WorldWideScience

Sample records for everyday life lessons

  1. Lessons in Everyday Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Kit

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author presents and discusses some of the lessons she has learned in everyday leadership. It's the kind of leadership one learns when he or she doesn't expect it--and the kind of lessons one teaches when he or she doesn't even know he or she is doing it.

  2. Partying as Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob; Østergaard, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    situates the event in everyday life. By drawing on Maffesoli's (1996) concept of ‘sociality' and Lincoln's (2005) concept of zoning the spatial and social logic of the house, partying is analysed using both qualitative and quantitative material. The analysis suggests that the consumption of alcohol (i...... to reaffirm friendship and is therefore an integrated part of adolescents' everyday life.  ...

  3. Conducting everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    In the paper I discuss how small children (0-4 year) develop through ‘conducting everyday life’ across contexts (Holzkamp 2013). I discuss how this process of conducting everyday life is essential when discussing the ‘good life for children’ from a child perspective. These issues are addressed......, they are involved in preventive interventions. I conducted participatory observations with the children in their everyday life. Overall, the study stresses that even small children must be perceived as active participants who act upon and struggle with different conditions and meaning making processes across...... contexts (home, day care, part-time foster family) and in relation to other co-participants....

  4. Geometry in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Graumann, Günter; Blum, Werner

    1989-01-01

    My conception of "practice-oriented-mathematical-education", which must be seen as one point of view side-by-side with others, has the aim to qualify pupils to master life and is based on a method of working on problems which are true to life. Therefore I plead for geometry teaching, where the formation of sound geometric concepts and the relevance of applications of geometry in everyday life is important. After discussing this conception a schedule of activities of everyday life where geomet...

  5. Everyday Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2010-01-01

    What are the implications of ongoing processes of modernization and individualization for social relations in everyday life? This overall research question is the pivotal point in empirical studies at the Centre of Childhood-, Youth- and Family Life Research at Roskilde University. One research...... project takes a social psychological approach, combining quantitative and qualitative methods in a longitudinal study of family life. The knowledge interest of the project is the constitution of communality and individuality in everyday family life. This article presents the theoretical framework...... and the conceptualization of everyday family life of the social psychological research agenda in this field. The main line of argument is that ongoing modernization is synonymous with accelerated processes of detraditionalization and individualization. This calls for a re-conceptualisation of ‘the family’ which enables...

  6. Mathematics in everyday life

    CERN Document Server

    Haigh, John

    2016-01-01

    How does mathematics impact everyday events? The purpose of this book is to show a range of examples where mathematics can be seen at work in everyday life. From money (APR, mortgage repayments, personal finance), simple first and second order ODEs, sport and games (tennis, rugby, athletics, darts, tournament design, soccer, snooker), business (stock control, linear programming, check digits, promotion policies, investment), the social sciences (voting methods, Simpson’s Paradox, drug testing, measurements of inequality) to TV game shows and even gambling (lotteries, roulette, poker, horse racing), the mathematics behind commonplace events is explored. Fully worked examples illustrate the ideas discussed and each chapter ends with a collection of exercises. Everyday Mathematics supports other first year modules by giving students extra practice in working with calculus, linear algebra, geometry, trigonometry and probability. Secondary/high school level mathematics is all that is required for students to und...

  7. Emotions in Everyday Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Trampe

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research establishing the causes and consequences of emotions in the laboratory, we know surprisingly little about emotions in everyday life. We developed a smartphone application that monitored real-time emotions of an exceptionally large (N = 11,000+ and heterogeneous participants sample. People's everyday life seems profoundly emotional: participants experienced at least one emotion 90% of the time. The most frequent emotion was joy, followed by love and anxiety. People experienced positive emotions 2.5 times more often than negative emotions, but also experienced positive and negative emotions simultaneously relatively frequently. We also characterized the interconnections between people's emotions using network analysis. This novel approach to emotion research suggests that specific emotions can fall into the following categories 1 connector emotions (e.g., joy, which stimulate same valence emotions while inhibiting opposite valence emotions, 2 provincial emotions (e.g., gratitude, which stimulate same valence emotions only, or 3 distal emotions (e.g., embarrassment, which have little interaction with other emotions and are typically experienced in isolation. Providing both basic foundations and novel tools to the study of emotions in everyday life, these findings demonstrate that emotions are ubiquitous to life and can exist together and distinctly, which has important implications for both emotional interventions and theory.

  8. Emotions in Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampe, Debra; Quoidbach, Jordi; Taquet, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research establishing the causes and consequences of emotions in the laboratory, we know surprisingly little about emotions in everyday life. We developed a smartphone application that monitored real-time emotions of an exceptionally large (N = 11,000+) and heterogeneous participants sample. People's everyday life seems profoundly emotional: participants experienced at least one emotion 90% of the time. The most frequent emotion was joy, followed by love and anxiety. People experienced positive emotions 2.5 times more often than negative emotions, but also experienced positive and negative emotions simultaneously relatively frequently. We also characterized the interconnections between people's emotions using network analysis. This novel approach to emotion research suggests that specific emotions can fall into the following categories 1) connector emotions (e.g., joy), which stimulate same valence emotions while inhibiting opposite valence emotions, 2) provincial emotions (e.g., gratitude), which stimulate same valence emotions only, or 3) distal emotions (e.g., embarrassment), which have little interaction with other emotions and are typically experienced in isolation. Providing both basic foundations and novel tools to the study of emotions in everyday life, these findings demonstrate that emotions are ubiquitous to life and can exist together and distinctly, which has important implications for both emotional interventions and theory.

  9. Resistance in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is about resistance in everyday life, illustrated through empirical contexts from different parts of the world. Resistance is a widespread phenomenon in biological, social and psychological domains of human cultural development. Yet, it is not well articulated in the academic literature...... and, when it is, resistance is most often considered counter-productive. Simple evaluations of resistance as positive or negative are avoided in this volume; instead it is conceptualised as a vital process for human development and well-being. While resistance is usually treated as an extraordinary...... occurrence, the focus here is on everyday resistance as an intentional process where new meaning constructions emerge in thinking, feeling, acting or simply living with others. Resistance is thus conceived as a meaning-making activity that operates at the intersection of personal and collective systems...

  10. Smartphones and hyper everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Amigo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some results from our research on technological media convergence and everyday life. The results suggest that new changes would be happening on the space-temporal dimension of daily experience on people and in the way in which those give stability, structure and meaning to the intersubjective world, as a consequence of uses, appropriations and meanings about smartphones. We propose the concept of enriched everyday life or hyper everyday life in order to explain what we consider one of the principal transformations in daily life to people in the contemporary world related to the incorporation of smartphones.

  11. Grief and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dorthe Refslund; Sandvik, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how everyday practices among parents who suffer the loss of a child include the use of both analogue and digital means, both established media and materialities occasionally functioning as media in order to create meaning-making relations to the dead child, the bereaved ...

  12. School Everyday Life in Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Ferraço

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at questioning school everyday life in images, based on intercessors and concepts from Deleuze and Guattari’s Philosophy of Difference. It is based on data-image-graffiti produced during investigations developed by us with public schools’ everyday life in the city of Vitória, ES, Brazil. The text claims that, in order to speak about school everyday life in images to favor the sudden, the production of meaning and the multiplicity of knowledge, it is necessary to invest in another research attitude - one that considers chaos, chance and permanent openness and complexity of school everyday life as forces to constitute an immanence plane and create concepts. The article affirms the idea of impossibility of choosing images that would be considered the most representative to speak about events in the schools.

  13. Reflexive fatherhood in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at fathering practices in Denmark, using the findings from a research project on everyday family life in Denmark. It takes a social psychological perspective and employs discursive psychology and theories about reflexive modernisation. It shows how fathers orient towards intimacy...... this analysis and discussion, the article offers a way to understand the complexities of fathering in everyday life from the perspective of fathers....

  14. Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    helps its reader develop a disciplined and analytic awareness informed by theory, and shows how less can be more in qualitative research. Each chapter introduces theoretical tools to think with, and demonstrates how they can be put to use in working concretely with everyday life materials.......This book is a 'survival guide' for students and researchers who would like to conduct a qualitative study with limited resources. Brinkmann shows how everyday life materials such as books, television, the internet, the media and everyday conversations and interactions can help us to understand...... larger social issues. As living human beings in cultural worlds, we are constantly surrounded by 'data' that call for analysis, and as we cope with the different situations and episodes of our lives, we are engaged in understanding and interpreting the world as a form of qualitative inquiry. The book...

  15. Audio Satellites: Overhearing Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Jonas Rasmussen; Breinbjerg, M.; Højlund, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    around or displaced arbitrarily in a given landscape. In the web browser, the different sound streams from the individual satellites can be mixed together to form a cooperative soundscape. The project thus allows people to tune into and explore the overheard soundscape of everyday life in a collaborative...

  16. Psychology and the conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psychology and the Conduct of Everyday Life moves psychological theory and research practice out of the laboratory and into the everyday world. Drawing on recent developments across the social and human sciences, it examines how people live as active subjects within the contexts of their everyday...

  17. The Sociomateriality of Creativity in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sociomateriality of creativity in everyday life. Whilst creativity research has traditionally been concerned with the intellectual and individual skills promoting creativity, such as the ability to apply divergent thinking, this author anchors creativity in social practice...

  18. Life lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. Nitschke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reminiscing about his younger self: “I mean I can’t very well just 86 [in American slang, to “86” is to eject, remove, or discard someone or something, J.R.N.] this guy from my life. On the other hand, if through some as yet undeveloped technology I were to run into him today, how comfortable would I feel about lending him money, or for that matter even stepping down the street to have a beer and talk over old times?” ― Thomas Pynchon, Slow Learner

  19. Life lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscing about his younger self: "I mean I can't very well just 86 [in American slang, to "86" is to eject, remove, or discard someone or something, J.R.N.] this guy from my life. On the other hand, if through some as yet undeveloped technology I were to run into him today, how comfortable would I feel about lending him money, or for that matter even stepping down the street to have a beer and talk over old times?" - Thomas Pynchon, Slow Learner.

  20. Personal ways of handling everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lasse Meinert

    While there has been repeated calls for Personality Psychology to study persons' behavior in real situations (for instance, Funder, 2001; Baumeister, Funder & Vohs, 2005), what persons actually do in their everyday lives is still a neglected area of research in Personality Psychology.  But studying...... behavior risks substituting a context-free personality with a personality bound to a single given situation - when persons actually move in and across different contexts in their everyday lives.  Therefore, this project studies "personality" from a different angle: Everyday situations are set within social...... structures of daily life, such as work schedules, transport itineraries, business opening hours, and calendars with workdays and weekends.  These structures order the activities of persons.  The project explores how persons conduct their everyday life in relation to such arrangements, by looking...

  1. Self-recognition in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Brédart, Serge; Young, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). METHOD: A total of 70 p...

  2. Dietary education must fit into everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann Hempler, Nana; Nicic, Sara; Ewers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study...... diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. RESULTS: Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection...... between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants' taste preferences in the educational setting. CONCLUSION: Dietary education...

  3. The Creative Pathways of Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two studies of how the conduct of life in itself can be a creative act. Very often, creativity research is concerned with the study of what enables people to express themselves creatively or aesthetically or to produce creative ideas and products. Creativity as it arises in the mundane processes of everyday life is, however,…

  4. Audio Satellites – Overhearing Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten; Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    around or displaced arbitrarily in a given landscape. In the web interface, the different sound streams from the individual satellites can be mixed together to form a cooperative soundscape. The project thus allows people to tune into and explore the overheard soundscape of everyday life...

  5. Mechanisms of Fatigue in Everyday Life

    OpenAIRE

    Dörr, Johanna M.; Nater, Urs M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to find out which factors predict and increase fatigue in everyday life with the aim of shedding light on mechanisms relevant for the chronification of fatigue. We expected stress to (prospectively) predict fatigue. Also, we expected fatigue to (prospectively) predict stress because it diminishes subjective coping abilities. Further, we expected hypoactivity of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) ax...

  6. Everyday life for users of electric wheelchairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Camilla Blach; Sørensen, Bodil; Jochumsen, Bente Würtz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how users of electric wheelchairs experience their everyday life and how their electric wheelchairs influence their daily occupation. Occupation is defined as a personalized dynamic interaction between person, task and environment, and implies the value...

  7. Everyday life through the eyes of ethnologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškareva Natal`ja L.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on some of the new and distinctive patterns of scientific discourse with special reference to the differences between ethnological research of ordinary life and history of everyday life as a part of "new social history". The author try to show the changing paradigms in humanities, reorganization of its problematic, new sociological (ethnometodological, interdisciplinary methods which were adopted in modern ethnology, as well as in the social history as a whole.

  8. Talking Video in 'Everyday Life'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    For better or worse, video technologies have made their way into many domains of social life, for example in the domain of therapeutics. Techniques such as Marte Meo, Video Interaction Guidance (ViG), Video-Enhanced Reflection on Communication, Video Home Training and Video intervention....../prevention (VIP) all promote the use of video as a therapeutic tool. This paper focuses on media therapeutics and the various in situ uses of video technologies in the mass media for therapeutic purposes. Reality TV parenting programmes such as Supernanny, Little Angels, The House of Tiny Tearaways, Honey, We......’re Killing the Kids, and Driving Mum and Dad Mad all use video as a prominent element of not only the audiovisual spectacle of reality television but also the interactional therapy, counselling, coaching and/or instruction intrinsic to these programmes. Thus, talk-on-video is used to intervene...

  9. Erving Goffman and Everyday Life Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary social life is marked by increasing levels of physical movement of people, goods and symbols. Within this context much theoretical activity points at notions of globalisation and the network society (e.g. Castells 1996). Such macro-theoretical interpretations capture only parts...... with the ambition of showing a vocabulary that makes the macro-societal conditions for contemporary mobility comprehensible from the vantage point of the ‘little practices' of everyday life. The exploration of everyday life mobility using Goffman as guide makes us see that waiting in line for the bus, riding...... in for example studies of global migration and large-scale population shifts, even though such ‘macro phenomena' also could be studied at the ‘micro level' (this distinction being perhaps less fruitful at the end of the day). The chapter offer a novel way of conceptualising the sociological meaning...

  10. Triggers of eating in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, A Janet; Mann, Traci; Comer, Lisa

    2009-02-01

    Understanding the triggers of eating in everyday life is crucial for the creation of interventions to promote healthy eating and to prevent overeating. Here, the proximal predictors of eating are explored in a natural setting. Research from laboratory settings suggests that restrained eaters overeat after experiencing anxiety, distraction, and the presence of positive or negative moods, but not hunger; whereas the only factor that triggers eating in unrestrained eaters is hunger. In this study, 137 female participants reported hourly for 2 days on these potential predictors and their eating using electronic diaries, allowing us to establish the relationships between these factors while participants went about their normal daily activities. The main outcome variables were the number of servings eaten and whether or not food was eaten. Contrary to findings from laboratory settings, in everyday life restrained eaters (1) did not overeat in response to anxiety; (2) ate less in the presence of positive or negative moods; and (3) ate more in response to hunger. The relationships between these factors and eating among unrestrained eaters were closer to those found in laboratory settings. In conclusion, predictors of eating must be studied in everyday life to develop successful interventions.

  11. Designing self-care for everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo; Nunes, Francisco; Grönvall, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Managing chronic conditions can be challenging. People in such conditions, and the people around them, have to: deal with symptoms, adapt to the resulting disability, manage emotions, and change habits to keep the condition under control. Self-care technologies have the potential to support self......-care and mediate the relationship between patients (and caregivers) and the condition. However, these technologies often disregard the complexity of the settings in which they are used and fail to become integrated in everyday life. In this workshop we will discuss how to design self-care technologies...

  12. Making Sense Bringing Everyday Life at Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas; Gleerup, Janne; Nielsen, Birger Steen

    Inspired by contemporary work life studies on making sense at work this paper elaborates on using Critical Utopian Action Research as methodology for enabling shared learning spaces in which citizens and professionals can conjoin around discussions of deeper human aspirations enabled through...... synergies between civil engagement and organisational capabilities. The paper reports on experiences with enabling free spaces in the contexts of everyday life, where broader human concerns and aspirations can be addressed, as in the context of work life, where organisational responses on these orientations...... can be developed. On this basis the paper highlights how the methodology invites for broader emancipatory considerations addressing aspirations on how we want to live; how these orientations transcends organisational and disciplinary boundaries; and how they calls for trans...

  13. Uncertainty Regarding Waste Handling in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Ewert

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available According to our study, based on interviews with households in a residential area in Sweden, uncertainty is a cultural barrier to improved recycling. Four causes of uncertainty are identified. Firstly, professional categories not matching cultural categories—people easily discriminate between certain categories (e.g., materials such as plastic and paper but not between others (e.g., packaging and “non-packaging”. Thus a frequent cause of uncertainty is that the basic categories of the waste recycling system do not coincide with the basic categories used in everyday life. Challenged habits—source separation in everyday life is habitual, but when a habit is challenged, by a particular element or feature of the waste system, uncertainty can arise. Lacking fractions—some kinds of items cannot be left for recycling and this makes waste collection incomplete from the user’s point of view and in turn lowers the credibility of the system. Missing or contradictory rules of thumb—the above causes seem to be particularly relevant if no motivating principle or rule of thumb (within the context of use is successfully conveyed to the user. This paper discusses how reducing uncertainty can improve recycling.

  14. Everyday life; Lived Experiences and Designed Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Michelle; Helms, Niels Henrik; Dræbel, Tania Aase

    2016-01-01

    Everyday life; Lived Experiences and Designed Learning: Students knowledge cultures and epistemic trajectories in a range of professional bachelor educations Helms, N.H., Vestbo, M., Steenfeldt, V.O., Dræbel, T.A., Hansen, T.A.E., Storm, H., and Schmidt, L.S.K. (University College Zealand...... and epistemic machines. In this panel, we will unfold three subprojects representing different educational contexts and research approaches: Lived experiences of clinical training Vibeke Østergaard Steenfeldt Within the framework of life world phenomenology, this study examines nursing students’ lived...... experiences of their clinical training. The purpose is to develop knowledge about how transformation, translation and application of professional knowledge are incorporated during clinical training programmes. Data is generated by narrative interviews with nursing students four weeks after the beginning...

  15. Everyday life; Lived Experiences and Designed Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Michelle; Helms, Niels Henrik; Dræbel, Tania Aase

    Everyday life; Lived Experiences and Designed Learning: Students knowledge cultures and epistemic trajectories in a range of professional bachelor educations Helms, N.H., Vestbo, M., Steenfeldt, V.O., Dræbel, T.A., Hansen, T.A.E., Storm, H., and Schmidt, L.S.K. (University College Zealand....... This research is a part of a greater national (Danish) research programme, the general objective is to generate knowledge about how professional bachelor educations and profession didactics can be developed to help in realizing learning objectives and educational policy goals. This specific project seeks...... and epistemic machines. In this panel, we will unfold three subprojects representing different educational contexts and research approaches: Lived experiences of clinical training Vibeke Østergaard Steenfeldt Within the framework of life world phenomenology, this study examines nursing students’ lived...

  16. New technology in everyday life - social processes and environmental impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2001-01-01

    aspect both of changes in everyday life and of the environmental impact of everyday-life activities. Technological change is often seen as an important part of the solutions to environmental problems, however, when technological change is seen from the perspective of everyday life, this image becomes...... more complex. In this paper technological changes are explored from the perspective of consumption and everyday life, and it is argued that environmental impacts arise through the interplay of technology, consumption and everyday life. Firstly, because technological renewals form integral parts......In the environmental debate it is increasingly acknowledged that our way of life has profound environmental consequences. Therefore, it becomes ever more important to focus on and to understand how everyday life is formed and how it changes over time. Changing technology constitutes an important...

  17. Self-recognition in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Serge; Young, Andrew W

    2004-08-01

    A sample of everyday difficulties was collected, encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and Capgras delusion). A total of 70 participants recalled experiences from memory. Incidents (n = 51) were recorded on questionnaire sheets that were filled out at home. Reports of three categories of incidents were analysed: misidentifications (the participant misidentified her/his own face as being that of another familiar person; n = 5), recognition failures (the participant judged that his/her own face was that of an unfamiliar person; n = 20) and perception of unusual aspects (the participant confidently recognised his/her own face but found that the seen face did not fit well the representation she/he had of his/her own face; n = 26). In the reported incidents, experiences showing some similarities to those of patients with prosopagnosia, Capgras delusion or mirrored-self misidentification were noted. However, across the whole study, no incident involved a failure of reality testing; in contrast to pathological forms of error, in all of the reported incidents from our study the participant realised that a mistake had been made. The importance of decision processes in pathological forms of own-face misrecognition is discussed.

  18. Architecture – a mirror of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of a research project that analyses trends in the last 100 years of housing architecture. The research project intends to show how changing norms have altered our views on housing, and how the development of new forms of everyday life and lifestyle has led to fundamental changes...... in housing architecture. In this paper the analysis focuses particularly on the kitchen. A 100 years ago the kitchen of the bourgeoisie and the middle class was used only by servants and other employees – the kitchen was not designed to be used by the residents. Today the kitchen has developed into a central...... room of the home, and it has great social qualities - and a lot of money is spent on the aesthetic appearance of the kitchen. Trends such as these are described in the paper in the light of societal and cultural trends - health, rationality, food culture, gender, sustainability, consumerism etc....

  19. Everyday life for women with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Susanne; Hellström, Ingrid; Hallert, Claes; Wilhelmsson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore how women with celiac disease experience everyday life. It is important that healthcare professionals understand what it is like to live with a chronic illness, and also the factors that affect the lives of women who have celiac disease. The study has a qualitative approach and the data were collected using interviews with 16 women. A conventional content analysis was used for the subjective interpretation of the qualitative interviews. Three main themes emerged in the analysis: illness trajectory and treatment, socializing with others, and feelings of loneliness and worry. The findings indicate that living with celiac disease affects the person's entire life from the past, in the present, and into the future, especially when daily routines must be altered. The women expressed a sense of loneliness and invisibility, especially when socializing with others. The diet could be a friend, enemy, obstacle, or opportunity in terms of enjoying a good life. Supporting women diagnosed with celiac disease appears to be a major task for healthcare professionals. Such professionals need to pay attention to women's symptoms, worries, and their feeling of being invisible.

  20. Routines and Concerns in Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybholt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I explore the concept conduct of everyday life, namely routines and real life, as they are confronted with empirical observations. The observations are from a study of changes in the conduct of everyday life for individuals who attended a patient education course. The course was a ...... analysis to perceive all conduct of everyday life as having profound personal meaning and to analyse the individuals' concerns in relation to their social selfunderstanding and localisation at a certain time.......In this paper, I explore the concept conduct of everyday life, namely routines and real life, as they are confronted with empirical observations. The observations are from a study of changes in the conduct of everyday life for individuals who attended a patient education course. The course...... was a part of their treatment after a hospitalisation with depression in a psychiatric ward. I use analysis of the main individual, Steven’s, conduct of everyday life and illustrate my points with models of conduct of everyday life made using beads. The conceptualisation of conduct of everyday life...

  1. Everyday Life, Sensuality, and Body Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Charlotte

    1987-01-01

    present an empirical study of women whose everyday lives were radically disrupted. Finally, recent trends in body culture will be discussed and evaluated from a feminist point of view. Thus, viewed from the perspective of sport, the purpose of this essay is to offer new approaches to the subject of sport......The purpose of this essay is to elucidate two kinds of sensuality, a dominant one and a concealed one, both viewed in the perspective of our everyday lives. My point of departure is the assumption that the interweaving of social power, the body and sensuality is constituted at the level of everyday...

  2. Genre, the organization of knowledge and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. From the point of view of genre theory, this paper explains how the organization of knowledge can be understood as an articulation of everyday communication with and in digital media. I argue that, with genre, a theoretical frame can be offered to cast the organization of knowledge...... as a communicative activity in everyday life. Method. This is a text-based argument which pulls together different sources for developing and discussing the contention. Analysis. I will start out with some brief reflections on digital media and communicative interaction. From there I will look into some steps...... already made toward understanding knowledge organization as an everyday activity, before providing some examples of how the organization of knowledge in digital media can be understood as genre-based communication in everyday life. Results. Due to the saturation of digital media in everyday life, genre...

  3. Living with Risk in Everyday Life - A Comparative Analysis on Handling and Reflecting Risk in Everyday Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elverdam, Beth; Hoel Felde, Lina Klara

    experiences, situated in social and cultural values. In managing risk, patients protect or try to re-establish a normal everyday life and a stable biography. Conclusion: Ordinary persons' handling of risk in everyday life is multidimensional. GPs need to be aware that patients' perceptions and handling...... analysis. Results: Although risk is communicated in the media and by health personnel, and thus has a general presence in society, participants in everyday life place risk at the periphery of life. Risk is not part of their everyday reflections. When risk manifests itself in everyday life, it is reflected...

  4. The Dynamic Structure of Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-12

    1986. Available as Technical Report 918, MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab- oratory, 1986. Pierre Bourdieu , Outline of a theory of practice, Cambridge...everyday cognition (see for example Bourdieu 1977, Garfinkel 1967, Lave 1988, Rogoff and Lave 1984, Scribner 198-1, Wertsch 1985). Much of this work is

  5. Bringing Performance Art into Everyday Life Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This position paper presents the concept of a tangible and modular interconnected “platform” for interactive digital artworks in everyday environments. Furthermore it presents a proposal for the study of human-human interaction through the use of digital systems embedded in these platforms. Final...

  6. A Semiotic Approach to Food and Ethics in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coff, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how food can be analysed in terms of signs and codes of everyday life, and especially how food can be used to express ethical concerns. The paper investigates the potential of a semiotic conceptual analysis: How can the semiotic approach be used to analyse...... as signs of ethics in everyday life? How is food used to send signals about care and concern? How are the signs of food ethics perceived? It is concluded that analysing ethical considerations with respect to food with the help of the semiotic model can show us perspectives that otherwise would be difficult...... expressions of ethics and food ethics in everyday life? The intention is to explore from a theoretical point of view and with constructed cases, how semiotics can be used to analyse the role of food as an expression of ethics in everyday life among families, friends and colleagues: How do foodstuffs function...

  7. Navigating Violence: Fear and Everyday Life in Colombia and Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helen Berents; Charlotte ten Have

    2017-01-01

    Violence and insecurity are often read as totalising narratives of communities in parts of Latin America, flattening the complexity of everyday life and the responses of occupants who suffer from fear...

  8. The concept Conduct of Everyday Life in relation to toddlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    In the paper I discuss how small children (0-4 year) develop through ‘conducting everyday life’ across contexts (Holzkamp 2013). I discuss how this process of conducting everyday life is essential when discussing the ‘good life for children’ from a child perspective. These issues are addressed by...... contexts (home, day care, part-time foster family) and in relation to other co-participants....

  9. Social psychology. Comment on "Morality in everyday life".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkle, Manuel C

    2015-05-15

    In examining morality in everyday life, Hofmann et al. (Reports, 12 September 2014, p. 1340) conclude that being the target of (im)moral deeds impacts happiness, whereas committing them primarily affects one's sense of purpose. I point to shortcomings in the analyses and interpretations and caution that, based on the methodological approach, conclusions about everyday life relationships between morality and happiness/purpose are premature. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Patients' experiences of everyday life after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Doris; Jensen, Birte Østergaard

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the experiences of everyday life after lung transplantation of patients with previous chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Compared with patients being transplanted due to other indications, those with COPD prior to lung transplantation report more problems in the form of shortness of breath, fatigue, sexual problems, insomnia and increased appetite. In addition, they are often faced with problems returning to normal working life. How these problems influence the patient's everyday life is unknown. An exploratory qualitative study. Ten COPD patients (five females and five males) aged 51-69 and more than six months post transplantation, were interviewed using of a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were taperecorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis revealed four themes of experience: a second chance; an ordinary life without chronic rejection; even minor daily activities take time with chronic rejection; and need for support and knowledge that were considered important by the participants for their situation and daily life. This is the first study describing the experiences of everyday life after lung transplantation of patients with COPD prior to surgery. The findings highlight the importance of addressing these patients' experiences of gratitude, positive life orientation and informational needs in relation to everyday life. Health professionals should be aware of the kind of problems both women and men may experience a long time after the lung transplantation. They constitute a basic knowledge of a patient's everyday life that is important when planning individual counselling and rehabilitation.

  11. Social pedagogy in children´s everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Ida

    on a German version of Critical Psychology and discusses how to understand social pedagogy in relation to the support of children’s conduct of everyday life. In general parents coordinate their children´s everyday lives, but for the case of children in out-of-home care, the responsibility of care...... and leisure time. The paper contributes to discussions of how to define and understand social pedagogy and argues that a central focus in social pedagogy should be to create possibilities of participation in society and to support children´s agency in their everyday life across different contexts. The paper...... concludes that for children in out-of-home care their possibilities of learning how to conduct their everyday lives are closely related to the ways professionals cooperate across contexts and that puts inter-professional cooperation at the core of social pedagogy....

  12. Young children and their conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt; Røn Larsen, Maja

    2015-01-01

    conditions in the social practice of day-care. These compound processes include the professional's complex efforts to support the many children's personal conduct of everyday life in and across their different life arenas, involving ongoing situated and sensitive exploration of children's perspectives...... of problems in day-care. Through a discussion of this apparent contradiction and the conditions for developing a more situated approach, the article aims to contribute to the current professional and political discussions about day-care practice for the youngest children.......The article presents findings from a practice research project dealing with the everyday life of 0–2 year olds across family and different day-care settings. From a critical psychological perspective, it explores three related issues: Young children's conduct of everyday life in and across...

  13. Can practice theory inspire studies of ICTs in everyday life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup; Røpke, Inge

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, rich countries have witnessed a proliferation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in everyday life. ICT equipment is thus one of the fastest growing categories of consumer goods. The widespread adoption of ICT equipment can be seen as an element in constructing...... a new ‘normality’ in everyday life: the expectations and conventions regarding a normal home’s necessary ‘infrastructure’ and the ordinary gear for a normal way of life are changing, and the changes are proceeding rapidly. This chapter takes a closer look at the construction of a new normality......, a practice theory approach helps us to avoid the risk of ending up with a ‘media-centric’ understanding of the use of new media and adds interesting details and subtleties to the study of the construction of a new normality in everyday life. Our application of practice theory in the study...

  14. An anthropological comparison between two studies of everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Ivana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on the experiences of a fieldwork researcher. Two studies of everyday life are compared. In spite of the differences in theoretical frameworks and methodologies, important similarities are identified, leading to identical basic results. These similarities are to be found in the (exclusive dependence of the everyday survival on political survival, of everyday life on political life, of coping on political developments. The similarity is proved by pointing to the shared broader socio-historical framework in which both studies have been located, and to the uniqueness of the environment/area in which both have taken place. This leads to the final conclusion on the relation between the character of everyday life and the collective character/mentality, where the key mediator is political life and the character shaped within its domain. In a culture basically structured as a warrior culture, in the circumstances of huge civilizational changes at the global world scene, the local political mentality assumes specific features, somewhat modified in comparison with the traditional ethos. These features in turn directly shape the everyday, particularly of ordinary people, beyond the centers of power and global decision-making.

  15. Personality and the Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to present a theory of persons that is rooted in the way persons conduct their everyday lives. The approach and the key concepts in the theory are presented in the second, central part of the paper. This theoretical approach to personhood is unusual. Current...... research on personality recognizes that personality must be studied in the interplay between person-situation-behavior. In the first part of the paper I present some of the core issues in those studies. The theoretical approach aims at resolving these issues. These issues are one of the two major sources...... of inspiration for the theoretical approach. The other important source of inspiration are studies of psychological interventions. In the third part of the paper I present a study that illuminates how the theory may provoke and enrich our understanding of interventions....

  16. Young children’s perspectives researched from everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Pernille

    The paper discusses methodological issues in relation to researching young (0-4 year) children’s first person’s perspectives. Drawing on a recent Danish study of children’s compound everyday life across day care contexts and family life, I argue that focusing on the children’s gazes and bodily...

  17. Psychological perspectives on children's conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Charlotte; Røn Larsen, Maja

    2015-01-01

    This texts is introducing the special Issue “Psychological perspectives on children's conduct of everyday life” touching on the concept of conduct of everyday life and some of the theoretical debates in relation to this. The common aim of the issue is to unfold and explore the concepts potential...... meaning to a psychology for children and their development. By addressing development as person's activities and involvement in a collective, shared everyday life, the authors emphasize the relations between the context and the person as a dialectical relation of developing through the process of gaining...... access, influencing and contributing to the collective, social life conditions. In this way, the discussions of the text are dealing with some of the fundamental theoretical debates about persons and their social lives. The discussions in this special issue is anchored in the Nordic, pedagogical...

  18. Satisfaction in everyday life for frail 85-years old adults:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, A; Petersen, Janne; Avlund, K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether social relations, continuity, self-determination, and use of own resources are associated with everyday life satisfaction among 85-year-old adults with physical disabilities. The population includes 187 frail men and women from the longitudinal......) feel able to manage their own lives; (4) do not live alone; and (5) have not lately lost close friends. Lack of everyday life satisfaction is associated with (1) using home-care services and (2) living in an institution. The findings stress the importance of helping old persons stay active...

  19. Repositioning news and public connection in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    News has traditionally served as a common ground, enabling people to connect to others and engage with the public issues they encounter in everyday life. This article revisits these theoretical debates about mediated public connection within the context of a digitalized news media landscape. While...... of public connection into four dimensions that emphasize people’s lived experiences: inclusiveness, engagement, relevance, and constructiveness. Situating these in an everyday life framework, this article advances a user-based perspective that considers the role of news for people in digital societies...

  20. Psychotherapeutic Methods of Coping with Stress in Everyday Life

    OpenAIRE

    Senol TURAN; Canan AKSOY POYRAZ

    2015-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable part of life. Knowing the ways of coping with stress are necessary to preserve our mental and physical health and to maintain good social and/or occupational func-tioning in daily life activities. Different ways of coping with stress have been developed throughout history. Various type of therapies offer quite effective remedies for coping with stress in everyday life. Among psychotherapeutic treatments cognitive behavioral therapy which involves teaching s...

  1. The creative pathways of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two studies of how the conduct of life in itself can be a creative act. Very often, creativity research is concerned with the study of what enables people to express themselves creatively or aesthetically or to produce creative ideas and products. Creativity as it arises...

  2. Music and Wellbeing in Everyday Life: An Exploratory Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) and semi-structured interviews, we examined how people experience and use music in everyday life in potentially beneficial ways to enhance subjective wellbeing. In contrast to previous research where music's self-regulatory role has been highlighted primarily in the context ...

  3. Children perspectives on everyday life and the pedagogical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Ida; Lind, Unni

    ’s own perspectives on everyday life. The second aim is reflection on the significance of such children’s perspectives on pedagogical knowledge and practice. Our research on children as participants in research and in institutional developments addresses overall interests in democratization...

  4. Kindergarten children’s digitized conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The relation between a child’s everyday life and digital media technologies is complex and complicated. To what extent children think them subjectively relevant for their lives and subsequently use meanings transmitted by domesticated technologies in the contexts they live in/with and move through...

  5. The everyday life of sexual politics: A feminist critical discourse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates a corpus of herbalist pamphlets – fairly common, everyday texts found in (South) African cities – which promote the services of traditional healers and promise solutions to a plethora of ailments and life problems. The article's multi-pronged approach brings feminist critical discourse analysis (FCDA), ...

  6. ICT in everyday life - the role of the user

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frissen, V.A.J.; Lieshout, M.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The history of innovation processes related to information and communication technologies (ICT) is an interesting mix of both massive market failures and successful and even groundbreaking innovations with the potential to bring about radical shifts in everyday life. To forecast these successes or

  7. Personalized nutrition advice : an everyday-life perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents societal preconditions for Personalized Nutrition Advice (PNA) that result from an everyday-life perspective on this innovative approach. Generally, PNA is regarded as promising, because it provides users with highly specific information on individual health risks and benefits

  8. Older Adults’ Coping with the Digital Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche M. Rønning

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was motivated by a concern for how older adults adjust to their digital everyday life. Theories of motivation and self-efficacy are applied in order to understand how older adults master and adjust to the rapid development into a paper-free, online world. A sample of eighteen older adults (62-90 years were interviewed about the reasons and motivations underlying their ICT usage, and how this affects their perception of mastering their everyday life. A semi-structured interview guide was developed for this purpose. The data were analyzed using an inductive coding procedure involving descriptive and interpretive phases based on the theoretical assumptions about motivation and mastery. Three overarching categories were evident in the data material; Challenges, Connectedness and Expanding. The first category describes new challenges mastering everyday life activities, and how this brings about feelings of pressure, barriers, and fear. The other two categories give a more positive picture of how older adults perceive the new developments. Internet and social media is perceived as positive because it enables them to stay connected to family, old and new friends. It also enables them to cultivate and expand leisure and hobby activities in new ways. Based on the findings we underscore the necessity of devising strategies that will prevent older people from being marginalized in relation to the digital everyday life.

  9. Learning to Compute: Computerization and Ordinary, Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    This study utilizes the basic framework of classical sociology as a foundation for examining the intersection of the structural history of the computer revolution with ordinary, everyday life. Just as the classical forefathers of modern sociology--Marx, Durkheim, and Weber--attempted to understand their eras of structural transformation, this…

  10. THE DISABLED AND THEIR EVERYDAY LIFE EXPERINCES IN IRANIAN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Chanzanagh, Hamid Ebadollahi; Piri, Akbar; Garjan, Elham Abbaszadeh

    2012-01-01

    Like the disabled in other cultures, Iranian disabled confront numerous difficulties in their everyday life. They are constantly rejected in different fields of social life by Iranian culture, and as a result Iranian disabled find themselves in an inappropriate cultural /social circumstance. This research is focused on Iranian disabled and host culture in one of northern Iranian provinces, Gilan (Rasht city) to explain living experiences of Iranian disabled as abandoned individuals in Iranian...

  11. Sensors for everyday life healthcare settings

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi; Swain, Akshya

    2017-01-01

    Sensors were developed to detect and quantify structures and functions of human body as well as to gather information from the environment in order to optimize the efficiency, cost-effectiveness and quality of healthcare services as well as to improve health and quality of life. This book offers an up-to-date overview of the concepts, modeling, technical and technological details and practical applications of different types of sensors. It also discusses the trends for the next generation of sensors and systems for healthcare settings. It is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the field of healthcare technologies, as well as academics and industry professionals involved in developing sensing systems for human body structures and functions, and for monitoring activities and health.

  12. High on Walking : Conquering Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Bente; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia; Norlyk, Annelise

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss the meaning of walking impairment among people who have previously been able to walk on their own. The study is based on findings from three different life situations: older people recovering after admission in intermediate care, people who have lost a leg, and people who live with Parkinson's disease. The analysis of the data is inspired by Paul Ricoeur's philosophy of interpretation. Four themes were identified: (a) I feel high in two ways; (b) Walking has to be automatic; (c) Every Monday, I walk with the girls in the park; and (d) I dream of walking along the street without sticks and things like that. The findings demonstrate that inability to walk profoundly affected the participants' lives. Other problems seemed small by comparison because walking impairment was at the same time experienced as a concrete physical limit and an existential deficit.

  13. Everyday life; Lived Experiences and Designed Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Michelle; Helms, Niels Henrik; Dræbel, Tania Aase

    ) In this panel the use of different methodological approaches to answer questions about students’ knowledge cultures and epistemic trajectories is discussed. The context is qualitative empirical educational studies in a range of professional bachelor educations; Nursing, Social Education and Nutrition and Health...... and epistemic machines. In this panel, we will unfold three subprojects representing different educational contexts and research approaches: Lived experiences of clinical training Vibeke Østergaard Steenfeldt Within the framework of life world phenomenology, this study examines nursing students’ lived...... of their first clinical training. The narrative interviews focus on the students’ experiences of actions, instructions, reflections and discussions taking place in interaction with the clinical nurses. The analysis seeks to identify and describe ways of getting access to professional knowledge. Students´ lived...

  14. (ImPossible Conversations? Activism, Childhood and Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevasti-Melissa Nolas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers an analytical exploration and points of connection between the categories of activism, childhood and everyday life. We are concerned with the lived experiences of activism and childhood broadly defined and especially with the ways in which people become aware, access, orient themselves to, and act on issues of common concern; in other words what connects people to activism. The paper engages with childhood in particular because childhood remains resolutely excluded from practices of public life and because engaging with activism from the marginalized position of children’s everyday lives provides an opportunity to think about the everyday, lived experiences of activism. Occupying a space ‘before method’, the paper engages with autobiographical narratives of growing up in the Communist left in the USA and the historical events of occupying Greek schools in the 1990s. These recounted experiences offer an opportunity to disrupt powerful categories currently in circulation for thinking about activism and childhood. Based on the analysis it is argued that future research on the intersections of activism, childhood and everyday life would benefit from exploring the spatial and temporal dimension of activism, to make visible the unfolding biographical projects of activists and movements alike, while also engaging with the emotional configurations of activists’ lives and what matters to activists, children and adults alike.

  15. Befriending Everyday Life When Bringing Technology Into the Private Sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Catharina; Fagerström, Cecilia; Willman, Ania; Sivberg, Bengt

    2017-05-01

    We present the findings of our phenomenological interview study concerning the meaning of being an autonomous person while dependent on advanced medical technology at home. This was elucidated in the participants' narratives as befriending everyday life when bringing technology into the private sphere. We discovered four constituents of the phenomenon: befriending the lived body, depending on good relationships, keeping the home as a private sphere, and managing time. The most important finding was the overall position of the lived body by means of the illness limiting the control over one's life. We found that the participants wanted to be involved in and have influence over their care to be able to enjoy autonomy. We therefore stress the importance of bringing the patients into the care process as chronic illness will be a part of their everyday life for a long time to come, hence challenging patient autonomy.

  16. Navigating Violence: Fear and Everyday Life in Colombia and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Berents

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Violence and insecurity are often read as totalising narratives of communities in parts of Latin America, flattening the complexity of everyday life and the responses of occupants who suffer from fear. In this article we draw on ethnographic research undertaken in los Altos de Cazucá in Colombia and in San Luis Potosí in Mexico. While both sites are distinct locations with different historic, economic, social and political contexts they share features of communities affected by violence and insecurity: distrust of institutions of the state; rationalisations for managing violence in daily life; and narratives of fear that appear woven through the fabric of conversations. However, fear and violence are not all-encompassing experiences and individuals in both these communities describe practices of navigation of violence that draw on positive communal experiences. This article explores how, in these communities where violence comes to be expected but never normalised, people navigate their everyday lives.

  17. Satisfaction in everyday life for frail 85-years old adults:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, A; Petersen, Janne; Avlund, K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether social relations, continuity, self-determination, and use of own resources are associated with everyday life satisfaction among 85-year-old adults with physical disabilities. The population includes 187 frail men and women from the longitudinal...... study of the 1914 population in Glostrup, Copenhagen. Participants were all interviewed in their homes by an occupational therapist. Findings provide evidence that frail older adults more frequently express satisfaction with their daily lives when they (1) are occupied as usual; (2) have friends; (3......) feel able to manage their own lives; (4) do not live alone; and (5) have not lately lost close friends. Lack of everyday life satisfaction is associated with (1) using home-care services and (2) living in an institution. The findings stress the importance of helping old persons stay active...

  18. Conduct of everyday life and social self-understanding after depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybholt, Lisbeth; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2015-01-01

    This paper theoretically and empirically explores critical psychological conceptualisations of conduct of everyday life and social self-understanding. The analysis of conduct of everyday life for people who have been hospitalized with depression shows experiences of doubleness. We understand...

  19. Material and emotional movements of everyday school life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosén Rasmussen, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    's memories of physical and emotional movements across and within space we are given a chance to sense the dynamics, the simultaneous regularity and unpredictability of everyday school life. It offers a chance to sense some of the intensities that makes up the specificity of the complex universe of the school......: Belgian primary schools, 1880-1940. History of Education, 30(2), 129-140. Massumi, B. (2002). Parables for the Virtual. Movement, Affect, Sensation. Durham/London: Duke University Press....

  20. Communicating certainty and uncertainty in everyday life: An introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Caronia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This introduction focuses on the relevance of certainty and uncertainty in sociallife. We will firstly underscore the structuring role of certainties as it was outlinedby the phenomenological approach to the life-world in the first half of the XXcentury. Drawing on the bottom-up perspective advanced by the interactionistturn in social sciences, we then consider how people routinely (reconstruct thesecertainties in ordinary life through their everyday mundane practices. To empiricallyillustrate how certainties are - at the same time - presupposed and constituted ineveryday communication, we analyze two examples of child/adult interaction. Byilluminating some consequences of building upon unquestionable certainties, weraise the issue of uncertainty as a relevant modality in and for everyday life. In thediscussion we contend that far from being proper to the philosopher’s attitude asformer phenomenology put it, uncertainty and doubt are – or at least may be - thetools for everyday rational and ethical thinking. Finally we present the articles collectedin this issue that represents a collective effort to explore the territories ofcertainty and uncertainty and the relevance the management of epistemics has insocial interaction.

  1. Maintaining families’ well-being in everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ziegert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss how everyday life changes for the family in the event of chronic illness or disability. It changes physically due to loss of body function and socially due to time and other constraints related to treatment or lack of mobility. Equally important, there is a psychological impact due to the uncertainty of the future. The article will explore how family participation can help to maintain well-being in everyday life. The family should therefore focus on their own needs as much as on the needs of the family members who are ill. In order to maintain well-being in everyday life, it is crucial for the family to create routines and spend time doing things that they enjoy. By doing this, the family will create a rhythm of well-being regardless of the critical family situation. Family members and professional caregivers also need to come together at the beginning and during the illness or disability event to discuss changes that could be made day-to-day for all those involved, thereby making for an easier transition into care giving.

  2. Materialities shape practices and notions of comfort in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Line Valdorff

    2017-01-01

    The development of residential energy technologies aims to ensure thermal comfort in an increasingly energy-efficient manner. This development influences everyday practices related to comfort in everyday life in dwellings. Therefore, an empirical analysis of interviews with residents in three types...... of Danish detached houses, related to the building age, is used to understand how changes in technologies influence residents’ practices and notions of comfort. Detached houses are the most widespread type of housing in Denmark, constituting 44% of the housing stock. The analysis focuses on differences...... in heating systems between the housing types and shows how changes in technologies and material structures shape the practices of heating and airing. A shift in technology from radiators to underfloor heating was found to make a clear difference in both how houses are heated and thermal comfort is perceived...

  3. The materiality of everyday life in urban greenspace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    that urban green areas are beneficial for human health. These studies do, however, not go into a broader understanding of the social significance of urban greenspace and its significance in people’s lives. The social functions of urban green areas are not limited to whatever good effects they have on public...... health and wellbeing. The question is also which roles green areas play in people’s lives and in the community. The study presented in this paper shows that urban green areas are included in everyday life as spaces for free time and for household flexibility. They serve a number of different social...

