appeared in the biomedical literature in 1991 in an article written by a prominent member of this group-Gordon Guyatt from McMaster University. The inventors of EBM have also created the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) working group, which is a prominent international organisation whose main purpose is to develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). CPGs that are based on the GRADE approach are becoming increasingly adopted worldwide, in particular by many professional or governmental organisations. This group of thinkers being thus identified, we have retrieved and read many of their publications in order to try and understand how they intend to incorporate bioethical values into their concept. The author of this little essay did also spend a few years on the internet as an active member of the GRADE group discussion list. The observations thus gathered suggest that although some of the inventors of EBM, at least Gordon Guyatt, wish to incorporate core principles of biomedical ethics into their concept (ie, non-malevolence, beneficence and maybe to a lesser extent respect for autonomy, and justice), some clarifications are still necessary in order to better understand how they intend to more explicitly incorporate bioethical values into their concept and, perhaps more importantly, into evidence-based CPGs.

  16. Introduction of evidence-based medicine in undergraduate medical curriculum for development of professional competencies in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotur, Premanath F

    2012-12-01

    Current undergraduate medical curricula in most institutions around the globe do not nurture the skills, needed for self-directed lifelong learning in medical graduates, and it needs to be reformed in such a way that the medical graduate who is trained through this reformed curriculum, possesses all the competencies of a self-directed learner. Evidence-based medicine (EBM), a new vision of physician learning which is based on continuous development and assessment of competencies needed for creating self-directed learners is to be strongly advocated for inclusion in the undergraduate medical curriculum. Clinical teaching opportunities which are available while treating patients, in outpatient clinic, operating room, and by the bedside need to be utilized to teach EBM. Medical curricula, both undergraduate and postgraduate, should incorporate both EBM and quality improvement training, and these should be taught in a holistic fashion. Evidence-based practice competency was shown to increase, regardless of whether evidence-based practice is delivered to medical students at an undergraduate or postgraduate level.Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. Introduction of EBM in undergraduate medical curriculum helps in the development of professional competencies of self-directed learners in medical students.

  17. Computer-based teaching is as good as face to face lecture-based teaching of evidence based medicine: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Khalid

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At postgraduate level evidence based medicine (EBM is currently taught through tutor based lectures. Computer based sessions fit around doctors' workloads, and standardise the quality of educational provision. There have been no randomized controlled trials comparing computer based sessions with traditional lectures at postgraduate level within medicine. Methods This was a randomised controlled trial involving six postgraduate education centres in the West Midlands, U.K. Fifty five newly qualified foundation year one doctors (U.S internship equivalent were randomised to either computer based sessions or an equivalent lecture in EBM and systematic reviews. The change from pre to post-intervention score was measured using a validated questionnaire assessing knowledge (primary outcome and attitudes (secondary outcome. Results Both groups were similar at baseline. Participants' improvement in knowledge in the computer based group was equivalent to the lecture based group (gain in score: 2.1 [S.D = 2.0] versus 1.9 [S.D = 2.4]; ANCOVA p = 0.078. Attitudinal gains were similar in both groups. Conclusion On the basis of our findings we feel computer based teaching and learning is as effective as typical lecture based teaching sessions for educating postgraduates in EBM and systematic reviews.

  18. Computer-based teaching is as good as face to face lecture-based teaching of evidence based medicine: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James; Chryssafidou, Evi; Zamora, Javier; Davies, David; Khan, Khalid; Coomarasamy, Arri

    2007-07-20

    At postgraduate level evidence based medicine (EBM) is currently taught through tutor based lectures. Computer based sessions fit around doctors' workloads, and standardise the quality of educational provision. There have been no randomized controlled trials comparing computer based sessions with traditional lectures at postgraduate level within medicine. This was a randomised controlled trial involving six postgraduate education centres in the West Midlands, U.K. Fifty five newly qualified foundation year one doctors (U.S internship equivalent) were randomised to either computer based sessions or an equivalent lecture in EBM and systematic reviews. The change from pre to post-intervention score was measured using a validated questionnaire assessing knowledge (primary outcome) and attitudes (secondary outcome). Both groups were similar at baseline. Participants' improvement in knowledge in the computer based group was equivalent to the lecture based group (gain in score: 2.1 [S.D = 2.0] versus 1.9 [S.D = 2.4]; ANCOVA p = 0.078). Attitudinal gains were similar in both groups. On the basis of our findings we feel computer based teaching and learning is as effective as typical lecture based teaching sessions for educating postgraduates in EBM and systematic reviews.

  19. A randomised-controlled trial of two educational modes for undergraduate evidence-based medicine learning in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Gabriel M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the overall evidence for the effectiveness of teaching of evidence based medicine (EBM is not strong, and the impact of cultural and societal influences on teaching method is poorly understood, we undertook a randomised-controlled trial to test the effectiveness and learning satisfaction with two different EBM teaching methods (usual teaching vs. problem based learning (PBL for undergraduate medical students. Methods A mixed methods study that included a randomised-controlled crossover trial with two intervention arms (usual teaching and PBL and a nested qualitative study with focus groups to explore student perceptions of learning and to assess the effectiveness and utility of the two teaching methods. All 129 second-year medical students at the University of Hong Kong in 2007. The main outcomes measures were attitudes towards EBM; personal application and current use of EBM; EBM knowledge; future use of EBM. Results PBL was less effective at imparting knowledge than usual teaching consisting of a lecture followed by a group tutorial. After usual teaching students showed improvement in scores for 'attitudes towards EBM', 'personal application and current use of EBM' and 'EBM knowledge, which were not evident after PBL. In contrast to the usual teaching, students found PBL difficult as they lacked the statistical knowledge necessary to support discussion, failed to understand core concepts, and lost direction. Conclusion The evidence presented here would suggest that the teaching of EBM within an Asian environment should adopt a format that facilitates both the acquisition of knowledge and encourages enquiry.

  20. A randomised-controlled trial of two educational modes for undergraduate evidence-based medicine learning in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Janice M; Schooling, C Mary; Leung, Gabriel M

    2009-09-29

    As the overall evidence for the effectiveness of teaching of evidence based medicine (EBM) is not strong, and the impact of cultural and societal influences on teaching method is poorly understood, we undertook a randomised-controlled trial to test the effectiveness and learning satisfaction with two different EBM teaching methods (usual teaching vs. problem based learning (PBL)) for undergraduate medical students. A mixed methods study that included a randomised-controlled crossover trial with two intervention arms (usual teaching and PBL) and a nested qualitative study with focus groups to explore student perceptions of learning and to assess the effectiveness and utility of the two teaching methods.All 129 second-year medical students at the University of Hong Kong in 2007.The main outcomes measures were attitudes towards EBM; personal application and current use of EBM; EBM knowledge; future use of EBM. PBL was less effective at imparting knowledge than usual teaching consisting of a lecture followed by a group tutorial. After usual teaching students showed improvement in scores for 'attitudes towards EBM', 'personal application and current use of EBM' and 'EBM knowledge, which were not evident after PBL. In contrast to the usual teaching, students found PBL difficult as they lacked the statistical knowledge necessary to support discussion, failed to understand core concepts, and lost direction. The evidence presented here would suggest that the teaching of EBM within an Asian environment should adopt a format that facilitates both the acquisition of knowledge and encourages enquiry.

  1. On-the-Job Evidence-Based Medicine Training for Clinician-Scientists of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine YL; Malick, Sadia M; Khan, Khalid S

    2013-01-01

    Clinical scientists are at the unique interface between laboratory science and frontline clinical practice for supporting clinical partnerships for evidence-based practice. In an era of molecular diagnostics and personalised medicine, evidence-based laboratory practice (EBLP) is also crucial in aiding clinical scientists to keep up-to-date with this expanding knowledge base. However, there are recognised barriers to the implementation of EBLP and its training. The aim of this review is to provide a practical summary of potential strategies for training clinician-scientists of the next generation. Current evidence suggests that clinically integrated evidence-based medicine (EBM) training is effective. Tailored e-learning EBM packages and evidence-based journal clubs have been shown to improve knowledge and skills of EBM. Moreover, e-learning is no longer restricted to computer-assisted learning packages. For example, social media platforms such as Twitter have been used to complement existing journal clubs and provide additional post-publication appraisal information for journals. In addition, the delivery of an EBLP curriculum has influence on its success. Although e-learning of EBM skills is effective, having EBM trained teachers available locally promotes the implementation of EBM training. Training courses, such as Training the Trainers, are now available to help trainers identify and make use of EBM training opportunities in clinical practice. On the other hand, peer-assisted learning and trainee-led support networks can strengthen self-directed learning of EBM and research participation among clinical scientists in training. Finally, we emphasise the need to evaluate any EBLP training programme using validated assessment tools to help identify the most crucial ingredients of effective EBLP training. In summary, we recommend on-the-job training of EBM with additional focus on overcoming barriers to its implementation. In addition, future studies evaluating the

  2. Pediatric Online Evidence-Based Medicine Assignment Is a Novel Effective Enjoyable Undergraduate Medical Teaching Tool: A SQUIRE Compliant Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Magd A; Elmahdy, Hesham Nabeh; Khalifa, Nour El Deen Mahmoud; El-Deen, Mohamed Hamed Nasr; Lotfi, Mohamed Amr N

    2015-07-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is delivered through a didactic, blended learning, and mixed models. Students are supposed to construct an answerable question in PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework, acquire evidence through search of literature, appraise evidence, apply it to the clinical case scenario, and assess the evidence in relation to clinical context. Yet these teaching models have limitations especially those related to group work, for example, handling uncooperative students, students who fail to contribute, students who domineer, students who have personal conflict, their impact upon progress of their groups, and inconsistent individual acquisition of required skills. At Pediatrics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, we designed a novel undergraduate pediatric EBM assignment online system to overcome shortcomings of previous didactic method and aimed to assess its effectiveness by prospective follow-up during academic years 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. The novel web-based online interactive system was tailored to provide sequential single and group assignments for each student. Single assignment addressed a specific case scenario question, while group assignment was teamwork that addressed different questions of same case scenario. Assignment comprised scholar content and skills. We objectively analyzed students' performance by criterion-based assessment and subjectively by anonymous student questionnaire. A total of 2879 were enrolled in 5th year Pediatrics Course consecutively, of them 2779 (96.5%) logged in and 2554 (88.7%) submitted their work. They were randomly assigned to 292 groups. A total of 2277 (89.15%) achieved ≥ 80% of total mark (4/5), of them 717 (28.1%) achieved a full mark. A total of 2178 (85.27%) and 2359 (92.36%) made evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in single and group assignment, respectively (P < 0.001). A total of 1102 (43.1%) answered student questionnaire, of them 898

  3. On-the-Job Evidence-Based Medicine Training for Clinician-Scientists of the Next Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Elaine Yl; Malick, Sadia M; Khan, Khalid S

    2013-08-01

    Clinical scientists are at the unique interface between laboratory science and frontline clinical practice for supporting clinical partnerships for evidence-based practice. In an era of molecular diagnostics and personalised medicine, evidence-based laboratory practice (EBLP) is also crucial in aiding clinical scientists to keep up-to-date with this expanding knowledge base. However, there are recognised barriers to the implementation of EBLP and its training. The aim of this review is to provide a practical summary of potential strategies for training clinician-scientists of the next generation. Current evidence suggests that clinically integrated evidence-based medicine (EBM) training is effective. Tailored e-learning EBM packages and evidence-based journal clubs have been shown to improve knowledge and skills of EBM. Moreover, e-learning is no longer restricted to computer-assisted learning packages. For example, social media platforms such as Twitter have been used to complement existing journal clubs and provide additional post-publication appraisal information for journals. In addition, the delivery of an EBLP curriculum has influence on its success. Although e-learning of EBM skills is effective, having EBM trained teachers available locally promotes the implementation of EBM training. Training courses, such as Training the Trainers, are now available to help trainers identify and make use of EBM training opportunities in clinical practice. On the other hand, peer-assisted learning and trainee-led support networks can strengthen self-directed learning of EBM and research participation among clinical scientists in training. Finally, we emphasise the need to evaluate any EBLP training programme using validated assessment tools to help identify the most crucial ingredients of effective EBLP training. In summary, we recommend on-the-job training of EBM with additional focus on overcoming barriers to its implementation. In addition, future studies evaluating the

  4. The Cochrane collaboration – the role in the evolution of evidence-based medicine and development of cooperation in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperny, Magdalena; Leśniak, Wiktoria; Jankowski, Miłosz; Bała, Małgorzata

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an approach to decision making on the basis of the reliable and up to date best evidence. EBM is regarded as the gold standard all over the world. Cochrane Collaboration is one of the institutions, which promote EBM among physicians, policy makers and other health care workers. Cochrane Collaboration is international non-profit organization bringing together people from all over the world, the aim of which is to create and disseminate reliable scientific information. The Cochrane Collaboration develops and publishes systematic reviews on medical and diagnostic procedures. The article presents the history of the Cochrane Collaboration, the Cochrane Library and the first Cochrane Branch in Poland. Cochrane Branch in Poland is hosted by the Systematic Reviews Centre created in 2015 within the Faculty of Medicine at the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow. The authors presented the activities of the Cochrane Collaboration, the scope of activities of Polish Branch and briefly principles for the development of Cochrane systematic reviews.

  5. Systematic review of level 1 evidence for laparoscopic pediatric surgery: do our procedures comply with the requirements of evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemann, Jens; Ure, Benno M

    2013-12-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have evolved quickly in recent years and are regarded as standard procedures in pediatric surgery today. However, most studies comparing laparoscopic operations with the corresponding open procedure do not reach a high level of evidence according to the criteria of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. For evidence Level 1a, a meta-analysis (MA) of different randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is required. For evidence Level 1b, at least one RCT is required. The aim of our study was to evaluate the availability of Level 1 studies comparing laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation in pediatric surgery. Systematic review of clinical Level 1 studies using PubMed. All MA and RCT were identified and individually reviewed. Only studies comparing pediatric laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation were included. RCTs included in MA were only individually analyzed if they focused on additional endpoints. Endpoints of the study were advantages and disadvantages of laparoscopy compared with the open operation. A total of 20 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria (9 MA and 11 RCT). Studies providing evidence Level 1a were identified for five types of laparoscopic procedures (laparoscopic appendectomy, inguinal hernia repair, orchidopexy, pyloromyotomy, and varicocelectomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1b were identified for two types of laparoscopic procedures (fundoplication and pyeloplasty). The advantages of laparoscopy were less wound infections, ileus and postoperative pain (appendectomy), less retching (fundoplication), lower incidence of metachronous inguinal hernia, shorter hospital stay (appendectomy, orchiopexy, and pyeloplasty), and shorter time to full feeds (pyloromyotomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1 are only available for seven laparoscopic procedures in pediatric surgery. Effort has to be made to extend the existing Level 1 evidence and to gain high level evidence for further

  6. Medicine Based Evidence for Individualized Decision Making: Case Study of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wivel, Ashley E; Lapane, Kate; Kleoudis, Christi; Singer, Burton H; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2017-11-01

    To guide management decisions for an index patient, evidence is required from comparisons between approximate matches to the profile of the index case, where some matches contain responses to treatment and others act as controls. We describe a method for constructing clinically relevant histories/profiles using data collected but unreported from 2 recent phase 3 randomized controlled trials assessing belimumab in subjects with clinically active and serologically positive systemic lupus erythematosus. Outcome was the Systemic lupus erythematosus Responder Index (SRI) measured at 52 weeks. Among 1175 subjects, we constructed an algorithm utilizing 11 trajectory variables including 4 biological, 2 clinical, and 5 social/behavioral. Across all biological and social/behavioral variables, the proportion of responders based on the SRI whose value indicated clinical worsening or no improvement ranged from 27.5% to 42.3%. Kappa values suggested poor agreement, indicating that each biological and patient-reported outcome provides different information than gleaned from the SRI. The richly detailed patient profiles needed to guide decision-making in clinical practice are sharply at odds with the limited information utilized in conventional randomized controlled trial analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Teaching evidence-based medicine to undergraduate medical students: a course integrating ethics, audit, management and clinical epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Martin; Ashcroft, Richard; Atun, Rifat A; Freeman, George K; Jamrozik, Konrad

    2006-06-01

    A six-week full time course for third-year undergraduate medical students at Imperial College uniquely links evidence-based medicine (EBM) with ethics and the management of change in health services. It is mounted jointly by the Medical and Business Schools and features an experiential approach. Small teams of students use a problem-based strategy to address practical issues identified from a range of clinical placements in primary and secondary care settings. The majority of these junior clinical students achieve important objectives for learning about teamwork, critical appraisal, applied ethics and health care organisations. Their work often influences the care received by patients in the host clinical units. We discuss the strengths of the course in relation to other accounts of programmes in EBM. We give examples of recurring experiences from successive cohorts and discuss assessment issues and how our multi-phasic evaluation informs evolution of the course and the potential for future developments.

