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Sample records for evapotranspiration equation implications

  1. Comparison of Crop Evapotranspiration Estimates from Reference Evapotranspiration Equations and a Variational Data Assimilation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, S. M.; Michalik, T.; Multsch, S.; Breuer, L.

    2015-12-01

    Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is a key component of water resources management in irrigation of farmlands as it determines the crop water consumption. Numerous methods have been used to estimate ETc for scheduling irrigation and evaluating the soil water balance. However, there is a significant difference in ETc estimates from various models, which leads to a large uncertainty in the soil water balance, crop water consumption, and irrigation scheduling. In this study, several commonly-used ETc equations (Turc, Priestley-Taylor, Hargreaves-Samani, Penman-Monteith) are compared with the variational data assimilation approach (VDA) of Bateni et al. (2013). The ETc equations initially estimate the reference evapotranspiration (ETo), which is the evapotranspiration from a healthy and actively-transpiring grass field with ample water in the soil. Thereafter, ETc is calculated by multiplying ETo by the crop coefficient (Kc), which accounts for the crop type and soil water stress. To properly apply the Kc to non-standard conditions, a daily water balance estimation for the root zone is required, which is done by two soil water budget models (Cropwat, Hydrus-1D) that compute incoming and outgoing water flows in the soil profile. In contrast to these methods that estimate ETc in two steps, the VDA approach directly predicts ETc by assimilating sequences of land surface temperature into the heat diffusion equation and thus it is expected to provide more accurate ETc estimates. All approaches are applied over three cropland sites namely, Bondville, Fermi, and Mead in the summer of 2006 and 2007. These sites are part of the AmeriFlux network and provide a wide variety of hydrological conditions. The results show that the variational data assimilation approach performs better compared to other equations.

  2. Processes driving nocturnal transpiration and implications for estimating land evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Víctor Resco; Roy, Jacques; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Alday, Josu G.; Landais, Damien; Milcu, Alexandru; Gessler, Arthur

    2015-06-01

    Evapotranspiration is a major component of the water cycle, yet only daytime transpiration is currently considered in Earth system and agricultural sciences. This contrasts with physiological studies where 25% or more of water losses have been reported to occur occurring overnight at leaf and plant scales. This gap probably arose from limitations in techniques to measure nocturnal water fluxes at ecosystem scales, a gap we bridge here by using lysimeters under controlled environmental conditions. The magnitude of the nocturnal water losses (12-23% of daytime water losses) in row-crop monocultures of bean (annual herb) and cotton (woody shrub) would be globally an order of magnitude higher than documented responses of global evapotranspiration to climate change (51-98 vs. 7-8 mm yr-1). Contrary to daytime responses and to conventional wisdom, nocturnal transpiration was not affected by previous radiation loads or carbon uptake, and showed a temporal pattern independent of vapour pressure deficit or temperature, because of endogenous controls on stomatal conductance via circadian regulation. Our results have important implications from large-scale ecosystem modelling to crop production: homeostatic water losses justify simple empirical predictive functions, and circadian controls show a fine-tune control that minimizes water loss while potentially increasing posterior carbon uptake.

  3. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Penmann-Monteith equation and finally calculation of crop evapotranspiration. The objective of this study was to establish crop coefficients and evapotranspiration of different soybean varieties using shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration (ET0). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Reference evapotranspiration.

  4. Evaluation of clear-sky incoming radiation estimating equations typically used in remote sensing evapotranspiration algorithms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sun, Z

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Net radiation is a key component of the energy balance, whose estimation accuracy has an impact on energy flux estimates from satellite data. In typical remote sensing evapotranspiration (ET) algorithms, the outgoing shortwave and longwave...

  5. Investigation on the Reference Evapotranspiration Distribution at Regional Scale By Alternative Methods to Compute the FAO Penman-Monteith Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, R. L.; Mancosu, N.; Spano, D.

    2014-12-01

    This study derived the summer (June-August) reference evapotranspiration distribution map for Sardinia (Italy) based on weather station data and use of the geographic information system (GIS). A modified daily Penman-Monteith equation from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (UN-FAO) and the American Society of Civil Engineers Environmental and Water Resources Institute (ASCE-EWRI) was used to calculate the Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration (ETos) for all weather stations having a "full" set of required data for the calculations. For stations having only temperature data (partial stations), the Hargreaves-Samani equation was used to estimate the reference evapotranspiration for a grass surface (ETo). The ETos and ETo results were different depending on the local climate, so two methods to estimate ETos from the ETo were tested. Substitution of missing solar radiation, wind speed, and humidity data from a nearby station within a similar microclimate was found to give better results than using a calibration factor that related ETos and ETo. Therefore, the substitution method was used to estimate ETos at "partial" stations having only temperature data. The combination of 63 full and partial stations was sufficient to use GIS to map ETos for Sardinia. Three interpolation methods were studied, and the ordinary kriging model fitted the observed data better than a radial basis function or the inverse distance weighting method. Using station data points to create a regional map simplified the zonation of ETos when large scale computations were needed. Making a distinction based on ETos classes allows the simulation of crop water requirements for large areas and it can potentially lead to improved irrigation management and water savings. It also provides a baseline to investigate possible impact of climate change.

  6. Estimation of reference evapotranspiration in a mountainous mediterranean site using the Penman-Monteith equation with limited meteorological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Moreno, J. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades many authors have adopted the Penman- Monteith formula as the standard way to estimate reference evapotranspiration from climate data. The main drawback associated with the Penman-Monteith method is the relatively high data demand: temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind speed are the minimum inputs required by the formula. In the Spanish Pyrenees historical databases usually consist of temperature and rainfall only, although an improvement in data acquisition is expected in terms of parameters monitored. Under situations of data scarcity, some authors recommend the use of less data intensive methods, such as the empirical Hargreaves equation. Other authors suggest that it is better to estimate the missing parameters and to apply the Penman-Monteith equation. This paper presents a study on the accuracy of the Penman-Monteith method for a situation where some parameters have to be estimated from available temperature, and wind speed data must be replaced by a constant value. The results have been compared with the information available for a location in the central Spanish Pyrenees (period 1999-2003 where parameters required by the Penman-Monteith method have been monitored. A comparison is then made with the Hargreaves model in order to assess the most appropriate method for calculation of the reference evapotranspiration. The results indicate that the use of the Penman-Monteith formula results in errors in reference evapotranspiration ETo estimation of different magnitude and sign throughout the year. However, in general, it offers a more accurate estimation of reference evapotranspiration than the Hargreaves formula.

    En los últimos años, diferentes autores han adoptado el método de Penman-Monteith para estimar la evapotranspiración potencial mediante datos climáticos. El principal inconveniente de este método es que precisa de un gran número de variables para ser calculado: temperatura, radiaci

  7. Extremophile Diatoms: Implications to the Drake Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrenburg, Frithjof A. S.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular Eukaryotes that (as a group and phylogenetically) are not strictly regarded as extremophiles , since the vast majority of diatoms are mesophilic photoautotrophs. However, among the terrestrial Eukaryotes, diatoms are by far the single group of organisms with the ability to inhabit the greatest range of hostile environments on Earth. They are the dominant eukaryotes in the polar regions; in fumaroles, hot springs and geysers; and in hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools. Cryophilic species such as Fragilaria sublinearis and Chaetoceras fragilis are able to carry out respiration at extremely low rates at low temperatures in darkness. The Drake Equation refers to the likelihood of there being intelligent life at the technological level of electromagnetic communication. However, consideration of the range of conditions suitable for the habitability of eukaryotic diatoms and prokaryotic extremophiles, the likelihood that life exists elsewhere in the cosmos becomes many orders of magnitude greater than that predicted by the classical Drake Equation. In this paper we review the characteristics of diatoms as eukaryotic extremophiles and consider the implications to adjustments needed to the Drake Equation to assess the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the Universe.

  8. Simple equation for estimating actual evapotranspiration using heat units for wheat in arid regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Salama

    2015-07-01

    Application of treatment (B resulted in highly significant increase in yield production of Gemmeza10 and Misr2 as compared to treatment (A. Grain yield of different wheat varieties grown under treatment (B could be ranked in the following descending order: Misr2 > Gemmeza10 > Sids12. While under treatment (A it could be arranged in the following descending order: Misr2 > Sids12 > Gemmeza10. On the other hand, the overall means indicated non-significant difference between all wheat verities. The highest values of water and irrigation use efficiency as well as heat use efficiency were obtained with treatment (B. The equation used in the present study is available to estimate ETa under arid climate with drip irrigation system.

  9. Generating reference evapotranspiration surfaces from the Hargreaves equation at watershed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aguilar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Hargreaves' formulation is considered to be appropriate for the water and energy balance at a daily scale due to its simplicity of application once the distributed values of temperature are available at cell scale. However, the coefficient of the Hargreaves equation must be previously calibrated. The interplay of different factors at different temporal scales became evident in the calibration process at the local scale of weather stations. The best fits against daily estimates by ASCE-PM were achieved when differentiating between the wet and the dry season. For the spatial distribution of Hargreaves coefficient at watershed scale, a regionalization in the area around each weather station was proposed in terms of areas of influence. The best results at watershed scale were obtained after a spatial correction for alpine areas, when the average of the difference cell by cell between ASCE-PM and Hargreaves's distributed daily estimates were 0.02 and 0.15 mm day−1 for the wet and the dry seasons, respectively. In all the cases, the best interpolation results were obtained using C-I (calculate and interpolate procedures.

  10. Recents declines in potential evapotranspiration over South Africa: potential causes and implications for maize yield and irrigation demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, L. D.; Caylor, K. K.; Chaney, N.; Herrera-Estrada, J. E.; Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work has identified a 31-year (1979-2010) decline in potential evapotranspiration (PET) during the maize growing season in South Africa, the world's 9th largest producer of that crop. Using a newly-developed, bias-corrected meteorological forcing dataset, we apply an attribution analysis to identify the relative role of four key physical drivers (temperature, net radiation, vapor pressure, and windspeed) in reducing atmospheric demand for water. We conduct a statistical analysis to correlate changes in these four key drivers to potential causal mechanisms, including atmospheric aerosol concentration and changes in the extent of irrigated cropland, which we identify using a novel, high accuracy landcover dataset. Finally, we use the DSSAT maize model, together with counter-factual climate scenarios, to investigate the implications of the PET decline on maize yields and maize irrigation demand. This study illustrates how improved meteorological data, better landcover maps, and crop simulation can be combined to 1) improve understanding of the linkages between the land surface and atmosphere, and 2) help inform crop and irrigation management under changing climates.

  11. Evapotranspiration Calculator Desktop Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Evapotranspiration Calculator estimates evapotranspiration time series data for hydrological and water quality models for the Hydrologic Simulation Program - Fortran (HSPF) and the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM).

  12. Investigation of climate change impact on water resources for an Alpine basin in northern Italy: implications for evapotranspiration modeling complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzani, Giovanni; Ghilardi, Matteo; Mendlik, Thomas; Gobiet, Andreas; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the future effects of climate change on water availability requires an understanding of how precipitation and evapotranspiration rates will respond to changes in atmospheric forcing. Use of simplified hydrological models is required because of lack of meteorological forcings with the high space and time resolutions required to model hydrological processes in mountains river basins, and the necessity of reducing the computational costs. The main objective of this study was to quantify the differences between a simplified hydrological model, which uses only precipitation and temperature to compute the hydrological balance when simulating the impact of climate change, and an enhanced version of the model, which solves the energy balance to compute the actual evapotranspiration. For the meteorological forcing of future scenario, at-site bias-corrected time series based on two regional climate models were used. A quantile-based error-correction approach was used to downscale the regional climate model simulations to a point scale and to reduce its error characteristics. The study shows that a simple temperature-based approach for computing the evapotranspiration is sufficiently accurate for performing hydrological impact investigations of climate change for the Alpine river basin which was studied.

  13. Estimating groundwater evapotranspiration by a subtropical pine plantation using diurnal water table fluctuations: Implications from night-time water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junliang; Ostergaard, Kasper T.; Guyot, Adrien; Fujiwara, Stephen; Lockington, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Exotic pine plantations have replaced large areas of the native forests for timber production in the subtropical coastal Australia. To evaluate potential impacts of changes in vegetation on local groundwater discharge, we estimated groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) by the pine plantation using diurnal water table fluctuations for the dry season of 2012 from August 1st to December 31st. The modified White method was used to estimate the ETg, considering the night-time water use by pine trees (Tn). Depth-dependent specific yields were also determined both experimentally and numerically for estimation of ETg. Night-time water use by pine trees was comprehensively investigated using a combination of groundwater level, sap flow, tree growth, specific yield, soil matric potential and climatic variables measurements. Results reveal a constant average transpiration flux of 0.02 mm h-1 at the plot scale from 23:00 to 05:00 during the study period, which verified the presence of night-time water use. The total ETg for the period investigated was 259.0 mm with an accumulated Tn of 64.5 mm, resulting in an error of 25% on accumulated evapotranspiration from the groundwater if night-time water use was neglected. The results indicate that the development of commercial pine plantations may result in groundwater losses in these areas. It is also recommended that any future application of diurnal water table fluctuation based methods investigate the validity of the zero night-time water use assumption prior to use.

  14. Properties of the resolvent of a linear Abel integral equation: implications for a complementary fractional equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Becker

    2016-09-01

    \\end{equation} where $D^{q}$ denotes the Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator. Finally, the resolvent integral function $\\int_0^t R(s\\,ds$ is shown to be the unique continuous solution of an integral equation closely related to (R$_\\lambda$. Closed-form expressions for it and $R(t$ are derived.

  15. Implications and application of the Raats superclass of soils equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, Marius; Bakker, Gerben

    2016-01-01

    According to the Richards equation, the capacity of a soil to hold and conduct water is determined by the water retention and hydraulic conductivity characteristics. Many mathematical relationships have been proposed in the literature to describe these characteristics. Raats introduced a general

  16. Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations and corresponding implications for iterative methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, B.S. [Macquarie Univ., Sydney (Australia); Fainberg, E.B. [Inst. of Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Energy conservation law imposes constraints on the norm and direction of the Hilbert space vector representing a solution of Maxwell`s equations. In this paper, we derive these constrains and discuss the corresponding implications for the Green`s function of Maxwell`s equations in a dissipative medium. It is shown that Maxwell`s equations can be reduced to an integral equation with a contracting kernel. The equation can be solved using simple iterations. Software based on this algorithm have successfully been applied to a wide range of problems dealing with high contrast models. The matrix corresponding to the integral equation has a well defined spectrum. The equation can be symmetrized and solved using different approaches, for instance one of the conjugate gradient methods.

  17. Blaney-Morin-Nigeria (BMN) Evapotranspiration Model (A Technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duru [1] presented a modified form of the Blaney-Morin potential evapotranspiration equation christened Blaney-Morin- Nigeria (BMN) Evapotranspiration (ET) model for use in Nigeria. In this work, Duru recognize the very wide variability of relative humidity in Nigeria and consequently the very important role this parameter ...

  18. A comparison of estimates of basin-scale soil-moisture evapotranspiration and estimates of riparian groundwater evapotranspiration with implications for water budgets in the Verde Valley, Central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; Wiele, Stephen M.; Pool, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Population growth in the Verde Valley in Arizona has led to efforts to better understand water availability in the watershed. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a substantial component of the water budget and a critical factor in estimating groundwater recharge in the area. In this study, four estimates of ET are compared and discussed with applications to the Verde Valley. Higher potential ET (PET) rates from the soil-water balance (SWB) recharge model resulted in an average annual ET volume about 17% greater than for ET from the basin characteristics (BCM) recharge model. Annual BCM PET volume, however, was greater by about a factor of 2 or more than SWB actual ET (AET) estimates, which are used in the SWB model to estimate groundwater recharge. ET also was estimated using a method that combines MODIS-EVI remote sensing data and geospatial information and by the MODFLOW-EVT ET package as part of a regional groundwater-flow model that includes the study area. Annual ET volumes were about same for upper-bound MODIS-EVI ET for perennial streams as for the MODFLOW ET estimates, with the small differences between the two methods having minimal impact on annual or longer groundwater budgets for the study area.

  19. Calibração regional e local da equação de Hargreaves para estimativa da evapotranspiração de referência Regional and local calibration of Hargreaves equation for estimating reference evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Simões Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A equação de Penman-Monteith FAO-56 (EToPM tem sido recomendada pela FAO, Organização para a Alimentação e Agricultura das Nações Unidas (ONU, como padrão para estimar a evapotranspiração de referência (ETo. Essa equação requer muitas variáveis que não estão disponíveis na maioria das estações meteorológicas no Brasil central. Por outro lado, a equação de Hargreaves é considerada simples e demanda somente dados de temperatura máxima e mínima para estimar a ETo. Entretanto, essa equação requer um ajuste local. Esse estudo analisa a possibilidade de utilizar a equação de Hargreaves ajustada para estimar a ETo no estado de Goiás. Para isso, os parâmetros empíricos, HC (coeficiente empírico de Hargreaves e HE (expoente empírico de Hargreaves, da equação de Hargreaves foram ajustados considerando dois processos, ajuste local (HGR - Hargreaves ajuste local e ajuste regional (HGL - Hargreaves ajuste regional. Para o HGL, os parâmetros empíricos foram ajustados para cada estação meteorológica. Já, para o HGR, os parâmetros empíricos foram ajustados considerando conjuntamente os dados de todas as estações meteorológicas. A equação de Hargreaves ajustada para ambos os processos, local e regional, apresentou valores de ERQM de 17,95 e 21,93%, respectivamente, considerando o conjunto total de dados climáticos. A equação de Hargreaves ajustada localmente ou regionalmente é uma opção para estimar os valores diários de ETo no Estado de Goiás em locais em que a disponibilidade de dados climáticos é limitada.The FAO-56 Penman-Monteith equation (EToPM has been recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO of the United Nations as the standard equation for estimating reference evapotranspiration (ETo. The FAO-56 PM equation requires numerous weather data that are not available in most of the stations of Brazil central. On the other hand, the Hargreaves equation is a more simple equation for

  20. On variability of evapotranspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Rasmus

    This dissertation is part of the long-term catchment-scale hydrological observatory, HOBE, situated in the Skjern River catchment covering 2500 km2 on the western coast of Denmark. To gain a more detailed knowledge of how evapotranspiration is controlled by the local surface and weather patterns...

  1. The practical implications of using standardized estimation equations in calculating the prevalence of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Michael P; Rainey, Andrea; Cairns, Karen J; Marshall, Adele H; Savage, Gerard; Kee, Frank; Peter Maxwell, A; Reaney, Elizabeth; Fogarty, Damian G

    2008-02-01

    Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) chronic kidney disease (CKD) guidelines have focused on the utility of using the modified four-variable MDRD equation (now traceable by isotope dilution mass spectrometry IDMS) in calculating estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs). This study assesses the practical implications of eGFR correction equations on the range of creatinine assays currently used in the UK and further investigates the effect of these equations on the calculated prevalence of CKD in one UK region Using simulation, a range of creatinine data (30-300 micromol/l) was generated for male and female patients aged 20-100 years. The maximum differences between the IDMS and MDRD equations for all 14 UK laboratory techniques for serum creatinine measurement were explored with an average of individual eGFRs calculated according to MDRD and IDMS or = 18 years (reflecting the five methods for serum creatinine measurement utilized in Northern Ireland) to explore, graphically, maximum differences in assays. CKD prevalence using both estimation equations was compared using an existing cohort of observed data. Simulated data indicates that the majority of laboratories in the UK have small differences between the IDMS and MDRD methods of eGFR measurement for stages 4 and 5 CKD (where the averaged maximum difference for all laboratory methods was 1.27 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for females and 1.59 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for males). MDRD deviated furthest from the IDMS results for the Endpoint Jaffe method: the maximum difference of 9.93 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for females and 5.42 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for males occurred at extreme ages and in those with eGFR > 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Observed data for 93,870 patients yielded a first MDRD eGFR 3 months later of which 47,093 (71%) continued to have an eGFR IDMS equation. Over 95% of this difference in prevalence was explained by older females with stage 3 CKD (eGFR 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) close to the stage 2 CKD (eGFR 60-90 ml/min/1

  2. Spatio-temporal dynamics of evapotranspiration from forested, ephemeral wetlands and its implication for hydrologic connectivity in the Western Boreal Plain in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Alexander; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Hokanson, Kelly; Leonard, Rhoswen; Krause, Stefan; Waddington, James Michael

    2017-04-01

    In catchments where hydrologic connectivity is predominantly controlled by storage-threshold dynamics, landscape units promoting water transmission can be crucial for overall ecohydrological functioning. In Canada's Western Boreal Plain, ephemeral wetlands surrounded by upland forests on deep and coarse, glacial deposits are examples of such units. In the sub-humid climate, their importance is exacerbated due to regional, multi-year water deficits, resulting from high evapotranspirative (ET) demand coinciding with most of the annual precipitation and its variability between years. Yet, these ephemeral wetlands frequently saturate during small rain events; hence, they likely play a key role in supplying water to adjacent and downstream systems in both dry and wet periods. We assess factors controlling water losses from these wetlands to the atmosphere (via the soil surface and vegetation), how they change over time (i.e. throughout the growing season), and the extent to which they vary in space. Our goal is to generate process-based understanding of ET dynamics and to determine potential feedbacks that reduce ET losses, maximizing the magnitude and period over which these landscape units may act as water sources. We hypothesize that the following mechanisms enhance the ascribed water transmitting function: (1) external and internal shading reduces incident radiation and therefore available energy to drive ET; this effect increases with leaf area, but is counter-acted by interception. (2) Vegetation structure reduces turbulent exchange with air masses above the canopy, thereby decreasing humidity gradients driving ET. (3) High, near-surface soil tensions during periods of drying limit rates of evaporation. We applied a combined measurement approach to assess spatial and temporal dynamics of ET in the 2016 growing season (May - August) and gathered additional data to assess abiotic and biotic controls on ET rates. We continuously measured ET from the wetland's surface

  3. Modelling annual evapotranspiration in a semi-arid, African savanna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modelling annual evapotranspiration in a semi-arid, African savanna: functional convergence theory, MODIS LAI and the Penman–Monteith equation. ... and, when used independently of the eddy covariance data, ETMODIS predicted an annual ET of 378 mm in 2007 for the semi-arid savanna around the Skukuza flux site.

  4. Estimation of monthly reference evapotranspiration (ETO) for areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper monthly reference evapotranspiration (ETo)- altitude regression equations are developed for the country using 125 stations meteorological data. ETo are calculated based on radiation (sunshine hours), temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed data. FA O-Penman Monteith formula is applied to calculate ...

  5. Thermal remote sensing data for estimating evapotranspiration on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amount of evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential input for modelling the water balance equation, and also has substantial value in the overall estimation of available water for long-term planning of the water resources of regional or very large river basins, such as the Nile, Congo, Niger and Volta. As an alternative to ...

  6. The Missing Data Assumptions of the NEAT Design and Their Implications for Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The Non-Equivalent groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) design involves "missing data" that are "missing by design." Three nonlinear observed score equating methods used with a NEAT design are the "frequency estimation equipercentile equating" (FEEE), the "chain equipercentile equating" (CEE), and the "item-response-theory observed-score-equating" (IRT…

  7. Assessing reference evapotranspiration in a subhumid climate in NE Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Eitzinger, Josef; Cepuder, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Computing reference evapotranspiration and multiplying it with a specific crop coefficient as recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is the most widely accepted approach to estimate plant water requirements. The standardized form of the well-known FAO Penman-Monteith equation, published by the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE-EWRI), is recommended as a standard procedure for calculating reference evapotranspiration. Applied and validated under different climatic conditions it generally achieved good results compared to other methods. However, several studies documented deviations between measured and calculated reference evapotranspiration depending on local environmental conditions. Consequently, it seems advisable to evaluate the model under local environmental conditions. Evapotranspiration was determined at a subhumid site in Austria (48°12'N, 16°34'E; 157 m asl) using a large weighing lysimeter operated at (limited) reference conditions and compared with calculations according to ASCE-EWRI. The lysimeter had an inner diameter of 1.9 m and a hemispherical bottom with a maximum depth of 2.5 m. Seepage water was measured at a free draining outlet using a tipping bucket. Lysimeter mass changes were sensed by a weighing facility with an accuracy of ±0.1 mm. Both rainfall and evapotranspiration were determined directly from lysimeter data using a simple water balance equation. Meteorological data for the ASCE-EWRI model were obtained from a weather station of the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Austria (ZAMG). The study period was from 2005 to 2010, analyses were based upon daily time steps. Daily calculated reference evapotranspiration was generally overestimated at small values, whereas it was rather underestimated when evapotranspiration was large, which is supported also by other studies. In the given case, advection of sensible heat proved

  8. Monitoring cropland evapotranspiration using MODIS products in Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhoff, Anderson; Aparecida Moreira, Adriana; de Arruda Souza, Vanessa; Roberti, Debora Regina

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), including water loss from plant transpiration and land evaporation, is of vital importance for understanding hydrological processes and climate dynamics. In this context, remote sensing is considered as the most important tool for estimate ET over large areas. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) offers an interesting opportunity to evaluate ET with spatial resolution of 1 km. The MODIS global evapotranspiration algorithm (MOD16) considers both surface energy fluxes and climatic constraints on ET (water or temperature stress) to estimate plant transpiration and soil evaporation based on Penman-Monteith equation. The algorithm is driven by remotely sensed and reanalysis meteorological data. In this study, MOD16 algorithm was applied to the State of Rio Grande do Sul (in Southern Brazil) to analyse cropland and natural vegetation evapotranspiration and its impacts during drought events. We validated MOD16 estimations using eddy correlation measurements and water balance closure at monthly and annual time scales. We used observed discharge data from three large rivers in Southern Brazil (Jacuí, Taquari and Ibicuí), precipitation data from TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (3B43 version 7) and terrestrial water storage estimations from the Gravity Recovery and climate Experiment (GRACE). MOD16 algorithm detected evapotranspiration in different land use and land cover conditions. In cropland areas, the average evapotranspiration was 705 mm/y, while in pasture/grassland was 750 mm/y and in forest areas was 1099 mm/y. Compared to the annual water balance, evapotranspiration was underestimated, with mean relative errors between 8 and 30% and coefficients of correlation between 0.42 to 0.53. The water storage change (dS/dt) computed from the water balance closure at monthly time scales showed a significant correlation with the terrestrial water storage obtained from GRACE data, with a coefficient of correlation of 0

  9. National Weather Service Forecast Reference Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, H. D.; Palmer, C. K.; Krone-Davis, P.; Melton, F. S.; Hobbins, M.

    2013-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS), Weather Forecasting Offices (WFOs) are producing daily reference evapotranspiration (ETrc) forecasts or FRET across the Western Region and in other selected locations since 2009, using the Penman - Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation for a short canopy (12 cm grasses), adopted by the Environmental Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE-EWRI, 2004). The sensitivity of these daily calculations to fluctuations in temperatures, humidity, winds, and sky cover allows forecasters with knowledge of local terrain and weather patterns to better forecast in the ETrc inputs. The daily FRET product then evolved into a suite of products, including a weekly ETrc forecast for better water planning and a tabular point forecast for easy ingest into local water management-models. The ETrc forecast product suite allows water managers, the agricultural community, and the public to make more informed water-use decisions. These products permit operational planning, especially with the impending drought across much of the West. For example, the California Department of Water Resources not only ingests the FRET into their soil moisture models, but uses the FRET calculations when determining the reservoir releases in the Sacramento and American Rivers. We will also focus on the expansion of FRET verification, which compares the daily FRET to the observations of ETo from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) across California's Central Valley for the 2012 water year.

  10. Potential crop evapotranspiration and surface evaporation estimates via a gridded weather forcing dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-03-01

    Absent local weather stations, a gridded weather dataset can provide information useful for water management in irrigated areas including potential crop evapotranspiration calculations. In estimating crop irrigation requirements and surface evaporation in Utah, United States of America, methodology and software were developed using the ASCE Standardized Penman-Monteith Reference Evapotranspiration equation with input climate drivers from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) gridded weather forcing dataset and a digital elevation model. A simple procedure was devised to correct bias in NLDAS relative humidity and air temperature data based on comparison to weather data from ground stations. Potential evapotranspiration was calculated for 18 crops (including turfgrass), wetlands (large and narrow), and open water evaporation (deep and shallow) by multiplying crop coefficient curves to reference evapotranspiration with annual curve dates set by summation of Hargreaves evapotranspiration, cumulative growing degree days, or number of days. Net potential evapotranspiration was calculated by subtracting effective precipitation estimates from the Daymet gridded precipitation dataset. Analysis of the results showed that daily estimated potential crop evapotranspiration from the model compared well with estimates from electronic weather stations (1980-2014) and with independently calculated potential crop evapotranspiration in adjacent states. Designed for this study but open sourced for other applications, software entitled GridET encapsulated the GIS-based model that provided data download and management, calculation of reference and potential crop evapotranspiration, and viewing and analysis tools. Flexible features in GridET allows a user to specify grid resolution, evapotranspiration equations, cropping information, and additional datasets with the output being transferable to other GIS software.

  11. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. A Citizen's Guide to Evapotranspiration Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide explains Evapotranspiration Covers which are Evapotranspiration (ET) covers are a type of cap placed over contaminated material, such as soil, landfill waste, or mining tailings, to prevent water from reaching it.

  13. Developing simplified Regional Potential Evapotranspiration (PET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) estimation method was developed to estimate the potential evapotranspiration (reference evapotranspiration) over Abbay Basin as a function of basin maximum and minimum temperature, and modulated by site specific elevation data. The method is intended to estimate PET in ...

  14. Evaluation of evaporation-measuring equipments for estimating evapotranspiration within a greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco,Flávio F.; Folegatti,Marcos V.

    2004-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the performance of simple evaporation measuring equipments in estimating the evapotranspiration in greenhouse, an experiment was conducted in Piracicaba, SP, during a tomato-growing season. Daily water evaporation rate from Piche atmometer, modified atmometer and a reduced evaporation pan installed inside the greenhouse and a Class A pan installed outside were compared to the evapotranspiration rates calculated with Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed tha...

  15. Multicollinearity and Measurement Error in Structural Equation Models: Implications for Theory Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Rajdeep Grewal; Joseph A. Cote; Hans Baumgartner

    2004-01-01

    The literature on structural equation models is unclear on whether and when multicollinearity may pose problems in theory testing (Type II errors). Two Monte Carlo simulation experiments show that multicollinearity can cause problems under certain conditions, specifically: (1) when multicollinearity is extreme, Type II error rates are generally unacceptably high (over 80%), (2) when multicollinearity is between 0.6 and 0.8, Type II error rates can be substantial (greater than 50% and frequent...

  16. Observations of an atmospheric chemical equator and its implications for the tropical warm pool region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Allen, Grant; Watson, Nicola M.; Lee, James D.; Saxton, Julie E.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Vaughan, Geraint; Bower, Keith N.; Flynn, Michael J.; Crosier, Jonathan; Carver, Glenn D.; Harris, Neil R. P.; Parker, Robert J.; Remedios, John J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports observations of a tropospheric chemical equator in the Western Pacific region during the Austral monsoon season, separating the polluted Northern Hemisphere from the cleaner Southern Hemisphere. Measurements of carbon monoxide, ozone, aerosol size/composition, and non-methane hydrocarbons were made from aircraft, flying north from Darwin, Australia as part of the Aerosol and Chemical Transport In tropical conVEction (ACTIVE) campaign. A chemical equator, defined as a sharp gradient in the chemical background, was found not to be coincident with the Intertropical Convergence Zone during this period. A pronounced interfacial region was identified between 8.5 and 10°S, where tracer mixing ratios increased rapidly within the boundary layer, e.g. CO from 40 ppbv to 160 ppbv within 0.5° latitude (50 km), with inhibited inter-hemispheric mixing. These measurements are discussed in context using a combination of meteorological and Earth-observing satellite imagery, back trajectory analysis and chemical model data with the conclusion that air flowing into and subsequently uplifted by the active convection of the Tropical Warm Pool (TWP) region in the Western Pacific is likely to be highly polluted, and will perturb the composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer. The main source of CO and other pollutants within the TWP region is expected to be biomass burning, with extensive fires in North Sumatra and Thailand during this period. The sharp gradient in composition at the chemical equator seen here results from extensive burning to the north, contrasting with pristine maritime air advected from the Southern Indian Ocean by a strong land-based cyclone over the Northern Territory of Australia.

  17. Assessing the suitability of American National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agro-climatology archive to predict daily meteorological variables and reference evapotranspiration in Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    For decades, the importance of evapotranspiration processes has been recognized in many disciplines, including hydrologic and drainage studies, irrigation systems design and management. A wide number of equations have been proposed to estimate crop reference evapotranspiration, ET0, based on the var...

  18. Implications of a wavepacket formulation for the nonlinear parabolized stability equations to hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) have been developed as an efficient and powerful tool for studying the stability of advection-dominated laminar flows. In this work, a new "wavepacket" formulation of the PSE is presented. This method accounts for the influence of finite-bandwidth-frequency distributions on nonlinear stability calculations. The methodology is motivated by convolution integrals and is found to appropriately represent nonlinear energy transfer between primary modes and harmonics, in particular nonlinear feedback, via a "nonlinear coupling coefficient." It is found that traditional discrete mode formulations overestimate nonlinear feedback by approximately 70%. This results in smaller maximum disturbance amplitudes than those observed experimentally. The new formulation corrects this overestimation, accounts for the generation of side lobes responsible for spectral broadening and results in disturbance saturation amplitudes consistent with experiment. A Mach 6 flared-cone example is presented. Support from the AFOSR Young Investigator Program via Grant FA9550-15-1-0129 is gratefully acknowledges.

  19. Contradictions in the Dynamics of Remote Sensing based Evapotranspiration Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, R.