  4. New State Policies and Everyday Life in Danish Kindergartens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Jan

    This presentation discusses significant changes in Danish policies on preschool curriculum and their effects on everyday life in kindergarten. This change is often conceptualized as neoliberal governance and consists of an increased focus on learning, documentation and evaluation. Grounded...... – pedagogues’ relation, in the amount of staff time devoted to documentation and management and in an increased focus on children’s learning and performativity. The project is based on a broad range of qualitative research methods, including ethnographic inspired observations and interviews with pedagogues...

  5. Proceedings of Designing Self-care for Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Managing chronic conditions can be challenging. People in such conditions, and the people around them, have to: deal with symptoms, adapt to the resulting disability, manage emotions, and change habits to keep the condition under control. Self-care technologies have the potential to support self......-care and mediate the relationship between patients (and caregivers) and the condition. However, these technologies often disregard the complexity of the settings in which they are used and fail to become integrated in everyday life. In this workshop we will discuss how to design self-care technologies...

  6. Searching for Ethics and Responsibility in Everyday Life Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene

    2014-01-01

    Living an everyday life among other people entails evaluating their behavior according to our own ideas about what is right and wrong – good or bad. And living according to our own ethics in a mobile risk society entails ambivalences and opens up the issue of responsibility. This article discusses...... how moral and ethical considerations are always part of individual’s interaction with others, exemplified through the experiences of being a cyclist in Copenhagen. The article finalizes by touching upon the role of social sciences whom for a long time has learned to ignore or reject ethical and thus...

  7. The formality of learning science in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonderup Dohn, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The terms non-formal and informal are attributed to learning in everyday life by many authors, often linked to their interests in particular learning practices. However, many authors use the terms without any clear definition, or employ conflicting definitions and boundaries. An analysis of relev......The terms non-formal and informal are attributed to learning in everyday life by many authors, often linked to their interests in particular learning practices. However, many authors use the terms without any clear definition, or employ conflicting definitions and boundaries. An analysis...... of relevant literature revealed two fundamentally different interpretations of informal learning. The one describes formality of education at the organizational level, while the second describes formality of learning at the psychological level. This article presents a conceptual reconciling of these two...... perspectives. Based on a literature review, the educational modes of education are defined as discrete entities (formal, non-formal, and informal education), whereas formality at the psychological level is defined in terms of attributes of formality and informality along a continuum (formal - informal learning...

  8. Theorizing Small Children’s Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn Larsen, Maja; Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    their societal settings. Furthermore, we conduct interviews with the adults in the child’s various societal settings. We work within a theoretical framework developed in German-Danish critical psychology, as well as the ethnographic tradition deriving from Jean Lave (Dreier, 2008; Holzkamp, 2013, in press; Lave......, 2011). We thus approach the empirical and theoretical challenge related to the study of small children’s every day life through analysis of the dialectic relation of the small child as a subject with agency, participating in societal contexts in which the child develops and learns. Accordingly, we...... argue that children develop their conduct of everyday life though play and learning in interconnected social practices among peers, parents and professionals. These activities take place in- and across various societal settings, such as home and institutional arrangements, e.g. nursery or day care. We...

  9. Sustainable Living in Finland: Combating Climate Change in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arto O. Salonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Finland aims to be a carbon-neutral society by the year 2050. We are interested to know on a general level how sustainable living materializes among Finnish people, what is the structure of a sustainable lifestyle in Finland and how do people reason about their everyday behavior choices in the context of sustainability in order to combat climate change. The data (n = 2052 were collected by questionnaire in April 2017. They were corrected by sex, age and residential area to be representative of the population of Finland (18–79 years old. We applied mixed methods. A principal axis factoring was conducted on the 32 variables with orthogonal rotation (varimax. Six factors explained 65.2% of the variance. The respondents were also able to write why they considered the specific variable to be important for them. We classified 2811 reasonings. According to our results, Finns have become conscious of climate change, but carbon reduction has not become mainstream in their everyday life. Circulation and preventing loss of materials show a promising start to a Finn’s sustainable way of living. Recycling has been automated so that it is part of a Finn’s everyday routine and habits. Finns also favor domestic food and products. They are interested in the origin of materials. Essential reasons for that are supporting the local economy and ensuring a good employment rate for the state. Smart, carbon-free mobility is a challenge. Finns seem to estimate that their personal car use is already at the proper level. On the other hand, even one fifth reported consideration of environmental effects when planning holidays.

  10. Manual Wheelchair Use: Bouts of Mobility in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Eve Sonenblum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to describe how people move about in manual wheelchairs (MWCs during everyday life by evaluating bouts of mobility or continuous periods of movement. Methods. A convenience sample of 28 MWC users was recruited. Participants' everyday mobility was measured using a wheel-mounted accelerometer and seat occupancy switch for 1-2 weeks. Bouts of mobility were recorded and characterized. Results. Across 29,200 bouts, the median bout lasted 21 seconds and traveled 8.6 m at 0.43 m/s. 85% of recorded bouts lasted less than 1 minute and traveled less than 30 meters. Participants' daily wheelchair activity included 90 bouts and 1.6 km over 54 minutes. Average daily occupancy time was 11 hours during which participants wheeled 10 bouts/hour and spent 10% of their time wheeling. Spearman-Brown Prophecy analysis suggested that 7 days were sufficient to achieve a reliability of 0.8 for all bout variables. Conclusions. Short, slow bouts dominate wheelchair usage in a natural environment. Therefore, clinical evaluations and biomechanical research should reflect this by concentrating on initiating movement, maneuvering wheelchairs, and stopping. Bouts of mobility provide greater depth to our understanding of wheelchair use and are a more stable metric (day-to-day than distance or time wheeled.

  11. Methodological approaches to the study of the city through the prism of everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Sklyarenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the interpretation of the city as space of everyday life. Shows the main approaches to the study of everyday life of the city. Everyday problem in recent decades firmly established in the field of social sciences and humanities. Depending on the areas of interest to consider various aspects of science of everyday life. We propose a typology of the main directions in the study of urban everyday life: analysis of representations of space and spatial practices of everyday and the study of cities as spaces of representations practices of everyday life. Construction of social reality in the existing picture of the world occurs largely through the prism of urban everyday life. City – the embodiment of possibilities of the human race. Sociology of the city – one of the most multifaceted and developed areas, and many, ranging from the classics to contemporary researchers from different perspectives applied to its study. Without claiming to be complete coverage of various aspects of this review, focus is on the methodological approaches exploring the city through the prism of his everyday life. In connection with this definition seems relevant specifics and priorities study everyday life and experience modern city dwellers.

  12. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Jette

    2009-01-01

    . The paper shares the concept of a new paradigm based upon a critical pedagogy, which for home economics education implies to know, to be able to, to want, and to be.  This paper will share a Scandinavian perspective of home economics in order to enrich the global understanding of different ways of knowing......The focus of this article is the subject home economics education in the primary and lower secondary school in the 21st century. Practical wisdom, understanding of coherence and competencies for everyday life are suggested as aims of home economics education. It is argued that these elements should...... be included as part of general education and ‘Bildung' [1] in late modern society. This article raises the following questions: what, how and why should these elements be included.   A literature research and developmental work within two home economics classes over two years commencing with observations...

  13. Assimilating Dokdo: The Islets in Korean Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Palmer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sovereignty over the Tokto Islets is heatedly contested between South Korea and Japan. The Korean government and citizenry have responded to this dispute by inserting the islets into their national collective memory in multifarious ways in an attempt to strengthen their nation’s claim to Tokto. The islets are included in the material culture and public memory of the nation in ways that make them part of everyday life for millions of Koreans. Korea’s claim to Tokto is currently taught in schools, presented in museums, found in popular songs, and exploited by businesses for profit. The deeper Tokto becomes entrenched in Korean society, the less likely a compromise can be reached with Japan over the islets.

  14. Psychotherapeutic Methods of Coping with Stress in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Þenol TURAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an inevitable part of life. Knowing the ways of coping with stress are necessary to preserve our mental and physical health and to maintain good social and/or occupational functioning in daily life activities. Different ways of coping with stress have been developed throughout history. Various type of therapies offer quite effective remedies for coping with stress in everyday life. Among psychotherapeutic treatments cognitive behavioral therapy which involves teaching stressful individuals to develop coping strategies have yielded very promising results. It is helpful to determine first whether stress source can be changed, several therapeutic approaches may then be used. Lazarus and Folkman have identified two major approaches for coping with stress so-called "problem-focused" and "emotion-focused". In "problem-focused" approaches targets are acquiring time management, self-monitoring, problem-solving skills, while in "emotion-focused" approaches, through ways of accepting or rejecting of stress associated negative emotions, or reconciling with these emotions, the target is learning how to keep emotions under control. "Problem-focused" and "emotion-focused" approaches may independently be used effectively in appropriate cases, their simultaneous practice may increase chances of successful treatment. Apart from this methods, psychodynamic therapy may be indicated in some cases. [JCBPR 2015; 4(3.000: 133-140

  15. Psychotherapeutic Methods of Coping with Stress in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol TURAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress is an inevitable part of life. Knowing the ways of coping with stress are necessary to preserve our mental and physical health and to maintain good social and/or occupational func-tioning in daily life activities. Different ways of coping with stress have been developed throughout history. Various type of therapies offer quite effective remedies for coping with stress in everyday life. Among psychotherapeutic treatments cognitive behavioral therapy which involves teaching stressful individuals to develop coping strategies have yielded very promising results. It is helpful to determine first whether stress source can be changed, several therapeutic approaches may then be used. Lazarus and Folkman have identified two major approaches for coping with stress so-called “problem-focused” and “emotion-focused”. In “problem-focused” approaches targets are acquiring time management, self-monitoring, prob-lem-solving skills, while in “emotion-focused” approaches, through ways of accepting or re-jecting of stress associated negative emotions, or reconciling with these emotions, the target is learning how to keep emotions under control. “Problem-focused” and “emotion-focused” approaches may independently be used effectively in appropriate cases, their simultaneous practice may increase chances of successful treatment. Apart from these methods, psychody-namic therapy may be indicated in some cases

  16. Colour blindness in everyday life and car driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagarelli, Antonio; Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lantieri, Pasquale Bruno; Risso, Domenico; Olivieri, Rosario Luciano

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to ascertain, through the administration of a psychosocial questionnaire, the difficulties that subjects with defective colour vision experience in carrying out everyday tasks and work, including driving a car with a driver's licence held for no more than 3 years. Subjects with defective colour vision (n = 151) and subjects with normal vision (n = 302) completed a psychosocial questionnaire regarding the difficulties associated with congenital colour vision deficiency in daily life, work and driving a car. Subjects were diagnosed as colour-blind using the Ishihara test. Statistically significant differences between the two samples were found for daily life activities. Subjects with defective colour vision preferred daytime driving. At night, subjects with defective colour vision had difficulty identifying reflectors on the road and the rear signal lights of cars ahead of them. Colour-blind Calabrian subjects admitted to experiencing colour-related difficulties with a wide range of occupational tasks and leisure pursuits. In particular, colour-blind Calabrian subjects preferred daytime driving, and fewer drove regularly, compared to orthochromatics, who were indifferent to night or daytime driving.

  17. Rituals of interaction in everyday life: Goffman, Durkheim player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Lopes de Carvalho Filho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7984.2016v15n34p137 This article proposes an exegesis of Goffman’s affiliation to Durkheim’s sociology, relating two works: Interaction Ritual and The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. He emphasizes two aspects that estimate present in both authors: the rites and the sacredness of the individual and the moral dimension of life in society. For Goffman the interaction rites are occasions to affirm the moral and social order. In a face-to-face, each social actor seeks to provide him a prized image, the “face” or “positive social value a person effectively claims by line of action that others assume that it adopted in the particular contact course.” In Interaction Ritual, Goffman critical sociologists and social anthropologists who, being engaged in the symbolic significance of modern society from Durkheim, did not take into account the notion of soul, present in the Elementary Forms of Religious Life. After identifying the intellectual and scientific influence in the formation of habitus and sociological métier Goffman, the text proposes to examine notions such rules, soul, rites, deference and the size necessary for the understanding of the social fabric in the order of interaction. It follows exposing a comparative table of the rites as described by Goffman modeled from Durkheim’s typology. It is expected that the reading of Goffman the light of Durkheim is an access road to the sociology of the first, and a way to update the contributions of the second reading of the social fabric of everyday life.

  18. Interverntion, evidence-based research and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    2011-01-01

    . Studies of practices of intervening in relation to people’s ongoing everyday lives are needed to improve our empirical basis for reconceptualizing intervention. On the background of studies of how psychotherapeutic practices intervene in the everyday lives of clients, I show how interventions work...

  19. Multi-morbidity: A patient perspective on navigating the health care system and everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Lisbeth; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Jønsson, Alexandra Brandt Ryborg

    2017-01-01

    and the management of their treatment burdens. Dilemmas were identified within three domains: family and social life; work life; agendas and set goals in appointments with health professionals. Individual resources and priorities in everyday life play a dominant role in resolving dilemmas and navigating the tension......Abstract Objective: The importance of everyday life when managing the burden of treatment is rarely studied. This article explores the burden of treatment among people with multimorbidity by investigating the tension between everyday life and the health care system. Method: This was an ethnographic...

  20. Exploring parents everyday life and emotion work related to school-home cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krab, Jimmy

    The paper will be based on an ongoing Ph.D. project using a critical ethnographic approach following families with children who experience difficulties in school in their everyday life. The project purpose is to explore parents perspectiv and everyday life. The paper will highlight a number of ex...... of examples of parents experience with school-home relations and discuss methodological challenges in researching everyday life practices and discuss how emotionwork – and management are connected to social differentierings processes in education......The paper will be based on an ongoing Ph.D. project using a critical ethnographic approach following families with children who experience difficulties in school in their everyday life. The project purpose is to explore parents perspectiv and everyday life. The paper will highlight a number...

  1. After the tsunami : the remaking of everyday life in Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuels, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the question of what it means to remake everyday life in the shadow of disaster. Focusing on the city of Banda Aceh, Indonesia, in the years after the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004, it explores how tsunami survivors have been remaking the everyday

  2. Psychometric evaluation of a new assessment of the ability to manage technology in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Nygård, Louise; Kottorp, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Technology increasingly influences the everyday lives of most people, and the ability to manage technology can be seen as a prerequisite for participation in everyday occupations. However, knowledge of the ability and skills required for management of technology is sparse. This study aimed to validate a new observation-based assessment, the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META). The META has been developed to assess the ability to manage technology in everyday life. A sample of 116 older adults with and without cognitive impairment were observed and interviewed by the use of the META when managing their everyday technology at home. The results indicate that the META demonstrates acceptable person response validity and technology goodness-of-fit. Additionally, the META can separate individuals with higher ability from individuals with lower ability to manage everyday technology. The META can be seen as a complement to existing ADL assessment techniques and is planned to be used in both research and practice.

  3. Argiilma poeetika ja pidulik elu. The poetics of the everyday and festive life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epp Annus

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates ways of writing about the everyday in contemporary life. It starts by posing the question of why literature thrives especially on violence and extraordinary events. If literature strives to speak to us through our experience of being in the world, and aims to help us understand our common human experience, should it not rather avoid the extraordinary? Without a doubt, a topic needs to captivate its writer no less than its reader--otherwise the writing and the reading would not take place at all. For perfectly understandable reasons, whenever literature proposes to face death, this implies that the given text is something to be taken seriously; it signifies that here one is dealing with existential matters, not just with the myriad small nothingnesses of the everyday. However, the present article analyzes a different way of intensifying the quotidian: turning the everyday into an experience of beauty. A writer can find moments of special importance from within the everyday, relieving the reader from the boredom of „nothing happens” by other means than through an encounter with death and the extraordinary. Through a close reading of several Estonian novels („Indigo” by Peeter Sauter and „Tõde ja õigus” by Anton Hansen Tammsaare, the article suggests that, instead of underlining the burdensome boredom of the everyday, literature has the potential, through the power of its imagery, to aestheticize the everyday, even against the conscious will of the writer. If the routine of the everyday involves the automatization of life and a loss of the intense feeling of being in the world, Heidegger reminds us that the work of art opens up being in the world as a whole – and art does so precisely by relying on the everyday, not on moments of extraordinary significance. Thus, art would imply the disappearance of the everyday as a locus of boredom, unfullfilment, obligation and repetition, and the replacement of the

  4. Music and Wellbeing in Everyday Life: An Exploratory Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-16

    Dec 16, 2016 ... ESM has been widely applied in psychological research (Christensen, Feldman Barrett, Bliss-Moreau, ... everyday music experience within the social psychology of music (e.g., Helsing, 2012; Hanser,. 2010 ..... alone they reported a greater increase in alertness, happiness, connectedness, interestedness,.

  5. ReHandle: towards integrating physical rehabilitation in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen L.; Sokoler, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    an integration of the rehab activities with the everyday activities of senior citizens. We expect that our articulation of the emerging ReHandle design space will be informative and inspirational for the interaction design and HCI community exploring the role of digital technology for successful rehabilitation...

  6. Subjective Acceleration of Time Experience in Everyday Life across Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Dennis; Lang, Frieder R.

    2015-01-01

    Most people believe that time seems to pass more quickly as they age. Building on assumptions of socioemotional selectivity theory, we investigated whether awareness that one's future lifetime is limited is associated with one's experience of time during everyday activities across adulthood in 3 studies. In the first 2 studies (Study 1: N = 608;…

  7. Youth, Life, and Politics: Examining the Everyday in Comparative Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuoste, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The traditional way of introducing comparative politics to freshmen, which is through the study of institutions, is contrasted with an alternative approach. An everyday-politics approach compares the daily struggles of global youth--how they cope in times of peace and war, and with issues of wealth and poverty, identity, education and employment,…

  8. Mastering Everyday Life in Ordinary Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Brolin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory about people who have psychiatric disabilities and live in ordinary housing with housing support. Interviews and observations during the interviews were analyzed, and secondary analyses of data from previous studies were performed. The impossible mission in everyday life emerged as the main concern and mastering everyday life as the pattern of behavior through which they deal with this concern. Mastering everyday life can be seen as a process, which involves identifying, organizing, tackling, challenging and boosting. Before the process is started, avoiding is used to deal with the main concern. The community support worker, providing housing support, constitutes an important facilitator during the process, and the continuity of housing support is a prerequisite for the process to succeed. If the process mastering everyday life is interrupted by, for example, changes in housing support, the strategy of avoiding is used.

  9. Managing occupations in everyday life for people with advanced cancer at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Brandt, Åse; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    Background: People with advanced cancer are increasingly able to live for extended periods of time. Advanced cancer influences the ability to manage occupations in the everyday life. Although studies have showed that people with advanced cancer experience occupational difficulties......, there are limited research that more specifically explore how these are managed. The objective was to describe and explore how people with advanced cancer manage occupations at home. Material and methods: A qualitative descriptive design was applied. 73 participants were consecutively recruited from a Danish...... “Everyday life under change” and two sub-categories 1) Appling strategies to manage occupations in everyday life and 2) Preserving a meaningful everyday life. Significance: The findings suggest that people with advanced cancer, to a greater extent, should be supported in exploring familiar as well as new...

  10. A true love story. Young people's romantic and sexual development in the context of everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderien Steenbeek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wieke Dalenberg. A true love story. Young people’s romantic and sexual development in the context of everyday life. Groningen: University of Groningen, 2016, 147 p., ISBN 978 94 6332 100 6

  11. Expanding the conduct of everyday life concept for psychological media research with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The concept conduct of everyday life has lately been discussed with regards to how children are engaged with participating in the manifold practices that constitute their daily living. They coordinate their actions with others (adults and children) in order to increasingly influence the conditions......, the article shows how the concept is fruitful for investigating how kindergarten children use media technologies for conducting their everyday lives in the mutually shared kindergarten practice. Finally, it argues that the concept needs to be expanded in order to comprehensively grasp the intersubjective...... and material mediatedness of an everyday life with media technologies....

  12. Borders in Europe: From history to everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcís Bassols

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This article reflects on European borders and their everyday dynamics from a cross-border perspective. The article begins with a discussion of recent events that question current border policies in the European Union, reviews the literature on borders and border territories, and finally moves on to a discussion of the everyday effects of cross-border practices on the inhabitants of border spaces. Occasional reference is made to borders in the Americas to complete the picture of this topic. Although the issue of security is indeed relevant, we focus on the economic and social dimensions of cooperation. Three aspects are essential for border residents who attempt to use the advantages of the territories for their global nature: work, shopping, and place of residence. In conclusion, there has been a tendency toward the softening of borders and greater integration of border zones in the European Union.

  13. Between Work and Nonwork: Precarious Transitions through Life Stories and Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Murgia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes critical transitions in work careers and the methodological implications with regard to the study of risk biographies. It analyzes contemporary work trajectories taking into account a variety of fields and spheres of life that are articulated in different ways, events, perceptions, and representations that inspire people’s action. From a methodological perspective, the paper concentrates on the development and implementation of methods for the narrative analysis of biographical transitions. The criteria used for the risk biographies analysis assume that the actor is a sense-maker who thoughtfully and retrospectively interprets the shifts and the events of his/her life, defining their coherence with his/her own principles. Moreover, a narrative approach enables both a longitudinal analysis of the biographical transitions in life stories and the analysis of everyday transitions among paid work, unpaid work, and private life.

  14. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  15. Bioreactors in Everyday Life: Ethanol and the Maize Craze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Silas

    2010-01-01

    This project served as a capstone event for the United States Military Academy sophomore Calculus II course. This multi-disciplinary problem-solving exercise motivated the link between math and biology and many other fields of study. The seven-lesson block of instruction was developed to show students how mathematics play a role in every…

  16. An Individualized and Everyday Life Approach to Cognitive Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-N. Levaux

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effectiveness of an individualized and everyday approach to cognitive rehabilitation for schizophrenia was examined in a case study. Method. After cognitive and functional assessment, concrete objectives were targeted for the person’s everyday complaints. Strategies were constructed based on an analysis of the cognitive profile, daily life functioning, and processes involved in activities. They included a memory strategy for reading, a diary to compensate memory difficulties, and working memory exercises to improve immediate processing of information when reading and following conversations. Efficacy was assessed with outcome measures. Results. The program had beneficial effects on the person’s cognitive and everyday functioning, which persisted at a 3-year follow-up. Conclusion. Findings provide suggestive evidence that an individualized and everyday approach may be a useful alternative in order to obtain a meaningfully lasting transfer of training to daily life, compared to the nomothetic ones which dominate the field.

  17. Small Children’s Development of a Conduct of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn Larsen, Maja; Stanek, Anja Hvidtfeldt

    Small Children’s Development of Conduct of Everyday Life. Nordic countries are characterised by a high rate of small children attending day care – in Denmark 18 % of children less than a year and 86 % one-to-three year-olds attend either day care or nursery (Haagensen, 2011). Still we need more...... knowledge about the specific meanings of these societal arrangements and how the youngest children develop their conduct of everyday life in the transitions across home and institutional arrangements as nursery or day care (Haavind, 2011) The aim of this paper is to discuss small children’s (aged 0 to 3...... years) development of a personal conduct of everyday life through participation in social practices among peers, parents and professionals - especially focussing on the children’s life in day care or nursery. We present an on-going two-year ethnographic study during which, we do participatory...

  18. Placed in homecare: Living an everyday life restricted by dependence and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasdam, Stinne; Præstegaard, Jeanette; Henriksen, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Through a sociological case study this article analyses how, seen from a relational perspective, everyday life for elderly people receiving care in their own homes is lived with dependence on health-care professionals. The healthcare professionals’ time and tasks are assigned and allocated...... in advance so that the elderly people are neither allowed nor able to vary their response in relation to the situation they encounter. The life of the client is also treated as though it were a solid, structured everyday life with minimal private time. Work in the home, for example, household chores...

  19. When risk becomes invisible in the everyday life of day care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Kristensen, Ole Steen

    2016-01-01

    Both the identification of children at risk in day care and multidisciplinary collaboration with other professions have a political focus. This study was designed as an organizational field study and attempts to establish a coherent practice of multidisciplinary collaboration between day care...... and their life circumstances become invisible in the everyday life of day care. Due to defensive routines as well as an organizational culture that frames and creates a non-explicitly structured practice using intuitive processes, the problems of children at risk become invisible in the everyday life of day care...

  20. Surviving Violence in Everyday Life: A Communicative Approach to Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Elaine

    2017-02-17

    In this narrative review, the author synthesizes the literature on homelessness across various disciplines (e.g., public health, social work, sociology, and communication) to demonstrate how the experiences of homelessness can be created, maintained, and reinforced through communication, including interpersonal interactions and public discourse. By conceptualizing homelessness as a culturally constructed and socially situated phenomenon, the author examines (a) the complex conceptualization of homelessness, (b) everyday violence faced by people who are homeless, and (c) coping strategies of people who are homeless. In summary, homelessness is a complex social phenomenon, involving tensions between individuals, families, and social systems, all of which are situated in the larger sociocultural and sociopolitical contexts of a specific time and place.

  1. Post-separation families: Residential arrangements and everyday life of separated parents and their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation is about post-separation families, their residential arrangements and the organization and practising of their everyday post-separation (family) life. Divorce and separation are common life events in most Western countries. In the Netherlands, 30% of all children under age 18

  2. German Anxiety Barometer—Clinical and Everyday-Life Anxieties in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Dirk; Schneider, Silvia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test a time-efficient screening instrument to assess clinically relevant and everyday-life (e.g., economic, political, personal) anxieties. Furthermore, factors influencing these anxieties, correlations between clinical and everyday anxieties and, for the first time, anxiety during different stages of life were assessed in a representative sample of the general population (N = 2229). Around 30% of the respondents manifested at least one disorder-specific key symptom within 1 year (women > men), 8% reported severe anxiety symptoms. Two thirds of respondents reported minor everyday anxieties and 5% were strongly impaired, whereby persons with severe clinical symptoms were more frequently affected. A variety of potential influencing factors could be identified. These include, in addition to socioeconomic status, gender, general health, risk-taking, and leisure behavior, also some up to now little investigated possible protective factors, such as everyday-life mental activity. The observed effects are rather small, which, however, given the heterogeneity of the general population seems plausible. Although the correlative design of the study does not allow direct causal conclusions, it can, however, serve as a starting point for experimental intervention studies in the future. Together with time series from repeated representative surveys, we expect these data to provide a better understanding of the processes that underlie everyday-life and clinical anxieties. PMID:27667977

  3. German Anxiety Barometer-Clinical and Everyday-Life Anxieties in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Dirk; Schneider, Silvia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test a time-efficient screening instrument to assess clinically relevant and everyday-life (e.g., economic, political, personal) anxieties. Furthermore, factors influencing these anxieties, correlations between clinical and everyday anxieties and, for the first time, anxiety during different stages of life were assessed in a representative sample of the general population (N = 2229). Around 30% of the respondents manifested at least one disorder-specific key symptom within 1 year (women > men), 8% reported severe anxiety symptoms. Two thirds of respondents reported minor everyday anxieties and 5% were strongly impaired, whereby persons with severe clinical symptoms were more frequently affected. A variety of potential influencing factors could be identified. These include, in addition to socioeconomic status, gender, general health, risk-taking, and leisure behavior, also some up to now little investigated possible protective factors, such as everyday-life mental activity. The observed effects are rather small, which, however, given the heterogeneity of the general population seems plausible. Although the correlative design of the study does not allow direct causal conclusions, it can, however, serve as a starting point for experimental intervention studies in the future. Together with time series from repeated representative surveys, we expect these data to provide a better understanding of the processes that underlie everyday-life and clinical anxieties.

  4. Is the method for succesful health promotion, public involvement and the everyday life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Maja

    The everyday life as a platform for health practices as well as the citizens’ perceptions of health and healthy aging has traditionally not been the core part of health promotion strategies. The project focuses on a groups of citizens and how they interpret and interact with health information, t......, their body and the local authorities in their everyday lives in order to become or remain healthy citizens. The aim of the project is to help create an understanding of how changes in lifestyle, habits and routines occur in a life course perspective.......The everyday life as a platform for health practices as well as the citizens’ perceptions of health and healthy aging has traditionally not been the core part of health promotion strategies. The project focuses on a groups of citizens and how they interpret and interact with health information...

  5. Casual information visualization: depictions of data in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousman, Zachary; Stasko, John; Mateas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Information visualization has often focused on providing deep insight for expert user populations and on techniques for amplifying cognition through complicated interactive visual models. This paper proposes a new subdomain for infovis research that complements the focus on analytic tasks and expert use. Instead of work-related and analytically driven infovis, we propose Casual Information Visualization (or Casual Infovis) as a complement to more traditional infovis domains. Traditional infovis systems, techniques, and methods do not easily lend themselves to the broad range of user populations, from expert to novices, or from work tasks to more everyday situations. We propose definitions, perspectives, and research directions for further investigations of this emerging subfield. These perspectives build from ambient information visualization [32], social visualization, and also from artistic work that visualizes information [41]. We seek to provide a perspective on infovis that integrates these research agendas under a coherent vocabulary and framework for design. We enumerate the following contributions. First, we demonstrate how blurry the boundary of infovis is by examining systems that exhibit many of the putative proper ties of infovis systems, but perhaps would not be considered so. Second, we explore the notion of insight and how, instead of a monolithic definition of insight, there may be multiple types, each with particular characteristics. Third, we discuss design challenges for systems intended for casual audiences. Finally we conclude with challenges for system evaluation in this emerging subfield.

  6. Media multitasking and failures of attention in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Brandon C W; Thomson, David R; Cheyne, James Allan; Smilek, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Using a series of online self-report measures, we examine media multitasking, a particularly pervasive form of multitasking, and its relations to three aspects of everyday attention: (1) failures of attention and cognitive errors (2) mind wandering, and (3) attentional control with an emphasis on attentional switching and distractibility. We observed a positive correlation between levels of media multitasking and self-reports of attentional failures, as well as with reports of both spontaneous and deliberate mind wandering. No correlation was observed between media multitasking and self-reported memory failures, lending credence to the hypothesis that media multitasking may be specifically related to problems of inattention, rather than cognitive errors in general. Furthermore, media multitasking was not related with self-reports of difficulties in attention switching or distractibility. We offer a plausible causal structural model assessing both direct and indirect effects among media multitasking, attentional failures, mind wandering, and cognitive errors, with the heuristic goal of constraining and motivating theories of the effects of media multitasking on inattention.

  7. From ideals to resignation - interprofessional teams perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Ringnér, Anders; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric inpatient care has been described by both ward staff and patients as being demanding and disorganized, lacking opportunities for quality interactions in everyday life through joint activities. Qualitative research on interprofessional teams' perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care is lacking. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Staff have ideals about care and collaboration, but the obstacles they face in everyday life, such as a poor environment, power asymmetry, lacking structure and the demands of managing chaos, mean that they appear to resign and shift focus from the patients' best interests to self-survival. Different professions in general describe the same obstacles in everyday life on the wards but there are also profession-specific perspectives on distancing and feelings of abandonment. To our knowledge, these findings have not been reported in the international evidence. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Given these findings we suggest interventions such as Protected Engagement Time as well as reflective dialogues within interprofessional teams. This would help staff to resume their caring role in everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care and put their ideals into practice. Introduction Patients and ward staff describe psychiatric inpatient care as demanding, characterized by unpredictable events, yet research on interprofessional teams perspectives of everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care lacks. Aim This study aims to explore everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care, as reported by staff in interprofessional teams. Method A grounded theory design was used and 36 participants were interviewed. Results The analysis resulted in a process-oriented core category From ideals to resignation. Related to this core category were three further categories: Knowing where to go, Walking a path of obstacles and Shifting focus from the patient's best

  8. Everyday life and health concepts among blue collar female workers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magne, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The article introduces a perspective on health of women with low level of education in terms of the organisation of their everyday life. The aim is to demonstrate the ways in which the women’s concept of health is contingent upon the conditions encountered in everyday life. A qualitative study...... based on interviews with the women forms the basis for the discussion. The analysis shows that the women find it difficult to adopt the official discourse on health and its foundation in a biomedical tradition. The article argues that it is necessary move away from the educational approach focusing...

  9. This Harlem life: black families and everyday life in the 1920s and 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stephen; White, Shane; Garton, Stephen; White, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article uses Probation Department files to reconstruct the lives of five ordinary residents of Harlem. It highlights what that black metropolis offered those outside the political and cultural elite, who have dominated historical scholarship, showing how ordinary blacks negotiated the challenges of life in northern neighborhoods, and drew on institutions and organizations, to establish and sustain new lives. We offer the kind of individualized perspective on everyday life that other scholars have provided for high culture, but which does not exist for other realms of existence in Harlem, even in early twentieth century sociological studies of black life. Where scholars seeking to distinguish the neighborhood from a slum have pointed to the prevailing pride and self-confidence of its residents, this article directs attention to more immediate, concrete supports that sustained and enriched life in Harlem. Relationships with spouses, children, siblings and cousins sustained individuals faced with the social reality of living in overcrowded, deteriorating, disease infested housing, subject to the racism of white police, politicians and employers; so too did friendships made in nightclubs, speakeasies, dances and movie theatres, and membership of churches, fraternal organizations, social clubs, and sports clubs and teams.

  10. Climate Change and Everyday Life: Repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jenny; Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes; Grace, Marcus

    2014-06-01

    There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9-10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students' engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.

  11. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Training on Stress Reactivity in Every-Day Life

    OpenAIRE

    Haaren, Birte von

    2015-01-01

    The current thesis investigated the effects of a 20-week aerobic exercise training on physiological and emotional responses to real-life stress using a randomized, controlled trial and an inactive sample. To assess participants' physiological and psychological responses during everyday life, ambulatory assessment was used. In summary, the present thesis provides empirical support that regular exercise can lead to improved emotional and physiological responses during real-life stress.

  12. The technological socio-materiality of kindergarten children’s conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    the relevance of material artifacts for conducting one’s everyday life. Everyday artifacts such as media technologies heavily shape the concrete socio-material arrangements in specific practices, hence co-constituting the scope of imaginable action possibilities. The presentation builds on insights drawn from......The conduct of everyday life concept has been enormously fruitful for theorizing how persons come to live their lives across diverse social contexts as participants in and contributors to social practices. However, social practice research still needs to investigate in a more detailed manner...... a four-month researcher participation in a kindergarten practice. It argues that the relevance of media technologies can only be investigated in relation to the various perspectives of the other practice participants. The main focus is put on the children’s perspectives, as it is their conduct...

  13. If not negotiation, then what? Gender equality and the organization of everyday life in Swedish couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Evertsson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Freed from the bonds of traditional gendered norms, responsibilities and obligations, it has been argued that negotiation is a key concept for understanding how modern couples organize their common life together. Interviews with Swedish couples cause us to question this assumption. In this article we argue that negotiations are relatively unusual in couple relationships. We found that couples seldom experience the reason, room space or need to negotiate. This can in part be understood from the perspective of seeing everyday life as a matter of practical coordination, i.e. as something we strive to master rather than something we try to change or critically reflect upon. We found that routines and rituals were a guiding force in how couples organize their everyday lives. “Doing gender”, “doing couple”, external circumstances and agreement were all central aspects in making the everyday lives of the couples we interviewed work.

  14. Social ruptures and the everyday life of homeless people: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorati, Regina Célia; Carretta, Regina Yoneko Dakuzaku; Kebbe, Leonardo Martins; Cardoso, Beatriz Lobato; Xavier, Joab Jefferson da Silva

    2017-07-20

    To discover the generators of disruptions in social support networks and identify the everyday life and projects of life of homeless people. Ethnographic study conducted between 2012 and 2013 in Ribeirão Preto -SP, Brazil. The participants were fifteen homeless people. Data were collected through video-recorded interviews addressing histories of life and a field diary. Data analysis was based on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action. Results revealed that the participants' families have faced inequalities for many generations and that everyday life is marked by violence and death, poverty and exclusion, disrupted social networks, loneliness, alcohol and drug consumption, and other socially determined diseases. The situation of living on the streets stems from several factors present in the organization of the Brazilian society and social determinants condition the life and health of homeless people.

  15. The Everyday Life of Children Across Early Childhood Institution and The Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the everyday life of Danish children across different social practices and explores what this outset can tell us about the life of children and families. Building on the critique of classical approaches in developmental psychology (e.g. Burman 1994; James, Jenks, & Prout...... 1998) and family research (e.g. Leira 1993; Thorne & Yalom 1982) the article puts forward a decentred approach to family life. The aim is to show how the institutional context and family context sets conditions for each other - and that interplay sets conditions for the development of the children....... The article argues that the social practice in which the children participate outside the family, in important ways shapes the life of children as well as their parents. The parents' insight and knowledge of their children's everyday life in early childhood institution and the co-operation between parents...

  16. Shift work to balance everyday life - a salutogenic nursing perspective in home help service in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Madelaine Törnquist; Andersson, Ingemar; Ejlertsson, Göran; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    Nurses in Sweden have a high absence due to illness and many retire before the age of sixty. Factors at work as well as in private life may contribute to health problems. To maintain a healthy work-force there is a need for actions on work-life balance in a salutogenic perspective. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of resources in everyday life to balance work and private life among nurses in home help service. Thirteen semi-structured individual interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with home help service nurses in Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was used for the analyses. In the analyses, six themes of perceptions of recourses in everyday life emerged; (i) Reflecting on life. (ii) Being healthy and taking care of yourself. (iii) Having a meaningful job and a supportive work climate. (iv) Working shifts and part time. (v) Having a family and a supporting network. (vi) Making your home your castle. The result points out the complexity of work-life balance and support that the need for nurses to balance everyday life differs during different phases and transitions in life. In this salutogenic study, the result differs from studies with a pathogenic approach. Shift work and part time work were seen as two resources that contributed to flexibility and a prerequisite to work-life balance. To have time and energy for both private life and work was seen as essential. To reflect on and discuss life gave inner strength to set boundaries and to prioritize both in private life and in work life. Managers in nursing contexts have a great challenge to maintain and strengthen resources which enhance the work-life balance and health of nurses. Salutogenic research is needed to gain an understanding of resources that enhance work-life balance and health in nursing contexts.

  17. Everyday problem solving across the adult life span: solution diversity and efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienaltowski, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Everyday problem solving involves examining the solutions that individuals generate when faced with problems that take place in their everyday experiences. Problems can range from medication adherence and meal preparation to disagreeing with a physician over a recommended medical procedure or compromising with extended family members over where to host Thanksgiving dinner. Across the life span, research has demonstrated divergent patterns of change in performance based on the type of everyday problems used as well as based on the way that problem-solving efficacy is operationally defined. Advancing age is associated with worsening performance when tasks involve single-solution or fluency-based definitions of effectiveness. However, when efficacy is defined in terms of the diversity of strategies used, as well as by the social and emotional impact of solution choice on the individual, performance is remarkably stable and sometimes even improves in the latter half of life. This article discusses how both of these approaches to everyday problem solving inform research on the influence that aging has on everyday functioning. PMID:22023569

  18. The Existential Experience of everyday life with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Jacobsen, Søren; Birkelund, Regner

    2018-01-19

    To explore, from the perspective of women the nature of basic existential conditions while living with systemic lupus erythematosus. Systemic lupus erythematosus has an unpredictable disease course and is documented to cause an existential rearrangement of life. The significance of changes in existential conditions and related experiences are unclear in the context of nursing and women with systemic lupus erythematosus. A qualitative design guided by Van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological methodology. Individual in-depth interviews with 15 women diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and of various ages, disease durations and severities were undertaken from September 2013 - October 2015. Data were analysed following van Manen's phenomenological approach and using drawing as an interpretive tool. The main existential experience was interpreted as a person "moving with the waves of systemic lupus erythematosus" constituted by the themes "oscillating between presence and absence of systemic lupus erythematosus", "recognizing space and bodily possibilities and limitations" and "being enriched through relationships and activities". When systemic lupus erythematosus was flaring, well-being was threatened and a laborious time to escape the feeling of a setback-in-life persisted long after the disease was medically under control. Daily life with systemic lupus erythematosus is conditioned by a prominent need to be in existential motion, related to the absence and presence of systemic lupus erythematosus. The experience of a setback-in-life by illness might challenge well-being and indicates that periods of disease flares or disturbing symptoms are critical time points to provide support. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. ICT in everyday life - energy impacts and the sustainability of innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    This poster summarises our work on the use of ICT in everyday life and the implications for energy consumption. It also raises the question of whether ICT innovation points in the direction of sustainability. The results are based on interviews with Danish households on their use of ICT...

  20. Energy impacts of ICT – Insights from an everyday life perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge; Haunstrup Christensen, Toke

    2012-01-01

    The environmental implications of information and communication technology (ICT) have been the subject of study since the early 1990s. Although previous research covers energy issues quite extensively, the treatment of the energy impacts of ICT integration in everyday life is still inadequate. Th...

  1. Inclusion and Participation in Everyday School Life: Experiences of Children with Physical (Dis)Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbjørnslett, Mona; Engelsrud, Gunn Helene; Helseth, Sølvi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the school experiences of children with physical (dis)abilities. Based on 39 interviews with 15 Norwegian children, participation in everyday school life is introduced as a central theme and divided into three sub-themes: community and independence; adequate help and influence in the classroom; and influence in planning and…

  2. Information Behaviour, Health Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Health Behaviour in Icelanders' Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsdottir, Agusta

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to gather knowledge about how different groups of Icelanders take advantage of information about health and lifestyle in their everyday life. Method: A random sample of 1,000 people was used in the study and data was gathered as a postal survey. Response rate was 50.8%. Analysis: K-means cluster analysis was…

  3. Moral landscapes and everyday life in families with Huntington´s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with understanding moral aspects of everyday life in families with Huntington’s Disease (HD). It draws on findings from an empirical research project in Denmark in 1998e2002 involving multi-sited ethnography to argue that medical genetics provides a particular framework...

  4. Two Mazahua (Mexican) Communities: Introducing a Collective Orientation into Everyday School Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Ruth; Robles, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an ethnographic description of parents' and other community members' participation in the everyday life of two rural schools in indigenous Mexican communities. Adults and children, together with school authorities, transform their schools by introducing a collective orientation that contrasts with the emphasis on individual…

  5. (Critical) Learning in/through Everyday Life in a Global Consumer Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin Redmon; Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the intersection of three areas of Peter Jarvis's work that have profoundly influenced the field of adult education generally and the authors own research trajectories, in particular: (a) learning from everyday life and in social context, (b) incidental and tacit learning in consumer societies in a globalised world (i.e.…

  6. Good parenthood and the constitution of we-ness in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2014-01-01

    together. The paper is based on social psychological analysis of both quantitative data and qualitative interview data rich with information about family relations and social networks in everyday life in Denmark. This analysis is informed by a critique of family sociology, which posits that conventional...

  7. Hand preference patterns in expert basketball players: interrelations between basketball-specific and everyday life behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Vater, Christian

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we examined the interrelation of everyday life handedness and hand preference in basketball, as an area of expertise that requires individuals being proficient with both their non-dominant and dominant hand. A secondary aim was to elucidate the link between basketball-specific practice, hand preference in basketball and everyday life handedness. Therefore, 176 expert basketball players self-reported their hand preference for activities of daily living and for basketball-specific behavior as well as details about their basketball-specific history via questionnaire. We found that compared to the general population the one-hand bias was significantly reduced for both everyday life and basketball-specific hand preference (i.e., a higher prevalence of mixed-handed individuals), and that both concepts were significantly related. Moreover, only preference scores for lay-up and dribbling skills were significantly related to measures of basketball-specific practice. Consequently, training-induced modulations of lateral preference seem to be very specific to only a few basketball-specific skills, and do not generalize to other skills within the domain of basketball nor do they extend into everyday life handedness. The results are discussed in terms of their relevance regarding theories of handedness and their practical implications for the sport of basketball. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. I eat healthfully but I am not a freak. Consumers’ everyday life perspective on healthful eating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.; Molder, te H.F.M.; Koelen, M.A.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The gap between the awareness and understanding of healthful eating on the one hand and actual eating practices on the other has been addressed in several ways in the literature. In this paper, we consider it from an everyday life perspective. Using discourse analysis, we analyse how Dutch consumers

  9. HIV/AIDS Content Knowledge and Presentation Strategies in Biology for Effective Use in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnguni, Lindelani; Abrie, Mia

    2012-01-01

    HIV/AIDS education should empower students to create knowledge using everyday life experiences. Such knowledge should then be used to construe experience and resolve social problems such as risk behaviour that leads to infection. In South Africa, attempts to reduce the spread of HIV include incorporating HIV/AIDS education in the biology…

  10. Integration of ICT in everyday life - exploration of transition processes in an environmental perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Presently, one of the fastest growing fields of consumption is the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). The integration of ICT in social practices is part of wide-ranging transition processes constructing new ‘normal standards’ in everyday life, and these changes have large...

  11. Educational research on everyday life, education and their transformations in globalized contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.; Kryger, Niels

    2013-01-01

    are staged ever more as pedagogical and educational relations, practices of learning undergo transformations. The concept of everyday life is changing as daily routines and associated practices of learning are being transformed through processes caused by virtualization (social media, cell phones, lap...

  12. Affective and Motivational Factors Mediate the Relation between Math Skills and Use of Math in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; Schmitz, Eva A.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence mediated the relationship between math skills and use of math in everyday life, taken gender differences into account. Results showed that women reported higher math anxiety, lower perceived math competence, and lower use of math in everyday life, compared to men. Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's. For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life. Only for women, math anxiety also mediated the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life. PMID:27148122

  13. Affective and Motivational Factors Mediate the Relation between Math Skills and Use of Math in Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Brenda R J; Schmitz, Eva A; van der Maas, Han L J

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence mediated the relationship between math skills and use of math in everyday life, taken gender differences into account. Results showed that women reported higher math anxiety, lower perceived math competence, and lower use of math in everyday life, compared to men. Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's. For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life. Only for women, math anxiety also mediated the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life.

  14. The Ethnographic Use of Facebook in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    New social media have become indispensable to people all over the world as platforms for communication, with Facebook being the most popular. Hence, platforms such as Facebook are also becoming crucial tools for ethnographers because much social life now exists ‘online’. What types of field...... play an important role even in ethnographic work concerned with questions other than how Facebook works as a social medium. Most importantly it allows the ethnographer to keep up-to-date with the field. I argue that ethnography is already in possession of the methodological tools critically to assess...

  15. Music and Wellbeing in Everyday Life: An Exploratory Study of Muscic Experience in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Carl

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we highlight the experience of music in everyday contexts in Ghana. Using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM and semi-structured interviews, we examined how people experience and use music in everyday life in potentially beneficial ways to enhance subjective wellbeing. In contrast to previous research where music's self-regulatory role has been highlighted primarily in the context of solitary music listening, for the participants in our study also played a crucial role as a form of social and participatory performance practice. This was particularly evident in the strong connection between music, religion, and social dance

  16. [Philosophy of psychiatry and phenomenology of everyday life: The disruptions of ordinary experience in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troubé, Sarah

    2016-12-01

    The paper considers the philosophy of psychiatry from the perspective of everyday life, as a particular structure of experience. We outline some questions raised by disturbances typical of psychotic disorders with regard to a phenomenology of the everyday and common sense. As a link between philosophy and clinical psychopathology, this phenomenology implies a transcendental point of view, embedded in concrete and practical forms of ordinary experience, along with social norms. This opens the possibility of a mutual questioning between philosophy and psychiatry, drawing on its clinical, epistemological, and ethical dimensions.