  8. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J; Dean, Rachel S; Massey, Andrew; Brennan, Marnie L

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  9. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene J Huntley

    Full Text Available Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9% undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%. Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%, online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%, regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7% or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%. Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286 followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286, respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7% for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6% for clinicians and PubMed (7.4% for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how

  10. International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J.; Dean, Rachel S.; Massey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these

  11. Has evidence-based medicine ever been modern? A Latour-inspired understanding of a changing EBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Sietse; Engebretsen, Eivind; Heggen, Kristin; Greenhalgh, Trish

    2017-10-01

    Evidence-based health care (EBHC), previously evidence-based medicine (EBM), is considered by many to have modernized health care and brought it from an authority-based past to a more rationalist, scientific grounding. But recent concerns and criticisms pose serious challenges and urge us to look at the fundamentals of a changing EBHC. In this paper, we present French philosopher Bruno Latour's vision on modernity as a framework to discuss current changes in the discourse on EBHC/EBM. Drawing on Latour's work, we argue that the early EBM movement had a strong modernist agenda with an aim to "purify" clinical reality into a dichotomy of objective "evidence" from nature and subjective "preferences" from human society and culture. However, we argue that this shift has proved impossible to achieve in reality. Several recent developments appear to point to a demise of purified evidence in the EBHC discourse and a growing recognition-albeit implicit and undertheorized-that evidence in clinical decision making is relentlessly situated and contextual. The unique, individual patient, not abstracted truths from distant research studies, must be the starting point for clinical practice. It follows that the EBHC community needs to reconsider the assumption that science should be abstracted from culture and acknowledge that knowledge from human culture and nature both need translation and interpretation. The implications for clinical reasoning are far reaching. We offer some preliminary principles for conceptualizing EBHC as a "situated practice" rather than as a sequence of research-driven abstract decisions. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evidence-based medicine, systematic reviews, and guidelines in interventional pain management: Part 2: Randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Smith, Howard S

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a shift in medical paradigms and about solving clinical problems, acknowledging that intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and pathophysiologic rationale are insufficient grounds for clinical decision-making. The importance of randomized trials has been created by the concept of the hierarchy of evidence in guiding therapy. Even though the concept of hierarchy of evidence is not absolute, in modern medicine, most researchers synthesizing the evidence may or may not follow the principles of EBM, which requires that a formal set of rules must complement medical training and common sense for clinicians to interpret the results of clinical research. N of 1 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been positioned as the top of the hierarchy followed by systematic reviews of randomized trials, single randomized trial, systematic review of observational studies, single observational study, physiologic studies, and unsystematic clinical observations. However, some have criticized that the hierarchy of evidence has done nothing more than glorify the results of imperfect experimental designs on unrepresentative populations in controlled research environments above all other sources of evidence that may be equally valid or far more applicable in given clinical circumstances. Design, implementation, and reporting of randomized trials is crucial. The biased interpretation of results from randomized trials, either in favor of or opposed to a treatment, and lack of proper understanding of randomized trials, leads to a poor appraisal of the quality. Multiple types of controlled trials include placebo-controlled and pragmatic trials. Placebo controlled RCTs have multiple shortcomings such as cost and length, which limit the availability for studying certain outcomes, and may suffer from problems of faulty implementation or poor generalizability, despite the study design which ultimately may not be the prime consideration when weighing evidence

  13. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015 – short version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAS-Taskforce 2015

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, twelve German medical societies published the “Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care”. Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade “A” (strong recommendation, Grade “B” (recommendation and Grade “0” (open recommendation. The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  14. Evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of delirium, analgesia, and sedation in intensive care medicine. Revision 2015 (DAS-Guideline 2015) - short version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Binder, Andreas; Biniek, Rolf; Braune, Stephan; Buerkle, Hartmut; Dall, Peter; Demirakca, Sueha; Eckardt, Rahel; Eggers, Verena; Eichler, Ingolf; Fietze, Ingo; Freys, Stephan; Fründ, Andreas; Garten, Lars; Gohrbandt, Bernhard; Harth, Irene; Hartl, Wolfgang; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Horter, Johannes; Huth, Ralf; Janssens, Uwe; Jungk, Christine; Kaeuper, Kristin Maria; Kessler, Paul; Kleinschmidt, Stefan; Kochanek, Matthias; Kumpf, Matthias; Meiser, Andreas; Mueller, Anika; Orth, Maritta; Putensen, Christian; Roth, Bernd; Schaefer, Michael; Schaefers, Rainhild; Schellongowski, Peter; Schindler, Monika; Schmitt, Reinhard; Scholz, Jens; Schroeder, Stefan; Schwarzmann, Gerhard; Spies, Claudia; Stingele, Robert; Tonner, Peter; Trieschmann, Uwe; Tryba, Michael; Wappler, Frank; Waydhas, Christian; Weiss, Bjoern; Weisshaar, Guido

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, under the guidance of the DGAI (German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine) and DIVI (German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine), twelve German medical societies published the "Evidence- and Consensus-based Guidelines on the Management of Analgesia, Sedation and Delirium in Intensive Care". Since then, several new studies and publications have considerably increased the body of evidence, including the new recommendations from the American College of Critical Care Medicine (ACCM) in conjunction with Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) from 2013. For this update, a major restructuring and extension of the guidelines were needed in order to cover new aspects of treatment, such as sleep and anxiety management. The literature was systematically searched and evaluated using the criteria of the Oxford Center of Evidence Based Medicine. The body of evidence used to formulate these recommendations was reviewed and approved by representatives of 17 national societies. Three grades of recommendation were used as follows: Grade "A" (strong recommendation), Grade "B" (recommendation) and Grade "0" (open recommendation). The result is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, evidence and consensus-based set of level 3 guidelines. This publication was designed for all ICU professionals, and takes into account all critically ill patient populations. It represents a guide to symptom-oriented prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of delirium, anxiety, stress, and protocol-based analgesia, sedation, and sleep-management in intensive care medicine.

  15. Learn, see, practice, prove, do, maintain: an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Taylor; White, Marjorie; Zaveri, Pavan; Chang, Todd; Ades, Anne; French, Heather; Anderson, JoDee; Auerbach, Marc; Johnston, Lindsay; Kessler, David

    2015-08-01

    Acquisition of competency in procedural skills is a fundamental goal of medical training. In this Perspective, the authors propose an evidence-based pedagogical framework for procedural skill training. The framework was developed based on a review of the literature using a critical synthesis approach and builds on earlier models of procedural skill training in medicine. The authors begin by describing the fundamentals of procedural skill development. Then, a six-step pedagogical framework for procedural skills training is presented: Learn, See, Practice, Prove, Do, and Maintain. In this framework, procedural skill training begins with the learner acquiring requisite cognitive knowledge through didactic education (Learn) and observation of the procedure (See). The learner then progresses to the stage of psychomotor skill acquisition and is allowed to deliberately practice the procedure on a simulator (Practice). Simulation-based mastery learning is employed to allow the trainee to prove competency prior to performing the procedure on a patient (Prove). Once competency is demonstrated on a simulator, the trainee is allowed to perform the procedure on patients with direct supervision, until he or she can be entrusted to perform the procedure independently (Do). Maintenance of the skill is ensured through continued clinical practice, supplemented by simulation-based training as needed (Maintain). Evidence in support of each component of the framework is presented. Implementation of the proposed framework presents a paradigm shift in procedural skill training. However, the authors believe that adoption of the framework will improve procedural skill training and patient safety.

  16. A randomised controlled trial of a blended learning education intervention for teaching evidence-based medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ilic, Dragan; Nordin, Rusli Bin; Glasziou, Paul; Tilson, Julie K; Villanueva, Elmer

    2015-01-01

    ...) to medical trainees. Current evidence can only conclude that any form of teaching increases EBM competency, but cannot distinguish which form of teaching is most effective at increasing student competency in EBM...

  17. Evidence-Based Medicine as a Tool for Undergraduate Probability and Statistics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, J; Humphrey, P T; Blackburn, B; Levine, J A

    2015-01-01

    Most students have difficulty reasoning about chance events, and misconceptions regarding probability can persist or even strengthen following traditional instruction. Many biostatistics classes sidestep this problem by prioritizing exploratory data analysis over probability. However, probability itself, in addition to statistics, is essential both to the biology curriculum and to informed decision making in daily life. One area in which probability is particularly important is medicine. Given the preponderance of pre health students, in addition to more general interest in medicine, we capitalized on students' intrinsic motivation in this area to teach both probability and statistics. We use the randomized controlled trial as the centerpiece of the course, because it exemplifies the most salient features of the scientific method, and the application of critical thinking to medicine. The other two pillars of the course are biomedical applications of Bayes' theorem and science and society content. Backward design from these three overarching aims was used to select appropriate probability and statistics content, with a focus on eliciting and countering previously documented misconceptions in their medical context. Pretest/posttest assessments using the Quantitative Reasoning Quotient and Attitudes Toward Statistics instruments are positive, bucking several negative trends previously reported in statistics education. © 2015 J. Masel et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. [Proposed global treatment algorithm for hallux rigidus according to evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Pérez, M; Andarcia-Bañuelos, C; de Bergua-Domingo, J; Paul, J; Barg, A; Valderrabano, V

    2014-01-01

    Hallux rigidus is the most common arthritis of the foot and ankle. There are numerous reviews on the surgical treatment, but few publications that address the effectiveness of conservative treatment. To present a comprehensive algorithm for treatment of all grades of this disease. Literature search in the following sources: Pubmed and PEDro database (physiotherapy evidence database) until October 2013 for articles on treatment hallux rigidus to record levels of evidence. A total of 112 articles were obtained on conservative treatment and 609 on surgical treatment. Finally, only 4 met the inclusion criteria. The use of orthoses or footwear modifications, infiltration with hyaluronate, cheilectomy in moderate degrees and the metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for advanced degrees, are the only procedures contrasted with grade B or moderate evidence in the treatment of hallux rigidus. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Adaptation and Validation of the Fresno Test of Competence in Evidence-Based Medicine in Doctor of Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppenrath, Valerie; Filosa, Lee Anne; Akselrod, Elizabeth; Carey, Katherine M

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To adapt and validate an instrument assessing competence in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in Doctor of Pharmacy students. Methods. The Fresno test was validated in medical residents. We adapted it for use in pharmacy students. A total of 120 students and faculty comprised the validation set. Internal reliability, item difficulty, and item discrimination were assessed. Construct validity was assessed by comparing mean total scores of students to faculty, and comparing proportions of students and faculty who passed each item. Results. Cronbach's alpha was acceptable, and no items had a low item-total correlation. All of the point-biserial correlations were acceptable. Item difficulty ranged from 0% to 60%. Faculty had higher total scores and also scored higher than students on most items, and 8 of 11 of these differences were statistically significant. Conclusion. The Pharm Fresno is a reliable and valid instrument to assess competence in EBM in pharmacy students. Future research will focus on further refining the instrument.

  20. Pattern search in multi-structure data: a framework for the next-generation evidence-based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Ainsworth, Keela C.

    2014-03-01

    With the impetus towards personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledgebase, etc.) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and answer the following questions: (i) How can we jointly analyze and explore measurement data in context with qualitative domain knowledge? (ii) How can we search and hypothesize patterns (not known apriori) from such multi-structure data? (iii) How can we build predictive models by integrating weakly-associated multi-relational multi-structure data? We propose a framework towards answering these questions. We describe a software solution that leverages hardware for scalable in-memory analytics and applies next-generation semantic query tools on medical data.

  1. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  2. Evidence-based medicine training in undergraduate medical education: a review and critique of the literature published 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; Tannery, Nancy H; Chen, H Carrie; ten Cate, Olle; O'Brien, Bridget

    2013-07-01

    To characterize recent evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational interventions for medical students and suggest future directions for EBM education. The authors searched the MEDLINE, Scopus, Educational Resource Information Center, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews databases for English-language articles published between 2006 and 2011 that featured medical students and interventions addressing multiple EBM skills. They extracted data on learner and instructor characteristics, educational settings, teaching methods, and EBM skills covered. The 20 included articles described interventions delivered in 12 countries in classroom (75%), clinic (25%), and/or online (20%) environments. The majority (60%) focused on clinical students, whereas 30% targeted preclinical students and 10% included both. EBM skills addressed included recognizing a knowledge gap (20%), asking a clinical question (90%), searching for information (90%), appraising information (85%), applying information (65%), and evaluating practice change (5%). Physicians were most often identified as instructors (60%); co-teachers included librarians (20%), allied health professionals (10%), and faculty from other disciplines (10%). Many studies (60%) included interventions at multiple points during one year, but none were longitudinal across students' tenures. Teaching methods varied. Intervention efficacy could not be determined. Settings, learner levels and instructors, teaching methods, and covered skills differed across interventions. Authors writing about EBM interventions should include detailed descriptions and employ more rigorous research methods to allow others to draw conclusions about efficacy. When designing EBM interventions, educators should consider trends in medical education (e.g., online learning, interprofessional education) and in health care (e.g., patient-centered care, electronic health records).

  3. [Evidence-based medicine in surgical practice - locating clinical studies and systematic reviews by searching the Medline database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummich, K; Jensen, K; Obst, O; Seiler, C M; Diener, M K

    2014-12-01

    Every day approximately 75 clinical trials and 11 systematic reviews are published in the health-care intervention and medical field. Due to this growing number of publications it is a challenge for every practicing clinician to keep track with the latest research. The implementation of new and effective diagnostic and therapeutic interventions into daily clinical routine may thus be delayed. Conversely, ineffective or even harmful interventions might still be in use. Decision-making in evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires consideration of the most recent high quality evidence. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are regarded as the "gold standard" to prove the efficacy of surgical interventions in patient-oriented research. Systematic reviews combine results from RCTs by summarising single RCTs which answer a particular clinical question. Some basic knowledge in systematic literature searching is required and helpful for detecting relevant publications. This article shows various possibilities for locating clinical studies and systematic reviews in the database Medline on the basis of illustrative step-by-step instructions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Depending on the aim and topic of the literature search, the time required for the task may vary. In routine practice, a systematic literature search is unrealistic in most cases. Clinicians in need of a quick update of current evidence on a certain clinical topic may make use of up-to-date systematic reviews. During a systematic literature search, different approaches and strategies might be necessary. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Self-reported use of evidence-based medicine and smoking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Good evidence exists to support the use of secondary prevention medications (aspirin, statins, beta-blockers and angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs)) and smoking cessation in patients after acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). Little is currently known about ...

  5. Evidence-based medicine: the time has come to set standards for staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirke, Phil; Cuvelier, Claude; Ensari, Arzu

    2010-01-01

    For international communication in cancer, staging systems such as TNM are essential; however, the principles and processes used to decide about changes in every new edition of TNM need to be subject to debate. Changes with major impact for patient treatment are introduced without evidence. We th...