    2016-12-01

    The significance of accurate evapotranspiration (ET) need not be overstated because of the current prolonged drought, water scarcity, increasing population, and climate change in many parts of the world. The remote sensing based ET calculation methods had been taken as one of the reliable tools for estimating ET at larger temporal and spatial resolution. The linearity between temperature difference (DT) and surface temperature (Ts) from the thermal band of the satellite is utilized in many operational evapotranspiration (ET) models (SEBAL/METRIC) invoking the anchor pixel concept. In these models, the surface-air temperature difference in anchor pixels (dThot/cold) are calculated based on known the sensible heat flux (H) from the surface energy balance method. We explored the inherent differences while inverting the aerodynamic equation of H with the actual surface-air temperature (dTact) to dThot/cold. The results showed that this formulation possibly underestimates H with smaller dT slope, which overall overestimates the ET. The major finding and innovative aspect of this study are to present the two inconsistent behaviors of the identical process of energy transformation, which had been utilized by remote sensing based evapotranspiration models. This study will help to understand the uncertainty in H calculations in these models, explore the limitations of this methodology (dThot, cold), and warrant further discussion of this application in remote sensing and micrometeorology community.

  20. Estimation of regional evapotranspiration in the extended Salado Basin (Argentina) from satellite gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesanelli, Andrés; Guarracino, Luis

    2011-05-01

    In this study, regional evapotranspiration is estimated in a wide flatland area that includes Salado River Basin and four tributary basins by using gravity measurements of the space mission Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). Monthly estimates of large-scale variations in the land-water storage are obtained from the satellite data. Evapotranspiration is computed with the water-balance equation using the GRACE land-water solutions, rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Center and runoff values obtained as 5% of the precipitation. GRACE-derived evapotranspiration values are consistent with the different climatic scenarios observed, and they satisfactorily agree with estimates provided by a global hydrological model. The overall results show that the method used is a valid tool for characterizing the evapotranspiration in the Argentine Pampas and that it can be used to detect and examine changes in the evapotranspiration pattern associated with the occurrence of extreme climatic events. This study illustrates the ability of GRACE to analyze and predict evapotranspiration and other processes on a regional scale in a flatland area.

  1. Partitioning evapotranspiration fluxes using atmometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsag, Matej; Fischer, Milan; Trnka, Miroslav; Kucera, Jiri; Zalud, Zdenek

    2013-04-01

    This effort is aimed to derive a simple tool for separating soil evaporation and transpiration from evapotranspiration, measured by Bowen ration energy balance method (BREB) in short rotation coppice (SRC). The main idea is to utilize daily data of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measured above bare soil (spring 2010 - first year following harvest), reference evapotranspiration (ETo) measured by atmometer ETgage and precipitation data, in order to create an algorithm for estimation evaporation from bare soil. This approach is based on the following assumption: evaporation of wetted bare soil same as the ETo from atmometer is assumed to be identical in days with rain. In first and further days with no rain (and e.g. high evaporative demand) the easily evaporable soil water depletes and ETa so as crop coefficient of bare soil (Kcb) decreases in a way similar to decreasing power function. The algorithm represents a parameterized function of daily cumulated ETo (ETc) measured by atmometer in days elapsed from last rain event (Kcb = a*ETc^b). After each rain event the accumulation of ETo starts again till next rain event (e. g. only days with no rain are cumulated). The function provides decreasing Kcb for each day without rain. The bare soil evaporation can be estimated when the atmometer-recorded value is multiplied by Kcb for particular day without rain. In days with rain Kcb is assumed to be back at 1. This method was successfully tested for estimating evaporation from bare soil under closed canopy of poplar-based SRC. When subtracting the estimated soil evaporation from total ETa flux, measured above the canopy using BREB method, it is possible to obtain transpiration flux of the canopy. There is also possibility to test this approach on the contrary - subtracting transpiration derived from sap-flow measurement from total ETa flux is possible to get soil evaporation as well. Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of project Inter

  2. Using the Priestley-Taylor expression for estimating actual evapotranspiration from satellite Landsat ETM + data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khaldi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of evapotranspiration from irrigated areas is important for agriculture water management, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where water deficiency is becoming a major constraint in economic welfare and sustainable development. Conventional methods that use point measurements to estimate evapotranspiration are representative only of local areas and cannot be extended to large areas because of landscape heterogeneity. Remote sensing-based energy balance models are presently most suited for estimating evapotranspiration at both field and regional scales. In this study, we aim to develop a methodology based on the triangle concept, allowing estimation of evapotranspiration through the classical equation of Priestley and Taylor (1972 where the proportional coefficient α in this equation is ranged using a linear interpolation between surface temperature and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI values. Preliminary results using remotely sensed data sets from Landsat ETM+ over the Habra Plains in west Algeria are in good agreement with ground measurements. The proposed approach appears to be more reliable and easily applicable for operational estimation of evapotranspiration over large areas.

  3. Comparison of soybean evapotranspirations measured by weighing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... atmosphere relations and considered as basic method to calibrate evapotranspiration ..... are the turbulent exchange coefficients for heat transport and water vapor transfer (m2s-1), ∆q is the ..... Forest Meteorol. 111: 109-120.

  4. Construction and implications of structural equation modeling network for pediatric cataract: a data mining research of rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Erping; Xu, Shuangjuan; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaohang; Zhang, Xiayin; Wang, Jinghui; Li, Wangting; Liu, Runzhong; Chen, Zicong; Chen, Kexin; Yu, Tongyong; Wu, Dongxuan; Zhao, Xutu; Chen, Jingjing; Lin, Zhuoling; Cao, Qianzhong; Lin, Duoru; Li, Xiaoyan; Cai, Jingheng; Lin, Haotian

    2017-05-19

    The majority of rare diseases are complex diseases caused by a combination of multiple morbigenous factors. However, uncovering the complex etiology and pathogenesis of rare diseases is difficult due to limited clinical resources and conventional statistical methods. This study aims to investigate the interrelationship and the effectiveness of potential factors of pediatric cataract, for the exploration of data mining strategy in the scenarios of rare diseases. We established a pilot rare disease specialized care center to systematically record all information and the entire treatment process of pediatric cataract patients. These clinical records contain the medical history, multiple structural indices, and comprehensive functional metrics. A two-layer structural equation model network was applied, and eight potential factors were filtered and included in the final modeling. Four risk factors (area, density, location, and abnormal pregnancy experience) and four beneficial factors (axis length, uncorrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, and age at diagnosis) were identified. Quantifiable results suggested that abnormal pregnancy history may be the principle risk factor among medical history for pediatric cataracts. Moreover, axis length, density, uncorrected visual acuity and age at diagnosis served as the dominant factors and should be emphasized in regular clinical practice. This study proposes a generalized evidence-based pattern for rare and complex disease data mining, provides new insights and clinical implications on pediatric cataract, and promotes rare-disease research and prevention to benefit patients.

  5. Wetlands Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J. M.; Myers, D. A.; Anderson, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    The application of remote sensing methods to estimate evapotranspiration has the advantage of good spatial resolution and excellent spatial coverage, but may have the disadvantage of infrequent sampling and considerable expense. The GOES satellites provide enhanced temporal resolution with hourly estimates of solar radiation and have a spatial resolution that is significantly better than that available from most ground-based pyranometer networks. As solar radiation is the primary forcing variable in wetland evapotranspiration, the opportunity to apply GOES satellite data to wetland hydrologic analyses is great. An accuracy assessment of the remote sensing product is important and the subsequent validation of the evapotranspiration estimates are a critical step for the use of this product. A wetland field experiment was conducted in the Paynes Prairie Preserve, North Central Florida during a growing season characterized by significant convective activity. Evapotranspiration and other surface energy balance components of a wet prairie community dominated by Panicum hemitomon (maiden cane), Ptilimnium capillaceum (mock bishop's weed), and Eupatorium capillifolium (dog fennel) were investigated. Incoming solar radiation derived from GOES-8 satellite observations, in combination with local meteorological measurements, were used to model evapotranspiration from a wetland. The satellite solar radiation, derived net radiation and estimated evapotranspiration estimates were compared to measured data at 30-min intervals and daily times scales.

  6. Evaluation of evapotranspiration methods for model validation in a semi-arid watershed in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the performance of four evapotranspiration methods (Priestley-Taylor, Penman-Monteith, Hargreaves and Makkink of differing complexity in a semi-arid environment in north China. The results are compared to observed water vapour fluxes derived from eddy flux measurements. The analysis became necessary after discharge simulations using an automatically calibrated version of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT failed to reproduce runoff measurements. Although the study area receives most of the annual rainfall during the vegetation period, high temperatures can cause water scarcity. We investigate which evapotranspiration method is most suitable for this environment and whether the model performance of SWAT can be improved with the most adequate evapotranspiration method.

    The evapotranspiration models were tested in two consecutive years with different rainfall amounts. In general, the simple Hargreaves and Makkink equations outmatch the more complex Priestley-Taylor and Penman-Monteith methods, although their performance depended on water availability. Effects on the quality of SWAT runoff simulations, however, remained minor. Although evapotranspiration is an important process in the hydrology of this steppe environment, our analysis indicates that other driving factors still need to be identified to improve SWAT simulations.

  7. Analysis of Numerical Weather Predictions of Reference Evapotranspiration and Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bughici, Theodor; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Fredj, Erick; Tas, Eran

    2017-04-01

    This study attempts to improve the forecast skill of the evapotranspiration (ET0) and Precipitation for the purpose of crop irrigation management over Israel using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Optimized crop irrigation, in term of timing and quantities, decreases water and agrochemicals demand. Crop water demands depend on evapotranspiration and precipitation. The common method for computing reference evapotranspiration, for agricultural needs, ET0, is according to the FAO Penman-Monteith equation. The weather variables required for ET0 calculation (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and solar irradiance) are estimated by the WRF model. The WRF Model with two-way interacting domains at horizontal resolutions of 27, 9 and 3 km is used in the study. The model prediction was performed in an hourly time resolution and a 3 km spatial resolution, with forecast lead-time of up to four days. The WRF prediction of these variables have been compared against measurements from 29 meteorological stations across Israel for the year 2013. The studied area is small but with strong climatic gradient, diverse topography and variety of synoptic conditions. The forecast skill that was used for forecast validation takes into account the prediction bias, mean absolute error and root mean squared error. The forecast skill of the variables was almost robust to lead time, except for precipitation. The forecast skill was tested across stations with respect to topography and geographic location and for all stations with respect to seasonality and synoptic weather system determined by employing a semi-objective synoptic systems classification to the forecasted days. It was noticeable that forecast skill of some of the variables was deteriorated by seasonality and topography. However, larger impacts in the ET0 skill scores on the forecasted day are achieved by a synoptic based forecast. These results set the basis for increasing the robustness of ET0 to

  8. Forecasting the Reference Evapotranspiration Using Time Series Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zare Abyaneh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reference evapotranspiration is one of the most important factors in irrigation timing and field management. Moreover, reference evapotranspiration forecasting can play a vital role in future developments. Therefore in this study, the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA model was used to forecast the reference evapotranspiration time series in the Esfahan, Semnan, Shiraz, Kerman, and Yazd synoptic stations. Materials and Methods: In the present study in all stations (characteristics of the synoptic stations are given in Table 1, the meteorological data, including mean, maximum and minimum air temperature, relative humidity, dry-and wet-bulb temperature, dew-point temperature, wind speed, precipitation, air vapor pressure and sunshine hours were collected from the Islamic Republic of Iran Meteorological Organization (IRIMO for the 41 years from 1965 to 2005. The FAO Penman-Monteith equation was used to calculate the monthly reference evapotranspiration in the five synoptic stations and the evapotranspiration time series were formed. The unit root test was used to identify whether the time series was stationary, then using the Box-Jenkins method, seasonal ARIMA models were applied to the sample data. Table 1. The geographical location and climate conditions of the synoptic stations Station\tGeographical location\tAltitude (m\tMean air temperature (°C\tMean precipitation (mm\tClimate, according to the De Martonne index classification Longitude (E\tLatitude (N Annual\tMin. and Max. Esfahan\t51° 40'\t32° 37'\t1550.4\t16.36\t9.4-23.3\t122\tArid Semnan\t53° 33'\t35° 35'\t1130.8\t18.0\t12.4-23.8\t140\tArid Shiraz\t52° 36'\t29° 32'\t1484\t18.0\t10.2-25.9\t324\tSemi-arid Kerman\t56° 58'\t30° 15'\t1753.8\t15.6\t6.7-24.6\t142\tArid Yazd\t54° 17'\t31° 54'\t1237.2\t19.2\t11.8-26.0\t61\tArid Results and Discussion: The monthly meteorological data were used as input for the Ref-ET software and monthly reference

  9. Estimating riparian and agricultural evapotranspiration by reference crop evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Nguyen, Uyen; Scott, Russell; Doody, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo). The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI) − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI) is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73). It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89) difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  10. Estimating Riparian and Agricultural Actual Evapotranspiration by Reference Evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell L. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo. The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73. It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89 difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  11. Evapotranspiration of applied water, Central Valley, California, 1957-78

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Alex K.

    1982-01-01

    In the Central Valley, Calif., where 57% of the 20,000 square miles of land is irrigated, ground-water recharge from agricultural lands is an important input to digital simulation models of ground-water flow. Several methods of calculating recharge were explored for the Central Valley Aquifer Project and a simplified water budget was designed where net recharge (recharge minus pumpage) equals net surface water diverted minus evapotranspiration of applied water (ETAW). This equation eliminates the need to determine pumpage from the water-table aquifer, assuming that the time lag for infiltration is not longer than the time intervals of interest for modeling. This study evaluates only the evapotranspiration of applied water. Future reports will describe the other components of the water budget. ETAW was calculated by summing the products of ETAW coefficients and respective crop areas for each 7 1/2-minute quadrangle area in the valley, for each of three land-use surveys between 1957 and 1978. In 1975 total ETAW was 15.2 million acre-feet, a 43% increase since 1959. The largest increases were in the south, especially Kern County, which had a sixfold increase, which was caused by the import of surface water in the California Aqueduct. (USGS)

  12. Coeficientes médios da equação de Angström-Prescott, radiação solar e evapotranspiração de referência em Brasília Angström-Prescott equation mean coefficients, solar radiation and reference crop evapotranspiration in Brasília

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Daniele e Silva Dornelas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estimar os coeficientes médios a e b da equação de Angström-Prescott, em Brasília, e seus efeitos sobre o cálculo da radiação solar global (Rs e da evapotranspiração de referência (ETo. Foram utilizados dados da estação meteorológica da Embrapa Hortaliças, do período de 1978 a 2003. Os coeficientes médios foram determinados por análise de regressão linear, no período todo e em períodos mensais e anuais. Utilizando-se o coeficiente calculado e os propostos pela FAO (0,25 e 0,50 estimaram-se Rs e ETo, e avaliaram-se os seus desempenhos. Os coeficientes médios mensais a variaram de 0,241 a 0,345, e b de 0,430 a 0,515. Os coeficientes médios anuais a e b foram 0,278 e 0,498, e os do período geral foram 0,282 e 0,490, respectivamente. A performance entre esses coeficientes na estimativa da radiação não diferiu. No mês de julho, foram verificados as piores estimativas e os piores desempenhos. Com as estimativas de Rs e os coeficientes médios calculados, as estimativas de ETo não diferiram dos observados, tendo-se constatado um ótimo desempenho, independentemente do coeficiente utilizado. Dependendo do tipo de aplicação final dos dados, recomenda-se utilizar, por sua simplicidade, os coeficientes médios obtidos para o período geral.The objective of this work was to estimate Angström-Prescott equation mean coefficients in Brasília, DF, Brazil, and their effects on the calculations of global radiation (Rs and reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo. It was used meteorological data from Embrapa Hortaliças weather station, from 1978 to 2003. The mean coefficients were determined by linear regression analysis considering monthly, annual and total periods. Using the calculated coefficients for different periods and those provided by FAO (0.25 and 0.50, Rs and ETo were estimated and their performances were evaluated. Monthly mean coefficient a varied from 0.241 to 0.345, and b from 0.430 to 0

  13. Geospatial interpolation of reference evapotranspiration (ETo in areas with scarce data: case study in the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Jorge Coelho Simões

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The reference evapotranspiration is an important hydrometeorological variable; its measurement is scarce in large portions of the Brazilian territory, what demands the search for alternative methods and techniques for its quantification. In this sense, the present work investigated a method for the spatialization of the reference evapotranspiration using the geostatistical method of kriging, in regions with limited data and hydrometeorological stations. The monthly average reference evapotranspiration was calculated by the Penman-Monteith-FAO equation, based on data from three weather stations located in southern Minas Gerais (Itajubá, Lavras and Poços de Caldas, and subsequently interpolated by ordinary point kriging using the approach "calculate and interpolate." The meteorological data for a fourth station (Três Corações located within the area of interpolation were used to validate the reference evapotranspiration interpolated spatially. Due to the reduced number of stations and the consequent impossibility of carrying variographic analyzes, correlation coefficient (r, index of agreement (d, medium bias error (MBE, root mean square error (RMSE and t-test were used for comparison between the calculated and interpolated reference evapotranspiration for the Três Corações station. The results of this comparison indicated that the spatial kriging procedure, even using a few stations, allows to interpolate satisfactorily the reference evapotranspiration, therefore, it is an important tool for agricultural and hydrological applications in regions with lack of data.

  14. Agro-ecological Differentials in Soybean Crop Evapotranspiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study estimated soybean crop evapotranspiration from weather data using the cropwat model. The effects of reference evapotranspiration, crop coefficients, and yield response factor were quantified for three different agroecological zones in Cameroon. The evapotranspiration of soybean was observed to be 281.03 ...

  15. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    is the slope of saturation vapour pressure curve at air temperature T (kPa °C-1), T is air temperature (°C). Crop coefficient. Shoot water content was assumed to be crop coefficient, as crop evapotranspiration is always determined under unlimited water supply (Pereira et al., 2015), and hence the shoot water content reflects ...

  16. Review: Estimating evapotranspiration using remote sensing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review: Estimating evapotranspiration using remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance System – A South African perspective. ... It is therefore recommended that any further research using the SEBS model in South Africa should be limited to agricultural areas where accurate vegetation parameters can be obtained, ...

  17. Measuring forest evapotranspiration--theory and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony C. Federer; Anthony C. Federer

    1970-01-01

    A satisfactory general method of measuring forest evapotranspiration has yet to be developed. Many procedures have been tried, but only the soil-water budget method and the micrometeorological methods offer any degree of success. This paper is a discussion of these procedures and the problems that arise in applying them. It is designed as a reference for scientists and...

  18. Evapotranspiration Derived from Satellite Observed Surface Temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Wim; Berg, Wim van den

    1985-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is calculated from surface temperatures using an energy balance method. This method is sensitive to the temperature difference between the surface and the air above, and somewhat to the windspeed. In this study we consider the influence of the spatial variability of air

  19. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Determination of water requirement for crops in resource limited areas is challenging, yet worsened by the common assumption that all crop varieties within a species have similar water requirements. The objective of the study was to indirectly determine crop evapotranspiration of soybean varieties, using reference ...

  20. Groundwater Recharge, Evapotranspiration and Surface Runoff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Groundwater Recharge, Evapotranspiration and Surface Runoff Estimation Using WetSpass Modeling Method in Illala Catchment, Northern Ethiopia. ... Abstract. Hydrometeorological information is important in planning and management of natural resources. The northern Ethiopia in general and Illala sub-basin in particular ...

  1. Dynamics of MODIS evapotranspiration in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available dependent on rainfall and potential evapotranspiration (PET) in 4 climatically different regions of South Africa. Average ET in South Africa (2000–2012) was estimated to be 303 mm·a-1 or 481.4 x 109 m3·a1 (14% of PET and 67% of rainfall), mainly in the form...

  2. Obtaining evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land), a remote sensing based evapotranspiration model, has been applied with Landsat ETM+ sensor for the estimation of actual ... The land uses in this study area consists of irrigated agriculture, rain-fed agriculture and livestock grazing. The obtained results ...

  3. Groundwater Recharge, Evapotranspiration and Surface Runoff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    this unit at different parts of the catchment. Hence, in the ... decrease currently due to different soil and water conservation practices conducted especially in .... water body. Actual evapotranspiration is one components of water balance to determine groundwater recharge of Illala catchment using the WetSpass model.

  4. Model Simulation of Urban Evapotranspiration Rates Given Spatial Changes in Land Cover and Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Endreny, T. A.

    2009-05-01

    Urban heat islands (UHI) emerge due to changes in albedo and imperviousness as compared with surrounding countryside, and UHI mitigation plans have focused on increasing urban tree cover. Trees can cool urban areas by direct shading and indirect evapotranspiration. Our goal is to create spatially distributed estimates of tree evapotranspiration during the growing season, to use in human thermal comfort models and other UHI simulations. We are modifying tree anatomy and growth functions in the USDA Forest Service Urban Forest Effects (UFORE) model. Modification represents the spatial variation of soil moisture and canopy radiation, which regulate evapotranspiration. Surface elevation derived topographic indices and land cover maps, including NLCD and aerial photographs, are used to adjust weather station estimates of radiation and soil moisture. Tree species and initial anatomy were selected from data gathered by the USDA Forest Service from plots in Syracuse, New York. Model estimates of evapotranspiration were generated for 30m by 30m pixels, and represented soil water and radiation constraints by modifying parameters in the Penman Monteith equations. Future work involves incorporating land cover and topographic data uncertainty into soil moisture and radiation constraints, which would be represented through Monte Carlo simulations. Applications of this research will be considered for the UFORE model in managing urban forest tree plantings to mitigate UHI impacts.

  5. Intercomparison of Evapotranspiration Over the Savannah Volta Basin in West Africa Using Remote Sensing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Duah, S; Donoghue, D N M; Burt, T P

    2008-04-17

    This paper compares evapotranspiration estimates from two complementary satellite sensors - NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and ESA's ENVISAT Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) over the savannah area of the Volta basin in West Africa. This was achieved through solving for evapotranspiration on the basis of the regional energy balance equation, which was computationally-driven by the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land algorithm (SEBAL). The results showed that both sensors are potentially good sources of evapotranspiration estimates over large heterogeneous landscapes. The MODIS sensor measured daily evapotranspiration reasonably well with a strong spatial correlation (R²=0.71) with Landsat ETM+ but underperformed with deviations up to ~2.0 mm day -1 , when compared with local eddy correlation observations and the Penman-Monteith method mainly because of scale mismatch. The AATSR sensor produced much poorer correlations (R²=0.13) with Landsat ETM+ and conventional ET methods also because of differences in atmospheric correction and sensor calibration over land.

  6. Intercomparison of Evapotranspiration Over the Savannah Volta Basin in West Africa Using Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Burt

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares evapotranspiration estimates from two complementary satellite sensors – NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and ESA’s ENVISAT Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR over the savannah area of the Volta basin in West Africa. This was achieved through solving for evapotranspiration on the basis of the regional energy balance equation, which was computationally-driven by the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land algorithm (SEBAL. The results showed that both sensors are potentially good sources of evapotranspiration estimates over large heterogeneous landscapes. The MODIS sensor measured daily evapotranspiration reasonably well with a strong spatial correlation (R2=0.71 with Landsat ETM+ but underperformed with deviations up to ~2.0 mm day-1, when compared with local eddy correlation observations and the Penman-Monteith method mainly because of scale mismatch. The AATSR sensor produced much poorer correlations (R2=0.13 with Landsat ETM+ and conventional ET methods also because of differences in atmospheric correction and sensor calibration over land.

  7. A Percolation‐Based Approach to Scaling Infiltration and Evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. Hunt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optimal flow paths obtained from percolation theory provide a powerful tool that can be used to characterize properties associated with flow such as soil hydraulic conductivity, as well as other properties influenced by flow connectivity and topology. A recently proposed scaling theory for vegetation growth appeals to the tortuosity of optimal paths from percolation theory to define the spatio‐temporal scaling of the root radial extent (or, equivalently, plant height. Root radial extent measures the maximum horizontal distance between a plant shoot and the root tips. We apply here the same scaling relationship to unsteady (horizontal flow associated with plant transpiration. The pore‐scale travel time is generated from the maximum flow rate under saturated conditions and a typical pore size. At the field‐scale, the characteristic time is interpreted as the growing season duration, and the characteristic length is derived from the measured evapotranspiration in that period. We show that the two scaling results are equivalent, and they are each in accord with observed vegetation growth limits, as well as with actual limiting transpiration values. While the conceptual approach addresses transpiration, most accessed data are for evapotranspiration. The equivalence of the two scaling approaches suggests that, if horizontal flow is the dominant pathway in plant transpiration, horizontal unsteady flow follows the same scaling relationship as root growth. Then, we propose a corresponding scaling relationship to vertical infiltration, a hypothesis which is amenable to testing using infiltration results of Sharma and co‐authors. This alternate treatment of unsteady vertical flow may be an effective alternative to the commonly applied method based on the diffusion of water over a continuum as governed by Richards’ equation.

  8. A process-based evapotranspiration model incorporating coupled soil water-atmospheric controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration models (in the framework of the Penman-Monteith equation) with improved parametrizations of various resistance terms to water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, evidence suggests that estimates of evapotranspiration and its partitioning are prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from the exclusion of surface hydro-thermal properties and of physical interactions close to the surface where heat and water vapor fluxes originate. Recent progress has been made in mechanistic modeling of surface-turbulence interactions, accounting for localized heat and mass exchange rates from bare soil surfaces covered by protruding obstacles. We seek to extend these results partially vegetated surfaces, to improve predictive capabilities and accuracy of remote sensing techniques quantifying evapotranspiration fluxes. The governing equations of liquid water, water vapor, and energy transport dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system are coupled to resolve diffusive vapor fluxes from isolated pores (plant stomata and soil pores) across a near-surface viscous sublayer, explicitly accounting for pore-scale transport mechanisms and environmental forcing. Preliminary results suggest that this approach offers unique opportunities for directly linking transport properties in plants and adjacent bare soil with resulting plant transpiration and localized bare soil evaporation rates. It thus provides an essential building block for interpreting and upscaling results to field and landscape scales for a range of vegetation cover and atmospheric conditions.

  9. Merging raster meteorological data with low resolution satellite images for improved estimation of actual evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel Leitao, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Stavridou, Domna; Iordanidis, Charalampos; Silleos, Nikolaos; Misopolinos, Nikolaos; Neves, Ramiro; Safara Araujo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) can be estimated using Energy Balance models and remotely sensed data. In particular, satellite images acquired in visible, near and thermal infrared parts of the spectrum have been used with the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to estimate actual evapotranspiration. This algorithm is solving the Energy Balance Equation using data from a meteorological station present in the vicinity, and assumes the meteorological conditions homogeneous over the study area. Most often, data from a representative weather station are used. This assumption may lead to substantial errors in areas with high spatial variability in weather parameters. In this paper, the ITA-MyWater algorithms (Integrated Thermodynamic Algorithms for MyWater project), an adaptation of SEBAL was merged together with spatially distributed meteorological data to increase the accuracy of ETa estimations at regional scale using MODIS satellite images. The major changes introduced to migrate from point to raster are that (i) air temperature and relative humidity maps are used for the estimation of the Energy Balance terms, including instantaneous net radiation and soil heat flux and (ii) the variability of wind speed is taken into account to generate maps of the aerodynamic resistance, sensible heat flux and difference between soil and air temperature at the boundary conditions (at dry and wet pixels). The approach was applied in the river basin of Tamega in Portugal, where actual evapotranspiration was estimated for several MODIS 8-day periods from spring to winter of the same year. The raster meteorological maps were produced by the MM5 weather forecast model. Daily reference evapotranspiration was calculated with MOHID LAND model. Using a temporal integration technique and the daily reference evapotranspiration maps, the cumulative evapotranspiration over the MODIS 8-day period was estimated and compared to the global evapotranspiration MODIS product (MOD16A2

  10. Projections of changes of areal evapotranspiration for different land-use units in the Wielkopolska Region (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwed, Małgorzata

    2017-10-01

    Strong global warming has been observed in the last three decades. Central Europe, including Poland, is not an exception. Moreover, climate projections for Poland foresee further warming as well as changes in the quantity as well as spatial and seasonal distribution of precipitation. This will result in changes in all elements of the water balance, including the areal evapotranspiration. For estimating the areal evapotranspiration, the heat balance method (HBM) is used in this paper for the growing season (March-October), whereas for the remaining months (November-February), evaporation is calculated according to the Ivanov equation. Values of areal evapotranspiration from selected land units are examined and compared for the average conditions in two time horizons, i.e. 1961-1990 (control period) and 2061-2090 (projection horizon) over the Wielkopolska Region in Poland, based on multi-model ensemble climate projections. Projections for the future, based on the MPI-M-REMO model, indicate that the regional average increases of the annual sum of areal evapotranspiration (connected mainly with an increase of air temperature) is equal to 45 mm, with the biggest changes during winter. In the growing season, the highest increases are expected to appear in July and June. As regards the spatial distribution, the highest increases are projected for the areas with presently highest evapotranspiration, e.g. the southwestern parts of the region.

  11. Areal potential Haude-evapotranspiration for Northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beinhauer, R.

    1988-02-01

    Daily observations of 66 stations in Northern Germany were used to calculate Haude's potential evapotranspiration. A variogram analysis tested spatial reproduction. A long range annual mean of 1951-80 of potential evapotranspiration is presented in a chart together with charts of mean evapotranspiration for oats, apples, winterwheat, beetroot, winterbarley, maize and pasture within their phenological phases emergence to maturity or end of season.

  12. Reliability of poroelastic equation in determination of minimum horizontal stress in sedimentary basins: implication of tectonic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uy; Chang, Chandong

    2017-04-01

    Minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) magnitude, normally one of the three principal stresses, provides vital information in various stages of petroleum development such as hydraulic fracture design, wellbore stability analysis, and sand production prediction. Mini-frac or leak-off tests (LOT) are considered to be the technique used to measure Shmin magnitudes directly in the formation. Still, other than being time-consuming and costly, LOT does not give a continuous Shminprofile. A conventional alternative is to use a linear poroelasticity equation derived based on the assumption of uniaxially strained basins, which provides minimum horizontal stress magnitude (Shmin) as a function of vertical stress, pore pressure and Poisson's ratio (ν). In this study, we inspect the reliability of poroelastic equation-based calculation by comparing measured data of Shmin, pore pressure with log-based minimum horizontal stress magnitude in 6 major sedimentary basins worldwide. For calculation of Shmin via the equation, we assume ν of 0.25 and Biot's constant of unity. The comparison shows that the predicted Shmin values generally underestimate the measured values by a range between 4% and as high as 29% depending on the regions. The wide variation of horizontal stress may imply unpredictable complications in the stress states in the sedimentary basins. Besides, we also collect the data of maximum horizontal stress magnitudes and Young's modulus to estimate local tectonic strains, which are responsible for additional stresses over the induced horizontal stresses. The result reveals that the tectonic strain magnitudes are not consistent with the difference between measured and calculated values in minimum horizontal stress. Our results suggest that rock mechanical property such as Young's modulus is a more dominant factor that controls tectonic stress.

  13. Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration from temporal satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) has many applications in water resources planning and management, including hydrological and ecological modeling. Availability of satellite remote sensing images is limited due to repeat cycle of satellite or cloud cover. This study was conducted to determine the suitability of different methods namely cubic spline, fixed, and linear for estimating seasonal ET from temporal remotely sensed images. Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model in conjunction with the wet METRIC (wMETRIC), a modified version of the METRIC model, was used to estimate ET on the days of satellite overpass using eight Landsat images during the 2001 crop growing season in Midwest USA. The model-estimated daily ET was in good agreement (R2 = 0.91) with the eddy covariance tower-measured daily ET. The standard error of daily ET was 0.6 mm (20%) at three validation sites in Nebraska, USA. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) among the cubic spline, fixed, and linear methods for computing seasonal (July–December) ET from temporal ET estimates. Overall, the cubic spline resulted in the lowest standard error of 6 mm (1.67%) for seasonal ET. However, further testing of this method for multiple years is necessary to determine its suitability.

  14. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration by numerical modeling of water flow in the unsaturated zone: a case study in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesanelli, Andrés; Guarracino, Luis

    2009-03-01

    A method is presented to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ETA) from potential evapotranspiration (ETP) by numerical modeling of water flow in the unsaturated zone. Water flow is described by the Richards equation with a sink term representing the root water uptake. Evaporation is included in the model as a Neumann boundary condition at the soil surface. The Richards equation is solved in a one-dimensional domain using a mixed finite element method. The values of ETA are obtained by applying a water stress factor to ETP to account for soil moisture changes during the simulation period. The proposed numerical model is used to estimate ETA in an experimental plot located in a flatland area in Buenos Aires (Argentina). Numerical results show that the proposed model is a useful tool for evaluating evapotranspiration under different scenarios.

  15. Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficients of Grain Legumes in Semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is a very important parameter in irrigation management. It can be either directly measured using water balance approach or estimated. A field experiment was carried out at Hudeiba Research Station farm in Sudan to determine crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and coefficients (kc) for faba bean ...

  16. Evapotranspiration studies on Themeda triandra Forsk. under field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydraulic non-floating lysimeters were used to determine the evapotranspiration (Et) of a Themeda triandra grass cover under field conditions. The highest evapotranspiration losses were recorded during December and January when the plants were in the reproductive phase, provided the soil moisture was not limiting.

  17. Modeling of coupled differential equations for cellular chemical signaling pathways: Implications for assay protocols utilized in cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Clock, George D

    2016-08-01

    Cellular engineering involves modification and control of cell properties, and requires an understanding of fundamentals and mechanisms of action for cellular derived product development. One of the keys to success in cellular engineering involves the quality and validity of results obtained from cell chemical signaling pathway assays. The accuracy of the assay data cannot be verified or assured if the effect of positive feedback, nonlinearities, and interrelationships between cell chemical signaling pathway elements are not understood, modeled, and simulated. Nonlinearities and positive feedback in the cell chemical signaling pathway can produce significant aberrations in assay data collection. Simulating the pathway can reveal potential instability problems that will affect assay results. A simulation, using an electrical analog for the coupled differential equations representing each segment of the pathway, provides an excellent tool for assay validation purposes. With this approach, voltages represent pathway enzyme concentrations and operational amplifier feedback resistance and input resistance values determine pathway gain and rate constants. The understanding provided by pathway modeling and simulation is strategically important in order to establish experimental controls for assay protocol structure, time frames specified between assays, and assay concentration variation limits; to ensure accuracy and reproducibility of results.