  17. Coeliac disease--women's experiences in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsson, Lisa R; Hallert, Claes; Milberg, Anna; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2012-12-01

    To describe what life is like as a woman living with coeliac disease. The therapy for coeliac disease is a gluten-free diet, and if sufferers keep strictly to this, it is suggested that they will stay well. However, previous studies point out that people who are treated for coeliac disease, particularly women, experience various kinds of inconvenience in relation to having coeliac disease and to being treated with gluten-free diet. A qualitative research design was chosen. A phenomenological approach as devised by Giorgi was used. Tape-recorded qualitative interviews with a total of 15 women who were being treated for coeliac disease were conducted in 2008 in Sweden. The results demonstrated that coeliac disease can influence women's lives in different ways. The general structure of being a woman with coeliac disease was described as a striving towards a normalised lifeworld. Three conditions necessary to achieve a normalised life were described, namely being secure, being in control and being seen and included. Understanding factors affecting the ability to live with coeliac disease as normally as possible can help caregivers, and others, to support these women in their aims. Nurses should help women to adopt facilitating thoughts in relation to the disease and, in so doing, help them to select appropriate coping strategies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. The Ethnographic Use of Facebook in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    New social media have become indispensable to people all over the world as platforms for communication, with Facebook being the most popular. Hence, platforms such as Facebook are also becoming crucial tools for ethnographers because much social life now exists ‘online’. What types of field...... relations stem from such social media-driven ethnography? And what kinds of data do these relations present to the ethnographer? These questions must be considered in order to understand the challenges Facebook and other social media pose to ethnographic methodology. This article focuses on how Facebook may...... the validity and value of data gathered or produced via Facebook including issues such as authenticity which are also pertinent to digital ethnography....

  19. Small Science: Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Science in Everyday Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shukla; Fleer, Marilyn

    2015-06-01

    Vygotsky (1987) stated that the restructured form of everyday concepts learned at home and in the community interact with scientific concepts introduced in formal school settings, leading to a higher level of scientific thinking for school-aged children. But, what does this mean for the scientific learning of infants and toddlers? What kinds of science learning are afforded at home during this early period of life? The study reported in this paper sought to investigate the scientific development of infants-toddlers (10 to 36 months) growing up in Bangladeshi families living in Australia and Singapore. Four families were studied over 2 years. Digital video observations were made of everyday family life and analysed using Vygotsky's theoretical framework of everyday concepts and scientific concepts (51 h of digital observations). While there are many possibilities for developing scientific concepts in infants-toddlers' everyday life, our study found four categories of what we have called small science: multiple possibilities for science; discrete science; embedded science and counter intuitive science. The findings of this study contribute to the almost non-existent literature into infants and toddlers' scientific development and advance new understandings of early childhood science education.

  20. Sounds like a Narcissist: Behavioral Manifestations of Narcissism in Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Nicholas S; Vazire, Simine; Mehl, Matthias R

    2010-08-01

    Little is known about narcissists' everyday behavior. The goal of this study was to describe how narcissism is manifested in everyday life. Using the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR), we obtained naturalistic behavior from participants' everyday lives. The results suggest that the defining characteristics of narcissism that have been established from questionnaire and laboratory-based studies are borne out in narcissists' day-to-day behaviors. Narcissists do indeed behave in more extraverted and less agreeable ways than non-narcissists, skip class more (among narcissists high in exploitativeness/entitlement only), and use more sexual language. Furthermore, we found that the link between narcissism and disagreeable behavior is strengthened when controlling for self-esteem, thus extending prior questionnaire-based findings (Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, & Tracy, 2004) to observed, real-world behavior.

  1. Neuroscience and everyday life: Facing the translation problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francken, Jolien C; Slors, Marc

    2018-02-01

    To enable the impact of neuroscientific insights on our daily lives, careful translation of research findings is required. However, neuroscientific terminology and common-sense concepts are often hard to square. For example, when neuroscientists study lying to allow the use of brain scans for lie-detection purposes, the concept of lying in the scientific case differs considerably from the concept in court. Furthermore, lying and other cognitive concepts are used unsystematically and have an indirect and divergent mapping onto brain activity. Therefore, scientific findings cannot inform our practical concerns in a straightforward way. How then can neuroscience ultimately help determine if a defendant is legally responsible, or help someone understand their addiction better? Since the above-mentioned problems provide serious obstacles to move from science to common-sense, we call this the 'translation problem'. Here, we describe three promising approaches for neuroscience to face this translation problem. First, neuroscience could propose new 'folk-neuroscience' concepts, beyond the traditional folk-psychological array, which might inform and alter our phenomenology. Second, neuroscience can modify our current array of common-sense concepts by refining and validating scientific concepts. Third, neuroscience can change our views on the application criteria of concepts such as responsibility and consciousness. We believe that these strategies to deal with the translation problem should guide the practice of neuroscientific research to be able to contribute to our day-to-day life more effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Activities of everyday life with high spinal loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Rohlmann

    Full Text Available Activities with high spinal loads should be avoided by patients with back problems. Awareness about these activities and knowledge of the associated loads are important for the proper design and pre-clinical testing of spinal implants. The loads on an instrumented vertebral body replacement have been telemetrically measured for approximately 1000 combinations of activities and parameters in 5 patients over a period up to 65 months postoperatively. A database containing, among others, extreme values for load components in more than 13,500 datasets was searched for 10 activities that cause the highest resultant force, bending moment, torsional moment, or shear force in an anatomical direction. The following activities caused high resultant forces: lifting a weight from the ground, forward elevation of straight arms with a weight in hands, moving a weight laterally in front of the body with hanging arms, changing the body position, staircase walking, tying shoes, and upper body flexion. All activities have in common that the center of mass of the upper body was moved anteriorly. Forces up to 1650 N were measured for these activities of daily life. However, there was a large intra- and inter-individual variation in the implant loads for the various activities depending on how exercises were performed. Measured shear forces were usually higher in the posterior direction than in the anterior direction. Activities with high resultant forces usually caused high values of other load components.

  3. Conflicts in Everyday Life: The Influence of Competing Goals on Domestic Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Selvefors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A common approach for understanding people’s domestic energy behavior is to study the influence of deterministic factors, such as attitudes, norms and knowledge, on behavior. However, few studies have succeeded in fully explaining people’s behavior based on these factors alone. To further the understanding of people’s everyday energy use, a goal-oriented approach based on activity theory has been applied to discuss energy conservation from a multiple goal perspective based on the findings from an interview study with 42 informants. The findings show that the informants used energy to fulfill goals linked to basic needs or desires related to their well-being. Even though the majority of informants had an explicit goal to reduce their energy consumption, many experienced conflicts with other competing goals, which often made energy conservation undesirable or challenging. The findings suggest that actions to reduce energy use will most often not be prioritized if they cannot be integrated into people’s daily life without jeopardizing their possibilities to achieve their primary goals and satisfy their everyday needs. It is thus vital to consider people’s everyday life and the many conflicts they experience when aiming to understand why people do, or do not, prioritize energy conservation during everyday activities.

  4. Siblings of children with complex care needs: their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, R L; Edwards, M; Ripat, J D; Rempel, G; Johnson, S F

    2016-07-01

    Participating in everyday life is essential to the healthy development and emotional well-being of children. However, little is known about siblings of children with complex care needs (CCN), and their perspectives and experiences of participating in everyday life. The aim of this paper is to present research findings that add to our understanding of how siblings of children with CCN view and experience participation in everyday life. To arrive at a detailed and accurate understanding of the siblings' perspectives and experiences, we used the qualitative research design of ethnography. Sixteen siblings (seven brothers, nine sisters) of children with CCN were recruited. The siblings ranged in age between 7 and 25 years, with a mean age of 14 years. All siblings took part in opened-ended interviews and completed ecomaps to describe how they participate. Five siblings also took part in the photovoice method. Analysis involved several iterative steps, congruent with ethnography. Four main themes emerged as follows: (1) participation is about being part of a group; (2) it feels good; (3) I love my sibling but…; and (4) promoting participation. Siblings of children with CCN identified challenges to participation and also described ways that they participate that relate to the care of their sibling. Siblings prioritized the relationship with their sisters and brothers with CCN in their life, and a great deal of their participation was chosen with their sibling in mind. Sibling-to-sibling relationships were distinct and meaningful and, as a result, participation was always done mindfully and with the family needs at the forefront. Nonetheless, clinicians caring for children with CCN must keep in mind the challenges that siblings of children with CCN experience and provide strategies to siblings that will help to promote their participation in everyday life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Family food practices: relationships, materiality and the everyday at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Julie

    2018-02-01

    This article draws on data from a research project that combined participant observation with in-depth interviews to explore family relationships and experiences of everyday life during life-threatening illness. In it I suggest that death has often been theorised in ways that make its 'mundane' practices less discernible. As a means to foreground the everyday, and to demonstrate its importance to the study of dying, this article explores the (re)negotiation of food and eating in families facing the end of life. Three themes that emerged from the study's broader focus on family life are discussed: 'food talk' and making sense of illness; food, family and identity; and food 'fights'. Together the findings illustrate the material, social and symbolic ways in which food acts relationally in the context of dying, extending conceptual work on materiality in death studies in novel directions. The article also contributes new empirical insights to a limited sociological literature on food, families and terminal illness, building on work that theorises the entanglements of materiality, food, bodies and care. The article concludes by highlighting the analytical value of everyday materialities such as food practices for future research on dying as a relational experience. © 2018 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  6. Music in everyday life by parents with their children with autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfried, Tali; Thompson, Grace; Carpente, John

    2016-01-01

    communication skills of children with autism, and improved parental competency perception. However, little is known about the amount or type of musical play that parents engage in with their child with autism, or whether parents use music as a facilitator in certain daily situations. Objective: The Music......Background: Music therapy has a long history in working with children with autism in both traditional settings and those which include working with the parents. Recent studies show that music therapy programs aimed at supporting parent–child interaction have resulted in significant gains in social...... in Everyday Life (MEL) assessment, developed by Gottfried and Thompson, was confirmed with evidences of validity to assess the use of music in everyday life by parents with their children with autism, and was used within a large multisite research project (TIME-A) in four countries. Discussion: This round...

  7. Emotion, Personality, Use of Music In Everyday Life and Musical Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Georgi, Richard von; Polat, Birce

    2013-01-01

    The use of music in everyday life (UofM) is an area with growing interest. Scales for the measurement can be criticized despite their reliability and validity. Additionally, the association of UofM with personality theories has not been carried out thoroughly. Within an ongoing project, the IAAM (Inventory for the measurement of Activation and Arousal modulation by Music) has been constructed. Within the existing study, the reliability and validity of the IAAM-scales are to be examined. The a...

  8. Strategies to manage activities in everyday life after a pain rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallhed, Cecilia; Mårtensson, Lena

    2018-03-01

    Owing to the complexity of the pain experience, it is important to understand how persons with chronic pain manage their condition, in order to provide an indication of how occupational therapists can enable participation in meaningful everyday activities during pain rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to explore how persons with chronic pain reason about their use and choice of strategies to manage activities of everyday life. A qualitative approach was used to capture experiences of strategies employed to manage activities while living with chronic pain. Eight persons agreed to participate. An overall theme, 'adjusting to life with chronic pain', encompasses the underlying meaning and the relations between the categories: finding new ways to perform activities, reaching for a reasonable balance of activities and using activities to achieve other purposes. Persons with chronic pain use various strategies as means to enable performance in activities of everyday life despite living with pain, which supports the conception that occupational therapists should focus on activities and strategies rather than the pain condition during pain rehabilitation.

  9. Non-specific chronic orofacial pain patients' experiences of everyday life situations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eva; Nilner, Maria; Petersson, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a complex condition with consequences that affect daily living. The aim was to analyse nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients'experiences of everyday life situations, using a qualitative approach. Eleven women and 3 men (21 to 77years) were selected through a purposive sampling among chronic orofacial pain patients referred to the Faculty of Odontology's orofacial pain unit at Malmö University, Malmö Sweden. All selected subjects agreed to participate. Data were obtained via two thematic in-depth interviews with each subject. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim.Text dealing with the subjects' daily experiences was identified in all interviews and analysed using qualitative content analysis that focused on manifest content. In everyday life situations, the analysis of nonspecific chronic orofacial pain patients' narrations exposed a fear of conflict, of personal weakness, and of the intangible; they also exposed self-blame and avoidance of fear-triggering situations. Eight of the 14 subjects did not spontaneously mention any situation in which they were content during daily living. When the patients spoke about everyday life experiences, the main finding was that unpleasant emotions dominated the subjects'experiences. In conclusion, the chronic orofacial pain condition cannot be understood as an isolated phenomenon; it must be considered in rela- tion to the person who is suffering from the condition.

  10. Participation in everyday life and life satisfaction in persons with stroke and their caregivers 3-6 months after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Aileen L; von Koch, Lena; Andersson, Magnus; Tham, Kerstin; Eriksson, Gunilla

    2015-06-01

    To explore and describe persons with stroke and their caregivers' restrictions in participation in everyday occupations, i.e. occupational gaps, 3-6 months post-stroke, in relation to life satisfaction, combined life satisfaction, care-giver burden, perceived impact of stroke, and activities of daily living. Cross-sectional study. Persons with stroke and their caregivers (105 dyads). The Occupational Gaps Questionnaire, Life Satisfaction Checklist, Caregiver Burden Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and Barthel Index were used. Correlations were analysed with Spearman's rank, and regression analyses used life satisfaction as the dependent variable. At least one person in 86% of the dyads perceived restrictions in participation, with the most common gap in travelling for pleasure. Correlations were low between the numbers of occupational gaps and life satisfaction (R = -0.33, R = -0.31); however, life satisfaction accounted for occupational gaps both for persons with stroke and for caregivers. A greater number of occupational gaps were perceived in the dyads with combined low levels of life satisfaction compared with those with combined high levels of life satisfaction. Participation in everyday occupations is related to life satisfaction even for caregivers of persons with stroke. The results of this study add to our knowledge about the stroke-caregiver dyad and will help to inform family-centred approaches within stroke rehabilitation.

  11. Everyday life among patients with multimorbidity and how GPs attend to it

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arreskov, Anne Beiter; Kristensen, Mads Aage Toft; Jønsson, Alexandra Brandt Ryborg

    , and priority settings in patients with cancer and chronic diseases. Content In this symposium we will present data from various projects concerning everyday life among patients with multimorbidity and discuss how GP’s attend to it. • “Structural Vulnerability and Health Risks of Elderly Men with Multimorbidity......”. Presenter Alexandra Ryborg Jønsson • “Life goes on… Priority settings in patients with cancer and comorbidities". Presenter Anne Arreskov • “Living with diabetes and concurrent chronic conditions – a qualitative study of the perspectives of patients with lowered self-care ability”. Presenter Mads Kristensen...

  12. Coming of age under Hitler and Stalin: the everyday life of adolescent girls in occupied Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the possibility of the continuation of everyday life in occupied Europe through a case study of the lives of twenty-five adolescent girls and young women living in Latvia between 1939 and 1944. Late adolescence is the period in which young women are struggling to establish some degree of independence, especially through leaving the parental home and entering the labour market. These transitions are the conventional markers of adulthood in modern societies. The article explores how occupation by the Soviet Union and the Third Reich affected daily life and the speed and nature of the transition to adulthood.

  13. The only gay in the village? Everyday life of gays and lesbians in rural Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Roman; Svab, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the comparison of the characteristics, experiences, and perceptions of everyday life of gays and lesbians living in rural and urban areas of Slovenia. We focus on the following thematic aspects: (1) coming out; (2) intimate partnerships; (3) the access and the use of gay infrastructure; and (4) violence against gays and lesbians. The article also addresses and discusses the urban/rural divide as a Western construct that might not be completely applicable to other social and cultural contexts. Taking Slovenia as an example, this article questions the self-evidence of rural/urban divide as an analytical concept. On the basis of our research, we conclude that this concept requires continuous revisions and reinterpretations in a concrete social and cultural context(s). The characteristics of gay and lesbian everyday life either in rural or in urban context in Slovenia lead to the conclusion that even within a specific social and cultural context, the concept of urban/rural divide should be used carefully, taking into account complexities of everyday lives and various factors that influence them.

  14. The impact of the economic crisis on Italian young people’s everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariela Mortara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the economic crisis of the last years has been characterized by recession, deflation, and unemployment. In addition to its broader effect on society, the crisis has deeply affected Italians’!everyday practices, their views, and their future goals. This is particularly true for young people, who can no longer rely on rising expectations. The paper presents the preliminary results of a qualitative study aimed at understanding how young people perceive and handle their everyday life in a social and working context so heavily influenced by income uncertainty, job insecurity, and a general lack of confidence in the future. Face-to-face in-depth interviews have been conducted in the metropolitan area of Milan (Italy.

  15. The overstimulation of everyday life: I. New aspects of male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, S H

    2001-01-01

    Western heterosexual culture surrounds the homosexually inclined boy in a climate of erotic overstimulation that powerfully affects his development and adult sexual adaptation. This assertion is illustrated through a case presentation of a homosexual man who shared a bed with his brother from childhood into adolescence. Analysis of the patient's transference enactment--repeatedly falling asleep on the couch--gradually revealed the psychic impact of this everyday overstimulation: the creation of a tantalized inner world of longing. The regular occurrence and developmental understanding of adolescent homosexual boys' unrequited love affairs with adolescent heterosexual boys are described and explored. Finally, the overstimulation of everyday life is proposed as a new model for understanding certain behavioral aspects of male homosexuality, such as the avoidance of rough-and-tumble play in childhood and homosexual cruising.

  16. Needs for everyday life support for brain tumour patients' relatives: systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karina; Poulsen, H S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to undertake a review of the everyday lives and the need for support felt by relatives of adults with malignant cerebral glioma. Through electronic literature searches we identified studies with qualitative, quantitative or mixed method designs. Fourteen studies were....... The relatives lacked information about how to provide day-to-day care and how to manage psychoses and neuropsychiatric problems at home. Likewise, they needed help from the professionals to talk with each other about potentially reduced life expectancy. Most relatives appeared to value specialist nurse support...... highly, and they found support groups helpful. Relatively few studies were identified, and extant research was found to be diverse in purpose, study design and study population. The majority of the studies focused only on the parts of the relatives' everyday lives in which they were taking care...

  17. Understanding everyday life of morbidly obese adults-habits and body image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørg Christiansen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morbid obesity is a progressive, chronic condition associated with failed attempts at change and repeated relapses. Aim: There seems to be little previous research into the understanding of the everyday life of morbidly obese adults. We wanted to gain more knowledge about characteristics of eating habits and body image as well as motivational forces for change. Methods: A qualitative approach was chosen in order to gain insight into how morbidly obese adults experience everyday life. Qualitative interviews are well suited to provide insight into themes from the interviewee's life story from the subjects’ own perspectives. To gain insight into such processes, a narrative approach that allowed the informants to give voice to their ways of doing, thinking and feeling in daily life, was adopted. The informants comprised seven women and four men aged of 26–56 years, recruited from a population of obese individuals who had participated in a weight reduction course. A hermeneutic approach was used where the research question was the basis for a reflective interpretation. Results: The following meaning-units were identified: to be perceived as overweight; and to see oneself as overweight. Ingrained habits: the struggle between knowing and doing; acting without knowing; and eating is soothing. Conclusions: Seeing oneself as an obese person is a gradual process that implied experiencing oneself as different from significant others, such as (slim siblings and friends. To experience a gap between knowing and doing concerning food habits in everyday life indicates that informants value they have a choice. This is an important insight to consider when framing interventions to support this vulnerable group.

  18. Experiencing and controlling time in everyday life with chronic widespread pain: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Bie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic widespread pain (CWP affects 10% of adults and often causes significant disability in everyday life. Research on time in chronic conditions has focused on biographical disruption and perceptions of past and future. However, more mundane aspects of time are also disrupted in a condition such as CWP, which is uncertain on a minute-to-minute, day-to-day basis, as well as in the longer term. The results presented here are part of a wider study, the aim of which was to explore how people with CWP experience and give meaning to their 'condition'. This article focuses on how mundane, repetitive and taken-for-granted aspects of everyday life are disrupted for people with CWP. Methods Eight people aged 40–60 years living with CWP took part in multiple in-depth interviews, diaries and family interviews, exploring the meanings and interpretations of participants and individuals' experiences in a social context. Results The findings illuminate the ways in which the experience of time is changed by CWP: carrying out the tasks of everyday life takes longer, routines are disrupted, and changes are needed in how time is managed. Some strategies for managing these tasks rely on ability to control one's time. However, this is not always possible and, for some, the experience of CWP becomes characterised by lack of such control. Conclusion This study explored the concept of controllable time in the experience of CWP. Regaining control over time is an important element in coping with chronic pain, and helping patients to regain such control has potential as a target for health professionals involved in pain management.

  19. Teachers' experiences of adolescents' pain in everyday life: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Gudrun; Westergren, Thomas; Haraldstad, Kristin; Johannessen, Berit; Høie, Magnhild; Helseth, Sølvi; Fegran, Liv; Slettebø, Åshild

    2015-09-03

    More adolescents report pain now than previously. In Norway, episodic pain problems have been reported by 60% of children and adolescents aged 8-18 years, with 21% reporting duration of pain of more than 3 months. Since adolescents spend much time at school, the attitude and behaviour of teachers play important roles regarding the experience of pain felt by adolescents in everyday life. Yet research on how teachers perceive the pain experienced by adolescents in a school setting is limited. We therefore seek to gain insight to teachers' classroom experiences with (1) adolescent's self-reported pain symptoms; (2) adolescents management of their pain and (3) how to help adolescents manage their pain. Teachers in 5 junior high schools in Norway representing municipalities in 3 rural areas and 2 cities. A qualitative study with an explorative design comprising 5 focus group interviews. Each group consisted of 3-8 junior high school teachers. A semistructured interview guide was used to cover the issues. The transcribed text was analysed with qualitative content analysis. 22 teachers participated (5 men, 17 women; age range 29-62 years) with teaching experience ranging from 3 to nearly 40 years. The main theme describing the experience of teachers with adolescents' pain in everyday life is that pain and management of pain is a social, physical and psychological interwoven phenomenon. Through empirical analyses, 3 subcategories emerged: (1) everyday pain--expressing strenuous life; (2) managing pain--escaping struggle and (3) strategies of teachers--support and normalisation. Teachers have a biopsychosocial understanding and approach to pain experienced by adolescents. This understanding influences the role of teachers as significant others in the lives of adolescents with regard to pain and management of their pain in a school setting. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  20. Involuntary cognitions in everyday life: Exploration of type, quality, content and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eKrans

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Psychological research into spontaneous or intrusive cognitions has typically focused cognitions in one predefined domain, such as obsessional thoughts in OCD, intrusive memories in PTSD and depression, or involuntary autobiographical memories and daydreaming in everyday life. Such studies have resulted in a wealth of knowledge about these specific cognitions. However, by focusing on a predefined type of cognition, other subtypes of cognition that may co-occur can be missed. In this exploratory study we aimed to assess involuntary cognitions in everyday life without a predetermined focus on any specific subtype of cognition. Seventy unselected undergraduate student participants were administered a questionnaire that assessed the presence of any involuntary cognitions in the past month, their quality, type, content, and potential function. In addition, participants provided self-descriptions and completed measures of psychopathology. Content analyses showed that involuntary cognitions were common, predominantly visual in nature, emotional, often about social relationships, and often related to a hypothetical function of emotional processing. About two-thirds of the cognitions that participants reported were memories. Non-memories included daydreams, imaginary worst case scenarios, imaginary future events, hypothetical reconstructions, and ruminations. Memories and non-memories were strikingly similar in their subjective experience of content and emotionality. Negative (but not positive self-descriptions were positively related with negative involuntary cognitions and psychopathology, suggesting a link between involuntary cognitions and the self. Overall, the findings suggest that people experience a wide variety of subtypes of involuntary cognitions in everyday life. Moreover, the specific subtype of involuntary cognition appears to be less important than its valence or content, at least to the subjective experience of the individual.

  1. Nuclear technology in research and everyday life; Kerntechnik in Forschung und Alltag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-12-15

    The paper.. discusses the impact of nuclear technology in research and everyday life covering the following issues: miniaturization of memory devices, neutron radiography in material science, nuclear reactions in the universe, sterilization of food, medical applies, cosmetics and packaging materials using beta and gamma radiation, neutron imaging for radioactive waste analysis, microbial transformation of uranium (geobacter uraniireducens), nuclear technology knowledge preservation, spacecrafts voyager 1 and 2, future fusion power plants, prompt gamma activation analysis in archeology, radiation protection and radioecology and nuclear medicine (radiotherapy).

  2. Personality and music: can traits explain how people use music in everyday life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a study on the relationship between individual differences and specific uses of music, referring to why and how people use music in everyday life. Questionnaire data from 341 respondents showed that open and intellectually engaged individuals, and those with higher IQ scores, tended to use music in a rational/cognitive way, while neurotic, introverted and non-conscientious individuals were all more likely to use music for emotional regulation (e.g. change or enhance moods). Results suggest that individual differences in personality and cognitive ability may partly determine the way in which we experience music. Limitations and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  3. Science at the supermarket: multiplication, personalization and consumption of science in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Luca

    2014-06-01

    Which is the kind science's psychological guidance upon everyday life? I will try to discuss some issues about the role that techno-scientific knowledge plays in sense-making and decision making about practical questions of life. This relation of both love and hate, antagonism and connivance is inscribable in a wider debate between a trend of science to intervene in fields that are traditionally prerogative of political, religious or ethical choices, and, on the other side, the position of those who aim at stemming "technocracy" and governing these processes. I argue that multiplication, personalization and consumption are the characteristics of the relationship between science, technology and society in the age of "multiculturalism" and "multi-scientism". This makes more difficult but intriguing the study and understanding of the processes through which scientific knowledge is socialized. Science topics, like biotech, climate change, etc. are today an unavoidable reference frame. It is not possible to not know them and to attach them to the most disparate questions. Like in the case of Moscovici's "Freud for all seasons", the fact itself that the members of a group or a society believe in science as a reference point for others, roots its social representation and the belief that it can solve everyday life problems.

  4. Activity and meaning-making in everyday life of people with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Johannessen, Helle; Josephsson, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore and understand how people with advanced cancer create meaning and handle everyday life through activity. Methods: A purposive sample of seven participants was recruited from a larger study. Data were collected through qualitative interviews and participant...... observations conducted in the participants’ home environments while they were engaged in activities to which they assigned particular value. Interpretive analysis was conducted using narrative theory and relevant literature. Results: The study shows how people in conditions of advanced cancer fashion....... “My little Mecca” was identified as a narrative reflecting the activity of life-confirming experiences and taking time out. Significance of results: The identified narratives performed and told in daily life may guide the development of palliative care services to support people with advanced cancer...

  5. Everyday politics, social practices and movement networks: daily life in Barcelona's social centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Luke

    2015-06-01

    The relations between everyday life and political participation are of interest for much contemporary social science. Yet studies of social movement protest still pay disproportionate attention to moments of mobilization, and to movements with clear organizational boundaries, tactics and goals. Exceptions have explored collective identity, 'free spaces' and prefigurative politics, but such processes are framed as important only in accounting for movements in abeyance, or in explaining movement persistence. This article focuses on the social practices taking place in and around social movement spaces, showing that political meanings, knowledge and alternative forms of social organization are continually being developed and cultivated. Social centres in Barcelona, Spain, autonomous political spaces hosting cultural and educational events, protest campaigns and alternative living arrangements, are used as empirical case studies. Daily practices of food provisioning, distributing space and dividing labour are politicized and politicizing as they unfold and develop over time and through diverse networks around social centres. Following Melucci, such latent processes set the conditions for social movements and mobilization to occur. However, they not only underpin mobilization, but are themselves politically expressive and prefigurative, with multiple layers of latency and visibility identifiable in performances of practices. The variety of political forms - adversarial, expressive, theoretical, and routinized everyday practices, allow diverse identities, materialities and meanings to overlap in movement spaces, and help explain networks of mutual support between loosely knit networks of activists and non-activists. An approach which focuses on practices and networks rather than mobilization and collective actors, it is argued, helps show how everyday life and political protest are mutually constitutive. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  6. The Scriptural Economy, the Forbes Figuration and the Racial Order: Everyday Life in South Africa 1850-1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Liz

    2015-10-01

    Social change and large-scale transformations are as important to everyday life sociology as to macro sociology approaches. South Africa has been a 'hotspot' of change with a number of such transitions occurring in a condensed time-period, in particular regarding 'race' matters. A large South African family collection, concerning the Forbes family, is used to explore how the processes of change regarding the racial order can be analysed within an everyday sociology framework, focusing on the period 1850 to 1930. A range of documents throwing light on 'the space of the day', 'the world and the word' and other aspects of everyday experience are discussed.

  7. Resisting social disenfranchisement: negotiating collective identities and everyday life with memory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Renée L; Fox, Patrick J

    2008-04-01

    Being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease marks a status passage formally legitimating the incorporation of forgetfulness into daily life. Based on interviews with diagnosed individuals in California, USA, we examine the mechanisms through which an Alzheimer's label is employed to justify forgetfulness, to manage social interactions, and to garner support when deemed necessary, while simultaneously combating the associated demented "master status." For diagnosed individuals, the transition from experience to symptom requires a redefinition of everyday forgetfulness into a medical problem. That is, respondents did not routinely perceive their experiences as pathological but rather were socialised into viewing age-related forgetfulness as symbolic of disease. Support groups sponsored by the Alzheimer's Association and memory clinics have a profound impact not only on the formation of group identity, but also on socialising forgetful individuals into diseased identities. The social disenfranchisement accompanying a diagnosis of dementia transforms forgetful older adults into "Alzheimer's patients," who must manage not only the manifestations of their disease, but also negotiate their interactions and identities. Their adaptation to the "symptoms" of forgetfulness and resultant social relations forms new interactional strategies whereby the diagnosis becomes a resource utilised to get through everyday life. Rather than being passive recipients of a diagnosis, respondents employ the label both as a resource, and as a phenomenon that needs to be incorporated into their self identity.

  8. Everyday life for black american adults: stress, emotions, and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Debra J

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the stress process in Black Americans by exploring chronic stress, emotions, age, body mass index, and blood pressure within the context of gender and socioeconomic position (SEP). The convenience sample of middle-class Black Americans ( N = 211) ranged from ages 25 to 79 years. A sociopsychophysiological model of everyday life for Black American adults was tested using structural equation modeling. The model explained 27% of the variance in systolic and 17% of the variance in diastolic blood pressure. SEP had a significant effect on chronic stress, and chronic stress had a significant effect on negative affect. Although men had lower negative affect scores than women, men's diastolic blood pressures were on average 4 mm Hg higher than women's. These findings are useful to the development and implementation of interventions to eliminate health disparities and improve years of healthy life for Black Americans.

  9. Lived experiences of everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Petri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore and describe the essential meaning of lived experiences of the phenomenon: Everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Background: Radiotherapy treatment in patients with NSCLC is associated with severe side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. However, little is known about the patients’ experience of everyday life during the care trajectory. Design: This study takes a reflective lifeworld approach using an empirical application of phenomenological philosophy described by Dahlberg and colleagues. Method: A sample of three patients treated with curative radiotherapy for NSCLC was interviewed 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment about their experiences of everyday life during their treatment. Data were collected in 2014 and interviews and analysis were conducted within the descriptive phenomenological framework. Findings: The essential meaning structure of the phenomenon studied was described as “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” which was a guide for the patients through the radiotherapy treatment to support their efforts in coping with side effects. The constituents of the structure were: Radiotherapy as a life priority, A struggle for acceptance of an altered everyday life, Interpersonal relationships for better or worse, and Meeting the health care system. Conclusion: The meaning of hope was essential during radiotherapy treatment and our results suggest that interpersonal relationships can be a prerequisite to the experience of hope. “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” furthermore identifies the essentials in the patients’ assertive approach to believing in recovery and thereby enabling hope in a serious situation.

  10. Affective and motivational factors mediate the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.R.J.; Schmitz, E.A.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence

  11. A Lifelog Browser for Visualization and Search of Mobile Everyday-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Sung Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices can now handle a great deal of information thanks to the convergence of diverse functionalities. Mobile environments have already shown great potential in terms of providing customized service to users because they can record meaningful and private information continually for long periods of time. The research for understanding, searching and summarizing the everyday-life of human has received increasing attention in recent years due to the digital convergence. In this paper, we propose a mobile life browser, which visualizes and searches human's mobile life based on the contents and context of lifelog data. The mobile life browser is for searching the personal information effectively collected on his/her mobile device and for supporting the concept-based searching method by using concept networks and Bayesian networks. In the experiments, we collected the real mobile log data from three users for a month and visualized the mobile lives of the users with the mobile life browser developed. Some tests on searching tasks confirmed that the result using the proposed concept-based searching method is promising.

  12. Discussion on Christianization of Everyday Life among St. Petersburg Clergy in 1907–1908

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. VORONTSOVA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Revolution of 1905 gave birth to the internal Church movement for renewal of Church life. Impressed by the revolutionary events the liberal clergy and laity of this movement called it “liberation”; in the period of the movement there was really a number of reforms that would free the Church from excessive state “custody ”. But there met and the other kinds of impulses of the “liberation” of Petersburg: the clergy, the strengthening of the role of Christianity got interested in everyday life, was wondering about the prospects for the introduction of the pastoral responsibilities of addressing social issues. There was a discussion on this topic in the “Society of Lovers of religious and moral education in the spirit of the Orthodox Church ”, the discussion took place in a number of forms of Church renovation included the offi cial recognition of the Russian Church “the Christianization of labour”. In their opinion the Christianization of all elements of everyday life would help draw in the Church wall to isolate themselves from the Church of the social strata of Russian society. Content of the discussion got into print and was propagated by priest Vladimir Kolachev, reworded features some “doctrine” and received a response in the provincial press. This discussion held at the St. Petersburg 1907–1908 by the clergs. It is highlighted the tendency of sociologization the moral teachings of Christianity in the beginning of the XX-th century in Russia and show the rejection of traditional ascetic outlook among representatives of the secular clergy.

  13. I eat healthfully but I am not a freak. Consumers' everyday life perspective on healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Laura I; te Molder, Hedwig; Koelen, Maria M; van Woerkum, Cees M J

    2009-12-01

    The gap between the awareness and understanding of healthful eating on the one hand and actual eating practices on the other has been addressed in several ways in the literature. In this paper, we consider it from an everyday life perspective. Using discourse analysis, we analyse how Dutch consumers account for their everyday food choices. We show how Dutch consumers use three interpretative repertoires to confirm the importance of health, while not portraying themselves as too self- and health-conscious eaters. The first repertoire associates healthful eating with common knowledge and 'scripted' actions, thereby suggesting that such eating is self-evident rather than difficult. The second repertoire constructs eating for health and pleasure as uncomplicated, by emphasizing consumers' relaxed way of dealing with both. The third repertoire constructs unhealthful eating practices as naturally requiring compensation in the form of certain products or pills. We discuss how the use of these repertoires may pose socio-interactional barriers to the pursuance of healthful eating behaviour. The depiction of one's eating habits as uncomplicated, self-evidently healthful and - when bad - easy to compensate for, does not seem to provide a basis for critical considerations about these eating habits. If structural change in eating practices is to be achieved, nutrition promotion must invest in creating a new social standard that both avoids 'overdoing' bio-medical health and challenges people's construction of their eating habits as naturally healthful.

  14. Complexity of everyday life heart rate dynamics and attentional control in healthy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornas, Xavier; Llabrés, Jordi; Morillas-Romero, Alfonso; Aguayo-Siquier, Blanca; Balle, Maria; Tortella-Feliu, Miquel

    2013-07-01

    Effective regulation of emotions requires the ability to voluntarily manage attention, i.e. attentional control (AC), which has been related to heart rate variability and vagal tone in laboratory based research. In this study, we calculated the correlation dimension (CD), the fractal-like properties (scaling exponents ?1 and ?2, and fractal dimension) and the sample entropy of heart rate time series obtained from ECG recordings (4 hours long each) taken from a sample of healthy students (n=47) during everyday activities. AC was assessed through a self-reported questionnaire. As expected, a linear positive correlation was found between AC scores and CD and entropy, but no associations were found between AC and ?1 and fractal dimension. The association between AC and ?2 was negative and marginally significant. No associations were found between AC and linear heart rate variability measures. These results show that nonlinear measures of long, everyday life, heart rate time series may provide useful information about the AC ability of healthy students.

  15. Hegemonical processes and Everyday life. Workers‘ practices during Sociedad Mixta Siderúrgica Argentina‘s privatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Soul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the analysis of the privatization process from the perspective of the disorganization of everyday life in working places, understanding everyday life as the instance of concretization of the hegemonical processes and as a moment of concrete totality. A description is made to show the way how the privatization of the national steel company (SOMISA develops throughout processes of disorganization/organization of the everyday life in the working place. Main topics are identified in regards to workers experience during the crisis that arose before and immediately after the privatization: work instability and individualization of work relationships. The analysis emphazises the importance of these topics in the workers´ meanings, mainly in relation to their previous working experience, labeled as “non-boss experience”, due to the statal quality of the company.

  16. ``Sober or enjoying`` - Energy consumption and everyday life in Norwegian households; Noektern eller nytende. Energiforbruk og hverdagsliv i norske husholdninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aune, Margrethe

    1997-12-31

    This Dr.polit. thesis studies the energy consumption in houses and transport in Norway and contributes to a new sociological understanding of the role of energy in everyday life. It discusses energy consumption and everyday life both individually and their interplay. Private cars provide 86% of all passenger transport. The efforts taken to influence the behaviour of the energy consumers have not been very successful as far as the measures aimed at the households are concerned. If the aim is to decrease the energy consumption in Norwegian households, for environmental protection, then clearly increased knowledge is needed about the extent and complexity of the implications of behaviour for the technological conditions. Thus the thesis examines the interrelationship between everyday life and energy consumption. 165 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Lived experiences of everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: A phenomenological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Suzanne; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore and describe the essential meaning of lived experiences of the phenomenon: Everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy treatment in patients with NSCLC is associated with severe side effects such as fatigue...... phenomenological framework. FINDINGS: The essential meaning structure of the phenomenon studied was described as "Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life," which was a guide for the patients through the radiotherapy treatment to support their efforts in coping with side effects......: A sample of three patients treated with curative radiotherapy for NSCLC was interviewed 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment about their experiences of everyday life during their treatment. Data were collected in 2014 and interviews and analysis were conducted within the descriptive...

  18. Telecentres and the provision of community based access to electronic information in everyday life in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Ellen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research undertaken for a PhD between 1997 and 2000 in the United Kingdom. The study explored three themes, the use of electronic information in everyday life, the use of telecentres by local communities in everyday life and community involvement strategies in the design, development and implementation of telecentres. Results led to development of a framework to inform future community based ICT initiatives. The findings and methods used to analyse the data are relevant to both future study of community based ICT initiatives and the broader areas of information seeking, information seeking behaviour and user needs. Consequently, it is hoped they will be used by other researchers wishing to take a qualitative approach when studying in these areas. This paper will report findings relating to the use of electronic information in everyday life, setting these findings within the context of the whole study. The full PhD thesis is available on-line.

  19. Digital technologies, participatory learning and the transformation of students’ conduct of everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraube, Ernst

    The teaching and learning spaces at universities are in transformation. With the incorporation of electronic technologies like ipads, smart boards and electronic platforms like “moodle” new digital spaces are emerging in educational practices. These technological spaces are not only useful tools...... expanding human activities, they are also powerful socio-political “forms of life” (Langdon Winner) transforming fundamentally the practice of teaching and learning as well as the students’ conduct of everyday life. The paper explores the meaning of digital learning spaces at universities (especially......, the paper examines the contradictory forms of participation materialized in digital learning spaces and explores how they might relate to the development of expansive learning....

  20. LEARNING FROM PARTICIPATION IN CREATIVE ACTVITIES TRANSFERRED T0 EVERYDAY LIFE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Winther; Pedersen, Helle Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Creative activities have traditionally been used in psychiatric occupational therapy. However, there is a lack of research on how creative activities influence everyday life; especially with a learning perspective. The aim of the study is to develop and qualify the use of creative activities...... and Aarkrog (2012) was used in the analysis.Results:The results showed that competences acquired by the informants related to general transfer to other contexts including use of general knowledge. Through participation in creative activities, the informants achieved competences such as active participation...... and engagement in social contexts as well as abilities to problem solve and plan/follow procedures and structures.Conclusion:The study shows that the use of creative activities as part of psychiatric rehabilitation has potential to give general transfer of competences into coping with daily tasks. The results...

  1. The photographic image of everyday life: meaning and information in journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atílio Avancini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical foundations of this article are the conceptual principlesof the French intellectuals Philippe Dubois (based on the book Photographic Act, Roland Barthes (book: Camera Lucida and Henri Cartier-Bresson (text: The Decisive Moment. Their texts are references for the purpose of providing a comprehension of the meanings ofphotographs in journalistic narratives. It is a critical debate aboutthe presence of the photographic image in journalism, reorganizing knowledge faced with its conceptual fragility, which gives digital photography an important role as document and information. Oneof the ideas to be considered rests on the assumption that today, inthe reconfiguration of the photographic studies of urban everyday life (identity crisis caused by digital technology, the meaning becomes more important than the image as an image.

  2. THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGE OF EVERYDAY LIFE: meaning and information in journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atílio Avancini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical foundations of this article are the conceptual principlesof the French intellectuals Philippe Dubois (based on the book Photographic Act, Roland Barthes (book: Camera Lucida and Henri Cartier-Bresson (text: The Decisive Moment. Their texts are references for the purpose of providing a comprehension of the meanings ofphotographs in journalistic narratives. It is a critical debate aboutthe presence of the photographic image in journalism, reorganizing knowledge faced with its conceptual fragility, which gives digital photography an important role as document and information. Oneof the ideas to be considered rests on the assumption that today, inthe reconfiguration of the photographic studies of urban everyday life (identity crisis caused by digital technology, the meaning becomes more important than the image as an image.

  3. Reproductive strategies and Islamic discourse: Malian migrants negotiate everyday life in Paris, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Carolyn F

    2006-03-01

    Approximately 37 thousand Malians currently reside in France as part of the West African diaspora. Primarily Muslim, both women and men confront challenges to their understandings of Islamic prohibitions and expectations, especially those addressing conjugal relations and reproduction. Biomedical policies generate marital conflicts and pose health dilemmas for women who face family and community pressures to reproduce but biomedical encouragement to limit childbearing. For many women, contraception represents a reprieve from repeated pregnancies and fatigue in spite of resistance from those who contest women's reproductive decisions as antithetical to Islam. French social workers play a particularly controversial role by introducing women to a discourse of women's rights that questions the authority of husbands and of religious doctrine. Women and men frame decisions and debate in diverse interpretations of Islam as they seek to manage the contradictions of everyday life and assert individual agency in the context of immigration and health politics.

  4. "Leaving it to chance"-Passive risk taking in everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruty Keinan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While risk research focuses on actions that put people at risk, this paper introduces the concept of ``passive risk''---risk brought on or magnified by inaction. We developed a scale measuring personal tendency for passive risk taking (PRT, validated it using a 150 undergraduate student sample, and obtained three factors indicating separate domains of passive risk taking: risk involving resources, medical risks and ethical risks. The scale has criterion validity, as it is correlated with reported passive risk taking in everyday life, and also has high test-retest reliability. While correlated with the DOSPERT scale, the PRT shows divergent validity from classic risk taking constructs like sensation seeking, and convergent validity with tendencies previously not linked to risk taking, such as procrastination and avoidance. The results indicate that passive risk is a separate and unique domain of risk taking, which merits further research to understand the cognitive and motivational mechanism perpetuating it.

  5. The formality of learning science in everyday life: A conceptual literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Bonderup Dohn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The terms non-formal and informal are attributed to learning in everyday life by many authors, often linked to their interests in particular learning practices. However, many authors use the terms without any clear definition, or employ conflicting definitions and boundaries. An analysis of relevant literature revealed two fundamentally different interpretations of informal learning. The one describes formality of education at the organizational level, while the second describes formality of learning at the psychological level. This article presents a conceptual reconciling of these two perspectives. Based on a literature review, the educational modes of education are defined as discrete entities (formal, non-formal, and informal education, whereas formality at the psychological level is defined in terms of attributes of formality and informality along a continuum (formal ↔ informal learning. Relations to other  well-established frameworks within the field of informal learning are discussed.

  6. The Role of Everyday Life Products and Social Practices in Sustainable Transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Louise; Remmen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    and the way we live. When opting for a low carbon society, the innovation dynamics of everyday life products as well as consumption and practice patterns become an important field of investigation. Hence, to approach consumption aspects of using and interacting with energy using products, it is important...... to kill (Røpke, 2009), so in order to make people change practice, alternate routines that work has to be proposed and accepted. Practice theory can help understanding how practices work, and thus clarifying what has to be included in a study of potentials for a sustainable transition. Social practices...... and the aspect of consumers being practitioners is an interesting subject to investigate further in relation to Geels’ Multi Level Perspective (MLP) on technological transitions. As the role of user practices in system change seems to be neglected in the MLP of transitions (Genus and Coles, 2008), analyzing...

  7. Sperm DNA damage-the effect of stress and everyday life factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M; Jurewicz, J; Merecz-Kot, D; Sobala, W; Radwan, P; Bochenek, M; Hanke, W

    2016-07-01

    The clinical significance of sperm DNA damage lies in its association with natural conception rates and also might have a serious consequence on developmental outcome of the newborn. The aim of the present study is to determine whether stress and everyday life factors are associated with sperm DNA damage in adult men. The study population consisted of 286 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20-300 m ml(-1) or with slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 m ml(-1)) (WHO, 1999). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The sperm chromatin structure assay was assessed using flow cytometry. In the present study, we found evidence for a relationship between sperm DNA damage parameters and everyday life factors. High and medium level of occupational stress and age increase DNA fragmentation index (P=0.03, P=0.004 and P=0.03, respectively). Other lifestyle factors that were positively associated with percentage of immature sperms (high DNA stainability index) included: obesity and cell phone use for more than 10 years (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively). Our findings indicate that stress and lifestyle factor may affect sperm DNA damage. Data from the present study showed a significant effect of age, obesity, mobile phone radiation and occupational stress on sperm DNA damage. As DNA fragmentation represents an extremely important parameter indicative of infertility and potential outcome of assisted reproduction treatment, and most of the lifestyle factors are easily modifiable, the information about factors that may affect DNA damage are important.

  8. Everyday imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Allan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    ’s detailed analysis of open-ended questionnaires from ‘millennial’ smartphone users elucidates the varied experiential, compositional, and technological aspects associated with smartphone imagery in everyday life. It argues that the associated changes do more than just update previous technologies but rather...