  6. A controlled comparison study of the efficacy of training medical students in evidence-based medicine literature searching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Rana, Gurpreet K; Arndt, Theresa S

    2005-10-01

    Many educational programs seek to develop skills in evidence-based medicine (EBM). The authors examined the efficacy of teaching the EBM skill of efficiently searching the research literature. They compared students who received brief training in EBM searching skills with those who did not, and assessed the quality of literature searching one month after that training. The authors used a nonrandomized control group study design to quantify the impact of a single, brief (two-hour) instructional intervention on EBM-based techniques for searching Medline for evidence related to a clinical problem provided to the students. Ninety-two fourth-year medical students (34 intervention, 58 control) at the University of Michigan participated in a four-week EBM elective between 2001 and 2003. The authors conducted a pre-intervention assessment of searching skills, followed by a repeat assessment one month after the intervention. Search quality was judged by medical librarians using a structured clinical scenario and scoring algorithm. Data for 30 intervention and 40 control students could be analyzed. Intervention students had fewer search errors and correspondingly higher quality searches than did control students. The educational intervention accounted for approximately 8% of the variance in both of these outcomes. The most common search errors were a lack of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) explosion, missing MeSH terms, lack of appropriate limits, failure to search for best evidence, and inappropriate combination of all search concepts. This study provides evidence that a single, brief training session can have a marked beneficial effect on the quality of subsequent, short-term EBM literature searching performance outcomes.

  7. Evidence-based Draft Guideline for Prevention of Midwifery Malpractices based on Referred Cases to the Forensic Medicine Commission and the Medical Council from 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Leila; Beigi, Marjan; Valiani, Mahbube; Mardani, Fardin

    2017-01-01

    Medical errors are the main concerns in health systems, which considering their ascending rate in the recent years, especially in the field of midwifery, have caused a medical crisis. Considering the importance of evidence-based health services as a way to improve health systems, the aim of this study was to suggest a guideline for preventing malpractice in midwifery services. In this cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2013, we investigated 206 cases that were referred to the Isfahan Legal Medicine Organization and Medical Council of Forensic Medicine from 2006-2011. Data were collected by a checklist and were analyzed using SPSS-16 software. Descriptive statistical tests (mean, maximum, minimum, standard deviation, frequency, and percentage agreement) were used to describe the data. Then, we used the Delphi technique with the participation from 17 experts in midwifery, gynecology, and legal medicine to provide an evidence-based draft guideline for prevention of midwifery errors. A total of 206 cases were reviewed. In 66 cases (32%) the verdict for malpractice in midwifery services was approved. A practical draft guideline for preventing clinical errors for midwifery in the fields of pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum period was developed. This evidence-based draft guideline can improve the attention of all the healthcare providers, especially midwives and physicians to prevent urgent problems and offer effective health services for mothers and infants.

  8. Patterns of care study and evidence based medicine for radiation therapy. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences; Teshima, Teruki; Takahashi, Yutaka [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Imai, Atsushi; Inoue, Toshihiko [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Koizumi, Masahiko [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, there is little evidence of radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, we have to refer to the evidence of radiation therapy from Western countries, but we should pay attention to the differences of cultural, racial, or social background between Japan and Western countries. The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) was conducted in Japan and extramural audits were performed for 50 randomly selected institutions. Detailed information of 311 prostate cancer patients without distant metastases and other cancers, who were treated with radiation therapy in 1996-1998, was collected. In this article, the results of PCS for primary prostate cancer were shown, with a review of literature for the appropriate choice of radiation therapy. This study was supported by the Grantin-Aid for Cancer Research from Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (10-17). (author)

  9. Update on new medicinal applications of gentamicin: Evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhua Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gentamicin (GM was discovered in 1963 and was introduced into parenteral usage in 1971. Since then, GM has been widely used in medicinal applications. The Food and Drug Administration of the United States approved the routine prescription of GM to treat the following infectious disorders: infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter spp., Enterobacteriaceae spp., Pseudomonas spp.; Staphylococcus infectious disease; bacterial meningitis; bacterial sepsis of newborns; bacterial septicemia; infection of the eye, bone, skin and/or subcutaneous tissue; infective endocarditis; peritoneal dialysis–associated peritonitis due to Pseudomonas and other gram-negative organisms; peritonitis due to gastrointestinal tract infections; respiratory tract infections; and urinary tract infectious disease. GM is an old antibiotic and is used widely beyond its FDA-labeled indications as follows: actinomycotic infection; Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia with pyelonephritis; appendicitis; cystic fibrosis; diverticulitis; adjunct regimen for febrile neutropenia; female genital infection; uterine infection; postnatal infection; necrotizing enterocolitis in fetus or newborn; osteomyelitis; pelvic inflammatory disease; plague; gonorrhea; tularemia; prophylaxis of post-cholecystectomy infection, transrectal prostate biopsy, and post–tympanostomy-related infection; malignant otitis externa; and intratympanically or transtympanically for Ménière's disease. GM is also used in combination regimens, such as with beta-lactam antibiotics to treat mixed infection and with bacteriophage to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections. It is also added to medical materials, such as GM-loaded cement spacers for osteomyelitis and prosthetic joint–associated infections. Overall, there are many medicinal applications for GM. To reduce the development of GM-resistant bacteria and to maintain its effectiveness, GM should be used

  10. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Torres, Yasaira; Huang, Jordan; Mihlstin, Melanie; Juzych, Mark S; Kromrei, Heidi; Hwang, Frank S

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90%) in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90%) in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  11. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaira Rodriguez Torres

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90% in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90% in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  12. Online information on complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients: evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jutta; Senf, Bianca; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Stoll, Christoph; Prott, Franz J; Muenstedt, Karsten; Dennert, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Most websites offering online information on CAM are not helpful for them. We extracted decisive elements for online information on CAM by analyzing the literature on the information needs of cancer patients and on counseling cancer patients on CAM. Key issues for online information on CAM are the qualification of the authors, transparency and accountability of the information, description of the aims, a scientific approach, description of treatment alternatives, support for the patient-physician relationship, individualized information, a summary of the information, disclosure of funding, and the privacy policy. The communicative challenge will be to convey information without destroying hope and motivation. We suggest that CAM topics should be integrated into broader information provided on cancer (etiology, conventional treatment). By also providing information for physicians, such a website could promote shared decision-making. Online information will gain the status of independent expert knowledge if provided by a well-known scientific organization as, e.g., a national cancer society. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Acquiring evidence-based medicine and research skills in the undergraduate medical curriculum: three different didactical formats compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, M; de Boer, M; Jaarsma, A D C

    2014-11-01

    Medical schools have recently witnessed a call for authentic research activities that equip students with the skills required for evidence-based medicine (EBM) and research. Because it is not always possible to make such activities available as a part of the curriculum, evaluating the effectiveness of the various choices of traditional and authentic EBM and research skills courses is essential. This study's purpose was to evaluate students' perceived EBM and research skill acquisition in three different courses in a Dutch medical school. Self-reported surveys were conducted among 163 Dutch medical undergraduates who participated in an undergraduate research project, a basic EBM skills elective, or a traditional lecture-based skills course. MANCOVA was employed to test for group differences in perceived skill acquisition. Students who finished their research project perceived themselves as more experienced in writing and information retrieval skills than students who participated in the lecture-based course or basic skills elective. Students in the lecture-based course identified themselves as being the most experienced in critical judgment. No group differences were found for overall gains. Authentic research activities may have benefits over traditional lecture-based courses in the undergraduate medical curriculum, especially in terms of equipping students with writing and information retrieval skills.

  14. Evidence based medicine and surgical approaches for colon cancer: evidences, benefits and limitations of the laparoscopic vs open resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Laura; La Torre, Marco; Ziparo, Vincenzo; Montebelli, Francesco; Mercantini, Paolo; Balducci, Genoveffa; Ferri, Mario

    2014-04-07

    To report a meta-analysis of the studies that compared the laparoscopic with the open approach for colon cancer resection. Forty-seven manuscripts were reviewed, 33 of which employed for meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines. The results were differentiated according to the study design (prospective randomized trials vs case-control series) and according to the tumor's location. Outcome measures included: (1) short-term results (operating times, blood losses, bowel function recovery, post-operative pain, return to the oral intake, complications and hospital stay); (2) oncological adequateness (number of nodes harvested in the surgical specimens); and (3) long-term results (including the survivals' rates and incidence of incisional hernias) and (4) costs. Meta-analysis of trials provided evidences in support of the laparoscopic procedures for a several short-term outcomes including: a lower blood loss, an earlier recovery of the bowel function, an earlier return to the oral intake, a shorter hospital stay and a lower morbidity rate. Opposite the operating time has been confirmed shorter in open surgery. The same trend has been reported investigating case-control series and cancer by sites, even though there are some concerns regarding the power of the studies in this latter field due to the small number of trials and the small sample of patients enrolled. The two approaches were comparable regarding the mean number of nodes harvested and long-term results, even though these variables were documented reviewing the literature but were not computable for meta-analysis. The analysis of the costs documented lower costs for the open surgery, however just few studies investigated the incidence of post-operative hernias. Laparoscopy is superior for the majority of short-term results. Future studies should better differentiate these approaches on the basis of tumors' location and the post-operative hernias.

  15. Perceived barriers to completing an e-learning program on evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Gagnon

    2007-06-01

    Conclusions This study offers a theoretical basis to understand physicians' beliefs towards completing an internet-based continuing medical education (CME program on EBM. Based upon respondents' insights, several modifications were carried out to enhance the uptake of the program by physicians and, therefore, its implementation.

  16. Research trends in evidence-based medicine: a joinpoint regression analysis of more than 50 years of publication data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui The Hung

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM has developed as the dominant paradigm of assessment of evidence that is used in clinical practice. Since its development, EBM has been applied to integrate the best available research into diagnosis and treatment with the purpose of improving patient care. In the EBM era, a hierarchy of evidence has been proposed, including various types of research methods, such as meta-analysis (MA, systematic review (SRV, randomized controlled trial (RCT, case report (CR, practice guideline (PGL, and so on. Although there are numerous studies examining the impact and importance of specific cases of EBM in clinical practice, there is a lack of research quantitatively measuring publication trends in the growth and development of EBM. Therefore, a bibliometric analysis was constructed to determine the scientific productivity of EBM research over decades.NCBI PubMed database was used to search, retrieve and classify publications according to research method and year of publication. Joinpoint regression analysis was undertaken to analyze trends in research productivity and the prevalence of individual research methods.Analysis indicates that MA and SRV, which are classified as the highest ranking of evidence in the EBM, accounted for a relatively small but auspicious number of publications. For most research methods, the annual percent change (APC indicates a consistent increase in publication frequency. MA, SRV and RCT show the highest rate of publication growth in the past twenty years. Only controlled clinical trials (CCT shows a non-significant reduction in publications over the past ten years.Higher quality research methods, such as MA, SRV and RCT, are showing continuous publication growth, which suggests an acknowledgement of the value of these methods. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of research method publication trends in EBM.

  17. [The role of evidence-based medicine in the neurorehabilitation: the innovative technologies (a review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiakina, I V; Dobrushina, O R; Liadov, K V; Shapovalenko, T V; Romashin, O V

    2015-01-01

    The present review is focused on the randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses in the field of technological means for neurorehabilitation. The available literature data and the results of original observations provide a basis for distinguishing between the following levels of evidence: instrumental verticalization--2a, robot-assisted mechanotherapy--1a, biological feedback--1a, virtual reality--1a, transcranial magnetic stimulation--1a for central hemiparesis and 1b for speech disturbance and unilateral spatial agnosia, transcranial electrical stimulation--2b, electromyostimulation--1a, telerehabilitation--3. It is concluded that the use of the innovative technologies for the purpose of neurorehabiltation is objectively substantiated. Further investigations are needed to allow their application on an individual basis.

  18. A Strategy To Advance the Evidence Base in Palliative Medicine: Formation of a Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Noreen M.; Basch, Ethan; Bull, Janet; Cleeland, Charles S.; Currow, David C.; Fairclough, Diane; Hanson, Laura; Hauser, Joshua; Ko, Danielle; Lloyd, Linda; Morrison, R. Sean; Otis-Green, Shirley; Pantilat, Steve; Portenoy, Russell K.; Ritchie, Christine; Rocker, Graeme; Wheeler, Jane L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Kutner, Jean S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Palliative medicine has made rapid progress in establishing its scientific and clinical legitimacy, yet the evidence base to support clinical practice remains deficient in both the quantity and quality of published studies. Historically, the conduct of research in palliative care populations has been impeded by multiple barriers including health care system fragmentation, small number and size of potential sites for recruitment, vulnerability of the population, perceptions of inappropriateness, ethical concerns, and gate-keeping. Methods A group of experienced investigators with backgrounds in palliative care research convened to consider developing a research cooperative group as a mechanism for generating high-quality evidence on prioritized, clinically relevant topics in palliative care. Results : The resulting Palliative Care Research Cooperative (PCRC) agreed on a set of core principles: active, interdisciplinary membership; commitment to shared research purposes; heterogeneity of participating sites; development of research capacity in participating sites; standardization of methodologies, such as consenting and data collection/management; agile response to research requests from government, industry, and investigators; focus on translation; education and training of future palliative care researchers; actionable results that can inform clinical practice and policy. Consensus was achieved on a first collaborative study, a randomized clinical trial of statin discontinuation versus continuation in patients with a prognosis of less than 6 months who are taking statins for primary or secondary prevention. This article describes the formation of the PCRC, highlighting processes and decisions taken to optimize the cooperative group's success. PMID:21105763

  19. Joint development of evidence-based medical record by doctors and patients through integrated Chinese and Western medicine on digestive system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Gao, Hong-yang; Gao, Rui; Zhao, Ying-pan; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Tang, Xu-dong; Shang, Hong-cai

    2016-02-01

    Building the clinical therapeutic evaluation system by combing the evaluation given by doctors and patients can form a more comprehensive and objective evaluation system. A literature search on the practice of evidence-based evaluation was conducted in key biomedical databases, i.e. PubMed, Excerpt Medica Database, China Biology Medicine disc and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. However, no relevant study on the subjects of interest was identified. Therefore, drawing on the principles of narrative medicine and expert opinion from systems of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, we propose to develop and pilot-test a novel evidence-based medical record format that captures the perspectives of both patients and doctors in a clinical trial. Further, we seek to evaluate a strategic therapeutic approach that integrates the wisdom of Chinese medicine with the scientific basis of Western medicine in the treatment of digestive system disorders. Evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of remedies under the system of Chinese medicine is an imperative ongoing research. The present study intends to identify a novel approach to assess the synergistic benefits achievable from an integrated therapeutic approach combining Chinese and Western system of medicine to treat digestive system disorders.

  20. ON ROLE OF CHONDROPROTECTIVE AGENTS IN OSTEOARTHRITIS: ON THE WAY TO THE EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Jargin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine and hyaluronic acid (HA applied for the treatment of arthrosis (osteoarthritis are designated as chondroprotective agents. There is evidence in favor of their effectiveness. However, some recent reviews questioned it, while it was noticed that later publications tended to be less positive than older industry-sponsored trials. For intraarticular injections predominantly HA is used. Clinical efficacy of intraarcticular injections and significance of the difference from placebo has been questioned as well. Moreover, no plausible explanation has been found for the discrepancy between the short intraarticular half-life of injected HA and reported long duaration of the positive effect (6-9 months after a course of intraarticular injections. Chondroprotective agents are administered to osteoarthritis patients, including pensioners and citizens with low incomes, who purchase them for a prolonged use. It must be largely equivalent to recommend them, instead of peroral drugs or dietary supplements, a diet modification with consumption of more food containing natural glycosaminoglycans. More comprehensive analysis of literature is required in the process of registration of drugs and dietary supplements.