  18. Satellite NDVI Assisted Monitoring of Vegetable Crop Evapotranspiration in California’s San Joaquin Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Trout

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Reflective bands of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper satellite imagery were used to facilitate the estimation of basal crop evapotranspiration (ETcb, or potential crop water use, in San Joaquin Valley fields during 2008. A ground-based digital camera measured green fractional cover (Fc of 49 commercial fields planted to 18 different crop types (row crops, grains, orchard, vineyard of varying maturity over 11 Landsat overpass dates. Landsat L1T terrain-corrected images were transformed to surface reflectance and converted to normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. A strong linear relationship between NDVI and Fc was observed (r2 = 0.96, RMSE = 0.062. The resulting regression equation was used to estimate Fc for crop cycles of broccoli, bellpepper, head lettuce, and garlic on nominal 7–9 day intervals for several study fields. Prior relationships developed by weighing lysimeter were used to transform Fc to fraction of reference evapotranspiration, also known as basal crop coefficient (Kcb. Measurements of grass reference evapotranspiration from the California Irrigation Management Information System were then used to calculate ETcb for each overpass date. Temporal profiles of Fc, Kcb, and ETcb were thus developed for the study fields, along with estimates of seasonal water use. Daily ETcb retrieval uncertainty resulting from error in satellite-based Fc estimation was < 0.5 mm/d, with seasonal uncertainty of 6–10%. Results were compared with FAO-56 irrigation guidelines and prior lysimeter observations for reference.

  19. [Quantitative estimation of evapotranspiration from Tahe forest ecosystem, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Di; Fan, Wen-Yi; Yang, Jin-Ming; Wang, Xu-Peng

    2014-06-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter of agriculture, meteorology and hydrology research, and also an important part of the global hydrological cycle. This paper applied the improved DHSVM distributed hydrological model to estimate daily ET of Tahe area in 2007 using leaf area index and other surface data extracted TM remote sensing data, and slope, aspect and other topographic indices obtained by using the digital elevation model. The relationship between daily ET and daily watershed outlet flow was built by the BP neural network, and a water balance equation was established for the studied watershed, together to test the accuracy of the estimation. The results showed that the model could be applied in the study area. The annual total ET of Tahe watershed was 234.01 mm. ET had a significant seasonal variation. The ET had the highest value in summer and the average daily ET value was 1.56 mm. The average daily ET in autumn and spring were 0.30, 0.29 mm, respectively, and winter had the lowest ET value. Land cover type had a great effect on ET value, and the broadleaf forest had a higher ET ability than the mixed forest, followed by the needle leaf forest.

  20. Measurement and Modeling of Cucumber Evapotranspiration Under Greenhouse Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Moazenzadeh

    2017-01-01

    growth period, high and considerable amounts of error occurred, as the difference between measured and predicted values of ET is approximately 2.86 mm day-1 which is noticeable. Overestimation of the cucumber ET in the first and last stages which will result in decreasing water use efficiency and underestimation in blooming and yielding fruit stages, when cucumber is more susceptible to water stress, are the other disadvantages of using one equation for the entire growth period to describe and predict cucumber ET. In contrast, when we divided growth period into four steps, the MLR method’s performance in prediction of ET was improved and the difference mentioned above between measured and predicted values of ET (2.86 mm day-1 decreased to about 1.32 mm day-1. The results showed that measured and predicted values of ET ranged from (0.08 to 4.75 and (0.13 to 4.25 when the whole growth period is considered as one step, respectively. These mentioned values were obtained (0.08 to 1.5 and (0.13 to 1.75; (0.71 to 2.64 and (1.31 to 4.25; (2.18 to 4.75 and (1.69 to 4.13; (1.32 to 2.61 and (2.66 to 3.74 for each of growth period stages, respectively. Also the value of total ET for the entire growth period is measured 273.45 mm and predicted 275.7 and 275.59 mm, when the whole growth period is considered as one step or divided into four stages, respectively. Although dividing the growth period improved ET prediction, the results in the first and especially the third stage are still discussable. Therefore, as with MLR method, the capability of ANN technique was investigated in prediction of cucumber ET. Comparison of measured and predicted values of ET confirms that ANN has better performance than MLR, even when growth period is divided. Conclusion: Determining cucumber evapotranspiration in the greenhouse was the main objective of this study. For this purpose we used Multiple Linear Regression (MLR and Artificial Neural Network (ANN techniques. In MLR, first we used one equation

  1. Potential Evapotranspiration Estimates (mm) for for Alaska, CRU TS3.0. The Wilderness Society, 2011.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — Potential Evapotranspiration (PET): These data represent decadal mean totals of potential evapotranspiration estimates (mm). The file name specifies the decade the...

  2. Potential Evapotranspiration Estimates (mm) for for Alaska, CCCMA - A1B scenario. The Wilderness Society, 2011.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — Potential Evapotranspiration (PET): These data represent decadal mean totals of potential evapotranspiration estimates (mm). The file name specifies the decade the...

  3. Seasonal contributions of vegetation types to suburban evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emily B.; Hiller, Rebecca V.; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2011-03-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important term of energy and water budgets in urban areas and is responsible for multiple ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation. The spatial heterogeneity of urban surface types with different seasonal water use patterns (e.g., trees and turfgrass lawns) complicates efforts to predict and manage urban evapotranspiration rates, necessitating a surface type, or component-based, approach. In a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, we simultaneously measured ecosystem evapotranspiration and its main component fluxes using eddy covariance and heat dissipation sap flux techniques to assess the relative contribution of plant functional types (evergreen needleleaf tree, deciduous broadleaf tree, cool season turfgrass) to seasonal and spatial variations in evapotranspiration. Component-based evapotranspiration estimates agreed well with measured water vapor fluxes, although the imbalance between methods varied seasonally from a 20% overestimate in spring to an 11% underestimate in summer. Turfgrasses represented the largest contribution to annual evapotranspiration in recreational and residential land use types (87% and 64%, respectively), followed by trees (10% and 31%, respectively), with the relative contribution of plant functional types dependent on their fractional cover and daily water use. Recreational areas had higher annual evapotranspiration than residential areas (467 versus 324 mm yr-1, respectively) and altered seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration due to greater turfgrass cover (74% versus 34%, respectively). Our results suggest that plant functional types capture much of the variability required to predict the seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration among cities, as well as differences in evapotranspiration that could result from changes in climate, land use, or vegetation composition.

  4. Reference evapotranspiration variability and trends in Spain, 1961-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Revuelto, Jesús; López-Moreno, Juan I.; González-Hidalgo, José C.; Moran-Tejeda, Enrique; Espejo, Francisco

    2014-10-01

    In this study we analyzed the spatial distribution, temporal variability and trends in reference evapotranspiration (ET0) in Spain from 1961 to 2011. Twelve methods were analyzed to quantify ET0 from quality controlled and homogeneous series of various meteorological variables measured at 46 meteorological stations. Some of the models used are temperature based (e.g., Thornthwaite, Hargreaves, Linacre), whereas others are more complex and require more meteorological variables for calculation (e.g., Priestley-Taylor, Papadakis, FAO-Blaney-Criddle). The Penman-Monteith equation was used as a reference to quantify ET0, and for comparison among the other methods applied in the study. No major differences in the spatial distribution of the average ET0 were evident among the various methods. At annual and seasonal scales some of the ET0 methods requiring only temperature data for calculation provided better results than more complex methods requiring more variables. Among them the Hargreaves (HG) equation provided the best results, at both the annual and seasonal scales. The analysis of the temporal variability and trends in the magnitude of ET0 indicated that all methods show a marked increase in ET0 at the seasonal and annual time scales. Nevertheless, results obtained suggested substantial uncertainties among the methods assessed to determine ET0 changes, due to differences in temporal variability of the resulting time series, but mainly for the differences in the magnitude of change of ET0 and its spatial distribution. This suggests that ET0 trends obtained by means of methods that only require temperature data for ET0 calculations should be evaluated carefully under the current global warming scenario.

  5. Mapping Evapotranspiration over Agricultural Land in the California Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, F. S.; Huntington, J. L.; Guzman, A.; Johnson, L.; Morton, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Post, K. M.; Rosevelt, C.; Shupe, J. W.; Spellenberg, R.; Vitale, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in satellite mapping of evapotranspiration (ET) have made it possible to largely automate the process of mapping ET over large areas at the field-scale. This development coincides with recent drought events across the western U.S. which have intensified interest in mapping of ET and consumptive use to address a range of water management challenges, including resolving disputes over water rights, improving irrigation management, and developing sustainable management plans for groundwater resources. We present a case study for California that leverages two automated ET mapping capabilities to estimate ET at the field scale over agricultural areas in the California Central Valley. We utilized the NASA Earth Exchange and applied a python-based implementation of the METRIC surface energy balance model and the Satellite Irrigation Management Support (SIMS) system, which uses a surface reflectance-based approach, to map ET over agricultural areas in the Central Valley. We present estimates from 2014 from both approaches and results from a comparison of the estimates. Though theoretically and computationally quite different from each other, initial results from both approaches show good agreement overall on seasonal ET totals for 2014. We also present results from comparisons against ET measurements collected on commercial farms in the Central Valley and discuss implications for accuracy of the two different approaches. The objective of this analysis is to provide data that can inform planning for the development of sustainable groundwater management plans, and assist water managers and growers in evaluating irrigation demand during drought events.

  6. Evaluation of six potential evapotranspiration models for estimating crop potential and actual evapotranspiration in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sien; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Jianhua; Du, Taisheng; Tong, Ling; Ding, Risheng

    2016-12-01

    Using potential evapotranspiration (PET) to estimate crop actual evapotranspiration (AET) is a critical approach in hydrological models. However, which PET model performs best and can be used to predict crop AET over the entire growth season in arid regions still remains unclear. The six frequently-used PET models, i.e. Blaney-Criddle (BC), Hargreaves (HA), Priestley-Taylor (PT), Dalton (DA), Penman (PE) and Shuttleworth (SW) models were considered and evaluated in the study. Five-year eddy covariance data over the maize field and vineyard in arid northwest China were used to examine the accuracy of PET models in estimating daily crop AET. Results indicate that the PE, SW and PT models underestimated daily ET by less than 6% with RMSE lower than 35 W m-2 during the four years, while the BC, HA and DA models under-predicted daily ET approximately by 10% with RMSE higher than 40 W m-2. Compared to BC, HA and DA models, PE, SW and PT models were more reliable and accurate for estimating crop PET and AET in arid regions. Thus the PE, SW and PT models were recommended for predicting crop evapotranspiration in hydrological models in arid regions.

  7. Tendências recentes nos elementos do clima e suas implicações na evapotranspiração da cultura do milho em Viçosa - MG Recent trends in the weather elements and its implications in the maize crop evapotranspiration in Viçosa-MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas P. de Alencar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A mudança nas condições climáticas tem gerado grandes preocupações em nível mundial, sendo que uma das grandes questões, neste contexto, é o aquecimento global. As alterações ocorridas nas condições climáticas podem afetar a demanda de água das plantas, porque a evapotranspiração é afetada por mudanças nos elementos climáticos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar os efeitos das possíveis mudanças dos elementos do clima na evapotranspiração de referência e na evapotranspiração da cultura do milho para a região de Viçosa - MG. Mediante análise de tendência pelo teste de Mann-Kendall e da estatística do teste t da regressão linear, verificou-se o comportamento dos seguintes elementos climáticos: temperaturas máxima e mínima, insolação, velocidade do vento e umidade relativa. Observou-se uma redução na evapotranspiração de referência e da cultura do milho ao longo dos últimos 41 anos, principalmente em razão da redução da insolação e da velocidade do vento. A evapotranspiração de referência apresentou redução da ordem de 4,2 mm por ano.The change in weather conditions has caused great concern in the world and the major issue, in this context, is the global warming. The changes in climate may affect the water demand of plants, because the evapotranspiration is affected by changes in climatic elements. The objective of this study was to examine the possible effects of climatological changes in evapotranspiration and reference evapotranspiration of corn in Viçosa - MG, Brazil. Trend analysis by the Mann-Kendall statistic and student t test of the linear regression were used to study the behavior of the following weather elements: maximum and minimum temperatures, sunshine duration, wind speed and relative humidity. It was observed a reduction in the reference evapotranspiration and maize crop evapotranspiration over the recent past 41 years, mainly because of reduced solar radiation and wind

  8. The Artificial Neural Network Estimation for Daily and Hourly Rice Evapotranspiration in the Region of Red Soil, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuanshu; Ruthaikarn, Buaphean; Jin, Xinyi; Pang, Bo

    The evapotranspiration estimation is a key item for irrigation program. It has the important practical significance for high stable yield and water-saving in the region of red soil, South China. Penman-Monteith equation, recommended by FAO, is verified to be the most effective calculation to actual evaporation in many regions of the world. The only default is it has to use complete meteorological factors. To solve this problem, we are trying to find out a artificial neural network model (ANN) which can easily get its information and easy to calculate as well as guaranteed accuracy. A Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system and automatic weather station were employed for simultaneous measurement of actual evapotranspiration above the rice field. The frequency of 20-min recording provided the possibility for the estimation of daily and hourly evapotranspiration. The determined coefficient from the artificial neural network model on daily scale R2 is 0.9642, while hourly scale R2 is 0.9880. The reason was that the hourly scale training samples was greater than the daily scale measures. In general, the model gives an effective and feasible way for the evaluation of paddy rice evapotranspiration by the conventional parameters.

  9. Land surface evapotranspiration modelling at the regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffelli, Giulia; Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio; Gisolo, Davide; Provenzale, Antonello

    2017-04-01

    Climate change has relevant implications for the environment, water resources and human life in general. The observed increment of mean air temperature, in addition to a more frequent occurrence of extreme events such as droughts, may have a severe effect on the hydrological cycle. Besides climate change, land use changes are assumed to be another relevant component of global change in terms of impacts on terrestrial ecosystems: socio-economic changes have led to conversions between meadows and pastures and in most cases to a complete abandonment of grasslands. Water is subject to different physical processes among which evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most significant. In fact, ET plays a key role in estimating crop growth, water demand and irrigation water management, so estimating values of ET can be crucial for water resource planning, irrigation requirement and agricultural production. Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is the amount of evaporation that occurs when a sufficient water source is available. It can be estimated just knowing temperatures (mean, maximum and minimum) and solar radiation. Actual evapotranspiration (AET) is instead the real quantity of water which is consumed by soil and vegetation; it is obtained as a fraction of PET. The aim of this work was to apply a simplified hydrological model to calculate AET for the province of Turin (Italy) in order to assess the water content and estimate the groundwater recharge at a regional scale. The soil is seen as a bucket (FAO56 model, Allen et al., 1998) made of different layers, which interact with water and vegetation. The water balance is given by precipitations (both rain and snow) and dew as positive inputs, while AET, runoff and drainage represent the rate of water escaping from soil. The difference between inputs and outputs is the water stock. Model data inputs are: soil characteristics (percentage of clay, silt, sand, rocks and organic matter); soil depth; the wilting point (i.e. the

  10. Verification SEBAL and Hargreaves –Samani Models to Estimate Evapotranspiration by Lysimeter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Morshedi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evapotranspiration (ET is an important component of the hydrological cycle, energy equations at the surface and water balance. ET estimation is needed in various fields of science, such as hydrology, agriculture, forestry and pasture, and water resources management. Conventional methods used to estimate evapotranspiration from point measurements. Remote sensing models have the capability to estimate ET using surface albedo, surface temperature and vegetation indices in larger scales. Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL estimate ET at the moment of satellite path as a residual of energy balance equation for each pixel. In this study Hargreaves-Samani (HS and SEBAL models ET compared to an alfalfa lysimeter data’s, located in Shahrekord plain within the Karun basin. Satellite imageries were based on Landsat 7 ETM+ sensor data’s in seven satellite passes for path 164 and row 38 in the World Reference System, similar to lysimeter sampling data period, from April to October 2011. SEBAL uses the energy balance equation to estimate evapotranspiration. Equation No. 1 shows the energy balance equation for an evaporative surface: λET=Rn–G–H [1] In this equation Rn, H, G and λET represent the net radiation flux input to the surface (W/m2, Sensible heat flux (W/m2, soil heat flux (W/m2, and latent heat of vaporization (W/m2, respectively. In this equation the vertical flux considered and the horizontal fluxes of energy are neglected. The above equation must be used for large surfaces and uniformly full cover plant area. SEBAL is provided for estimating ET, using the minimum data measured by ground equipment. This model is applied and tested in more than 30 countries with an accuracy of about 85% at field scale, and 95 percent in the daily and seasonal scales. In Borkhar watershed (East of Isfahan, IRAN ASTER and MODIS satellite imageries were used for SEBAL to compare Penman-Monteith model. Results showed that estimated

  11. Evaluation of evapotranspiration in small on-site HSF constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaevangelou, Vassiliki A; Gikas, Georgios D; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results on evapotranspiration (ET), relevant to small on-site facilities are presented, derived from one-year controlled experiments in five pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow (HSF) constructed wetlands (CW) used as lysimeters. The CW units operated in Northern Greece. They were rectangular tanks made of steel, with dimensions 3m long, 0.75m wide and 1m deep. Three different porous media were used, i.e., medium gravel, fine gravel and cobbles. Two plants were used, namely common reed (R, Phragmites australis) and cattails (C, Typha latifolia). One unit was unplanted. ET was estimated based on the water budget method. Conclusions were drawn on its relation to season and vegetation density. Furthermore, Pearson correlation coefficient analysis identified the main factors affecting wetland plant ET. Seven well-known ET empirical methods were applied to estimate ET using the measured meteorological and wetland data. ET estimated by the empirical methods were multiplied with appropriate correction coefficients to match measured ET, providing this way appropriate plant coefficient (K(c)) values, and equations for predicting HSF CW evapotranspiration. The suitability of these methods for the particular constructed wetland type is discussed through comparison with the measured data. The Blaney-Criddle method was found as best. Furthermore, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was used with the measured ET and meteorological data to produce simple empirical equations to predict ET rates according to meteorological factors, plant and substrate material.

  12. Educational Software for Illustration of Drainage, Evapotranspiration, and Crop Yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that developed a software package for illustrating drainage, evapotranspiration, and crop yield as influenced by water conditions. The software is a tool for depicting water's influence on crop production in western Kansas. (DDR)

  13. Evapotranspiration Input Data for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains monthly reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  14. Evapotranspiration-based irrigation scheduling of lettuce and broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimation of crop evapotranspiration supports efficient irrigation water management, which in turn supports water conservation, mitigation of groundwater depletion/degradation, energy savings, and crop quality maintenance. Past research in California has revealed strong relationships between fract...

  15. NASA GLDAS Evapotranspiration Data and Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Hualan; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce; Rodell, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the water lost to the atmosphere by evaporation and transpiration. ET is a shared component in the energy and water budget, therefore, a critical variable for global energy and water cycle and climate change studies. However, direct ET measurements and data acquisition are difficult and expensive, especially at the global level. Therefore, modeling is one common alternative for estimating ET. With the goal to generate optimal fields of land surface states and fluxes, the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) has been generating quality-controlled, spatially and temporally consistent, terrestrial hydrologic data, including ET and other variables that affect evaporation and transpiration, such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind, soil moisture, heat flux, and solar radiation. This poster presents the long-term ET climatology (mean and monthly), derived from the 61-year GLDAS-2 monthly 1.0 deg x 1.0 deg. NOAH model Experiment-1 data, and describes the basic characteristics of spatial and seasonal variations of the climatology. The time series of GLDAS-2 precipitation and radiation, and ET are also discussed to show the improvement of GLDAS-2 forcing data and model output over those from GLDAS-1.

  16. Evapotranspiration of rose cultivated in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo C. Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the evapotranspiration and crop coefficient for the cut rose (cv. Carola cultivated in protected environment and the coefficient of small tank installed inside the greenhouse during the period of one year. Five rows of plants were planted with spacing of 1.20 m between rows and 0.20 m between plants. Each line consisted of five plots with five plants per plot. Plants of the second and fourth rows and of the second and fourth plots were installed in four drainage lysimeters with dimensions of 1.20 x 1.20 x 0.80 m. The plants of the remaining plots were considered as border plants. A drip irrigation system was used. An automatic weather station was installed in the greenhouse and the data were collected and stored daily at an interval of one hour in a data-logger. The crop coefficient (Kc showed mean values of 0.75 in the vegetative phase and 1.18 during the productive phase. The small pan (tank coefficient (Ktr was 0.72.

  17. A hybrid approach for estimating spatial evapotranspiration from satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, C. M. U.; Gonzalez-Dugo, M. P.; Mateos, L.; Kustas, W. P.; Kaheil, Y.

    2007-10-01

    Two common approaches for estimating crop evapotranspiration (ET) using satellite imagery are the reflectance-based crop coefficient method and the energy balance method. The reflectance-based crop coefficient method relates a reflectance-based vegetation index such as the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) to ET basal crop coefficients such as those described by Wright (1982) [1] and the FAO 56 manual [2]. A time-series of remotely sensed inputs is then used to build the crop coefficient curve in each field being monitored. In order to obtain actual ET, a water balance must be maintained in the root zone of the crop in order to make the appropriate adjustments due to soil moisture deficits and wet soil surface from irrigation and/or rain. Ground meteorological data must be provided by a weather station located in the modeled area for the estimation of reference ET. In the energy balance approach, surface temperatures are used in the estimation of sensible heat fluxes and depending on the complexity of the model, different methods are used to either handle the aerodynamic temperature term or deal with sparse canopies (empirical approaches, two-source model, SEBAL model). Remotely sensed inputs are also used for the estimation of net radiation and soil heat flux, with latent heat flux (ET) obtained as a residual from the energy balance equation. The energy balance approach results in the actual ET being estimated directly. Instantaneous values of ET must be extrapolated to the entire day and over time in between satellite overpass inputs. This paper describes a hybrid approach that uses both methods in combination to monitor actual ET over a growing season for irrigated and non-irrigated crops. The model has been coded in an ArcGIS environment, using visual basic for the calculations. This paper describes the modeling environment and coded ET models within and presents some application results.

  18. Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The “Equator Principle” is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

  19. Evaluation and Recalibration of Empirical Constant for Estimation of Reference Crop Evapotranspiration against the Modified Penman Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasireka, K.; Jagan Mohan Reddy, C.; Charan Reddy, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The major demand in our country is irrigation demand. Looking to the low irrigation potential and small water resources, it is felt necessary to see that water must be used economically and efficiently. This may be achieved by using latest methods of determination of water requirements for crops and applying the proper water management practices. Evapotranspiration (ET) is a basic for calculation of water requirement for crops. The various popular empirical equations for reference crop evapotranspiration (ETr) belong to three categories namely, Temperature, Radiation based methods and Combined methods. The above methods are site specific; hence it is necessary to recalibrate the coefficients for applying them in India. In the present paper, the standard combined method namely FAO modified Penman method was used to recalibrate the constants in temperature based (TB) methods and it can also be used to determine the ETr for the selected station. Four TB evapotranspiration models namely Blaney-Criddle, Romanenko, Kharrufa, and, Thronthwaite methods are recalibrated and the constant in each method are redefined for the data from Lekkur station, Cuddalore district in India. The result shows that, large error existed when ETr has been calculated with original constants. Hence regression equations were developed to minimise these variations in magnitude. It was found that out of four methods the Blaney-Criddle method suits better for the selected region.

  20. Evaluating the generalizability of GEP models for estimating reference evapotranspiration in distant humid and arid locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiafar, Hamed; Babazadeh, Hosssien; Marti, Pau; Kisi, Ozgur; Landeras, Gorka; Karimi, Sepideh; Shiri, Jalal

    2017-10-01

    Evapotranspiration estimation is of crucial importance in arid and hyper-arid regions, which suffer from water shortage, increasing dryness and heat. A modeling study is reported here to cross-station assessment between hyper-arid and humid conditions. The derived equations estimate ET0 values based on temperature-, radiation-, and mass transfer-based configurations. Using data from two meteorological stations in a hyper-arid region of Iran and two meteorological stations in a humid region of Spain, different local and cross-station approaches are applied for developing and validating the derived equations. The comparison of the gene expression programming (GEP)-based-derived equations with corresponding empirical-semi empirical ET0 estimation equations reveals the superiority of new formulas in comparison with the corresponding empirical equations. Therefore, the derived models can be successfully applied in these hyper-arid and humid regions as well as similar climatic contexts especially in data-lack situations. The results also show that when relying on proper input configurations, cross-station might be a promising alternative for locally trained models for the stations with data scarcity.

  1. Evapotranspiration seasonality across the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiji Maeda, Eduardo; Ma, Xuanlong; Wagner, Fabien Hubert; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Eamus, Derek; Huete, Alfredo

    2017-06-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) of Amazon forests is a main driver of regional climate patterns and an important indicator of ecosystem functioning. Despite its importance, the seasonal variability of ET over Amazon forests, and its relationship with environmental drivers, is still poorly understood. In this study, we carry out a water balance approach to analyse seasonal patterns in ET and their relationships with water and energy drivers over five sub-basins across the Amazon Basin. We used in situ measurements of river discharge, and remotely sensed estimates of terrestrial water storage, rainfall, and solar radiation. We show that the characteristics of ET seasonality in all sub-basins differ in timing and magnitude. The highest mean annual ET was found in the northern Rio Negro basin (˜ 1497 mm year-1) and the lowest values in the Solimões River basin (˜ 986 mm year-1). For the first time in a basin-scale study, using observational data, we show that factors limiting ET vary across climatic gradients in the Amazon, confirming local-scale eddy covariance studies. Both annual mean and seasonality in ET are driven by a combination of energy and water availability, as neither rainfall nor radiation alone could explain patterns in ET. In southern basins, despite seasonal rainfall deficits, deep root water uptake allows increasing rates of ET during the dry season, when radiation is usually higher than in the wet season. We demonstrate contrasting ET seasonality with satellite greenness across Amazon forests, with strong asynchronous relationships in ever-wet watersheds, and positive correlations observed in seasonally dry watersheds. Finally, we compared our results with estimates obtained by two ET models, and we conclude that neither of the two tested models could provide a consistent representation of ET seasonal patterns across the Amazon.

  2. Hill's equation

    CERN Document Server

    Magnus, Wilhelm

    1979-01-01

    The hundreds of applications of Hill's equation in engineering and physics range from mechanics and astronomy to electric circuits, electric conductivity of metals, and the theory of the cyclotron. New applications are continually being discovered and theoretical advances made since Liapounoff established the equation's fundamental importance for stability problems in 1907. Brief but thorough, this volume offers engineers and mathematicians a complete orientation to the subject.""Hill's equation"" connotes the class of homogeneous, linear, second order differential equations with real, period

  3. Estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration Using an Agro-Hydrological Model and Remote Sensing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mostafa yaghoobzadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration plays an important role in quantification of water balance at awatershed, plain and regional scale. Moreover, it is important in terms ofmanaging water resources such as water allocation, irrigation management, and evaluating the effects of changing land use on water yields. Different methods are available for ET estimation including Bowen ratio energy balance systems, eddy correlation systems, weighing lysimeters.Water balance techniques offer powerful alternatives for measuring ET and other surface energy fluxes. In spite of the elegance, high accuracy and theoretical attractions of these techniques for measuring ET, their practical use over large areas might be limited. They can be very expensive for practical applications at regional scales under heterogeneous terrains composed of different agro-ecosystems. To overcome aforementioned limitations by use of satellite measurements are appropriate approach. The feasibility of using remotely sensed crop parameters in combination of agro-hydrological models has been investigated in recent studies. The aim of the present study was to determine evapotranspiration by two methods, remote sensing and soil, water, atmosphere, and plant (SWAP model for wheat fields located in Neishabour plain. The output of SWAP has been validated by means of soil water content measurements. Furthermore, the actual evapotranspiration estimated by SWAP has been considered as the “reference” in the comparison between SEBAL energy balance models. Materials and Methods: Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL was used to estimate actual ET fluxes from Modis satellite images. SEBAL is a one-layer energy balance model that estimates latent heat flux and other energy balance components without information on soil, crop, and management practices. The near surface energy balance equation can be approximated as: Rn = G + H + λET Where Rn: net radiation (Wm2; G

  4. Clinical implications of the CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation compared with the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study equation for the estimation of renal dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Luigi; Barbati, Giulia; Cioffi, Giovanni; McAlister, Finlay Aleck; Ezekowitz, Justin Adrian; Mazzone, Carmine; Faganello, Giorgio; Russo, Giulia; Franceschini Grisolia, Enrico; Di Lenarda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CKD-EPI equation is more accurate than the MDRD equation in the general population. We performed this study to establish whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) is commonly recognized by clinicians and whether the CKD-EPI equation improves prognosis estimation in patients with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD). We analyzed data on 12394 CVD patients consecutively examined at the Cardiovascular Center of Trieste (Italy) between November 2009 and October 2013. The outcomes were all-cause death and a composite outcome of death/hospitalization for CV events (D+cvH). CKD-EPI formula reclassified 1786 (14.4 %) patients between KDIGO categories compared to the MDRD: 2.3 % (n = 280) placed in a lower risk and 12.1 % (n = 1506) into a higher risk group. CKD, defined as eGFR-CKD-EPI formula 60 but eGFR-CKD-EPI formula EPI equation provides more accurate risk stratification than MDRD equation in patients with CVD. CKD was unrecognized in nearly two-thirds of these patients but clinical outcomes were similar in those for patients with recognized CKD.

  5. TDR Technique for Estimating the Intensity of Evapotranspiration of Turfgrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Grzegorz; Wolski, Karol; Daniel, Anna; Albert, Małgorzata; Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szyszkowski, Paweł; Walczak, Amadeusz

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a method for precise estimation of evapotranspiration of selected turfgrass species. The evapotranspiration functions, whose domains are only two relatively easy to measure parameters, were developed separately for each of the grass species. Those parameters are the temperature and the volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm. Evapotranspiration has the character of a modified logistic function with empirical parameters. It assumes the form ETR(θ (2.5 cm), T (2.5 cm)) = A/(1 + B · e (-C · (θ (2.5 cm) · T (2.5 cm)), where: ETR(θ (2.5 cm), T (2.5 cm)) is evapotranspiration [mm · h(-1)], θ (2.5 cm) is volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm [m(3) · m(-3)], T (2.5 cm) is soil temperature at the depth of 2.5 cm [°C], and A, B, and C are empirical coefficients calculated individually for each of the grass species [mm · h(1)], and [-], [(m(3) · m(-3) · °C)(-1)]. The values of evapotranspiration calculated on the basis of the presented function can be used as input data for the design of systems for the automatic control of irrigation systems ensuring optimum moisture conditions in the active layer of lawn swards.

  6. Global daily reference evapotranspiration modeling and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.P.; Lietzow, R.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and reliable evapotranspiration (ET) datasets are crucial in regional water and energy balance studies. Due to the complex instrumentation requirements, actual ET values are generally estimated from reference ET values by adjustment factors using coefficients for water stress and vegetation conditions, commonly referred to as crop coefficients. Until recently, the modeling of reference ET has been solely based on important weather variables collected from weather stations that are generally located in selected agro-climatic locations. Since 2001, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) has been producing six-hourly climate parameter datasets that are used to calculate daily reference ET for the whole globe at 1-degree spatial resolution. The U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science has been producing daily reference ET (ETo) since 2001, and it has been used on a variety of operational hydrological models for drought and streamflow monitoring all over the world. With the increasing availability of local station-based reference ET estimates, we evaluated the GDAS-based reference ET estimates using data from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS). Daily CIMIS reference ET estimates from 85 stations were compared with GDAS-based reference ET at different spatial and temporal scales using five-year daily data from 2002 through 2006. Despite the large difference in spatial scale (point vs. ∼100 km grid cell) between the two datasets, the correlations between station-based ET and GDAS-ET were very high, exceeding 0.97 on a daily basis to more than 0.99 on time scales of more than 10 days. Both the temporal and spatial correspondences in trend/pattern and magnitudes between the two datasets were satisfactory, suggesting the reliability of using GDAS parameter-based reference ET for regional water and energy balance studies in many parts of the world

  7. Three decades of reference evapotranspiration estimates for a tropical watershed in the eastern Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATO O. DA SILVA JÚNIOR

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study estimated the reference evapotranspiration rate (ETo for the Itacaiúnas River Watershed (IRW, Eastern Amazonia, and measured the accuracy of eight empirical equations: Penman-Monteith (PM, Priestley-Taylor (PT, Hargreaves and Samani (HS, Camargo (CAM, Thornthwaite (TH, Hamon (HM, Kharrufa (KF and Turc (TC using monthly data from 1980 to 2013. In addition, it verifies the regional applicability to the IRW using a for the Marabá-PA station. The methods TC and PM (FAO56 presented the best results, which demonstrate that radiation and higher temperatures are the dominant drivers in the Evapotranspiration process, while relative humidity and wind speed have a much smaller impact. The temporal and spatial variability of ETo for IRW show has strong seasonality, increasing during the dry season and decreasing during the rainy season. The statistical analyses at 1% level of significance, indicates that there is no correlation of the residuals between the dry and rainy seasons, and test of the physical parameters such as mean temperature, solar radiation and relative air humidity explains the variations of ETo.