  9. On reflexivity and the conduct of the self in everyday life: reflections on Bourdieu and Archer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Sadiya; Hogan, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a critique of the concept of reflexivity in social theory today and argues against the tendency to define agency exclusively in terms of reflexivity. Margaret Archer, in particular, is highlighted as a key proponent of this thesis. Archer argues that late modernity is characterized by reflexivity but, in our view, this position neglects the impact of more enduring aspects of agency, such as the routinization of social life and the role of the taken-for-granted. These concepts were pivotal to Bourdieu and Giddens' theorization of everyday life and action and to Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self. We offer Bourdieu's habitus as a more nuanced approach to theorizing agency, and provide an alternative account of reflexivity. Whilst accepting that reflexivity is a core aspect of agency, we argue that it operates to a backdrop of the routinization of social life and operates from within and not outside of habitus. We highlight the role of the breach in reflexivity, suggesting that it opens up a critical window for agents to initiate change. The article suggests caution in over-ascribing reflexivity to agency, instead arguing that achieving reflexivity and change is a difficult and fraught process, which has emotional and moral consequences. The effect of this is that people often prefer the status quo, rather than to risk change and uncertainty. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2015.

  10. Improvements of task performance in daily life after acquired brain injury using commonly available everyday technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Larsson Lund, Maria

    2011-01-01

    To investigate how individualised occupation-based interventions with commonly available everyday technology (ET) can compensate for perceived difficulties with daily life tasks after an aquired brain injury (ABI) and improve satisfaction with occupational performance. This intervention study was designed as a multiple case study according to Yin. Ten men and women with an ABI (traumatic or non-traumatic) participated. Data were collected through interviews, observations and field notes before and after the intervention and at follow-up (on average 11 weeks afterwards). The interventions focused on enabling each participant's prioritised goals related to task performance in daily life. All participants achieved all their goals by learning to use both new functions in their own familiar ET and new ET. The participant's perceived difficulties in occupational performance decreased and their satisfaction with occupational performance increased with the use of ET. An individualised intervention process, involving the use of own familiar ET or ET off-the-shelf, has the potential to compensate for perceived difficulties following an ABI and improve satisfaction with occupational performance in daily life.

  11. Life and death in the city: Lessons from Venezuela | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-11-16

    Nov 16, 2016 ... ... compassion and solidarity in the cities of Venezuela — and the lessons that can be taken from their experience. Cities of Life and Death presents findings from research led by Laboratorio de Ciencias Sociales (LACSO) in four cities: Caracas, Ciudad Guayana, San Cristobal, and San Antonio del Táchira.

  12. Everyday Physical Activity of Students in Nyíregyháza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fintor, János Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of physical education lessons has already been demonstrated by a lot of essays, however, it has also been revealed that this popularity, as well as the frequency of doing sports, tends to decrease at later ages of life. Pursuing sports has a positive effect on academic performance. Introducing PE as an everyday lesson at schools was…

  13. Effectiveness of the "Cancer Home-Life Intervention" on everyday activities and quality of life in people with advanced cancer living at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Åse; Pilegaard, Marc Sampedro; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2016-01-01

    , and that they spend a considerable part of their time at home. Still, research on interventions to support the performance of and participation in everyday activities is only scarcely available. Therefore, the occupational therapy-based “Cancer Home-Life Intervention” consisting of tailored adaptive interventions...... by the responsible oncologist; and with a functional level 1–2 on the WHO performance scale. The primary outcome is the quality of performance of activities of daily living. Secondary outcomes are problems with prioritised everyday activities; autonomy and participation; and health-related quality of life...... applied in the participant’s home environment was developed. The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Cancer Home-Life Intervention compared to usual care on the performance of and participation in everyday activities and quality of life in people...

  14. Mom, Dad and the research object: The ethics of conducting research based on your own children’s everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Noomi Christine Linde; Szulevicz, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Doing research into the everyday lives of one’s own children allows for a unique in-depth insight into the complexities of educational life. This article discusses the ethical dilemmas of this kind of research including issues of power, consent, emotional involvement, objectivity and researcher p...

  15. Sense, symbol, and soma: illness experience in the soundscape of everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuengsatiansup, K

    1999-09-01

    This article explores the lived experience of women suffering from an illness prevalent in the Kui communities of Northeast Thailand. The symptoms, ranging from loss of appetite to chronic fatigue, were typically triggered by being exposed to certain kinds of sounds, such as motorcycles, quarrelling neighbors, or carousing drunkards. I examine the illness experience as it was constituted in the soundscape of everyday life to reveal how the meaning-endowed sounds aggravated the feeling of being vulnerable and defenseless. The felt immediacies created by the audio-somatic experience were reconceptualized within the indigenous somato-psychic framework as a form of illness. By examining the life histories and illness experiences of individuals who were rendered vulnerable and defenseless, the study reveals how symbols that carry political significance, the body as a cultural form of memory, and the senses combine to create a specific mode of being-in-the-world. Sense, symbols, and somatic processes combined to create an illness experience out of the felt immediacies of the Kui's socio-political predicament of marginality.

  16. Induced ruminative and mindful attention in everyday life: an experimental ambulatory assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffziger, Silke; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Eisenbach, Christina; Koudela, Susanne; Reinhard, Iris; Zamoscik, Vera; Kirsch, Peter; Kuehner, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Rumination has been proposed as a risk factor for depression, while mindful attention might be protective. Differential effects of these attention foci have so far only been examined in the laboratory. Therefore, we conducted an experimental ambulatory assessment study using ruminative and mindful attention inductions in everyday life to examine their effects in a natural context. Fifty young adults carried palmtops over three weekdays (rumination induction day, mindful attention induction day, noninduction day; randomized cross-over design). Ten times a day, participants rated ruminative self-focus and mood. On the induction days, they were additionally subjected to 3-min inductions of ruminative or mindful attention at each assessment. The two induction modes exhibited differential immediate effects on ruminative self-focus and mood. While induced rumination immediately deteriorated valence and calmness, induced mindful attention specifically enhanced calmness. Depressive symptoms did not moderate these effects. While overall longer term effects of the inductions were missing, the mindful attention day was associated with slightly increasing positive valence over the day. The results need to be replicated in high-risk and patient samples to demonstrate the clinical significance of identified effects. Results confirm the emotional relevance of rumination and mindful attention in real world settings. Future work may test whether adaptive attention-focusing instructions delivered in daily life can support clinical interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Review: Irene Ziehle & Ulrich Hägele (Eds. (2004. Fotografien vom Alltag – Fotografieren als Alltag [Photographs of Everyday Life—Taking Photographs in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Döring

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The reader looks at the meaning of (everyday photographs for ethnography and cultural studies. It deals with the methodological implications of both the photograph as a research object and the taking of photographs as a research method. Some contributions describe selected methods—for example, photo archiving or photo interpretation. Most chapters reconstruct photo practices in everyday life (i.e. the work of photo studios in department stores or sanatoriums or present the results of photo analyses (e.g., family photo albums, photo collections of companies, or photo contributions of magazine readers. The book covers a whole conference and delivers 21 exciting, but fairly heterogeneous chapters; it would have benefited from a tighter structure. The focus is on the 20th and 19th centuries and ample photo material is provided. One thing this book, the first volume of a series on visual culture, does not do is build a bridge to the era of digital photography. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0703181

  18. Anytime-Anywhere? Mobile Communicative Practices and the Management of Relationships in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Becerra, Tabita Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines how mobile practices of social-media use are integrated into individuals' everyday lives as a way to manage their relationships. Mobile communication technologies and social-media use intersect in people's everyday communicative practices, allowing individuals to engage in continuous interactions that take place on the…

  19. Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Ulrica; Sandell, Rolf; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation. The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations. While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence. Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

  20. Dealing with the Margins of Law: Adult Sex Workers' Resistance in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Natalia Fassi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the way sex workers in Córdoba, Argentina, have dealt with legal marginalization, focusing on their understandings and associated practices of resistance. Sex workers position in law shows the group is on the margins of law, which means that their activity is not considered to be legal but is not illegal either. Since 2000 a group of sex workers started to organize to stop the constant detentions and humiliations by police officers. The organization called AMMAR (Asociación de Mujeres Meretrices Argentinas implied a major shift from an oppression of consciousness to a consciousness of oppression, modifying in this process the terms of their resistance from mere tactics of survival to a struggle for redefinition of their position in law and society. This article firstly explores the idea of margins of law, consciousness, power and resistance, and also describes the regulation of sex work in the city of Córdoba; secondly, it refers to sex workers experiences, perceptions and practices of resistance before the organization in relation to the police, the Judiciary, as well as with other institutions, and relates this experiences with their practices of resistance in that period; thirdly, it explains the process of organization and the way it has influenced their reflective awareness and practices of resistance, it describes as well the heterogeneity of understandings regarding law. Lastly, the Conclusion revisits the outcomes and literature to propose final reflections about dealing with the margins of law in everyday life.

  1. Pediatric evaluation of the ClearVoice™ speech enhancement algorithm in everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Noël-Petroff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ClearVoice™ enables Advanced Bionics cochlear implant users to improve their speech understanding in difficult listening environments, without compromising performance in quiet situations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of ClearVoice in children. Children between six and fourteen years of age randomly tested two modalities of ClearVoice for one month each. The baseline program, HiRes 120™, and both ClearVoice programs were evaluated with a sentence test in quiet and noise. Parents and teachers completed a questionnaire related to everyday noisy situations. The switchover to ClearVoice was uneventful for both modalities. Adjustments to thresholds and comfort levels were required. Seven out of the nine children preferred a ClearVoice program. No impact of ClearVoice on performance in quiet was observed and both modalities of ClearVoice improved speech understanding in noise compared to the baseline program, significantly with ClearVoice high. Positive outcomes were obtained from the questionnaires and discussions with parents and children. This study showed that children benefited from using ClearVoice in their daily life. There was a clear trend towards improved speech understanding in noise with ClearVoice, without affecting performance in quiet; therefore ClearVoice can be used by children all day, without having to change programs.

  2. Recognition of flow in everyday life using sensor agent robot with laser range finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshima, Misa; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, we suggest an algorithm for a sensor agent robot with a laser range finder to recognize the flows of residents in the living spaces in order to achieve flow recognition in the living spaces, recognition of the number of people in spaces, and the classification of the flows. House reform is or will be demanded to prolong the lifetime of the home. Adaption for the individuals is needed for our aging society which is growing at a rapid pace. Home autonomous mobile robots will become popular in the future for aged people to assist them in various situations. Therefore we have to collect various type of information of human and living spaces. However, a penetration in personal privacy must be avoided. It is essential to recognize flows in everyday life in order to assist house reforms and aging societies in terms of adaption for the individuals. With background subtraction, extra noise removal, and the clustering based k-means method, we got an average accuracy of more than 90% from the behavior from 1 to 3 persons, and also confirmed the reliability of our system no matter the position of the sensor. Our system can take advantages from autonomous mobile robots and protect the personal privacy. It hints at a generalization of flow recognition methods in the living spaces.

  3. Implicit theories about willpower predict self-regulation and grades in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Walton, Gregory M; Bernecker, Katharina; Dweck, Carol S

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory research shows that when people believe that willpower is an abundant (rather than highly limited) resource they exhibit better self-control after demanding tasks. However, some have questioned whether this "nonlimited" theory leads to squandering of resources and worse outcomes in everyday life when demands on self-regulation are high. To examine this, we conducted a longitudinal study, assessing students' theories about willpower and tracking their self-regulation and academic performance. As hypothesized, a nonlimited theory predicted better self-regulation (better time management and less procrastination, unhealthy eating, and impulsive spending) for students who faced high self-regulatory demands. Moreover, among students taking a heavy course load, those with a nonlimited theory earned higher grades, which was mediated by less procrastination. These findings contradict the idea that a limited theory helps people allocate their resources more effectively; instead, it is people with the nonlimited theory who self-regulate well in the face of high demands. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The everyday life of the homeless: disruptions, sociabilities, wishes and possibilities of Occupational Therapy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldez Cavalcante Bezerra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many homeless people living in Brazilian cities, configuring a collective problem that has challenged the state-owned power to implement actions to revert the situation of extreme exclusion that affects these people. Objective: To know and discuss the everyday life of people living in the streets of Maceió, Alagoas state. Methods: This article presents part of the results of a research that had as main objective tracing the profile of the street population that attends a public hostel from the public social assistance network of the city of Maceió, identifying possible demands of intervention through occupational therapy. It consists of a qualitative study, accomplished with 37 individuals who attend this public hostel, whose data were analyzed through content analysis. Results and discussion: The main processes of entering and living in the streets (disruptions, sociabilites, wishes are discussed, acknowledging the social complexity of the concerned phenomenon, based on the heterogeneity of the researched group, as well as on the possible occupational therapy interventions related to the demands presented.

  5. Disturbing Information and Denial in the Classroom and Beyond: Climate Change, Emotions and Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? Most studies of public response to climate change have focused on information deficit approaches. Many in the general public and environmental community have presumed that the public's failure to engage is a function of lack of concern about climate change. Instead, using interviews and ethnographic research on how knowledge of climate change is experienced in everyday life I describe "the social organization of climate denial" and discuss how it impacts classroom learning and the broader social understanding of climate change. Disturbing emotions of guilt, helplessness and fear of the future arose when people were confronted with the idea of climate change. People then normalized these disturbing emotions by changing the subject of conversations, shifting their attention elsewhere, telling jokes, and drawing on stock social discourses that deflected responsibility to others. The difficulty people have in making sense of climate change is in direct relation to the social world around them. This research suggests that educational strategies in the classroom and for the general public that consider and target the social, cultural and political aspects of the meaning of climate change will be most effective (in addition to factors that affect individual cognition).

  6. Everyday Ageing in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald-Bolow, Nina Rose; Malmborg, Lone; Brandt, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Senior life in Copenhagen is lived in numerous ways. Through three seniors' stories from their everyday life, we give an insight into this diversity. We lookig into how they imagine a good senior life can unfold in Copenhagen today. The three senior lives portrayed here were part of the everyday...

  7. Are Your Cells Pregnant? Relating Biology Laboratory Exercises to Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Simon J.; Banner, Lisa R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise that allows students to investigate the principles of hormone release from endocrine cells, which is highly relevant to students' everyday lives. (Contains 17 references.) (ASK)

  8. Dietary education must fit into everyday life: a qualitative study of people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hempler NF

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nana F Hempler,1 Sara Nicic,1 Bettina Ewers,2 Ingrid Willaing1 1Health Promotion Research, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark; 2Nutrition and Food Services Department, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark Background: The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study explores perspectives on dietary diabetes education and healthy food choices of people living in Denmark who have a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 with 12 participants with type 2 diabetes who had received dietary diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. Results: Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants’ taste preferences in the educational setting. Conclusion: Dietary education that is sensitive to the attitudes, wishes, and preferences of the participants and that aims at establishing a connection to the everyday life of the participants might facilitate successful changes in dietary practices among people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. The findings suggest that more focus should be placed on collaborative processes in the dietary educational setting in order to achieve appropriate education and to improve communication between this population and health care professionals. Keywords: dietary diabetes

  9. The Association between Short Periods of Everyday Life Activities and Affective States: A Replication Study Using Ambulatory Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Thomas; Kanning, Martina; Koudela-Hamila, Susanne; Hey, Stefan; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Regularly conducted exercise programs effectively influence affective states. Studies suggest that this is also true for short bouts of physical activity (PA) of 10 min or less. Accordingly, everyday life activities of short duration might be used to regulate affective states. However, this association has rarely been studied in reference to unstructured activities in ongoing real-life situations. The current study examined the influence of various everyday life activities on three dimensions of mood (valence, calmness, energetic arousal) in a predominantly inactive sample. Ambulatory Assessment (AA) was used to investigate the association between actual PA and affective states during the course of 1 day. Seventy-seven students ages 19-30 participated in the study. PA was assessed with accelerometers, and affective state assessments were conducted hourly using an e-diary with a six-item mood scale that was specially designed for AA. Multilevel analyses indicated that the mood dimensions energetic arousal (p = 0.001) and valence (p = 0.005) were positively influenced by the intensity of the activity carried out in the 10-min prior to the assessment. As their activity increased, the participants' positive feelings and energetic arousal increased. However, the students' calmness was not affected by their activity levels. The findings highlight the importance of integrating short activity intervals of 10 min or less into everyday life routines to improve affective states.

  10. The everyday life of the young child shortly after receiving a cancer diagnosis, from both children's and parent's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Laura; Knutsson, Susanne; Huus, Karina; Enskar, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Providing qualified, evidence-based healthcare to children requires increased knowledge of how cancer affects the young child's life. There is a dearth of research focusing on the young child's experience of everyday life. The purpose of this study was to explore young children's and their parents' perceptions of how cancer affects the child's health and everyday life shortly after diagnosis. Thirteen children with newly diagnosed cancer aged 1 to 6 years and their parents, connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden, participated in this study through semistructured interviews. Child and parent data were analyzed as a family unit, using qualitative content analysis. Everyday life was spent at hospital or at home waiting to go back to hospital. Analysis led to the following categories: feeling like a stranger, feeling powerless, and feeling isolated. The child wants to be seen as a competent individual requiring information and participation in care. Parents need to be a safe haven for their child and not feel forced to legitimize painful and traumatic procedures by assisting with them. Nurses play a major role in the lives of children. Research with and on the young child is necessary and a way of making them visible and promoting their health and well-being. Nurses need to reevaluate the newly diagnosed child's care routines so as to shift focus from the illness to the child. This requires competent nurses, secure in their caring role.

  11. The association between short periods of everyday life activities and affective states: a replication study using ambulatory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eBossmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Regularly conducted exercise programs effectively influence affective states. Studies suggest that this is also true for short bouts of physical activity of ten minutes or less. Accordingly, everyday life activities of short duration might be used to regulate affective states. However, this association has rarely been studied in reference to unstructured activities in ongoing real-life situations. The current study examined the influence of various everyday life activities on three dimensions of mood (valence, calmness, energetic arousal in a predominantly inactive sample. Ambulatory Assessment (AA was used to investigate the association between actual physical activity (aPA and affective states during the course of one day. Seventy-seven students ages 19 - 30 participated in the study. aPA was assessed with accelerometers, and affective state assessments were conducted hourly using an e-diary with a six-item mood scale that was specially designed for AA. Multilevel analyses indicated that the mood dimensions energetic arousal (p = .001 and valence (p = .005 were positively influenced by the intensity of the activity carried out in the ten minutes prior to the assessment. As their activity increased, the participants’ positive feelings and energetic arousal increased. However, the students’ calmness was not affected by their activity levels. The findings highlight the importance of integrating short activity intervals of 10 minutes or less into everyday life routines to improve affective states.

  12. Life Functions and Cells: Level II, Unit 7, Lesson 1; Cell Structure: Lesson 2; Tissues, Organs, Systems: Lesson 3; Growth and Nutrition: Lesson 4; Metabolism: Lesson 5. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Life Functions and Cells; Cell Structure; Tissues, Organs, Systems; Growth and Nutrition; and Metabolism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  13. Developing, integrating, and perpetuating new ways of applying sociology to health, medicine, policy, and everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Jeffrey Michael; Clark, Cullen; Hinote, Brian P; Robinson, Caroline O; Wasserman, Jason A

    2007-01-01

    As a framework for presenting ideas on developing ways to make sociology more applicable, we focus on the recent state of medical sociology research. Data for this paper were generated through a content analysis of a twelve-year period (1993-2004) of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior (JHSB) and Social Science & Medicine (SSM). The analysis aims to determine if the content of JHSB and SSM reflect the breadth of the sub-discipline of medical sociology as well as the stated goals of the journals. The selected issues of JHSB and SSM were coded on the basis of the following attributes: (1) Primary Substantive Topic, (2) Methodology, (3) Data Type and Analytic Technique, and (4) Research and Policy Recommendations. We found that the orientation of JHSB articles was towards generating research and theory that shy away from policy, interdisciplinary approaches, and applied issues. SSM content tends to display more interdisciplinary breadth and variety, but also reflects a dearth of applied recommendations. Our discussion focuses on what JHSB and SSM could be. We present ideas on how the sociological discipline in general-and JHSB and SSM in particular-can help generate and nourish new forms of inquiry that can impact the way research questions are framed. We conclude that such a shift is needed in order to maximize the applicability of social scientific evidence to everyday life, and we share examples situated within a socio-medical context, where there is a particular need for the application of social evidence to practice.

  14. The perception of odor objects in everyday life: a review on the processing of odor mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry eThomas-Danguin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smelling monomolecular odors hardly ever occurs in everyday life, and the daily functioning of the sense of smell relies primarily on the processing of complex mixtures of volatiles that are present in the environment (e.g., emanating from food or conspecifics. Such processing allows for the instantaneous recognition and categorization of smells and also for the discrimination of odors among others to extract relevant information and to adapt efficiently in different contexts. The neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning this highly efficient analysis of complex mixtures of odorants is beginning to be unraveled and support the idea that olfaction, as vision and audition, relies on odor-objects encoding. This configural processing of odor mixtures, which is empirically subject to important applications in our societies (e.g., the art of perfumers, flavorists, and wine makers, has been scientifically studied only during the last decades. This processing depends on many individual factors, among which are the developmental stage, lifestyle, physiological and mood state, and cognitive skills; this processing also presents striking similarities between species. The present review gathers the recent findings, as observed in animals, healthy subjects, and/or individuals with affective disorders, supporting the perception of complex odor stimuli as odor objects. It also discusses peripheral to central processing, and cognitive and behavioral significance. Finally, this review highlights that the study of odor mixtures is an original window allowing for the investigation of daily olfaction and emphasizes the need for knowledge about the underlying biological processes, which appear to be crucial for our representation and adaptation to the chemical environment.

  15. Landslides in everyday life: An interdisciplinary approach to understanding vulnerability in the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudmeier-Rieux, K.; Breguet, A.; Dubois, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2009-04-01

    Several thousand landslides were triggered by the Kashmir earthquake, scarring the hillside with cracks. Monsoon rains continue to trigger landslides, which have increased the exposure of populations because of lost agricultural lands, blocked roads and annual fatalities due to landslides. The great majority of these landslides are shallow and relatively small but greatly impacting the population. In this region, landslides were a factor before the earthquake, mainly due to road construction and gravel excavation, but the several thousand landslides triggered by the earthquake have completely overwhelmed the local population and authorities. In Eastern Nepal, the last large earthquake to hit this region occurred in 1988, also triggering numerous landslides and cracks. Here, landslides can be considered a more common phenomenon, yet coping capacities amount to local observations of landslide movement, subsequent abandonment of houses and land as they become too dangerous. We present a comparative case study from Kashmir, Pakistan and Eastern Nepal, highlighting an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex interactions between land use, landslides and vulnerability. Our approach sets out to understand underlying causes of the massive landslides triggered by the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir, Pakistan, and also the increasing number of landslides in Nepal. By approaching the issue of landslides from multiple angles (risk perceptions, land use, local coping capacities, geological assessment, risk mapping) and multiple research techniques (remote sensing, GIS, geological assessment, participatory mapping, focus groups) we are better able to create a more complete picture of the "hazardscape". We find that by combining participatory social science research with hazard mapping, we obtain a more complete understanding of underlying causes, coping strategies and possible mitigation options, placing natural hazards in the context of everyday life. This method is

  16. Charisma in everyday life: Conceptualization and validation of the General Charisma Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tskhay, Konstantin O; Zhu, Rebecca; Zou, Christopher; Rule, Nicholas O

    2018-01-01

    Although both scholars and lay people are fascinated with charismatic individuals, relatively few theorists have attempted to define charisma. Much of the empirical research examining charisma has focused on leadership. Even within that literature, however, theorists have focused on charisma's outcomes, leaving unarticulated what charisma actually is. Here, we tested an operational conceptualization of charisma in the context of everyday life. Specifically, we proposed that charisma is composed of the interpersonally focused dimensions of influence (the ability to guide others) and affability (the ability to make other people feel comfortable and at ease). We validated this conceptualization in a series of studies. In Studies 1-3, we used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to construct a short 6-item measure of charisma, the General Charisma Inventory. Next, in Study 4, we used round-robin evaluations and informant reports to establish the interpersonal nature of charisma. Finally, we examined the incremental validity of the scale in the context of dyadic interactions and tested the impact of charisma on perceptions of persuasiveness from voices. We found that (a) lay people possess a consensual conception of charisma; (b) charisma consists of a composition of quantifiable dimensions; (c) charisma is distinct from other constructs of interest to psychologists and leadership theorists; (d) charisma is observable; and (e) assessments of charisma predict real world outcomes. Thus, the current work not only comprehensively conceptualizes and measures charisma as an empirical construct, but also demonstrates its potential importance for the routine interactions that people experience every day. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Encountering the Everyday

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , as sociologists, need to take everyday life seriously. This is the objective of this book. Encountering the Everyday: An Introduction to the Sociologies of the Unnoticed provides the first comprehensive and updated globally applicable introduction to everyday life sociology for many years. The contributors...... and the absurdists. Finally, a section deals with the most recent approaches such as the specifically Scandinavian everyday life perspectives, the sociology of emotions, social semiotics, cultural studies and postmodern interpretive interactionism. The chapters all accessibly introduce the reader to the ‘core......' of these traditions and perspectives and provide an entry-point for students and scholars alike into the world of the everyday. The book is edited by Michael Hviid Jacobsen, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Studies at Aalborg University, Denmark. He has previously published books on everyday life...

  18. Should We Bother with the Speed of Light in Everyday Life? A Closer Look at GSM Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The speed of light, or more generally, the speed of electromagnetic waves, seems to be incredibly high. 300 000 km s[superscript -1] is far greater than the typical speed of a car, a plane or even a rocket, which is just several kilometres per second. It is thus natural that we treat the speed of light as infinite in everyday life. It appears,…

  19. Condition and Organization of Everyday Life in the Military Units of the Southwestern, Stalingrad and Don fronts (1942–1943

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana P. Khlynina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to various aspects of the condition and organization of the everyday life of military units of the Southwestern, Stalingrad and Don fronts in 1942–1943 years. The looks of the questions of food and clothing supplies, ensure domestic needs and recreation. At the base of the article are documents of the Central Archive of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, recorded memories participants in the events of that time, published sources.

  20. Interviews on the Dietary Habits and the Everyday Life of the Aged in Shibushi, Kagoshima Prefecture

    OpenAIRE

    倉元, 綾子; Ayako, KURAMOTO; 鹿児島県立短期大学; Kagoshima Prefectural College

    2000-01-01

    I made the interviews on the dietary habits and the everyday life of the aged in Shibushi, Kagoshima Prefecture, in Febrary 2000. The results were as follows : (1) They were very interested in their dietary habits, for example some of them managed thier kitchen garden without agricultural chemicals and some cooked riced by firewood. They had the healthy and safe dietary habits. (2) The mutural aid was very active in their community, and they helped their elder neighbors by bringing meals and ...

  1. Neuroticism and the mental noise hypothesis: Relationships to lapses of attention and slips of action in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    HAGEN C. FLEHMIG; MICHAEL STEINBORN; ROBERT LANGNER; KARL WESTHOFF

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between neuroticism and cognitive failure liability in everyday-life situations. Previous research (e.g., Robinson & Tamir, 2005; Robinson, Wilkowski & Meier, 2006) reported a positive association between the trait of neuroticism (N) and fluctuations in mental efficiency when performing elementary cognitive operations. High-N individuals were proposed to be characterized by increased noise within information processing from perception to action. To further exa...

  2. Estudos do cotidiano, pequisa em educação e vida cotidiana: o desafio da coerência/Everyday life studies, research on education and everyday life: the challenge of the coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Barbosa de Oliveira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available As pesquisas nos/dos/com os cotidianos se desenvolvem simultaneamente ao desenvolvimento da própria metodologia desse modo de pesquisar. Isso porque, para recuperar a importância das práticas microbianas, singulares e plurais, dos praticantes da vida cotidiana (Certeau, 1994 é necessário vivenciar esse processo de (reinvenção do ato de pesquisar. Parece cada vez mais fundamental ir-se à vida cotidiana, ao que acontece e ao que estão vivendo as pessoas para se pensar políticas sociais. Definir juventude, o que ela é, como é possível pensá-la e abordá-la são questões centrais para o debate a respeito dos modos como a sociedade pode e deve desenvolver políticas apropriadas às necessidades e anseios desse heterogêneo grupo social. A crescente consciência sobre a insuficiência dos métodos de pesquisa associados ao cientificismo positivista – voltados para as generalizações e definição de modelos – para a compreensão da complexa dinâmica que envolve a vida cotidiana associa-se à convicção de que o desenvolvimento epistemológico da noção de cotidiano é indissociável daquele das metodologias das pesquisas que nele, com ele e sobre ele se desenvolvem. O texto traz uma reflexão teórico-epistemológico-metodológica sobre o tema, entendendo que um dos principais desafios a ser enfrentado pelo campo sociológico dos chamados estudos do cotidiano – seja para pensar a juventude, a escola, ou outras questões – é a coerência interna entre essas diferentes, mas indissociáveis, dimensões. The researches in / for / with the everyday life grow simultaneously with the development of the methodology of this kind of search. That's because, in order to recover the importance of microbial practices — singular and plural — of the everyday’s life practitioners (Certeau, 1994 is necessary to experience this process of (re invention of the searching act. It seems each time more crucial go to everyday life, to what

  3. Cognitive Development through Schooling and Everyday Life: A Natural Experiment among Kharwar Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Symen A.; van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Mishra, Ramesh C.

    2017-01-01

    The influences of schooling and everyday experiences on cognitive development are typically confounded. In the present study, we unraveled the influence of chronological age and years of schooling on the development of general cognitive competency in a two-wave longitudinal design with a three-year interval among 181 Kharwar children in India,…

  4. Cognitive development through schooling and everyday life : A natural experiment among Kharwar children in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, S.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Mishra, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    The influences of schooling and everyday experiences on cognitive development are typically confounded. In the present study, we unraveled the influence of chronological age and years of schooling on the development of general cognitive competency in a two-wave longitudinal design with a three-year

  5. Towards ICT in Everyday Life in Finnish Schools: Seeking Conditions for Good Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Hannele; Kynaslahti, Heikki; Vahtivuori-Hanninen, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses how to strengthen educational use of information and communication technology (ICT) in Finnish schools. The conceptions and experiences of the successful integration of ICT in everyday school settings are reported. Participant observations in 20 schools in different parts of Finland were carried out, including discussions…

  6. Micro-serendipity: Meaningful Coincidences in Everyday Life Shared on Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Björneborn, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present work on micro-serendipity: investigating everyday contexts, conditions, and attributes of serendipity as shared on Twitter. In contrast to related work, we deliberately omit a preset definition of serendipity to allow for the inclusion of micro-occurrences of what people...

  7. "Small Science": Infants and Toddlers Experiencing Science in Everyday Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shukla; Fleer, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Vygotsky (1987) stated that the restructured form of everyday concepts learned at home and in the community interact with scientific concepts introduced in formal school settings, leading to a higher level of scientific thinking for school-aged children. But, what does this mean for the scientific learning of infants and toddlers? What kinds of…

  8. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...... when planning everyday life, psychosocial interventions, and care; and that early psychosocial intervention may offer important support to improve coping with everyday life and social relations in patients with mild AD and their caregivers. Future studies should focus on the long-term perspective...... Group, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, as part of the DAISY study. The overarching objective of the PhD project was to investigate patients’ perspectives of the impact of mild AD on coping with everyday life and social relations...

  9. Evidence for Ancient Life in Mars Meteorites: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    The lines of evidence we first proposed as supporting a hypothesis of early life on Mars are discussed by Treiman, who presents pros and cons of our hypothesis in the light of subsequent research by many groups. Our assessment of the current status of the many controversies over our hypothesis is given in reports by Gibson et al. Rather than repeat or elaborate on that information, I prefer to take an overview and present what I think are some of the "lessons learned" by our team in particular, and by the science community in general.

  10. Design for Life. Abortion. A Student's Lesson Plan [and] A Teacher's Lesson Plan [and] A Lawyer's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Estelle; And Others

    One of a series of secondary level teaching units presenting case studies with pro and con analyses of particular legal problems, the document consists of a student's lesson plan, a teacher's lesson plan, and a lawyer's lesson plan for a unit on abortion. The lessons are designed to expose students to the Supreme Court's decision concerning…

  11. "Time for dialysis as time to live": experiences of time in everyday life of the Swedish next of kin of hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegert, Kristina; Fridlund, Bengt; Lidell, Evy

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of patients on hemodialysis in Sweden. Chronic renal disease often requires hemodialysis, which is a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan everyday life and involves the next of kin to a large degree. This study used a descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The analysis of the data from the twenty interviews revealed the experiences of time in the everyday lives of the next of kin of a patient on hemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time, vacuous time, and uninterrupted time. The findings show how everyday life time for the next of kin is minimized and that the common life space is contracted. The next of kin must be provided with supervision in order to provide them with more of their own time in everyday life, which can benefit their health.

  12. The speed of our mental soundtracks : tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, N.; Halpern, A.R.; Sankarpandi, S.K.; Stewart, L.

    2015-01-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previousl...

  13. Literature as a source for researching everyday life of Kyiv citizens in the second half of the XIX – at the beginning of the XX centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ha S. Musiiachenko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is analyzing the place of music in everyday life of different layers of Kyiviets in the second half of the XIX – at the beginning of the XX centuries on the examples of fragments of works of the Ukrainian literature «Kaydasheva family», «Kievskiye prosytely», «Evening on the Volodymyr hill» by Ivan Nechui- Levytsky, «Za dvoma zaitsiamy» by Myhailo Starytskiy, «Holosni struny» by Lesya Ukrainka. It is explored the level of musical education of the intelligentsia, its playing on the musical instruments, the repertoire of songs, the attitude to music and musical tastes, the musical parties, the fashion to the concerts in the garden of Merchant Assembly. It is examined the episodes from the life of the Kyiv’s workers and former peasants, who came to work to Kyiv, their evening festivities in the center and the singing, their ability to listen from a distance the concerts in the garden of Merchant Assembly. It is described the perception of music on the city guests - the Kyiv-Pechersk Lavra’s church singing impact on the newcomer pilgrims. It is analyzed the place of music in the life of poor Kyiviets. It is determined the features of the use of Ukrainian literature as a historical source and a degree of coverage of the issue in the scientific publications. It is paid the attention to the feasibility of using the obtained results on the New History of Ukraine lessons.

  14. The everyday life and customs of Constantinople Patriarchs in the second half of the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venediktov Vadim Yuriyevich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The author of the article analyzes the church conflicts between Greeks and Bulgarians in the second half of the 19th century. It is rather interesting to have an overlook of everyday life, customs and material status of the Constantinople Patriarchs of those times during the Church conflict. In his research the author bases on the documents from the Archive of Foreign Policy of the Russian Empire. The schism of 1872 has set on edge the tensed relations in the midst of the highest Greek hierarchy of the Constantinople Church.

  15. Managing an everyday life of uncertainty--a qualitative study of coping in persons with mild stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Gunnel E; Möller, Anders; Blomstrand, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate from the actor's perspective how and why persons with mild stroke coped with their new life situation as they did, during the first year after stroke. Eighteen persons physically recovered and independent in P-ADL were interviewed 1 year after stroke. The most common symptoms experienced by the respondents were mental fatigability, memory and concentration difficulties, increased stress sensitivity, irritability, emotionalism, lack of initiative and sensitivity to lights and sounds. The questions concerned how and why the respondents tried to cope with their condition as they did. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the grounded theory method. Despite a mild stroke, the respondents still after 1 year found everyday life a struggle of uncertainty. Individual and relational concerns and environmental conditions were categories grounded in data describing the coping efforts. The co-occurrence of positive and negative feelings during-coping was an important finding. Leisure activities served as an important source of coping. Still 1 year after a stroke that in the acute phase was classified as mild, with expectations of complete recovery, respondents struggled to cope with its consequences and often experienced an everyday life of uncertainty.

  16. Difficulties in everyday life: young persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders perspectives. A chat-log analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlström, Britt H; Wentz, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the everyday life of young persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There are follow-up studies describing ADHD, and ASD in adults, and residual impairments that affect life. Few qualitative studies have been conducted on the subject of their experiences of everyday life, and even fewer are from young persons' perspectives. This study's aim was to describe how young persons with ADHD and ASD function and how they manage their everyday life based on analyses of Internet-based chat logs. Twelve young persons (7 males and 5 females aged 15-26) diagnosed with ADHD and ASD were included consecutively and offered 8 weeks of Internet-based Support and Coaching (IBSC). Data were collected from 12 chat logs (445 pages of text) produced interactively by the participants and the coaches. Qualitative content analysis was applied. The text was coded and sorted into subthemes and further interpreted into themes. The findings revealed two themes: "fighting against an everyday life lived in vulnerability" with the following subthemes: "difficult things," "stress and rest," and "when feelings and thoughts are a concern"; and the theme "struggling to find a life of one's own" with the following subthemes: "decide and carry out," "making life choices," and "taking care of oneself." Dealing with the problematic situations that everyday encompasses requires personal strength and a desire to find adequate solutions, as well as to discover a role in society. This study, into the provision of support and coaching over the Internet, led to more in-depth knowledge about these young persons' everyday lives and revealed their ability to use IBSC to express the complexity of everyday life for young persons with ADHD and ASD. The implications of the findings are that using online coaching makes available new opportunities for healthcare professionals to acknowledge these young persons' problems.

  17. Sexual behavior in the everyday life of adolescents and young adults from the hip hop culture

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz, Maria Angeles Garcia-Carpintero; Nitschke, Rosane Gonçalves; Tholl, Adriana Dutra

    2014-01-01

    This is a quantitative, cross-sectional, descriptive study, conducted in two consecutive series in 2007 (S1) and 2008 (S2), comprised of 350 people between 15 and 29 years of age, with the aim to understand the profile of adolescents and young adults from the hip hop culture of Seville, Spain, and to detect risky sexual behavior in their everyday lives. Data were obtained by means of a self-administered questionnaire followed by a statistical analysis, corresponding to a sexually active popul...

  18. Speech acts: sampling the social construction of mental retardation in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, S; Navarro, V

    1998-02-01

    A sample of speech acts in everyday discourse referring to persons or events having to do with the term mental retardation was analyzed in order to investigate the belief that language use both constructs and reflects cultural norms that define the social roles of persons reduced to object status through categorical membership. Speech acts gathered suggest four emergent themes: the discourse of category membership, the dichotomy of normal and abnormal, issues of place and space, and fear. These themes were explicated from a social constructionist perspective, displaying the way speech acts construct mental retardation and subvert individuals with the label into demeaned and ridiculed objects of cultural fear.

  19. The Quennells and the 'history of everyday life' in England, c. 1918-69

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://hwj.oxfordjournals.org/content/81/1/106.abstract. This article argues that a new popular social history, the ‘history of everyday life’, emerged in England after the First World War. Couched in the rhetoric of ‘democratization’, this version of social history was an afterlife of the Arts and Crafts movement and is the prehistory of post-1945 mass history teaching and popular heritage tourism techniques. However, it occupies a...

  20. In Old Pompeii. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    In this Web-based interdisciplinary lesson (involving social studies, geography, history, and language arts) students take a virtual field trip to the ruins of Pompeii to learn about everyday life in Roman times, then create a travelogue to attract visitors to the site and write an account of their field trip modeled on a description of Pompeii…

  1. Review: Elisa T. Bertuzzo (2009. Fragmented Dhaka. Analysing Everyday Life with Henri Lefebvre's Theory of Production of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa Müller

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In her book "Fragmented Dhaka. Analysing Everyday Life with Henri Lefebvre's Theory of Production of Space," Elisa T. BERTUZZO aims at using Henri LEFEBVRE's concept of space and his suggestions for the study of spatial structures and practices in an empirical study. The city of Dhaka, for BERTUZZO a rural "mega city," serves as a laboratory for studying the spatial practices of everyday life and specific representations of the city. This qualitative study is thought to counteract the lack of research literature on Dhaka and takes a postmodern perspective on the process of urbanization in Bangladesh's capital by highlighting heterogeneity and ambiguity. LEFEBVRE's concepts of space are transferred into a qualitative research design in a generally convincing way. However, the presentation of the results loses some of its clarity due to the abundance of the empirical findings. Although there is some conceptual "fuzziness," this does not narrow the significance of this innovative study. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1003199

  2. "I am not living my life": lived experience of participation in everyday occupations after stroke in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, Mandana; Jonsson, Hans; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Tham, Kerstin

    2013-06-01

    To describe and understand the lived experience and to identify what characterizes the phenomenon of participation in everyday occupations after stroke, in Tehran, Iran. Eight individuals with stroke, who had previously been admitted to a neurological hospital ward in Tehran, were interviewed in-depth on one occasion. Data were collected and analysed using the Empirical, Phenomenological, Psychological method. The findings identified 3 main characteristics of the phenomenon of participation in everyday occupations as being: (i) I cannot do activities as before; (ii) I am not the same person - discovery of a different self; (iii) I am not living my life. Enabling participation after stroke within a client-centred paradigm in this socio-cultural context requires consideration of the essential meaning of this concept as characterized by the dynamic process between the characteristics of "doing", "identity", and "living life". The study highlights how the provision of efficient rehabilitation services in this Eastern context requires attention to both "doing" and to "identity" in rehabilitation interventions, in order to enable individuals to adapt to their new lives after stroke and to "live their lives".

  3. Analysing long-term changes of everyday life in an environmental perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2004-01-01

    time of 35 years. In spite of technologically induced reductions in the average environmental impact of each monetary unit spent on consumption, it is hard to keep up with the quantitative increase and, in particular, to cope with accumulated problems like the greenhouse effect and to make room...... for increasing consumption in developing countries. This problem of ever increasing quantities of consumption ought to be placed high on the sustainable development agenda, and it calls for research on the dynamics behind the growth to improve the possibilities for curbing it. A real challenge in relation...... to this issue is that the increases in consumption are imperceptible and that most people in the industrialized countries are preoccupied with managing their everyday lives and do not experience that they live in any kind of extreme luxury. Some years ago I wrote a paper dealing with this issue in general terms...

  4. Carbon calculators as a tool for a low-carbon everyday life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2012-01-01

    The number of Internet-based carbon calculators that estimate personal carbon footprints has been growing in recent years. This article discusses the roles that these calculators can play in changing everyday practices and how users evaluate them. The study builds on results from a questionnaire...... survey and focus groups with users of a Danish Internet-based carbon calculator developed in 2009, the year of the Climate Summit in Copenhagen, when climate change was prominent on the political agenda. The article concludes that the subject website primarily attracts people already interested...... in the issue, and that its main contribution is to confirm their engagement. Furthermore, we show, on one hand, that users seem to accept the individualized approach of the carbon calculator while, on the other hand, they question the allocation of responsibility for mitigating climate change. The article...

  5. Correlates of psychopathic personality traits in everyday life: results from a large community survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Latzman, Robert D; Watts, Ashley L; Smith, Sarah F; Dutton, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Although the traits of psychopathic personality (psychopathy) have received extensive attention from researchers in forensic psychology, psychopathology, and personality psychology, the relations of these traits to aspects of everyday functioning are poorly understood. Using a large internet survey of members of the general population (N = 3388), we examined the association between psychopathic traits, as measured by a brief but well-validated self-report measure, and occupational choice, political orientation, religious affiliation, and geographical residence. Psychopathic traits, especially those linked to fearless dominance, were positively and moderately associated with holding leadership and management positions, as well as high-risk occupations. In addition, psychopathic traits were positively associated with political conservatism, lack of belief in God, and living in Europe as opposed to the United States, although the magnitudes of these statistical effects were generally small in magnitude. Our findings offer preliminary evidence that psychopathic personality traits display meaningful response penetration into daily functioning, and raise provocative questions for future research.

  6. A Prop’s Story: from everyday life to the stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Malva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An everyday object can be used in performance as a mediator between the reality of the stage and that of the narrative. It can go back and forward between these universes, allowing performers to play with the boundaries between presentational and fictional spaces, as defined by Gay McAuley in Space in Performance – re-positioning the narrative, either mentally or spatially. Performers can achieve this change by manipulating the perception of an object’s function, scale, sound and aesthetics. The performer uses the object’s original characteristics, such as colour, texture, form and design purpose, as potential clues, reframing them to establish new links with the main narrative. This process of transformation makes for a fluid scenography/dramaturgy relationship where performers, scenographer and, of course, spectators share the experiencee an emerging theatrical creation.

  7. Emotion, Embodied Mind and the Therapeutic Aspects of Musical Experience in Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan van der Schyff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for music to function as a force for bio-cognitive organisation is considered in clinical and everyday contexts. Given the deeply embodied nature of such therapeutic responses to music, it is argued that cognitivist approaches may be insufficient to fully explain music’s affective power. Following this, an embodied approach is considered, where the emotional-affective response to music is discussed in terms of primary bodily systems and the innate cross-modal perceptive capacities of the embodied human mind. It is suggested that such an approach may extend the largely cognitivist view taken by much of contemporary music psychology and philosophy of music by pointing the way towards a conception of musical meaning that begins with our most primordial interactions with the world.

  8. Every Kind of Everyday...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Lusty

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A review of Michael Sheringham, Everyday Life: Theories and Practices from Surrealism to the Present (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006 and Kathleen Stewart, Ordinary Affects (Duke University Press, Durham and London, 2007

  9. Feasibility of a Computerized Method to Measure Quality of "Everyday" Life in Children with Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Paula; Bundy, Anita C.; Ryan, Monique M.; North, Kathryn N.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of quality of life is becoming increasingly important in health care. Self-reported quality of life is the preferred method of gathering this information, but children are often excluded from this process, their input being replaced by parent-proxy report. This feasibility study tested assessment of "daily" quality-of-life by a…

  10. Efficacy of resistance and task-specific exercise in older adults who modify tasks of everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Todd; Marko, Moshe; VanArnam, Tom; Cook, Summer; Fernhall, Bo; Burke, Jeanmarie; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of 10 weeks of resistance (RT), functional (FT), or functional plus resistance (FRT) training in older adults who modify tasks of everyday life and are at risk for subsequent disability. Thirty-two older adults (75.8 +/- 6.7 years) were tested following a control period and training. The primary outcome of the study was the number of task modifications and timed performance on eight tasks of daily life. Secondary outcomes included knee and elbow strength (extension and flexion), body composition, self-reported physical function, single-leg balance time, walking speed, and time to vacuum a carpet. The RT group performed progressive intensity training, and the FT group performed task-specific exercises 2 days per week. The FRT group performed 1 day of each training type. No changes occurred in the control period. All three training groups reduced the need to modify tasks of everyday life (RT: 21%, FRT: 26%, and FT: 28%) and improved self-rated function and time to vacuum a carpet. Individuals who performed FT either 1 or 2 days per week also reduced their timed performance (RT: 2.5% [p = 0.48], FRT: 18.5%, and FT: 23%). Strength gains were primarily found in groups that performed RT either 1 or 2 days per week (RT and FRT). No significant changes occurred in walking speed, single-leg balance, or body composition. The benefits of exercise are dependent on tasks performed during training. Exercise recommendations for low-functioning older adults should reflect task-specific exercise to prevent the onset of disability.