  1. Neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer: Evidence-based medicine? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Francesco; Antolino, Laura; Farcomeni, Alessio; Sirimarco, Dario; Kazemi Nava, Andrea; De Siena, Martina; Petrucciani, Niccolò; Nigri, Giuseppe; Valabrega, Stefano; Aurello, Paolo; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2017-05-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment in non-metastatic pancreatic cancer (PaC) has the theoretical advantages of downstaging the tumor, sterilizing any present systemic undetectable disease, selecting patients for surgery and administering therapy to each patient. The aim of this systematic review is to analyze the state of the art on neoadjuvant protocols for non-metastatic PaC. A literature search over the last 10 years was conducted, and papers had to be focused on resectable, borderline resectable (BLR) or locally advanced (LA) histo- or cytologically proven PaC; to be prospective studies or prospectively collected databases; to report percentage of protocol achievement and survival data at least in an intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. Twelve studies were eligible for systematic review. Studies included a total of 624 patients: 248 resectable, 268 BLR, 71 LA and 37 non-specified. All studies were included for meta-analysis. ITT overall survival (OS) was 16.7 months (95% CI 15.16-18.26 months); for resected patients OS was 22.78 months (95% CI 20.42-25.16), and for eventually non-resected patients it was 9.89 months (95% CI 8.84-10.96). Neoadjuvant approaches for resectable, BLR and LA PaC are spreading. Outcomes tend to be better outside an RCT context, but strong evidences are lacking. Actually such treatments should be performed only in a randomized clinical trial setting.

  2. Stem cell therapy: from evidence-based medicine to emotion-based medicine? The long Italian way for a scientific regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati, Paola; Frati, Giacomo; Gulino, Matteo; Montanari Vergallo, Gianluca; Di Luca, Alessandro; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-10-11

    On 23 May 2013, the Italian health minister decided to endorse a law regarding controversial stem cell-based therapies in 32 young terminally ill patients, shocking many scientists. According to the international scientific community, these therapies could be dangerous because they were not rigorously tested in humans. This decision was made after many days of media and judiciary pressure. Several lawsuits regarding stem cell-based therapies were brought before the judiciary districts of different Italian regions. We analyzed the Italian legal context regarding the field of pharmaceutical and medical devices, including the European Union trend. A national database - commonly used to manage legal materials for professional or educational purposes or both - was used to find relevant legal cases involving stem cell-based therapies. Stem cell-based therapies endorsed by the new Italian law have been the subject of an important discussion not only in the scientific community but also in various courts. We found several legal actions filed by parents in order to make stem cells available to their young children, who had serious neurodegenerative diseases. The majority of the analyzed legal disputes were settled in favor of the applicants, whereas only two decisions (Courts of Justice of Rome and Florence) rejected the complaint because of the absence of sufficient scientific data regarding stem cell-based therapies. The present Italian situation is influencing the destiny of future young patients and strongly impacting public and institutional opinion. It is a practical example of the complexity of the decision of not providing unapproved scientific stem cell-based therapies when medicine does not have any other alternative therapies.

  3. Buoyed by a Rising Tide: Information Literacy Sails into the Curriculum on the Currents of Evidence-Based Medicine and Professional Competency Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Whelan, Julia S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how information literacy efforts at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences have been supported by national trends within health science education to incorporate evidence-based medicine and problem-based learning into the curriculum. Describes effects on librarians, including requests for more instruction, creating…

  4. Effectiveness of evidence-based medicine training for undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University: a self-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiangyu; Xu, Bin; Liu, Qingyun; Zhang, Yao; Xiong, Hongyan; Li, Yafei

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of the integration of evidence-based medicine (EBM) into medical curriculum by measuring undergraduate medical students’ EBM knowledge, attitudes, personal application, and anticipated future use. Methods A self-controlled trial was conducted with 251 undergraduate students at a Chinese Military Medical University, using a validated questionnaire regarding the students’ evidence-based practice (EBP) about knowledge (EBP-K), attitude (EBP-A), personal applicat...

  5. A mandatory intercalated degree programme: revitalising and enhancing academic and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John P; Farish, Stephen; McCalman, Janet S; McColl, Geoffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment of medical graduates to research careers is declining. Expansion of medical knowledge necessitates all graduates be equipped to critically evaluate new information. To address these challenges, a mandatory intercalated degree programme was introduced as part of curriculum reform. To review the place on intercalated degrees, the methods available for learning about research and to analyse experience with a new university programme focusing on research. A literature review followed by the analysis of experience with eight cohorts of students who had completed the new programme. A total of 1599 students completed the programme. Laboratory-based research was the most common choice followed by clinical research, population health, epidemiology, medical humanities and mental health. Also, 93% of students spent over 75% of their time undertaking research. Sixty-three students published their research, half as first authors. Students and coordinators support the programme. Learning about research during the postgraduate phase is variable and frequently left to individual choice. Intercalating an additional degree focusing on research can achieve a number of learning objectives but demands a level of maturity, autonomy and preparedness, not uniformly present in students undertaking a mandatory intercalated programme. A more realistic goal is the development of 'research-mindedness' amongst all students.

  6. Evidence-based interventional pain medicine according to clinical diagnoses. 16. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijs, Frank; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Van Zundert, Jan; Faber, Catharina G; Lubenow, Timothy R; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a pain syndrome with an unclear pathophysiology and unpredictable clinical course. The disease is often therapy resistant, the natural course not always favorable. The diagnosis of CRPS is based on signs and symptoms derived from medical history and physical examination. Pharmacological pain management and physical rehabilitation of limb function are the main pillars of therapy and should be started as early as possible. If, however, there is no improvement of limb function and persistent severe pain, interventional pain management techniques may be considered. Intravenous regional blocks with guanethidine did not prove superior to placebo but frequent side effects occurred.Therefore this technique receives a negative recommendation (2 A-). Sympathetic block is the interventional treatment of first choice and has a 2 B+ rating. Ganglion stellatum (stellate ganglion) block with repeated local anesthetic injections or by radiofrequency denervation after positive diagnostic block is documented in prospective and retrospective trials in patients suffering from upper limb CRPS. Lumbar sympathetic blocks can be performed with repeated local anesthetic injections. For a more prolonged lumbar sympathetic block radiofrequency treatment is preferred over phenol neurolysis because effects are comparable whereas the risk for side effects is lower (2 B+). For patients suffering from CRPS refractory to conventional treatment and sympathetic blocks, plexus brachialis block or continuous epidural infusion analgesia coupled with exercise therapy may be tried (2 C+). Spinal cord stimulation is recommended if other treatments fail to improve pain and dysfunction (2 B+). Alternatively peripheral nerve stimulation can be considered, preferentially in study conditions (2 C+). © 2010 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  7. Understanding physicians' acceptance of the Medline system for practicing evidence-based medicine: a decomposed TPB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shin-Yuan; Ku, Yi-Cheng; Chien, Jui-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) supports physicians in their improvement of clinical quality and enhances hospitals' improvement of patient safety. Many health care institutions implement information systems to support physicians practicing EBM. However, studies exploring the antecedent factors of physicians' usage intention of information systems facilitating EBM practice are rare. Hence this study proposed a research model based on the decomposed theory of the planned behavior model (decomposed TPB) to investigate the factors influencing physicians' acceptance of the Medline system. A field survey was conducted in Taiwan to collect data from physicians with experience in using the Medline system. A valid sample of 224 physicians was collected for data analysis. Structural equation modeling using the partial least squares (PLS) method with bootstrap estimate was used to test the research model. The findings of this study show that a physician's usage intention is significantly influenced by three factors, i.e. attitude, the subjective norm, and perceived behavior control. Furthermore, these three factors can be predicted by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, interpersonal influence, personal innovativeness in IT and self-efficacy, respectively. The results of this study indicate that our research model provides an effective prediction of the intention of physicians to use the Medline system and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Awareness of the International Veterinary Profession of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine and Preferred Methods of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J.; Dean, Rachel S.; Brennan, Marnie L.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVM) is an evolving discipline in veterinary medicine so it is important to periodically “benchmark” opinion about EVM across the profession. An international survey to assess veterinarians’ awareness of EVM was conducted. Veterinarians were surveyed via an online questionnaire (all countries) or a postal questionnaire (UK only). Participants were asked whether they had heard of EVM, where they had first heard the term, and their preferences of method for receiving continuing professional development (CPD). There were 6310 respondents, of which 4579 (72.5%) worked in the UK and 5384 (85.3%) were clinicians. Veterinarians that had heard of EVM (n = 5420, 85.9%) were most likely to be clinicians (OR = 4.00; 95% CI: 3.37, 4.75), respondents working in the UK (OR = 1.32; CI: 1.13, 1.54), or respondents with a postgraduate degree or qualification (OR = 1.77; CI: 1.51, 2.08). The most common sources from which respondents had heard of EVM were at vet school or university (n = 1207, 29.8%), via literature (peer-reviewed papers or other publications) (n = 1074, 26.5%), and via CPD courses (n = 564, 13.9%). Most respondents were interested in finding out more about EVM (n = 4256 of 6173, 69%). The preferred methods of CPD were day or evening seminars (n = 2992 of 6017, 49.7%), conferences (n = 1409, 23.4%), and online courses (n = 524, 8.7%), although the order of preference differed slightly between groups. There appears to be substantial awareness of EVM amongst veterinarians internationally. However, it appears that further training in EVM would be welcomed. Preferences on how CPD in general is received differs between groups, so this should be borne in mind by training providers when formulating a strategy for the dissemination of EVM training across the global profession. PMID:29056674

  9. The Awareness of the International Veterinary Profession of Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine and Preferred Methods of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Selene J; Dean, Rachel S; Brennan, Marnie L

    2017-03-08

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVM) is an evolving discipline in veterinary medicine so it is important to periodically "benchmark" opinion about EVM across the profession. An international survey to assess veterinarians' awareness of EVM was conducted. Veterinarians were surveyed via an online questionnaire (all countries) or a postal questionnaire (UK only). Participants were asked whether they had heard of EVM, where they had first heard the term, and their preferences of method for receiving continuing professional development (CPD). There were 6310 respondents, of which 4579 (72.5%) worked in the UK and 5384 (85.3%) were clinicians. Veterinarians that had heard of EVM ( n = 5420, 85.9%) were most likely to be clinicians (OR = 4.00; 95% CI: 3.37, 4.75), respondents working in the UK (OR = 1.32; CI: 1.13, 1.54), or respondents with a postgraduate degree or qualification (OR = 1.77; CI: 1.51, 2.08). The most common sources from which respondents had heard of EVM were at vet school or university ( n = 1207, 29.8%), via literature (peer-reviewed papers or other publications) ( n = 1074, 26.5%), and via CPD courses ( n = 564, 13.9%). Most respondents were interested in finding out more about EVM ( n = 4256 of 6173, 69%). The preferred methods of CPD were day or evening seminars ( n = 2992 of 6017, 49.7%), conferences ( n = 1409, 23.4%), and online courses ( n = 524, 8.7%), although the order of preference differed slightly between groups. There appears to be substantial awareness of EVM amongst veterinarians internationally. However, it appears that further training in EVM would be welcomed. Preferences on how CPD in general is received differs between groups, so this should be borne in mind by training providers when formulating a strategy for the dissemination of EVM training across the global profession.

  10. Solarium Use and Risk for Malignant Melanoma: Meta-analysis and Evidence-based Medicine Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgard, Barbara; Schöpe, Jakob; Holzschuh, Isabel; Schiekofer, Claudia; Reichrath, Sandra; Stefan, Wagenpfeil; Pilz, Stefan; Ordonez-Mena, Jose; März, Winfried; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2018-02-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether solarium use (indoor tanning/artificial UV) may increase the risk for primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. A systematic literature search was conducted using MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science. Included studies were critically assessed regarding their risk of bias, and methodological shortcomings. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were determined according to guidelines of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Summary risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals for four different outcomes (ever exposure, exposure at younger age, high/low exposure vs. non-exposure) were derived from random-effects meta-analyses to account for possible heterogeneity across studies. Two cohort and twenty-nine case-control studies were eligible. Overall, quality of included studies was poor as a result of severe limitations, including possible recall and selection bias, and due to lack of interventional trials. Summary risk estimates suggested a weak association (odds ratio (OR)=1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.35, p=0.009) for ever-exposure to UV radiation from a solarium with melanoma risk. However, sensitivity analyses did not show an association for studies from Europe (OR=1.10; 95%CI=0.95-1.27, p=0.218), studies with low risk of bias (OR=1.15; 95%CI=0.94-1.41, p=0.179), and studies conducted after 1990 (OR 1.09; 95%CI=0.93-1.29, p=0.295). Moreover, moderate associations were found for first exposure to UV radiation from a solarium at younger age (10 sessions in lifetime) with melanoma risk. However, for all outcomes analyzed, overall study quality and resulting levels of evidence (3a-) and grades of recommendation (D) were low due to lack of interventional studies and severe limitations including unobserved or unrecorded confounding. Current scientific knowledge is mainly based on observational studies with poor quality data, which report associations but do not prove causality. At present, there is no convincing

  11. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM has become standard approach in medicine. Patients and health authorities increasingly claim active patient roles in decision making. Education to cope with these roles might be useful. We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and possible impact of EBM training courses for patient and consumer representatives. Methods We designed a generic one-week EBM course based on previous experience with EBM courses for non-medical health professionals. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure EBM skills. Formative and summative evaluation of the course comprised: 1 EBM skills; 2 individual learning goals; 3 self-reported implementation after six months using semi-structured interviews; 4 group-based feedback by content analysis. EBM skills' achievement was compared to results gathered by a group of undergraduate University students of Health Sciences and Education who had attended a comparable EBM seminar. Results Fourteen EBM courses were conducted including 161 participants without previous EBM training (n = 54 self-help group representatives, n = 64 professional counsellors, n = 36 patient advocates, n = 7 others; 71% had a higher education degree; all but five finished the course. Most participants stated personal learning goals explicitly related to practicing EBM such as acquisition of critical appraisal skills (n = 130 or research competencies (n = 67. They rated the respective relevance of the course on average with 80% (SD 4 on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100%. Participants passed the competence test with a mean score of 14.7 (SD 3.0, n = 123 out of 19.5 points. The comparison group of students achieved a mean score of 14.4 (SD 3.3, n = 43. Group-based feedback revealed increases of self confidence, empowerment through EBM methodology and statistical literacy, and acquisition of new concepts of patient information and counselling

  12. Training of patient and consumer representatives in the basic competencies of evidence-based medicine: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bettina; Steckelberg, Anke; Meyer, Gabriele; Kasper, Jürgen; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2010-02-11

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become standard approach in medicine. Patients and health authorities increasingly claim active patient roles in decision making. Education to cope with these roles might be useful. We investigated the feasibility, acceptability and possible impact of EBM training courses for patient and consumer representatives. We designed a generic one-week EBM course based on previous experience with EBM courses for non-medical health professionals. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure EBM skills. Formative and summative evaluation of the course comprised: 1) EBM skills; 2) individual learning goals; 3) self-reported implementation after six months using semi-structured interviews; 4) group-based feedback by content analysis. EBM skills' achievement was compared to results gathered by a group of undergraduate University students of Health Sciences and Education who had attended a comparable EBM seminar. Fourteen EBM courses were conducted including 161 participants without previous EBM training (n = 54 self-help group representatives, n = 64 professional counsellors, n = 36 patient advocates, n = 7 others); 71% had a higher education degree; all but five finished the course. Most participants stated personal learning goals explicitly related to practicing EBM such as acquisition of critical appraisal skills (n = 130) or research competencies (n = 67). They rated the respective relevance of the course on average with 80% (SD 4) on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100%.Participants passed the competence test with a mean score of 14.7 (SD 3.0, n = 123) out of 19.5 points. The comparison group of students achieved a mean score of 14.4 (SD 3.3, n = 43). Group-based feedback revealed increases of self confidence, empowerment through EBM methodology and statistical literacy, and acquisition of new concepts of patient information and counselling. Implementation of EBM skills was reported by 84 of the