  8. Comparison of four different energy balance models for estimating evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in the Midwestern United States. Our models validation using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska, showed that all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well with an R2 of more than 0.81. Both the METRIC and SSEBop models showed a low root mean square error (0.80), whereas the SEBAL and SEBS models resulted in relatively higher bias for estimating daily ET. The empirical equation of daily average net radiation used in the SEBAL and SEBS models for upscaling instantaneous ET to daily ET resulted in underestimation of daily ET, particularly when the daily average net radiation was more than 100 W·m−2. Estimated daily ET for both cropland and grassland had some degree of linearity with METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS, but linearity was stronger for evaporative fraction. Thus, these ET models have strengths and limitations for applications in water resource management.

  9. Comparison of Four Different Energy Balance Models for Estimating Evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K. Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET in the Midwestern United States. Our models validation using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska, showed that all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well with an R2 of more than 0.81. Both the METRIC and SSEBop models showed a low root mean square error (<0.93 mm·day−1 and a high Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (>0.80, whereas the SEBAL and SEBS models resulted in relatively higher bias for estimating daily ET. The empirical equation of daily average net radiation used in the SEBAL and SEBS models for upscaling instantaneous ET to daily ET resulted in underestimation of daily ET, particularly when the daily average net radiation was more than 100 W·m−2. Estimated daily ET for both cropland and grassland had some degree of linearity with METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS, but linearity was stronger for evaporative fraction. Thus, these ET models have strengths and limitations for applications in water resource management.

  10. Tomato and cowpea crop evapotranspiration in an unheated greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Junzeng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of protected cultivation of vegetables in China, it is necessary to study the water requirements of crops in greenhouses. Lysimeter experiments were carried out to investigate tomato (2001 and cowpea (2004 crop evapotranspiration (ETc in an unheated greenhouse in Eastern China. Results showed remarkably reduced crop evapotranspiration inside the greenhouse as compared with that outside. ETc increased with the growth of the crops, and varied in accordance with the temperature inside the greenhouse and 20-cm pan evaporation outside, reaching its maximum value at the stage when plants’ growth was most active. Differences between the variation of crop evapotranspiration and pan evaporation inside the greenhouse were caused by shading of the pan in the later period when the crops were taller than the location where the pan was installed, 70 cm above ground. The ratio of crop evapotranspiration to pan evaporation was not constant as reported in previous studies, and the variation of the inside ratio αin lagged behind that of the outside ratio αout. Simulation of crop evapotranspiration based on 20-cm pan evaporation inside the greenhouse is more reasonable than that based on 20-cm pan evaporation outside, although pan evaporation outside is more consistent with ETc than that inside. The value of αin, calculated based on air temperature, relative humidity, and ground temperature inside, plays a dominant role in the calculation of ETc. As the crop height increases, altering the location of the inside pan and placing it above the canopy, out of the shade, would help to achieve more reasonable values of crop evapotranspiration.

  11. Tomato and cowpea crop evapotranspiration in an unheated greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Junzeng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of protected cultivation of vegetables in China, it is necessary to study the water requirements of crops in greenhouses. Lysimeter experiments were carried out to investigate tomato (2001 and cowpea (2004 crop evapotranspiration (ETc in an unheated greenhouse in Eastern China. Results showed remarkably reduced crop evapotranspiration inside the greenhouse as compared with that outside. ETc increased with the growth of the crops, and varied in accordance with the temperature inside the greenhouse and 20-cm pan evaporation outside, reaching its maximum value at the stage when plants' growth was most active. Differences between the variation of crop evapotranspiration and pan evaporation inside the greenhouse were caused by shading of the pan in the later period when the crops were taller than the location where the pan was installed, 70 cm above ground. The ratio of crop evapotranspiration to pan evaporation was not constant as reported in previous studies, and the variation of the inside ratio αin lagged behind that of the outside ratio αout. Simulation of crop evapotranspiration based on 20-cm pan evaporation inside the greenhouse is more reasonable than that based on 20-cm pan evaporation outside, although pan evaporation outside is more consistent with ETc than that inside. The value of αin, calculated based on air temperature, relative humidity, and ground temperature inside, plays a dominant role in the calculation of ETc. As the crop height increases, altering the location of the inside pan and placing it above the canopy, out of the shade, would help to achieve more reasonable values of crop evapotranspiration.

  12. Drought impacts and resilience on crops via evapotranspiration estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Asadollahi Dolatabad, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the global needs for food and water is at a critical level. It has been estimated that 12.5 % of the global population suffers from malnutrition and 768 million people still do not have access to clean drinking water. This need is increasing because of population growth but also by climate change. Changes in precipitation patterns will result either in flooding or droughts. Consequently availability, usability and affordability of water is becoming challenge and efficient use of water and water management is becoming more important, particularly during severe drought events. Drought monitoring for agricultural purposes is very hard. While meteorological drought can accurately be monitored using precipitation only, estimating agricultural drought is more difficult. This is because agricultural drought is dependent on the meteorological drought, the impacts on the vegetation, and the resilience of the crops. As such not only precipitation estimates are required but also evapotranspiration at plant/plot scale. Evapotranspiration (ET) describes the amount of water evaporated from soil and vegetation. As 65% of precipitation is lost by ET, drought severity is highly linked with this variable. In drought research, the precise quantification of ET and its spatio-temporal variability is therefore essential. In this view, remote sensing based models to estimate ET, such as SEBAL and SEBS, are of high value. However the resolution of current evapotranspiration products are not good enough for monitoring the impact of the droughts on the specific crops. This limitation originates because plot scales are in general smaller than the resolution of the available satellite ET products. As such remote sensing estimates of evapotranspiration are always a combination of different land surface types and cannot be used for plant health and drought resilience studies. The goal of this research is therefore to enable adequate resolutions of daily evapotranspiration estimates

  13. Integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2005-01-01

    Two distinct but related approaches hold the solutions to many mathematical problems--the forms of expression known as differential and integral equations. The method employed by the integral equation approach specifically includes the boundary conditions, which confers a valuable advantage. In addition, the integral equation approach leads naturally to the solution of the problem--under suitable conditions--in the form of an infinite series.Geared toward upper-level undergraduate students, this text focuses chiefly upon linear integral equations. It begins with a straightforward account, acco

  14. NOAA Introduces its First-Generation Reference Evapotranspiration Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbins, M.; Geli, H. M.; Lewis, C.; Senay, G. B.; Verdin, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA is producing daily, gridded operational, long-term, reference evapotranspiration (ETo) data for the National Water Census (NWC). The NWC is a congressional mandate to provide water managers with accurate, up-to-date, scientifically defensible reporting on the national water cycle; as such, it requires a high-quality record of actual ET, which we derive as a fraction of NOAA's land-based ETo a fraction determined by remotely sensed (RS) LST and/or surface reflectance in an operational version of the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop). This methodology permits mapping of ET on a routine basis with a high degree of consistency at multiple spatial scales. This presentation addresses the ETo input to this process. NOAA's ETo dataset is generated from the American Society of Civil Engineers Standardized Penman-Monteith equation driven by hourly, 0.125-degree (~12-km) data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). Coverage is CONUS-wide from Jan 1, 1979, to within five days of the present. The ETo is verified against agro-meteorological stations in western CONUS networks, while a first-order, second-moment uncertainty analysis indicates when, where, and to what extent each driver contributes to ETo variability (and so potentially require the most attention). As the NWC's mandate requires a nationwide coverage, the ETo dataset must also be verified outside of the measure's traditional, agricultural/irrigated areas of application. In this presentation, we summarize the verification of the gridded ETo product and demonstrate the drivers of ETo variability in space and time across CONUS. Beyond its primary use as a component of ET in the NWC, we further explore potential uses of the ETo product as an input to drought models and as a stand-alone index of fast-developing agricultural drought, or 'flash drought.' NOAA's product is the first consistently modeled, daily, continent-wide ETo dataset that is both up-to-date and as temporally

  15. Reference Evapotranspiration Estimation in Climate Change Scenarios for Rio Verde in the State of Goiás, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Costa Santos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term changes in evapotranspiration can have extreme effects in hydrological processes as well as crop yields. The objective of this study was to quantify the expected changes in evapotranspiration in climate change scenarios using the Penman Monteith/FAO56 (PM standard method and empirical equations for estimating reference evapotranspiration (ET0, specifically for the conditions of Rio Verde, in the state of Goiás, Brazil. Data from the National Institute of Meteorology, and Meteorology and Hydrology System of the State of Goiás were used to estimate the ET0 by using the following methods: Modified Penman, Radiation, Blaney-Criddle, Hargreaves-Samani, and Priestley-Taylor and Turc, which were compared with the PM method on the daily scale. From the ET0 obtained in each of these methods, their performance was evaluated through statistical indices in four future climate scenarios. The projections originated from two emission scenarios based on the HadGEM2-ES global climate model with medium (2040-2069 and long (2070-2099 term scenarios. The results presented that the Radiation and Turc methods are currently—and can be under the predicted conditions of future climate scenarios—the best options for estimation of ET0 in Rio Verde, when meteorological data are not available to implement the PM method. The Modified Penman and the Hargreaves-Samani methods should not be considered for estimating ET0 in the location evaluated.

  16. A one-layer satellite surface energy balance for estimating evapotranspiration rates and crop water stress indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Salvatore; Consoli, Simona; Russo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Daily evapotranspiration fluxes over the semi-arid Catania Plain area (Eastern Sicily, Italy) were evaluated using remotely sensed data from Landsat Thematic Mapper TM5 images. A one-source parameterization of the surface sensible heat flux exchange using satellite surface temperature has been used. The transfer of sensible and latent heat is described by aerodynamic resistance and surface resistance. Required model inputs are brightness, temperature, fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index, albedo, crop height, roughness lengths, net radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. The aerodynamic resistance (r(ah)) is formulated on the basis of the Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory and the surface resistance (r(s)) is evaluated from the energy balance equation. The instantaneous surface flux values were converted into evaporative fraction (EF) over the heterogeneous land surface to derive daily evapotranspiration values. Remote sensing-based assessments of crop water stress (CWSI) were also made in order to identify local irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration data and crop coefficient values obtained from the approach were compared with: (i) data from the semi-empirical approach "K(c) reflectance-based", which integrates satellite data in the visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum with ground-based measurements and (ii) surface energy flux measurements collected from a micrometeorological tower located in the experiment area. The expected variability associated with ET flux measurements suggests that the approach-derived surface fluxes were in acceptable agreement with the observations.

  17. Potential Evapotranspiration Estimates (mm) for for Alaska, ECHAM5 - A1B scenario. The Wilderness Society, 2011.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — Potential Evapotranspiration (PET): These data represent decadal mean totals of potential evapotranspiration estimates (mm). The file name specifies the decade the...

  18. [Spatiotemporal characteristics of reference crop evapotranspiration in inland river basins of Hexi region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xiao-Dong; Wang, He-ling; Ma, Zhong-ming

    2010-12-01

    Based on the 1961-2008 daily observation data from 17 meteorological stations in the inland river basins in Hexi region, the daily reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) in the basins was computed by Penman-Monteith equation, and the spatiotemporal characteristics of seasonal and annual ET0 were studied by GIS and IDW inverse-distance spatial interpolation. In 1961-2008, the mean annual ET0 (700-1330 mm) increased gradually from southeast to northwest across the basins. The high value of mean annual ET0 in Shule River basin and Heihe River basin declined significantly (P spring > autumn > winter. Wind speed and maximum temperature were the primary factors affecting the ET0 in the basins. Furthermore, wind speed was the predominant factor of downward trend of ET0 in Shule and Heihe basins, while maximum temperature and sunshine hours played an important role in the upward trend of ET0 in Shiyang basin.

  19. Penetration equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.W. [Applied Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In 1967, Sandia National Laboratories published empirical equations to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. Since that time there have been several small changes to the basic equations, and several more additions to the overall technique for predicting penetration into soil, rock, concrete, ice, and frozen soil. The most recent update to the equations was published in 1988, and since that time there have been changes in the equations to better match the expanding data base, especially in concrete penetration. This is a standalone report documenting the latest version of the Young/Sandia penetration equations and related analytical techniques to predict penetration into natural earth materials and concrete. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  20. In-Situ Determination Of Actual Evapotranspiration Using Zero Flux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical expression and analytical approach of the plane of zero flux method was demonstrated in determining the values of actual evapotranspiration of the maize crop grown in the field. The method was simple to use and did not require the values of hydraulic conductivity, which are often very laborious to determine in the ...

  1. Hydrological model uncertainty due to spatial evapotranspiration estimation methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, X.; Lamačová, Anna; Duffy, Ch.; Krám, P.; Hruška, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 90, part B (2016), s. 90-101 ISSN 0098-3004 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Uncertainty * Evapotranspiration * Forest management * PIHM * Biome -BGC Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.533, year: 2016

  2. Estimating evapotranspiration using remote sensing and the Surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-08

    Jul 8, 2013 ... Remote sensing-based evapotranspiration (ET) algorithms developed in recent years are well suited for estimating evapo- transpiration and its spatial trends over time. In this paper the application of energy balance methods in South Africa is reviewed, showing that the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm ...

  3. Validation of remotely-sensed evapotranspiration and NDWI using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote sensing techniques and products have recently been developed for the estimation of water balance variables. The objective of this study was to test the reliability of LandSAF (Land Surface Analyses Satellite Applications Facility) evapotranspiration (ET) and SPOT-Vegetation Normalised Difference Water Index ...

  4. Trend analysis of evapotranspiration over India- observed from long ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3

    in this study to validate satellite derived monthly ET data over India from 1983 to 2006. 3.3 Climate data: Several climatic parameters affect the land evapotranspiration. The influence of some of the important parameters such as precipitation, air temperature, soil moisture and incident solar radiation on ET over India was ...

  5. Trend Analysis of Evapotranspiration over India- Observed from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3

    Abstract. Owing to the lack of consistent spatial time series data on actual evapotranspiration (ET), very few studies have been conducted on the long-term trend and variability in ET at a national scale over the Indian subcontinent. The present study uses biome specific ET data derived from NOAA satellite's Advanced Very ...

  6. Evapotranspiration in three plant communities of a Rhigozum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evapotranspiration losses in three Rhigozum trichotomum plant communities namely, pure grass, pure R. trichotomum and a mixed stand of grass and R. trichotomum were determined during the 1985-86 growing season. Three hydrologically isolated plots in each community type were irrigated and changes in soil water ...

  7. Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency of different grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evapotranspiration (Et) and water use efficiency (WUE) were determined for each of seven grass species during the 1986/87 seasons. The highest and lowest mean daily Et of 2, 39 and 1, 66 mm were recorded respectively for Themeda triandra and Sporobolus fimbriatus. Between species, the average Et for the two ...

  8. Modeling Using Dryness Index to Predict Evapotranspiration in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on crop-climate studies from the viewpoint of modeling and predictability, this paper presents a new dryness index (DI), the ratio of rainfall over reference evapotranspiration (ET), for Ilorin (8.48o N) in the transition zone between humid and semi-arid climatic belts in Nigeria. The ET values were computed using the ...

  9. Effect of evapotranspiration models on optimised values of apron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of tank irrigation system is to provide a mechanism for making better and sustainable use of the scarce and infrequent rainfall resource occurring in arid and semi-arid regions for agricultural production. Three models which attempt to explain the mode of evapotranspiration under drip irrigated agriculture in ...

  10. the sensitivity of evapotranspiration models to errors in model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    used in Nigeria, their sensitivity analysis is important. Again, Jensen [4], writing on the use of empirical formulae for the determination of evapotranspiration rates, said that such formulae. (models) can be used when the "absolute accuracy" of the measured climatic variables have been found adequate. Through sensitivity.

  11. Measurement and modelling of evapotranspiration in three fynbos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) was quantified at each site during specific periods using a boundary layer scintillometer and energy balance system. A simple dual source model in which the stand ET was calculated as the algebraic sum of outputs from soil evaporation and transpiration sub-models was used to scale up the ET ...

  12. Forest evapotranspiration: measurements and modeling at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; J-C. Domec; Devendra Amatya

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional engineering hydrology, forest hydrology has a relatively long history of studying the effects of vegetation in regulating streamflow through evapotranspiration (Hewlett, 1982; Swank and Crossley, 1988; Andreassian, 2004; Brown et al., 2005; Amatya et al., 2011, 2015, 2016; Sun et al., 2011b; Vose et al., 2011). It is estimated that more than...

  13. The Sensitivity of Evapotranspiration Models to Errors in Model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five evapotranspiration (Et) model-the penman, Blaney - Criddel, Thornthwaite, the Blaney –Morin-Nigeria, and the Jensen and Haise models – were analyzed for parameter sensitivity under Nigerian Climatic conditions. The sensitivity of each model to errors in any of its measured parameters (variables) was based on the ...

  14. Estimation of evapotranspiration over the terrestrial ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianglan Li; Shunlin Liang; Wenping Yuan; Guirui Yu; Xiao Cheng; Yang Chen; Tianbao Zhao; Jinming Feng; Zhuguo Ma; Mingguo Ma; Shaomin Liu; Jiquan Chen; Changliang Shao; Shenggong Li; Xudong Zhang; Zhiqiang Zhang; Ge Sun; Shiping Chen; Takeshi Ohta; Andrej Varlagin; Akira Miyata; Kentaro Takagi; Nobuko Saiqusa; Tomomichi Kato

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying regional evapotranspiration (ET) and environmental constraints are particularly important for understanding water and carbon cycles of terrestrial ecosystems. However, a large uncertainty in the regional estimation of ET still remains for the terrestrial ecosystems in China. This study used ET measurements of 34 eddy covariance sites within China and...

  15. A note on India's water budget and evapotranspiration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some recent analyses of India 's water budget are based on information attributed to the Ministry of Water Resources.An examination of the budget components indicates that they imply an evapotranspiration estimate that is significantly lower than what one may expect based on information from other sources.If such is the ...

  16. Annual evapotranspiration of a forested wetland watershed, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Carl Trettin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, hydro-meteorological data collected from 1 964 to 1 9 76 on an approximately 5, 000 ha predominantly forested coastal watershed (Turkey Creek) at the Francis Marion National Forest near Charleston, SC were analyzed to estimate annual evapotranspiration (E T) using four different empirical methods. The first one, reported by Zhang et a/. (2001), that...

  17. Estimation of evapotranspiration rate in irrigated lands using stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umirzakov, Gulomjon; Windhorst, David; Forkutsa, Irina; Brauer, Lutz; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2013-04-01

    Agriculture in the Aral Sea basin is the main consumer of water resources and due to the current agricultural management practices inefficient water usage causes huge losses of freshwater resources. There is huge potential to save water resources in order to reach a more efficient water use in irrigated areas. Therefore, research is required to reveal the mechanisms of hydrological fluxes in irrigated areas. This paper focuses on estimation of evapotranspiration which is one of the crucial components in the water balance of irrigated lands. Our main objective is to estimate the rate of evapotranspiration on irrigated lands and partitioning of evaporation into transpiration using stable isotopes measurements. Experiments has done in 2 different soil types (sandy and sandy loam) irrigated areas in Ferghana Valley (Uzbekistan). Soil samples were collected during the vegetation period. The soil water from these samples was extracted via a cryogenic extraction method and analyzed for the isotopic ratio of the water isotopes (2H and 18O) based on a laser spectroscopy method (DLT 100, Los Gatos USA). Evapotranspiration rates were estimated with Isotope Mass Balance method. The results of evapotranspiration obtained using isotope mass balance method is compared with the results of Catchment Modeling Framework -1D model results which has done in the same area and the same time.

  18. Stable isotope measurements of evapotranspiration partitioning in a maize field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick; Parajka, Juraj; Oismüller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Heng, Lee; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important processes in describing land surface - atmosphere interactions as it connects the energy and water balances. Furthermore knowledge of the individual components of evapotranspiration is important for ecohydrological modelling and agriculture, particularly for irrigation efficiency and crop productivity. In this study, we tested the application of the stable isotope method for evapotranspiration partitioning to a maize crop during the vegetative stage, using sap flow sensors as a comparison technique. Field scale ET was measured using an eddy covariance device and then partitioned using high frequency in-situ measurements of the isotopic signal of the canopy water vapor. The fraction of transpiration (Ft) calculated with the stable isotope method showed good agreement with the sap flow method. High correlation coefficient values were found between the two techniques, indicating the stable isotope method can successfully be applied in maize. The results show the changes in transpiration as a fraction of evapotranspiration after rain events and during the subsequent drying conditions as well as the relationship between transpiration and solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit.

  19. Flooding Regime Impacts on Radiation, Evapotranspiration, and Latent Energy Fluxes over Groundwater-Dependent Riparian Cottonwood and Saltcedar Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cleverly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation and energy balances are key drivers of ecosystem water and carbon cycling. This study reports on ten years of eddy covariance measurements over groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs in New Mexico, USA, to compare the role of drought and flooding on radiation, water, and energy budgets of forests differing in species composition (native cottonwood versus nonnative saltcedar and flooding regime. After net radiation (700–800 W m−2, latent heat flux was the largest energy flux, with annual values of evapotranspiration exceeding annual precipitation by 250–600%. Evaporative cooling dominated the energy fluxes of both forest types, although cottonwood generated much lower daily values of sensible heat flux (<−5 MJ m−2 d−1. Drought caused a reduction in evaporative cooling, especially in the saltcedar sites where evapotranspiration was also reduced, but without a substantial decline in depth-to-groundwater. Our findings have broad implications on water security and the management of native and nonnative vegetation within semiarid southwestern North America. Specifically, consideration of the energy budgets of GDEs as they respond to fluctuations in climatic conditions can inform the management options for reducing evapotranspiration and maintaining in-stream flow, which is legally mandated as part of interstate and international water resources agreements.

  20. A Note of Extended Proca Equations and Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for quite long time that the electrodynamics of Maxwell equations can be extended and generalized further into Proca equations. The implications of in- troducing Proca equations include an alternative description of superconductivity, via extending London equations. In the light of another paper suggesting that Maxwell equations can be written using quaternion numbers, then we discuss a plausible exten- sion of Proca equation using biquaternion number. Further implications and experi- ments are recommended.

  1. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, FG

    2013-01-01

    Based on his extensive experience as an educator, F. G. Tricomi wrote this practical and concise teaching text to offer a clear idea of the problems and methods of the theory of differential equations. The treatment is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students and addresses only questions that can be resolved with rigor and simplicity.Starting with a consideration of the existence and uniqueness theorem, the text advances to the behavior of the characteristics of a first-order equation, boundary problems for second-order linear equations, asymptotic methods, and diff

  2. Emulation of recharge and evapotranspiration processes in shallow groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Rebecca C.; Pickett, Trevor; Crosbie, Russell S.; Morgan, Leanne K.; Turnadge, Chris; Davies, Phil J.

    2017-12-01

    In shallow groundwater systems, recharge and evapotranspiration are highly sensitive to changes in the depth to water table. To effectively model these fluxes, complex functions that include soil and vegetation properties are often required. Model emulation (surrogate modelling or meta-modelling) can provide a means of incorporating detailed conceptualisation of recharge and evapotranspiration processes, while maintaining the numerical tractability and computational performance required for regional scale groundwater models and uncertainty analysis. A method for emulating recharge and evapotranspiration processes in groundwater flow models was developed, and applied to the South East region of South Australia and western Victoria, which is characterised by shallow groundwater, wetlands and coastal lakes. The soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model WAVES was used to generate relationships between net recharge (diffuse recharge minus evapotranspiration from groundwater) and depth to water table for different combinations of climate, soil and land cover types. These relationships, which mimicked previously described soil, vegetation and groundwater behaviour, were combined into a net recharge lookup table. The segmented evapotranspiration package in MODFLOW was adapted to select values of net recharge from the lookup table depending on groundwater depth, and the climate, soil and land use characteristics of each cell. The model was found to be numerically robust in steady state testing, had no major increase in run time, and would be more efficient than tightly-coupled modelling approaches. It made reasonable predictions of net recharge and groundwater head compared with remotely sensed estimates of net recharge and a standard MODFLOW comparison model. In particular, the method was better able to predict net recharge and groundwater head in areas with steep hydraulic gradients.

  3. Vertical structure of evapotranspiration at a spruce forest site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, K.; Falge, E.; Serafimovich, A.; Pyles, D.; Foken, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) was used to model the turbulent fluxes of heat, water vapor and momentum as well as the carbon dioxide exchange within and above a spruce canopy at the FLUXNET-station Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen (DE-Bay) in the Fichtelgebirge mountains in northern Bavaria, Germany. ACASA is a multilayer canopy-surface-layer model that incorporates a third-order closure method to calculate turbulent transfer within and above the canopy and was developed at the University of California, Davis. Within the EGER (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions) project, comprehensive micrometeorological and plant physiological measurements were performed during two intensive observation periods in fall 2007 and summer 2008. This data base allowed us to extensively test the ability of the ACASA model to simulate the exchange of energy and matter at our site. Here, the vertical structure of evapotranspiration within and above the canopy for a few days is investigated in detail. The ACASA model provides profiles of all components of evapotranspiration, such as transpiration and evaporation from the soil, and estimates the interception of precipitation and the corresponding evaporation from wet plant surfaces. Fluxes of momentum, heat, carbon dioxide and water vapor were measured with six eddy-covariance systems below, within and above the canopy on a 36 m high tower. Furthermore, xylem sapflow measurements at six heights within the canopy were performed for the determination of canopy transpiration. This combination of multilevel measurements allowed us to estimate all components of evapotranspiration of and within the spruce forest. Model results and measurements of evapotranspiration are analyzed with regard to the partitioning between its components as well as between the canopy layers. Furthermore, the ability of the ACASA model to reproduce evapotranspiration profiles for different exchange regimes of the subcanopy and the canopy is

  4. TDR Technique for Estimating the Intensity of Evapotranspiration of Turfgrasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Janik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for precise estimation of evapotranspiration of selected turfgrass species. The evapotranspiration functions, whose domains are only two relatively easy to measure parameters, were developed separately for each of the grass species. Those parameters are the temperature and the volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm. Evapotranspiration has the character of a modified logistic function with empirical parameters. It assumes the form ETRθ2.5 cm,T2.5 cm=A/1+B·e-C·θ2.5 cm·T2.5 cm, where: ETRθ2.5 cm,T2.5 cm is evapotranspiration [mm·h−1], θ2.5 cm is volumetric moisture of soil at the depth of 2.5 cm [m3·m−3], T2.5 cm is soil temperature at the depth of 2.5 cm [°C], and A, B, and C are empirical coefficients calculated individually for each of the grass species [mm·h1], and [—], [(m3·m−3·°C−1]. The values of evapotranspiration calculated on the basis of the presented function can be used as input data for the design of systems for the automatic control of irrigation systems ensuring optimum moisture conditions in the active layer of lawn swards.

  5. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  6. Integral Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hochstadt, Harry

    2011-01-01

    This classic work is now available in an unabridged paperback edition. Hochstatdt's concise treatment of integral equations represents the best compromise between the detailed classical approach and the faster functional analytic approach, while developing the most desirable features of each. The seven chapters present an introduction to integral equations, elementary techniques, the theory of compact operators, applications to boundary value problems in more than dimension, a complete treatment of numerous transform techniques, a development of the classical Fredholm technique, and applicatio

  7. On the absence of turbulence in exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation and implications of a quantum interpretation of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Amador

    2017-01-01

    There have been several papers published which show exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. None of the solutions admit any possibility of turbulence. It is strongly suggested that the Navier-Stokes equation is not the correct problem definition for turbulence. Yet, by contrast, in a simple example, it s shown that turbulence can result quite directly by using two or more species of fluids. The species are in fact identical atoms with different quantum states, provoking the strong suggestion that a plausible explanation for the origin of turbulence is quantum mechanical. This suggestion is heavily supported by actual modern pipe flow experiments [Muriel, Quantum Theory of Turbulence, Harvard Book Store (2011),which may be downloaded from (Muriel, ResearchGate)] The most general exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation will be displayed. In addition, experiments supporting a quantum interpretation will be reviewed.

  8. Sensitivity of potential evapotranspiration to changes in climate variables for different Australian climatic zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Danlu; Westra, Seth; Maier, Holger R.

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the factors that have an impact on potential evapotranspiration (PET) sensitivity to changes in different climate variables is critical to understanding the possible implications of climatic changes on the catchment water balance. Using a global sensitivity analysis, this study assessed the implications of baseline climate conditions on the sensitivity of PET to a large range of plausible changes in temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), solar radiation (Rs) and wind speed (uz). The analysis was conducted at 30 Australian locations representing different climatic zones, using the Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor PET models. Results from both models suggest that the baseline climate can have a substantial impact on overall PET sensitivity. In particular, approximately 2-fold greater changes in PET were observed in cool-climate energy-limited locations compared to other locations in Australia, indicating the potential for elevated water loss as a result of increasing actual evapotranspiration (AET) in these locations. The two PET models consistently indicated temperature to be the most important variable for PET, but showed large differences in the relative importance of the remaining climate variables. In particular for the Penman-Monteith model, wind and relative humidity were the second-most important variables for dry and humid catchments, respectively, whereas for the Priestley-Taylor model solar radiation was the second-most important variable, with the greatest influence in warmer catchments. This information can be useful to inform the selection of suitable PET models to estimate future PET for different climate conditions, providing evidence on both the structural plausibility and input uncertainty for the alternative models.

  9. Estimation of Evapotranspiration ETc and Crop Coefficient Kc of Wheat, in south Nile Delta of Egypt Using integrated FAO-56 approach and remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Farg

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Crop water requirements are represented by the actual crop evapotranspiration. Estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ETc and crop coefficient using remote-sensing data is essential for planning the irrigation water use in arid and semiarid regions. This study focuses on estimating the crop coefficient (Kc and crop evapotranspiration (ETc using SPOT-4 satellite data integrated with the meteorological data and FAO-56 approach. Reference evapotranspiration (ETo were estimated using FAO Penman-Monteith and tabled single crop coefficient values were adjusted to real values. SPOT-4 images geometrically and radio metrically corrected were used to drive the vegetation indices (NDVI and SAVI. Multi linear regression analysis was applied to develop the crop coefficient (Kc prediction equations for the different growth stages from vegetation indices. The results showed R2 were 0.82, 0.90 and 0.97 as well as adjusted R2 were 0.80, 0.86 and 0.96 for developing, mid-season and late-season growth stage respectively.

  10. Assessment of daily reference evapotranspiration in Sicily by means of POWER-NASA agro-climatology archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Amro; Jabro, Jay; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The importance of evapotranspiration, ET, processes has long been recognized in many disciplines, including hydrologic and drainage studies as well as for irrigation system design and management. A wide number of equations have been proposed to estimate crop reference evapotranspiration, ET0, based on the variables affecting the process. When a full data set of climate variables is available, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations recommended to use the physically based FAO-56 Penman-Monteith equation. The lack of climate variables and particularly of solar radiation has led several researchers to propose simplified ET0 estimation equations using a limited number of climate variables. These equations, however, need site-specific validation prior to their use and cannot be generalized. Recently, the American National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), created an efficient and open access agro-climatology archive in the frame of the Prediction Of Worldwide Energy Resource (POWER) project containing, on global scale, a long-series of meteorological variables and surface solar energy fluxes. The main objective of the research was to assess the suitability of POWER-NASA open access archive to estimate daily reference evapotranspiration, ET0, in Sicily, for the period 2006-2014. Daily ET0 were evaluated according to FAO-56 PM equation, by considering the POWER-NASA database characterized by a grid resolution of 1° latitude × 1° longitude, as well as the climate data measured on the ground, by a network of 36 meteorological stations installed in Sicily and belonging to the Agro-meteorological Information Service (SIAS). After comparing the climate data available in both databases (minimum, maximum and average air temperature and relative air humidity, wind speed, solar radiation and air pressure), a statistical comparison was also carried out on ET0 values estimated with the FAO-56 PM equation. The analysis showed a good correlation

  11. RIP-ET: A riparian evapotranspiration package for MODFLOW-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Thomas; Baird, Kathryn J.; Hanson, R.T.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Ajami, Hoori

    2012-01-01

    A new evapotranspiration package for the U.S. Geological Survey's groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW, is documented. The Riparian Evapotranspiration Package (RIP-ET) provides flexibility in simulating riparian and wetland transpiration not provided by the Evapotranspiration (EVT) or Segmented Function Evapotranspiration (ETS1) Packages for MODFLOW 2005. This report describes how the RIP-ET package was conceptualized and provides input instructions, listings and explanations of the source code, and an example. Traditional approaches to modeling evapotranspiration (ET) processes assume a piecewise linear relationship between ET flux and hydraulic head. The RIP-ET replaces this traditional relationship with a segmented, nonlinear dimensionless curve that reflects the eco-physiology of riparian and wetland ecosystems. Evapotranspiration losses from these ecosystems are dependent not only on hydraulic head, but on the plant types present. User-defined plant functional groups (PFGs) are used to elucidate the interaction between plant transpiration and groundwater conditions. Five generalized plant functional groups based on transpiration rates, plant rooting depth, and water tolerance ranges are presented: obligate wetland, shallow-rooted riparian, deep-rooted riparian, transitional riparian and bare ground/open water. Plant functional groups can be further divided into subgroups (PFSGs) based on plant size, density or other characteristics. The RIP-ET allows for partial habitat coverage and mixtures of plant functional subgroups to be present in a single model cell. RIP-ET also distinguishes between plant transpiration and bare-ground evaporation. Habitat areas are designated by polygons; each polygon can contain a mixture of PFSGs and bare ground, and is assigned a surface elevation. This process requires a determination of fractional coverage for each of the plant functional subgroups present in a polygon to account for the mixture of coverage types and resulting

  12. Predicting water suppy and actual evapotranspiration of street trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessolek, Gerd; Heiner, Moreen; Trinks, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    It's well known that street trees cool air temperature in summer-time by transpiration and shading and also reduce runoff. However, it's difficult to analyse if trees have water shortage or not. This contribution focus on predicting water supply, actual evapotranspiration, and runoff by using easily available climate data (precipiation, potential evapotranspiration) and site characteristics (water retention, space, sealing degree, groundwater depth). These parameter were used as input data for Hydro-Pedotransfer-Functions (HPTFs) allowing the estimation of the annual water budget. Results give statements on water supply of trees, drought stress, and additional water demand by irrigation. Procedure also analyse, to which extent the surrounding partly sealed surfaces deliver water to the trees. Four representative street canyons of Berlin City were analysed and evaluated within in training program for M.A. students of „Urban Eco-system Science" at the Technische Universität Berlin.