  11. When everyday life becomes a storm on the horizon: families' experiences of good mental health while hiking in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklien, Børge; Ytterhus, Borgunn; Bongaardt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Hiking in nature is often presented as a yearning for lost harmony premised on an alleged divide between nature as authentically healthy and society as polluted. This paper's aim is to question this strict divide and the strong belief in nature as having an innate health-providing effect, the biophilia hypothesis, by examining what Norwegian families with young children experience when walking in the forest. Twenty-four conversations with families during a hiking trip in the forest were recorded, and the data were analysed with Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological research method. The paper introduces the general descriptive meaning structure of the phenomenon 'family-hiking with young children'. It shows that a hiking trip clears space for the family in their everyday lives which is largely dominated by relations with non-family members at both work and leisure. The families experience that they actively generate a different existence with a sense of here-and-now presences that can strengthen core family relations and also provide the opportunity to pass down experiences that can be recollected and realized by future generations. This experience is complex and constituted by social practices, which indicate that the biophilia hypothesis seems to be an insufficient explanation of why families go hiking in nature. Nature rather represents a peaceful background that allows for the perpetuation of the family as a social institution and the recreation of cohesion in everyday life.

  12. Everyday Physical Activity of Students in Nyíregyháza

    OpenAIRE

    Fintor János Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of physical education lessons has already been demonstrated by a lot of essays, however, it has also been revealed that this popularity, as well as the frequency of doing sports, tends to decrease at later ages of life. Pursuing sports has a positive effect on academic performance. Introducing PE as an everyday lesson at schools was a milestone in physical education. Provided the aims are realised successfully, the general state of health of students can show a favourable chang...

  13. Genetic analysis of a temperament test as a tool to select against everyday life fearfulness in Rough Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvelius, P; Eken Asp, H; Fikse, W F; Strandberg, E; Nilsson, K

    2014-11-01

    Fear-related problems are common among Rough Collies in Sweden. Annually, on average, >200 Rough Collies are subjected to the dog mentality assessment (DMA), a temperament test during which 33 behavioral reactions are rated. Previous research has shown that a dog's DMA result can be condensed into 5 underlying personality traits. The aim of the study was to evaluate if it is possible to use the DMA for selection for temperament in Swedish Rough Collies, in particular to decrease everyday life fearfulness. We also wanted to compare 2 methods to compute the personality traits: summated scales (SS) and factor scores (FS). The DMA data for 2,953 Rough Collies were used to estimate genetic parameters for the 5 personality traits (both SS and FS), using a linear animal model including fixed effects of sex, year and month of test, and random effects of litter, judge, test occasion, genetic effect of the individual, and residual. Age at test was included as linear and quadratic regressions. The DMA personality trait heritability estimates ranged from 0.13 to 0.25. The SS showed greater or equal heritability estimates compared with the FS. To validate the DMA, data on everyday life behavior of 1,738 Rough Collies were collected using an extended version of the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire. Each dog's questionnaire result was condensed into 18 underlying behavioral subscales. Genetic parameters for the subscales were estimated using a linear animal model, including a fixed effect of sex and random genetic effect of the individual and residual. Age when the questionnaire was completed was included as linear and quadratic regressions. Heritability estimates for the questionnaire subscales were 0.06 to 0.36. There were high and significant genetic correlations between DMA personality traits and questionnaire subscales. For instance, the DMA personality trait Curiosity/Fearlessness correlated strongly genetically to the questionnaire subscale Non

  14. Lessons from Cacti: How to Survive the Prickles of Life during Tough Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Alan S.; Bigger, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The saguaro cactus looked a little like humans, in different shapes and sizes. How on earth do they survive in a climate that seems so inhospitable? It is possible to learn lessons for life from a cactus, if one can only get beyond the thorns, and that these lessons will assist one to survive during tough or prickly times. These plants survive…

  15. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...... Group, Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, as part of the DAISY study. The overarching objective of the PhD project was to investigate patients’ perspectives of the impact of mild AD on coping with everyday life and social relations...... with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...

  16. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...... interviews with 10 couples before and after the intervention programme. For the analysis, a template organising style of interpretation was used. Patients and caregivers found good support for coping with everyday life and social relations by participating in the intervention programme. Early counselling......Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...

  17. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    and support may improve patients and caregivers opportunities to adapt to the challenges of the progressive AD, and to maintain well-being. The studies suggest that impaired social participation is an important aspect of deficits in mild AD; that the perspective of the patients should be taken into account...... when planning everyday life, psychosocial interventions, and care; and that early psychosocial intervention may offer important support to improve coping with everyday life and social relations in patients with mild AD and their caregivers. Future studies should focus on the long-term perspective......Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...

  18. What remains invariant: Life lessons from Abdus Salam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, T. Z.

    2017-03-01

    Abdus Salam was a multi-dimensional man who straddled research and institution-building with enviable flair; he was both religious and iconoclastic, a true citizen of the world yet deeply nationalistic, a scientist and a lover of literature, a villager and a cosmopolitan. While the specific details of his life belong to the man alone, Salam’s rich experiences exemplify certain values, attitudes and lessons that are universal. In this talk, we attempt to draw out those truths, by looking through the lens of physics. Our analysis of Salam’s personal journey mirrors the search for the invariants of a physical system in that we look beyond the particularities of his unique set of circumstances, to the essence that both categorizes, and transcends, explicit events. Thus we move through Salam’s life, collecting ’invariants’ that apply as much to us today as they did to him several decades ago. Together, these constitute an enduring wisdom that can prove invaluable to young scientists — especially those from developing countries — as they navigate different cultures, manage diverse loyalties, and balance the lure of research with the demands of service.

  19. The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R; Sankarpandi, Sathish K; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previously possible, concerning (1) the precision of memory representations within INMI and (2) the interactions between INMI and concurrent affective state. Over the course of 4 days, INMI tempo was measured by asking participants to tap to the beat of their INMI with a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants documented additional details regarding their INMI in a diary. Overall, the tempo of music within INMI was recalled from long-term memory in a highly veridical form, although with a regression to the mean for recalled tempo that parallels previous findings on voluntary musical imagery. A significant positive relationship was found between INMI tempo and subjective arousal, suggesting that INMI interacts with concurrent mood in a similar manner to perceived music. The results suggest several parallels between INMI and voluntary imagery, music perceptual processes, and other types of involuntary memories.

  20. Correlates of Psychopathic Personality Traits in Everyday Life:Results from a Large Community Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott O Lilienfeld

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the traits of psychopathic personality (psychopathy have received extensive attention from researchers in forensic psychology, psychopathology, and personality psychology, the relations of these traits to aspects of everyday functioning are poorly understood. Using a large internet survey of members of the general population (N=3398, we examined the association between psychopathic traits, as measured by a brief but well-validated self-report measure, and occupational choice, political orientation, religious affiliation, and geographical residence. Psychopathic traits, especially those linked to fearless dominance, were positively and moderately associated with holding leadership and management positions, as well as high-risk occupations. In addition, psychopathic traits were positively associated with political conservatism, lack of belief in God, and living in Europe as opposed to the United States, although the magnitudes of these statistical effects were generally small in magnitude. Our findings offer preliminary evidence that psychopathic personality traits display meaningful response penetration into daily functioning, and raise provocative questions for future research.

  1. The Everyday Life of the Mounted Police Guard Force in the Territory of the Black Sea Governorate (1901–1909

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V. Taran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the everyday life of the mounted police guard force in the territory of the Black Sea Governorate – more specifically, the territory of Sochi Okrug. On the eve of and during the 1905-1907 revolutionary events, it was this area where an extremely volatile situation had persisted due to interethnic conflicts. It was in hopes of enhancing authority in the region that the mounted police guard force was set up, which consisted of Cossacks, the Ingush, and Ossetians. In conclusion, the author points up that, on the whole, the mounted police guard force did a good job performing its law enforcement duties in the region’s territory during the pre-revolutionary and revolutionary periods.

  2. Casual Video Games as Training Tools for Attentional Processes in Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Michael J; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss

    2015-11-01

    Three experiments examined the attentional components of the popular match-3 casual video game, Bejeweled Blitz (BJB). Attentionally demanding, BJB is highly popular among adults, particularly those in middle and later adulthood. In experiment 1, 54 older adults (Mage = 70.57) and 33 younger adults (Mage = 19.82) played 20 rounds of BJB, and completed online tasks measuring reaction time, simple visual search, and conjunction visual search. Prior experience significantly predicted BJB scores for younger adults, but for older adults, both prior experience and simple visual search task scores predicted BJB performance. Experiment 2 tested whether BJB practice alone would result in a carryover benefit to a visual search task in a sample of 58 young adults (Mage = 19.57) who completed 0, 10, or 30 rounds of BJB followed by a BJB-like visual search task with targets present or absent. Reaction times were significantly faster for participants who completed 30 but not 10 rounds of BJB compared with the search task only. This benefit was evident when targets were both present and absent, suggesting that playing BJB improves not only target detection, but also the ability to quit search effectively. Experiment 3 tested whether the attentional benefit in experiment 2 would apply to non-BJB stimuli. The results revealed a similar numerical but not significant trend. Taken together, the findings suggest there are benefits of casual video game playing to attention and relevant everyday skills, and that these games may have potential value as training tools.

  3. Self-Reported Executive Functioning in Everyday Life in Parkinson's Disease after Three Months of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Uyen Ha Gia; Andersson, Stein; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebolt; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Studies on the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on executive functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial. In this study we compared self-reported daily executive functioning in PD patients before and after three months of STN-DBS. We also examined whether executive functioning in everyday life was associated with motor symptoms, apathy, and psychiatric symptoms. Method. 40 PD patients were examined with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). Results. PD patients reported significant improvement in daily life executive functioning after 3 months of STN-DBS. Anxiety scores significantly declined, while other psychiatric symptoms remained unchanged. The improvement of self-reported executive functioning did not correlate with motor improvement after STN-DBS. Apathy scores remained unchanged after surgery. Only preoperative depressed mood had predictive value to the improvement of executive function and appears to prevent potentially favorable outcomes from STN-DBS on some aspects of executive function. Conclusion. PD patients being screened for STN-DBS surgery should be evaluated with regard to self-reported executive functioning. Depressive symptoms in presurgical PD patients should be treated. Complementary information about daily life executive functioning in PD patients might enhance further treatment planning of STN-DBS.

  4. That bloody Cape Breton coal: stories of mining disasters in everyday life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, R.; Caplan, R. (ed.)

    2004-07-01

    The book is a compilation of 18 true stories about coal mining accidents to individuals and the impact of each on the miner, if he survived, and his family. The stories are based on the recollections of New Waterford miners, family members and people in the community. The accidents all occurred in the twentieth century, in particular during the period 1950 to 1980. The daily life of the miner, working conditions, the reality of working underground, causes of the accidents, and family life in the New Waterford community are described in detail. 28 photos.

  5. Needs for everyday life support for brain tumour patients' relatives: systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karina; Poulsen, H S

    2011-01-01

    . The relatives lacked information about how to provide day-to-day care and how to manage psychoses and neuropsychiatric problems at home. Likewise, they needed help from the professionals to talk with each other about potentially reduced life expectancy. Most relatives appeared to value specialist nurse support...

  6. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour in everyday life with chronic hand eczema - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, A; Johansen, J D; Thing, Lone Friis

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hand eczema is a common disease which may impact quality of life and have occupational and social consequences. Self-management is pivotal, both in handling acute eruptions and avoiding relapses. However, little is known about how people with hand eczema self-manage and integrate...

  7. Difficulties in everyday life: Young persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders perspectives. A chat-log analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt H. Ahlström

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the everyday life of young persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD. There are follow-up studies describing ADHD, and ASD in adults, and residual impairments that affect life. Few qualitative studies have been conducted on the subject of their experiences of everyday life, and even fewer are from young persons’ perspectives. This study's aim was to describe how young persons with ADHD and ASD function and how they manage their everyday life based on analyses of Internet-based chat logs. Twelve young persons (7 males and 5 females aged 15–26 diagnosed with ADHD and ASD were included consecutively and offered 8 weeks of Internet-based Support and Coaching (IBSC. Data were collected from 12 chat logs (445 pages of text produced interactively by the participants and the coaches. Qualitative content analysis was applied. The text was coded and sorted into subthemes and further interpreted into themes. The findings revealed two themes: “fighting against an everyday life lived in vulnerability” with the following subthemes: “difficult things,” “stress and rest,” and “when feelings and thoughts are a concern”; and the theme “struggling to find a life of one's own” with the following subthemes: “decide and carry out,” “making life choices,” and “taking care of oneself.” Dealing with the problematic situations that everyday encompasses requires personal strength and a desire to find adequate solutions, as well as to discover a role in society. This study, into the provision of support and coaching over the Internet, led to more in-depth knowledge about these young persons’ everyday lives and revealed their ability to use IBSC to express the complexity of everyday life for young persons with ADHD and ASD. The implications of the findings are that using online coaching makes available new opportunities for healthcare professionals to acknowledge

  8. Law in everyday life and death: a socio-legal study of chronic disorders of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Simon; Kitzinger, Celia; Kitzinger, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses, from a socio-legal perspective, the question of the significance of law for the treatment, care and the end-of-life decision making for patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. We use the phrase ‘chronic disorders of consciousness’ as an umbrella term to refer to severely brain-injured patients in prolonged comas, vegetative or minimally conscious states. Based on an analysis of interviews with family members of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness, we explore the images of law that were drawn upon and invoked by these family members when negotiating the situation of their relatives, including, in some cases, the ending of their lives. By examining ‘legal consciousness’ in this way (an admittedly confusing term in the context of this study,) we offer a distinctly sociological contribution to the question of how law matters in this particular domain of social life. PMID:26041944

  9. Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billieux, Joël; Schimmenti, Adriano; Khazaal, Yasser; Maurage, Pierre; Heeren, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background Behavioral addiction research has been particularly flourishing over the last two decades. However, recent publications have suggested that nearly all daily life activities might lead to a genuine addiction. Methods and aim In this article, we discuss how the use of atheoretical and confirmatory research approaches may result in the identification of an unlimited list of “new” behavioral addictions. Results Both methodological and theoretical shortcomings of these studies were discussed. Conclusions We suggested that studies overpathologizing daily life activities are likely to prompt a dismissive appraisal of behavioral addiction research. Consequently, we proposed several roadmaps for future research in the field, centrally highlighting the need for longer tenable behavioral addiction research that shifts from a mere criteria-based approach toward an approach focusing on the psychological processes involved. PMID:26014667

  10. The insertion of afro-brazilian hystory and culture in everyday school life: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Silvestre Fernandes Martins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the implications of mandatory of thematic study of Afro-Brazilian history and culture in school daily life. It aims to analyze to what extent the promulgation of a specific law can modify relations established at school. The data from this case study were collected through questionnaires, interviews, observation, document analysis and focus groups. The analysis indicates that prejudices and biased relations still exist and determine conflicting relations on which educators generally tend to omit themselves. However, the review also indicated that the performance of the school can contribute to change the students' way of thinking and acting, thus collaborating for changing the social reality and the relations established in school daily life.

  11. How can we feel at home in everyday life of college?

    OpenAIRE

    甲村, 和三; 飯田, 沙依亜

    2012-01-01

    When we go into a new environment, it impose both change and major challenge. While most people can turn them into opportunity, some people are crushed with anxiety or loneliness. In this study, we asked college students to describe the factors contributing to their comfort at college. Based on results, we discuss how we can support the efforts made by college students to adjust to college life.

  12. Quality of Life and Everyday Activities in Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Selmi, Carlo; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lindor, Keith D.; Worman, Howard J.; Gold, Ellen B.; Watnik, Mitchell; Utts, Jessica; Invernizzi, Pietro; Kaplan, Marshall M.; Vierling, John M.; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Silveira, Marina G.; Bossi, Ilaria

    2007-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is generally a slowly progressive disease that may lead to cirrhosis and liver failure. However, patients with PBC often suffer from a variety of symptoms long before the development of cirrhosis that include issues of daily living that have an impact on their work environment and their individual quality of life. We therefore examined multiple parameters by taking advantage of the database of our cohort of 1032 patients with PBC and 1041 matched controls. The ...

  13. Life in extraterrestrial space: An anthropological consideration on astronauts' everyday experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Tomohisa; 佐藤, 知久

    2015-01-01

    Since the completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2000, over 80 astronauts have experienced months of life in extraterrestrial space. Based on an analysis of texts mainly written by three Japanese ISS astronauts (Wakata, Noguchi, and Furukawa), this paper examines the meanings of their daily experiences in the ISS from three perspectives: psychological, physical, and ontological. These perspectives were chosen based on the following: ||1) Psychological studies show that long-du...

  14. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeven, P.J.; Hemmen, B.; Geers, R.P.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Brink, P.R.; Seelen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. DESIGN: Randomized cross-over trial. SUBJECTS: Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified

  15. On the "Critique of Everyday Life" to "Metaphilosophy": Henri Lefebvre's Philosophical-Political Legacy of the Cultural Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sünker, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Henri Lefebvre (1901-91), philosopher and sociologist, is, together with Theodor W. Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin and Ernst Bloch, one of the most relevant representatives of the first generation in Western Marxism. His engagement with Marxism led him to analyse everyday life in post-war France in order to decipher the possibilities of,…

  16. Playing it by the rules: Local bans on the public use of soft drugs and the production of shared spaces of everyday life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalier, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In a nutshell, this book is about formalized social control in public space: it examines the different ways shared public spaces of everyday life are used and perceived, focusing on the manner in which the urge to control such space is operationalized, and how in turn formalized control effects the

  17. Living an unstable everyday life while attempting to perform normality - the meaning of living as an alcohol-dependent woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurang, Anna; Bengtsson Tops, Anita

    2013-02-01

    To illuminate the meaning of living with alcohol dependency as a woman. The number of women suffering from alcohol dependency is increasing. Today there are shortcomings in knowledge about the lived experiences of being a woman with alcohol dependency; knowledge which might be of importance for meeting these women's specific needs of care. The study has a qualitative design. Fourteen women with alcohol dependency participated in open in-depth interviews. Data were analysed according to a phenomenological-hermeneutic method, and interpreted by help from gender and caring perspectives as well as results from previous research of alcohol dependency. In relation to the women's senses of well-being, four main gender formations were found; An unstable self involving continual and rapid swings between emotional and bodily reactions. Ambivalence - meaning ambiguous feelings towards themselves as human beings and how they lead their lives. Introspectiveness - involving reflections, pondering and being introverted. Attempts to perform normality - covering - dealing with life through various strategies and facades to live up to the expectations of how to behave as a woman. Living with alcohol dependency as a woman constitutes of a rapid shifting everyday life resulting in senses of alienation as well as private introspection leading to self-degradation, and to a lesser extent meaningfulness and hope. It also constitutes of managing to perform normality. When supporting women with alcohol dependency towards wellbeing, professionals need to work towards approaching the woman's inner thoughts, share them and reflect over them together. To support these women to find balance in life, caregivers need to cooperate with the women to find out how best to live a life adjusted to the woman's abilities and wishes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Everyday Struggels with Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Martina; Schwartz, Sander Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Technology has not only become an integral part of people’s lives but also of people’s everyday struggles. Struggles with technology are complex in nature; we tend to not only struggle with their basic functions but also with how they make us feel. During the course of our life we tend to master...... and struggle with technology in different ways. This struggle has been studied in relation to media literacy (Livingstone, 2004), to domestication theory (Silverstone et al. 1992), or in everyday life (Bakardjieva, 2005). This work enhances these lines of studies by exploring everyday struggles with technology...... from a life stage (Erikson, 1959) point of view. In particular, we explore what are common struggles people have with technology and what are distinct struggles in relation to life stages. In conclusion, we will present our findings by outlining what we call ‘technological biographies’. Those...

  19. Upbringing with a TV set in the background. Of television in everyday family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRYCJA HANYGA-JANCZAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily, television is the most popular of all mass media and watching it is the most frequent way of spending leisure time. It seems that no one argues for a positive role of television in family life anymore, with complete lack of contact with television being disadvantageous to the family, as well. The opportunity to use television increases self-esteem and allows for participation in what is going on in the country and in the world; it is, therefore, worth it to make use of its benefits reasonably

  20. Sweden in the Delaware Valley: Everyday Life and Material Culture in New Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naum, Magdalena; Ekengren, Fredrik; Zagal Mach Wolfe, Ulla Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In 1637 the Swedish Crown, encouraged by Dutch merchants, developed a plan to establish a colonial outpost in America to tap into profitable tobacco and beaver pelt trade. The same year the first cargo ships left Sweden and sailed westwards to claim their piece of America along the Delaware River....... Although in many ways unsuccessful and short-lived (the colony collapsed in 1656), New Sweden became a home for generations of colonists. This chapter focuses on the different aspects of their daily life: their longing and desperation, practices of homemaking and domesticating the landscape...

  1. Living in supportive housing for people with serious mental illness: a paradoxical everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Ericsson, Ulf; Ehliasson, Kent

    2014-10-01

    Since the closure of large psychiatric institutions, various types of community-based supportive housing for people with serious mental illness (SMI) have been developed. There is currently limited knowledge about users' experiences of living in supportive housing. The aim of the present study was to describe user experiences of living in supportive housing for people with SMI. Twenty-nine people living in such facilities participated in open, qualitative interviews. Data were subjected to latent content analysis. Three main themes emerged from this analysis: (i) having a nest, which included the subthemes of a place to rest and having someone to attach to; (ii) being part of a group, with the subthemes of being brought together and a community spirit; and (iii) leading an oppressive life, including the subthemes of questioning one's identity, sense of inequality, and a life of gloom. It could be concluded that user experiences of living in supportive housing are complex and paradoxical. In order to provide supportive housing, staff need to recognize and work within social group processes, and perform continual and structural evaluations of users' social and emotional needs. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. From School Knowledge to Everyday Life: Introducing an Alert Bell to Upgrade the Common Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie René de Cotret

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the aims of school education is that students develop knowledge they will be able to use in their professional and personal life. However, it seems that school does not completely reach its goal. Too often, learned knowledge is not used when it should be. Actually, many research results illustrate the fact that well learned knowledge is not necessarily used outside its belonging discipline, for instance in a day-today context, even if it could be helpful. We assume that, in those cases, decisions are based on common sense instead of school knowledge, however the later was learned. Developing a didactic of common sense, our research project has two goals: the first one is to better understand the dynamic between school knowledge and common sense knowledge involved in day-to-day situations. The second one is to design a device that will upgrade the common sense in order for it to mobilize relevant learned school knowledge when dealing with problems pertaining to real life situations. This paper will focus on the first steps of the research dealing with the second goal.

  3. Factors contributing to depressive mood states in everyday life: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Rachel; Fuller Tyszkiewicz, Matthew D

    2016-08-01

    Although accumulated evidence suggests that fluctuations in depressed mood are common among individuals with depression, and may be associated with onset, duration, and severity of illness, a systematic appraisal of putative predictors of depressed mood is lacking. A systematic search for relevant studies in the literature was conducted using PsycInfo and PubMed databases via EbscoHost in February 2016. The search was limited to articles using the experience sampling method, an approach suitable for capturing in situ fluctuations in mood states. Forty-two studies met inclusion criteria for the review, from which three key risk factors (poor sleep, stress, and significant life events) and two protective factors (physical activity and quality of social interactions) were identified. The majority of papers supported concurrent and lagged associations between these putative protective/risk factors and depressed mood. Despite support for each of the proposed protective/risk factors, few studies evaluated multiple factors in the same study. Moreover, the time course for the effects of these predictors on depressed mood remains largely unknown. The present review identified several putative risk and protective factors for depressed mood. A review of the literature suggests that poor sleep, negative social interactions, and stressful negative events may temporally precede spikes in depressed mood. In contrast, exercise and positive social interactions have been shown to predict subsequent declines in depressed mood. However, the lack of multivariate models in which the unique contributions of various predictors could be evaluated means that the current state of knowledge prevents firm conclusions about which factors are most predictive of depressed mood. More complex modeling of these effects is necessary in order to provide insights useful for clinical treatment in daily life of the depressed mood component of depressive disorders. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by

  4. Persons with Haemophilia in Sweden- Experiences and Strategies in Everyday Life. A Single Centre Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Brodin

    Full Text Available Haemophilia is caused by deficiency in coagulation factor VIII or IX. Treatment with the missing coagulation factors has been available in most developed countries for several decades. The aim was to explore the experiences of adults living with severe or moderate haemophilia and their coping strategies at a single centre in Sweden.The interview study had a qualitative empirical approach and was analyzed on the basis of the method empirical phenomenological psychology. The sample included 14 participants, mean age 42 (19-80 y, who met the inclusion criteria and to saturation of information.General characteristics were; All were satisfied with and grateful for access to medication. An acceptance of the disorder and willingness to live a normal life was identified among all participants. They were all content with the care provided by Haemophilia Treatment Centre (HTC and felt supported by its multidisciplinary team. Four typologies were identified; Protective adults and assertive children during up-bringing, finding a role in social context, symptoms and treatments, fear of limited resources in the future. Task-, emotional- and avoidance coping strategies were seen in the interviews. The most prominent coping strategy was task oriented.This interview study with Swedish PWH shows that they strive for normality and adaptation in social activities throughout life finding their own niche. The PWH expressed the importance of knowledge and support from the comprehensive medical team at HTC and therefore it seems important to continue comprehensive medical care at HTC in order to follow-up the haemophilia persons regularly.

  5. Participation in everyday activities and quality of life in pre-teenage children living with cerebral palsy in South West Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Manus, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children but its impact on quality of life is not well understood. This study examined participation in everyday activities among children without CP and children with mild, moderate and severe impairment due to CP. We then examined ten domains of quality of life in children with CP and investigated whether participation in everyday activities was associated with improved quality of life independent of gender, age and level of impairment. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of children aged 8-12 years based on two questionnaires, frequency of participation (FPQ) and KIDSCREEN, completed by parents of 98 children on the South of Ireland Cerebral Palsy Register (response rate = 82%) and parents of 448 children attending two Cork city schools (response rate = 69%) who completed one questionnaire (FPQ). Multiple linear regression was used: firstly to estimate the effect of severity of CP on participation in everyday activities independent of age and gender and secondly we estimated the effect of participation on quality of life independent of age gender and level of impairment. RESULTS: Participation in 11 of the 14 everyday activities examined varied across the children without CP and the children with varying severity of CP. In general, increased impairment decreased participation. Independent of age and gender, there was a highly significant decrease in overall participation with a fall of -6.0 (95% CI = -6.9 to -5.2) with each increasing level of impairment. The children with CP generally had high quality of life. Increased impairment was associated with diminished quality of life in just two domains - Physical well-being and Social support and peers. Overall participation in everyday activities was significantly associated with quality of life in 3 of the 10 domains (Physical well-being, Social support and peers & Moods and emotions) in analysis adjusted for gender age and

  6. Participation in everyday activities and quality of life in pre-teenage children living with cerebral palsy in South West Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corcoran Paul

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause of physical disability in children but its impact on quality of life is not well understood. This study examined participation in everyday activities among children without CP and children with mild, moderate and severe impairment due to CP. We then examined ten domains of quality of life in children with CP and investigated whether participation in everyday activities was associated with improved quality of life independent of gender, age and level of impairment. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of children aged 8–12 years based on two questionnaires, frequency of participation (FPQ and KIDSCREEN, completed by parents of 98 children on the South of Ireland Cerebral Palsy Register (response rate = 82% and parents of 448 children attending two Cork city schools (response rate = 69% who completed one questionnaire (FPQ. Multiple linear regression was used: firstly to estimate the effect of severity of CP on participation in everyday activities independent of age and gender and secondly we estimated the effect of participation on quality of life independent of age gender and level of impairment. Results Participation in 11 of the 14 everyday activities examined varied across the children without CP and the children with varying severity of CP. In general, increased impairment decreased participation. Independent of age and gender, there was a highly significant decrease in overall participation with a fall of -6.0 (95% CI = -6.9 to -5.2 with each increasing level of impairment. The children with CP generally had high quality of life. Increased impairment was associated with diminished quality of life in just two domains – Physical well-being and Social support and peers. Overall participation in everyday activities was significantly associated with quality of life in 3 of the 10 domains (Physical well-being, Social support and peers & Moods and emotions in analysis adjusted

  7. Everyday Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Wegener, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how vocational teachers’ everyday practices can constitute innovative learning spaces that help students to experience engagement and commitment towards education and thus increase their possibilities for completing their studies despite notable...... difficulties. Design/methodology/approach – Based on two ethnographic field studies, we analyse vocational teaching situations in which teachers and students engage in daily remaking of the vocational educational training practice. It is argued that these everyday situations can be understood as innovative...... transformation of participation and practice. Findings – The exploration of teachers’ practicing new learning spaces sheds light on innovation potential embedded in everyday educational practices. The paper thus challenges the celebration of radical innovation and argues that innovation emerges from everyday...

  8. Food cravings in everyday life: An EMA study on snack-related thoughts, cravings, and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Anna; Meule, Adrian; Reichenberger, Julia; Blechert, Jens

    2017-06-01

    Food craving refers to an intense desire to consume a specific food and is regularly experienced by the majority of individuals. Yet, there are interindividual differences in the frequency and intensity of food craving experiences, which is often referred to as trait food craving. The characteristics and consequences of trait and state food craving have mainly been investigated in questionnaire-based and laboratory studies, which may not reflect individuals' behavior in daily life. In the present study, sixty-one participants completed the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait-reduced (FCQ-T-r) as measure of trait food craving, followed by seven days of Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), during which they reported snack-related thoughts, craving intensity, and snack consumption at five times per day. Results showed that 86 percent of reported snacks were high-caloric, with chocolate-containing foods being the most often reported snacks. Individuals with high FCQ-T-r scores (high trait food cravers, HCs) thought more often about high-calorie than low-calorie snacks whereas no differences were found in individuals with low FCQ-T-r scores (low trait food cravers, LCs). Further, the relationship between craving intensity and snack-related thoughts was stronger in HCs than in LCs. Higher craving intensity was associated with more consumption of snacks and again this relationship was stronger in HCs than in LCs. Finally, more snack-related thoughts were related to more frequent consumption of snacks, independent of trait food craving. Thus, HCs are more prone to think about high-calorie snacks in their daily lives and to consume more snack foods when they experience intense cravings, which might be indicative of a heightened responding towards high-calorie foods. Thus, trait-level differences as well as snack-related thoughts should be targeted in dietary interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Everyday life of the displaced persons’ camps in occupied Germany (The magazine «DiPiniada», 1946-1947

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Tarasov

    2017-01-01

    The research is based on the materials of the archive of Kharkov engineer and poet V. Ellis. The main point of which was the magazine «DiPiniada». The magazine was published during the years 1946-1947 in the camp Munich-Pasing (US zone of occupation in Germany. The schedule log (artist V. Odinokov has been analyzed being a set of historical visual sources, as well as the poetry of W. Ellis 1944-1947 being a literary source. The most common situations in everyday life DPs that had appeared due the difficult circumstances of post-war world order had been described. The complex world of DPs relationship has been shown in the context of the overall historical situation on the territory of occupied Germany and in the whole post-war Europe. It has been proved that the investigation has prospects both in methodological and objective aspects. Particular interesting are the artistic solutions of the magazine, which are interesting not only for historians but also for art critics.

  10. A Cultural-Historical Study of the Development of Children's Scientific Thinking about Clouds in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkiadaki, Glykeria; Fleer, Marilyn; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2017-09-01

    Research into early childhood children's understandings in science has a long history. However, few studies have drawn upon cultural-historical theory to frame their research. Mostly, what is known has come from studies which have examined individual understandings of science concepts, without reference to culture, context or the collective nature in which children learn, play and live. The cultural-historical study reported in this paper examines the process of constructing understandings about clouds by kindergarten children (16 children, aged 4.5 to 6 years, mean age of 5. 3 years) in an urban area of Greece. The research examines how children form relevant representations of clouds, how they conceptualize meteorological understandings in everyday life and how understandings transform through communications with others. The collection of the data was achieved through expanded, open-type conversations between pairs of children and one of the researchers, totalling 4 h of data. In depth analysis, using Rogoff's three foci of analysis (personal, interpersonal and context focusing) allowed for an examination of children's representations of clouds, how social and cultural factors framed thinking and gave insights into the processes of scientific thinking. On this basis, theoretical and methodological insights of this study of natural science by young children are discussed.

  11. Racial identification, knowledge, and the politics of everyday life in an Arizona science classroom: A linguistic ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brendan Harold

    This dissertation is a linguistic ethnography of a high school Astronomy/Oceanography classroom in southern Arizona, where an exceptionally promising, novice, white science teacher and mostly Mexican-American students confronted issues of identity and difference through interactions both related and unrelated to science learning. Through close analysis of video-recorded, naturally-occurring interaction and rich ethnographic description, the study documents how a teacher and students accomplished everyday classroom life, built caring relationships, and pursued scientific inquiry at a time and in a place where nationally- and locally-circulating discourses about immigration and race infused even routine interactions with tension and uncertainty. In their talk, students appropriated elements of racializing discourses, but also used language creatively to "speak back" to commonsense notions about Mexicanness. Careful examination of science-related interactions reveals the participants' negotiation of multiple, intersecting forms of citizenship (i.e., cultural and scientific citizenship) in the classroom, through multidirectional processes of language socialization in which students and the teacher regularly exchanged expert and novice roles. This study offers insight into the continuing relevance of racial, cultural, and linguistic identity to students' experiences of schooling, and sheds new light on classroom discourse, teacher-student relationships, and dimensions of citizenship in science learning, with important implications for teacher preparation and practice.

  12. Neuroticism and the mental noise hypothesis: Relationships to lapses of attention and slips of action in everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAGEN C. FLEHMIG

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between neuroticism and cognitive failure liability in everyday-life situations. Previous research (e.g., Robinson & Tamir, 2005; Robinson, Wilkowski & Meier, 2006 reported a positive association between the trait of neuroticism (N and fluctuations in mental efficiency when performing elementary cognitive operations. High-N individuals were proposed to be characterized by increased noise within information processing from perception to action. To further examine this relationship, we collected self-report data from 222 individuals, measuring N via the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the related construct of Behavioural Inhibition System sensitivity via the BIS/BAS scales, and assessing cognitive failure liability via the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ. The results revealed positive correlations between N and general cognitive failure liability, providing further support for the mental noise hypothesis. A more detailed investigation of CFQ subscales (Meiran et al., 1994 yielded a specific pattern, with the strongest correlation between N and the CFQ–Unintended Activation subscale (r = .40; p < .01. This suggests that high-N individuals preferably commit cognitive failures due to intrusions of task-irrelevant cognitions from associative memory.

  13. [Effect of pseudophacic mini-monovision as an option for independence of spectacles in everyday life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, S; Reiß, S; Terwee, T; Guthoff, R F; Beck, R; Stachs, O

    2014-12-01

    Modern day patients who undergo bilateral cataract surgery expect to be spectacles-independent after surgery. The options that are available to attain this goal are pseudophakic monovision, implanting multifocal IOLs or alternatively accommodative IOLs. The aim of this study is to establish the suitability in daily life when attaining minor monovision, named hereafter mini-monovision. In this clinical retrospective study 30 patients were examined. These subjects where bilaterally pseudophake and received either AcrySof®-IOL or Acreos® Adapt-IOL with a slight anisometropia of between 0.5 and 1.75 D and with a maximal astigmatism up to 1.5 D. Visual acuity (VA) for distance (ETDRS), intermediate (Jaeger 80 cm) and near (Jaeger 40 cm) as well as defocus curves were assessed. Furthermore were examined: the reading speed using the font size of the Radner reading chart, anisoconia (FA Oculus according to Esser), stereopsis (Titmus), subjective patient satisfaction (adapted VF-14-questionnaire) and the subjective dependence on having to wear spectacles. The median anisometropia was at 0.75 D; the age was between 61 and 80 (median being at 73 years). 12 patients were male and 18 female. When examined with binocular vision 100 % could attain distance VA of at least decimal 1.0 (LogMAR 0) and an intermediate VA of at least decimal 0.8 (LogMAR 0.1), up to 86.57 % a near VA of at least Jaeger 5, (LogMAR 0.4); up to 63.33 % even managed at least Jaeger 3 (LogMAR 0.3). The median average reading speed for binocular uncorrected reading under photopic conditions was 145 words/minute and under mesopic conditions 117 words/minute. The critical font size was LogRAD 0.60 (Jaeger 5-6), the anisoconia at 2 % and stereopsis at 80 arc seconds. The general dependence on glasses was reduced from 100 % preoperatively to 13 %, postoperatively. Simultaneously a high patient satisfaction score of 93.18 in the VF-14 questionnaire was attained. The result is comparable to those

  14. Hepatitis B discrimination in everyday life by rural migrant workers in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Anli; Li, Youwei; Wangen, Knut Reidar; Nicholas, Stephen; Maitland, Elizabeth; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-03

    In China, the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a particularly challenging public health issue, with an estimated 90 million chronic hepatitis B carriers accounting for almost 7% of the population. Health-related discrimination can serve as a barrier to prevention and care for infectious diseases, such as HBV, degrade the HBV sufferers' quality of life and limit HBV patients' employment opportunities. While rural migrants account for up to 40% of the total urban population in the developed cities in China, there has been no study of the discrimination behavior of rural migrant workers toward HBV carriers. This study evaluates the discrimination behavior of rural migrant workers toward HBV carriers and patients and proposes public policy recommendations to address discrimination and stigma. The sample comprised 903 rural adults, aged over 18 years old, who migrated to Beijing. Using a face-to-face interview, we surveyed rural migrants' demographic characteristics, knowledge of HBV and discrimination against HBV carriers. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study population, HBV stigma and knowledge of HBV. Three discrimination levels (no-mild, medium and severe discrimination) were modeled using multiple logistic regression. Rural migrants to Beijing had a mean age of 36 years, were overwhelmingly married (91.58%), mostly with a junior high school or lower education (78.05%) and mainly engaged as temporary workers (42.52%) or self-employed (33.78%). Only 30.56% reported that they had been vaccinated against HBV. On the 0-10 discrimination scale, rural migrants rated 6.24, with only 4.54% displaying no sign of HBV-related discrimination. The high discrimination score occurred alongside a low mean knowledge of HBV (7.61 on the 1-22 ranking of HBV knowledge). Multiple logistic regression results suggest an inverse relationship between discrimination levels and HBV knowledge, especially knowledge about treatment and transmission routes. The "fear of being

  15. Translation and Adaptation of the Auditory Behavior in Everyday Life (ABEL Questionnaire into Persian: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Majid Oryadi-Zanjani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory rehabilitation is one of the important tasks of speechlanguage pathologists. So, it is necessary to know auditory behaviors in order to make some decisions about the children with hearing loss such as determining the effectiveness of the current rehabilitation programs and/or devices. The Auditory Behavior in Everyday Life (ABEL questionnaire is a valid and reliable assessment tool in English which is developed by Purdy et al. (1995. The aim of this study was to translate and adapt ABEL questionnaire for Persian language. Methods: The ABEL consists of three factors of auditory-oral, auditory awareness, and conversational/social skills. First, the questionnaire was translated and culturally adapted from English to Persian by an independent Iranian translator. The back translated version was compared with the original one in terms of the semantic/idiomatic equivalence. Then the questionnaire was completed two times by 43 mothers of 4-to-6 year old children with hearing loss who were using either hearing aids or cochlear implants. Finally, the results of the test-retest reliability were statistically compared in order to assess internal consistency. The statistical tests which were used include Cronbach’s Alpha, Spearman correlation, and Pearson correlation tests in significance level of 0.05. Results: There was a significant strength correlation among the items of the factor 1 (Alpha=0.94, factor 2 (Alpha=0.86, factor 3 (Alpha=0.82 and three factors (Alpha=0.96. There was a significant strength correlation at the 0.01 level between the scores of each factor in test-retest include auditory-oral (Spearman’s rho=0.94, P<0.001, auditory awareness (Spearman’s rho=0.92, P<0.001, and conversational/social skills (Spearman’s rho=0.82, P<0.001. Conclusion: The Persian version of ABEL questionnaire is a valid and reliable tool for the assessment of auditory performance development in Persianspeaking children wearing hearing aids

  16. 'I lose all these hours...'--exploring gender and consequences of dilemmas experienced in everyday life with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverker, Annette; Ostlund, Gunnel; Hallert, Claes; Hensing, Gunnel

    2009-06-01

    Few studies have focused on gendered consequences of coeliac disease (CD), despite the fact that women with coeliac disease report lower health-related quality of life than men do. The aim of this study was to explore consequences of dilemmas in everyday lives for women and men, as personally affected by CD or as close relatives to someone affected by the disease and to put these experiences into context regarding household activities. This QUAL-quan study included 28 men and 38 women. A mix method design was used. The critical incident technique that captures, in a structured way, the qualities of experiences was used in interviews to identify dilemmas and their consequences. To describe the social context of these dilemmas, a quantitative questionnaire was developed on food preparations and purchase, as well as on cooking and meal behaviours. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Health Sciences. The consequences were found in cognitive, social, emotional and physical aspects of human life. The overall pattern of these consequences was similar in women and men irrespective of being personally affected or a close relative. The main consequences identified were: daily concerns about gluten, constant preparation, being different, emotional pressure and body sensations because of CD. Descriptive data extracted from the questionnaire showed that women and men reported having a different social situation in relation to preparing food, making decisions about purchases, buying food products and preparing meals. The clinical implications of these findings are that healthcare professionals need to develop family-oriented information in relation to CD. It is necessary to inform the close relatives irrespective of sex of the possible consequences of the disease and to take in to account the different social context that women and men report in relation to food preparations.

  17. An approach to facilitate healthcare professionals' readiness to support technology use in everyday life for persons with dementia.

    OpenAIRE

    Malinowsky, Camilla; Rosenberg, Lena; Nygård, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Everyday technologies (ETs) like microwave ovens and automatic telephone services as well as assistive technologies (ATs) are often used in the performance of everyday activities. As a consequence, the ability to manage technology is important. This pilot study aimed to clarify the applicability of a model for knowledge translation to support healthcare professionals, to support technology use among older adults with dementia and their significant others. An additional aim was to explore the ...

  18. Everyday Tectonics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne; Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    2016-01-01

    or Carlo Scarpa’s Brion Cemetery that posses an ability to enrich the lives of their users are signified by an in-depth attention to the correlation ofbetween structure, materials and details. InWithin the architectural history and theorydiscourse such works are referred to, as key examples of a tectonic...... consciousness, and (construction) technique. 1 Conclusions In addressing the … As st formulated by Lefebvre: ‘Why should the study of the banal be banal? Are not the surreal, the extraordinary, the surprising, even the magical, also part of the real? Why wouldn’t the concept of everydayness reveal...... challenge for research, practice, and education, which focus onwhen dealing with everyday architecture that is based on where the development of tectonic thinking and methods as fundamentals is inevitably key.: What conditions the realization of everyday architecture? And how to position and release...

  19. What is Everyday Life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Grahame

    and constitutionality in particular. Although the relationship between EDL and constitutionality might at first sight seem remote the argument is that there is an emerging constitutionalization of EDL that is heralding a potentially new form of citizenship amongst those subject to its strictures. Throughout the paper...

  20. Toxins in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chey, Howard; Buchanan, Susan

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews the sources of exposure and health effects of common toxicants encountered by patients in primary care practice. The recognition and management of exposure to indoor and outdoor pollutants, heavy metals, pesticides, electromagnetic fields, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals are listed. A sample environmental history form is included.

  1. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research......, and the impact of a psychosocial intervention programme on patients and caregivers. To meet the objective three studies were conducted: 1) to investigate social participation in patients with mild AD, and to analyse predictors of low social participation; 2) to analyse how patients with mild AD cope...... with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...

  2. Effects of Everyday Life Events on Glucose, Insulin, and Glucagon Dynamics in Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion–Treated Type 1 Diabetes: Collection of Clinical Data for Glucose Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the development of glucose control algorithms, mathematical models of glucose metabolism are useful for conducting simulation studies and making real-time predictions upon which control calculations can be based. To obtain type 1 diabetes (T1D) data for the modeling of glucose...... metabolism, we designed and conducted a clinical study.Methods: Patients with insulin pump–treated T1D were recruited to perform everyday life events on two separate days. During the study, patients wore their insulin pumps and, in addition, a continuous glucose monitor and an activity monitor to estimate...... energy expenditure. The sequence of everyday life events was predetermined and included carbohydrate intake, insulin boluses, and bouts of exercise; the events were introduced, temporally separated, in different orders and in different quantities. Throughout the study day, 10-min plasma glucose...

  3. Modelling News Media Use. Positing and applying the MC/GC model to the analysis of media use in everyday life and crisis situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlund, Oscar; Ghersetti, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The contemporary mediascape offers a plethora of news media and social media, which people can turn to in everyday life and during a crisis. The characteristics of media vary, providing different logics and affordances, and occupying different niches in time and space (medium-centric (MC) approach......). Generations develop routinized media usage patterns in the formative phases of their lives, which they often maintain in their daily habits in everyday life (generation-centric (GC) approach). Crisis events in the vicinity, such as gas emissions, terrorist attacks, pandemics and earthquakes, presumably ignite...... an augmented interest for information and news on the events that may cause a destabilization of established media usage routines. This article aims to conceptualize, describe and explain how four generations envision their media use during such crises. The article posits the MC/GC-model, a 2x2 matrix...

  4. Variation in the Characteristics of Everyday Life and Meaning of Urban Housing Due to the Transition of Social Structure: Focusing on Articles Published in Lifestyle Magazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-ah Kwon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The patterns and characteristics of everyday life have been changing according to changes in social structure. However, South Korean apartment complexes as a representative urban housing type are still based on the Western tradition of modern working-class housing, and have been commodified in the context of consumer capitalism. Therefore, this research explores the contemporary lifestyles that should be supported in urban housing by analyzing the articles of lifestyle magazines. Based on this analysis, we derived the changed patterns of contemporary lifestyles in terms of residents’ characteristics, the relationship between individuals and family, the relationship between house and workplace, and the pursuing direction of residential space planning. These results can contribute to discover the contemporary characteristics of everyday life and its lifestyle; define the changed meaning of urban housing; and reduce the gap between living space and their lives for urban and social sustainability.