  13. Research methodology search filters: are they effective for locating research for evidence-based veterinary medicine in PubMed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah Anne

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the effectiveness of research methodology search filters developed by Haynes and colleagues and utilized by the Clinical Query feature of PubMed for locating literature for evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). Methods: A manual review of articles published in 6 commonly read veterinary journals was conducted. Articles were classified by format (original study, review, general article, conference report, decision analysis, and case report) and purpose category (etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment). Search strategies listed in PubMed's Clinical Query feature were then tested and compared to the manually reviewed data to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and precision. Results: The author manually reviewed 914 articles to identify 702 original studies. Search #1 included terms determined to have the highest sensitivity and returned acceptable sensitivities over 75% for diagnosis and treatment. Search #2 included terms identified as providing the highest specificity and returned results with specificities over 75% for etiology, prognosis, and treatment. Discussion: The low precision for each search prompts the question: Are research methodology search filters practical for locating literature for the practice of EBVM? A study examining terms related to appropriate research methodologies for advanced clinical veterinary research is necessary to develop filters designed to locate literature for EBVM. PMID:14566380

  14. Harmonising Evidence-based medicine teaching: a study of the outcomes of e-learning in five European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello Juan B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed and evaluated the outcomes of an e-learning course for evidence based medicine (EBM training in postgraduate medical education in different languages and settings across five European countries. Methods We measured changes in knowledge and attitudes with well-developed assessment tools before and after administration of the course. The course consisted of five e-learning modules covering acquisition (formulating a question and search of the literature, appraisal, application and implementation of findings from systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions, each with interactive audio-visual learning materials of 15 to 20 minutes duration. The modules were prepared in English, Spanish, German and Hungarian. The course was delivered to 101 students from different specialties in Germany (psychiatrists, Hungary (mixture of specialties, Spain (general medical practitioners, Switzerland (obstetricians-gynaecologists and the UK (obstetricians-gynaecologists. We analysed changes in scores across modules and countries. Results On average across all countries, knowledge scores significantly improved from pre- to post-course for all five modules (p Conclusion E-learning in EBM can be harmonised for effective teaching and learning in different languages, educational settings and clinical specialties, paving the way for development of an international e-EBM course.

  15. Harmonising evidence-based medicine teaching: a study of the outcomes of e-learning in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, Regina; Hadley, Julie; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berrit; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R; Nagy, Eva; Emparanza, Jose I; Coppus, Sjors F P J; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karen; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-04-29

    We developed and evaluated the outcomes of an e-learning course for evidence based medicine (EBM) training in postgraduate medical education in different languages and settings across five European countries. We measured changes in knowledge and attitudes with well-developed assessment tools before and after administration of the course. The course consisted of five e-learning modules covering acquisition (formulating a question and search of the literature), appraisal, application and implementation of findings from systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions, each with interactive audio-visual learning materials of 15 to 20 minutes duration. The modules were prepared in English, Spanish, German and Hungarian. The course was delivered to 101 students from different specialties in Germany (psychiatrists), Hungary (mixture of specialties), Spain (general medical practitioners), Switzerland (obstetricians-gynaecologists) and the UK (obstetricians-gynaecologists). We analysed changes in scores across modules and countries. On average across all countries, knowledge scores significantly improved from pre- to post-course for all five modules (p system in their country should have its own programme of research about clinical effectiveness. E-learning in EBM can be harmonised for effective teaching and learning in different languages, educational settings and clinical specialties, paving the way for development of an international e-EBM course.

  16. Educational Needs Assessment Highlights Several Areas of Emphasis in Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine Skills to Physician Assistant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Susan; Ali, Syed Haris; Hahn, Emily

    2016-08-03

    An assessment of educational needs is essential for curricular reform in medical education. Using the conceptual framework of needs assessment, this study aimed to determine which content should be emphasized in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills to physician assistant (PA) students. Key content areas were identified from the published literature and objectives for previous courses. A questionnaire-type needs assessment instrument was created and given to a graduating class of PA students (n = 21) at the University of North Dakota. The response format had two 5-option scales, one to assess current skill levels and the other to assess ideal skill levels. Means for each category were calculated, and a mean difference analysis was performed. An average mean difference of 0.5 was noted in 3 domains (information retrieval skills, writing skills, and overall gains), and a mean difference of 0.7 was noted in one domain (statistical skills). Items with a mean difference of ≥ 0.7 were identified for prioritization for curricular reform. Open-ended input from respondents substantiated the need for greater emphasis on these content areas. Several content areas related to EBM skills can be identified and prioritized through a systematically conducted educational needs assessment. This method can be used to identify discrepancies between the existing and ideal states of affairs in PA education.

  17. Evidence-based medicine in the era of social media: Scholarly engagement through participation and online interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa; Trueger, N Seth; Roland, Damian; Thoma, Brent

    2018-01-01

    The integration of new knowledge into clinical practice continues to lag behind discovery. The use of Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) has disrupted communication between emergency physicians, making it easy for practicing clinicians to interact with colleagues from around the world to discuss the latest and highest impact research. FOAM has the potential to decrease the knowledge translation gap, but the concerns raised about its growing influence are 1) research that is translated too quickly may cause harm if its findings are incorrect; 2) there is little editorial oversight of online material; and 3) eminent online individuals may develop an outsized influence on clinical practice. We propose that new types of scholars are emerging to moderate the changing landscape of knowledge translation: 1) critical clinicians who critically appraise research in the same way that lay reviewers critique restaurants; 2) translational teachers adept with these new technologies who will work with researchers to disseminate their findings effectively; and 3) interactive investigators who engage with clinicians to ensure that their findings resonate and are applied at the bedside. The development of these scholars could build on the promise of evidence-based medicine by enhancing the appraisal and translation of research in practice.

  18. A pilot study exploring the relationship between lifelong learning and factors associated with evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Halalau, Alexandra

    2016-07-03

    To explore possible relationships between residents' lifelong learning orientation, skills in practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM), and perceptions of the environment for learning and practicing EBM. This was a pilot study with a cross-sectional survey design. Out of 60 residents in a medical residency program, 29 participated in the study. Data were collected using a survey that comprised three sections: the JeffSPLL Scale, EBM Environment Scale, and an EBM skill questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS and were reported with descriptive and inferential statistics (mean, standard deviation, Pearson's correlation, and a two-sample t-test). Mean scores on the JeffSPLL Scale were significantly correlated with perceptions of the EBM Scale and use of EBM resources to keep up to date or solve a specific patient care problem. There was a significant correlation between mean scores on the EBM Scale and hours per week spent in reading medical literature to solve a patient care problem. Two-sample t-tests show that residents with previous training in research methods had significantly higher scores on the JeffSPLL Scale (p=0.04), EBM Scale (p=0.006), and self-efficacy scale (p =0.024). Given the fact that physicians are expected to be lifelong learners over the course of their professional career, developing residents' EBM skills and creating interventions to improve specific areas in the EBM environment would likely foster residents' lifelong learning orientation.

  19. [The use of the new direct oral anticoagulants among older subjects: The limits of the evidence-based medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, T; Lang, P-O; Kaltenbach, G; Karcher, P

    2015-12-01

    The growing use of direct oral anticoagulants, in particular among older subjects, raises questions about the limits of the evidence-based medicine. The phase III studies that have validated the efficacy and the safety profile of these molecules (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in their both indications, the venous thromboembolic disease and the non-valvular atrial fibrillation raise concerns in four major fields: the financial support of pharmaceutical companies, the links of interest for many authors with the industry, the study design (exclusively non-inferiority studies), and the poor representativeness of the older subjects included. All these points are discussed, using data of sub-groups studies, post-marketing studies and recent meta-analysis. The lack of data for the very old subjects, with frailty or comorbidities, remains the main concern from these phase III studies. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The 10-D assessment and evidence-based medicine tool for authors and peer reviewers in clinical pharmacology
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Barry G; Harder, Sebastian

    2017-08-01

    Peer reviewers and authors of clinical pharmacology manuscripts need to meet the standards for Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) and Good Publication Practices (GPP), and editors of clinical pharmacology journals have to maintain an overview of the peer review process. The peer review process can be monitored and facilitated using the 10-D assessment, which comprises peer review criteria to determine if: 1. design of the study, 2. diagnoses employed, 3. drug molecules involved, 4. dosages applied, 5. data collected, 6. discussion of the findings, 7. deductions made, 8. documentation, 9. declarations, and 10. dHS (drug hypersensitivity syndrome) risk assessment is in accord with the objectives of the study and meet the requirements of EBM and GPP. The 10-D assessment tool, although easy to apply, requires a high level of clinical pharmacology expertise, especially in the fields of drug disposition, pharmacokinetics, and drug action. Its application will facilitate the peer review of clinical research and clinical trial reports and thus promote safety in drug development and pharmacotherapy and meet the needs of Good Publication Practices.
.

  1. Local development of MCQ tests for evidence-based medicine and clinical decision making can be successful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, Gerald E; Markert, Ronald J; Goggans, D Stephen; Richardson, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines for the design of multiple-choice item (MCQ) tests of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and clinical decision making (CDM) have not been published. We describe a strategy to develop an EBM/CDM MCQ test database guided by educational theory and used psychometric analyses, including reliability, validity, and item analyses, to judge the strategy's success. The internal consistency reliability of tests derived from the database was in the good-to-excellent range (0.74-0.95) and test-retest reliability was fair (0.51). One test discriminated across three levels of EBM/CDM learners (discriminant validity). Tests also predictively correlated with other medical school assessments according to theory (convergent and discriminant validity). The items were infrequently misclassified, had statistics close to historical standards, and were acceptable after no more than one round of revisions. Our strategy for developing an EBM/CDM MCQ database was successful and tests derived from it can be flexibly sampled to assess different EBM/CDM knowledge domains and three levels of EBM/CDM learners. Assuming the availability of similar resources to support its application, this strategy should be replicable at other settings.

  2. Challenges to the practice of evidence-based medicine during residents' surgical training: a qualitative study using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Montori, Victor; Devereaux, P J; Dosanjh, Sonia; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2003-11-01

    To examine surgical trainees' barriers to implementing and adopting evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the day-to-day care of surgical patients. In 2000, 28 surgical residents from various subspecialties at a hospital affiliated with McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences in Ontario, Canada, participated in a focus group (n = 8) and semistructured interviews (n = 20) to explore their perceptions of barriers to the practice of EBM during their training. Additional themes were explored, such as definitions of EBM and potential strategies to implement EBM during training. The canons and procedures of the grounded theory approach to qualitative research guided the coding and content analysis of the data derived from the focus group and semistructured interviews. Residents identified personal barriers, staff-surgeon barriers, and institutional barriers that limited their ability to apply EBM in their daily activities. Residents perceived their lack of education in EBM, time constraints, lack of priority, and fear of staff disapproval as major challenges to practicing EBM. Moreover, the lack of ready access to surgical EBM resource materials proved to be an important additional factor limiting EBM surgical practice. Residents identified several strategies to overcome these barriers to EBM, including hiring staff surgeons with EBM training, offering coursework in critical appraisal for all staff, improving interdepartmental communication, and providing greater flexibility for EBM training. Surgical residents identified a general lack of education, time constraints, lack of priority, and staff disapproval as important factors limiting incorporation of EBM. Curriculum reform and surgeon education may help overcome these barriers.

  3. Evidence-based dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chi Chi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine (EBM has become a hot topic in medical practice, education, and research. However, a large number of senior doctors did not have an opportunity to learn EBM in medical schools. Firstly, this article addresses the history of EBM and the principle of practicing EBM, i.e., asking, acquiring, appraisal, application, and auditing. Secondly, this article also provides a brief introduction to evidence-based dermatology and compares the introduction of clinical practice guidelines between Europe, the UK, and the US. Finally, this article addresses the present condition and future perspective of evidence-based dermatology in Taiwan.

  4. Teaching evidence based medicine to surgery residents-is journal club the best format? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Negar; McKenzie, Margaret E; Maclean, Anthony; Brown, Carl J; Mastracci, Tara; McLeod, Robin S

    2012-01-01

    Systematic reviews were performed to assess methods of teaching the evidence-based medicine (EBM) process and determine which format or what components of journal club appear to be most effective in teaching critical appraisal skills to surgical residents and have the highest user satisfaction. MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, AMED, PsychINFO, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Google scholar were searched to identify relevant articles. To be included, studies had to provide details about the format of their EBM curriculum or journal club and report on the effectiveness or participant satisfaction. Potentially relevant articles were independently reviewed by 2 authors and data were extracted on separate data forms. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for assessment of teaching EBM and 8 studies (including 3 in the EBM systematic review) met criteria for assessment of journal club format. Overall, study quality was poor. Only 2 studies were randomized controlled trials. Five were before-after studies, which showed significant improvement in critical appraisal skills or statistical knowledge following an EBM course or journal club. The 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared teaching EBM or critical appraisal skills in lecture format or journal club to online learning. There was no significant difference in mean scores in 1 study whereas the other reported significantly better scores in the journal club format. Four studies reported high participant satisfaction with the EBM course or journal club format. There is some evidence that courses with or without the addition of journal clubs lead to improved knowledge of the EBM process although the impact on patient care is unknown. Journal clubs seem to be the preferred way of teaching critical appraisal skills but while some components of journal clubs are favored by participants, it remains unclear which elements are most important for resident learning. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in

  5. Attitude, knowledge and behaviour towards evidence-based medicine of physical therapists, students, teachers and supervisors in the Netherlands: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Beekman-Evers, Monique S; van Boxel, Annemiek C J W; van Hemert, Sjanna; Paulis, Winifred D; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has gained widespread acceptance in physical therapy. However, because little is known about the attitudes, knowledge and behaviour of physical therapists towards EBM, and their participation in research to generate EBM, we explored these

  6. Is the Information about a Test Important? Applying the Methods of Evidence-Based Medicine to the Clinical Examination of Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbek, John C.; McCullough, Gary H.; Wertz, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    A hotly debated topic in oropharyngeal dysphagia is the Clinical Swallowing Examination's (CSE) importance in clinical practice. That debate can profit from the application of evidence-based medicine's (EBM) principles and procedures. These can guide both appropriate data collection and interpretation as will be demonstrated in the present report.…

  7. Development and Validation of a Measurement Scale to Analyze the Environment for Evidence-Based Medicine Learning and Practice by Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Fangqiong

    2010-01-01

    A growing number of residency programs are instituting curricula to include the component of evidence-based medicine (EBM) principles and process. However, these curricula may not be able to achieve the optimal learning outcomes, perhaps because various contextual factors are often overlooked when EBM training is being designed, developed, and…

  8. Medical Students' and Tutors' Experiences of Directed and Self-Directed Learning Programs in Evidence-Based Medicine: A Qualitative Evaluation Accompanying a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Peter; Oterholt, Christina; Nordheim, Lena; Bjorndal, Arild

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to interpret the results of a randomized controlled trial comparing two educational programs (directed learning and self-directed learning) in evidence-based medicine (EBM) for medical students at the University of Oslo from 2002 to 2003. There is currently very little comparative educational research in this field. In…

  9. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: the EU-EBM project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppus, Sjors F. P. J.; Emparanza, Jose I.; Hadley, Julie; Kulier, Regina; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B.; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R.; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karin; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result,

  10. Uma visão evidente da prática baseada em evidências na medicina perinatal: ausência de evidência não é evidência de ausência An evident view of evidence-based pratice in perinatal medicine: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Sola

    2007-10-01

    not be evidence. SOURCES: Books and peer-reviewed articles are quoted and listed in the bibliography. Evidence of life, learning from our own mistakes and many other evident facts that support this review are not quoted. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: 1 "Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence" and "lack of evidence of effect does not mean evidence of no effect". 2 RCTs with "negative" results and those with "positive" results, but without outcomes that matter, often cannot conclude what they conclude. 3 Non-randomized clinical trials and practical trials may be important. 4 Research to prove is different than research to improve. 5 Clinical choice must assess effects on outcomes that matter to patients and their parents. 6 Quantifying adverse outcomes, number needed to damage and to treat is not that simple. CONCLUSIONS: Significant challenges inherent to health service research must be correlated to possible clinical applications using tools to have a more "evident view of evidence-based practice" in perinatal medicine, recalling that absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  11. Radiosynoviorthesis in the reflection of Evidence-based Medicine (EbM); Die Radiosynoviorthese im Spiegel der Evidenz-basierten Medizin (EbM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampen, W.U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    This paper summarizes the literature on clinical efficacy of radiosynoviorthesis with respect to the criteria of evidence-based medicine (EbM). Each therapy has to face up to the success and the costs of other treatment modalities, especially in times of scarce financial resources of our health care system. For many physicians and scientists, evidence-based medicine, which means weighting clinical trials by several quality factors like randomization, blinding or comparison with a placebo seems to be the ''philosophers'stone'' to some extent. Concerning radiosynoviorthesis, the existence of clinical studies with a high quality according to the EbM is sometimes negated. However, this statement cannot be abided after extensive revision of the literature. The nuclear medicine physician practising radiosynoviorthesis should be provided with arguments from the literature supporting his personal experience for successful discussions with referring colleques. This is achieved by listing the respective papers especially of evidence classes Ib and IIa with a short summary of each of them. Some critical remarks on evidence-based medicine if used as the only basis of therapeutic practise complete this paper. (orig.)