  13. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  14. Estimating watershed evapotranspiration across the United States using multiple methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Shanlei Sun; Jingfeng Xiao; Peter Caldwell; Devendra Amatya; Suat Irmak; Prasanna H. Gowda; Sudhanshu Panda; Steve McNulty; Yang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the largest watershed water balance component only next to precipitation in the United States. ET is closely coupled with ecosystem carbon and energy fluxes, affects flooding or drought magnitude, and is also a good predictor for biodiversity at a regional scale.Thus, accurately estimating ET is of paramount importance to quantify the effects...

  15. Determining suitability of Large Aperture Scintillometer for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, G.; Gowda, P. H.; Howell, T. A.; Basu, S.; Colaizzi, P. D.; Marek, T.

    2013-12-01

    Scintillation method is a relatively new technique for measuring the sensible heat and water fluxes over land surfaces. Path integrating capabilities of scintillometer over heterogeneous landscapes make it a potential tool for comparing the energy fluxes derived from remote sensing based energy balance algorithms. For this reason, scintillometer-derived evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes are being used to evaluate remote sensing based energy balance algorithms for their ability to estimate ET fluxes. However, LAS' (Large Aperture Scintillometer) ability to derive ET fluxes is not thoroughly tested. The objective of this study was to evaluate LAS- and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS)-derived fluxes against lysimetric data to determine LAS' suitability for validating remote sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) maps. The study was conducted during the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment - 2008 (BEAREX-08) at the USDA-ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL), Bushland, Texas. SEBS was coded in a GIS environment to retrieve ET fluxes from the high resolution imageries acquired using airborne multispectral sensors. The CPRL has four large weighing lysimeters (3 m long x 3 m wide x 2.4 m deep), each located in the middle of approximately 5 ha fields, arranged in a block pattern. The two lysimeter fields located on the east (NE and SE) were managed under irrigated conditions, and the other two lysimeters on the west (NW and SW) were under dryland management. Each lysimeter field was equipped with an automated weather station that provided measurements for net radiation (Rn), Ts, soil heat flux (Go), Ta, relative humidity, and wind speed. During BEAREX08, the NE and SE fields were planted to cotton on May 21, and the NW and SW dryland lysimeters fields were planted to cotton on June 5. One LAS each was deployed across two large dryland lysimeter fields (NW and SW) and two large irrigated lysimeter fields (NE and SE). The

  16. Estimating Potential Evapotranspiration by Missing Temperature Data Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eladio Delgadillo-Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the statistical characteristics of potential evapotranspiration calculations and their relevance within the water balance used to determine water availability in hydrological basins. The purpose of this study was as follows: first, to apply a missing data reconstruction scheme in weather stations of the Rio Queretaro basin; second, to reduce the generated uncertainty of temperature data: mean, minimum, and maximum values in the evapotranspiration calculation which has a paramount importance in the manner of obtaining the water balance at any hydrological basin. The reconstruction of missing data was carried out in three steps: (1 application of a 4-parameter sinusoidal type regression to temperature data, (2 linear regression to residuals to obtain a regional behavior, and (3 estimation of missing temperature values for a certain year and during a certain season within the basin under study; estimated and observed temperature values were compared. Finally, using the obtained temperature values, the methods of Hamon, Papadakis, Blaney and Criddle, Thornthwaite, and Hargreaves were employed to calculate potential evapotranspiration that was compared to the real observed values in weather stations. With the results obtained from the application of this procedure, the surface water balance was corrected for the case study.

  17. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hochstadt, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Modern approach to differential equations presents subject in terms of ideas and concepts rather than special cases and tricks which traditional courses emphasized. No prerequisites needed other than a good calculus course. Certain concepts from linear algebra used throughout. Problem section at end of each chapter.

  18. Estimating Daily Reference Evapotranspiration in a Semi-Arid Region Using Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peshawa M. Najmaddin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimating daily evapotranspiration is challenging when ground observation data are not available or scarce. Remote sensing can be used to estimate the meteorological data necessary for calculating reference evapotranspiration ETₒ. Here, we assessed the accuracy of daily ETₒ estimates derived from remote sensing (ETₒ-RS compared with those derived from four ground-based stations (ETₒ-G in Kurdistan (Iraq over the period 2010–2014. Near surface air temperature, relative humidity and cloud cover fraction were derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AIRS/AMSU, and wind speed at 10 m height from MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application. Four methods were used to estimate ETₒ: Hargreaves–Samani (HS, Jensen–Haise (JH, McGuinness–Bordne (MB and the FAO Penman Monteith equation (PM. ETₒ-G (PM was adopted as the main benchmark. HS underestimated ETₒ by 2%–3% (R2 = 0.86 to 0.90; RMSE = 0.95 to 1.2 mm day−1 at different stations. JH and MB overestimated ETₒ by 8% to 40% (R2= 0.85 to 0.92; RMSE from 1.18 to 2.18 mm day−1. The annual average values of ETₒ estimated using RS data and ground-based data were similar to one another reflecting low bias in daily estimates. They ranged between 1153 and 1893 mm year−1 for ETₒ-G and between 1176 and 1859 mm year−1 for ETₒ-RS for the different stations. Our results suggest that ETₒ-RS (HS can yield accurate and unbiased ETₒ estimates for semi-arid regions which can be usefully employed in water resources management.

  19. [Evapotranspiration characteristics of artificial and natural forests in Liupan Mountains of Ningxia, China during growth season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gong-xiang; Wang, Xu-fang; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Yan-hui; Yu, Peng-tao; Wang, Yun-ni; Xu, Li-hong; Li, Zhen-hua

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of the structure of forest ecosystem on the hydrological processes, a comparative study by using thermal dissipation technique and hydrological methodology was made on the evapotranspiration (ET) and its components of Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation and Pinus armandi natural forest in two adjacent stands in a small catchment Xiangshuihe of Liupan Mountains during the growth season (May-October) in 2009. Throughout the growth season, the total ET from the plantation was 518.2 mm, which accounted for 104.6% of the precipitation and was much higher than that (420.5 mm) of the natural forest. The allocation of ET in the vertical layers performed similarly between the two stands, with the order of canopy layer > herb and soil layer > shrub layer, but the ratio of each component to total ET differed significantly. The plantation consumed 0.2 and 0.9 times more water for canopy interception (19.6 mm per month) and tree transpiration (25.2 mm per month) than the natural forest, respectively. However, the transpiration from the plantation was 4.4 mm per month, and took up 23.4% of the natural forest. In contrast, the sum of soil evaporation and herbage evapotranspiration consumed 37.1 mm water per month in the plantation, which was 0.8 times higher than that in the natural forest. The ET was calculated by Penman-Monteith equation to compare the results estimated by sap flow measurements, and the values estimated by the two methods were similar.

  20. Application of ANFIS and SVM Systems in Order to Estimate Monthly Reference Crop Evapotranspiration in the Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ahmadi

    2016-10-01

    by a linear boundary. In this method, the nearest samples to the decision boundary called support vectors. These vectors define the equation of the decision boundary. The classic intelligent simulation algorithms such as artificial neural network usually minimize the absolute error or sum of square errors of the training data, but the SVM models, used the structural error minimization principle (5. Results Discussion Based on the results of performance evaluations, and RMSE and R criteria, both of the SVM and ANFIS models had a high accuracy in predicting the reference evapotranspiration of North West of Iran. From the results of Tables 6 and 8, it can be concluded that both of the models had similar performance and they can present high accuracy in modeling with different inputs. As the ANFIS model for achieving the maximum accuracy used the maximum, minimum and average temperature, sunshine (M8 and wind speed. But the SVM model in Urmia and Sanandaj stations with M8 pattern and in other stations with M9 pattern achieves the maximum performance. In all of the stations (apart from Sanandaj station the SVM model had a high accuracy and less error than the ANFIS model but, this difference is not remarkable and the SVM model used more input parameters (than the ANFIS model for predicting the evapotranspiration. Conclusion In this research, in order to predict monthly reference evapotranspiration two ANFIS and SVM models employed using collected data at the six synoptic stations in the period of 38 years (1973-2010 located in the north-west of Iran. At first monthly evapotranspiration of a reference crop estimated by FAO-Penman- Monteith method for selected stations as the output of SVM and ANFIS models. Then a regression equation between effective meteorological parameters on evapotranspiration fitted and different input patterns for model determined. Results showed Relative humidity as the less effective parameter deleted from an input of the model. Also in this paper

  1. Explaining the evaporation paradox in Jiangxi Province of China: Spatial distribution and temporal trends in potential evapotranspiration of Jiangxi Province from 1961 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghui Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation acts as an important component and a key control factor in land hydrological processes. In order to analyze the trend of change on potential evapotranspiration from 1961 to 2013 and to discuss the existence of the evaporation paradox in Jiangxi province, China, monthly meteorological data spanning the years 1961–2013 were analyzed in this study, where the data were collected from 15 national meteorological stations in Jiangxi Province. The Penman–Monteith equation was employed to compute the potential evapotranspiration (ET0. Spatial interpolation and data mining technology were used to analyze the spatial and temporal changes of ET0 and air temperature, with the effort to explain the evaporation paradox. By solving the total differential and the partial derivatives coefficients of the independent variables in Penman–Monteith equation, the cause of the paradox was quantitatively evaluated. The results showed that the annual ET0 had been decreasing significantly in Jiangxi Province since 1979, whereas the air temperature had been rising significantly, presenting the evaporation paradox. The decreases in sunshine duration and wind speed reduced ET0 by 0.207 mm and 0.060 mm, respectively, accounting for 92.3% and 26.7% of the total ET0, respectively. It is concluded that sunshine duration and wind speed are the main causes to the decrease in potential evapotranspiration in Jiangxi Province.

  2. Groundwater Modelling For Recharge Estimation Using Satellite Based Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Mahmoud; (Tom) Rientjes, T. H. M.; (Christiaan) van der Tol, C.

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater movement is influenced by several factors and processes in the hydrological cycle, from which, recharge is of high relevance. Since the amount of aquifer extractable water directly relates to the recharge amount, estimation of recharge is a perquisite of groundwater resources management. Recharge is highly affected by water loss mechanisms the major of which is actual evapotranspiration (ETa). It is, therefore, essential to have detailed assessment of ETa impact on groundwater recharge. The objective of this study was to evaluate how recharge was affected when satellite-based evapotranspiration was used instead of in-situ based ETa in the Salland area, the Netherlands. The Methodology for Interactive Planning for Water Management (MIPWA) model setup which includes a groundwater model for the northern part of the Netherlands was used for recharge estimation. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) based actual evapotranspiration maps from Waterschap Groot Salland were also used. Comparison of SEBAL based ETa estimates with in-situ abased estimates in the Netherlands showed that these SEBAL estimates were not reliable. As such results could not serve for calibrating root zone parameters in the CAPSIM model. The annual cumulative ETa map produced by the model showed that the maximum amount of evapotranspiration occurs in mixed forest areas in the northeast and a portion of central parts. Estimates ranged from 579 mm to a minimum of 0 mm in the highest elevated areas with woody vegetation in the southeast of the region. Variations in mean seasonal hydraulic head and groundwater level for each layer showed that the hydraulic gradient follows elevation in the Salland area from southeast (maximum) to northwest (minimum) of the region which depicts the groundwater flow direction. The mean seasonal water balance in CAPSIM part was evaluated to represent recharge estimation in the first layer. The highest recharge estimated flux was for autumn

  3. Regionalization of the Hargreaves coefficient to estimate long-term reference evapotranspiration series in SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Maestre-Valero

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study employs a methodological approach for estimating long-term series of monthly reference evapotranspiration (ETo from historical data. To carry it out a regionally calibrated version of the Hargreaves equation was applied at old ordinary weather stations which only provide data of air temperature and precipitation. The proposed approach was based on the analysis of: (1 the Hargreaves coefficient obtained by local calibration from data of 66 modern automatic weather stations; (2 the regional characterization of the spatial variability of that coefficient by means of a “regional function”; and (3 the final application of this function to the old ordinary weather stations. This approach was assessed under the semiarid conditions of the Segura River Basin (south-eastern Spain by comparing ETo estimates against those obtained with the Penman-Monteith method, which was used as reference. Spatial variability of the Hargreaves coefficient was well correlated with the annual and monthly means of daily temperature range, so they were selected as explanatory variables for the regionalization of the Hargreaves coefficient following two approaches: a global regional function and monthly regional functions. The regionally calibrated version of the Hargreaves equation by monthly functions clearly improved the performance of its original parameterization (average relative error decreased from 19.8% to 10.1% although, as expected, estimates were not as good as those obtained with the local calibration (average relative error=7.7%.

  4. A glimpse at short-term controls of evapotranspiration along the southern slopes of Kilimanjaro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detsch, Florian; Otte, Insa; Appelhans, Tim; Nauss, Thomas

    2017-08-23

    Future climate characteristics of the southern Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania, are mainly determined by local land-use and global climate change. Reinforcing increasing dryness throughout the twentieth century, ongoing land transformation processes emphasize the need for a proper understanding of the regional-scale water budget and possible implications on related ecosystem functioning and services. Here, we present an analysis of scintillometer-based evapotranspiration (ET) covering seven distinct habitat types across a massive climate gradient from the colline savanna woodlands to the upper-mountain Helichrysum zone (940 to 3960 m.a.s.l.). Random forest-based mean variable importance indicates an outstanding significance of net radiation (R net) on the observed ET across all elevation levels. Accordingly, topography and frequent cloud/fog events have a dampening effect at high elevations, whereas no such constraints affect the energy and moisture-rich submontane coffee/grassland level. By contrast, long-term moisture availability is likely to impose restrictions upon evapotranspirative net water loss in savanna, which particularly applies to the pronounced dry season. At plot scale, ET can thereby be approximated reasonably using R net, soil heat flux, and to a lesser degree, vapor pressure deficit and rainfall as predictor variables (R 2 0.59 to 1.00). While multivariate regression based on pooled meteorological data from all plots proves itself useful for predicting hourly ET rates across a broader range of ecosystems (R 2 = 0.71), additional gains in explained variance can be achieved when vegetation characteristics as seen from the NDVI are considered (R 2 = 0.87). To sum up, our results indicate that valuable insights into land cover-specific ET dynamics, including underlying drivers, may be derived even from explicitly short-term measurements in an ecologically highly diverse landscape.

  5. Applicability of three complementary relationship models for estimating actual evapotranspiration in urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamichi Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of evapotranspiration estimated by the complementary relationship actual evapotranspiration (CRAE, the advection-aridity (AA, and the modified advection-aridity (MAA models were investigated in six pairs of rural and urban areas of Japan in order to evaluate the applicability of the three models the urban area. The main results are as follows: 1 The MAA model could apply to estimating the actual evapotranspiration in the urban area. 2 The actual evapotranspirations estimated by the three models were much less in the urban area than in the rural. 3 The difference among the estimated values of evapotranspiration in the urban areas was significant, depending on each model, while the difference among the values in the rural areas was relatively small. 4 All three models underestimated the actual evapotranspiration in the urban areas from humid surfaces where water and green spaces exist. 5 Each model could take the effect of urbanization into account.

  6. Encounter risk analysis of rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration in the irrigation district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinping; Lin, Xiaomin; Zhao, Yong; Hong, Yang

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration are random but mutually affected variables in the irrigation district, and their encounter situation can determine water shortage risks under the contexts of natural water supply and demand. However, in reality, the rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration may have different marginal distributions and their relations are nonlinear. In this study, based on the annual rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration data series from 1970 to 2013 in the Luhun irrigation district of China, the joint probability distribution of rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration are developed with the Frank copula function. Using the joint probability distribution, the synchronous-asynchronous encounter risk, conditional joint probability, and conditional return period of different combinations of rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration are analyzed. The results show that the copula-based joint probability distributions of rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration are reasonable. The asynchronous encounter probability of rainfall and reference crop evapotranspiration is greater than their synchronous encounter probability, and the water shortage risk associated with meteorological drought (i.e. rainfall variability) is more prone to appear. Compared with other states, there are higher conditional joint probability and lower conditional return period in either low rainfall or high reference crop evapotranspiration. For a specifically high reference crop evapotranspiration with a certain frequency, the encounter risk of low rainfall and high reference crop evapotranspiration is increased with the decrease in frequency. For a specifically low rainfall with a certain frequency, the encounter risk of low rainfall and high reference crop evapotranspiration is decreased with the decrease in frequency. When either the high reference crop evapotranspiration exceeds a certain frequency or low rainfall does not exceed a

  7. Prediction of Evapotranspiration in a Mediterranean Region Using Basic Meteorological Variables

    OpenAIRE

    Jato Espino, Daniel; Charlesworth, Susanne M.; Perales-Momparler, Sara; Andrés-Doménech, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    A critical need for farmers, particularly those in arid and semiarid areas is to have a reliable, accurate and reasonably accessible means of estimating the evapotranspiration rates of their crops to optimize their irrigation requirements. Evapotranspiration is a crucial process because of its influence on the precipitation that is returned to the atmosphere. The calculation of this variable often starts from the estimation of reference evapotranspiration, for which a variety of methods have ...

  8. Spatial and temporal evolution of climatic factors and its impacts on potential evapotranspiration in Loess Plateau of Northern Shaanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Wu, P T; Li, X L; Zhou, T W; Sun, S K; Wang, Y B; Luan, X B; Yu, X

    2017-07-01

    Agriculture is very sensitive to climate change, and correct forecasting of climate change is a great help to accurate allocation of irrigation water. The use of irrigation water is influenced by crop water demand and precipitation. Potential evapotranspiration (ET0) is a measure of the ability of the atmosphere to remove water from the surface through the processes of evaporation and transpiration, assuming no control on water supply. It plays an important role in assessing crop water requirements, regional dry-wet conditions, and other factors of water resource management. This study analyzed the spatial and temporal evolution processes and characteristics of major meteorological parameters at 10 stations in the Loess Plateau of northern Shaanxi (LPNS). By using the Mann-Kendall trend test with trend-free pre-whitening and the ArcGIS platform, the potential evapotranspiration of each station was quantified by using the Penman-Monteith equation, and the effects of climatic factors on potential evapotranspiration were assessed by analyzing the contribution rate and sensitivity of the climatic factors. The results showed that the climate in LPNS has become warmer and drier. In terms of the sensitivity of ET0 to the variation of each climatic factor in LPNS, relative humidity (0.65) had the highest sensitivity, followed by daily maximum temperature, wind speed, sunshine hours, and daily minimum temperature (-0.05). In terms of the contribution rate of each factor to ET0, daily maximum temperature (5.16%) had the highest value, followed by daily minimum temperature, sunshine hours, relative humidity, and wind speed (1.14%). This study provides a reference for the management of agricultural water resources and for countermeasures to climate change. According to the climate change and the characteristics of the study area, farmers in the region should increase irrigation to guarantee crop water demand. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. CMS: Evapotranspiration and Meteorology, Water-Limited Shrublands, Mexico, 2008-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides daily average observations for evapotranspiration (measured and gap-filled), precipitation, net radiation, soil water content, air...

  10. Climate Change: Generic Implications for Agriculture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Climate Change: Generic Implications for Agriculture. Increasing carbon dioxide: Good for most crops. Increase in mean temperature: orter crop durations, higher evapotranspiration, other effects on growth and yield. Intermittent periods of extreme heat stress: highly ...

  11. Integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, Francesco Giacomo

    1957-01-01

    This classic text on integral equations by the late Professor F. G. Tricomi, of the Mathematics Faculty of the University of Turin, Italy, presents an authoritative, well-written treatment of the subject at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. To render the book accessible to as wide an audience as possible, the author has kept the mathematical knowledge required on the part of the reader to a minimum; a solid foundation in differential and integral calculus, together with some knowledge of the theory of functions is sufficient. The book is divided into four chapters, with two useful

  12. Assessing factors that influence deviations between measured and calculated reference evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodny, Marek; Nolz, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a fundamental component of the hydrological cycle, but challenging to be quantified. Lysimeter facilities, for example, can be installed and operated to determine ET, but they are costly and represent only point measurements. Therefore, lysimeter data are traditionally used to develop, calibrate, and validate models that allow calculating reference evapotranspiration (ET0) based on meteorological data, which can be measured more easily. The standardized form of the well-known FAO Penman-Monteith equation (ASCE-EWRI) is recommended as a standard procedure for estimating ET0 and subsequently plant water requirements. Applied and validated under different climatic conditions, the Penman-Monteith equation is generally known to deliver proper results. On the other hand, several studies documented deviations between measured and calculated ET0 depending on environmental conditions. Potential reasons are, for example, differing or varying surface characteristics of the lysimeter and the location where the weather instruments are placed. Advection of sensible heat (transport of dry and hot air from surrounding areas) might be another reason for deviating ET-values. However, elaborating causal processes is complex and requires comprehensive data of high quality and specific analysis techniques. In order to assess influencing factors, we correlated differences between measured and calculated ET0 with pre-selected meteorological parameters and related system parameters. Basic data were hourly ET0-values from a weighing lysimeter (ET0_lys) with a surface area of 2.85 m2 (reference crop: frequently irrigated grass), weather data (air and soil temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, wind velocity, and solar radiation), and soil water content in different depths. ET0_ref was calculated in hourly time steps according to the standardized procedure after ASCE-EWRI (2005). Deviations between both datasets were calculated as ET0_lys-ET0_ref and

  13. Spatiotemporal Variability in Potential Evapotranspiration across an Urban Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. R.; Long, M. R.; Fipps, G.; Swanson, C.; Traore, S.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration in urban and peri-urban environments is difficult to measure and predict. Barriers to accurate assessment include: the wide range of microclimates caused by urban canyons, heat islands, and park cooling; limited instrument fetch; and the patchwork of native soils, engineered soils, and hardscape. These issues combine to make an accurate assessment of the urban water balance difficult, as evapotranspiration calculations require accurate meteorological data. This study examines nearly three years of data collected by a network of 18 weather stations in Dallas, Texas, designed to measure potential evapotranspiration (ETo) in support of the WaterMyYard conservation program (http://WaterMyYard.org). Variability amongst stations peaked during the summer irrigation months, with a maximum standard deviation of 0.3 mm/hr and 4 mm/d. However, we found a significant degree of information overlap in the network. Most stations had a high correlation (>0.75) with at least one other station in the network, and many had a high correlation with at least 10 others. Correlation strength between station ETo measurements did not necessarily decrease with Euclidean distance, as expected, but was more closely related to differences in station elevation and longitude. Stations that had low correlations with others in the network typically had siting and fetch issues. ETo showed a strong temporal persistence; average station autocorrelation was 0.79 at a 1-hour lag and 0.70 at a 24-hour lag. To supplement the larger-scale network data, we deployed a mobile, vehicle-mounted weather station to quantify deviations present in the atmospheric drivers of evapotranspiration: temperature, humidity, wind, and solar radiation. Data were collected at mid-day during the irrigation season. We found differences in mobile and station ETo predictions up to 0.2 mm/hr, primarily driven by wind speed variations. These results suggest that ETo variation at the neighborhood to municipality

  14. Stochastic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    2014-01-01

    Preliminaries Introduction Some Examples Brownian Motions and Martingales Stochastic Integrals Stochastic Differential Equations of Itô Type Lévy Processes and Stochastic IntegralsStochastic Differential Equations of Lévy Type Comments Scalar Equations of First Order Introduction Generalized Itô's Formula Linear Stochastic Equations Quasilinear Equations General Remarks Stochastic Parabolic Equations Introduction Preliminaries Solution of Stochastic Heat EquationLinear Equations with Additive Noise Some Regularity Properties Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Equations Parabolic Equations with Grad

  15. New alternatives for reference evapotranspiration estimation in West Africa using limited weather data and ancillary data supply strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeras, Gorka; Bekoe, Emmanuel; Ampofo, Joseph; Logah, Frederick; Diop, Mbaye; Cisse, Madiama; Shiri, Jalal

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ET 0 ) is essential for the computation of crop water requirements, irrigation scheduling, and water resources management. In this context, having a battery of alternative local calibrated ET 0 estimation methods is of great interest for any irrigation advisory service. The development of irrigation advisory services will be a major breakthrough for West African agriculture. In the case of many West African countries, the high number of meteorological inputs required by the Penman-Monteith equation has been indicated as constraining. The present paper investigates for the first time in Ghana, the estimation ability of artificial intelligence-based models (Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Gene Expression Programing (GEPs)), and ancillary/external approaches for modeling reference evapotranspiration (ET 0 ) using limited weather data. According to the results of this study, GEPs have emerged as a very interesting alternative for ET 0 estimation at all the locations of Ghana which have been evaluated in this study under different scenarios of meteorological data availability. The adoption of ancillary/external approaches has been also successful, moreover in the southern locations. The interesting results obtained in this study using GEPs and some ancillary approaches could be a reference for future studies about ET 0 estimation in West Africa.

  16. Research of large-amplitude waves evolution in the framework of shallow water equations and their implication for people's safety in extreme situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Chaikovskaia, Natalya; Rodin, Artem

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the formation and evolution of shock wave in shallow water with no restrictions on its amplitude in the framework of the nonlinear shallow water equations. It is shown that in the case of large-amplitude waves appears a new nonlinear effect of reflection from the shock front of incident wave. These results are important for the assessment of coastal flooding by tsunami waves and storm surges. Very often the largest number of victims was observed on the coastline where the wave moved breaking. Many people, instead of running away, were just looking at the movement of the "raging wall" and lost time. This fact highlights the importance of researching the problem of security and optimal behavior of people in situations with increased risk. Usually there is uncertainty about the exact time, when rogue waves will impact. This fact limits the ability of people to adjust their behavior psychologically to the stressful situations. It concerns specialists, who are busy both in the field of flying activity and marine service as well as adults, young people and children, who live on the coastal zone. The rogue wave research is very important and it demands cooperation of different scientists - mathematicians and physicists, as well as sociologists and psychologists, because the final goal of efforts of all scientists is minimization of the harm, brought by rogue waves to humanity.

  17. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration of Mediterranean perennial crops by means of remote-sensing based surface energy balance models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rallo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual evapotranspiration from typical Mediterranean crops has been assessed in a Sicilian study area by using surface energy balance (SEB and soil-water balance models. Both modelling approaches use remotely sensed data to estimate evapotranspiration fluxes in a spatially distributed way. The first approach exploits visible (VIS, near-infrared (NIR and thermal (TIR observations to solve the surface energy balance equation whereas the soil-water balance model uses only VIS-NIR data to detect the spatial variability of crop parameters. Considering that the study area is characterized by typical spatially sparse Mediterranean vegetation, i.e. olive, citrus and vineyards, alternating bare soil and canopy, we focused the attention on the main conceptual differences between one-source and two-sources energy balance models. Two different models have been tested: the widely used one-source SEBAL model, where soil and vegetation are considered as the sole source (mostly appropriate in the case of uniform vegetation coverage and the two-sources TSEB model, where soil and vegetation components of the surface energy balance are treated separately. Actual evapotranspiration estimates by means of the two surface energy balance models have been compared vs. the outputs of the agro-hydrological SWAP model, which was applied in a spatially distributed way to simulate one-dimensional water flow in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Remote sensing data in the VIS and NIR spectral ranges have been used to infer spatially distributed vegetation parameters needed to set up the upper boundary condition of SWAP. Actual evapotranspiration values obtained from the application of the soil water balance model SWAP have been considered as the reference to be used for energy balance models accuracy assessment.

    Airborne hyperspectral data acquired during a NERC (Natural Environment Research Council, UK campaign in 2005 have been used. The results of this

  18. Evaluation of satellite-based evapotranspiration estimates in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Li, Zhe; Tang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Xingcai; Cui, Huijuan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and continuous estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is crucial for effective water resource management. We used the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) standard ET algorithm forced by the MODIS land products and the three-hourly solar radiation datasets to estimate daily actual evapotranspiration of China (ET_MOD) for the years 2001 to 2015. From the point scale validations using seven eddy covariance tower sites, the results showed that the agreement of ET_MOD estimates and observations was higher for monthly and daily values than that of instantaneous values. Under the major river basin and subbasin levels' comparisons with the variable infiltration capacity hydrological model estimates, the ET_MOD exhibited a slight overestimation in northern China and underestimation in southern China. The mean annual ET_MOD estimates agreed favorably with the hydrological model with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.93 and 0.83 at major river basin and subbasin scale, respectively. At national scale, the spatiotemporal variations of ET_MOD estimates matched well with those ET estimates from various sources. However, ET_MOD estimates were generally lower than the other estimates in the Tibetan Plateau. This underestimation may be attributed to the plateau climate along with low air temperature and sparsely vegetated surface on the Tibetan Plateau.

  19. Evapotranspiration Cycles in a High Latitude Agroecosystem: Potential Warming Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruairuen, Watcharee

    2015-01-01

    As the acreages of agricultural lands increase, changes in surface energetics and evapotranspiration (ET) rates may arise consequently affecting regional climate regimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate summertime ET dynamics and surface energy processes in a subarctic agricultural farm in Interior Alaska. The study includes micrometeorological and hydrological data. Results covering the period from June to September 2012 and 2013 indicated consistent energy fractions: LE/Rnet (67%), G/Rnet (6%), H/Rnet (27%) where LE is latent heat flux, Rnet is the surface net radiation, G is ground heat flux and H is the sensible heat flux. Additionally actual surface evapotranspiration from potential evaporation was found to be in the range of 59 to 66%. After comparing these rates with those of most prominent high latitude ecosystems it is argued here that if agroecosystem in high latitudes become an emerging feature in the land-use, the regional surface energy balance will significantly shift in comparison to existing Arctic natural ecosystems. PMID:26368123

  20. Mapping reference evapotranspiration from meteorological satellite data and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hwi Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference evapotranspiration (ETo is an agrometeorological variable widely used in hydrology and agriculture. The FAO-56 Penman-Monteith combination method (PM method is a standard for computing ETo for water management. However, this scheme is limited to areas where climatic data with good quality are available. Maps of 10-day averaged ETo at 5 km × 5 km grid spacing for the Taiwan region were produced by multiplying pan evaporation (Epan, derived from ground solar radiation (GSR retrieved from satellite images using the Heliosat-3 method, by a fixed pan coefficient (Kp. Validation results indicated that the overall mean absolute percentage error (MAPE and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD were 6.2 and 7.7%, respectively, when compared with ETo computed by the PM method using spatially interpolated 10-day averaged daily maximum and minimum temperature datasets and GSR derived from satellite inputs. Land coefficient (KL values based on the derived ETo estimates and long term latent heat flux measurements, were determined for the following landscapes: Paddy rice (Oryza sativa, subtropical cypress forest (Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana and Chamaecyparis formosensis, warm-to-temperate mixed rainforest (Cryptocarya chinensis, Engelhardtia roxburghiana, Tutcheria shinkoensis, and Helicia formosana, and grass marsh (Brachiaria mutica and Phragmites australis. The determined land coefficients are indispensable to scale ETo in estimating regional evapotranspiration.

  1. Experimental study and simulations of infiltration in evapotranspiration landfill covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xian Zhang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various cover systems have been designed for landfill sites in order to minimize infiltration (percolation into the underlying waste. This study evaluated the soil water balance performance of evapotranspiration covers (ET covers and simulated percolation in the systems using the active region model (ARM. Experiments were conducted to measure water flow processes and water balance components in a bare soil cover and different ET covers. Results showed that vegetation played a critical role in controlling the water balance of the ET covers. In soil profiles of 60-cm depth with and without vegetation cover, the maximum soil water storage capacities were 97.2 mm and 62.8 mm, respectively. The percolation amount in the bare soil was 2.1 times that in the vegetation-covered soil. The ARM simulated percolation more accurately than the continuum model because it considered preferential flow. Numerical simulation results also indicated that using the ET cover system was an effective way of removing water through evapotranspiration, thus reducing percolation.

  2. Validation and calibration of various reference evapotranspiration alternative methods under the climate conditions of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrija Čadro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH, the number of weather stations (WS that are monitoring all climatic parameters required for FAO-56 Penman-Monteith (FAO-PM equation is limited. In fact, it is of great need and importance to achieve the possibility of calculating reference evapotranspiration (ET0 for every WS in BiH (around 150, regardless of the number of climate parameters which they collect. Solving this problem is possible by using alternative equations that require less climatological data for reliable estimation of daily and monthly ET0. The main objective of this study was to validate and determine, compared to the FAO-PM method, a suitable and reliable alternative ET0 equations that are requiring less input data and have a simple calculation procedure, with a special focus on Thornthwaite and Turc as methods previously often used in BiH. To fulfill this objective, 12 alternative ET0 calculation methods and 21 locally adjusted versions of same equations were validated against FAO-PM ET0 method. Daily climatic data, recorded at sixteen WS, including mean maximum and minimum air temperature (°C, precipitation (mm, minimum and maximum relative humidity (%, wind speed (m s−1 and sunshine hours (h for the period 1961–2015 (55 years were collected and averaged over each month. Several types of statistical indicators: the determination coefficient (R2, mean bias error (MBE, the variance of the distribution of differences (sd2, the root mean square difference (RMSD and the mean absolute error (MAE were used to assess alternative ET0 equation performance. The results, confirmed by various statistical indicators, shows that the most suitable and reliable alternative equation for monthly ET0 calculation in BiH is the locally adjusted Trajkovic method. Adjusted Hargreaves-Samani method was the second best performing method. The two most frequently used ET0 calculation methods in BiH until now, Thornthwaite and Turc, were ranked low

  3. Determination of crop and soil evaporation coefficients for estimating evapotranspiration in a paddy field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, H.; Zhang, C.; Oue, Hiroki; Peng, Guang Jie; Darko, Ransford Opoku

    2017-01-01

    Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration is important in efficient water management for improving water use efficiency. In order to obtain evapotranspiration and evaporation beneath the canopy using the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) method, pan evaporation was used instead of reference

  4. Evapotranspiration from understory vegetation in an eastern Siberian boreal larch forest, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iida, S.; Ohta, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Nakai, T.; Kuwada, T.; Konovov, A.V.; Maximov, T.C.; van der Molen, M.K.; Dolman, A.J.; Tanaka, H.; Yabuki, H.