  5. Wandering minds and wavering goals: Examining the relation between mind wandering and grit in everyday life and the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Brandon C W; Wammes, Jeffrey D; Barr, Nathaniel; Smilek, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Here we examined the relation between mind wandering and the personality trait of 'grit.' Our hypothesis was that because mind wandering leads to a disruption of momentary goal completion, the tendency to mind wander might be inversely related to the completion of long-term goals that require sustained interest and effort (i.e., grittiness). In Study 1 we used online questionnaires and found that in everyday life, the propensity to mind wander was negatively correlated with individuals' self-reported grittiness. Interestingly, the relation between mind wandering and grit was strongest for unintentional bouts of mind wandering (as compared with intentional mind wandering). We extended these findings in Study 2 by (a) using a more heterogeneous sample of participants, (b) including a measure of conscientiousness, and (c) including another measure of general perseverance. In addition to replicating our findings from Study 1, in Study 2 we found that the grit measure uniquely predicted spontaneous mind wandering over and above a measure of conscientiousness and an alternative measure of general perseverance. Lastly, in Study 3 we extend the relation between mind wandering and grit to the classroom, finding that mind wandering during university lectures was also related to self-reported grittiness. Taken together, we suggest that the propensity to experience brief lapses of attention is associated with the propensity to stick-with and complete long-term goals. We also provide evidence that when predicting mind wandering and inattention, measures of grit are not redundant with existing measure of conscientiousness and general perseverance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Mindfulness Meditation: A Preliminary Study on Meditation Practice During Everyday Life Activities and its Association with Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp M. Keune

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that mindfulness meditation is useful for the attenuation of psychological and physical suffering in clinical populations. In structured mindfulness-based interventions, patients engage in meditation exercises to refine their attentional skills and to learn to purposefully relate to the present moment experience in a non-judgemental manner. Following the development of such interventions, mindfulness has also received considerable attention in academic psychology, where it has been incorporated in the self-determination theory (SDT. According to SDT, the cultivation of mindfulness may warrant effective need gratification and consequently yield enhanced well-being in healthy individuals. In this context, in the current study, we examined the association between mindfulness meditation, self-reported trait mindfulness and their predictive value for psychological well-being in a non-clinical sample. Individuals who engaged in mindfulness meditation regularly (N = 30 were compared to individuals without meditation experience (N = 30 on various scales which assessed trait mindfulness and psychological well-being. Meditators reported higher emotional well-being, which was predicted by frequency and duration of practice. Especially those practitioners, who made efforts to implement mindfulness practice in activities of everyday life showed enhanced emotional adjustment. In an explorative analysis, mindfulness was identified as a putative partial mediator of the relationship between meditation practice and well-being. Despite methodological constraints, results of the current study suggest that mindfulness meditation, in a non-clinical context, is associated with increased psychological well-being, and as such worth to be explored in more detail by future research. The study and its results might be relevant for the clinical sector as well, since they provide some information on how individuals with e.g., subclinical residual

  7. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation

    OpenAIRE

    Theeven, P.J.; Hemmen, B.; Geers, R.P.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Brink, P.R.; Seelen, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. DESIGN: Randomized cross-over trial. SUBJECTS: Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified as Medicare Functional Classification Level-2. METHODS: Participants were measured in 3 conditions, i.e. using a mechanically controlled prosthesis, an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled st...

  8. How to Investigate Within-Subject Associations between Physical Activity and Momentary Affective States in Everyday Life: A Position Statement Based on a Literature Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanning, Martina K.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W.; Schlicht, Wolfgang Michael

    2013-01-01

    Several meta-analyses have investigated the association between physical activity and affective states and have found evidence suggesting that exercise exerts a positive effect on affective state. However, in this field of research, most studies have conducted between-subject analyses. Nonetheless, there is more and more interest in the within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. This position statement pertains to this up-and-coming field of research and provides methodological recommendations for further studies. The paper is divided into three parts: first, we summarize and evaluate three methodological requirements necessary for the proper evaluation of within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. We propose that the following issues should be considered: (a) to address the dynamic nature of such relationships, repeated assessments are necessary; (b) as activities performed in everyday life are mostly spontaneous and unconscious, an objective assessment of physical activity is useful; (c) given that recall of affective states is often affected by systematic distortions, real-time assessment is preferable. In sum, we suggest the use of ambulatory assessment techniques, and more specifically the combination of accelerometer-assessment of physical activity with an electronic diary assessment of the momentary affective state and additional context information. Second, we summarize 22 empirical studies published between 1980 and 2012 using ambulatory assessment to investigate within-subject associations between momentary affective states and physical activity in everyday life. Generally, the literature overview detects a positive association, which appears stronger among those studies that were of high methodological quality. Third, we propose the use of ambulatory assessment intervention (AAIs) strategies to change people’s behavior and to enable

  9. How to investigate within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life: A position statement based on a literature overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina K. Kanning

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several meta-analyses have investigated the association between physical activity and affective states and have found evidence suggesting that exercise exerts a positive effect on affective state. However, in this field of research, most studies have conducted between-subject analyses. Nonetheless, there is more and more interest in the within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. This position statement pertains to this up-and-coming field of research and provides methodological recommendations for further studies. The paper is divided into three parts:First, we summarise and evaluate three methodological requirements necessary for the proper evaluation of within-subject associations between physical activity and momentary affective states in everyday life. We propose that the following issues should be considered: a to address the dynamic nature of such relationships, repeated assessments are necessary; b as activities performed in everyday life are mostly spontaneous and unconscious, an objective assessment of physical activity is useful; c given that recall of affective states is often affected by systematic distortions, real-time assessment is preferable. In sum, we suggest the use of ambulatory assessment techniques, and more specifically the combination of acceloremeter-assessment of physical activity with an electronic diary assessment of the momentary affective state and additional context information. Second, we summarise 22 empirical studies published between 1980 and 2012 using ambulatory assessment to investigate within-subject associations between momentary affective states and physical activity in everyday life. Generally, the literature overview detects a positive association, which appears stronger among those studies that were of high methodological quality.Third, we propose the use of ambulatory assessment intervention strategies to change people's behaviour (ambulatory

  10. Toward an ethnography of silence: the lived presence of the past in the everyday life of Holocaust trauma survivors and their descendants in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Carol A

    2009-02-01

    Despite the abundant scholarship on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the memoropolitics entailed by testimonial accounts of trauma and genocide, little is known of the everyday experience of trauma survivors and their descendants. Survivor silence is thought to signify only psychological or political repression and the "unspeakability" of traumatic pasts. It is widely accepted that the everyday lives of trauma victims and their descendants entail only the "absence of presence" of the past and the absence of descendant knowledge of that past, while the familial social milieu is thought to foster only the wounds of transmitted PTSD. Contrary to the literature, ethnographic accounts of Holocaust descendants depict the survivor home as embedding the nonpathological presence of the Holocaust past within silent, embodied practices, person-object interaction, and person-person interaction. These silent traces form an experiential matrix of Holocaust presence that sustains familial "lived memory" of the past and transmits tacit knowledge of the past within the everyday private social milieu. The ethnography of silent memory may also provide a tentative model of nontraumatic individual and familial memory work in everyday life.

  11. Student perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life: A study in higher education biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is the last science course they will take for life. General biology courses are suspected of discouraging student interest in biology with large enrollment, didactic instruction, covering a huge amount of content in one semester, and are charged with promoting student disengagement with biology by the end of the course. Previous research has been aimed at increasing student motivation and interest in biology as measured by surveys and test results. Various methods of instruction have been tested and show evidence of improved learning gains. This study focused on students' perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life and the methods of instruction that increase it. A quantitative survey was administered to assess perception of relevance pre and post instruction over three topics typically taught in a general biology course. A second quantitative survey of student experiences during instruction was administered to identify methods of instruction used in the course lecture and lab. While perception of relevance dropped in the study, qualitative focus groups provided insight into the surprising results by identifying topics that are more relevant than the ones chosen for the study, conveying the affects of the instructor's personal and instructional skills on student engagement, explanation of how active engagement during instruction promotes understanding of relevance, the roll of laboratory in promoting students' understanding of relevance as well as identifying external factors that affect student engagement. The study also investigated the extent to which gender affected changes in students' perception of

  12. Persons with dementia “are given a voice” when music and singing are included as part of their everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Aase Marie

    with inspiration from action research. Methodical is interviews, storytelling, video documentation and the Dementia Care Mapping method used. The results from this part of the project will be presented. The project contains three parts, which in addition to involve the perspective from the person with dementia...... have when singing and music are used as a communicative form of intervention in everyday life and in their interaction and relationship with caregivers and what impact does it have on their quality of life and well-being? b) What impact does it have, from a professional and an interdisciplinary...

  13. Life's Little Lessons: An Inch-By-Inch Tale of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Joanne; Small, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Life's Little Lessons is a delightful and humorous story about a caterpillar named Cyrano and his misadventures. In school he struggles, at times he gives up, until one day he discovers that he and only he is in charge of his own happiness. Children, will easily identify with Cyrano, his feelings and his flight, as they learn that although life…

  14. Aesthetic Inquiry into Chinese University Student Fatherly Life Lessons: "Roots" and Their Implications for Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura Blythe

    2017-01-01

    Globally, teachers are trained to educate and assess children through matrices based on comparative competition, a practice that thrives on ranking. In an era of glocalization, how might educational systems cultivate classroom connections embracing diverse student gifts? This arts-based narrative inquiry explores fatherly life lessons of 17…

  15. Everyday Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Lewis; Haladyn, Dennis; Grønnebæk, Christian; Hansen, Johannes; Jensen, Mikkel; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    This paper will strive to comprehend performance-studie’s ability to enlighten individuals’ upon an inferred technological impact within their everyday lives. More precisely, revolve around its paradigmatic capacity to act as a foundation for the pragmatic establishment of an interactive exhibition, where such reflection is to occur. Thus proposing a reflection encapsulated and enabled through the interaction of a representative system constituent of systematically arranged technological arte...

  16. Children's Subject Positions in Discourses of Music in Everyday Life: Rethinking Conceptions of the Child in and for Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestad, Ingeborg Lunde

    2014-01-01

    In this article I discuss children's everyday uses of recorded music (such as CDs, Mp3-files) in the light of sociological notions of "children" and "childhood". The discussion provides perspectives on musical engagement and musicality that supplement perspectives within developmental psychology. The study is based on…

  17. Experiences of housing support in everyday life for persons with schizophrenia and the role of the media from a societal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrika Jormfeldt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mental health-care system in Sweden, as in many other counties, has its main focus on the reduction of psychiatric symptoms and the prevention of relapses. People diagnosed with schizophrenia often have significant health issues and experience reduced well-being in everyday life. The social imaginary of mental illness as an imbalance of the brain has implications concerning general attitudes in society. The news media are an important source of information on psychiatric disorders and have an important role in cultivating public perceptions and stigma. News media can contribute to the mental illness stigma and place individuals with mental illnesses at risk of not receiving adequate care and support. The aim of this preliminary study was to describe users’ experiences of housing support in everyday life. Results: The results revealed three themes of housing support, which were needed, but frequently insufficiently fulfilled in the municipality. The three themes were: “Support to Practice Healthy Routines in Daily Life,” “Support to Shape Meaningful Contents in Everyday Life,” and “Support to Meet Needs of Integrity and Respect.” Conclusions: The findings support previous studies arguing that current health care and housing support fails to meet basic needs and may lead to significant and unnecessary health risks. Further investigation is needed regarding the links between attitudes to mental illness in society and political and financial principles for health care and housing support for persons with schizophrenia. Further research is needed regarding the role of the media in policymaking concerning health promotion interventions for people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

  18. Promoting health in virtual worlds: lessons from second life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Reima; Mäntymäki, Matti; Söderlund, Sari

    2014-10-13

    Social media services can help empower people to take greater responsibility for their health. For example, virtual worlds are media-rich environments that have many technically advantageous characteristics that can be used for Health 2.0 purposes. Second Life has been used to build environments where people can obtain information and interact with other users for peer support and advice from health care professionals. The intent of the study was to find out whether Second Life is a working and functional platform supporting the empowerment of people in health-related issues. We conducted a review of the current health-related activity in Second Life, coupled with an extensive series of observations and interactions with the respective resources inside Second Life. A total of 24 operative health resources were found in Second Life, indicating that health-related activity is rather limited in Second Life, though at first glance it appears to contain very rich health-related content. The other main shortcomings of Second Life relate to a lack of activity, a low number of resource users, problems with Second Life's search features, and the difficulty of finding trustworthy information. For the average user, Second Life offers very little unique value compared to other online health resources.

  19. Everyday sexism

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, Laura

    2014-01-01

    'If Caitlin Moran's How To Be A Womanis the fun-filled manual for female survival in the 21st century, everyday sexism is its more politicised sister' (Independent on Sunday). After experiencing a series of escalating sexist incidents, Laura Bates started theeveryday sexism projectand has gone on to write 'a pioneering analysis of modern day misogyny' (Telegraph). After an astounding response from the wide range of stories that came pouring in from all over the world, the project quickly became one of the biggest social media success stories of the internet. From being harassed and wolf-whistled at on the street, to discrimination in the workplace and serious sexual assault, it is clear that sexism had become normalised. But Bates inspires women to lead a real change and writes this 'extremely powerful book that could, and should, win hearts and minds right across the spectrum' (Financial Times). Often shocking, sometimes amusing and always poignant, everyday sexism is a protest against inequality and a manif...

  20. Children’s everyday transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    This chapter analyses children’s everyday transitions across home and the day-care institution, as well as between different activities and communities. Employing a cultural-historical approach, historical and socio-structural conditions for everyday life are analysed on the basis of subjective...... meanings and experiences of action possibilities (Chaiklin, Hedegaard, & Jensen, 1999). Employing the concept of conduct of everyday life (Dreier, 2008, 2011; Holzkamp, 2013; Højholt & Kousholt, 2017), this chapter analyses the active, creative and coordinating processes involved in leading a compound...... everyday life. Analysing transitions from the children’s perspective produces knowledge about how children actively deal with and arrange their conditions as they move between different communities and practices, as well as the struggles and possibilities involved, which are not always visible to adult...

  1. Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research. Excessive behaviors are not necessarily addictive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Ju-Yu

    2015-09-01

    The commentary aims to provide clarity to the article "Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research." We provide another viewpoint for the important issues of behavior addiction. The course of behavior addiction should be further studied. The criteria of withdrawal and tolerance of behavior addiction are ill-defined and need to be further evaluated. The etiology, course, presentation, and functional impairment of behavior addiction should be validated by evidence-based data before being defined as a disorder.

  2. “Festive Customs” and “Everyday Beauty”. The Agenda and Self-Conception of the Nordic Life Reform Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atli Magnus Seelow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second half of the 19th century, a wave of modernization, industrialization and urbanization swept the Nordic countries, catapulting what had until then been lagging and primarily rural countries into modernity. These major upheavals, however, also plunged the Nordic countries into a profound social and cultural crisis resulting from their consciousness of their own backwardness vis-a-vis the countries on the European continent, as well as the recognition that a nostalgic nationalism recalling a mythical past had become obsolete in the industrial age. In response to this crisis, a life reform movement emerged that was based on Arts and Crafts movements as well as various artistic and literary reform movements and—equally absorbing rural traditions and progressive social ideas—tried to establish a new national everyday culture. In this article, the two key terms coined by Ellen Key, “Festive Customs” (“festvanor” and “Everyday Beauty” (“vardagsskönhet”—the programmatic core of the Nordic life reform movement—are analysed and illustrated in various typical manifestations. It also examines to what extent the Nordic life reform movement with these two key concepts as its core agenda found expression in arts and crafts, in painting as well as in the architecture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and contributed to the progress of social and cultural renewal.

  3. Effectiveness of the "Cancer Home-Life Intervention" on everyday activities and quality of life in people with advanced cancer living at home: a randomised controlled trial and an economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Å; Pilegaard, M S; Oestergaard, L G; Lindahl-Jacobsen, L; Sørensen, J; Johnsen, A T; la Cour, K

    2016-01-22

    During the past decade an increasing number of people live with advanced cancer mainly due to improved medical treatment. Research has shown that many people with advanced cancer have problems with everyday activities, which have negative impact on their quality of life, and that they spend a considerable part of their time at home. Still, research on interventions to support the performance of and participation in everyday activities is only scarcely available. Therefore, the occupational therapy-based "Cancer Home-Life Intervention" consisting of tailored adaptive interventions applied in the participant's home environment was developed. The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Cancer Home-Life Intervention compared to usual care on the performance of and participation in everyday activities and quality of life in people with advanced cancer living at home. The study is a randomised, controlled trial (RCT) including an economic evaluation. The required sample size of 272 adults living at home will be recruited from outpatient clinics at two Danish hospitals. They should be diagnosed with cancer; evaluated incurable by the responsible oncologist; and with a functional level 1-2 on the WHO performance scale. The primary outcome is the quality of performance of activities of daily living. Secondary outcomes are problems with prioritised everyday activities; autonomy and participation; and health-related quality of life. Participants are randomly assigned to: a) The Cancer Home-Life Intervention in addition to usual care, and b) Usual care alone. The trial will show whether the Cancer Home-Life Intervention provides better support for people with advanced cancer living at home in performing and participating in everyday activities, and whether it contributes to their health-related quality of life. The economic evaluation alongside the RCT will show if the Cancer Home-Life Intervention is cost-effective. The trial will

  4. Aligning everyday life priorities with people's self-management support networks: an exploration of the work and implementation of a needs-led telephone support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickem, Christian; Kennedy, Anne; Jariwala, Praksha; Morris, Rebecca; Bowen, Robert; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Brooks, Helen; Blakeman, Tom; Rogers, Anne

    2014-06-17

    Recent initiatives to target the personal, social and clinical needs of people with long-term health conditions have had limited impact within primary care. Evidence of the importance of social networks to support people with long-term conditions points to the need for self-management approaches which align personal circumstances with valued activities. The Patient-Led Assessment for Network Support (PLANS) intervention is a needs-led assessment for patients to prioritise their health and social needs and provide access to local community services and activities. Exploring the work and practices of patients and telephone workers are important for understanding and evaluating the workability and implementation of new interventions. Qualitative methods (interviews, focus group, observations) were used to explore the experience of PLANS from the perspectives of participants and the telephone support workers who delivered it (as part of an RCT) and the reasons why the intervention worked or not. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) was used as a sensitising tool to evaluate: the relevance of PLANS to patients (coherence); the processes of engagement (cognitive participation); the work done for PLANS to happen (collective action); the perceived benefits and costs of PLANS (reflexive monitoring). 20 patients in the intervention arm of a clinical trial were interviewed and their telephone support calls were recorded and a focus group with 3 telephone support workers was conducted. Analysis of the interviews, support calls and focus group identified three themes in relation to the delivery and experience of PLANS. These are: formulation of 'health' in the context of everyday life; trajectories and tipping points: disrupting everyday routines; precarious trust in networks. The relevance of these themes are considered using NPT constructs in terms of the work that is entailed in engaging with PLANS, taking action, and who is implicated this process. PLANS gives scope to align

  5. Searching for Life on Early Mars: Lessons from the Pilbara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. D. A.; Stoker, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Stromatolites in the Pilbara region of Western Australia constitute the earliest outcrop-scale evidence of life on Earth (Figure 1). The stromatolites in the 3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation (SPF) provide an important analog for searching for fossil evidence of early life on Mars, as Noachian aged sediments on Mars were formed under similar environmental conditions. Stromatolites represent possibly the best evidence that could be collected by a rover because they form recognizable macroscopic structures and are often associated with chemical and microscopic evidence.

  6. Friendship in childhood and adulthood: lessons across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, A M; de Vries, B; Lansford, J E

    2000-01-01

    Friendship occupies an important place in the growing body of literature in child development and gerontological research. As such, it may be useful for researchers from both fields to consider what can be learned from work carried out in each tradition. Therefore, we present a selected review of topics in friendship research across the life span. Through discussion of the value of friendship, the development of friendship, challenges to friendship, the gendered nature of friendship, and the connection between friends and family, points of commonality and contrast are identified. We conclude by presenting possible avenues for future investigation for researchers interested in friendship at any point in the life span.

  7. They need to be recognized as a person in everyday life: Teachers' and helpers' experiences of teacher-student relationships in upper secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Vibeke; Karlsson, Bengt; Ness, Ottar; Binder, Per-Einar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how teachers and helpers experience that teacher-student relationship (TSR) is developed and promoted in upper secondary school.We also explored their experiences of qualities of TSR with students with mental health problems or at risk of dropping out. The study used a qualitative and participative approach; key stakeholders were included as co-researchers. Focus group interviews were held with 27 teachers and helpers. A thematic analysis was conducted. The participants' descriptions of important experiential dimensions of TSR were clustered around four themes: (1) to be recognized as a person with strengths and challenges in everyday life, (2) collaborative relationships between students and teachers, (3) flexible boundaries in the relationship between teachers and students and (4) organization of classes and procedures set the stage for TSR. Collaborative, emotional and contextual qualities were found important to the development of TSR in upper secondary school. Experiences of negative qualities of TSR can contribute to push students out of school. Teachers and helpers experience that TSR may have the potential to play a role in promoting mental health in students' everyday life.

  8. They need to be recognized as a person in everyday life: Teachers’ and helpers’ experiences of teacher–student relationships in upper secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Krane

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore how teachers and helpers experience that teacher–student relationship (TSR is developed and promoted in upper secondary school.We also explored their experiences of qualities of TSR with students with mental health problems or at risk of dropping out. The study used a qualitative and participative approach; key stakeholders were included as co-researchers. Focus group interviews were held with 27 teachers and helpers. A thematic analysis was conducted. The participants’ descriptions of important experiential dimensions of TSR were clustered around four themes: (1 to be recognized as a person with strengths and challenges in everyday life, (2 collaborative relationships between students and teachers, (3 flexible boundaries in the relationship between teachers and students and (4 organization of classes and procedures set the stage for TSR. Collaborative, emotional and contextual qualities were found important to the development of TSR in upper secondary school. Experiences of negative qualities of TSR can contribute to push students out of school. Teachers and helpers experience that TSR may have the potential to play a role in promoting mental health in students’ everyday life.

  9. They need to be recognized as a person in everyday life: Teachers’ and helpers’ experiences of teacher–student relationships in upper secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Vibeke; Karlsson, Bengt; Ness, Ottar; Binder, Per-Einar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how teachers and helpers experience that teacher–student relationship (TSR) is developed and promoted in upper secondary school. We also explored their experiences of qualities of TSR with students with mental health problems or at risk of dropping out. The study used a qualitative and participative approach; key stakeholders were included as co-researchers. Focus group interviews were held with 27 teachers and helpers. A thematic analysis was conducted. The participants’ descriptions of important experiential dimensions of TSR were clustered around four themes: (1) to be recognized as a person with strengths and challenges in everyday life, (2) collaborative relationships between students and teachers, (3) flexible boundaries in the relationship between teachers and students and (4) organization of classes and procedures set the stage for TSR. Collaborative, emotional and contextual qualities were found important to the development of TSR in upper secondary school. Experiences of negative qualities of TSR can contribute to push students out of school. Teachers and helpers experience that TSR may have the potential to play a role in promoting mental health in students’ everyday life. PMID:27707451

  10. From Lessons to Life: Authentic Materials Bridge the Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelleri, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the use of authentic materials in teaching English as a Second Language. Issues addressed include students' interest in "real life" materials, the role of the teacher, and how to teach using authentic materials. Sample criteria for selecting authentic materials are included. (Author/VWL)

  11. Assessing social impacts in a life cycle perspective-Lessons learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Jørgensen, Andreas; Dreyer, Louise Camilla

    2008-01-01

    In our globalised economy, important stakeholder groups nowadays hold companies responsible for the social impacts they cause in their product chain through activities like child labour, corruption or discrimination of employees. Many companies thus see themselves in need of a tool which can help...... them make informed decisions about their social impacts throughout the life cycle of their products. The paper presents lessons learned from four years of work with industry on development of a methodology for social Life Cycle Assessment and implementation in the industrial product chain. The Social...

  12. AMisfit Theory of Spontaneous Conscious Odor Perception (MITSCOP: reflections on the role and function of odor memory in everyday life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egon P Köster

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Our senses have developed as an answer to the world we live in (Gibson, 1966 and so have the forms of memory that accompany them. All senses serve different purposes and do so in different ways. In vision, where orientation and object recognition are important, memory is strongly linked to identification. In olfaction, the guardian of vital functions such as breathing and food ingestion, perhaps the most important (and least noticed and researched role of odor memory is to help us not to notice the well-known odors or flavors in our everyday surroundings, but to react immediately to the unexpected ones. At the same time it provides us with a feeling of safety when our expectancies are met. All this happens without any smelling intention or conscious knowledge of our expectations. Identification by odor naming is not involved in this and people are notoriously bad at it. Odors are usually best identified via the episodic memory of the situation in which they once occurred. Spontaneous conscious odor perception normally only occurs in situations where attention is demanded, either because the inhaled air or the food smell is particularly good or particularly bad and people search for its source or because people want to actively enjoy the healthiness and pleasantness of their surroundings or food. Odor memory is concerned with novelty detection rather than with recollection of odors. In this paper, these points are illustrated with experimental results and their consequences for doing ecologically valid odor memory research are drawn. Furthermore, suggestions for ecologically valid research on everyday odor memory and some illustrative examples are given.

  13. Everyday Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Vicki R. TenHaken

    2011-01-01

    For years business writers and speakers have focused on larger than life, charismatic Leaders, with a capital L. The implication is that the success of an organization is dependent on this one person and his or her ability to inspire everyone else to follow a unique vision. This focus on the Leader is at least a partial cause of the lack of trust we are witnessing in business organizations today. Leaders believe they must behave in some larger than life way. With the expectation that they mus...

  14. Everyday Heroes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karns, Michelle; McGee, Ben

    2011-01-01

    There's no need to be "Waiting for Superman." Heroes are everywhere in education. The efforts, dedication, and commitment of educators to create learning organizations that awaken the spirit of children in spite of their life circumstances and build capacity for those that have not had the benefit of privilege is worth telling. This article shares…

  15. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the second study, data were collected using semi-structured research interviews with 11 patients before their participation in the DAISY intervention programme. Grounded theory analysis of the interview data revealed that the basic social psychological problem......Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...... faced by the patients was: their awareness of decline in personal dignity and value. Coping strategies used to meet these problems were adaptations to the altered situation in order to maintain a feeling of well-being. In the third study, data were collected using individual semi-structured research...

  16. Assessing Advanced Theory of Mind in Children and Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism: The Spanish Version of the Stories of Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera-Miguel, Sara; Rosa, Mireia; Puig, Olga; Kaland, Nils; Lázaro, Luisa; Castro-Formieles, Josefina; Calvo, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Most individuals with autism spectrum disorders often fail in tasks of theory of mind (ToM). However, those with normal intellectual functioning known as high functioning ASD (HF-ASD) sometimes succeed in mentalizing inferences. Some tools have been developed to more accurately test their ToM abilities. The aims of this study were to examine the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of Stories of Everyday Life Test (SEL) in a sample of 29 children and adolescents with HF-ASD and 25 typically developing controls and to compare their performance. The Spanish-SEL demonstrated good internal consistency, strong convergence with clinical severity and another ToM test, and adequate discriminant validity from intellectual capability and age, identifying the condition of 70 % of participants.

  17. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    , and the impact of a psychosocial intervention programme on patients and caregivers. To meet the objective three studies were conducted: 1) to investigate social participation in patients with mild AD, and to analyse predictors of low social participation; 2) to analyse how patients with mild AD cope...... with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...... and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the second study, data were collected using semi-structured research interviews with 11 patients before their participation in the DAISY intervention programme. Grounded theory analysis of the interview data revealed that the basic social psychological problem...

  18. Unstimulated cortisol secretory activity in everyday life and its relationship with fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review and subset meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Daniel J H; Liossi, Christina; Moss-Morris, Rona; Schlotz, Wolff

    2013-11-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a psychoneuroendocrine regulator of the stress response and immune system, and dysfunctions have been associated with outcomes in several physical health conditions. Its end product, cortisol, is relevant to fatigue due to its role in energy metabolism. The systematic review examined the relationship between different markers of unstimulated salivary cortisol activity in everyday life in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fatigue assessed in other clinical and general populations. Search terms for the review related to salivary cortisol assessments, everyday life contexts, and fatigue. All eligible studies (n=19) were reviewed narratively in terms of associations between fatigue and assessed cortisol markers, including the cortisol awakening response (CAR), circadian profile (CP) output, and diurnal cortisol slope (DCS). Subset meta-analyses were conducted of case-control CFS studies examining group differences in three cortisol outcomes: CAR output; CAR increase; and CP output. Meta-analyses revealed an attenuation of the CAR increase within CFS compared to controls (d=-.34) but no statistically significant differences between groups for other markers. In the narrative review, total cortisol output (CAR or CP) was rarely associated with fatigue in any population; CAR increase and DCS were most relevant. Outcomes reflecting within-day change in cortisol levels (CAR increase; DCS) may be the most relevant to fatigue experience, and future research in this area should report at least one such marker. Results should be considered with caution due to heterogeneity in one meta-analysis and the small number of studies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Maneiras de pesquisar no cotidiano: contribuição da teoria do ator-rede Ways of researching everyday life: the actor-network theory contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald João Jacques Arendt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir da temática geral do XI Simpósio da ANPEPP"Maneiras de pesquisar no cotidiano: contribuições para a formação em pesquisa em Psicologia", e tendo em vista a participação do autor no GT "Cotidiano e Práticas Sociais" da ANPEPP, este texto busca descrever a prática de formação em pesquisa a partir da teoria do ator-rede. Após efetuar a recensão de um texto de Bruno Latour, um diálogo entre um professor e um aluno em que são expostas as principais características da prática de pesquisa no âmbito desta abordagem, o autor busca precisar o posicionamento epistemológico-metodológico da referida teoria assim como suas raízes fundadas na filosofia pragmática, descrevendo sucintamente algumas proposições de William James e John Dewey.Using the actor-network theory, this paper describes the practices of becoming educated in research, based on the general subject of the XI ANPPEP Symposium "Ways of searching in everyday life: contributions to the formation of research in Psychology", considering that the author was a participant in the ANPEPP work group "Everyday life and Social Practices". After summarizing a paper of Bruno Latour, a dialogue between a professor and a student in which the main characteristics of the research practice in this approach are outlined, the author exposes in a more accurate manner the epistemological and methodological positioning of the referred theory and its pragmatic philosophical roots, describing briefly some propositions of William James and John Dewey.

  20. Teaching Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS): A nationwide retrospective analysis of 8202 lessons taught in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedi, Markus M; Wölfl, Christoph C; Wieferich, Katharina; Dogjani, Agron; Kauf, Peter; Doll, Dietrich

    To examine whether faculty who teach the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course would improve with experience and, correspondingly, ratings from course evaluations would increase. Retrospective analysis of student evaluations of 262 ATLS courses held between 2008 and 2012. All ATLS courses held between 2008 and 2012 nationwide in Germany. All ATLS student course evaluations covering 8202 lessons, 81 instructors, 36 course directors, and 5 coordinators. ATLS courses in Germany attained high levels of student satisfaction. Satisfaction levels increased steadily over the 5-year period studied. The entire staff influenced this finding. Teaching quality improved the most within the first 100 lessons taught. Skill stations received better evaluations than lectures, and local courses were less satisfactory than national course formats. The 2 demonstrations that open the course were the top rated events. Skill stations, including a human phantom, were highly rated; the cricothyrotomy station was top rated. The German ATLS course evaluations indicated steady improvement over the 5-year study. The level of experience of course coordinators, directors, and instructors influenced this finding. Teaching quality improved most within the first 100 lessons taught, and then reached a steady state. Skill stations received better evaluations than lectures, and local courses were less satisfactory than national course formats. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Do Lessons Learned on the International Space Station (ISS) Help Plan Life Support for Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Gentry, Gregory J.; Kliss, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    How can our experience in developing and operating the International Space Station (ISS) guide the design, development, and operation of life support for the journey to Mars? The Mars deep space Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) must incorporate the knowledge and experience gained in developing ECLSS for low Earth orbit, but it must also meet the challenging new requirements of operation in deep space where there is no possibility of emergency resupply or quick crew return. The understanding gained by developing ISS flight hardware and successfully supporting a crew in orbit for many years is uniquely instructive. Different requirements for Mars life support suggest that different decisions may be made in design, testing, and operations planning, but the lessons learned developing the ECLSS for ISS provide valuable guidance.

  2. The everyday-life in neanderthal times: a full-immersive Pleistocene reconstruction for the Casal De' Pazzi Museum (Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Palombini

    2012-11-01

    movie in computer-graphic, to be shown to the public, explaining neanderthal man and ancient elephant's life, and an edu-game, for children's learning, the Plei-stostation, implemented by touch-screen interaction dynamics.

  3. Envejecimiento Productivo: Las contribuciones de las personas mayores desde la cotidianidad Productive Aging: The contributions of older people from everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Miralles

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se reflexiona sobre la actividad productiva de las personas mayores y su valiosa contribución al desarrollo familiar y social. Se toma como ejemplo un conjunto de historias de vida laboral de adultos mayores residentes de la ciudad de Tandil, en las cuales se evidencia un proceso de envejecimiento caracterizado por actividades diversas que, no necesariamente se traducen en términos económicos y, significan un aporte fundamental en la vida cotidiana de las familias y la comunidad. En el análisis biográfico de las personas consultadas se destacan múltiples aspectos, personales y sociales, que influyen en el desarrollo de actividades productivas en esta etapa de la vida: las trayectorias y saberes laborales, necesidades ocupacionales, significados del trabajo, motivaciones, oportunidades y recursos sociales disponibles.This article reflects on the productive activity of older people and their valuable contribution to family and social development. It takes as example a set of labour life stories of elderly residents of the city of Tandil, in which evidence an aging process characterized by various activities that, do not necessarily translate into economic terms and, mean a fundamental contribution everyday life of families and the community. The biographical analysis of respondents highlights many personal and social factors that influence the development of productive activities in this phase of life: trajectories and labour knowledges, occupational needs, representations of work, motivations, opportunities and social resources available.

  4. An approach for integrating media education into everyday school-life and instruction at secondary school level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter SPANHEL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The new media as a challenge for school education require to redefine its aims and methods. It is no longer sufficient to transmit knowledge and help young people to build up special competences. In addition and primarily they must learn to deal with unknown problems in the future, with uncertainty and insecurity, with an increasing lot of information, changing knowledge and truth and with the unknown. Therefore school must help students to build up flexible structures of operational thinking and orientation, abstract conceptual frames, phantasy and creativity and acquire the capability of learning to learn, to reorganize learning structures and knowledge and the ability for lifelong learning. within this context media in schools have two fundamental functions: they are instruments of teaching-learning-processes as well as subject matter helping students to acquire media competence. Our approach to integrated media education for secondary schools can be characterized as follows: It should imply all sorts of media, it should involve all teachers and embrace all subject matters (lessons. There should no longer be made a distinction between media education and computer literacy because of the integration of all media on the basis of ongoing digitalization. The different media with their specific capacities should be used naturally as a means of improving teaching and learning, as tools for problem-solving and coping with tasks, and as instruments of communication and self-reflexion, of documentation and formation, of expression and publicity. The realization of a sustainable media education is confronted with two difficulties: 1. Most teachers mostly are not trained for media education and they fear the great burden of this task. 2. Media education requires open forms and varying methods of instruction and specific media facilities must be at hand at any time and everywhere.

  5. Effectiveness of the "Cancer Home-Life Intervention" on everyday activities and quality of life in people with advanced cancer living at home: a randomised controlled trial and an economic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Åse; Pilegaard, Marc Sampedro; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2016-01-01

    with advanced cancer living at home. Methods The study is a randomised, controlled trial (RCT) including an economic evaluation. The required sample size of 272 adults living at home will be recruited from outpatient clinics at two Danish hospitals. They should be diagnosed with cancer; evaluated incurable...... by the responsible oncologist; and with a functional level 1–2 on the WHO performance scale. The primary outcome is the quality of performance of activities of daily living. Secondary outcomes are problems with prioritised everyday activities; autonomy and participation; and health-related quality of life...

  6. Dating, marriage, and parenthood for HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men: normalizing perspectives on everyday life with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2015-03-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. The Everyday Condition of Metaphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan Afloroaei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The question I intend to answer is whether one can speak of a tacit metaphysics, not expressed conceptually, but nevertheless common. If the answer is positive and providing that it is specific to day-to-day life, such metaphysics may be called everyday metaphysics. To this end, I review the meaning of everyday life and its ambivalent character. Next, I present several milestones in the debate on the subject, from authors who have focused on a kind of usual, common or ‘natural’ metaphysics. Lastly, I formulate the idea under consideration, namely that everyday life implies or underlies a certain metaphysics. I note that it is an implicit metaphysics – not expressed formally – and rather free. Embraced in experience with a certain degree of freedom, it is recognisable by means of certain representations active in our mind, by the manner of speaking or of understanding and by the common forms of expression. Its vibrancy, concrete and relaxed character makes it highly evocative of the mental life of an era. It ensures a truly essential difference in our everyday mode of being.

  8. Everyday life of Frianovo silk weaving factory workers in XVIII — first quarter of the XIX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. GOTOVTSOVA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Based upon a wide range of archive records, the article covers issues relating to particular aspects of life and living standards of silk weaving factory workers’ families in a village of Fryanovo of Moskovski county in XVIII — fi rst quarter of XIX centuries.Workers’ daily life was signifi cantly infl uenced by living conditions. It is via this article that we analyze dimensions and types of living premises provided to workers by the factory owners, as well as its improvements. The Fryanovo factory offi ce records that remain intact allow consideration of issues relating to food for workers, including sources for providing Fryanovo inhabitants with bread and other food products, the composition and the average amount thereof.One chapter of the article is specifi cally devoted to workers’ worship service attendance, as well as diff erences in religion belief of Fryanovo inhabitants. In addition to the orthodox Christian majority of its population, there were also Catholics and Old Believers among its inhabitants.The issues directly relating to working at the silk weaving factory include work schedule and rules, average age of workers, wage payment methods, as well as workers motivation by the silk weaving factory owner. Considered are the issues relating to employment of children and women at the silk weaving factory. An important part of the research relates to living conditions of non-working population groups: young children, retired and handicaps who were given some money or bread, on monthly bases, by silk weaving factory owners.Medical services for the silk weaving factory workers, personal taxation and other fees, participation by factory workers, in recruitments, penalties and fi nes system as implemented by the silk weaving factory in Fryanovo are also within the spectrum of questions that are discussed within the article.The fi nal chapter of the research points out the village inner life issues, such as alcohol abuse among

  9. "Everyday Memory" Impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Catherine R. G.; Happe, Francesca; Pickles, Andrew; Marsden, Anita J. S.; Tregay, Jenifer; Baird, Gillian; Simonoff, Emily; Charman, Tony

    2011-01-01

    "Everyday memory" is conceptualised as memory within the context of day-to-day life and, despite its functional relevance, has been little studied in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first study of its kind, 94 adolescents with an ASD and 55 without an ASD completed measures of everyday memory from the Rivermead…

  10. The self-created outdoor class-room "Michelbachpark": Practical experiences of 5 years project work in every-day school life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Jens; Istler, Katharina; Kisser, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    project is positioned in every-day school-life, the presentation is about practical experiences and given feedback by pupils (class 10 and primary school), teachers (gymnasia and primary school), partners and people. This way, the presentation may also give hints, what are determinants for success and how to overcome barriers in every-day school life and practice. In the future, we are going to found a company leaded by the pupils. Younger classes can book the whole equipment together with tutors. This will lead to the economic aspect of sustainability.

  11. Everyday life consequences of substance use in adult patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a patient's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kronenberg, L.M.; Slager-Visscher, K.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Brink, W. van den; van Achterberg, T

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) with co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is relatively high in adult patients, there is hardly any knowledge about these dual diagnoses. A recent study reported met- and unmet needs for several life domains regarding these patient groups. To improve treatment, it is necessary to identify the everyday life consequences of SUD and co-occurring ADHD or ASD in adult patie...

  12. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeven, Patrick J; Hemmen, Bea; Geers, Richard P J; Smeets, Rob J E M; Brink, Peter R G; Seelen, Henk A M

    2012-05-01

    To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. Randomized cross-over trial. Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified as Medicare Functional Classification Level-2. Participants were measured in 3 conditions, i.e. using a mechanically controlled prosthesis, an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled stance and swing phase (MPKA), and an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled stance phase (MPKB). Subjects' perceived performance regarding prosthesis use was measured with the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. Subjects' activity level was quantified using accelerometry. As high within-group variability regarding subjects' functional performance was expected to impede detection of possible effects of an MPK, data were analysed for the total group and for 3 subgroups of participants. Participants' perception regarding ambulation, residual limb health, utility, and satisfaction with walking were significantly higher in the MPKA condition compared with the mechanical knee joint condition. Participants' activity level was similar in all knee joint conditions. Although Medicare Functional Classification Level-2 amputees report benefitting in terms of their performance from using an MPK, this is not reflected in their actual daily activity level after one week of using an MPK.

  13. Bridging gaps in everyday life - a free-listing approach to explore the variety of activities performed by physiotherapists in specialized palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson Möller, U; Stigmar, K; Beck, I; Malmström, M; Rasmussen, B H

    2018-01-29

    physiotherapists' everyday activities. Physiotherapists in specialized palliative care help patients and families to bridge the gap between their real and ideal everyday life with the aim to maximize security, autonomy and wellbeing. The concrete examples included can be used in understanding the contribution of physiotherapists to the palliative care team and inform future research interventions and outcomes.

  14. Learning from Life: Turning Life's Lessons into Leadership Experience. An Ideas into Action Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Marian N.; Ohlott, Patricia J.

    Ordinary nonwork activities like fundraising, coaching, and community advocacy can serve as sources of learning for managers in such areas as interpersonal skills, handling multiple tasks, using relevant background information, and leadership practice. Private life encourages leadership development by offering managers experience developing their…

  15. That which goes unsaid: Experiences of everyday life in residential care for residents with limited communication ability. A collective case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MSc Donna Frost

    2008-01-01

    Background The experiences of residents who have communication difficulties such as dysphasia are largely absent from the literature. Aim To illuminate the everyday experiences of four residents with severe communication difficulties living in a residential care setting in the Netherlands.

  16. Everyday Memory in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Luen; Hsu, Yung-Wen; Ma, Hui-Ing; Lai, Hsuan-An

    2013-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have deficits in working memory, but little is known about the everyday memory of these children in real-life situations. We investigated the everyday memory function in children with DCD, and explored the specific profile of everyday memory across different domains. Nineteen children with…

  17. Coordinating everyday life in the Netherlands: a holistic quantitative approach to the analysis of ICT-related and other work-life balance strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubers, C.G.T.M.; Schwanen, T.; Dijst, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to women’s increased participation in the labour force, more and more family-households are now juggling paid labour and care-giving in space and time and do so in many different ways. Much research and policy about how households try to establish a satisfactory work-life balance singles out

  18. Intergenerational Conflicts in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smol'kin, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Conflicts between younger and older generations can take on a character that goes beyond personal experience to become a narrative of more general social conditions. In times of change, this phenomenon may play an important role in defining new social realities. This seems to be occurring in Russia today. Available studies of intergenerational…

  19. Physical exercise in everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    IKONOMI EDISON; SHEHU AIDA

    2017-01-01

    In studies, physical exercise is commonly assessed by a series of questions tapping the frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activities at work, leisure time physical exercise, and housework physical activity. In “modern” times, physical activity consists mostly of leisure-time physical exercise because levels of physical activity at work or at home are quite scarce. One of the main methods of assessment of leisure-time physical exercise consists of employment of the Minnesota leisu...

  20. The Europeanisation of Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favell, Adrian; Recchi, Ettore; Solgaard Jensen, Janne

    2011-01-01

    these questions, we use the concepts of ‘Europeanisation’, ‘European identity’, ‘cross-border practices’ and ‘cosmopolitanism’ drawing on and elaborating from their meaning in the contemporary social science literature – and especially in sociology, anthropology, political science and social psychology. Overall......This paper illustrates the research questions, the main underlying concepts and the relevant literature of the EUCROSS project. The project examines the relationship between the manifold activities of EU residents (nationals, mobile EU citizens, and thirdcountry nationals) across the borders...

  1. Technology and Everyday Functioning in People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Rasch Analysis of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, M.; Nygard, L.; Kottorp, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As people with intellectual disabilities (ID) today live integrated in society and use different technological artefacts and services in their everyday life, more in-depth evaluation methods are crucial to detect strengths and limitations of their everyday technology use. The Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ) was originally…

  2. Stress: How Does It Affect Your Life? Advance Guidance (Individual Quest), Lesson Plan No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Pauline

    This lesson plan focuses on the definition, kinds, and causes of stress, and explores some ways of coping with stress. The lesson plan begins with information on the course for which the plan was developed; equipment and audio-visual aids needed; requirements for student materials; course objectives; bibliographic references; and special remarks…

  3. Challenges in real-life diabetes translation research: early lessons from BRIDGES projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Siminerio, Linda; L'Heveder, Ronan; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2012-03-01

    Efficacious interventions for prevention of diabetes and its complications exist; however, their implementation is woefully inadequate. The purpose of this project is to qualitatively assess the early lessons learnt from implementing translational research from eleven projects supported by BRIDGES, an International Diabetes Federation program. Semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with 10 researchers, seeking their views on factors relating to success and barriers to implementation. Data were collected from June to September 2010 by a trained interviewer; information was recorded, transcribed and further analyzed with MAXQDA. Patient recruitment and retention were reported as challenges. Lack of availability of local multidisciplinary teams was highlighted as having a negative effect on the project. Grassroots and community participation were emphasized to have beneficial effects. Flexibility was recognized as a key for successful execution of the projects. Recommendations include: feedback from previous grantees, in the form of pre-submission workshops, and mentoring from experienced investigators with emphasis on the differences between traditional and translational researches. This evaluation underscores the main contingencies to be considered for successful implementation of translational research. It emphasizes the importance of having the three stakeholders: patients, providers, and health systems, acting together in a flexible environment within real life settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Cultural-Historical Reading of How Play Is Used in Families as a Tool for Supporting Children's Emotional Development in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyan; Fleer, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have identified the positive "link" between imaginary play and emotion regulation in laboratory settings. However, little is known about "how" play and emotion regulation are related in everyday practice. This article examines how families use play as a tool to support young children's emotion regulation in…

  5. Os resultados do Ideb no cotidiano escolar Los resultados del Ideb en la vida cotidiana escolar The results of the Ideb in everyday school life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Mesquita

    2012-09-01

    metodología un abordaje etnográfico. El investigador permaneció inmerso en el campo durante seis meses recopilando datos a través de la observación participante y entrevistando gestores y profesores, además de observar y acompañar las actividades en el aula y analizar los documentos de la escuela. Se adoptaron como base teórica los estudios de la sociología de establecimientos escolares, además de la investigación sobre escuelas eficaces en Brasil, Estados Unidos e Inglaterra. Se logró identificar que los datos, recogidos a través de encuestas de evaluación externa, se redirigen dentro del ámbito escolar por sus actores, pero eso no significa que dejan de contribuir para el entendimiento del sistema de enseñanza. Queda claro que si se aproximan los datos cuantitativos con el punto de vista de los actores de la comunidad escolar se pueden aprehender las contribuciones de estos dos campos de investigación para poder reflexionar sobre la escuela y la búsqueda por más calidad.This work is part of the master's research on " Intra-school factors and school performance: what makes the difference?" This text presents the data collected during the investigation show that the impact of the disclosure of the results of the Ideb on everyday life of a public school in Rio de Janeiro. Aiming to integrate quantitative data, brought by the statistics of external evaluations, with the qualitative data from school of everyday life, if adopted as methodology the ethnographic approach. The researcher remained immersed in the field for six months gathering data through participant observation, interviews with managers and teachers, and track the activities in the classroom and analyze documents from school. It was adopted as theoretical studies of the sociology school establishments, in addition to research on effective schools in Brazil, United States and England. It was possible to identify that data, collected through research of external evaluation are redirected within

  6. Search for life on Mars in surface samples: Lessons from the 1999 Marsokhod rover field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, Horton E.; Bishop, J.L.; Cockell, C.; Roush, T.L.; Johnson, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The Marsokhod 1999 field experiment in the Mojave Desert included a simulation of a rover-based sample selection mission. As part of this mission, a test was made of strategies and analytical techniques for identifying past or present life in environments expected to be present on Mars. A combination of visual clues from high-resolution images and the detection of an important biomolecule (chlorophyll) with visible/near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy led to the successful identification of a rock with evidence of cryptoendolithic organisms. The sample was identified in high-resolution images (3 times the resolution of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder camera) on the basis of a green tinge and textural information suggesting the presence of a thin, partially missing exfoliating layer revealing the organisms. The presence of chlorophyll bands in similar samples was observed in visible/NIR spectra of samples in the field and later confirmed in the laboratory using the same spectrometer. Raman spectroscopy in the laboratory, simulating a remote measurement technique, also detected evidence of carotenoids in samples from the same area. Laboratory analysis confirmed that the subsurface layer of the rock is inhabited by a community of coccoid Chroococcidioposis cyanobacteria. The identification of minerals in the field, including carbonates and serpentine, that are associated with aqueous processes was also demonstrated using the visible/NIR spectrometer. Other lessons learned that are applicable to future rover missions include the benefits of web-based programs for target selection and for daily mission planning and the need for involvement of the science team in optimizing image compression schemes based on the retention of visual signature characteristics. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Walking the Everyday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bissen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, @matthewalking (Bissen, 2013 has published real-time public texts of walks in the city. This text-based Twitter feed has developed a narrative of a particular everyday life and developed a space of interface with others that represents a centering of perspective within an urban landscape. Walking the city provides a spatial, tactile, social, and embodied knowledge of the environment as each of us emerges into a space, orients ourselves, and determines a path that is highly localized, but is in connection with distant spaces and cultures. According to Ben Jacks in “Walking the City: Manhattan Projects,” “for urban dwellers and designers, walking is a fundamental tool for laying claim to, understanding, and shaping a livable city. Walking yields bodily knowing, recovers place memory, creates narrative, prioritizes human scale, and reconnects people to places” (75. @matthewalking’s walks, at times for as long as 5 hours, attempt to center an experience of an urban existence in a spatial narrative of the city that at once prioritizes a connection to place, but also is projected outward into a mediated relationship with others. The project is a series of unbounded walks, or dérives (drift, through the city that are logged on Twitter and traced to create an archive map of a set of particular urban experiences. The dérive concept as outlined in “The Theory of the Dérive,” by Guy Debord is when “one or more persons during a certain period drop their relations, their work and leisure activities, and all their other usual motives for movement and action, and let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there” (62.