  12. Health care professionals' attitudes towards evidence-based medicine in the workers' compensation setting: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbers, Nieke A; Chase, Robin; Craig, Ashley; Guy, Lyn; Harris, Ian A; Middleton, James W; Nicholas, Michael K; Rebbeck, Trudy; Walsh, John; Willcock, Simon; Lockwood, Keri; Cameron, Ian D

    2017-05-22

    Problems may arise during the approval process of treatment after a compensable work injury, which include excess paperwork, delays in approving services, disputes, and allegations of over-servicing. This is perceived as undesirable for injured people, health care professionals and claims managers, and costly to the health care system, compensation system, workplaces and society. Introducing an Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) decision tool in the workers' compensation system could provide a partial solution, by reducing uncertainty about effective treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes of health care professionals (HCP) to the potential implementation of an EBM tool in the workers' compensation setting. The study has a mixed methods design. The quantitative study consisted of an online questionnaire asking about self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviour to EBM in general. The qualitative study consisted of interviews about an EBM tool being applied in the workers' compensation process. Participants were health care practitioners from different clinical specialties. They were recruited through the investigators' clinical networks and the workers' compensation government regulator's website. Participants completing the questionnaire (n = 231) indicated they were knowledgeable about the evidence-base in their field, but perceived some difficulties when applying EBM. General practitioners reported having the greatest obstacles to applying EBM. Participants who were interviewed (n = 15) perceived that an EBM tool in the workers' compensation setting could potentially have some advantages, such as reducing inappropriate treatment, or over-servicing, and providing guidance for clinicians. However, participants expressed substantial concerns that the EBM tool would not adequately reflect the impact of psychosocial factors on recovery. They also highlighted a lack of timeliness in decision making and proper assessment, particularly in

  13. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  14. Systematic review of efficacy for manual lymphatic drainage techniques in sports medicine and rehabilitation: an evidence-based practice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Giampietro L; Miller, Sayers John; McBrier, Nicole M; Buckley, William E

    2009-01-01

    Manual therapists question integrating manual lymphatic drainage techniques (MLDTs) into conventional treatments for athletic injuries due to the scarcity of literature concerning musculoskeletal applications and established orthopaedic clinical practice guidelines. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide manual therapy clinicians with pertinent information regarding progression of MLDTs as well as to critique the evidence for efficacy of this method in sports medicine. We surveyed English-language publications from 1998 to 2008 by searching PubMed, PEDro, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and SPORTDiscus databases using the terms lymphatic system, lymph drainage, lymphatic therapy, manual lymph drainage, and lymphatic pump techniques. We selected articles investigating the effects of MLDTs on orthopaedic and athletic injury outcomes. Nine articles met inclusion criteria, of which 3 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We evaluated the 3 RCTs using a validity score (PEDro scale). Due to differences in experimental design, data could not be collapsed for meta-analysis. Animal model experiments reinforce theoretical principles for application of MLDTs. When combined with concomitant musculoskeletal therapy, pilot and case studies demonstrate MLDT effectiveness. The best evidence suggests that efficacy of MLDT in sports medicine and rehabilitation is specific to resolution of enzyme serum levels associated with acute skeletal muscle cell damage as well as reduction of edema following acute ankle joint sprain and radial wrist fracture. Currently, there is limited high-ranking evidence available. Well-designed RCTs assessing outcome variables following implementation of MLDTs in treating athletic injuries may provide conclusive evidence for establishing applicable clinical practice guidelines in sports medicine and rehabilitation.

  15. An evidence-based medicine curriculum implemented in journal club improves resident performance on the Fresno test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Stoltze, Andrew J; Harland, Karisa K; Van Heukelom, Jon N; Hogrefe, Christopher P; Ahmed, Azeemuddin

    2015-02-01

    Journal club is a standard component of residency education. Journal club focuses on review and interpretation of the medical literature with varying degrees of evidence-based medicine (EBM) education. To evaluate learning of EBM principles with an EBM curriculum implemented as a component of journal club. EBM competency was established using the Fresno test, a validated 12-question instrument of short-answer and essay-style questions to assess competency in EBM. An EBM curriculum was implemented that consisted of a focus on EBM topics (e.g., study validity, bias, confidence intervals, search strategies) using a structured journal club format using a peer instruction model. The Fresno test was used prior to and after the implementation of the first year of this curriculum to measure effectiveness of the intervention. A hierarchical multivariable model using generalized estimating equations was used to account for repeated measures in the primary outcome of change in total Fresno test score. The total test scores did not increase significantly (105.4 vs. 120.9, p = 0.058) in the before-after analysis. The only subscore showing improvement was interpretation of study validity (32.1 vs. 40.4 points, p = 0.03). Attendance was significantly associated with Fresno test score, with those attending ≥ 6/11 sessions (55%) scoring 28.2 points higher (p = 0.003), and those attending fewer than six sessions scoring only 1.9 points higher (p = 0.81) than in the preintervention group. An EBM curriculum implemented as part of journal club improves performance on the Fresno test among residents who attended at least six journal club sessions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of clinical maturity on competency in evidence-based medicine: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Dragan; Diug, Basia

    2016-09-01

    To identify whether the clinical maturity of medical trainees impacts upon the level of trainee competency in evidence-based medicine (EBM). Undergraduate and graduate-entry medical trainees entering their first year of training in the clinical environment were recruited for this study. Competency in EBM was measured using a psychometrically validated instrument. EBM competency scores were analysed using Student's t tests, in order to differentiate between undergraduate and graduate-entry trainee performance. Ten focus group discussions were conducted with undergraduate and graduate-entry trainees. Audio transcripts were thematically analysed. Data on a total of 885 medical trainees were collected over a 5-year period. Undergraduate trainees had significantly higher EBM competency scores during years in which the programme was presented in a didactic format (mean difference (MD)=1.24 (95% CI)CI 0.21 to 2.26; 1.78 (0.39 to 3.17); 2.13 (1.16 to 3.09)). Graduate trainee EBM competency scores increased when a blended learning approach to EBM was adopted, demonstrating no significant difference in EBM competency scores between undergraduate and graduate cohorts (-0.27 (-1.38 to 0.85); -0.39 (-1.57 to 0.79). Qualitative findings indicated that differences in learning and teaching preference among undergraduate and graduate-entry trainees influenced the level of competency obtained in EBM. Clinical maturity is the only one factor that may influence medical trainees' competency in EBM. Other predictors of EBM competency may include previous training and exposure to epidemiology, biostatistics and information literacy. While graduate-entry medical students may have more 'life' experience, or maturity, it does not necessarily translate into clinical maturity and integration into the clinical environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, Shakila; Barnfield, Gemma; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Meyerrose, Berit; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Horvath, Andrea R; Zanrei, Gianni; Kunz, Regina; Suter, Katja; Walczak, Jacek; Kaleta, Anna; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Gee, Harry; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-10

    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional development (CPD) courses that train clinical trainers to teach EBM through on-the-job training by demonstration of applied EBM real time in clinical practice. We developed such a course to encourage clinically relevant teaching of EBM in post-graduate education in various clinical environments. We devised an e-learning course targeting trainers with EBM knowledge to impart educational methods needed to teach application of EBM teaching in commonly used clinical settings. The curriculum development group comprised experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions in seven European countries. The e-learning sessions were designed to allow participants (teachers) to undertake the course in the workplace during short breaks within clinical activities. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. The curriculum defined specific learning objectives for teaching EBM by exploiting educational opportunities in six different clinical settings. The e-modules incorporated video clips that demonstrate practical and effective methods of EBM teaching in everyday clinical practice. The course encouraged focussed teaching activities embedded within a trainer's personal learning plan and documentation in a CPD portfolio for reflection. This curriculum will help senior clinicians to identify and make the best use of available opportunities in everyday practice in clinical situations to teach various steps of EBM and demonstrate their

  18. An evidence-based definition of lifelong premature ejaculation: Report of the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahon, C.G.; Althof, S.E.; Waldinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    authority based rather than evidence based, and have no support from controlled clinical and/or epidemiological studies. Aim. The aim of this article is to develop a contemporary, evidence-based definition of PE. Methods. In August 2007, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) appointed several......, sexual satisfaction, and personal/interpersonal distress, and to propose a new evidence-based definition of PE. Results. The committee unanimously agreed that the constructs that are necessary to define PE are rapidity of ejaculation, perceived self-efficacy and control, and negative personal...... penetrations, and negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy." This definition is limited to men with lifelong PE who engage in vaginal intercourse. The panel concluded that there are insufficient published objective data to propose an evidence-based...

  19. Undergraduate medical students’ perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM, and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alahdab Fares

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. Methods The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies’ in EBM. Results According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%, role models among professors and instructors (92%, a librarian (70%, institutional subscription to medical journals (94%, and sufficient IT hardware (58%. After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%, searching for evidence (39.8%, appraising the evidence (27.3%, understanding statistics (48%, and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%. However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. Conclusion The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria.

  20. Undergraduate medical students’ perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM), and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. Methods The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students’ awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies’ in EBM. Results According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%), role models among professors and instructors (92%), a librarian (70%), institutional subscription to medical journals (94%), and sufficient IT hardware (58%). After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%), searching for evidence (39.8%), appraising the evidence (27.3%), understanding statistics (48%), and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%). However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. Conclusion The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria. PMID:22882872

  1. Undergraduate medical students' perceptions, attitudes, and competencies in evidence-based medicine (EBM), and their understanding of EBM reality in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahdab, Fares; Firwana, Belal; Hasan, Rim; Sonbol, Mohamad Bassam; Fares, Munes; Alnahhas, Iyad; Sabouni, Ammar; Ferwana, Mazen

    2012-08-12

    Teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) should be evaluated and guided by evidence of its own effectiveness. However, no data are available on adoption of EBM by Syrian undergraduate, postgraduate, or practicing physicians. In fact, the teaching of EBM in Syria is not yet a part of undergraduate medical curricula. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course. The authors evaluated education of evidence-based medicine through a two-day intensive training course that took place in 2011. The course included didactic lectures as well as interactive hands-on workshops on all topics of EBM. A comprehensive questionnaire, that included the Berlin questionnaire, was used to inspect medical students' awareness of, attitudes toward, and competencies' in EBM. According to students, problems facing proper EBM practice in Syria were the absence of the following: an EBM teaching module in medical school curriculum (94%), role models among professors and instructors (92%), a librarian (70%), institutional subscription to medical journals (94%), and sufficient IT hardware (58%). After the course, there was a statistically significant increase in medical students' perceived ability to go through steps of EBM, namely: formulating PICO questions (56.9%), searching for evidence (39.8%), appraising the evidence (27.3%), understanding statistics (48%), and applying evidence at point of care (34.1%). However, mean increase in Berlin scores after the course was 2.68, a non-statistically significant increase of 17.86%. The road to a better EBM reality in Syria starts with teaching EBM in medical school and developing the proper environment to facilitate transforming current medical education and practice to an evidence-based standard in Syria.

  2. [Evidence-based physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Tamás

    2013-12-01

    This article on physiotherapy presents some current evidence stating the strengths and weaknesses of the physiotherapeutic procedures. In the area of physiotherapy empirical data obtained during decades were overtaken by evidence from current studies. The author points out the great problem of physiotherapy, namely the heterogeneity of the applied parameters. Knowledge of current evidence may be very important and helpful for the physicians, but the author proposes, from the practical point of view, that physiotherapeutical procedures based on exprience and used for many years should not be entirely neglected. Nowadays physiotherapy plays an important role in the treament of locomotor diseases but its use is increasing in other fields of medicine, as well.

  3. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  4. Evidence-based Medicine versus the Conventional Approach to Journal Club Sessions: Which One Is More Successful in Teaching Critical Appraisal Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi-Moghaddam, Mostafa; Yazdani, Shahram; Mortazavi, Fathie; Chichi, Samira; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare evidence-based medicine (EBM) vs. conventional approaches to journal club sessions in teaching critical appraisal skills in reading papers by emergency medicine residents. This double cut off discontinuation regression quasi-experimental study was conducted among emergency medicine residents. EBM vs. the conventional approach were applied to teach critical appraisal skills for half of the residents as an experimental group and another half as a control group respectively. Both groups participated in one hour monthly journal club sessions for six months. Before and after the study, all participants were examined by two tests: the Fresno Test (FT) [to evaluate their knowledge about EBM] and the Critical Appraisal Skills Test (CAST) [to evaluate their competency with critical appraisal skills]. The allocation of the participants into the experimental or control groups was according to their CAST scores before the study. 50 emergency medicine residents participated. After the study, the scores of both groups in the FT and CAST significantly improved (pevidence-based medicine approach in journal club sessions was comparatively more advantageous compared to the conventional approach in teaching critical appraisal skills for reading papers among the residents of emergency medicine.

  5. The practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in gastroenterology: discrepancies between EBM familiarity and EBM competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscaglia, Jonathan; Nagula, Satish; Yuan, Jay; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Kumar, Atul; Forsmark, Chris E; Draganov, Peter V

    2011-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has become increasingly important in the practice of gastroenterology and endoscopy, and the training of future gastroenterology physicians. The objectives were to assess the attitudes/opinions of gastroenterology specialists towards EBM, and evaluate possible gaps in education for certain EBM-related concepts. An internet-based survey was emailed to 4073 gastroenterology specialists. The main outcome measurements were physicians' endorsement of EBM, impact of EBM on clinical practice, utilization of EBM-specific resources, self-assessed understanding of EBM concepts (EBM familiarity score), and actual knowledge of EBM concepts (EBM competency score). A total of 337 gastroenterology specialists participated. On a sale of 1-10, there was widespread agreement that EBM improves patient care (median score = 9, interquartile range (IQR) = 7-10), and physicians should be familiar with techniques for critical appraisal of studies (median = 9, IQR = 8-10). Most (64.0%) utilized the EBM-related resource UpToDate™ regularly, as opposed to PubMed™ (47.1%) or Clinical Evidence™ (5.4%). The mean EBM familiarity score was 3.4 ± 0.6 on a scale of 1-4. Out of a maximum 49 points, the mean EBM competency score was 35 ± 4.9. There was poor concordance among EBM familiarity and competency scores (r = 0.161; p = 0.005). Academic practice (p < 0.001), research/teaching (p < 0.001), advanced degree (p = 0.012), and recent EBM training (p = 0.001) were all associated with improved EBM competency. The attitudes and opinions of EBM are extremely favorable among gastroenterology physicians. Although gastroenterology physicians report familiarity with most EBM-related concepts, there is poor correlation with their actual knowledge of EBM. Further educational initiatives should be undertaken to address methods in which EBM skills are reinforced among all gastroenterology practitioners.