    2009-01-01

    We measured evapotranspiration in an eastern Siberian boreal forest, in which the understory was cowberry and the overstory was larch, during the entire growing seasons of 2005 and 2006. We compared evapotranspiration from the understory vegetation above the forest floor E

  5. Estimating Daily Evapotranspiration From Remotely Sensed Instantaneous Observations With Simplified Derivations of a Theoretical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ronglin; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2017-10-01

    Surface evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the key components in global hydrological cycle and energy budget on Earth. This paper designs a theoretical relationship between daily and instantaneous ETs with a multiplication of multiple fractions through a mathematical derivation of the physics-based Penman-Monteith equation and further develops five methods for converting remotely sensed instantaneous ET to daily values, one of which is equivalent to the conventional constant evaporative fraction (EF) method. The five methods are then evaluated and intercompared using long-term ground-based eddy covariance system-measured half-hourly latent heat flux (LE) and three groups of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-based instantaneous LE data sets collected from April 2009 to late October 2011 at the Yucheng station. Overall, the constant decoupling factor (Ω) method, the constant surface resistance (Rc) method, and the constant ratio of surface resistance to aerodynamic resistance (Rc/Ra) method could produce daily LE estimates that are in reasonably good agreement with the ground-based eddy covariance measurements, whereas the constant EF method and the constant Priestley-Taylor parameter (α) method underestimate the daily LE with larger biases and root-mean-square errors. The former three methods are of more solid physical foundation and can effectively capture the effect of temporally variable meteorological factors on the diurnal pattern of surface ET. They provide good alternatives to the nowadays commonly applied methods for the conversion of remotely sensed instantaneous ET to daily values.

  6. [An operational remote sensing algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration based on NOAA PAL dataset].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; He, Yan-Bo; Wang, Jian-Lin; Tian, Guo-Liang

    2009-10-01

    Based on the time series 10-day composite NOAA Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) dataset (8 km x 8 km), and by using land surface energy balance equation and "VI-Ts" (vegetation index-land surface temperature) method, a new algorithm of land surface evapotranspiration (ET) was constructed. This new algorithm did not need the support from meteorological observation data, and all of its parameters and variables were directly inversed or derived from remote sensing data. A widely accepted ET model of remote sensing, i. e., SEBS model, was chosen to validate the new algorithm. The validation test showed that both the ET and its seasonal variation trend estimated by SEBS model and our new algorithm accorded well, suggesting that the ET estimated from the new algorithm was reliable, being able to reflect the actual land surface ET. The new ET algorithm of remote sensing was practical and operational, which offered a new approach to study the spatiotemporal variation of ET in continental scale and global scale based on the long-term time series satellite remote sensing images.

  7. Estimating Evapotranspiration from an Improved Two-Source Energy Balance Model Using ASTER Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Zhuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliably estimating the turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat at the Earth’s surface by remote sensing is important for research on the terrestrial hydrological cycle. This paper presents a practical approach for mapping surface energy fluxes using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER images from an improved two-source energy balance (TSEB model. The original TSEB approach may overestimate latent heat flux under vegetative stress conditions, as has also been reported in recent research. We replaced the Priestley-Taylor equation used in the original TSEB model with one that uses plant moisture and temperature constraints based on the PT-JPL model to obtain a more accurate canopy latent heat flux for model solving. The collected ASTER data and field observations employed in this study are over corn fields in arid regions of the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER area, China. The results were validated by measurements from eddy covariance (EC systems, and the surface energy flux estimates of the improved TSEB model are similar to the ground truth. A comparison of the results from the original and improved TSEB models indicates that the improved method more accurately estimates the sensible and latent heat fluxes, generating more precise daily evapotranspiration (ET estimate under vegetative stress conditions.

  8. SMAP Soil Moisture Data To Improve Remotely Sensed Global Estimates of Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, A. J.; Fisher, J.; Goulden, M.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Surface water availability limits plant productivity and the ability to transport water from the soil to the atmosphere in over 1/3rd of earth's vegetated land. Quantifying evapotranspiration (ET) across large areas requires the integration of satellite-observed land surface variables into physical or empirical equations that govern the transfer of mass and energy from land to the atmosphere. Many satellite ET algorithms have been developed to compute ET globally, but the current methods of two widely-used ET algorithms rely on implicit representation of soil moisture, limiting their capacity to impose proper physical constraints on ET under water limiting conditions. The successful launch of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite provides the first space-based soil moisture observations with the fidelity and the necessary spatio-temporal resolution to integrate directly into remote sensing ET algorithms and compare to in situ observations. Here we incorporate SMAP soil moisture observations into two widely used ET algorithms, the Priestley Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) ET model and the Penman Monteith MOD16. We present new soil moisture stress formulation and parameterization for each algorithm and evaluate model performance before and after soil moisture integration across a suite of in situ observations spanning a range of plant functional types and climates.

  9. Influence of green-house cover on potential evapotranspiration and cucumber water requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Hashem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain morphology and seed coat characters of 11 cultivars belonging to two species. The experiment was conducted through two successive seasons of 2008 and 2009 at El-Bosaily farm, El-Behira governorate at the North Coastal of the Nile Delta, in Egypt. This work aimed to study the effect of three green-house covers (polyethylene sheet, white and black net and three irrigation levels [80%, 100% and 120% of the potential evapotranspiration estimated according to class A pan equation (ETo], applied by drip irrigation system, on plant growth and crop yield of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Reda F1. The experimental design was split–plot with three replicates. The results showed that white net green-house cover optimized growth and yield of cucumber plant. White net cover treatment recorded the highest vegetative growth (plant height, number of leaves, total leaves area, total fresh and dry weights, and significantly increased total yield. The highest vegetative growth was obtained by 100% ETo compared to 80% and 120% ETo treatments. The interaction among water treatment and green-house cover indicated the highest vegetative growth and crop yield was obtained under white net cover with 100% ETo.

  10. Reference evapotranspiration models using different time scales in the Jaboticabal region of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Buzinaro Caporusso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare 18 reference evapotranspiration models to the standard Penman-Monteith model in the Jaboticabal, São Paulo, region for the following time scales: daily, 5-day, 15-day and seasonal. A total of 5 years of daily meteorological data was used for the following analyses: accuracy (mean absolute percentage error, Mape, precision (R2 and tendency (bias (systematic error, SE. The results were also compared at the 95% probability level with Tukey’s test. The Priestley-Taylor (1972 method was the most accurate for all time scales, the Tanner-Pelton (1960 method was the most accurate in the winter, and the Thornthwaite (1948 method was the most accurate of the methods that only used temperature data in the equations.

  11. Measuring Evapotranspiration in Urban Irrigated Lawns in Two Kansas Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Bremer, D.; Ham, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Conservation of water is becoming increasingly critical in many metropolitan areas. The use of automated irrigation systems for the maintenance of lawns and landscapes is rising and these systems are typically maladjusted to apply more water than necessary, resulting in water wastage. Provision of accurate estimates of actual lawn water use may assist urbanites in conserving water through better adjustment of automatic irrigation systems. Micrometeorological methods may help determine actual lawn water use by measuring evapotranspiration (ET) from urban lawns. From April - August of 2011, four small tripod-mounted weather stations (tripods, five total) were deployed in twelve residential landscapes in the Kansas cities of Manhattan (MHK) and Wichita (ICT) in the USA (six properties in each city). Each tripod was instrumented to estimate reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo) via the FAO-56 method. During tripod deployment in residential lawns, actual evapotranspiration (ETactual) was measured nearby using a stationary, trailer-mounted eddy covariance (EC) station. The EC station sampled well-watered turf at the K-State Rocky Ford Turfgrass Center within 5 km of the study properties in MHK, and was also deployed at a commercial sod farm 15 - 40 km from the study residences in the greater ICT metro area. The fifth tripod was deployed in the source area of the EC station to estimate ETo in conjunction with tripods in the lawns (i.e., to serve as a reference). Data from EC allowed for computation of a so-called lawn coefficient (Kc) by determining the ratio of ETo from the tripods in residential lawns to ETo from the EC station (ETo,EC); hence, Kc = ETo,tripod / ETo,EC. Using this method, ETactual can be estimated for individual tripods within a lawn. Data suggests that it may be more accurate to quantify ET within individual lawns by microclimate (i.e., determine coefficients for "shaded" and "open/unshaded" portions of a lawn). By finding microclimate coefficients

  12. Seasonal comparison of two spatially distributed evapotranspiration mapping methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisfaludi, Balázs; Csáki, Péter; Péterfalvi, József; Primusz, Péter

    2017-04-01

    More rainfall is disposed of through evapotranspiration (ET) on a global scale than through runoff and storage combined. In Hungary, about 90% of the precipitation evapotranspirates from the land and only 10% goes to surface runoff and groundwater recharge. Therefore, evapotranspiration is a very important element of the water balance, so it is a suitable parameter for the calibration of hydrological models. Monthly ET values of two MODIS-data based ET products were compared for the area of Hungary and for the vegetation period of the year 2008. The differences were assessed by land cover types and by elevation zones. One ET map was the MOD16, aiming at global coverage and provided by the MODIS Global Evaporation Project. The other method is called CREMAP, it was developed at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics for regional scale ET mapping. CREMAP was validated for the area of Hungary with good results, but ET maps were produced only for the period of 2000-2008. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the MOD16 product compared to the CREMAP method. The average difference between the two products was the highest during summer, CREMAP estimating higher ET values by about 25 mm/month. In the spring and autumn, MOD16 ET values were higher by an average of 6 mm/month. The differences by land cover types showed a similar seasonal pattern to the average differences, and they correlated strongly with each other. Practically the same difference values could be calculated for arable lands and forests that together cover nearly 75% of the area of the country. Therefore, it can be said that the seasonal changes had the same effect on the two method's ET estimations in each land cover type areas. The analysis by elevation zones showed that on elevations lower than 200 m AMSL the trends of the difference values were similar to the average differences. The correlation between the values of these elevation zones was also strong. However weaker

  13. Quantifying Climatic Impact on Reference Evapotranspiration Trends in the Huai River Basin of Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Reference evapotranspiration (ETref is an important study object for hydrological cycle processes in the context of drought-flood risks of the Huai River Basin (HRB. In this study, the FAO-56 Penman–Monteith (PM model was employed to calculate seasonal and annual ETref based on 137 meteorological station data points in HRB from 1961 to 2014. The Mann–Kendall (MK trend analysis was adopted together with Theil–Sen’s estimator to detect tendencies of ETref and climate factors. Furthermore, a developed differential equation method based on the FAO-56 PM model was applied to quantify the sensitivities of ETref to meteorological factors and their contributions to ETref trends. The results showed that the ETref demonstrated a strong spatially heterogeneity in the whole HRB at each time scale. ETref showed a significant decreasing trend in the upper-middle HRB and Yi-Shu-Si River Basin, especially at the annual time scale, in growing season and summer, while a generally increasing trend in ETref was detected in the lower HRB, and the significance only showed in spring. These phenomena could be reasonably explained by a significantly increasing mean temperature (TA, a significantly decreasing wind speed (WS, solar radiation (SR, and a slightly decreasing relative humidity (RH. The most sensitive factor to ETref was RH in most sub-regions and most time scales, except in the growing season and summer. Based on the developed differential equation method, the dominant factor of the decreasing ETref was WS in the annual time scale, spring, autumn, and winter in most sub-regions, except the lower HRB, which then shifted to SR in the growing season and summer. However, in the lower HRB, the significantly decreasing RH was the most dominant factor, especially in the annual time scale, growing season, and spring, which might be responsible for the slightly increasing ETref there.

  14. Evaluation of three empirical reference evapotranspiration models at a tropical station under three sky conditions using two solar radiation estimation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Ejieji

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An existing solar radiation model developed at Ilorin and found to be more reliable than Angstrom-type and Hargreaves solar radiation equations was used in the FAO Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration model (FAOPM to obtain daily reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo for a 32-year (1970 to 2001 period. The number of days having all the required input meteorological data was 9335. The sky conditions of the days were classified as clear, partially cloudy or cloudy depending on the cloudiness index i.e. the ratio of diffuse solar radiation to total solar radiation. The ETo values obtained with FAOPM were compared with predictions of three simpler empirical ETo models namely the Hargreaves (HGRV, Jensen and Haise (JHSE and Blaney-Morin-Nigeria (BMN models. When the more reliable solar radiation model was used in HGRV and JHSE, their performances were better than when the solar radiation equation of Hargreaves was used. Generally the three simpler models overpredicted ETo. The bias, root mean square difference (RSMD and absolute error of prediction deteriorated with sky cloudiness when the solar radiation equation of Hargreaves was used. Linear regression equations with zero intercepts were developed for the estimation of FAOPM predictions from those of the simpler ETo models. The regression equations relating the predictions of FAOPM to those of HGRV generally yielded the highest coefficients of determination and the lowest standard errors of regression. The predictions of HGRV were also the closest to the corresponding FAOPM predictions under the various sky conditions. Based on the outcome of the regression analysis and the ease of application of HGRV, the FAOPM-versus-HGRV regression equations were recommended for the estimation of FAOPM predictions of daily ETo when the use of FAOPM is necessary but not feasible because of incomplete input data.

  15. Effect of Weather Patterns in Cities Across the United States on Surface Runoff, Deep Drainage, and Evapotranspiration from a Residential Parcel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voter, C. B.; Steven, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    In order to compensate for the effects of impervious surfaces, a common hydrologic goal in urban areas is to reduce surface runoff and enhance infiltration. Characteristics of urban development such as impervious connectivity and soil condition are important controls over these hydrologic processes; decreasing impervious connectivity and increasing soil permeability and microtopography can reduce runoff and locally enhance infiltration. By extension, these changes in development characteristics must also increase one or more subsurface fluxes, but the relationship among subsurface processes is complicated by the degree to which evapotranspiration is water-limited or energy-limited; increases in infiltration more directly translate to increases in recharge during wetter conditions than in drier times when plant water stress is high. Exploring how these tradeoffs change under different climate and weather scenarios is relevant for understanding the hydroecologic implications of development decisions in a range of locations. We use ParFlow.CLM, a watershed model with variably-saturated subsurface flow and fully integrated overland flow and land-surface processes, to examine the extent to which weather patterns in different cities across the United States affect subsurface partitioning in alternate residential parcel development scenarios. We show that evapotranspiration is more sensitive to parcel-scale development characteristics in drier climates and deep drainage is more sensitive to these characteristics in wetter climates, as measured by parameters such as storm intensity, storm duration, between-storm duration, and potential evapotranspiration.

  16. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully

  17. Comparison of three different approaches to estimate evapotranspiration over large areas: remotely sensed method, complementary approach and SVAT model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguy, Maliko; Baille, Alain; Taylor, Christopher; Harris, Phil

    2010-05-01

    Methods able to accurately estimate ET over large areas are important for many applications. Spatial mapping of evapotranspiration (ET) is a prerequisite to a wide range of studies in hydrology, forestry, land and crop management, irrigation, water resources planning, etc. In this study, three different approaches to estimate ET over large areas are compared and evaluated. (1) The first one is a variant of the so-called "triangle" method (Jiang et al., 2004), which uses almost exclusively remote sensing data. Vegetation Fraction (Fv) - from the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) - and surface temperature (Ts) were obtained from MODIS products at satellite overpass. The graphical analysis of the Ts-Fv space allows estimating the evaporative fraction (EF), which is then used to derive ET. (2) The second method is the Advection-Aridity (AA) model (Brusaert et al., 1979). This simple approach, which only requires routinely available meteorological data, assumes that a complementary relationship exists between Potential Evapotranspiration (ETpot) and Actual Evapotranspiration (ETa). Although questioned for the lack of scientific basis of the complementary assumption, the AA model is currently used in hydrological applications requiring spatial mapping of ET. (3) The third method relies on the use of a land surface scheme ("JULES" - the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) which is integrated within the UK Met Office climate model. This approach, based on equations that take into account the different biophysical processes involved in land surface environment, is likely to be the most reliable in theory but in practice it may be limited by the availability of parameters describing the soil and vegetation in a particular area, required to solve the set of equations describing land-atmosphere interactions. The three methods were applied to ET mapping of the Segura River Basin, a semi-arid region of South-Eastern Spain. Results from the case-study are presented

  18. Convolutional neural networks for estimating spatially distributed evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pedrero, Angel M.; Gonzalo-Martín, Consuelo; Lillo-Saavedra, Mario F.; Rodriguéz-Esparragón, Dionisio; Menasalvas, Ernestina

    2017-10-01

    Efficient water management in agriculture requires an accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET). There are available several balance energy surface models that provide a daily ET estimation (ETd) spatially and temporarily distributed for different crops over wide areas. These models need infrared thermal spectral band (gathered from remotely sensors) to estimate sensible heat flux from the surface temperature. However, this spectral band is not available for most current operational remote sensors. Even though the good results provided by machine learning (ML) methods in many different areas, few works have applied these approaches for forecasting distributed ETd on space and time when aforementioned information is missing. However, these methods do not exploit the land surface characteristics and the relationships among land covers producing estimation errors. In this work, we have developed and evaluated a methodology that provides spatial distributed estimates of ETd without thermal information by means of Convolutional Neural Networks.

  19. Modelling of evapotranspiration at field and landscape scales. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Butts, M.B.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    The overall aim of this project is to couple a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (ARPS) to an integrated hydrological model (MIKE SHE) to investigate atmospheric and hydrological feedbacks at different scales. To ensure a consistent coupling a new land-surface component based on a modified...... Shuttleworth-Wallace scheme was implemented in MIKE SHE. To validate the new land-surface component at different scales, the hydrological model was applied to an intensively monitored 10 km2 agricultural area in Denmark with a resolution of 40 meter. The model is forced with half-hourly metorological...... observations from a nearby weather station. Detailed land-use and soil maps were used to set up the model. Leaf area index was derived from NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) images. To validate the model at field scale the simulated evapotranspiration rates were compared to eddy...

  20. Exploring standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index for drought assessment in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Md Giashuddin; Abdullah, Hasan Muhammad; Jeong, Changyoon

    2017-10-09

    Drought is a critical issue, and it has a pressing, negative impact on agriculture, ecosystems, livelihoods, food security, and sustainability. The problem has been studied globally, but its regional or even local dimension is sometimes overlooked. Local-level drought assessment is necessary for developing adaptation and mitigation strategies for that particular region. Keeping this in understanding, an attempt was made to create a detailed assessment of drought characteristics at the local scale in Bangladesh. Standardized precipitation evapotranspiration (SPEI) is a new drought index that mainly considers the rainfall and evapotranspiration data set. Globally, SPEI has become a useful drought index, but its local scale application is not common. SPEI base (0.5° grid data) for 110 years (1901-2011) was utilized to overcome the lack of long-term climate data in Bangladesh. Available weather data (1955-2011) from Bangladesh Meteorology Department (BMD) were analyzed to calculate SPEI weather station using the SPEI calculator. The drivers for climate change-induced droughts were characterized by residual temperature and residual rainfall data from different BMD stations. Grid data (SPEI base ) of 26 stations of BMD were used for drought mapping. The findings revealed that the frequency and intensity of drought are higher in the northwestern part of the country which makes it vulnerable to both extreme and severe droughts. Based on the results, the SPEI-based drought intensity and frequency analyses were carried out, emphasizing Rangpur (northwest region) as a hot spot, to get an insight of drought assessment in Bangladesh. The findings of this study revealed that SPEI could be a valuable tool to understand the evolution and evaluation of the drought induced by climate change in the country. The study also justified the immediate need for drought risk reduction strategies that should lead to relevant policy formulations and agricultural innovations for developing

  1. ANALYZING TRENDS IN REFERENCE EVAPOTRANSPIRATION IN NORTHWEST PART OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Azizzadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration is one of the most important components of the hydrological cycle. It is essential in all of hydro climatological studies, irrigation and drainage calculations, water balance, and crop water requirements. The aim of this study is to investigate temporal trends of reference evapotranspiration (ETo in the Northwest part of Iran. For this purpose, the meteorological data from 20 synoptic stations over a 22-year time period (1986–2007 were used. After the calculation of ETo using the Penman-Monteith FAO-56 method, the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test was used to investigate the temporal trends on monthly, seasonal and annual scales. The Sen’s estimator method was used and to calculate the slope of the trend line. The results indicated that the ETo trend was increasing (positive in various months, except for the Sarab station in December. On a monthly scale, the Maragheh station showed the highest positive slope in August, and the Bijar station showed the highest negative slope in May. 43.34% of the stations showed a significant trend, and 56.66% did not show a significant trend. In seasonal and annual time periods there was not a significant decreasing trend in any of the stations. The analysis of the results shows that in the spring 20%, in the summer 55%, in the fall 70%, in the winter 75%, and on an annual scale 60% of the stations under study showed an increasing trend. For modeling these changes, the spatial distribution of ETo trends (on monthly, seasonal, and annual scales were mapped in ArcGIS. Final models determine that most stations in this study show an increasing trend on monthly, seasonal and annual scales.

  2. Drone based estimation of actual evapotranspiration over different forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Philip; Gampe, David; Castro, Saulo; Vega-Araya, Mauricio; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Ludwig, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (Eta) plays an important role in surface-atmosphere interactions. Traditionally, Eta is measured by means of lysimeters, eddy-covariance systems or fiber optics, providing estimates which are spatially restricted to a footprint from a few square meters up to several hectares . In the past, several methods have been developed to derive Eta by means of multi-spectral remote sensing data using thermal and VIS/NIR satellite imagery of the land surface. As such approaches do have their justification on coarser scales, they do not provide Eta information on the fine resolution plant level over large areas which is mandatory for the detection of water stress or tree mortality. In this study, we present a comparison of a drone based assessment of Eta with eddy-covariance measurements over two different forest types - a deciduous forest in Alberta, Canada and a tropical dry forest in Costa Rica. Drone based estimates of Eta were calculated applying the Triangle-Method proposed by Jiang and Islam (1999). The Triangle-Method estimates actual evapotranspiration (Eta) by means of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and land surface temperature (LST) provided by two camera systems (MicaSense RedEdge, FLIR TAU2 640) flown simultaneously on an octocopter. . Results indicate a high transferability of the original approach from Jiang and Islam (1999) developed for coarse to medium resolution satellite imagery tothe high resolution drone data, leading to a deviation in Eta estimates of 10% compared to the eddy-covariance measurements. In addition, the spatial footprint of the eddy-covariance measurement can be detected with this approach, by showing the spatial heterogeneities of Eta due to the spatial distribution of different trees and understory vegetation.

  3. A soil moisture accounting-procedure with a Richards' equation-based soil texture-dependent parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given a time series of potential evapotranspiration and rainfall data, there are at least two approaches for estimating vertical percolation rates. One approach involves solving Richards' equation (RE) with a plant uptake model. An alternative approach involves applying a simple soil moisture accoun...

  4. Response of mean annual evapotranspiration to vegetation changes at catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Dawes, W. R.; Walker, G. R.

    2001-03-01

    It is now well established that forested catchments have higher evapotranspiration than grassed catchments. Thus land use management and rehabilitation strategies will have an impact on catchment water balance and hence water yield and groundwater recharge. The key controls on evapotranspiration are rainfall interception, net radiation, advection, turbulent transport, leaf area, and plant-available water capacity. The relative importance of these factors depends on climate, soil, and vegetation conditions. Results from over 250 catchments worldwide show that for a given forest cover, there is a good relationship between long-term average evapotranspiration and rainfall. From these observations and on the basis of previous theoretical work a simple two-parameter model was developed that relates mean annual evapotranspiration to rainfall, potential evapotranspiration, and plant-available water capacity. The mean absolute error between modeled and measured evapotranspiration was 42 mm or 6.0%; the least squares line through the origin had as lope of 1.00 and a correlation coefficient of 0.96. The model showed potential for a variety of applications including water yield modeling and recharge estimation. The model is a practical tool that can be readily used for assessing the long-term average effect of vegetation changes on catchment evapotranspiration and is scientifically justifiable.

  5. Potential of remote sensing derived soil moisture for the estimation of actual evapotranspiration in cotton ecosystems of Middle Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoefel, Patrick; Conrad, Christopher; Dech, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETact) is an essential component of the water balance and its determination for larger areas is difficult on regional scale. Here, remote sensing provides a powerful tool to estimate regional actual evapotranspiration to support regional water management. Particularly, in irrigation agriculture of Middle Asia decision makers have to handle limited water availability and to improve the efficiency of their regional water management systems. The growing interest in quantifying regional actual ET for water resource and irrigation management led to the development of numerous methods to estimate ET from remote sensing data. The study is primarily concerned with the irrigation farming of cotton ecosystems in Middle Asia, in particular with the situation within Khorezm Oblast in Uzbekistan. Regional problems of Khorezm Oblast are e.g. high groundwater levels, soil salinity, and non-sustainable use of land and water. The water for irrigation is taken from the Amu Darya River and then canalled to the agricultural fields. The available water in Khorezm depends on the water demand in the upstream regions. Because of this variation and the historical annual shortage of available irrigation water a sustainable use of water is highly important for the regional water management in Khorezm. Cotton is the major crop in Khorezm region. About 46% of the agricultural area was covered with cotton in 2010 and 2011, among the other main crops winter wheat (30%) and rice (5%). The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of satellite derived surface soil moisture for the optimization of the estimated ETact. Actual evapotranspiration in this study is indirectly derived by solving the surface energy balance equation using the surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL). Due to its high temporal resolution MODIS (1km) data is used to provide the input information to solve the equation. The results were compared with measurements of an eddy

  6. Contrasting patterns of groundwater evapotranspiration in grass and tree dominated riparian zones of a temperate agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchithanantham, Sanjayan; Wilson, Henry F.; Glenn, Aaron J.

    2017-06-01

    Consumptive use of shallow groundwater by phreatophytic vegetation is a significant part of the water budget in many regions, particularly in riparian areas. The influence of vegetation type on groundwater level fluctuations and evapotranspiration has rarely been quantified for contrasting plant communities concurrently although it has implications for downstream water yield and quality. Hourly groundwater evapotranspiration (ETG) rates were estimated for grass and tree riparian vegetation in southwestern Manitoba, Canada using two modified White methods. Groundwater table depth was monitored in four 21 m transects of five 3 m deep monitoring wells in the riparian zone of a stream reach including tree (Acer negundo; boxelder) and grass (Bromus inermis; smooth brome) dominated segments. The average depths to the groundwater table from the surface were 1.4 m and 1 m for the tree and grass segments, respectively, over the two-year study. During rain free periods of the growing season ETG was estimated for a total of 70 days in 2014 and 79 days in 2015 when diurnal fluctuations were present in groundwater level. Diurnal groundwater level fluctuations were observed during dry periods under both segments, however, ETG was significantly higher (p < 0.001) under trees compared to grass cover in 2014 (a wet year with 72% higher than normal growing season precipitation) and 2015 (a drier year with 15% higher than normal growing season precipitation). The two methods used to estimate ETG produced similar daily and seasonal values for the two segments. In 2014, total ETG was approximately 50% (148 mm) and 100% (282-285 mm) of reference evapotranspiration (ETref, 281 mm) for the grass and tree segments, respectively. In 2015, total ETG was approximately 40% (106-127 mm) and 120% (369-374 mm) of ETref (307 mm) for the grass and tree segments, respectively. Results from the study show the tree dominated portions of the stream reach consumed approximately 2.4 ML ha-1 yr-1 more

  7. Using MOD16 products for analyzing evapotranspiration and evaporation on the surface of lakes. Case studies in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Florentina; Madelin, Malika; Zaharia, Liliana

    2017-04-01

    Evapotranspiration and evaporation are some of the most complex atmospheric processes and major components of the water balance. The knowledge of these processes at several spatial and temporal scales has great practical importance in the field of water resources management and agriculture. However, the direct measurement of these parameters is generally a problem, because it requires accuracy and instruments (lysimeters and pans) difficult to install; therefore many equations based on physical processes or vegetation stages have been proposed by different scientists (Thornthwaite, Penman, etc.). The use of remote sensing is a good alternative to estimate the evapotranspiration, by taking advantage of the new generation of Earth Observation Satellites. In recent years, a remote sensing product from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer - MOD16 has been developed. The MOD16 algorithm (Mu et al. 2007) combines on the one hand remote sensing data on land cover, albedo, leaf area index and in the other hand radiation, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit data, in order to estimate real evapotranspiration (ET) and potential evapotranspiration (PET), at 1 km2 resolution. Until now the MOD16 products were not used in the Romanian studies, so the product accuracy is unknown. The main objective of this study is to correlate the MOD16 ET and PET products with the evaporation (E) data measured at the surface of some lakes (Căldăruşani, Soleşti, Cinciş), located in different climate and landform conditions in Romania, in order to establish the relationships between those parameters, that could allow estimate indirectly the evaporation, based on the MODIS products. We correlated the daily recorded pan evaporation data with the MOD16 products, by taking into account R2 coefficients. Eight-day cumulative evaporation data from the considered pans was calculated to coincide with the eight-day MOD16 products over 2010 - 2012. A secondary purpose of the paper is to

  8. Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    The volume contains a selection of papers presented at the 7th Symposium on differential geometry and differential equations (DD7) held at the Nankai Institute of Mathematics, Tianjin, China, in 1986. Most of the contributions are original research papers on topics including elliptic equations, hyperbolic equations, evolution equations, non-linear equations from differential geometry and mechanics, micro-local analysis.

  9. Evapotranspiration and cloud variability at regional sub-grid scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Sikma, Martin; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; van Heerwaarden, Chiel; Hartogensis, Oscar; Ouwersloot, Huug

    2017-04-01

    In regional and global models uncertainties arise due to our incomplete understanding of the coupling between biochemical and physical processes. Representing their impact depends on our ability to calculate these processes using physically sound parameterizations, since they are unresolved at scales smaller than the grid size. More specifically over land, the coupling between evapotranspiration, turbulent transport of heat and moisture, and clouds lacks a combined representation to take these sub-grid scales interactions into account. Our approach is based on understanding how radiation, surface exchange, turbulent transport and moist convection are interacting from the leaf- to the cloud scale. We therefore place special emphasis on plant stomatal aperture as the main regulator of CO2-assimilation and water transpiration, a key source of moisture source to the atmosphere. Plant functionality is critically modulated by interactions with atmospheric conditions occurring at very short spatiotemporal scales such as cloud radiation perturbations or water vapour turbulent fluctuations. By explicitly resolving these processes, the LES (large-eddy simulation) technique is enabling us to characterize and better understand the interactions between canopies and the local atmosphere. This includes the adaption time of vegetation to rapid changes in atmospheric conditions driven by turbulence or the presence of cumulus clouds. Our LES experiments are based on explicitly coupling the diurnal atmospheric dynamics to a plant physiology model. Our general hypothesis is that different partitioning of direct and diffuse radiation leads to different responses of the vegetation. As a result there are changes in the water use efficiencies and shifts in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes under the presence of clouds. Our presentation is as follows. First, we discuss the ability of LES to reproduce the surface energy balance including photosynthesis and CO2 soil

  10. MODIS/Terra Net Evapotranspiration Yearly L4 Global 500m SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOD16A3 Version 6 Evapotranspiration/Latent Heat Flux product is a yearly composite product produced at 500 meter pixel resolution. The algorithm is based on the...

  11. MODIS/Aqua Net Evapotranspiration 8-Day L4 Global 500m SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MYD16A2 Version 6 Evapotranspiration/Latent Heat Flux product is an 8-day composite product produced at 500 meter pixel resolution. The improved algorithm is...

  12. MODIS/Terra Net Evapotranspiration 8-Day L4 Global 500m SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOD16A2 Version 6 Evapotranspiration/Latent Heat Flux product is an 8-day composite product produced at 500 meter pixel resolution. The algorithm used for the...

  13. MODIS/Aqua Net Evapotranspiration Yearly L4 Global 500m SIN Grid V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MYD16A3 Version 6 Evapotranspiration/Latent Heat Flux product is a yearly composite product produced at 500 meter pixel resolution. The improved algorithm is...

  14. Measurement and partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) for application to vadose zone studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into its constituent components, soil evaporation (E) and plant transpiration (T), is important for vadose zone studies because E and T are often parameterized separately. However, partitioning ET is challenging, and many longstanding approaches have significant ...

  15. Upflow Evapotranspiration System for the Treatment of On-Site Wastewater Effluent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sean Curneen; Laurence Gill

    2015-01-01

      Full-scale willow evapotranspiration systems fed from the base with septic tank or secondary treated domestic effluent from single houses have been constructed and instrumented in Ireland in order...

  16. Classification of evapotranspiration units in major discharge areas of Death Valley regional

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The raster-based classification of evapotranspiration (ET) units is for nine major discharge areas in the Death Valley regional flow system. The ET units delineate...

  17. Mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the glaciated northeastern United States, 1951-80

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Two maps, compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale, depict mean annual runoff, precipitation, and evapotranspiration in the part of the United States east of Cleveland, Ohio...

  18. Estimation of daily evapotranspiration over Africa using MODIS/Terra and SEVIRI/MSG data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sun, Z

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Most existing remote sensing-based evapotranspiration (ET) algorithms rely exclusively on polar-orbiting satellites with thermal infrared sensors, and therefore the resulting ET values represent only “instantaneous or snapshot” values. However...

  19. Critical review of methods for the estimation of actual evapotranspiration in hydrological models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, Nebojsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The chapter is structured in three parts, namely: i) A theoretical overview of evapotranspiration processes, including the principle of atmospheric demand-soil water supply, ii) A review of methods and techniques to measure and estimate actual...