  8. The everyday elasticity of compliance in a symptomless disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felde, Lina Hoel

    2011-01-01

    is to describe people's everyday elasticity of compliance in shifting contexts in everyday life. The empirical material presented, based on interviews with people with elevated cholesterol, suggests that people with symptomless diseases can be perceived to be living in a virtual 'temporal limbo', living 'here...... give-and-take. This elasticity of compliance reveals a reflexive critique of medical compliance as a moral standard and leads us to discuss how people are adequately compliant in everyday moral contexts....

  9. Everyday meal preparation for people with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Mette Kathrine Friis; Nejsum, Hanne Lindberg; Bendtsen, Trine Vase

    When people are diagnosed with dementia everyday activities like meal preparation will gradually become more difficult. A recipe is a support for meal preparation but as dementia develops, it seems that following a recipe can be a challenge. In Denmark health professionals often use meal...... preparation as an activity for people with dementia but they have no combined material to base the planning of the activity on. The thesis of this project is that when persons with dementia is involved in cooking his or her own meal meal preparation it will contribute to the feeling of content and meaning...... in everyday life. Furthermore getting the appropriate and nutritious food will be a step in the right direction regarding prevention of malnutrition. The aim of this project is to develop a guide to increase the possibility for people with dementia to continue everyday life through participating in meal...

  10. Eavesdropping on Character: Assessing Everyday Moral Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollich, Kathryn L; Doris, John M; Vazire, Simine; Raison, Charles L; Jackson, Joshua J; Mehl, Matthias R

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of interest in moral character, comparatively little is known about moral behavior in everyday life. This paper reports a novel method for assessing everyday moral behaviors using the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR)-a digital audio-recorder that intermittently samples snippets of ambient sounds from people's environments-and examines the stability of these moral behaviors. In three samples (combined N = 186), participants wore an EAR over one or two weekends. Audio files were coded for everyday moral behaviors (e.g., showing sympathy, gratitude) and morally-neutral comparison language behaviors (e.g., use of prepositions, articles). Results indicate that stable individual differences in moral behavior can be systematically observed in daily life, and that their stability is comparable to the stability of neutral language behaviors.

  11. Interventions in everyday lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of psychotherapy is to help clients address and overcome problems troubling them in their everyday lives. Therapy can therefore only work if clients include it in their ongoing lives to deal with their problems. Detailed, systematic research is needed on how clients do so in their eve......The purpose of psychotherapy is to help clients address and overcome problems troubling them in their everyday lives. Therapy can therefore only work if clients include it in their ongoing lives to deal with their problems. Detailed, systematic research is needed on how clients do so...

  12. Life of Mary Nzimiro (1898-1993): Lessons for the Future of Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She invested her money in real estates, education, and philanthropy. She carved out a place for herself in the annals of South-Eastern Nigeria in the area of commerce, for which there are lessons to be learnt for the enhancement of the future of women entrepreneurship in the South Eastern Region of Nigeria. The data for ...

  13. Human Factors Throughout the Life Cycle: Lessons Learned from the Shuttle Program. [Human Factors in Ground Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    2011-01-01

    With the ending of the Space Shuttle Program, it is critical that we not forget the Human Factors lessons we have learned over the years. At every phase of the life cycle, from manufacturing, processing and integrating vehicle and payload, to launch, flight operations, mission control and landing, hundreds of teams have worked together to achieve mission success in one of the most complex, high-risk socio-technical enterprises ever designed. Just as there was great diversity in the types of operations performed at every stage, there was a myriad of human factors that could further complicate these human systems. A single mishap or close call could point to issues at the individual level (perceptual or workload limitations, training, fatigue, human error susceptibilities), the task level (design of tools, procedures and aspects of the workplace), as well as the organizational level (appropriate resources, safety policies, information access and communication channels). While we have often had to learn through human mistakes and technological failures, we have also begun to understand how to design human systems in which individuals can excel, where tasks and procedures are not only safe but efficient, and how organizations can foster a proactive approach to managing risk and supporting human enterprises. Panelists will talk about their experiences as they relate human factors to a particular phase of the shuttle life cycle. They will conclude with a framework for tying together human factors lessons-learned into system-level risk management strategies.

  14. Lessons from culturally contrasted alternative methods of inquiry and styles of comprehension for the new foundations in the study of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallverdú, Jordi; Schroeder, Marcin J

    2017-12-01

    Contemporary scientific approaches to Biology are the result of some cultural ideas considered as universal by Western reductionist traditions. The study of the cultural, symbolic and historical approaches to reality and Life provides us important lessons about the necessity of integrating Eastern holistic views into the study of Life. This is both an epistemological and ontological enhancement which provides more powerful and insightful ways to deal with Life and its understanding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in the perceived pleasantness of fluids before and after fluid loss through exercise: a demonstration of the association between perceived pleasantness and physiological usefulness in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, K M

    2005-01-17

    It has previously been suggested that the perceived pleasantness of a food item in any situation may be directly related to the physiological usefulness of that item to the consumer in that situation. This study investigated changes in the perceived pleasantness of fluids before and after fluid loss through exercise-an everyday situation in which physiological need can alter. Total of 40 exercisers achieving high fluid loss (Group H) and 41 exercisers achieving low fluid loss (Group L) rated seven fluids of varying osmolality, electrolyte content, and energy content on measures of pleasantness, before and after exercise. After fluid loss compared to before fluid loss, perceived pleasantness of all fluids increased (F(1,79)=14.58, peveryday situations.

  16. Final Conversations, Phase 2: Children and Everyday Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Maureen; Baldwin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined messages of everyday communication (small talk and routine interactions). The importance of these messages was highlighted in light of their role in creating structure, safety, and meaning making in the family at the end of life. In addition, family rituals that developed from children's everyday communication were…

  17. The suspension of everyday life: immigration in the images from the movie Welcome A suspensão do cotidiano: a imigração nas imagens do filme Bem-vindo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the interrelationship between everyday, cinema and immigration. For this, we start from the situations presented in the film welcome, French production of 2009, directed by Philippe Lioret, wich tells the story of a young iraqi who is in France, trying to get to England. Interspersed with several personal narratives, are the immigration situation in France, legislation, the routine of the subjects involved: police, residents, immigrants. We use the theoretical concept of everyday Agnes Heller, as well as studies on film and Edgar Morin immigration Zigmunt Bauman. Before an overexposure imagery everyday, we understand that the film would constitute a privileged space for these discussions by your logic reception. Similary, we observed that the film presents selected current issues and timely, while private and generic, such as suspending the daily, return to it and modified overcoming stereotypes, prejudices and generalizations related to immigration, although common and to some extend, necessary for everyday life, impose restrictions on citizenship.Neste trabalho, analisamos a interrelação entre cotidiano, cinema e imigração. Para isso, partimos de situações apresentadas no filme Bem-vindo, produção francesa de 2009, dirigida por Philippe Lioret, que narra a história de um jovem iraquiano que está na França, tentando chegar à Inglaterra. Entremeadas com diversas narrativas pessoais, estão a situação imigratória na França, a legislação, a rotina dos sujeitos envolvidos: policiais, moradores, imigrantes. Utilizamos como referencial teórico o conceito de cotidiano de Agnes Heller, assim como estudos de Edgar Morin sobre cinema e de imigração de Zigmunt Bauman. Diante de uma superexposição imagética cotidiana, entendemos que o cinema se constitua um espaço privilegiado para essas discussões, por sua lógica de recepção. Da mesma forma, observamos que o filme escolhido apresenta questões atuais e

  18. Age benefits in everyday prospective memory: the influence of personal task importance, use of reminders and everyday stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, Andreas; Schnitzspahn, Katharina; Rendell, Peter G; Luong, Cäcilia; Kliegel, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The present diary study examined everyday prospective memory tasks in younger and old adults and explored the role of personal task importance, use of reminders and everyday stress as possible correlates of age-related prospective memory performance in everyday life. Results revealed an age benefit in everyday prospective memory tasks. In addition, task importance was identified as a critical moderator of age-related prospective memory performance. More frequent use of reminders and lower levels of stress, however, were associated with better prospective memory performance in general but did not contribute to age-related prospective memory performance. Exploring further possible correlates of prospective memory revealed that the strategy to reprioritize initially planned intentions was associated with age benefits in everyday prospective memory. Results suggest that the age-related benefit observed in experimenter-given tasks transfers to everyday prospective memory and varies in dependence of motivational and cognitive factors. Implications for theoretical models of prospective memory and aging are discussed.

  19. O cotidiano na investigação em saúde pública: um recorte teórico e metodológico The everyday life in public health research: a theoretical and methodological framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Regina Mazza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar algumas reflexões acerca das possibilidades investigativas do cotidiano através da análise dos modos de vida, que ampliem perspectivas ao campo de pesquisa em saúde pública, considerando que o estudo dos modos de vida no cotidiano envolve a análise das trajetórias que contextualizam rotinas, interações e significados de vida. Isso possibilita ao pesquisador social do campo da saúde, a partir de um enquadre teórico, uma flexibilização metodológica que oferece mobilidade na escolha da técnica que melhor favoreça o entendimento da questão a ser investigada. Tem-se aqui, como referência conceitual, a ideia de um cotidiano investigado a partir de processos e contextos interativos, em oposição a uma objetivação categorial entre sujeito e objeto. Nesse contexto, partindo da reflexão teórica, toma-se como referencial empírico da pesquisa, a sala de espera do ambulatório do Serviço de Metabolismo Osteoarticular de um Posto de Saúde na cidade de Fortaleza/CE, no intuito de tornar possível uma compreensão interpretativa do cotidiano que envolve as situações de vida e de saúde de mulheres com osteoporose.The aim of this paper is to present some reflections on possibilities to investigate everyday life by examining ways of life, so as to broaden perspectives to the field of research in public health, in light of the fact that the study of daily ways of life involves the analysis of trajectories that contextualize routines, interactions and meanings of life. This allows the social researcher in the health field to have, based on a theoretical framework, a flexible methodology that offers mobility in the choice of the technique that best favors the understanding of the issue to be investigated. We have here, as a conceptual reference, the idea of everyday life investigated from interactive processes and contexts, as opposed to a categorial objectification between subject and object. In this

  20. The Views of the Teachers about the Mind Mapping Technique in the Elementary Life Science and Social Studies Lessons Based on the Constructivist Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul; Kartal, Ayca

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of teachers on using the mind mapping technique in Life Science and Social Studies lessons. The participants of the study are 20 primary education teachers. In this study, a semi-structured interview technique was used. For content analysis, the themes and codes were defined, based on the views…

  1. Everyday Physical Activity of Students in Nyíregyháza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fintor János Gábor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of physical education lessons has already been demonstrated by a lot of essays, however, it has also been revealed that this popularity, as well as the frequency of doing sports, tends to decrease at later ages of life. Pursuing sports has a positive effect on academic performance. Introducing PE as an everyday lesson at schools was a milestone in physical education. Provided the aims are realised successfully, the general state of health of students can show a favourable change. The aim of our research, on the one hand, is to reveal how important physical education is as contrasted with other school subjects, according to those students asked. On the other hand, we aim to examine how the certain positive and negative attitudes of the subjects of our study appear in the resulting figures. The research was conducted in the form of self-completion questionnaires in four different funded institutions in Nyíregyháza (n=285, in May, 2014. In the course of evaluation, we have used multivariate function analysis as well as frequency research and cross table reference. Participants mainly regard PE as important as other school subjects, however, boys significantly regard it more important than girls do. Those who do sports on a regular basis were more likely to agree that PE lessons are conducted in a friendly atmosphere than those who do sports less. Significantly, boys tended to agree with positive statements about sport.

  2. Professional Knowledge and Everyday Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Camilla

    Professional care work in preschools in Denmark is faced with a knowledge crisis, due to increasing influence by regulations from state and market. As a consequence the professionals seem more inclined to focus on how to meet demands for documentation, rather than focusing on developing their pro......Professional care work in preschools in Denmark is faced with a knowledge crisis, due to increasing influence by regulations from state and market. As a consequence the professionals seem more inclined to focus on how to meet demands for documentation, rather than focusing on developing......, that are not traditionally valued, nor by “users” or the professionals themselves, into account. With inspiration from a Danish researcher of everyday life and her concept of ‘the unnoticed/unrecognized’ (det upåagtede) (Bech-Jørgensen 1994), this paper will discuss how understandings of professional identity...

  3. Kenya’s Life Lessons through the Lived Experience of Rural Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Cappiccie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research study used a phenomenological lens to examine the perspectives of familial caregivers in the Laikipia Region of Kenya. Through the narrative of the caregivers’ lived experience, key factors identified included social supports, rewards of caregiving, and lessons to others. Overarching basic themes centered on food insecurity, disease, rejection, lack of support, education challenges, inadequate land ownership, the absence of male support and neglect issues. These unique perspectives can contribute towards our understanding of policy and programming needs for orphaned children and familial caregivers in rural Kenya and within the rural areas of the East African context.

  4. Some life lessons in the work place: personal narrative/case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Michael Schwartz, a lawyer deaf since birth, describes his journey as a professional for the last 32 years since his graduation from NYU School of Law in 1981. He offers a case study of his experiences with accommodations on the job as required by federal and state law. The study includes specific examples of what worked and what did not work for a deaf lawyer like him working at his craft. Schwartz wraps up with the lessons he learned over the last three decades as we moved from the model of non-compliance to that of compliance, even beyond compliance, with the mandates of law in the employment context.

  5. Life lessons after classes: investigating the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents? life skills development

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Okseon; Park, Mirim; Jang, Kyunghwan; Park, Yongnam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents? life skills development and to identify which characteristics of the program would have an influence on their life skills acquisition. The participants were six children (4 boys, 2 girls) who participated in a 12-week afterschool program implemented in two elementary schools, as well as the two program instructors who implemented the afterschool sport program. Data were collecte...

  6. Whose Job Is It? Everyday Routines and Quality of Life in Latino and Non-Latino Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Susan D.; Domínguez-Pareto, Irenka; Cohen, Shana R.; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that families construct daily routines that enable the household to function smoothly and promote family quality of life. However, we know little about how activities are distributed between parents caring for a child with an intellectual disability (ID), particularly in Latino families. To address this gap, we…

  7. Religion and diet in a multi-religious city: a comprehensive study regarding interreligious relations in Tbilisi in everyday life and on feast days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrica Söderlind

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the importance of foodways among the believers of Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the Georgian capital Tbilisi, both on feast days and in daily life. It takes the form of an interdisciplinary survey in which interviews and written sources are used as well as personal observations from people living within the city.

  8. USGS Science Data Life Cycle Tools - Lessons Learned in moving to the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M. T.; Mancuso, T.; Hutchison, V.; Zolly, L.; Wheeler, B.; Urbanowski, S.; Devarakonda, R.; Palanisamy, G.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Core Science Systems has been working for the past year to design, re-architect, and implement several key tools and systems within the USGS Cloud Hosting Service supported by Amazon Web Services (AWS). As a result of emerging USGS data management policies that align with federal Open Data mandates, and as part of a concerted effort to respond to potential increasing user demand due to these policies, the USGS strategically began migrating its core data management tools and services to the AWS environment in hopes of leveraging cloud capabilities (i.e. auto-scaling, replication, etc.). The specific tools included: USGS Online Metadata Editor (OME); USGS Digital Object Identifier (DOI) generation tool; USGS Science Data Catalog (SDC); USGS ScienceBase system; and an integrative tool, the USGS Data Release Workbench, which steps bureau personnel through the process of releasing data. All of these tools existed long before the Cloud was available and presented significant challenges in migrating, re-architecting, securing, and moving to a Cloud based environment. Initially, a `lift and shift' approach, essentially moving as is, was attempted and various lessons learned about that approach will be discussed, along with recommendations that resulted from the development and eventual operational implementation of these tools. The session will discuss lessons learned related to management of these tools in an AWS environment; re-architecture strategies utilized for the tools; time investments through sprint allocations; initial benefits observed from operating within a Cloud based environment; and initial costs to support these data management tools.

  9. Walking as a social practice: dispersed walking and the organisation of everyday practices

    OpenAIRE

    Harries, Tim; Rettie, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses social practice theory to study the interweaving of walking into everyday practices and considers how greater awareness of everyday walking can influence its position within the organisation and scheduling of everyday life. Walking is of policy interest because of its perceived benefits for health. This paper asserts that increased awareness of everyday walking allows users to become more active without having to reschedule existing activities. Using Schatzki’s distinction bet...

  10. Life lessons after classes: investigating the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents' life skills development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon; Park, Mirim; Jang, Kyunghwan; Park, Yongnam

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents' life skills development and to identify which characteristics of the program would have an influence on their life skills acquisition. The participants were six children (4 boys, 2 girls) who participated in a 12-week afterschool program implemented in two elementary schools, as well as the two program instructors who implemented the afterschool sport program. Data were collected from individual interviews with program participants and instructors. The inductive analysis of data revealed four categories of life skills developed through program participation: (1) playing well and being more active, (2) connecting well and having better social skills, (3) coping well and becoming a better problem solver, and (4) dreaming well and having a better sense of purpose. Regarding the characteristics of the program that influenced life skills development, three themes emerged: (1) having a clear goal and building consensus with stakeholders, (2) establishing a firm yet flexible structure, and (3) instructors' use of effective strategies for teaching life skills.

  11. Life lessons after classes: investigating the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents’ life skills development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon; Park, Mirim; Jang, Kyunghwan; Park, Yongnam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents’ life skills development and to identify which characteristics of the program would have an influence on their life skills acquisition. The participants were six children (4 boys, 2 girls) who participated in a 12-week afterschool program implemented in two elementary schools, as well as the two program instructors who implemented the afterschool sport program. Data were collected from individual interviews with program participants and instructors. The inductive analysis of data revealed four categories of life skills developed through program participation: (1) playing well and being more active, (2) connecting well and having better social skills, (3) coping well and becoming a better problem solver, and (4) dreaming well and having a better sense of purpose. Regarding the characteristics of the program that influenced life skills development, three themes emerged: (1) having a clear goal and building consensus with stakeholders, (2) establishing a firm yet flexible structure, and (3) instructors’ use of effective strategies for teaching life skills. PMID:28367697

  12. Reconceptualised Life Skills in Secondary Education in the African Context: Lessons Learnt from Reforms in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2014-01-01

    Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an…

  13. Augmenting Everyday Artefacts to Support Social Interaction Among Senior Peers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazzi, Elena; Sokoler, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Novel technological possibilities emerge when tangible and social computing come together. This paper explores the potential of such technology when designing for seniors and their social interaction. Our research is guided by the concept of twitterIDo, which is to make seniors’ everyday activities...... more visible by augmenting everyday artefacts to communicate the ongoing activity they are used for. We engaged a local community of seniors in a living lab to explore the possibilities of twitterIDo in real life situations. This paper presents a series of interactive prototypes of everyday artefacts...... and displays designed to start a dialogue with the seniors on how twitterIDo-technology may fit into their everyday situations. Our findings point out how augmented everyday artefacts can make a positive difference when designing technology in a domain such the one of seniors’ and their social interaction...

  14. The Geography of the Everyday

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Robert Edward

    2012-01-01

    Beginning with the premise that the everyday is constitutionally elusive, a mobile structure is formulated and then deployed to, if not capture the everyday, at least corner it. Using Ian Hacking's notion that a formidable analytical apparatus could be created using Erving Goffman's "bottom-up" micro-sociology in combination with Michel Foucault's "top-down" macro-critique, a comprehensive approach is constructed to track the feints and parries of the everyday. This analytical apparatus is ex...

  15. Everyday-Oriented Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munnecke, Max

    The exploration of radical innovation has long been regarded as fundamental to business growth. In the 21st century, modern organisations increasingly seek to combine business innovation with the broader goal to confront social and environmental challenges. Vision projects are related phenomena...... which explore and map radical innovation opportunities within everyday activities. The aim of a vision project is to produce an innovation map that can empower an organisation to navigate between potential innovation opportunities and pro‐actively confront modern challenges for the benefit of people......, business, and society. The study addresses the concern that vision projects do not produce sufficient navigational innovation maps, and seeks to improve their quality by modelling a new methodological framework. The study was conducted as a series of four research cycles which modelled and experimented...

  16. Everyday Language Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwazume, Michiaki; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Itho, Noriko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Fujishiro, Hiroko; Sugeno, Michio

    The aim of this study is to provide all people, from small children to aged persons, with a computational environment for everyday language communication. In order to achieve this, we propose a framework for a language-based operating system. In this paper, we explain our approach to dealing with the meaning of language, the architecture of the language operating system and its components. In particular, we describe the notion of language protocol and its resource representation (i.e., semiotic base), compared to the other protocols and their resource representations. We argue that by processing meaning of language rather than processing information, we attempt to provide a more human-like computer system and an intelligent computational environment to all people.

  17. Cognitive Predictors of Everyday Problem Solving across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Hertzog, Christopher; Park, Denise C

    2017-01-01

    An important aspect of successful aging is maintaining the ability to solve everyday problems encountered in daily life. The limited evidence today suggests that everyday problem solving ability increases from young adulthood to middle age, but decreases in older age. The present study examined age differences in the relative contributions of fluid and crystallized abilities to solving problems on the Everyday Problems Test (EPT). We hypothesized that due to diminishing fluid resources available with advanced age, crystallized knowledge would become increasingly important in predicting everyday problem solving with greater age. Two hundred and twenty-one healthy adults from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study, aged 24-93 years, completed a cognitive battery that included measures of fluid ability (i.e., processing speed, working memory, inductive reasoning) and crystallized ability (i.e., multiple measures of vocabulary). These measures were used to predict performance on EPT. Everyday problem solving showed an increase in performance from young to early middle age, with performance beginning to decrease at about age of 50 years. As hypothesized, fluid ability was the primary predictor of performance on everyday problem solving for young adults, but with increasing age, crystallized ability became the dominant predictor. This study provides evidence that everyday problem solving ability differs with age, and, more importantly, that the processes underlying it differ with age as well. The findings indicate that older adults increasingly rely on knowledge to support everyday problem solving, whereas young adults rely almost exclusively on fluid intelligence. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Multi-scale Data Sharing in the Life Sciences: Some Lessons for Policy Makers

    OpenAIRE

    Graham Pryor

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on the final report on a recent series of case studies in the life sciences at the University of Edinburgh, this paper explores the attitudes and perceptions of researchers towards data sharing and contrasts these with the policies of the major research funders. Notwithstanding economic, technical and cultural inhibitors, the general ethos in the Life Sciences is one of support to the principle of data sharing. However, this position is subject to a complex range of qualifications, no...

  19. A Tale of Two Chambers: Iterative Approaches and Lessons Learned from Life Support Systems Testing in Altitude Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The drive for the journey to Mars is in a higher gear than ever before. We are developing new spacecraft and life support systems to take humans to the Red Planet. The journey that development hardware takes before its final incarnation in a fully integrated spacecraft can take years, as is the case for the Orion environmental control and life support system (ECLSS). Through the Pressure Integrated Suit Test (PIST) series, NASA personnel at Johnson Space Center have been characterizing the behavior of a closed loop ECLSS in the event of cabin depressurization. This kind of testing - one of the most hazardous activities performed at JSC - requires an iterative approach, increasing in complexity and hazards). The PIST series, conducted in the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) 11-ft Chamber, started with unmanned test precursors before moving to a human-in-the-loop phase, and continues to evolve with the eventual goal of a qualification test for the final system that will be installed on Orion. Meanwhile, the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program is an effort to research and develop technologies that will work in concert to support habitation on Mars. September 2015 marked the first unmanned HESTIA test, with the goal of characterizing how ECLSS technologies work together in a closed environment. HESTIA will culminate in crewed testing, but it can benefit from the lessons learned from another test that is farther ahead in its development and life cycle. Discussing PIST and HESTIA, this paper illustrates how we approach testing, the kind of information that facility teams need to ensure efficient collaborations and successful testing, and how we can apply what we learn to execute future tests.

  20. "Petr Oznobishin’s diary since september, 1796" as a historical source on the history of everyday life of the Russian nobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M. Buranok

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the analysis of Petr Oznobishin’s manuscript “Petr Oznobishin’s Diary Since September, 1796”. It examines the social climate of provincial nobles along with their views on government officials. Studying diaries dated by the end of the eighteenth century is particularly relevant for history, literature and culture studies. This allows us to understand historical events and the socio-cultural background of the century under analysis more fully. Since diaries and other private materials written by famous politicians and government officials may seem insufficient for more detailed analysis, we need to take into account unpublished and scientifically undescribed materials written by average representatives of Russian society. The article presents description of the diary from the point of source criticism as well as its potential for analyzing daily life of nobles and provincial cities in the end the eighteenth century. Petr Oznobishin’s diary allows us to clarify details of Morteza Qoli Khan Qajar’s biography, the remarkable Persian politician. Despite elaborate preparations for the war against Persia, he managed to invite Russian provincial officials of all ranks to receptions. The examining of Petr Oznobishin’s diary provides valuable information regarding ‘natsionalny vopros’ (nationalist problem in the Russian Empire as well as cooperation of various ethnicities in the south of the country and the way Russian nobles perceived their activity. With the help of P.N.Oznobishin’s notes, which he took from September to December in 1796, daily life of Russian noble government officers and officials is examined in terms of its peculiar features.

  1. Reconceptualised life skills in secondary education in the African context: Lessons learnt from reforms in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2014-04-01

    Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an emphasis on developing specific technical vocational skills considered essential for employability or self-employment. Using Ghana as an example, this paper shows how secondary education curriculum reformers recommended shifts that embraced a new interpretation of life skills focused on 21st-century skills. This gradual move also reflected the difficulty that secondary education in general has had in networking with the world of work to provide work experience that would lead to the development of work-related skills and enhance employability. The author's main argument is that although the reconceptualisation of life skills in secondary education to reflect 21st-century skills is a welcome shift in the African context, this needs to be accompanied by reforms in teacher education. Classroom teaching and learning need to be adapted in a fundamental way in order to ensure that youth fully benefit from the inclusion of 21st-century life skills in secondary education curricula. Such reforms must include pedagogical practices which nurture communication, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking skills.

  2. Affirming Life in the Face of Death: Ricoeur's Living Up to Death as a modern ars moriendi and a lesson for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Ds Frits

    2014-11-01

    In his posthumously published Living Up to Death Paul Ricoeur left an impressive testimony on what it means to live at a high old age with death approaching. In this article I present him as a teacher who reminds us of valuable lessons taught by patients in palliative care and their caretakers who accompany them on their way to death, and also as a guide in our search for a modern ars moriendi, after--what many at least experience as--the breakdown of traditional religious belief in a personal afterlife. These lessons can be summarized in the following theses. 'Living up to death, one cannot experience one's own death. Therefore, never consider someone dying as moribund'. 'Though everybody is alone in dying, nobody should die alone.' 'The preparation for death is an affirmation of life'. 'Life experienced as a gift can be given up'. The plausibility of the last thesis, however, may go beyond the confines of austere philosophical thinking.

  3. Domestic Violence as Everyday Terrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Cunningham, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Seeing bride kidnapping and domestic violence as everyday terrorism unpacks the political nature of so-called “private” phenomena and how they reify patriarchal society.......Seeing bride kidnapping and domestic violence as everyday terrorism unpacks the political nature of so-called “private” phenomena and how they reify patriarchal society....

  4. Electrosmog and electrostress. Radiation in everyday life and what can be done against it. A guide. Elektrosmog - Elektrostress. Strahlung in unserem Alltag und was wir dagegen tun koennen. Ein Ratgeber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation in everyday life and what can be done against it. A guide nowadays, the assult on our environment by all kinds of radiation is such that it can justly be described as electrosmog. This, in turn, appears to be a promoter of electrostress in the human organism, the causes of which - and of its many attendant disturbances and disorders - are only rarely recognised. This book attempts to inform on the related dangers and to give guidance on self-protection. - Electric lines close to your bed may be the reason why you wake in the morning still feeling tired. - How safe are microwave devices. The radiation levels of many of the older ones are so high that they exceed the permissible values in the immediate vicinity of radar equipments. - Individuals living in the neighbourhood of high-voltage transmission lines are at a particular risk: predisposition to myocaridal infarction, disorders of vision and infantile cancer are only the most striking health impairments observed in this connection. - Women working with screens or display panels are at a risk of giving birth to premature or abnormal infants. - Symptoms attributable to stress and nervousness and frequent headaches may be caused by electric devices in your immediate surroundings. (orig.).

  5. Palliative and end of life care for people with dementia: lessons for clinical commissioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Mareeni; Warner, Alex; Davies, Nathan; Nicholas, Nirusha; Manthorpe, Jill; Iliffe, Steve

    2014-10-01

    To synthesize information about management of end of life care in people with dementia using review papers. There are increasing numbers of people being diagnosed with dementia worldwide, and the needs of people with dementia and their carers at the end of life may be different from those with other chronic diseases. By highlighting the challenges of palliative care in persons with dementia and the ways they are best managed, practitioners in primary care may be able to improve services for this group of people at the end of life. A search of electronic databases of English language papers published in peer-reviewed journals, 2000-2011 inclusive was undertaken using broad terms related to palliative care and dementia. 6167 papers were identified. Titles and abstracts were read. Papers were included if they were literature reviews of palliative or end of life care for people with dementia/Parkinson's disease/Lewy body dementia/cognitive impairment/Alzheimer's disease or any other cognitive impairment, in any setting (hospital, care home, community) and covering people of all ages. Papers were excluded if they covered palliative care focusing on other conditions, or were about an aspect of dementia care and treatment not related to palliative care. Our critical synthesis generated five main themes from this review of the reviews: (1) carers' (family caregivers') experiences; (2) person-centred care; (3) practice (including advance care planning, pain and comfort, nutrition, medical complications and minimizing the distress of behavioural symptoms); (4) system factors, including ethical dilemmas, decision making, information, and training; and (5) research priorities. There appears to be good evidence on the care and management of patients with dementia at the end of life which can be used to influence policy development and emerging specificity about research priorities in palliative care practice for people with dementia.

  6. Multi-scale Data Sharing in the Life Sciences: Some Lessons for Policy Makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Pryor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on the final report on a recent series of case studies in the life sciences at the University of Edinburgh, this paper explores the attitudes and perceptions of researchers towards data sharing and contrasts these with the policies of the major research funders. Notwithstanding economic, technical and cultural inhibitors, the general ethos in the Life Sciences is one of support to the principle of data sharing. However, this position is subject to a complex range of qualifications, not least the crucial need for sharing through collaboration. The kind of generic vision for data sharing that is currently promoted by national agencies is judged to be neither productive nor effective.  Only close engagement with research practitioners in the identification of bottom-up strategies that preserve the exercise of informed choice - a fundamental and persistent element of scientific research - will produce change on a national scale.

  7. Young Sun, Early Earth and the Origins of Life Lessons for Astrobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    - How did the Sun come into existence? - How was the Earth formed? - How long has Earth been the way it is now, with its combination of oceans and continents? - How do you define “life”? - How did the first life forms emerge? - What conditions made it possible for living things to evolve? All these questions are answered in this colourful textbook addressing undergraduate students in "Origins of Life" courses and the scientifically interested public. The authors take the reader on an amazing voyage through time, beginning five thousand million years ago in a cloud of interstellar dust and ending five hundred million years ago, when the living world that we see today was finally formed. A chapter on exoplanets provides an overview of the search for planets outside the solar system, especially for habitable ones. The appendix closes the book with a glossary, a bibliography of further readings and a summary of the Origins of the Earth and life in fourteen boxes.

  8. Resignificar la educación televisiva: desde la escuela a la vida cotidiana A New Meaning of Educational Television: from School to Audience’s Everyday Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Fuenzalida Fernández

    2011-03-01

    «educational programs », including news/journalistic programs, entertainment and fictional shows. This presents an opportunity for organizations and professionals of television to contribute to the improvement in the quality of life of their audience members, especially children and adolescents. With regards to the specific challenges that Latin American public television face, it is necessary to shift the axis from propaganda/situational to audiovisual programs that take into account the verbalized needs of various research projects in the region, especially for social groups that suffer not only financial disadvantages, but also those dealing with insecurity and ethnic exclusion.

  9. Everyday life consequences of substance use in adult patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD): a patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Linda M; Slager-Visscher, Karin; Goossens, Peter J J; van den Brink, Wim; van Achterberg, Theo

    2014-09-19

    Although the prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) with co-occurring attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is relatively high in adult patients, there is hardly any knowledge about these dual diagnoses. A recent study reported met- and unmet needs for several life domains regarding these patient groups. To improve treatment, it is necessary to identify the everyday life consequences of SUD and co-occurring ADHD or ASD in adult patients. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. 11 SUD + ADHD and 12 SUD + ASD patients participated in the study. The interview transcripts were coded and analysed according to the seven steps for descriptive phenomenology by Colaizzi. Both patients with ADHD and patients with ASD can get caught in a jumble of thoughts and emotions which can often lead to agitation and impulsivity in the case of ADHD or passivity and melancholia in the case of ASD with co-occurring SUD in both cases. Initially substance use ameliorates the symptoms and related problems, but both patient groups can later experience even greater problems: difficulties with the structuring of daily life due to a lack of planning (SUD + ADHD) or due to a lack of initiative (SUD + ASD). Both groups indicate that structure helps them function better. They also recognize that substance use disorganizes their lives and that an absence of structure contributes to substance use in what becomes a vicious circle which needs to be broken for effective treatment and care. This study provides insight into the daily life consequences of SUD with a co-occurring ADHD or ASD. Substance use is reported to solve some ADHD- or ASD-related problems in the short run but have negative consequences in the long run (i.e., contribute to already impaired cognitive functioning). Insight is provided into what clinicians can do to break this vicious circle and thus help ADHD patients to refrain from action and ASD patients to take

  10. Complementary use of life cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: Lessons learned from chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Successful strategies to handle the potential health and environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) often rely upon the well-established frameworks of life cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA). However, current research and specific guidance on how to actually apply these two......, and hence, there does not appear to be much progress made specifically for ENM. We therefore provide specific recommendations for applying LCA and RA to ENM, for which the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods is identified as an important requirement....

  11. CLIL in physics lessons at grammar school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefančínová, Iveta; Valovičová, Ľubomíra

    2017-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is one of the most outstanding approaches in foreign language teaching. This teaching method has promising prospects for the future of modern education as teaching subject and foreign languages are combined to offer a better preparation for life in Europe, especially when the mobility is becoming a highly significant factor of everyday life. We realized a project called Foreign languages in popularizing science at grammar school. Within the project five teachers with approbation subjects of English, French, German and Physics attended the methodological courses abroad. The teachers applied the gained experience in teaching and linking science teaching with the teaching of foreign languages. Outputs of the project (e.g. English-German-French-Slovak glossary of natural science terminology, student activity sheets, videos with natural science orientation in a foreign language, physical experiments in foreign languages, multimedia fairy tales with natural contents, posters of some scientists) are prepared for the CLIL-oriented lessons. We collected data of the questionnaire for students concerning attitude towards CLIL. The questionnaire for teachers showed data about the attitude, experience, and needs of teachers employing CLIL in their lessons.

  12. Do everyday problems of people with chronic illness interfere with their self-management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtum, L. van; Rijken, M.; Groenewegen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Being chronically ill is a continuous process of balancing the demands of the illness and the demands of everyday life. Understanding how everyday life affects self-management might help to provide better professional support. However, little attention has been paid to the influence of

  13. Implementing the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle into everyday care: opportunities, challenges, and lessons learned for implementing the ICU Pain, Agitation, and Delirium Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Michele C; Burke, William J; Gannon, David; Cohen, Marlene Z; Colburn, Lois; Bevil, Catherine; Franz, Doug; Olsen, Keith M; Ely, E Wesley; Vasilevskis, Eduard E

    2013-09-01

    other ICU team members. In this study of the implementation of the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle in a tertiary care setting, clear factors were identified that both advanced and impeded adoption of this complex intervention that requires interprofessional education, coordination, and cooperation. Focusing on these factors preemptively should enable a more effective and lasting implementation of the bundle and better care for critically ill patients. Lessons learned from this study will also help healthcare providers optimize implementation of the recent ICU pain, agitation, and delirium guidelines, which has many similarities but also some important differences as compared with the awakening and breathing coordination, delirium monitoring/management, and early exercise/mobility bundle.

  14. Borders of life: lessons from Microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D.

    Thirty years ago, the deep-sea was known as a low density biotope due to coldness, darkness and famine-like conditions. The discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific in 1977 and the associated black smokers in 1979 considerably changed our views about life on Earth. For the first time, an ecosystem almost independent (at least for tens of years) of solar nergy was discovered. Besides the spectacular and unexpected communities of invertebrates based on symbiotic associations with chemo-litho-autotrophic bacteria, prokaryotic communities associated with high temperature black smokers fascinated microbiologists of extreme environments. Within mineral structures where temperature gradients may fluctuate from ambient seawater temperatures (2°C) up to 350°C, thermophilic (optimal growth above 60°C) and hyperthermophilic (optimal growth above 80°C) microorganisms thrived under very severe conditions due to elevated hydrostatic pressure, toxic compounds or strong ionizing radiations. These organisms belong to both domains of Bacteria and Archaea and live aerobically but mostly anaerobically, using a variety of inorganic and organic carbon sources, and a variety of electron donnors and acceptors as well. The most thermophilic organism known on Earth was isolated from a mid-Atlantic-Ridge hydrotermal vent: Pyrolobus fumarii grows optimally at 110°c and its upper temperature limit for life is 113°C. Such an organism survived to autoclaving conditions currently used for sterilization procedures. Many other hyperthermophilic organisms were isolated and described, including fermenters, sulphate and sulphur reducers, hydrogen oxidizers, nitrate reducers, methanogens, etc. Although most of anaerobes are killed when exposed to oxygen, several deep-sea hyperthermophiles appeared to survive to both oxygen and starvation exposures, indicating that they probably can colonize rather distant environments Because of elevated hydrostatic pressure that exists at

  15. Reflecting on the Tensions Between Emic and Etic Perspectives in Life History Research: Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Olive

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I utilized a life history methodology in this study through which written and oral narratives were obtained from six postsecondary students who self-identified as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and/or Queer (LGBQ. Through this narrative process, I endeavored to understand how past events and behaviors shaped the participants' identities and their sense of resiliency. During the data analysis process, I experienced tension between etic and emic categories and themes. Consequently, I struggled to maintain an inductive position throughout the coding process. This article provides an overview of this process and seeks to add to the discussion regarding etic and emic perspectives in qualitative research. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs140268

  16. Mobile Video in Everyday Social Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reponen, Erika; Lehikoinen, Jaakko; Impiö, Jussi

    Video recording has become a spontaneous everyday activity for many people, thanks to the video capabilities of modern mobile phones. Internet connectivity of mobile phones enables fluent sharing of captured material even real-time, which makes video an up-and-coming everyday interaction medium. In this article we discuss the effect of the video camera in the social environment, everyday life situations, mainly based on a study where four groups of people used digital video cameras in their normal settings. We also reflect on another study of ours, relating to real-time mobile video communication and discuss future views. The aim of our research is to understand the possibilities in the domain of mobile video. Live and delayed sharing seem to have their special characteristics, live video being used as a virtual window between places whereas delayed video usage has more scope for good-quality content. While this novel way of interacting via mobile video enables new social patterns, it also raises new concerns for privacy and trust between participating persons in all roles, largely due to the widely spreading possibilities of videos. Video in a social situation affects cameramen (who record), targets (who are recorded), passers-by (who are unintentionally in the situation), and the audience (who follow the videos or recording situations) but also the other way around, the participants affect the video by their varying and evolving personal and communicational motivations for recording.

  17. Cognition in scientific and everyday domains: Comparison and learning implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Frederick; Larkin, Jill H.

    An analysis and comparison of everyday life and the domain of science reveals significant differences in their goals and in the cognitive means used to attain these goals. Students' lack of awareness of these differences can lead to pervasive learning difficulties in their study of science. Thus many students (a) have erroneous conceptions of scientific goals, (b) import goals and ways of thinking which are effective in everyday life but inadequate in science, and (c) devise ways of thinking ill suited to science. Additional complications arise because science taught in schools often differs both from actual science and from everyday life. Students' learning difficulties are thus increased because scientific goals are distorted and scientific ways of thinking are inadequately taught. The preceding analysis suggests some empirical investigations and instructional improvements.

  18. Postscript: Everyday Life and Mediated Fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2015-01-01

    , in general, the two approaches had diverging views on market-based fisheries management, and I have suggested that these originate in the different research objects, instruments, and assumptions that underlie the social sciences. In this postscript, I reflect on the two waypoints, and I discuss the wider...

  19. Everyday Life with ALS: A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fixture s A ccessible hardware or specialized fixtures can transform any shower, sink basin or bathtub, and further ... placard or license plate that allows you to park in “handicapped” or disabled parking spots is something ...

  20. Cream Soda. The rhythm of everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Benecchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work I will focus my attention on a specific manga, Cream Soda by Adachi Mitsuru (1996. As suggested by Eco (1999, I will analyze this single work keeping in mind that it belongs to a medium and some genre practiced through this medium, but focusing my attention on the specific syntax of the speech of Adachi. This means that in this work I won’t talk about manga in general or in itself, at least, not in the foreground and in the first instance, but I will consider Adachi’s specific execution of the art of manga. This work will start from the analysis of single panels, and their relationship with each other inside the page layout, following the critical path indicated by Thierry Groensteen (1999, and will be then accompanied by the analysis of images and texts contained inside those panels, with special regard to their relationship with each other and with images and texts contained in other panels, following the lead of Barbieri (1995 and Pellitteri (1998.

    The analysis of the elements that this text brings together to create a coherent narrative, and those elements it will not, will show that to properly understand Adachi’s manga the reader must recognize the fictional nature of what he is reading and his function as co-author of the story. Obviously this reflection is based on a first level or narrative interpretation of the text because it is starting from this basic layer that all the other layers can be explored. This is also the reason why this work provides a punctual examination of the single panels.

    The analysis here proposed will also demonstrate that, despite many panels open up to different levels of readings, the activation of the second or third level of reading is not a given. It will also become evident, though, that if one stops at a first level reading, the most obvious one, the text in question isn’t really fulfilled according to its author’s expectations: the reader’s high engagement with the text and how, as a result, he is able to better understand it, forms the heart of Adachi’s style and language.

    Disseminating his work with clues, spoilers, symbolic objects and inside jokes, Adachi invites, in fact, his reader not only to re-read the text but also to read between the lines. As it will be demonstrated through this work, with his stylistic solutions and meta-narrative approach, Adachi often brings into question the art of manga and its specific language, and therefore I believe that the analysis of his peculiar execution of this art and language can represent a good starting off point for a more general discourse on the manga language.p { margin-bottom: 0in; text-align: justify; }

  1. Dealing with pupils digital everyday life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl F. Dons.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to answer the following research question: How can we prepare student teachers to deal with pupils who have a wide range of day-to-day experiences of the digital world? This question arises out of the understanding that today's student-teacher training is inadequately equipped to realize the potential for learning found in the way that digital technology is now an integral part of the social and cultural practices of children and young people. Based on theory and practice from research and development activities in primary and lower secondary school, the article points out some perspectives connected to the technology culture of children and young people that may have importance for the professional training of student teachers. The article concludes by summarizing some findings from a research project in general teacher education, where it is argued that student teachers can be qualified to cope with the way children and young people use technology by teaching them to adopt solutions based on personal publishing. In many ways the article deals with classical issues in the education field; how the relations between cognition, learning, technology and fellow-citizenship raise practical issues connected to teaching and learning (Dewey, 1915; 1938; 1958.

  2. Everyday Life of Tajik Women. Some Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Dodkhudoeva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an overview of the complex world of contemporary women in Tajikistan. There are considered the traditions, customs and rules that define their daily lives, as well as the restrictions and limitations imposed by economic difficulties and social mentality. Additionally, there are presented some of the challenges and imperatives of Tajik society, such as the need to reconsider the role of women in family and community.