  6. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal Suneeta; Lumbiganon Pisake; Cecatti Jose G; Germar Maria J; Carroli Guillermo; Gulmezoglu A Metin; Khan Khalid S; Kulier Regina; Pattinson Robert; Wolomby-Molondo Jean-Jose; Bergh Anne-Marie; May Win

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL) as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for i...

  7. Prospective, controlled assessment of the impact of formal evidence-based medicine teaching workshop on ability to appraise the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harewood, G C; Hendrick, L M

    2010-03-01

    The ability to critically appraise the calibre of studies in medical literature is increasingly important for medical professionals. This prospective controlled study evaluated the impact of a 6-h Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) Workshop on the critical appraisal skills of medical trainees. Individuals attended three 2-h workshops over a 3-week period, incorporating didactic lectures in statistics, clinical trial design, appraising research papers and practical examples. Appraisal skills were assessed pre- and post-training based on grading the quality of randomised control studies (level 1 evidence), cohort studies (level 2 evidence) and case-control studies (level 3 evidence) [From Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence (2001), http://www.cebm.net/critical_appraisal.asp ]. Overall grading improved from 39% (pre-course) to 74% (post-course), P = 0.002, with grading of levels 1, 2 and 3 studies improving from 42 to 75%, 53 to 61% and 21 to 84%, respectively. We conclude that a 6-h formal EBM workshop is effective in enhancing the critical appraisal skills of medical trainees.

  8. What "CAM" we learn about the level of evidence from 60 years of research into manipulative and body-based therapies in sports and exercise medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mącznik, Aleksandra K; Schneiders, Anthony G; Sullivan, S John; Athens, Josie

    2014-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly accepted in modern western society, including amongst amateur and professional athletes, however, it has not yet been determined how CAM is reflected in scientific publications in sports and exercise medicine (SEM). The aim of this study was to identify trends in the levels of evidence for manipulative and body-based therapies within the SEM literature. The literature was systematically searched with no language restrictions in seven databases and retrieved articles were screened and classified according to their study design using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. From 6088 retrieved articles, 395 were retained for evaluation and these included 180 on massage, 96 on acupuncture and 95 on manipulation. The majority of the articles were published in English, with 88 in non-English languages. Level-1 evidence was available for acupuncture, manipulation, massage, and Pilates. From the nineteen-seventies onwards, a decreasing trend was observed for low evidence articles with a corresponding increasing trend for clinical trials. After the year 2000, over 50% of the published articles were clinical trials, RCTs or systematic reviews. This review revealed an increase in the quantity and quality of published manipulative and body-based therapy articles in SEM over the last 60 years with the evidence level varying considerably between therapies. The timeframe associated with the development of evidence in CAM may reflect the move to provide scientific support for therapies previously justified primarily by anecdotal evidence, or traditional and cultural use. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Ilaj bil hijamah (cupping therapy) in the Unani system of medicine: anecdotal practice to evidence based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Zaidi, S M; Jameel, S S; Jafri, Kehkashan; Khan, Shariq A; Ahmad, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    Cupping (Hijamah) therapy is very well documented as a result of several thousand years of clinical experiences in Unani medicine. In this procedure, suction is created by various means either with or without bloodletting. Though this therapy is being widely practiced across the globe for treating many chronic and intractable ailments but many reports reveal its unscientific and improper practices which results in many complications. Therefore to develop standard operative procedures and to propose protocols of cupping therapy in various diseases is the need of hour. A thorough literature review of relevant journals and textbooks was performed to gather the maximum available data on cupping therapy. This paper seeks to introduce the general concepts of cupping therapy in Unani medicine and other traditional systems of medicine, shortcomings and limitations of the currently published studies and suggest ways to improve these technical/methodological flaws. In addition, the authors have also attempted to provide the cupping related materials, hypotheses, observations which will provide the researchers the base for evaluating their usefulness in future clinical trials.

  10. Methodological development of the Hoeven Outcome Monitor (HOM): A first step towards a more evidence based medicine in forensic mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Lobke H; de Vogel, Vivienne; van Marle, Hjalmar J C

    2016-01-01

    To comply with the need for a more evidence based risk assessment and management in forensic mental health, an outcome monitor is being developed in the Dutch forensic psychiatric centre Van der Hoeven Kliniek in Utrecht, the Hoeven Outcome Monitor (HOM). Conform evidence based medicine (EBM) guidelines, the HOM is subdivided into three consecutive stages, (1) the evaluation stage, (2) the aetiology stage and (3) the implementation stage. In this article an account is provided for the design of the evaluation stage. To account for predicaments in previous research that pertain to a lack of uniformity and disregard of specific context- and patient-related characteristics, a macro-, meso- and micro-treatment evaluation instrument is developed. This instrument provides for the first step to build an evidence base for specific interventions and treatments in forensic psychiatry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Clinically Discriminating, Evidence-Based Checklist Items on the Reliability of Scores from an Internal Medicine Residency OSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J.; Bordage, Georges; Gierl, Mark J.; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are used worldwide for summative examinations but often lack acceptable reliability. Research has shown that reliability of scores increases if OSCE checklists for medical students include only clinically relevant items. Also, checklists are often missing evidence-based items that high-achieving…

  12. Under the narrative medicine theory to establish the evidence-based medical record written by doctors and patients through integrated therapy of traditional Chinese and western on digestive system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article was to discuss the theory of doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record and set up the preliminary frame of the doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record following the concept of narrative evidence-based medicine. Methods: The information was searched from Pubmed, Embase, CBMdisc, CNKI. A preliminary agreement was reached by referring to the principles of narrative medicine and advises given by experts of digestive system and evidence-based medicine in both Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine. Result: This research is a useful attempt to discuss the establishment of doctor-patient co-operated evidence-based medical record guided by the direction of narrative evidence-based medicine. Reflection and outlook: Doctor-patient co-operated medical record can be a key factor of the curative effect evaluation methodology system of integrated therapy of Tradition Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine on spleen and stomach diseases.

  13. A clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in evidence-based medicine versus 'no intervention' for improving disability evaluations: a cluster randomised clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Kok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although several studies have shown that teaching EBM is effective in improving knowledge, at present, there is no convincing evidence that teaching EBM also changes professional behaviour in practice. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in EBM on evidence-based disability evaluation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a cluster randomised controlled trial, fifty-four case-based learning groups consisting of 132 physicians and 1680 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. A clinically integrated, post-graduate, 5-day training programme in evidence-based medicine, consisting of (home assignments, peer teaching, interactive training in searching databases, lectures and brainstorming sessions was provided to the intervention group. The control group received no training. The primary outcome was evidence-based disability evaluation, as indicated by the frequency in use of evidence of sufficient quality in disability evaluation reports. There are no general EBM behaviour outcome measures available. Therefore, we followed general guidelines for constructing performance indicators and defined an a priori cut-off for determination of sufficient quality as recommended for evaluating EB training. Physicians trained in EBM performed more evidence-based disability evaluations compared to physicians in the control group (difference in absolute proportion 9.7%, 95% CI 3.5 to 15.9. The primary outcome differences between groups remained significant after both cluster-adjusted analysis and additional sensitivity analyses accounting for subjects lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A EBM programme successfully improved the use of evidence in a non-hospital based medical specialty. Our findings support the general recommendations to use multiple educational methods to change physician behaviour. In addition, it appeared important that the

  14. Difficulties and Perspectives of Immunomodulatory Therapy with Mistletoe Lectins and Standardized Mistletoe Extracts in Evidence-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Hajtó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscum album preparations are aqueous mistletoe plant extracts used in complementary and alternative medicine as immunomodulators in cancer therapy. However, evidence of immunological efficacy of mistletoe extracts (MEs used in clinical trials is often lacking. Mechanisms involved in anti-tumor properties of ME and mistletoe lectins (MLs modify both innate and adaptive immune systems, according to animal model experiments. In the background of these effects, a selective binding of ML on CD75 ganglioside receptors of interleukin 12 (IL-12-producing macrophages or dendritic cells can play an important role. Immunological effects of ME correlate with their lectin activity, showing a bell-shaped dose-response curve of efficacy. Therefore, a correct determination of MLs for the standardization of commercial ME is essential. However, plant MLs exhibit heterogeneity, which most likely results from post-translational processing. In addition, amino acid analysis of ML has revealed numerous conservative substitutions along their amino acid sequence. Consequently, ML research needs new perspectives, and the advantages and disadvantages of purified and biologically better defined ML preparations are also discussed in this article.

  15. Partnership on Rotational ViscoElastic Test Standardization (PROVETS): evidence-based guidelines on rotational viscoelastic assays in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, Robert; Brainard, Benjamin; de Laforcade, Armelle M; Flatland, Bente; Hanel, Rita; McMichael, Maureen; Wiinberg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    To systematically examine the evidence relating to the performance of rotational viscoelastic testing in companion animals, to develop assay guidelines, and to identify knowledge gaps. Multiple questions were considered within 5 parent domains, specifically system comparability, sample handling, assay activation and test protocol, definitions and data reporting, and nonstandard assays. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence and assessed for quality. Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. Databases searched included Medline, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux abstracts, and Google Scholar. Worksheets were prepared evaluating 28 questions across the 5 domains and generating 84 assay guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the performance of thromboelastography in companion animals were generated through this process. Some of these guidelines are well supported while others will benefit from additional evidence. Many knowledge gaps were identified and future work should be directed to address these gaps and to objectively evaluate the impact of these guidelines on assay comparability within and between centers. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  16. [Is evidence-based medicine really a craze? Surely it is fashionable to criticize it. A methodologic comment from the Centro Italiano per la Medicina Basata sulle Prove (Italian Center for Proof-Based Medicine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A A; Galanti, C; Gensini, G F

    2000-09-01

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) represents the methodological search for the best solution of a clinical problem, using the most relevant scientific acquisitions of biomedical research, collected and critically appraised in the light of the experience and expertise of physicians. This search is targeted to individual patient care, in the frame of risk/benefit and cost/effectiveness ratios. EBM approach constitutes a precious tool for applied clinical practice, and can also represent a useful methodological instrument for the complete management of patients. The impetus given to outcome studies, to effectiveness studies, to careful attention for outpatients, to the individual data (of the patients of controlled trials) analysis is a major merit of EBM. Many authors nowadays consider EBM just a fashion, and today denigrating EBM appears a fashion too. Medicine complexity is enormous, and EBM can provide a useful methodological approach to this same complexity. EBM is not the automatic solution for every clinical problem, but is a logical tool for the critical evaluation of the relevance of biomedical research results and for the judgment of their applicability into daily clinical practice.

  17. Paediatric musculoskeletal matters (pmm)--collaborative development of an online evidence based interactive learning tool and information resource for education in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicola; Rapley, Tim; Jandial, Sharmila; English, Christine; Davies, Barbara; Wyllie, Ruth; Foster, Helen E

    2016-01-05

    We describe the collaborative development of an evidence based, free online resource namely 'paediatric musculoskeletal matters' (pmm). This resource was developed with the aim of reaching a wide range of health professionals to increase awareness, knowledge and skills within paediatric musculoskeletal medicine, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and referral to specialist care. Engagement with stakeholder groups (primary care, paediatrics, musculoskeletal specialties and medical students) informed the essential 'core' learning outcomes to derive content of pmm. Representatives from stakeholder groups, social science and web development experts transformed the learning outcomes into a suitable framework. Target audience representatives reviewed the framework and their opinion was gathered using an online survey (n = 74) and focus groups (n = 2). Experts in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine peer reviewed the content and design. User preferences informed design with mobile, tablet and web compatible versions to facilitate access, various media and formats to engage users and the content presented in module format (i.e. Clinical assessment, Investigations and management, Limping child, Joint pain by site, Swollen joint(s) and Resources). We propose that our collaborative and evidence-based approach has ensured that pmm is user-friendly, with readily accessible, suitable content, and will help to improve access to paediatric musculoskeletal medicine education. The content is evidence-based with the design and functionality of pmm to facilitate optimal and 'real life' access to information. pmm is targeted at medical students and the primary care environment although messages are transferable to all health care professionals involved in the care of children and young people.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes towards evidence-based medicine of mentors in general practice can be influenced by using medical students as academic detailers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Petric, Dragomir; Diminić Lisica, Ines; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Došen Janković, Sanja; Delija, Ita; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    Regular use of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among general practitioners (GP) is insufficient. To analyse whether knowledge and attitudes about EBM can be improved among mentors in general practice by involving sixth-year medical students as academic detailers. An interventional non-randomized before-and-after study included 98 GPs (49 in the intervention group of mentors and 49 controls) and 174 medical students attending family medicine clinical rotations. A telephone survey on knowledge and attitudes towards EBM was conducted among participating physicians before, and six months after the rotation. During the rotation, each mentor chose two cases from real life, and the students' task was to form an answerable clinical question, find the evidence-based answer and to write a brief report. The mentor reviewed the report and discussed it with the student. Students' EBM detailing intervention led to significant improvement in knowledge and attitudes about EBM in the intervention group of mentors in general practice compared to control GPs (relative increase in knowledge was 20 ± 46.9% vs 6 ± 12.1%, respectively; P = 0.042). Among participants with Ph.D. or specialization in family medicine, the observed effects of the intervention were similar as in the total sample, and statistically significant, but not in the group of participants with neither scientific degree nor specialization in family medicine. Knowledge and attitudes of GP mentors towards EBM can be improved by involving medical students as academic detailers. Further studies should explore the effectiveness of this method among GPs that are not mentors, and who do not have a specialization or research degree.

  19. THE CHOICE OF DRUG FROM THE STANDPOINT OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE: CASE STUDY OF BETA-BLOCKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic principles of beta-blockers choice strategy are presented. Attention is focused on the facts concerning the evidence base for effects of various beta-blockers on the outcomes of cardiovascular diseases. Beta-blocker indications and safety of their long-term use are considered from this point of view. Convincing data about beta-blocker impact on the prognosis of cardiovascular disease should be the reason for any beta-blocker choice, as well as choice of their doses which were tested in large randomized trials.

  20. From evidence-based to hope-based medicine? Ethical aspects on conditional market authorization of and early access to new cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars; Liliemark, Jan

    2017-08-01

    There is a strong patient demand for early access to potentially beneficial cancer drugs. In line with this authorization agencies like the European Medicines Agency are providing drugs with conditional market authorisation based on positive interim analyses. This implies that drugs are used with insecure evidence of efficacy and adverse side-effects. Several authors have pointed to ethical problems with such a system but up to date no indepth ethical analysis of this system is found which is the aim of this article. Drawing of the four generally accepted principles of medical ethics: beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy and justice the ethical pros and cons of conditional market authorisation are analysed. From the perspective of beneficence and non-maleficence it is found that the main problem is not risk of adverse side-effects to patients, but rather risk of less beneficial outcomes than what can be expected which could change incentives for patients' choice of treatment. This is also related to the extent to which patients might make an autonomous choice, especially taking into account problematic psychological attitudes and biases in medical decision-making. However, the main problem is related to justice and an equitable distribution of scarce health-care resources given the opportunity cost of drugs treatment. When using resources on cancer treatments which later might be found to be less efficacious than was first expected, other patients (in and outside the cancer field) are deprived of potentially more beneficial treatments even though their needs might be equally or more severe. At the same time, demanding more evidence has an ethical cost to patients in terms of depriving them of potential benefits in terms of reduced mortality and morbidity. In order to handle these ethical conflicts further research and analyses are required and it is suggested that pricing strategies and information requirements are alternatives to be further explored

  1. An evidence-based unified definition of lifelong and acquired premature ejaculation : report of the second international society for sexual medicine ad hoc committee for the definition of premature ejaculation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/163958564; Althof, Stanley E; Shindel, Alan; Adaikan, Ganesh; Becher, Edgardo F; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne Jg; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation developed the first evidence-based definition for lifelong premature ejaculation (PE...