  20. Low Evapotranspiration Enhances the Resilience of Peatland Carbon Stocks to Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettridge, N.; Lukenbach, M. C.; Hokanson, K. J.; Hopkinson, C.; Devito, K. J.; Petrone, R. M.; Mendoza, C. A.; Waddington, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Boreal peatlands may be vulnerable to projected changes in the wildfire regime under future climates. Extreme drying during the sensitive postfire period may exceed peatland ecohydrological resilience, triggering long-term degradation of these globally significant carbon stocks. Despite these concerns, we show low peatland evapotranspiration at both the plot- and landscape-scale postfire, in water-limited peatlands dominated by feather moss that are ubiquitous across continental western Canada. Low postfire evapotranspiration enhances the resilience of carbon stocks in such peatlands to wildfire disturbance and reinforces their function as a regional source of water. Near-surface water repellency may provide an important, previously unexplored, regulator of peatland evapotranspiration that can induce low evapotranspiration in the initial postfire years by restricting the supply of water to the peat surface.

  1. Upflow evapotranspiration system for the treatment of on-site wastewater effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Curneen; Laurence Gill

    2015-01-01

    Full-scale willow evapotranspiration systems fed from the base with septic tank or secondary treated domestic effluent from single houses have been constructed and instrumented in Ireland in order to investigate whether the technology could provide a solution to the problem of on-site effluent disposal in areas with low permeability subsoils. Continuous monitoring of rainfall, reference evapotranspiration, effluent flows and water level in the sealed systems revealed varying evapotranspiratio...

  2. FAO-56 dual approach combined with multi-sensor remote sensing for regional evapotranspiration estimations

    OpenAIRE

    Amri, R.; Zribi, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Szczypta, C; Calvet, J.C.; Boulet, G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to use a dual, modified version of the FAO-56 methodology for the estimation of regional evapotranspiration. The proposed approach combines the FAO-56 technique with remote sensing. Two vegetation classes are considered in the evapotranspiration estimations. In the case of cereals, crop coefficients and cover fractions are estimated using relationships established with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), retrieved from SPOT-VG...

  3. Propagation of soil moisture memory to streamflow and evapotranspiration in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Orth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As a key variable of the land-climate system soil moisture is a main driver of streamflow and evapotranspiration under certain conditions. Soil moisture furthermore exhibits outstanding memory (persistence characteristics. Many studies also report distinct low frequency variations for streamflow, which are likely related to soil moisture memory. Using data from over 100 near-natural catchments located across Europe, we investigate in this study the connection between soil moisture memory and the respective memory of streamflow and evapotranspiration on different time scales. For this purpose we use a simple water balance model in which dependencies of runoff (normalised by precipitation and evapotranspiration (normalised by radiation on soil moisture are fitted using streamflow observations. The model therefore allows us to compute the memory characteristics of soil moisture, streamflow and evapotranspiration on the catchment scale. We find considerable memory in soil moisture and streamflow in many parts of the continent, and evapotranspiration also displays some memory at monthly time scale in some catchments. We show that the memory of streamflow and evapotranspiration jointly depend on soil moisture memory and on the strength of the coupling of streamflow and evapotranspiration to soil moisture. Furthermore, we find that the coupling strengths of streamflow and evapotranspiration to soil moisture depend on the shape of the fitted dependencies and on the variance of the meteorological forcing. To better interpret the magnitude of the respective memories across Europe, we finally provide a new perspective on hydrological memory by relating it to the mean duration required to recover from anomalies exceeding a certain threshold.

  4. Comparison of Four Different Energy Balance Models for Estimating Evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in the Midweste...

  5. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California; with a section on estimating evapotranspiration using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, John B.; Stannard, David I.

    1997-01-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the ground-water-flow system associated with Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. By using the energy-budget eddy-correlation technique, measurements made between June 1983 and April 1984 to estimate evapotranspiration were found to range from 0.1 centimeter per day during winter months to about 0.3 centimeter per day during summer months; the annual average was 0.16 centimeter per day. These estimates were compared with evapotranspiration estimates calculated from six other methods.

  6. Combining remote sensing and GIS climate modelling to estimate daily forest evapotranspiration in a Mediterranean mountain area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cristóbal

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration monitoring allows us to assess the environmental stress on forest and agricultural ecosystems. Nowadays, Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS are the main techniques used for calculating evapotranspiration at catchment and regional scales. In this study we present a methodology, based on the energy balance equation (B-method, that combines remote sensing imagery with GIS-based climate modelling to estimate daily evapotranspiration (ETd for several dates between 2003 and 2005. The three main variables needed to compute ETd were obtained as follows: (i Land surface temperature by means of the Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal band, (ii air temperature by means of multiple regression analysis and spatial interpolation from meteorological ground stations data at satellite pass, and (iii net radiation by means of the radiative balance. We calculated ETd using remote sensing data at different spatial and temporal scales (Landsat-7 ETM+, Landsat-5 TM and TERRA/AQUA MODIS, with a spatial resolution of 60, 120 and 1000 m, respectively and combining three different approaches to calculate the B parameter, which represents an average bulk conductance for the daily-integrated sensible heat flux. We then compared these estimates with sap flow measurements from a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. stand in a Mediterranean mountain area. This procedure allowed us to better understand the limitations of ETd modelling and how it needs to be improved, especially in heterogeneous forest areas. The method using Landsat data resulted in a good agreement, R2 test of 0.89, with a mean RMSE value of about 0.6 mm day−1 and an estimation error of ±30 %. The poor agreement obtained using TERRA/AQUA MODIS, with a mean RMSE value of 1.8 and 2.4 mm day−1 and an estimation error of about ±57 and 50 %, respectively. This

  7. Linear equations and matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bolton, W

    1995-01-01

    This book is concerned with linear equations and matrices, with emphasis on the solution of simultaneous linear equations. The solution of simultaneous linear equations is applied to electric circuit analysis and structural analysis.

  8. COMS-Based Retrieval of Daily Actual Evapotranspiration over Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Yeon Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET from the land surface is an important hydrometeorological factor in the exchange of energy between the atmosphere and land surface. The accurate quantification for management of water resources and understanding of climate change are crucial, requiring continuous temporal and spatial monitoring. The objective of this study is to apply and estimate daily actual ET using semiempirical method, B-method, which is based on surface energy balance over heterogeneous area, Korea. To estimate daily ET, we used geostationary meteorological satellite data (Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite, COMS and polar-orbiting satellite data (Système Pour ľObservation de la Terre, SPOT. Estimated daily ET using only satellite data was relatively accurate and reflects land surface characteristics. It had high periodicity and spatial resolution over a wide area on clear-sky days. The daily ET was overestimated by about 1 mm/day at the two flux tower measurements sites, but the simulated seasonal variation and pattern were in good agreement with flux tower measurements. In the mixed forest, the root-mean-square error (RMSE was 0.94 mm/day and the bias was 1.05 mm/day, while, in the rice paddy, RMSE was 1.12 mm/day and bias was 1.21 mm/day.

  9. Evapotranspiration from irrigated turfgrass in the Los Angeles Metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, E.; Bijoor, N. S.; Pataki, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the United States, turfgrasses cover an area larger than any cultivated crop. In arid and semiarid cities, where up to 75% of household water is used for irrigation, turfgrass may contribute to a substantial portion of evapotranspiration (ET) from urban landscapes. However, urban ET and the role of turfgrass have seldom been directly quantified. Using portable chambers, we directly measured ET from irrigated turfgrass in 8 locations in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. We addressed the following questions: (1) How does ET from irrigated turfgrass compare with transpiration of urban trees in the study region? (2) What are the major environmental controls on turfgrass ET? (3) How variable is turfgrass ET spatially and temporally? We found summertime ET from irrigated turfgrass to vary from 2.2 ± 0.2 mm/d to 8.8 ± 0.8 mm/d, which exceeded the maximum, plot-level transpiration of irrigated trees in the study region. The main driver of spatial variability of turfgrass ET was incoming solar radiation. This allowed us to evaluate ET from turfgrass partially shaded by trees as a function of tree canopy cover. Our results contribute to an improved representation of irrigated lawns in urban water budgets and can inform decisions about water-wise landscape planning, which is vital in semi-arid cities facing water shortages.

  10. Evapotranspiration from Urban Green Spaces in the Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanni, K. A.; Montalto, F. A.; Gaffin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The measurement and estimation of urban evapotranspiration (ET) has historically received limited consideration from researchers in the hydrologic and climatologic communities yet are arguably vital to both. In the studies presented, ET rates from four different urban green spaces have been measured using weighing lysimeter setups for periods ranging from one to three years. The experimental sites predominantly include in-situ engineered urban green spaces or green infrastructure installations throughout the boroughs of New York City, specifically a green roof, irrigated bioretention area, un-irrigated bioretention area, and a wooded area in one of the last remaining sections of old growth urban forest in NYC. Comparison of ET rates between these urban green spaces at a daily time-step show statistically significant differences between the rates at each site at the 0.05 significance level. Examination of the factors impacting ET rates across sites (including net radiation, wind speed, relative humidity, air temperature and media volumetric water content) was also performed for a total of eight (8) sites including the four at which ET was directly measured using weighing lysimeters. Findings suggest that statistically significant differences in micro-climate conditions do exist across the city and that these are partially responsible for differences in rates of ET. Soil moisture (irrigated vs. un-irrigated bioretention areas) conditions and vegetation types (green roof vs. bioretention area) also play a role.

  11. Evapotranspiration data to determine agro-climatic zones in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouda Samiha A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to compare between agro-climatic zones developed from 10-year interval of weather data from 2005-2014, 20-year interval of weather data from 1995-2014 and the zoning developed by [NORELDIN et al. 2016] using 30-year interval from 1985-2014 in the old cultivated land of Egypt in the Nile Delta and Valley. Monthly means of weather data were calculated for each year, and then monthly values for 10-year and 20-years were calculated for each governorate. Basic Irrigation scheduling model (BISm was used to calculate reference evapotranspiration (ETo. Analysis of variance was used and the means was separated and ranked using least significant difference test (LSD0.05. Our results showed that agro-climatic zoning using 20-year values of ETo was similar to the zones developed with 30-year values of ETo, with different values of average ETo in each zone. Furthermore, using 10-year values of ETo resulted in higher values of ETo in each zone, compared to 20-year and 30-year ETo values. However, the average value of ETo over the three classifications was close to each other. Thus, depending on the availability of weather data, either zoning can be sufficient to develop agro-climatic zones.

  12. Combining surface reanalysis and remote sensing data for monitoring evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, M.; Tu, K.; Funk, C.; Michaelsen, J.; Williams, Pat; Williams, C.; Ardö, J.; Marie, B.; Cappelaere, B.; Grandcourt, A.; Nickless, A.; Noubellon, Y.; Scholes, R.; Kutsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have the greatest impact on the world's poor. In the Sahel, a climatically sensitive region where rain-fed agriculture is the primary livelihood, expected decreases in water supply will increase food insecurity. Studies on climate change and the intensification of the water cycle in sub-Saharan Africa are few. This is due in part to poor calibration of modeled actual evapotranspiration (AET), a key input in continental-scale hydrologic models. In this study, a model driven by dynamic canopy AET was combined with the Global Land Data Assimilation System realization of the NOAH Land Surface Model (GNOAH) wet canopy and soil AET for monitoring purposes in sub-Saharan Africa. The performance of the hybrid model was compared against AET from the GNOAH model and dynamic model using eight eddy flux towers representing major biomes of sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvements in model performance are at humid sites with dense vegetation, while performance at semi-arid sites is poor, but better than individual models. The reduction in errors using the hybrid model can be attributed to the integration of a dynamic vegetation component with land surface model estimates, improved model parameterization, and reduction of multiplicative effects of uncertain data.

  13. Isotope-based evapotranspiration partition in semi-arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Parkes, Stephen; McCabe, Matthew; Azcurra, Cecilia; Wang, Jin; Graham, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning is important for quantifying the water budget and understanding vegetation control on water cycles in various ecosystems. With the development of spectroscopy-based techniques for in-situ isotope measurements, the use of stable isotope based ET partition is rising rapidly. The sub-daily scale ET partition, however, is still rarely seen in the literature. In this study, we conducted an intensive field campaign measuring ET partition using laser-based isotope and chamber techniques in a pasture system between May and June 2012 in eastern Australia. Six soil collars were used, three of which had natural vegetation and the other three were bare soil collars where vegetation was artificially removed. The vegetated and bare soil collars were used to determine the isotopic composition of ET and evaporation, respectively. The isotopic composition of the transpiration flux was determined using a Licor leaf chamber for grasses inside the vegetated collars. The diurnal patterns in dET, dE and dT are observed. In the morning, they are depleted and became more enriched and level off during mid-day. Overall the total ET flux is dominated by evaporation, though transpiration contributions are relatively higher between 10am and 12pm. D-excess is a conservative tracer of ET components and may not be useful in ET partition. This study demonstrated the use of chamber-based measurements for direct partitioning of ET at sub-daily scale and showed a rarely observed diurnal pattern of ET partition.

  14. Actual evapotranspiration for a reference crop within measured and future changing climate periods in the Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerji, Nader; Rana, Gianfranco; Ferrara, Rossana Monica

    2017-08-01

    The study compares two formulas for calculating the daily evapotranspiration ET0 for a reference crop. The first formula was proposed by Allen et al. (AL), while the second one was proposed by Katerji and Perrier with the addition of the carbon dioxide (CO2) effect on evapotranspiration (KP). The study analyses the impact of the calculation by the two formulas on the irrigation requirement (IR). Both formulas are based on the Penman-Monteith equation but adopt different approaches for parameterising the canopy resistance r c . In the AL formula, r c is assumed constant and not sensitive to climate change, whereas in the KP formula, r c is first parameterised as a function of climatic variables, then ET0 is corrected for the air CO2 concentration. The two formulas were compared in two periods. The first period involves data from two sites in the Mediterranean region within a measured climate change period (1981-2006) when all the input climatic variables were measured. The second period (2070-2100) involves data from a future climate change period at one site when the input climatic variables were forecasted for two future climate scenarios (A2 and B2). The annual cumulated values of ET0 calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those determined by the KP formula. The differences between the ET0 estimation with the AL and KP formulas have a strong impact on the determination of the IR for the reference crop. In fact, for the two periods, the annual values of IR when ET0 is calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those calculated by the KP formula. For the actual measured climate change period, this reduction varied from 26 to 28 %, while for the future climate change period, it varied based on the scenario from 16 % (A2) to 20 % (B2).

  15. Spatial pattern of reference evapotranspiration change and its temporal evolution over Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanlei; Wang, Guojie; Huang, Jin; Mu, Mengyuan; Yan, Guixia; Liu, Chunwei; Gao, Chujie; Li, Xing; Yin, Yixing; Zhang, Fangmin; Zhu, Siguang; Hua, Wenjian

    2017-11-01

    Due to the close relationship of climate change with reference evapotranspiration (ETo), detecting changes in ETo spatial distribution and its temporal evolution at local and regional levels is favorable to comprehensively understand climate change-induced impacts on hydrology and agriculture. In this study, the objective is to identify whether climate change has caused variation of ETo spatial distribution in different analysis periods [i.e., long- (20-year), medium- (10-year), and short-term (5-year)] and to investigate its temporal evolution (namely, when these changes happened) at annual and monthly scales in Southwest China (SWC). First, we estimated ETo values using the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Penman-Monteith equation, based on historical climate data measured at 269 weather sites during 1973-2012. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) results indicated that the spatial pattern of annual ETo had significantly changed during the past 40 years, particularly in west SWC for the long-term analysis period, and west and southeast SWC in both medium- and short-term periods, which corresponded to the percent area of significant differences which were 21.9, 58.0, and 48.2 %, respectively. For investigating temporal evolution of spatial patterns of annual ETo, Duncan's multiple range test was used, and we found that the most significant changes appeared during 1988-2002 with the significant area of higher than 25.0 %. In addition, for long-, medium-, and short-term analysis periods, the spatial distribution has significantly changed during March, September, November, and December, especially in the corresponding periods of 1988-1997, 1983-1992, 1973-1977, and 1988-2002. All in all, climate change has resulted in significant ETo changes in SWC since the 1970s. Knowledge of climate change-induced spatial distribution of ETo and its temporal evolution would aid in formulating strategies for water resources and agricultural managements.

  16. Evaluating relationships between urban land cover composition and evapotranspiration in semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.; Litvak, E.; Pataki, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    California experienced its most severe drought on record in 2013 and 2014, forcing the governor to call for the first statewide reductions in urban water use. This led to numerous water conservation efforts including turf removal and restrictions on outdoor irrigation. The decrease in irrigation across the city of Los Angeles has had major effects on regional hydrologic fluxes. Previous studies have found that conservation efforts have decreased streamflow but little work has been done on the impact of reduced irrigation on Evapotranspiration (ET). ET is one of the most difficult variables to measure as a result of its heterogeneity both spatially and temporally; yet, it is imperative in characterizing energy and hydrologic processes and in aiding water management decisions. Estimating ET is further complicated in urban regions where land cover composition is extremely variable, even at small scales. Irrigated landscape and impervious surfaces are two of the most common land cover types associated with urbanization, but they have opposite effects on ET. While numerous studies have evaluated changes in ET caused by urbanization, they have all produced varying results. This is expected as changes to ET are highly dependent on land cover composition. In this study, we modeled the relationship between ET and urban land cover change in Los Angeles. We utilized empirical equations derived from in situ measurements to calculate tree and irrigated turfgrass ET and compared the results to estimates based on remote-sensing and California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) network of weather stations. We found that unshaded turfgrass largely increased ET compared to impervious surfaces, which reveals lavish irrigation practices. Trees also increased ET, but they provided shade that decreased ET from turf grass. With much of the western United States facing drought and water supply uncertainty due to climate change, understanding and predicting how land cover

  17. The changing rainfall pattern and its implication for flood frequency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study deals with analysis of recent changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall and their implication for flood frequency in Makurdi. Data on extreme daily rainfall, evapotranspiration and flood occurrences were collected for analysis. The annual rainfall was analysed for trends using spearman rank correlation ...

  18. Estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration in Mahidasht using SEBS Algorithm and LANDSAT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Farhadi Bansouleh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evapotranspiration (ET is one of the key parameters in water resource planning and design of irrigation systems. ET could have spatial variations in a plain due to the diversity of plant species and spatial variability of meteorological parameters. Common methods of ET measurement are mostly point based and generalization of their results to the regional level are costly, time consuming and difficult. During the last three decades, several algorithms have been developed to estimate regional ET based on remote sensing techniques. Verstraeten et al. (2008 classified remote sensing-based methods for ET estimation into four categories i methods based on the surface energy balance, ii Penman-Monteith equation, iii water balance and iv the relationship between surface temperature and vegetation indices. SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System, SEBAL, METRIC and SEBI are examples of the algorithms which is developed based on the surface energy balance approach. SEBS is developed by Su (2002 and has been evaluated by several researchers. However this algorithm has been examined in the several studies in the world,it has been used rarely in Iran. The aim of the current study was to assess the results of SEBS algorithm in Mahidasht, Kermanshah, Iran. The study area is located at the latitude of 34º 5' – 34º 32' N and longitude of 46º 31' - 47º 06' E. Materials and Methods: A brief description of the SEBS algorithm (in Persian as well as its procedure to calculate ET based on Landsat images were presented in this paper. All equations of the algorithm were coded in the ERDAS Imagine package software using model maker tools. Actual ET over the study area was estimated using SEBS algorithm during the growth period of grain maize in the year 2010. For this purpose, available LANDSAT TM satellite images during the growing season of maize in 2010 (25 June, 11 July, 27 July and 12 August were downloaded free of charge from the http

  19. Spatial disaggregation of POWER-NASA air temperatures and effects on grass reference evapotranspiration in Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Amro; Minacapilli, Mario; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The accurate estimation of grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is important for many fields, including hydrology and irrigation water management. Being direct measure of ET0 difficult, expensive and time consuming, application of simplified approaches and web-based meteorological information are often preferred. The Prediction of Worldwide Energy Resource project developed by the American National Aeronautics and Space Administration (POWER-NASA) provides meteorological observations and surface energy fluxes on 1° latitude by 1° longitude grid, with a continuous daily coverage and for the entire globe. However, the broad spatial resolution of these data represents a limiting factor, for example when they have to be used for local estimations of reference ET0. In this work, a procedure for the spatial disaggregation of POWER-NASA daily average air temperature was proposed. In particular, a daily scaling factor was initially defined as the ratio between disaggregated average air temperature and the corresponding native value. This ratio was then modeled with a cosine function, characterized by three parameters depending on elevation, so to account for seasonal and regional variability. The proposed model was calibrated with three years of ground measurements (2006-2008) and then validated over six years (2009-2014). The suitability of the procedure was finally assessed by applying two simplified empirical models to estimate ET0 (Turc, 1961; Hargreaves, 1975). When compared to ET0 values obtained with FAO-56 PM equation, both simplified equations associated to downscaled meteorological observations, were characterized by RMSE ranging between 0.44 and 1.08 mm (average of 0.72-0.74 mm), and average MBE of -0.06 (Turc equation) and 0.13 mm (Hargreaves equation). These results indicated the strength of the proposed procedure to estimate ET0, even for regions characterized by the lack of detailed meteorological information.

  20. Comment on 'Shang S. 2012. Calculating actual crop evapotranspiration under soil water stress conditions with appropriate numerical methods and time step. Hydrological Processes 26: 3338-3343. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8405'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatheendradas, Soni; Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Funk, Christopher; Verdin, James

    2014-01-01

    A previous study analyzed errors in the numerical calculation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub a)) under soil water stress. Assuming no irrigation or precipitation, it constructed equations for ET(sub a) over limited soil-water ranges in a root zone drying out due to evapotranspiration. It then used a single crop-soil composite to provide recommendations about the appropriate usage of numerical methods under different values of the time step and the maximum crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub c)). This comment reformulates those ET(sub a) equations for applicability over the full range of soil water values, revealing a dependence of the relative error in numerical ET(sub a) on the initial soil water that was not seen in the previous study. It is shown that the recommendations based on a single crop-soil composite can be invalid for other crop-soil composites. Finally, a consideration of the numerical error in the time-cumulative value of ET(sub a) is discussed besides the existing consideration of that error over individual time steps as done in the previous study. This cumulative ET(sub a) is more relevant to the final crop yield.

  1. Water balance-based actual evapotranspiration reconstruction from ground and satellite observations over the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhanming; Zhang, Ke; Xue, Xianwu; Hong, Zhen; Hong, Yang; Gourley, Jonathan J.

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce an observationally based monthly evapotranspiration (ET) product using the simple water balance equation across the conterminous United States (CONUS). We adopted the best quality ground and satellite-based observations of the water budget components, i.e., precipitation, runoff, and water storage change, while ET is computed as the residual. Precipitation data are provided by the bias-corrected PRISM observation-based precipitation data set, while runoff comes from observed monthly streamflow values at 592 USGS stream gauging stations that have been screened by strict quality controls. We developed a land surface model-based downscaling approach to disaggregate the monthly GRACE equivalent water thickness data to daily, 0.125° values. The derived ET computed as the residual from the water balance equation is evaluated against three sets of existing ET products. The similar spatial patterns and small differences between the reconstructed ET in this study and the other three products show the reliability of the observationally based approach. The new ET product and the disaggregated GRACE data provide a unique, important hydro-meteorological data set that can be used to evaluate the other ET products as a benchmark data set, assess recent hydrological and climatological changes, and terrestrial water and energy cycle dynamics across the CONUS. These products will also be valuable for studies and applications in drought assessment, water resources management, and climate change evaluation.

  2. Evapotranspiration of urban landscapes in Los Angeles, California at the municipal scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, E.; Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.; Pataki, D. E.

    2017-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), an essential process in biosphere-atmosphere interactions, is highly uncertain in cities that maintain cultivated and irrigated landscapes. We estimated ET of irrigated landscapes in Los Angeles by combining empirical models of turfgrass ET and tree transpiration derived from in situ measurements with previously developed remotely sensed estimates of vegetation cover and ground-based vegetation surveys. We modeled irrigated landscapes as a two-component system comprised of trees and turfgrass to assess annual and spatial patterns of ET. Annual ET from vegetated landscapes (ETveg) was 1110 ± 53 mm/yr and ET from the whole city (vegetated and nonvegetated areas, ETland) was three times smaller, reflecting the fractional vegetation cover. With the exception of May and June, monthly ETland was significantly higher than predicted by the North American Land Data Assimilation System. ETveg was close to potential ET, indicating abundant irrigation inputs. Monthly averaged ETveg varied from 1.5 ± 0.1 mm/d (December) to 4.3 ± 0.2 mm/d (June). Turfgrass was responsible for ˜70% of ETveg. For trees, angiosperm species (71% of all trees) contributed over 90% to total tree transpiration, while coniferous and palm species made very small contributions. ETland was linearly correlated with median household income across the city, confirming the importance of social factors in determining spatial distribution of urban vegetation. These estimates have important implications for constraining the municipal water budget of Los Angeles and improving regional-scale hydrologic models, as well as for developing water-saving practices. The methodology used in this study is also transferable to other semiarid regions for quantification of urban landscape ET.

  3. Difference equations by differential equation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hydon, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    Most well-known solution techniques for differential equations exploit symmetry in some form. Systematic methods have been developed for finding and using symmetries, first integrals and conservation laws of a given differential equation. Here the author explains how to extend these powerful methods to difference equations, greatly increasing the range of solvable problems. Beginning with an introduction to elementary solution methods, the book gives readers a clear explanation of exact techniques for ordinary and partial difference equations. The informal presentation is suitable for anyone who is familiar with standard differential equation methods. No prior knowledge of difference equations or symmetry is assumed. The author uses worked examples to help readers grasp new concepts easily. There are 120 exercises of varying difficulty and suggestions for further reading. The book goes to the cutting edge of research; its many new ideas and methods make it a valuable reference for researchers in the field.

  4. Evapotranspiration models for a maize agro-ecosystem in irrigated and rainfed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Facchi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A high level of accuracy in the estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ET may lead to significant savings of economic and water resources in irrigated agriculture. Although ET is a fundamental process in many applications, it cannot be directly measured but it has to be estimated by monitoring the exchange of energy/water above the vegetated surface (micrometeorological methods, or as a residual term of the hydrological balance (lysimeters, soil water budget. The techniques to be adopted are often complex, costly and require specific equipment. Thus, since the ‘50s, many researchers have devoted their activity to the development of models for its estimation. The available approaches can be classified in “direct” methods, based on the original Penman-Monteith (PM equation, in which the canopy resistance rc is modelled, and “indirect” methods, based on the preliminary calculation of ET for a well-watered reference grass (ET0 with a constant rc, which is then multiplied by a crop coefficient Kc and, in case, by a stress coefficient Ks to obtain ET. Even if the latter approaches are more widely adopted for their practical simplicity, many authors show that the former often provide better ET estimates in absence of calibration of crop parameters. In this study the performances of different direct and indirect methods were evaluated in the case of a surface irrigated and of a rainfed maize grown in the Padana Plain (Northern Italy. The following models were considered: the “one-layer” original PM equation with three different models for rc (Monteith, Jarvis, Katerji-Perrier, the “two-layers” PM model proposed by Shuttleworth and Wallace, the “single” and “double” crop coefficient models illustrated in the Paper FAO-56. Latent heat fluxes measured in 2006 and 2011 in an experimental maize field by eddy-covariance were used to evaluate the models accuracy. Crop, soil and meteo data monitored contextually were used for the

  5. Quantifying the impact of groundwater depth on evapotranspiration in a semi-arid grassland region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Soylu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between shallow groundwater and land surface processes play an important role in the ecohydrology of riparian zones. Some recent land surface models (LSMs incorporate groundwater-land surface interactions using parameterizations at varying levels of detail. In this paper, we examine the sensitivity of land surface evapotranspiration (ET to water table depth, soil texture, and two commonly used soil hydraulic parameter datasets using four models with varying levels of complexity. The selected models are Hydrus-1D, which solves the pressure-based Richards equation, the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS, which simulates interactions among multiple soil layers using a (water-content variant of the Richards equation, and two forms of a steady-state capillary flux model coupled with a single-bucket soil moisture model. These models are first evaluated using field observations of climate, soil moisture, and groundwater levels at a semi-arid site in south-central Nebraska, USA. All four models are found to compare reasonably well with observations, particularly when the effects of groundwater are included. We then examine the sensitivity of modelled ET to water table depth for various model formulations, node spacings, and soil textures (using soil hydraulic parameter values from two different sources, namely Rawls and Clapp-Hornberger. The results indicate a strong influence of soil texture and water table depth on groundwater contributions to ET. Furthermore, differences in texture-specific, class-averaged soil parameters obtained from the two literature sources lead to large differences in the simulated depth and thickness of the "critical zone" (i.e., the zone within which variations in water table depth strongly impact surface ET. Depending on the depth-to-groundwater, this can also lead to large discrepancies in simulated ET (in some cases by more than a factor of two. When the Clapp-Hornberger soil parameter dataset is used, the

  6. Monitoring Daily Evapotranspiration in California Vineyards Using Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. C.; Semmens, K. A.; Kustas, W. P.; Gao, F.; Alfieri, J. G.; McKee, L.; Prueger, J. H.; Hain, C.; Cammalleri, C.

    2014-12-01

    In California's Central Valley, due to competing demands for limited water resources, it is critical to monitor evaporative water loss and crop conditions at both individual field scales and over larger areas in support of water management decisions. This is particularly important for viticulture because grape vines must be maintained under highly controlled conditions in order to maximize production of quality fruit. Thus, regular high resolution temporal monitoring of hundreds of acres is required, a task only efficiently achieved with satellite remote sensing, combining multiple earth observations. In this research, we evaluate the utility of a multi-scale system for monitoring evapotranspiration (ET) and crop water stress applied over two vineyard sites near Lodi, California during the 2013 growing season. The system employs a data fusion methodology (STARFM: Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflective Fusion Model) combined with multi-scale ET modeling (ALEXI: Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse Model) to compute daily 30 m resolution ET. ALEXI ET fluxes (4 km resolution, daily) are integrated with ET fluxes from Landsat 8 thermal data (30 m resolution, ~16 day) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data (1 km resolution, daily). The high spatial resolution Landsat retrievals are then fused with high temporal frequency MODIS data using STARFM to produce daily estimates of crop water use that resolve within field variation in ET for individual vineyards. Estimates of daily ET generated in two fields of Pinot Noir vines of different maturity agreed well with ground-based flux measurements collected within each field with relative errors of about 15%. Spatial patterns of cumulative ET correspond to yield estimates and indicate areas of variable crop moisture, condition, and yield within the vineyards that could require additional management strategies due to variation in soil type/texture, nutrient conditions and other environmental factors.

  7. Estimating Evapotranspiration Using an Observation Based Terrestrial Water Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; McWilliams, Eric B.; Famiglietti, James S.; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Nigro, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is difficult to measure at the scales of climate models and climate variability. While satellite retrieval algorithms do exist, their accuracy is limited by the sparseness of in situ observations available for calibration and validation, which themselves may be unrepresentative of 500m and larger scale satellite footprints and grid pixels. Here, we use a combination of satellite and ground-based observations to close the water budgets of seven continental scale river basins (Mackenzie, Fraser, Nelson, Mississippi, Tocantins, Danube, and Ubangi), estimating mean ET as a residual. For any river basin, ET must equal total precipitation minus net runoff minus the change in total terrestrial water storage (TWS), in order for mass to be conserved. We make use of precipitation from two global observation-based products, archived runoff data, and TWS changes from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite mission. We demonstrate that while uncertainty in the water budget-based estimates of monthly ET is often too large for those estimates to be useful, the uncertainty in the mean annual cycle is small enough that it is practical for evaluating other ET products. Here, we evaluate five land surface model simulations, two operational atmospheric analyses, and a recent global reanalysis product based on our results. An important outcome is that the water budget-based ET time series in two tropical river basins, one in Brazil and the other in central Africa, exhibit a weak annual cycle, which may help to resolve debate about the strength of the annual cycle of ET in such regions and how ET is constrained throughout the year. The methods described will be useful for water and energy budget studies, weather and climate model assessments, and satellite-based ET retrieval optimization.

  8. Simulation of Evapotranspiration using an Optimality-based Ecohydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lajiao

    2014-05-01

    Accurate estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) is essential in understanding the effect of climate change and human activities on ecosystem and water resource. As an important tool for ET estimation, most of the traditional hydrological or ecohydrological models treat ET as a physical process, controlled by energy, vapor, pressure and turbulence. It is at times questionable as transpiration, major component of ET, is biological activity closely linked to photosynthesis by stomatal conductivity. Optimality-based ecohydrological models consider the mutual interaction of ET and photosynthesis based on optimality principle. However, as a rising generation of ecohydrological models, so far there are only a few applications of the optimality-based model in different ecosystems. The ability and reliability of this kind of models for ecohydrological modeling need to be validated in more ecosystems. The objective of this study is to validate the optimality hypothesis for water-limited ecosystem. To achieve this, the study applied an optimality-based model Vegetation Optimality Model (VOM) to simulate ET and its components based on optimality principle. The model is applied in a semiarid watershed. The simulated ET and soil waster were compared with long term measurement data in Kendall and Lcukyhill sites in the watershed. The result showed that the temporal variations of simulated ET and soil water are in good agreement with observed data. Temporal dynamic of soil evaporation and transpiration and their response to precipitation events can be well captured with the model. This could come to a conclusion the optimality-based ecohydrological model could be a potential approach to simulate ET.