  3. Monumentality vs. everyday life: architecture's public role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Manoel Guedes Sobrinho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Conference held in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, on March 18, 2006. Thoughts about architecture and the nation." Architecture is everything dealing with construction." (ARGAN, c. 1992. An object's cultural and ethical value is measured by how well it addresses demand, which in turn is related to the planet Earth, to scarce resources, and to people's survival. Architecture, its craft, and its teaching are studied from the perspective of the act, which is the art of building, to meet social, public and private demands through historical processes of power games, at a given place and time. Architecture is reduced to its essence to unveil the roots of its emergence and understand the architect's responsibilities in the new mass society, when we enter this" new popular period in history" (SANTOS; SOUZA, c1998. We suggest the following sequence of procedures as a path of knowledge and to support the free development of invention: 1 Initially assess the prospective problem to choose and study the location and the tasks of the architect, the client, society, and government; 2 identify and understand building plans for that location; 3 study the activities, flows, quantity, quality and combination of spaces resulting from the conflicting yearnings of people, in line with social needs and translated into private and public building plans; 4 graphically analyze the sectorial subsystems of areas associated according to affinities, considering their arrangement and organization in the site; 5 work on the rigorous construction of architecture, which in final analysis is matter and form; It should be pointed out that it is necessary to: 6 expand the supply of information on specific architectural problems to be addressed, and to organize the actual and effective involvement of people in the discussion of projects and works of their interest, unlike assembly and participative meetings; 7 expand opportunities to allow a greater number of architects to take part in building the nation, which implies the government implementing new recruitment policies. Three projects are presented to illustrate the involvement of architects in the architectural craft in Brazil: 1 Brasília's Pilot Plan, 1957; 2 the city of Caraíba, (Pillar, Jaguarari, Bahia, 1978; and 3 Bicocca project, in Milan, Italy, 1987.

  4. Illness, everyday life and narrative montage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Nina; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a study of Sara Bro's Diary (2004), a book montage of images and texts recording the experiences of a Danish breast cancer survivor, Sara Bro. It examines two montages of photography and text, drawing on Roland Barthes' concept of 'the third meaning' to explain and discuss t...

  5. Social pedagogy between everyday life and professionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap

    2014-01-01

    You have to know a bit of history in order to understand that the term social pedagogy can have different meanings. This article presents social pedagogy first and foremost as an approach that focuses on the other person’s possibilities to decide, to be an actor and to be a participant. When you...... practice a social pedagogical approach, you have to think because you will often find yourself in situations with no fixed recipe for what to do. The social pedagogy occurs in tension fields. Therefore, social pedagogical work is in constant development....

  6. Immortality and the base of multicellular life: Lessons from cnidarian stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hoang, Van Thanh; Mättner, Robert; Holstein, Thomas W

    2009-12-01

    Cnidarians are phylogenetically basal members of the animal kingdom (>600 million years old). Together with plants they share some remarkable features that cannot be found in higher animals. Cnidarians and plants exhibit an almost unlimited regeneration capacity and immortality. Immortality can be ascribed to the asexual mode of reproduction that requires cells with an unlimited self-renewal capacity. We propose that the basic properties of animal stem cells are tightly linked to this archaic mode of reproduction. The cnidarian stem cells can give rise to a number of differentiated cell types including neuronal and germ cells. The genomes of Hydra and Nematostella, representatives of two major cnidarian classes indicate a surprising complexity of both genomes, which is in the range of vertebrates. Recent work indicates that highly conserved signalling pathways control Hydra stem cell differentiation. Furthermore, the availability of genomic resources and novel technologies provide approaches to analyse these cells in vivo. Studies of stem cells in cnidarians will therefore open important insights into the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology. Their critical phylogenetic position at the base of the metazoan branch in the tree of life makes them an important link in unravelling the common mechanisms of stem cell biology between animals and plants.

  7. Mozambique child soldier life outcome study: lessons learned in rehabilitation and reintegration efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, N; Crawford, J; Halperin, J

    2006-01-01

    As the use of child soldiers continues to proliferate throughout the world, effective psychosocial interventions must be developed and evaluated. Our research shows that former child soldiers who are provided rehabilitative services and accepted back into their families and communities are able to become productive, responsible and caring adults. In 1988, 39 captured or escaped child soldiers were brought by the Mozambican government to the Lhanguene Rehabilitation Center in Maputo, Mozambique's capital city. Interventions that focused on rehabilitating the children both psychologically and physically were initiated during their 6-month stay at the Lhanguene centre, and reintegration assistance was provided for 2 years thereafter to support their return to families and communities. Our research continued to follow these former child soldiers for 16 years, and focused on their psychological, social and economic functioning. The study included qualitative and quantitative data collection methods to obtain adult well-being outcomes and was also designed to identify interventions that enabled these child soldiers to re-enter civilian life and lead relatively productive lives. Efficacious rehabilitation activities included those that strengthened individuals' coping skills for anticipated trauma and grief, instilled a sense of social responsibility and promoted self-regulation and security (versus survival) seeking behaviour. Activities that supported long term reintegration and self-sufficiency included community acceptance and forgiveness, traditional cleansing and healing rituals, livelihoods and apprenticeships.

  8. Positive emotions from social company in women with persisting subclinical psychosis: lessons from daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collip, D; Wigman, J T W; van Os, J; Oorschot, M; Jacobs, N; Derom, C; Thiery, E; Peeters, F; Wichers, M; Myin-Germeys, I

    2014-03-01

    Altered social reward functioning is associated with psychosis irrespective of stage and severity. Examining the role of social reward functioning prospectively in relation to psychotic experiences before these become persistent and potentially disabling can aid in elucidating social mechanisms that induce shifts toward more severe psychotic states, without the confounding effects of clinical disorder. In a longitudinal general population sample (N = 566), the experience sampling method (repetitive random sampling of momentary emotions and social context) was used to assess daily life social functioning at baseline. Persistence of subclinical psychotic experiences was based on the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences assessed three times over 14 months. Analyses examined to what degree i) social context and ii) appreciation thereof differentiated between those who did and did not develop persistent psychotic experiences. Although individuals with persistent psychotic experiences did not differ in overall level of positive effect, the amount of time spent alone or the level of social satisfaction compared to individuals without persistent psychotic experiences, they were more sensitive to the rewarding effects of social company. Alterations in social reward experience may form one of the mechanisms that precede the development of the extended psychosis phenotype over time. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Designing Effective Interactions for Concordance around End-of-Life Care Decisions: Lessons from Hospice Admission Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Candrian

    2017-04-01

    choice patients make to forego aggressive treatment measures when they enroll in hospice. In a literal sense, to enroll in hospice means to bring in support for end-of-life care. It means to identify the need for expertise around symptom management at end-of-life, and agree to having a care team come and manage someone’s physical, psychosocial, and/or spiritual needs. As with all care, hospice can be stopped if it is no longer considered appropriate. To uncover the communication tensions undergirding a hospice admission interaction, we use Street’s ecological theory of patient-centered communication to analyze a case exemplar of a hospice admission interaction. This analysis reveals diverse points of struggle within hospice decision-making processes around hospice care and the need for communication techniques that promote trust and acceptance of end-of-life care. Lessons learned from talking about hospice care can inform other quality initiatives around communication and informed decision-making in the context of advance care planning, palliative care, and end-of-life care.

  10. Designing Effective Interactions for Concordance around End-of-Life Care Decisions: Lessons from Hospice Admission Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candrian, Carey; Tate, Channing; Broadfoot, Kirsten; Tsantes, Alexandra; Matlock, Daniel; Kutner, Jean

    2017-01-01

    to forego aggressive treatment measures when they enroll in hospice. In a literal sense, to enroll in hospice means to bring in support for end-of-life care. It means to identify the need for expertise around symptom management at end-of-life, and agree to having a care team come and manage someone’s physical, psychosocial, and/or spiritual needs. As with all care, hospice can be stopped if it is no longer considered appropriate. To uncover the communication tensions undergirding a hospice admission interaction, we use Street’s ecological theory of patient-centered communication to analyze a case exemplar of a hospice admission interaction. This analysis reveals diverse points of struggle within hospice decision-making processes around hospice care and the need for communication techniques that promote trust and acceptance of end-of-life care. Lessons learned from talking about hospice care can inform other quality initiatives around communication and informed decision-making in the context of advance care planning, palliative care, and end-of-life care. PMID:28420191

  11. False Negatives for Remote Life Detection on Ocean-Bearing Planets: Lessons from the Early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Olson, Stephanie L; Schwieterman, Edward W; Lyons, Timothy W

    2017-04-01

    Ocean-atmosphere chemistry on Earth has undergone dramatic evolutionary changes throughout its long history, with potentially significant ramifications for the emergence and long-term stability of atmospheric biosignatures. Though a great deal of work has centered on refining our understanding of false positives for remote life detection, much less attention has been paid to the possibility of false negatives, that is, cryptic biospheres that are widespread and active on a planet's surface but are ultimately undetectable or difficult to detect in the composition of a planet's atmosphere. Here, we summarize recent developments from geochemical proxy records and Earth system models that provide insight into the long-term evolution of the most readily detectable potential biosignature gases on Earth-oxygen (O2), ozone (O3), and methane (CH4). We suggest that the canonical O2-CH4 disequilibrium biosignature would perhaps have been challenging to detect remotely during Earth's ∼4.5-billion-year history and that in general atmospheric O2/O3 levels have been a poor proxy for the presence of Earth's biosphere for all but the last ∼500 million years. We further suggest that detecting atmospheric CH4 would have been problematic for most of the last ∼2.5 billion years of Earth's history. More broadly, we stress that internal oceanic recycling of biosignature gases will often render surface biospheres on ocean-bearing silicate worlds cryptic, with the implication that the planets most conducive to the development and maintenance of a pervasive biosphere will often be challenging to characterize via conventional atmospheric biosignatures. Key Words: Biosignatures-Oxygen-Methane-Ozone-Exoplanets-Planetary habitability. Astrobiology 17, 287-297.

  12. Accounting for Medication Particularities: Designing for Everyday Medication Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Lea Gulstav; Grönvall, Erik; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2013-01-01

    management involves more than just specific illness-related strategies and should take into account the broad set of activities conforming people’s everyday life. This study investigates how older adults manage their medication in everyday life. To inform the design of pervasive healthcare medication...... management systems (PHMMS), the study calls for attention to medication-specific particularities that account for: according to need medication, the heterogeneous care network, the substitute medication, the medication informational order, the shared responsibility and the adjustment of medication intake...

  13. 從生活風格觀點探討樂活消費者的日常生活資訊行為 On the Everyday Life Information Behavior of LOHAS Consumers: A Perspective of Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nei-Ching Yeh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available 本研究由生活風格的觀點,探討樂活消費者的日常生活資訊行為,試圖發掘生活風格與資訊行為間的關係。本研究採用質性研究法,先邀請研究對象填寫「樂活族生活型態量表」,以確定其為樂活族,再進行半結構式深度訪談。受訪者計有十五位,研究主要分析其生活風格展現、影響生活風格的因素、和為展現生風出現的日常生活資訊行為。研究發現,生活風格與資訊行為可能的兩種辯證關係:相互交揉的關係和平行並列的關係。此外,研究也發現,在消費社會裏,生活風格概念是個適合探討資訊行為的研究取向,也呼應社會學家Maffesoli的觀點,即因為共感共應汙捉E的團體是現今社會的特色。此發現也指出,以情感概念為資訊行為研究取向的重要性。在實務方面,消費社會的樂活市場具有龐大商機,本研究結果可供市場調查或分析之用,亦有助於相關產業擬定經營及行銷策略。With the aim of finding a correlation between lifestyle and information behavior, the everyday information behaviors of LOHAS (Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability consumers were investigated in this study. Fifteen participants were invited to accomplish the LOHAS lifestyle scale to determine their identities as LOHAS consumers. Thereafter, semi-structural in-depth interviews were conducted. This study also analyzed the manifestations of the lifestyles of LOHAS consumers, as well as the factors influencing their lifestyles and their everyday life information behaviors. It was found that there are two kinds of possible dialectical relationships between lifestyle and information behavior: ambivalent and parallel relationships. In addition, it was found that the concept of lifestyle is a worthy research orientation in investigating the information behavior of people in consumption societies, which echoes Mafffesoli’s empathetic viewpoint on forming a

  14. Entrepreneurship as everyday practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blenker, Per; Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Korsgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    and disharmonies in their personal life. The paper illustrates how opportunities unfold depending on regional differences, local heritage and gender, to show how entrepreneurship education must take into account differences in context, culture and circumstance. Rather than perceiving entrepreneurship education...... as universalistic and searching for a generally applicable teaching approach, the authors argue that there is a need to tailor entrepreneurship education to the particular. They therefore propose that the pedagogy of entrepreneurship education should be personalized and they build a conceptual framework...... that contrasts two opposing views of entrepreneurship education: ‘universalistic’ and ‘idiosyncratic’. Following this distinction, they explore how different elements of entrepreneurship education may be fitted to the particular needs of each individual learner. This insight is relevant for didactic reflections...

  15. Strawberry Square II: Take Time. Teacher's Guide. 33 Lessons in the Arts to Help Children Take Time with Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Nancy

    This teacher's guide accompanies a series of telelessons designed to stimulate arts activities in grades 2 and 3. It follows a story line established in "Strawberry Square" which centers around the revitilization of Strawberry Square by Skipper, the owner of the Tune Shoppe in the square. Each of the 15 lessons has four sections, which contain a…

  16. Image acts and visual communities: everyday nationalism in contemporary Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuryel, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the dissertation entitled "Image Acts and Visual Communities: Contemporary Nationalism in Turkey", I investigate the image politics of nationalist practices in everyday life by focusing on contemporary Turkey and tracking the way images of the nation travel through a variety of fields. I depart

  17. In Pursuit of Everyday Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Teresa M.

    2017-01-01

    Creativity researchers have long paid careful attention to individual creativity, beginning with studies of well-known geniuses, and expanding to personality, biographical, cognitive, and social-psychological studies of individual creative behavior. Little is known, however, about the everyday psychological experience and associated creative…

  18. Intercultural Education in Everyday Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupas, Ruanni

    2014-01-01

    While there is substantive work in intercultural education, especially that which proposes intellectual or conceptual road maps for pedagogic interculturalism and, more specifically for the classroom, there is a need to surface the complexity of everyday intercultural classroom practices. This article reflects on some Singapore students' responses…

  19. The Everyday Work of Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlois, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Schools attempting to transform themselves by adopting desirable characteristics generally fail because they have skipped a long, difficult self-discovery process involved in becoming effective schools. Leadership may be as simple as knowing oneself, envisioning alternative realities, being persistent, and building everyday relationships. (MLH)

  20. The Everyday Use of Celebrities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.; Kooijman, J.; Marschall, P.D.; Redmond, S.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores what celebrities may do for us when we are not especially aware of them, combining the work Dutch popular culture and everyday media use, using the prerogative of the long-term media researcher who aims to theorize from empirical material. The chapter first introduces and

  1. Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated with the Everyday Health Information Literacy of Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Noora; Ek, Stefan; Niemelä, Raimo; Korpelainen, Raija; Huotari, Maija-Leena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Everyday health information literacy refers to the competencies needed to find relevant information, evaluate its reliability, and use it to make decisions concerning health in everyday life. More evidence is needed of the determinants of health information literacy to better understand how it is acquired and through which mechanisms…

  2. Entrepreneurship as Everyday Practice: Towards a Personalized Pedagogy of Enterprise Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenker, Per; Frederiksen, Signe Hedeboe; Korsgaard, Steffen; Muller, Sabine; Neergaard, Helle; Thrane, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Adopting the perspective of "entrepreneurship as an everyday practice" in education, the authors conceptualize opportunities as arising from the everyday practice of individuals. Opportunities are thus seen as emanating from the individual entrepreneur's ability to disclose anomalies and disharmonies in their personal life. The paper illustrates…

  3. Remembering myth and ritual in the everyday tectonics of hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    2015-01-01

    emphasis on both the physical construction and mental construing of architecture. With this dual perspective Frascari established a discourse in tectonic thinking which brings the tectonic expression beyond structural genius into socio-cultural realms of storytelling, myth and ritual. However, in everyday...... and the realms of storytelling, myth and ritual are also important ethical aims of architectural construction, because they are crucial for what we experience, feel, and remember in our everyday life. Relative hereto, I suggest that the focus on structural genius is unfolded to investigate how myths and rituals...

  4. The Management of Difference in Everyday School Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    2015-01-01

    for participation. Our goal is to create knowledge about the way difference is constructed and managed in schools. How is the concept of ‘difference’ conceived of, produced and reproduced through everyday practices and how is the management of difference embedded in school culture. Further our goal is to create...... knowledge about the consequences that occur for different students as a result of specific ways of managing differences by teachers.......The paper will present and discuss our field study of everyday life in a Danish fifth grade classroom. Our aim has been to observe, describe and analyze those everyday practices in the classroom that ultimately result in offering students different positions, identities and opportunities...

  5. Everyday couples' communication research: Overcoming methodological barriers with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reblin, Maija; Heyman, Richard E; Ellington, Lee; Baucom, Brian R W; Georgiou, Panayiotis G; Vadaparampil, Susan T

    2017-10-26

    Relationship behaviors contribute to compromised health or resilience. Everyday communication between intimate partners represents the vast majority of their interactions. When intimate partners take on new roles as patients and caregivers, everyday communication takes on a new and important role in managing both the transition and the adaptation to the change in health status. However, everyday communication and its relation to health has been little studied, likely due to barriers in collecting and processing this kind of data. The goal of this paper is to describe deterrents to capturing naturalistic, day-in-the-life communication data and share how technological advances have helped surmount them. We provide examples from a current study and describe how we anticipate technology will further change research capabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  7. Behavioral confirmation of everyday sadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckels, Erin E; Jones, Daniel N; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2013-11-01

    Past research on socially aversive personalities has focused on subclinical psychopathy, subclinical narcissism, and Machiavellianism-the "Dark Triad" of personality. In the research reported here, we evaluated whether an everyday form of sadism should be added to that list. Acts of apparent cruelty were captured using two laboratory procedures, and we showed that such behavior could be predicted with two measures of sadistic personality. Study 1 featured a bug-killing paradigm. As expected, sadists volunteered to kill bugs at greater rates than did nonsadists. Study 2 examined willingness to harm an innocent victim. When aggression was easy, sadism and Dark Triad measures predicted unprovoked aggression. However, only sadists were willing to work for the opportunity to hurt an innocent person. In both studies, sadism emerged as an independent predictor of behavior reflecting an appetite for cruelty. Together, these findings support the construct validity of everyday sadism and its incorporation into a new "Dark Tetrad" of personality.

  8. Studying Normal, Everyday Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Daren C. Brabham

    2015-01-01

    Social media research has tended to focus on stand-out cases and has made use of big data methods to make claims about human experience and sociality. This commentary urges researchers to consider the everyday, normal experiences of most social media users, to consider the place of social media in a broader social context, and to consider marrying big data approaches with interviews and surveys of users.

  9. Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ie, Amanda Yen Lin

    2014-01-01

    The present research assessed whether levels of depression, anxiety and worry, obsessive-compulsive distress, and psychopathy were differentially related to distinct thought suppression profiles. As a means to achieving this goal, the Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression (PETS) scale was constructed to measure the frequencies with which various target thoughts are suppressed. The PETS scale demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and scores were positively co...

  10. Da (contranormatividade do cotidiano escolar: problematizando discursos sobre a indisciplina discente On the (counter-normative spectrum of everyday school life: an analysis of the disciplinary events of a public school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Groppa Aquino

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo ambiciona colocar em causa a proliferação discursiva contemporânea em torno das condutas do alunado tidas como indisciplinadas, situando-a, em diálogo com a conceituação foucaultiana, no interior de um quadro socio-histórico e institucional atravessado por demandas multiformes de governamento dos sujeitos escolares. Para tanto, o texto oferece primeiramente uma configuração preliminar da produção acadêmica brasileira sobre a temática disciplinar nas últimas três décadas, bem como problematiza os nortes teórico-metodológicos da investigação voltada ao âmbito (contranormativo do cotidiano escolar. Em seguida, apresenta os resultados de uma investigação baseada nos registros das ocorrências disciplinares que tomaram lugar no ensino médio de uma escola pública na cidade de São Paulo, num intervalo de cinco anos (2003-2007. Por fim, opera algumas aproximações analíticas do problema, apontando que se as queixas disciplinares parecem ser, num primeiro momento, solidárias a uma espécie de esgarçadura do modus operandi escolar clássico, num segundo momento, elas passam a apontar para a irrupção de modos sutis de controle das condutas não apenas discentes, mas também dos profissionais, de modo consoante aos processos de governamentalização em ação na contemporaneidade.This article seeks to question the present day proliferation of discourses related to undisciplined conduct of pupils in schools. Such propagation will be situated, within a foucaultian framework, against the backdrop of complex institutional and socio-historic realities constituted by multiple demands of government of the school subjects. It starts out with a preliminary overview of brazilian academic production concerning the disciplinary theme, and spanning over the last three decades. This leads to a problematization of the theoretical and methodological orientations of research regarding the (counter-normative in everyday school life

  11. ...El vivir, mitad pueblerino, mitad ciudadano, en la urbe luminosa y sonriente... La vida cotidiana en Guadalajara en la década de 1930 ...Living midway between a village and city in the luminous, smiling city... Everyday life in Guadalajara in the 1930s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia del Palacio Montiel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del artículo es hacer un esbozo de la vida cotidiana de la ciudad de Guadalajara -epicentro de diversos acontecimientos de importancia nacional- al iniciar la tercera década del siglo XX, momento de transición cuando se puso en marcha el proceso de modernización acelerada que no se detuvo ya en el transcurso del siglo XX. La vida cotidiana se vio afectada por diversos acontecimientos de la década anterior en el ámbito local -repercusiones de la guerra cristera en la región-, así como nacionales -asesinato de Obregón y gobierno de Calles-, e internacionales -crisis económica de 1929- Sin embargo, la vida cotidiana se vio enriquecida por las nuevas diversiones públicas y la presencia en Guadalajara de un grupo de intelectuales que en los años posteriores ganaría fama tanto a escala nacional como internacional. Para dibujar el cuadro de la cotidianidad tapatía, se utilizaron como fuente varios de los periódicos que ahí se publicaban, así como algunas de las fuentes literarias disponibles.The purpose of the article is to provide a sketch of everyday life in the city of Guadalajata -the epicenter of various events of national importance- in the early 1930s, a moment of transition marking rhe start of the rapid modernization that continued uninterruptedly during the 20th century. Everyday life was affected by various events from the previous decade at all levels, local -repercussions of the Cristero war in the region-, national -the murder of Obregón, and Calles's government- and international -the economic crisis of 1929- Everyday life, however, was enhanced by the new forms of public entertainment and the presence in Guadalajara of a group of intellectuals that would subsequently become famous both nationally and internationally. This picture of everyday life in Guadalajara was drawn from several of the newspapers published there at the time as well as some of the available literary sources.

  12. “I Felt Like My Life Had Been Given to Me to Start Over”: Alice Kaplan’s Language Memoir, French Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alice Kaplan’s memoir French Lessons (1993 is a story that deals as much with the issue of language learning as with that of cultural belonging(s. This “language memoir,” as it is typical of this sub-genre, is an intimate tale of the transition between languages and cultures. French Lessons recounts her evolving relationship with French language and culture in various phases of her life: starting from childhood, continuing through her graduate student years at Yale and finally as professor of French at Duke. Soon, however, in this unconventional Bildung, the second language turns out to be a verbal safe-house, an instant refuge when her first language and culture happen to be too uncomfortable. Ultimately, French provides a psychic space and a hiding place. Ultimately, however, as Derrida has shown, we are alienated from both the first and the second; we find ourselves to be more comfortable in one than in the other. This essay will analyze such processes with special attention to the part played by the body in Kaplan’s building as a student and eventually as a teacher. The analysis will be linked with the text’s peculiar narrative style: fast-paced, with simple, concise sentences, nevertheless extremely effective and moving.

  13. Indicators+: a proposal for everyday peace indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Ginty, Roger

    2013-02-01

    Many of the approaches to measuring peace favoured by international organisations, INGOs and donor governments are deficient. Their level of analysis is often too broad or too narrow, and their aggregated statistical format often means that they represent the conflict-affected area in ways that are meaningless to local communities. This article takes the form of a proposal for a new generation of locally organised indicators that are based in everyday life. These indicators are inspired by practice from sustainable development in which indicators are crowd sourced. There is the potential for these to become 'indicators+' or part of a conflict transformation exercise as communities think about what peace might look like and how it could be realised. The article advocates a form of participatory action research that would be able to pick up the textured 'hidden transcript' found in many deeply divided societies and could allow for better targeted peacebuilding and development assistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Affirming Difference: Everyday Aesthetic Experience after Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Roberdeau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the complex relationships among two different types of critique, the socio-temporal zone known as "everyday life" and the moment of the encounter by those who are encountering art works. It proceeds with a close study of the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Mikel Dufrenne, and tests their key concepts against generalized contemporary art practices that question a model of the traditional aesthetic experience by suggesting the possibility that within the expanse of postmodernity such a paradigm has shifted, (although it is not completely irretrievable. The paper argues that this shift has been achieved by remobilizing readymade objects and banal customs within spaces otherwise reserved for extraordinary experience. Thus, it also considers the problem of authoritative experience and Jürgen Habermas' extension of the Husserlian Lebenswelt in order to map out the urgencies of our current cultural sphere.

  15. Self-reported Lupus flare: Association with everyday home and personal product exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marline L. Squance

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Everyday product exposures can impact on symptom exacerbation in SLE. Some offering protection and others increased health risk. Identifying environmental associations offer the possibility of life-style interventions to reduce illness impact.

  16. Everyday stress response targets in the science of behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joshua M; Sliwinski, Martin J; Zawadzki, Matthew J; Scott, Stacey B; Conroy, David E; Lanza, Stephanie T; Marcusson-Clavertz, David; Kim, Jinhyuk; Stawski, Robert S; Stoney, Catherine M; Buxton, Orfeu M; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Green, Paige M; Almeida, David M

    2017-09-28

    Stress is an established risk factor for negative health outcomes, and responses to everyday stress can interfere with health behaviors such as exercise and sleep. In accordance with the Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) program, we apply an experimental medicine approach to identifying stress response targets, developing stress response assays, intervening upon these targets, and testing intervention effectiveness. We evaluate an ecologically valid, within-person approach to measuring the deleterious effects of everyday stress on physical activity and sleep patterns, examining multiple stress response components (i.e., stress reactivity, stress recovery, and stress pile-up) as indexed by two key response indicators (negative affect and perseverative cognition). Our everyday stress response assay thus measures multiple malleable stress response targets that putatively shape daily health behaviors (physical activity and sleep). We hypothesize that larger reactivity, incomplete recovery, and more frequent stress responses (pile-up) will negatively impact health behavior enactment in daily life. We will identify stress-related reactivity, recovery, and response in the indicators using coordinated analyses across multiple naturalistic studies. These results are the basis for developing a new stress assay and replicating the initial findings in a new sample. This approach will advance our understanding of how specific aspects of everyday stress responses influence health behaviors, and can be used to develop and test an innovative ambulatory intervention for stress reduction in daily life to enhance health behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Aesthetic properties of everyday objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stich, Christine; Knäuper, Bärbel; Eisermann, Jens; Leder, Helmut

    2007-06-01

    This research addresses whether one underlying concept of appreciation exists across different classes of objects. Three studies were done. To identify aesthetic properties relevant for the aesthetic judgment of everyday objects and paintings, in Study 1 expert interviews were conducted with 12 interior designers, object-oriented designers and architects, and 12 students of art history. In Study 2, multidimensional unfolding (MDU) was used to examine whether common judgment criteria can be identified for the objects of the different classes. A sample of 217 German subjects participated. 2- or 3-dimensional MDU solutions resulted for each object class. The identified dimensions were labeled using the aesthetic properties derived from the expert interviews (Study 1). These dimensions represent relevant dimensions of aesthetic judgment on which object properties vary. Study 2 suggested that people use different dimensions of aesthetic judgment for different object classes. The identified dimensions were then used to construct three sets of systematically varied everyday objects and one set of systematically varied paintings. Using this stimulus material in Study 3, conjoint analysis indicated these dimensions are differentially important for the overall aesthetic judgment.

  18. Translation and pilot validation of the Danish version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helle, Tina; Kaptain, Rina Juel; Kottorp, Anders

    Background: The use of everyday technologies has grown rapidly during the last decades and become an increasing part of people’s everyday life, and also now include the use of e-health technologies that are used on a daily basis for persons living with chronic health conditions, e.g., chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There are however no validated assessments targeting the competence to use everyday- and e-health technology for these people. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the validity of the Danish version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ) in a sample...... overall high unidimensionality, person response validity and precision in measures. Conclusion: The findings from this pilot study support the use of ETUQ as a validated functional outcomes assessment also in people with COPD in Denmark. Application to Practice: Inclusion of everyday e-health items...

  19. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of villagers in rural Botswana about the everyday life burden and impact of their musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months included 55 in-depth interviews with 34 villagers. Interviews were typically conducted in Setswana with ...... country settings. Community-engaged partnerships are needed to develop rehabilitation programmes to ease the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in rural Botswana....

  20. Nurse-led health promotion interventions improve quality of life in frail older home care clients: lessons learned from three randomized trials in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Browne, Gina; Gafni, Amiram

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores the lessons learned from a series of three randomized controlled trials that included 498 community-living frail older adults (≥65 years) using home care services in Southern Ontario, Canada. Each study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of different multi-component nurse-led health promotion and disease prevention (HPDP) interventions. The nurse-led HPDP interventions were 6- or 12-month multi-component and evidence-based strategies targeting known risk factors for functional decline and frailty. Across the three studies, a common approach was used to measure the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) (SF-36) and the costs of use of health services (Health and Social Services Utilization Inventory) from baseline to the end of the intervention. The main lesson learned from the three studies is that nurse-led HPDP interventions for frail older home care clients provide greater improvements in HRQOL compared with usual home care. Such approaches are highly acceptable to this population and can be implemented using existing home care resources. Nurse-led HPDP interventions should include multiple home visits, multidimensional screening and assessment, multi-component evidence-based HPDP strategies, intensive case management, inter-professional collaboration, providers with geriatric training and experience, referral to and coordination of community services, and theory use. The results of the three trials underscore the need to reinvest in nurse-led HPDP interventions in home care to optimize HRQOL and promote ageing in place in the target population of frail older adults. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of additional nurse-led HPDP interventions in other contexts and settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Quality of life improvement in people with spinal cord injury: The transition from rehabilitation hospital to the everyday life from users’ perspective La mejora de la calidad de vida de las personas con lesión medular: La transición del centro rehabilitador a la vida cotidiana desde la perspectiva de los usuarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Gifre Monreal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Returning process to the everyday life context for a person with spinal cord injury after its Hospitalization period has been defined as a moment of difficulties and personal challenges. 
    In this article we show the most prominent factors contributing to improve quality of life from the perspective of the injured people. Two discussion groups, one formed by 12 people with paraplegia, and another formed by 6 people with tetraplejia, have been carried out. Content analysis carried out indicates that participants related quality of life quality once leaving the rehabilitation hospital with to dimensions: a closer context need of attention and, b real world preparation. On conclusion, to design integral rehabilitation programme, physical rehabilitation, learning abilities to allow maximum autonomy and, family assessment must be included. 

    El proceso de retorno a la vida cotidiana para una persona con lesión medular después de su periodo de hospitalización, se ha definido como un momento lleno de dificultades, ambigüedades y retos personales.

    En este trabajo nos planteamos identificar los factores más relevantes que contribuyen a mejorar su calidad de vida, desde la perspectiva de las propias personas afectada. Para ello, hemos realizado dos grupos de discusión: uno formado por 12 personas con paraplejia y otro formado por 6 personas con tetraplejia. El análisis de contenido realizado con las transcripciones de los dos grupos indica que, para los participantes existen dos dimensiones relacionadas con el nivel de calidad de vida una vez salen del centro de rehabilitación: a necesidad de atención al entorno más próximo y b preparación para el mundo real. Como conclusión señalamos la necesidad de incluir la atención integral a las personas con lesión medular desde los diferentes niveles asistenciales del territorio.

     

  2. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…

  3. Mediating epistemic access through everyday language resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In most rural and township English additional language classrooms, everyday language discursive practices of bi/multilingual students are underutilised. This study reports on how grade 4 emergent isiZulu-English bilingual children used their everyday language resources as a tool for epistemic access. Drawing on ...

  4. Neurobiology of Everyday Communication: What Have We Learned From Music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Nina; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2016-06-09

    Sound is an invisible but powerful force that is central to everyday life. Studies in the neurobiology of everyday communication seek to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying sound processing, their stability, their plasticity, and their links to language abilities and disabilities. This sound processing lies at the nexus of cognitive, sensorimotor, and reward networks. Music provides a powerful experimental model to understand these biological foundations of communication, especially with regard to auditory learning. We review studies of music training that employ a biological approach to reveal the integrity of sound processing in the brain, the bearing these mechanisms have on everyday communication, and how these processes are shaped by experience. Together, these experiments illustrate that music works in synergistic partnerships with language skills and the ability to make sense of speech in complex, everyday listening environments. The active, repeated engagement with sound demanded by music making augments the neural processing of speech, eventually cascading to listening and language. This generalization from music to everyday communications illustrates both that these auditory brain mechanisms have a profound potential for plasticity and that sound processing is biologically intertwined with listening and language skills. A new wave of studies has pushed neuroscience beyond the traditional laboratory by revealing the effects of community music training in underserved populations. These community-based studies reinforce laboratory work highlight how the auditory system achieves a remarkable balance between stability and flexibility in processing speech. Moreover, these community studies have the potential to inform health care, education, and social policy by lending a neurobiological perspective to their efficacy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Impaired intestinal barrier function and relapsing digestive disease: Lessons from a porcine model of early life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A L; Blikslager, A T

    2017-11-01

    Within this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, an article by Pohl et al highlights new insights from a powerful porcine model of the link between early life adversity and relapsing functional gastrointestinal disorders. Early weaning stress closely mimics the early life psychosocial stressors that have been linked to adult onset gastrointestinal dysfunction. This early weaning model provides reproducible and highly translatable outcomes in young stress-challenged pigs. Due to the convincingly comparable neurological and gastroenterological anatomy and physiology between pigs and human beings, gastrointestinal stress and injury studies utilizing swine models will provide invaluable insights to improve our understanding and treatment of gastrointestinal disease in human beings. Future studies to examine mechanisms underlying this link between early life adversity and functional gastrointestinal disorders will explore the roles of gender and hypomaturity in gastrointestinal responses to stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The everyday challenges of Pro-environmental practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthou, Sara Kristine Gløjmar

    2013-01-01

    . However, awareness of climate change problems and intentions to live pro-environmentally friendly do not always translate into actual changed practice. In this sense, there is often a discrepancy between attitude and actual behaviour. This article is an in-depth empirical investigation of the logics......Much research and policy planning aimed at climate change mitigation currently focuses on individual behavioural change as a means to reduce carbon emissions. An often used approach in order to achieve this is the attempt to influence behaviour through transfers of knowledge and information...... guiding everyday pro-environmental practices, the aim was to examine the challenges experienced in this regard. Based on visits to households in Copenhagen, four major challenges are identified and discussed. The paper argues that everyday life, as the starting point of individual pro...

  7. The materiality of everyday practices in urban greenspace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how urban greenspace is integrated in everyday practices of urban populations. What are the social functions that green areas serve, and how do people interact with the materiality of urban greenspace – its bio-physical structures and its nature and landscape. The paper...... reports from a recent empirical study in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark, and it seeks to unfold and qualify concepts of lifestyle and practice, i.e. concepts by which sociological studies can capture and understand patterns of actions in people’s daily lives and life courses. Particularly it seeks...... to include an understanding of the role of materiality in the analyses of social practices. Inspired by actor-network theory the paper proposes to analyse the role of urban greenspace in everyday practices as actant functions performed by the greenspace and its elements. A number of studies show that urban...

  8. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    of independence and social identity to fulfil traditional roles held meaning as significance. Outmigration for wage labour and other shifts in family structure compounded everyday musculoskeletal burden. CONCLUSION: Uncovering burden is an important first step to address musculoskeletal care needs in developing......OBJECTIVE: To examine the perspectives of villagers in rural Botswana about the everyday life burden and impact of their musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Ethnographic fieldwork for 8 months included 55 in-depth interviews with 34 villagers. Interviews were typically conducted in Setswana...... for the consequences and significance of musculoskeletal burden related to 3 themes: (i) hard work for traditional lives; (ii) bearing the load of a rugged landscape; and, (iii) caring for others with disrupted lives. Physical labour with musculoskeletal symptoms had economic and subsistence consequences. The loss...

  9. The design of everyday things

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Don

    2013-01-01

    Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious—even liberating—book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization. The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time. In this entertaining and insightful analysis, cognitive scientist Don Norman hails excellence of design as the most important key to regaining the competitive e...

  10. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  11. Osmanlı Kültürel Mirasının Popüler Kültür Ürünü Olarak Gündelik Hayata Yansıması The Reflection Of Cultural Heritage Of Ottoman Empire To Everyday Life As A Popular Cultural Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaliha İnci KARABACAK

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In today’s consumption society, many different products becomepopular in everyday life. When analysing popular culture in the frame of“everyday life” term, it can be seen that longing for the past in modern lifeinfluences everyday life. Ottoman Empire has influenced today’s Turkishsociety in many different aspects. We have recently faced with thatinfluence reflecting in various fields of everyday life. The magnificencethat reflects to the everyday used objects, jewelleries, clothes, spaces etc.as an extension of the strength Ottoman Empire has, come intoprominence as an important element used to affect these consumers.Information belonging especially to the rising period of Ottoman takesplace in “best sellers” lists of many booksellers today. Another field, thattakes attention as much as books about Ottoman Empire, is movietelevision.After books, movies and serials that take place in our everydaylife, space names can be given as an example to Ottoman Empire traces.These products and spaces in the appearance of cultural heritage ofOttoman are commoditized as popular culture products.In this study, the reflection of Cultural heritage of OttomanEmpire to everyday life as a popular culture product is analysed withexamples in the frame of Lefebvre’s perspective to “everyday life”. Günümüz tüketim toplumunda gündelik hayat içinde pek çokfarklı ürün popülerleştirilmektedir. Popüler kültürü, “gündelik hayat”kavramı çerçevesinde incelerken, modern zamanda geçmişe duyulanözlemin gündelik hayatı etkisi altına aldığı görülmektedir. Osmanlıİmparatorluğu, günümüz Türk toplumunu farklı pek çok açıdan etkisialtına almaktadır. Son dönemlerde bu etki gündelik hayatın farklıalanlarına yansıyarak karşımıza çıkmaktadır. Osmanlı İmparatorluğu’nun sahip olduğu gücün bir uzantısı olarak gündelikhayatta kullanılan eşyalara, takılara, giysilere, mekâna vb. unsurlarayansıyan ihti

  12. Ethical challenges and lessons learned from Inuulluataarneq - "Having the Good Life" study: a community-based participatory research project in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Elizabeth; Montgomery-Andersen, Ruth; Koch, Anders; Mulvad, Gert; Gesink, Dionne

    2013-04-01

    We present the ethical challenges and lessons learned over the course of a four-year community-based participatory research (CBPR) project conducted on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Greenland. Specifically discussed is Inuulluataarneq-the "Having the Good Life" study. Inuulluataarneq is an interdisciplinary international, collaborative CBPR study involving the University of Toronto in Canada, the Greenlandic Medical Research Council, the Centre for Primary Care in Nuuk, the University of Greenland, local health partners and communities in Greenland, the Statens Serum Institut in Denmark, and Montana State University in the United States. Inuulluataarneq is the first CBPR project implemented in Greenland. Ethical issues discussed are: (1) the complexity of working with multiple institutional review boards on an international health research project using a CBPR framework; (2) unexpected influences on health policy; and (3) the dynamic of balancing community decision making and practices with academic research requirements and expectations. Inuulluataarneq's primary contribution to understanding ethical issues when conducting research in the Arctic involves an acceptance of the time, patience, and dedication of researchers and community partners it takes to discuss, understand, and process differing ethical viewpoints and procedures.

  13. Compassion in healthcare – lessons from a qualitative study of the end of life care of people with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Jacqueline; Wilson, Kenneth CM; Horton, Siobhan; Lloyd-Williams, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Objectives A lack of compassion in UK healthcare settings has received much recent attention. This study explores the experiences of people with dementia in the last year of life and time surrounding death and how the presence and lack of compassion, kindness and humanity influenced the experience of care. Design Qualitative in-depth interviews with bereaved informal carers of people with dementia. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Forty bereaved carers – 31 women and nine men – with an age range of 18–86 years and from wide socioeconomic backgrounds participated. Main outcome measures Experiences of carers of care for person with dementia during last year of life. Results The interviews highlighted differences and challenges in care settings in providing compassionate, humanistic care and the impact of the care experienced by the person with dementia during the last year of life on informal carers during the bereavement period and beyond. Excellent examples of compassionate care were experienced alongside very poor and inhumane practices. Conclusion The concepts of compassion, kindness and humanity in dementia care are discussed within the paper. The ability to deliver care that is compassionate, kind and humanistic exists along a continuum across care settings – examples of excellent care sit alongside examples of very poor care and the reasons for this are explored together with discussion as to how health and social care staff can be trained and supported to deliver compassionate care. PMID:24108538

  14. Increasing access and quality in Department of Veterans Affairs care at the end of life: a lesson in change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edes, Thomas; Shreve, Scott; Casarett, David

    2007-10-01

    The pursuit of a "good death" remains out of reach for many despite numerous piecemeal solutions to address the growing need for access to quality care at the end of life. In 2002, U.S. veteran deaths were at an all-time high, few Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals had inpatient palliative care services, and there was no reliable approach to meet home hospice needs. The VA embarked on a course of major change to improve veterans' care at the end of life. A coordinated plan to increase access to hospice and palliative care services was established, addressing policy development, program and staff development, collaboration with community hospices, outcomes measurement, and proving value to the organization. To determine progress and monitor resource allocation, workload and outcome measures were established in all settings. Within 3 years, the number of veterans receiving VA-paid home hospice had tripled, all VA hospitals had a palliative care team, 42% of all veterans who died as VA inpatients received a palliative care consultation, and a nationwide network of VA partnerships with community hospice agencies was established. Through a multifaceted strategic plan and a mission of honoring veterans' preferences for care at the end of life, the VA has made rapid progress in improved access to palliative care services for inpatients and outpatients. The VA's experience serves as a powerful example of the magnitude of change possible in a complex health system and a model for improving access and quality of palliative care services in other health systems.

  15. Compassion in healthcare - lessons from a qualitative study of the end of life care of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Jacqueline; Wilson, Kenneth C M; Horton, Siobhan; Lloyd-Williams, Mari

    2013-12-01

    A lack of compassion in UK healthcare settings has received much recent attention. This study explores the experiences of people with dementia in the last year of life and time surrounding death and how the presence and lack of compassion, kindness and humanity influenced the experience of care. Qualitative in-depth interviews with bereaved informal carers of people with dementia. United Kingdom. Forty bereaved carers - 31 women and nine men - with an age range of 18-86 years and from wide socioeconomic backgrounds participated. Experiences of carers of care for person with dementia during last year of life. The interviews highlighted differences and challenges in care settings in providing compassionate, humanistic care and the impact of the care experienced by the person with dementia during the last year of life on informal carers during the bereavement period and beyond. Excellent examples of compassionate care were experienced alongside very poor and inhumane practices. The concepts of compassion, kindness and humanity in dementia care are discussed within the paper. The ability to deliver care that is compassionate, kind and humanistic exists along a continuum across care settings - examples of excellent care sit alongside examples of very poor care and the reasons for this are explored together with discussion as to how health and social care staff can be trained and supported to deliver compassionate care.

  16. The Third Tear in Everyday Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Katya Mandoki

    2010-01-01

    Although totally overlooked by mainstream aesthetic theory, various paths were nevertheless left open for addressing everyday aesthetics, a natural yet surprisingly controversial topic. Why they were never taken until recently, when the theme of everyday aesthetics is now becoming fashionable, can be explained not only by the obvious fact of philosophical aesthetics’ restrictive focal point on art but, among other reasons, by a kind of fetishism that demands an object of recognized value for...

  17. Observations of Everyday Biodiversity: a New Perspective for Conservation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix Cosquer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Public involvement is one of the keys to achieving biodiversity conservation goals. Increasing public involvement in conservation activities requires investigation into what makes people more aware of nature, especially in an ordinary and local context, in their everyday lives. Among the initiatives developed to increase the public's awareness of conservation issues and individual environmental practices, citizen-science programs are based on an invitation to observe and survey nature. In our study, we examined the consequences of participation in a participative citizen-science program that takes place in an everyday-life context on individuals' knowledge and beliefs about biodiversity. This program, the French Garden Butterflies Watch, is addressed to the non-scientifically literate public and is run by the French National Museum of Natural History (MNHN. We examined the ways increased knowledge or strengthened beliefs or ideas about biodiversity can foster pro-conservation attitudes and behavior. We explored how repeated interactions with nature influence the development of knowledge in this area, and how these repeated observations of biodiversity become integrated into complex cognitive processes over time and space. We showed that repeated observations of nature can increase individual knowledge and beliefs. Our results brought out three important conclusions: (1 conservation issues must be integrated into a wider network of social relationships; (2 observing everyday nature often makes people consider its functional and evolutionary characteristics; and (3 scientific knowledge seems necessary to help people to develop their own position on ecosystems.

  18. Perfectionism, Therapy and the Everyday: on Cavell on Makavejev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dinić

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A substantial strand in the interpretations of the films of Dušan Makavejev foregrounds the juxtaposition between ordinary life and public perfectionist strivings, and argues that the director takes the side of the former against the latter. A reference to Stanley Cavell, the philosopher to whom we owe some canonical interpretations of Makavejev, appears to be crucial in those readings. However, both Cavell’s and Makavejev’s views on the matters of the everyday are far more complex than the prevailing dichotomous readings suggest. It is my view that the critics who came after Cavell significantly diluted the complexity of his arguments on the everyday, which are not limited only to his writings on Makavejev, but also include his interpretations of Emerson and Wittgenstein. Hence I argue that the more nuanced reading of Cavell’s work – and not just his dwellings on Makavejev – paves the way for the more salient interpretations of the former’s work.   Article received: May 2, 2017; Article accepted: May 8, 2017; Published online: September 15, 2017 Original scholarly paper How to cite this article: Dinić, Rastislav. "Perfectionism, Therapy and the Everyday: on Cavell on Makavejev." AM Journal of Art and Media Studies 13 (2017: 165-175. doi: 10.25038/am.v0i13.193

  19. lessons and challenges from software quality assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    We discussed these lessons and challenges across two measurable characteristics namely quality of design (life cycle stages) and quality of conformance. Finally, we also recommended the lessons and challenges from software quality management for space system software. KEYWORDS: Software, Software Quality ...

  20. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.