  2. Mapping cognitive overlaps between practice-based learning and improvement and evidence-based medicine: an operational definition for assessing resident physician competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Madhabi; Graham, Mark J; Wyer, Peter C

    2009-12-01

    The complex competency labeled practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) incorporates core knowledge in evidence-based medicine (EBM). The purpose of this study was to operationally define a "PBLI-EBM" domain for assessing resident physician competence. The authors used an iterative design process to first content analyze and map correspondences between ACGME and EBM literature sources. The project team, including content and measurement experts and residents/fellows, parsed, classified, and hierarchically organized embedded learning outcomes using a literature-supported cognitive taxonomy. A pool of 141 items was produced from the domain and assessment specifications. The PBLI-EBM domain and resulting items were content validated through formal reviews by a national panel of experts. The final domain represents overlapping PBLI and EBM cognitive dimensions measurable through written, multiple-choice assessments. It is organized as 4 subdomains of clinical action: Therapy, Prognosis, Diagnosis, and Harm. Four broad cognitive skill branches (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, and Apply) are subsumed under each subdomain. Each skill branch is defined by enabling skills that specify the cognitive processes, content, and conditions pertinent to demonstrable competence. Most items passed content validity screening criteria and were prepared for test form assembly and administration. The operational definition of PBLI-EBM competence is based on a rigorously developed and validated domain and item pool, and substantially expands conventional understandings of EBM. The domain, assessment specifications, and procedures outlined may be used to design written assessments to tap important cognitive dimensions of the overall PBLI competency, as given by ACGME. For more comprehensive coverage of the PBLI competency, such instruments need to be complemented with performance assessments.

  3. Factors associated with faith-based health counselling in the United States: implications for dissemination of evidence-based behavioural medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Elizabeth A; Bopp, Melissa; Webb, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Health counselling is an evidence-based behavioural medicine approach and the most commonly reported form of faith-based health interventions. Yet, no research has explored the factors influencing the implementation of faith-based health counselling. Therefore, this study examined individual, organisational and environmental factors associated with offering/not offering faith-based health counselling programmes within faith-based organisations. A national, internet-based, opt-in, cross-sectional survey of faith leaders (N = 676) was conducted (March-December 2009) to assess faith leaders' demographic information, health status, fatalism, health-related attitudes and normative beliefs, attitudes towards health counselling, institutional and occupational information, and perceptions of parent organisation support for health and wellness interventions. Most faith leaders reported offering some type of health counselling in the past year [n = 424, 62.7%, 95% CI (59.0, 66.3)]. Results of a multivariate logistic regression showed that faith leaders reporting greater proxy efficacy (OR = 1.40, P = 0.002), greater comfort in speaking with church members about health (OR = 1.25, P = 0.005), greater perceived health (OR = 1.27, P = 0.034), and who worked at larger churches (OR ≥ 3.2, P ≤ 0.001) with greater parent organisation support (OR = 1.33, P = 0.002) had significantly higher odds of offering faith-based health counselling. Church size and parent organisation support for faith-based health interventions appear to be important factors in the presence of faith leader health counselling. The content of faith leader health counselling training should aim to increase faith leaders' confidence that church members will successfully change their health behaviours as a result of the health counselling and increase faith leaders' comfort in speaking with church members about health. Future research is needed to examine efficacious and effective dissemination methods such as

  4. Origen, evolución y reflexiones sobre la medicina basada en la evidencia Origin, course and reflections on evidence-based medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Brito Sosa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El problema de la medicina actual radica en considerar que se cuenta con más evidencias de las que realmente existen, y lo cierto es que en buena medida se carece de ellas. Según estudios realizados, anualmente se publican 25 000 revistas biomédicas y 2 millones de artículos; únicamente en los EE.UU. existen 20 revistas de medicina interna, donde cada año se publican 6 000 artículos. Por consiguiente, se requeriría leer 17 artículos diarios durante los 365 días del año, para llegar a la conclusión de que el 95 % de ellos no pueden ser considerados evidencia científica relevante. Otra investigación realizada demuestra que solo el 16,9 % de los trabajos publicados en el New England cumplen con los criterios de la medicina basada en la evidencia. Este porcentaje baja al 12,2 % en el caso de JAMA, al 13,4 % en los Annals of Internal Medicine, al 8,5 % en la British Medical Journal, y al 7,3 % en Lancet.The problem of current medicine is to consider that there are more evidences than those existing but to a greater measure they are lacking. According to studies conducted, yearly 25 000 biomedical journals and two millions of articles are published; only in the United States there are 20 journals of internal medicine in which 6 000 articles are published. Therefore, it will be necessary to read 17 daily articles during the 365 days of the year to reach the conclusion that the 95% of them can't be considered as relevant scientific evidence. Another research performed demonstrated that only the 16,9% of papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine fulfill the evidence based medical criteria. This percentage goes to 12,2% in the case of JAMA, to 13,4% in Annals of Internal Medicine, to 8,5% in British Medical Journal, and to 7,3% in The Lancet.

  5. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal Suneeta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for incorporation of evidence provided through the WHO RHL. The hypothesis is that the RHL-EBM (clinically integrated e-learning course will improve participants' knowledge, skills and attitudes, as well as institutional practice and educational environment, as compared to the use of standard postgraduate educational resources for EBM teaching that are not clinically integrated. Methods The study will be a multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial, carried out in seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, involving 50-60 obstetrics and gynaecology teaching units. The trial will be carried out on postgraduate trainees in the first two years of their training. In the intervention group, trainees will receive the RHL-EBM course. The course consists of five modules, each comprising self-directed e-learning components and clinically related activities, assignments and assessments, coordinated between the facilitator and the postgraduate trainee. The course will take about 12 weeks, with assessments taking place pre-course and 4 weeks post-course. In the control group, trainees will receive electronic, self-directed EBM-teaching materials. All data collection will be online. The primary outcome measures are gain in EBM knowledge, change in attitudes towards EBM and competencies in EBM measured by multiple choice questions (MCQs and a skills-assessing questionniare administered eletronically. These

  6. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, Regina; Khan, Khalid S; Gulmezoglu, A Metin; Carroli, Guillermo; Cecatti, Jose G; Germar, Maria J; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Mittal, Suneeta; Pattinson, Robert; Wolomby-Molondo, Jean-Jose; Bergh, Anne-Marie; May, Win

    2010-05-14

    Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL) as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for incorporation of evidence provided through the WHO RHL. The hypothesis is that the RHL-EBM (clinically integrated e-learning) course will improve participants' knowledge, skills and attitudes, as well as institutional practice and educational environment, as compared to the use of standard postgraduate educational resources for EBM teaching that are not clinically integrated. The study will be a multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial, carried out in seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand), involving 50-60 obstetrics and gynaecology teaching units. The trial will be carried out on postgraduate trainees in the first two years of their training. In the intervention group, trainees will receive the RHL-EBM course. The course consists of five modules, each comprising self-directed e-learning components and clinically related activities, assignments and assessments, coordinated between the facilitator and the postgraduate trainee. The course will take about 12 weeks, with assessments taking place pre-course and 4 weeks post-course. In the control group, trainees will receive electronic, self-directed EBM-teaching materials. All data collection will be online.The primary outcome measures are gain in EBM knowledge, change in attitudes towards EBM and competencies in EBM measured by multiple choice questions (MCQs) and a skills-assessing questionniare administered eletronically. These questions have been developed by using questions from

  7. How are medical students trained to locate biomedical information to practice evidence-based medicine? A review of the 2007-2012 literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; Kung, Janice Y

    2014-07-01

    This study describes how information retrieval skills are taught in evidence-based medicine (EBM) at the undergraduate medical education (UGME) level. The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, Scopus, Educational Resource Information Center, Web of Science, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews for English-language articles published between 2007 and 2012 describing information retrieval training to support EBM. Data on learning environment, frequency of training, learner characteristics, resources and information skills taught, teaching modalities, and instructor roles were compiled and analyzed. Twelve studies were identified for analysis. Studies were set in the United States (9), Australia (1), the Czech Republic (1), and Iran (1). Most trainings (7) featured multiple sessions with trainings offered to preclinical students (5) and clinical students (6). A single study described a longitudinal training experience. A variety of information resources were introduced, including PubMed, DynaMed, UpToDate, and AccessMedicine. The majority of the interventions (10) were classified as interactive teaching sessions in classroom settings. Librarians played major and collaborative roles with physicians in teaching and designing training. Unfortunately, few studies provided details of information skills activities or evaluations, making them difficult to evaluate and replicate. This study reviewed the literature and characterized how EBM search skills are taught in UGME. Details are provided on learning environment, frequency of training, level of learners, resources and skills trained, and instructor roles. The results suggest a number of steps that librarians can take to improve information skills training including using a longitudinal approach, integrating consumer health resources, and developing robust assessments.

  8. Supporting implementation of evidence-based behavioral interventions: the role of data liquidity in facilitating translational behavioral medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Wheeler, Jane L; Courtney, Paul K; Keefe, Francis J

    2011-03-01

    The advancement of translational behavioral medicine will require that we discover new methods of managing large volumes of data from disparate sources such as disease surveillance systems, public health systems, and health information systems containing patient-centered data informed by behavioral and social sciences. The term "liquidity," when applied to data, refers to its availability and free flow throughout human/computer interactions. In seeking to achieve liquidity, the focus is not on creating a single, comprehensive database or set of coordinated datasets, nor is it solely on developing the electronic health record as the "one-stop shopping" source of health-related data. Rather, attention is on ensuring the availability of secure data through the various methods of collecting and storing data currently existent or under development-so that these components of the health information infrastructure together support a liquid data system. The value of accessible, interoperable, high-volume, reliable, secure, and contextually appropriate data is becoming apparent in many areas of the healthcare system, and health information liquidity is currently viewed as an important component of a patient-centered healthcare system. The translation from research interventions to behavioral and psychosocial indicators challenges the designers of healthcare systems to include this new set of data in the correct context. With the intention of advancing translational behavioral medicine at the local level, "on the ground" in the clinical office and research institution, this commentary discusses data liquidity from the patient's and clinician's perspective, requirements for a liquid healthcare data system, and the ways in which data liquidity can support translational behavioral medicine.

  9. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for MicrobiologyAd HocCommittee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Evidence-based medicine. Understanding the basic concepts, the principles and the practice; Evidenz-basierte Medizin. Praxis-Handbuch fuer Verstaendnis und Anwendung der EBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antes, G.; Bassler, D.; Forster, J. (eds.)

    2003-07-01

    The toolbook is a practical guide explaining the basic concepts, methodology and working instruments of evidence-based medicine, (EbM). The goals of EbM and the pros and cons are addressed. The reader is taught how to efficiently apply the statistical tools and concepts for an evaluation of clinical trials, review articles, and meta analyses. [German] In diesem Buch werden die theoretischen Grundlagen der Evidenz-basierten Medizin verstaendlich und praxisnah erlaeutert und die Pros und Kontras vorgestellt. Ferner gibt das Buch eine detaillierte Anleitung zur eigenen Beurteilung von klinischen Studien, Uebersichtsarbeiten und Meta-Analysen und vermittelt Medizinern das notwendige statistische Handwerkszeug und Hintergrundwissen fuer die Anwendung der EBM in Praxis und Klinik. (orig.)

  11. The use of medicinal herbs in gynecological and pregnancy-related disorders by Jordanian women: a review of folkloric practice vs. evidence-based pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akour, Amal; Kasabri, Violet; Afifi, Fatma U; Bulatova, Nailya

    2016-09-01

    Context National statistical reports in Jordan indicate a decrease in the total fertility rate along with a parallel increase in contraceptive use. The folkloric use of medicinal herbs in gynecological disorders has been growing in Jordan, despite of deficient reports on the evidence-based safety and efficacy of these practices. Objective The aim of this comprehensive article is to review medicinal plants with claimed ethnonpharmacological usage in various gynecological and pregnancy-related issues in Jordan, and to assess their evidence-based pharmacological studies as well as their phytochemistry. Methods The published literature was surveyed using Google Scholar entering the terms "ethnopharmacology AND Jordan AND infertility AND gynecology OR gestation". We included ethnopharmacological surveys in Jordan with available full-text. Results Twelve articles were reviewed. Plant species which are commonly used for female gynecological issues such as Artemisia monosperma Del. and A. herba-alba Asso. (Asteraceae) have been found to exert an antifertility effect. Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae) and Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae) had antifertility effects in male rats, but Nigella sativa oil L. (Ranunculaceae) and Cinnamon zeylanicum J. Presl (Lauraceae) were found to enhance it. Conclusion Using plants for gynecological disorders is a common practice in Jordan. Many of them, whether utilised for gynecological or non-gynecological conditions equally, were found to have detrimental effects on female or male fertility. Thus, couples planning pregnancy should be discouraged from the consumption of these herbs. Further local studies are warranted to confirm the appreciable beneficial pharmacological effects and safety of these plants.

  12. Evidence-Based Clinical Decision: Key to Improved Patients Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    religious acts of the prehistoric era to empirical-rational decisions of the Egyptian civilization, to modern day evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine requires that clinical decisions and health policies on the prevention, diagnosis and ...

  13. A real-world approach to Evidence-Based Medicine in general practice: a competency framework derived from a systematic review and Delphi process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kevin; Ward, Alison; Heneghan, Carl

    2017-05-03

    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) skills have been included in general practice curricula and competency frameworks. However, GPs experience numerous barriers to developing and maintaining EBM skills, and some GPs feel the EBM movement misunderstands, and threatens their traditional role. We therefore need a new approach that acknowledges the constraints encountered in real-world general practice. The aim of this study was to synthesise from empirical research a real-world EBM competency framework for general practice, which could be applied in training, in the individual pursuit of continuing professional development, and in routine care. We sought to integrate evidence from the literature with evidence derived from the opinions of experts in the fields of general practice and EBM. We synthesised two sets of themes describing the meaning of EBM in general practice. One set of themes was derived from a mixed-methods systematic review of the literature; the other set was derived from the further development of those themes using a Delphi process among a panel of EBM and general practice experts. From these two sets of themes we constructed a real-world EBM competency framework for general practice. A simple competency framework was constructed, that acknowledges the constraints of real-world general practice: (1) mindfulness - in one's approach towards EBM itself, and to the influences on decision-making; (2) pragmatism - in one's approach to finding and evaluating evidence; and (3) knowledge of the patient - as the most useful resource in effective communication of evidence. We present a clinical scenario to illustrate how a GP might demonstrate these competencies in their routine daily work. We have proposed a real-world EBM competency framework for general practice, derived from empirical research, which acknowledges the constraints encountered in modern general practice. Further validation of these competencies is required, both as an educational resource and as a

  14. Awareness and use of evidence-based medicine information among patients in Croatia: a nation-wide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejašmić, Danijel; Miošić, Ivana; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Permozer Hajdarović, Snježana; Tomičić, Marion; Gmajnić, Rudika; Diminić Lisica, Ines; Sironić Hreljanović, Jelena; Pleh, Vlatka; Cerovečki, Venija;