  9. Parametric Modelling of Potential Evapotranspiration: A Global Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristoteles Tegos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present and validate a global parametric model of potential evapotranspiration (PET with two parameters that are estimated through calibration, using as explanatory variables temperature and extraterrestrial radiation. The model is tested over the globe, taking advantage of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO CLIMWAT database that provides monthly averaged values of meteorological inputs at 4300 locations worldwide. A preliminary analysis of these data allows for explaining the major drivers of PET over the globe and across seasons. The model calibration against the given Penman-Monteith values was carried out through an automatic optimization procedure. For the evaluation of the model, we present global maps of optimized model parameters and associated performance metrics, and also contrast its performance against the well-known Hargreaves-Samani method. Also, we use interpolated values of the optimized parameters to validate the predictive capacity of our model against monthly meteorological time series, at several stations worldwide. The results are very encouraging, since even with the use of abstract climatic information for model calibration and the use of interpolated parameters as local predictors, the model generally ensures reliable PET estimations. Exceptions are mainly attributed to irregular interactions between temperature and extraterrestrial radiation, as well as because the associated processes are influenced by additional drivers, e.g., relative humidity and wind speed. However, the analysis of the residuals shows that the model is consistent in terms of parameters estimation and model validation. The parameter maps allow for the direct use of the model wherever in the world, providing PET estimates in case of missing data, that can be further improved even with a short term acquisition of meteorological data.

  10. Monitoring and Forecasting Reference Evapotranspiration for Food Security Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S.; Hobbins, M.; McEvoy, D.; Husak, G. J.; Dewes, C.; McNally, A.; Huntington, J. L.; Funk, C. C.; Verdin, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Reference evapotranspiration (Ref ET; driven by temperature, humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation) and precipitation are the two most important climatic drivers of seasonal crop yields, which are directly associated with food security in several parts of the globe. In the last decade or so, significant strides have been made by the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) team and collaborators, towards improving precipitation monitoring. However, efforts to improve Ref ET monitoring and forecasting have thus far lagged by comparison. This presentation describes ongoing activities of the FEWS NET team and collaborators towards the development and implementation of a near-real time Ref ET monitoring and forecasting system, focusing primarily on the food-insecure FEWS NET countries. Due to a lack of in situ observations of meteorological forcings, the Ref ET monitoring dataset, which is calculated using the Penman-Monteith formulation of the ASCE Standardized Reference ET, uses NASA's MERRA-2 atmospheric forcings and is spatially downscaled using a finer resolution climatology of the International Water Management Institute global PET dataset. Ref ET forecasts (up to 6 months lead time) are calculated using seasonal climate forecasts from NCEP's CFSv2 and NASA's GEOS-5 models. Long-term (since early 1980s through 2015) evaluation of Ref ET monitoring and forecast datasets and the approach to provide operational updates of both datasets in near-real time, are summarized in this presentation. As a case study, the influence of improved Ref ET monitoring and Ref ET forecasts on crop yield estimates and food security outlooks in East Africa is also examined using the Water Requirement Satisfaction Index model. In summary, this presentation highlights the importance of monitoring and forecasting Ref ET for food security assessments and early warning.

  11. Measuring surface energy and evapotranspiration across Caribbean mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Price, R.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal mangroves lose large amounts of water through evapotranspiration (ET) that can be equivalent to the amount of annual rainfall in certain years. Satellite remote sensing has been used to estimate surface energy and ET variability in many forested ecosystems, yet has been widely overlooked in mangrove forests. Using a combination of long-term datasets (30-year) acquired from the NASA Landsat 5 and 7 satellite databases, the present study investigated ET and surface energy balance variability between two mangrove forest sites in the Caribbean: 1) Everglades National Park (ENP; Florida, USA) and 2) Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve (SKBR; Quintana Roo, Mexico). A satellite-derived surface energy balance model was used to estimate ET in tall and scrub mangroves environments at ENP and SKBR. Results identified significant differences in soil heat flux measurements and ET between the tall and scrub mangrove environments. Scrub mangroves exhibited the highest soil heat flux coincident with the lowest biophysical indices (i.e., Fractional Vegetation Cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index) and ET rates. Mangrove damage and mortality was observed on the satellite images following strong tropical storms and associated with anthropogenic modifications and resulted in low values in spectral vegetation indices, higher soil heat flux, and higher ET. Recovery of the spectral characteristics, soil heat flux and ET was within 1-2 years following hurricane disturbance while, degradation caused by human disturbance persisted for many years. Remotely sensed ET of mangrove forests can provide estimates over a few decades and provide us with some understanding of how these environments respond to disturbances to the landscape in periods where no ground data exists or in locations that are difficult to access. Moreover, relationships between energy and water balance components developed for the coastal mangroves of Florida and Mexico could be

  12. Estimation of evapotranspiration in the Mu Us Sandland of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET was estimated from 1981–2005 over Wushen County located in the Mu Us Sandland, China, by applying the Advection-Aridity model, which is based on the complementary relationship hypothesis. We used National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, and meteorological data. Our results show that the estimated daily ET was about 4.5% higher than measurements using an Eddy Covariance (EC system after forcing energy balance closure over an alfalfa field from 22 July 2004 to 23 August 2004. At a regional scale, the estimated monthly ET was about 8.7% lower than measurements using the EC system after forcing energy balance closure over an alfalfa field in August 2004. These results were about 3.0% higher than ET measurements by microlysimeter over sand dunes during June 1988. From 1981 to 2005, the average annual ET and precipitation levels were 287 mm and 336 mm, respectively, in Wushen County. The average annual ET varied from 230 mm in western parts of Wushen County to 350 mm in eastern parts of the county. Both inter-annual and seasonal variations in ET were substantial in Wushen County. The annual ET was 200–400 mm from 1981–2005, and the seasonal pattern of ET showed a single peak distribution. The cumulative ET during the June–September 2004 period was 250 mm, which was 87% of the total annual ET. The annual ET, precipitation, and the maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVImax showed positive correlations temporally and spatially.

  13. Reconstruction of temporal variations of evapotranspiration using instantaneous estimates at the time of satellite overpass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Delogu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration estimates can be derived from remote sensing data and ancillary, mostly meterorological, information. For this purpose, two types of methods are classically used: the first type estimates a potential evapotranspiration rate from vegetation indices, and adjusts this rate according to water availability derived from either a surface temperature index or a first guess obtained from a rough estimate of the water budget, while the second family of methods relies on the link between the surface temperature and the latent heat flux through the surface energy budget. The latter provides an instantaneous estimate at the time of satellite overpass. In order to compute daily evapotranspiration, one needs an extrapolation algorithm. Since no image is acquired during cloudy conditions, these methods can only be applied during clear sky days. In order to derive seasonal evapotranspiration, one needs an interpolation method. Two combined interpolation/extrapolation methods based on the self preservation of evaporative fraction and the stress factor are compared to reconstruct seasonal evapotranspiration from instantaneous measurements acquired in clear sky conditions. Those measurements are taken from instantaneous latent heat flux from 11 datasets in Southern France and Morocco. Results show that both methods have comparable performances with a clear advantage for the evaporative fraction for datasets with several water stress events. Both interpolation algorithms tend to underestimate evapotranspiration due to the energy limiting conditions that prevail during cloudy days. Taking into account the diurnal variations of the evaporative fraction according to an empirical relationship derived from a previous study improved the performance of the extrapolation algorithm and therefore the retrieval of the seasonal evapotranspiration for all but one datasets.

  14. Estimation of land surface evapotranspiration with A satellite remote sensing procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmak, A.; Ratcliffe, I.; Ranade, P.; Hubbard, K.G.; Singh, R.K.; Kamble, B.; Kjaersgaard, J.

    2011-01-01

    There are various methods available for estimating magnitude and trends of evapotranspiration. Bowen ratio energy balance system and eddy correlation techniques offer powerful alternatives for measuring land surface evapotranspiration. In spite of the elegance, high accuracy, and theoretical attractions of these techniques for measuring evapotranspiration, their practical use over large areas can be limited due to the number of sites needed and the related expense. Application of evapotranspiration mapping from satellite measurements can overcome the limitations. The objective of this study was to utilize the METRICTM (Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution using Internalized Calibration) model in Great Plains environmental settings to understand water use in managed ecosystems on a regional scale. We investigated spatiotemporal distribution of a fraction of reference evapotranspiration (ETrF) using eight Landsat 5 images during the 2005 and 2006 growing season for path 29, row 32. The ETrF maps generated by METRICTM allowed us to follow the magnitude and trend in ETrF for major land-use classes during the growing season. The ETrF was lower early in the growing season for agricultural crops and gradually increased as the normalized difference vegetation index of crops increased, thus presenting more surface area over which water could transpire toward the midseason. Comparison of predictions with Bowen ratio energy balance system measurements at Clay Center, NE, showed that METRICTM performed well at the field scale for predicting evapotranspiration from a cornfield. If calibrated properly, the model could be a viable tool to estimate water use in managed ecosystems in subhumid climates at a large scale.

  15. Improving evapotranspiration in a land surface model using biophysical variables derived from MSG/SEVIRI satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ghilain

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring evapotranspiration over land is highly dependent on the surface state and vegetation dynamics. Data from spaceborn platforms are desirable to complement estimations from land surface models. The success of daily evapotranspiration monitoring at continental scale relies on the availability, quality and continuity of such data. The biophysical variables derived from SEVIRI on board the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG and distributed by the Satellite Application Facility on Land surface Analysis (LSA-SAF are particularly interesting for such applications, as they aimed at providing continuous and consistent daily time series in near-real time over Africa, Europe and South America. In this paper, we compare them to monthly vegetation parameters from a database commonly used in numerical weather predictions (ECOCLIMAP-I, showing the benefits of the new daily products in detecting the spatial and temporal (seasonal and inter-annual variability of the vegetation, especially relevant over Africa. We propose a method to handle Leaf Area Index (LAI and Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC products for evapotranspiration monitoring with a land surface model at 3–5 km spatial resolution. The method is conceived to be applicable for near-real time processes at continental scale and relies on the use of a land cover map. We assess the impact of using LSA-SAF biophysical variables compared to ECOCLIMAP-I on evapotranspiration estimated by the land surface model H-TESSEL. Comparison with in-situ observations in Europe and Africa shows an improved estimation of the evapotranspiration, especially in semi-arid climates. Finally, the impact on the land surface modelled evapotranspiration is compared over a north–south transect with a large gradient of vegetation and climate in Western Africa using LSA-SAF radiation forcing derived from remote sensing. Differences are highlighted. An evaluation against remote sensing derived land

  16. Estimating groundwater recharge in the dry zone of Sri Lanka using weekly, 10-daily or monthly evapotranspiration data

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, RP

    1999-01-01

    Howard and Lloyd (1979) have shown that daily values for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are required in estimating recharge with a soil water balance model. However, available data may not be daily but weekly or even monthly. This is true for potential evapotranspiration data which are usually derived from pan evaporation data. This paper examines the effect of using distributed weekly, 10-daily or monthly potential evapotranspiration values rather than the actual daily values in e...

  17. Emmy Noether and Linear Evolution Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. L. Leach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noether’s Theorem relates the Action Integral of a Lagrangian with symmetries which leave it invariant and the first integrals consequent upon the variational principle and the existence of the symmetries. These each have an equivalent in the Schrödinger Equation corresponding to the Lagrangian and by extension to linear evolution equations in general. The implications of these connections are investigated.

  18. Riccati differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Brolih, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The intention of this thesis is to present Riccati differential equations, which are used in mathematics and in many other natural sciences. These equations are presented in their basic and in some specific forms and supported with several examples, which make this issue easier to understand. We will introduce mostly Riccati equations of first order and also their correlation with second-order differential equation. At the beginning of solving equations we will sum up the process of solvin...

  19. Kinetic energy equations for the average-passage equation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Important kinetic energy equations derived from the average-passage equation sets are documented, with a view to their interrelationships. These kinetic equations may be used for closing the average-passage equations. The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation used is formed by subtracting the mean kinetic energy equation from the averaged total instantaneous kinetic energy equation. The aperiodic kinetic energy equation, averaged steady kinetic energy equation, averaged unsteady kinetic energy equation, and periodic kinetic energy equation, are also treated.

  20. Analysis of Evapotranspiration Model Sensitivity to Climate and Vegetation Parameters With Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a dominant component of the global water balance and in the study of hydroclimatic effects of climate change. However, its computation remains challenging due to the multiple environmental factors that influence the magnitude of ET flux. Therefore, understanding the sensitivity of ET models to changes in climate and vegetation inputs remains a major concern for hydrologists, biometeorologists, and climatologists. To date, sensitivity analyses (SAs) of evapotranspiration (ET) models are incomplete on two counts: 1) contemporary, data-driven SAs do not account for the effects of both climate and vegetation input variables on model output (ET estimates); and 2) SAs do not account for the effects of input variable correlation on model output. This is problematic because of the potentially dominant role of vegetation in controlling ET, and the non-trivial interactions between climate variables, and climate and vegetation variables. Ignoring the role of interactions between variables limits the value of SAs for reducing model dimensionality and guiding model calibration, and may lead to incorrect assessments of environmental system response to climate change, where the synchronies between climate variables change over time and space. The problems addressed by this study are the issues identified above: the lack of accounting for both climate and vegetation inputs, and correlated inputs, on ET model SAs. This study: 1) performs a SA of the standardized American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Penman-Monteith (PM) equation for reference ET to both climate and vegetation variables using a mixed empirical and simulation based global Sobol' SA; and 2) performs a SA of ASCE PM reference ET to both climate and vegetation variables through a simulation-based analysis using a new Sobol' SA analogue developed for models with correlated input variables. At the time of completion, this study constitutes the first use of a Sobol' SA (Sobol', 2001

  1. blaney-morin-nigeria (bmn) evapotranspiration model (a technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Duru's work was the analysis and evaluation of the right hand side (RHS) of Equ. 2; the basic concept of the analysis and evaluation being the determination of an "m" value that would yield a unique value of "H" using relevant methodological data of the country. (Nigeria) for the other parameters or the equation.

  2. Measurement and modelling of evapotranspiration in three fynbos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-28

    Feb 28, 2014 ... Climate change, the encroachment of alien invasive plants and wild fires also threaten ... and groundwater sources (Dye et al., 2001; 2008). In studies to quantify ... tected Nature Reserves in the Western Cape Province namely: Riverlands ..... version of the Priestley-Taylor equation wherein evaporation is.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of reference evapotranspiration to sensor accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteorological sensor networks are often used across agricultural regions to calculate the ASCE Standardized Reference ET Equation, and inaccuracies in individual sensors can lead to inaccuracies in ET estimates. Multiyear datasets from the semi-arid Colorado Agricultural Meteorological (CoAgMet) an...

  4. Time series analysis of reference crop evapotranspiration for Bokaro District, Jharkhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Ratnesh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration is the one of the major role playing element in water cycle. More accurate measurement and forecasting of Evapotranspiration would enable more efficient water resources management. This study, is therefore, particularly focused on evapotranspiration modelling and forecasting, since forecasting would provide better information for optimal water resources management. There are numerous techniques of evapotranspiration forecasting that include autoregressive (AR and moving average (MA, autoregressive moving average (ARMA, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA, Thomas Feiring, etc. Out of these models ARIMA model has been found to be more suitable for analysis and forecasting of hydrological events. Therefore, in this study ARIMA models have been used for forecasting of mean monthly reference crop evapotranspiration by stochastic analysis. The data series of 102 years i.e. 1224 months of Bokaro District were used for analysis and forecasting. Different order of ARIMA model was selected on the basis of autocorrelation function (ACF and partial autocorrelation (PACF of data series. Maximum likelihood method was used for determining the parameters of the models. To see the statistical parameter of model, best fitted model is ARIMA (0, 1, 4 (0, 1, 112.

  5. Regional simulation of urban evapotranspiration over Helsinki, Finland in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M.; Spano, D.; Snyder, R. L.; Paw U, K.; Marras, S.; Pyles, D.

    2012-12-01

    The number of urban metabolism studies has increased in recent years, due to the important impact that energy, water and carbon exchange over urban areas have on climate change. Urban modeling is therefore crucial in the future design and management of cities. This study presents the ACASA model coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) mesoscale model to simulate urban area evapotranspiration, surface energy budget terms, and carbon exchange estimates at a horizontal resolution of 600 meters for urban areas of roughly 20 by 20 km. As part of the European Project "BRIDGE", these regional simulations were used in combination with remotely sensed data to provide constraints on the land surface types and mass and energy exchange of urban centers. Land surface-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges LE were simulated using the Advanced Canopy Atmosphere Soil Algorithm (ACASA). The WRF-ACASA coupled model was used to scale up to a regional domain to better simulate the evolution of the urban atmosphere exchange at regional scale: we used a sequence of 6 nested domains with feedback for WRF-ACASA (dx = 48.6, 16.4, 5.2, 1.8, and 0.6 km) using NNRP reanalysis data in combination with CLC land cover data. Our results show that the model performed well compared with the observations both for the surface energy fluxes as well as the surface carbon exchange. The model can generally account for 45-72% of half-hourly variations of observed fluxes. Generally the partitioning of energy fluxes was on par with other urban model performances. On a biweekly time scale we compared the average diurnal course of LE (latent energy flux) of the model against observations. The model was able to resolve 91-92% of the variation of observed fluxes on this aggregate scale with a slope of the linear regression of 0.92 for LE. Simulations yielded spatially consistent results according to land use distribution and location of the urban center. Keywords: Urban metabolism, surface

  6. Introduction to differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical formulations of problems in physics, economics, biology, and other sciences are usually embodied in differential equations. The analysis of the resulting equations then provides new insight into the original problems. This book describes the tools for performing that analysis. The first chapter treats single differential equations, emphasizing linear and nonlinear first order equations, linear second order equations, and a class of nonlinear second order equations arising from Newton's laws. The first order linear theory starts with a self-contained presentation of the exponen

  7. Nonlinear evolution equations

    CERN Document Server

    Uraltseva, N N

    1995-01-01

    This collection focuses on nonlinear problems in partial differential equations. Most of the papers are based on lectures presented at the seminar on partial differential equations and mathematical physics at St. Petersburg University. Among the topics explored are the existence and properties of solutions of various classes of nonlinear evolution equations, nonlinear imbedding theorems, bifurcations of solutions, and equations of mathematical physics (Navier-Stokes type equations and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation). The book will be useful to researchers and graduate students working in p

  8. Using water vapor isotopes to examine evapotranspiration dynamics in corn and miscanthus reveals challenges to the technique as well as seasonal differences between crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2016-12-01

    Second-generation biofuel crops are being planted at an increasing extent around the globe. Changing land use from common field crops to perennial biofuel crops such as miscanthus or switchgrass is expected to alter ecohydrology via changes in evapotranspiration (ET). However, the direction in which evapotranspiration will shift, either partitioning more moisture through soil evaporation (E) or through plant transpiration (T) is uncertain. To investigate how land conversion from maize to miscanthus affects ET partitioning we measured the isotopic composition of water vapor via continuous air sampling. We obtained continuous diurnal measurements of δ2H and δ18O for miscanthus and maize on multiple days over the course of the growing season. Water vapor isotopes drawn from two heights were measured at 2 Hz using a cavity ringdown spectrometer and partitioned into components of E and T using a simple mixing equation. Partitioning was also accomplished with a combination of sap flow sensors and soil lysimeters. Preliminary results reveal that while daily transpiration fraction can be strongly influenced by meteorological events, the whole season transpiration fraction dominates variations in ET in miscanthus fields more so than in fields of maize.

  9. Artificial neural networks employment in the prediction of evapotranspiration of greenhouse-grown sweet pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héliton Pandorfi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to investigate the applicability of artificial neural networks (ANNs in the prediction of evapotranspiration of sweet pepper cultivated in a greenhouse. The used data encompass the second crop cycle, from September 2013 to February 2014, constituting 135 days of daily meteorological data, referring to the following variables: temperature and relative air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation (input variables, as well as evapotranspiration (output variable, determined using data obtained by load-cell weighing lysimeter. The recorded data were divided into three sets for training, testing and validation. The ANN learning model recognized the evapotranspiration patterns with acceptable accuracy, with mean square error of 0.005, in comparison to the data recorded in the lysimeter, with coefficient of determination of 0.87, demonstrating the best approximation for the 4-21-1 network architecture, with multilayers, error back-propagation learning algorithm and learning rate of 0.01.

  10. Improving evapotranspiration processes in distrubing hydrological models using Remote Sensing derived ET products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitew, T. A.; van Griensven, A.; Bauwens, W.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is the main process in hydrology (on average around 60%), though has not received as much attention in the evaluation and calibration of hydrological models. In this study, Remote Sensing (RS) derived Evapotranspiration (ET) is used to improve the spatially distributed processes of ET of SWAT model application in the upper Mara basin (Kenya) and the Blue Nile basin (Ethiopia). The RS derived ET data is obtained from recently compiled global datasets (continuously monthly data at 1 km resolution from MOD16NBI,SSEBop,ALEXI,CMRSET models) and from regionally applied Energy Balance Models (for several cloud free days). The RS-RT data is used in different forms: Method 1) to evaluate spatially distributed evapotransiration model resultsMethod 2) to calibrate the evotranspiration processes in hydrological modelMethod 3) to bias-correct the evapotranpiration in hydrological model during simulation after changing the SWAT codesAn inter-comparison of the RS-ET products shows that at present there is a significant bias, but at the same time an agreement on the spatial variability of ET. The ensemble mean of different ET products seems the most realistic estimation and was further used in this study.The results show that:Method 1) the spatially mapped evapotranspiration of hydrological models shows clear differences when compared to RS derived evapotranspiration (low correlations). Especially evapotranspiration in forested areas is strongly underestimated compared to other land covers.Method 2) Calibration allows to improve the correlations between the RS and hydrological model results to some extent.Method 3) Bias-corrections are efficient in producing (sesonal or annual) evapotranspiration maps from hydrological models which are very similar to the patterns obtained from RS data.Though the bias-correction is very efficient, it is advised to improve the model results by better representing the ET processes by improved plant/crop computations, improved

  11. Dominant effect of increasing forest biomass on evapotranspiration: interpretations of movement in Budyko space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Fernando; Cory, Neil; Arheimer, Berit; Laudon, Hjalmar; van der Velde, Ype; Hasper, Thomas B.; Teutschbein, Claudia; Uddling, Johan

    2018-01-01

    During the last 6 decades, forest biomass has increased in Sweden mainly due to forest management, with a possible increasing effect on evapotranspiration. However, increasing global CO2 concentrations may also trigger physiological water-saving responses in broadleaf tree species, and to a lesser degree in some needleleaf conifer species, inducing an opposite effect. Additionally, changes in other forest attributes may also affect evapotranspiration. In this study, we aimed to detect the dominating effect(s) of forest change on evapotranspiration by studying changes in the ratio of actual evapotranspiration to precipitation, known as the evaporative ratio, during the period 1961-2012. We first used the Budyko framework of water and energy availability at the basin scale to study the hydroclimatic movements in Budyko space of 65 temperate and boreal basins during this period. We found that movements in Budyko space could not be explained by climatic changes in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration in 60 % of these basins, suggesting the existence of other dominant drivers of hydroclimatic change. In both the temperate and boreal basin groups studied, a negative climatic effect on the evaporative ratio was counteracted by a positive residual effect. The positive residual effect occurred along with increasing standing forest biomass in the temperate and boreal basin groups, increasing forest cover in the temperate basin group and no apparent changes in forest species composition in any group. From the three forest attributes, standing forest biomass was the one that could explain most of the variance of the residual effect in both basin groups. These results further suggest that the water-saving response to increasing CO2 in these forests is either negligible or overridden by the opposite effect of the increasing forest biomass. Thus, we conclude that increasing standing forest biomass is the dominant driver of long-term and large-scale evapotranspiration

  12. Dominant effect of increasing forest biomass on evapotranspiration: interpretations of movement in Budyko space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jaramillo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 6 decades, forest biomass has increased in Sweden mainly due to forest management, with a possible increasing effect on evapotranspiration. However, increasing global CO2 concentrations may also trigger physiological water-saving responses in broadleaf tree species, and to a lesser degree in some needleleaf conifer species, inducing an opposite effect. Additionally, changes in other forest attributes may also affect evapotranspiration. In this study, we aimed to detect the dominating effect(s of forest change on evapotranspiration by studying changes in the ratio of actual evapotranspiration to precipitation, known as the evaporative ratio, during the period 1961–2012. We first used the Budyko framework of water and energy availability at the basin scale to study the hydroclimatic movements in Budyko space of 65 temperate and boreal basins during this period. We found that movements in Budyko space could not be explained by climatic changes in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration in 60 % of these basins, suggesting the existence of other dominant drivers of hydroclimatic change. In both the temperate and boreal basin groups studied, a negative climatic effect on the evaporative ratio was counteracted by a positive residual effect. The positive residual effect occurred along with increasing standing forest biomass in the temperate and boreal basin groups, increasing forest cover in the temperate basin group and no apparent changes in forest species composition in any group. From the three forest attributes, standing forest biomass was the one that could explain most of the variance of the residual effect in both basin groups. These results further suggest that the water-saving response to increasing CO2 in these forests is either negligible or overridden by the opposite effect of the increasing forest biomass. Thus, we conclude that increasing standing forest biomass is the dominant driver of long-term and large

  13. Temporal upscaling of instantaneous evapotranspiration on clear-sky days using the constant reference evaporative fraction method with fixed or variable surface resistances at two cropland sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ronglin; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Xiaomin; Bi, Yuyun

    2017-01-01

    Surface evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of water and energy in land and atmospheric systems. This paper investigated whether using variable surface resistances in the reference ET estimates from the full-form Penman-Monteith (PM) equation could improve the upscaled daily ET estimates in the constant reference evaporative fraction (EFr, the ratio of actual to reference grass/alfalfa ET) method on clear-sky days using ground-based measurements. Half-hourly near-surface meteorological variables and eddy covariance (EC) system-measured latent heat flux data on clear-sky days were collected at two sites with different climatic conditions, namely, the subhumid Yucheng station in northern China and the arid Yingke site in northwestern China and were used as the model input and ground-truth, respectively. The results showed that using the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)-PM equation, the American Society of Civil Engineers-PM equation, and the full-form PM equation to estimate the reference ET in the constant EFr method produced progressively smaller upscaled daily ET at a given time from midmorning to midafternoon. Using all three PM equations produced the best results at noon at both sites regardless of whether the energy imbalance of the EC measurements was closed. When the EC measurements were not corrected for energy imbalance, using variable surface resistance in the full-form PM equation could improve the ET upscaling in the midafternoon, but worse results may occur in the midmorning to noon. Site-to-site and time-to-time variations were found in the performances of a given PM equation (with fixed or variable surface resistances) before and after the energy imbalance was closed.

  14. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Features a balance between theory, proofs, and examples and provides applications across diverse fields of study Ordinary Differential Equations presents a thorough discussion of first-order differential equations and progresses to equations of higher order. The book transitions smoothly from first-order to higher-order equations, allowing readers to develop a complete understanding of the related theory. Featuring diverse and interesting applications from engineering, bioengineering, ecology, and biology, the book anticipates potential difficulties in understanding the various solution steps

  15. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    A broad introduction to PDEs with an emphasis on specialized topics and applications occurring in a variety of fields Featuring a thoroughly revised presentation of topics, Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Third Edition provides a challenging, yet accessible,combination of techniques, applications, and introductory theory on the subjectof partial differential equations. The new edition offers nonstandard coverageon material including Burger's equation, the telegraph equation, damped wavemotion, and the use of characteristics to solve nonhomogeneous problems. The Third Edition is or

  16. Combining the triangle method with thermal inertia to estimate regional evapotranspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Simon; Sandholt, Inge; Nørgaard, Anette

    2008-01-01

    Spatially distributed estimates of evaporative fraction and actual evapotranspiration are pursued using a simple remote sensing technique based on a remotely sensed vegetation index (NDVI) and diurnal changes in land surface temperature. The technique, known as the triangle method, is improved...... in surface temperature, dTs with an interpretation of the triangular shaped dTs-NDVI space allows for a direct estimation of evaporative fraction. The mean daytime energy available for evapotranspiration (Rn-G) is estimated using several remote sensors and limited ancillary data. Finally regional estimates...

  17. Averaged RMHD equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    A new reduced set of resistive MHD equations is derived by averaging the full MHD equations on specified flux coordinates, which is consistent with 3D equilibria. It is confirmed that the total energy is conserved and the linearized equations for ideal modes are self-adjoint. (author)

  18. Spatial modelling of evapotranspiration in the Luquillo experimental forest of Puerto Rico using remotely-sensed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Wu; Charles A.S. Hall; Frederick N. Scatena; Lindi J. Quackenbush

    2006-01-01

    Summary Actual evapotranspiration (aET) and related processes in tropical forests can explain 70% of the lateral global energy transport through latent heat, and therefore are very important in the redistribution of water on the Earth’s surface [Mauser, M., Scha¨dlich, S., 1998. Modelling the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration on different scales using remote...

  19. Evapotranspiration modules for crop growth simulation. Implementation of the algorithms from Penman, Makkink and Priestley-Taylor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Stol, W.

    1997-01-01

    Calculation of evapotranspiration is essential for the estimation of crop water use or for studying the effect of drought stress on crop performance with simulation models. Several methods are available for calculation of evapotranspiration. This report describes three different methods : the Penman

  20. Regional estimation of daily to annual regional evapotranspiration with MODIS data in the Yellow River Delta wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, L.; Xi, G.; Liu, S.; Huang, C.; Yan, Y.; Liu, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) from the wetland of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) is one of the important components in the water cycle, which represents the water consumption by the plants and evaporation from the water and the non-vegetated surfaces. Reliable estimates of the total evapotranspiration from

  1. Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powerful mathematical tool for solving fractional differential equations.

  2. Sensitivity of potential evapotranspiration estimation to the Thornthwaite and Penman-Monteith methods in the study of global drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Ma, Zhuguo; Zheng, Ziyan; Duan, Yawen

    2017-12-01

    Drylands are among those regions most sensitive to climate and environmental changes and human-induced perturbations. The most widely accepted definition of the term dryland is a ratio, called the Surface Wetness Index (SWI), of annual precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET) being below 0.65. PET is commonly estimated using the Thornthwaite (PET Th) and Penman-Monteith equations (PET PM). The present study compared spatiotemporal characteristics of global drylands based on the SWI with PET Th and PET PM. Results showed vast differences between PET Th and PET PM; however, the SWI derived from the two kinds of PET showed broadly similar characteristics in the interdecadal variability of global and continental drylands, except in North America, with high correlation coefficients ranging from 0.58 to 0.89. It was found that, during 1901-2014, global hyper-arid and semi-arid regions expanded, arid and dry sub-humid regions contracted, and drylands underwent interdecadal fluctuation. This was because precipitation variations made major contributions, whereas PET changes contributed to a much lesser degree. However, distinct differences in the interdecadal variability of semi-arid and dry sub-humid regions were found. This indicated that the influence of PET changes was comparable to that of precipitation variations in the global dry-wet transition zone. Additionally, the contribution of PET changes to the variations in global and continental drylands gradually enhanced with global warming, and the Thornthwaite method was found to be increasingly less applicable under climate change.

  3. Comparative Study of M5 Model Tree and Artificial Neural Network in Estimating Reference Evapotranspiration Using MODIS Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Alipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference evapotranspiration (ETO is one of the major parameters affecting hydrological cycle. Use of satellite images can be very helpful to compensate for lack of reliable weather data. This study aimed to determine ETO using land surface temperature (LST data acquired from MODIS sensor. LST data were considered as inputs of two data-driven models including artificial neural network (ANN and M5 model tree to estimate ETO values and their results were compared with calculated ETO by FAO-Penman-Monteith (FAO-PM equation. Climatic data of five weather stations in Khuzestan province, which is located in the southeastern Iran, were employed in order to calculate ETO. LST data extracted from corresponding points of MODIS images were used in training of ANN and M5 model tree. Among study stations, three stations (Amirkabir, Farabi, and Gazali were selected for creating the models and two stations (Khazaei and Shoeybie for testing. In Khazaei station, the coefficient of determination (R2 values for comparison between calculated ETO by FAO-PM and estimated ETO by ANN and M5 tree model were 0.79 and 0.80, respectively. In a similar manner, R2 values for Shoeybie station were 0.86 and 0.85. In general, the results showed that both models can properly estimate ETO by means of LST data derived from MODIS sensor.

  4. Comparison of sap flux, moisture flux tower and MODIS enhanced vegetation index methods for estimating riparian evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Morino, Kiyomi; Neale, Christopher M.U; Cosh, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) was measured on a salt cedar (Tamarix spp.) dominated river terrace on the Lower Colorado River from 2007 to 2009 using tissue-heat-balance sap flux sensors at six sites representing very dense, medium dense, and sparse stands of plants. Salt cedar ET varied markedly across sites, and sap flux sensors showed that plants were subject to various degrees of stress, detected as mid-day depression of transpiration and stomatal conductance. Sap flux results were scaled from the leaf level of measurement to the stand level by measuring plant-specific leaf area index and fractional ground cover at each site. Results were compared to Bowen ratio moisture tower data available for three of the sites. Sap flux sensors and flux tower results ranked the sites the same and had similar estimates of ET. A regression equation, relating measured ET of salt cedar and other riparian plants and crops on the Lower Colorado River to the Enhanced Vegetation Index from the MODIS sensor on the Terra satellite and reference crop ET measured at meteorological stations, was able to predict actual ET with an accuracy or uncertainty of about 20%, despite between-site differences for salt cedar. Peak summer salt cedar ET averaged about 6 mm d-1 across sites and methods of measurement.

  5. Relationship between evapotranspiration and precipitation pulses in a semiarid rangeland estimated by moisture flux towers and MODIS vegetation indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.; Kim, H.; Emmerich, W.; Scott, R.L.; Huxman, T. E.; Huete, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    We used moisture Bowen ratio flux tower data and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite to measure and scale evapotranspiration (ET) over sparsely vegetated grassland and shrubland sites in a semiarid watershed in southeastern Arizona from 2000 to 2004. The grassland tower site had higher mean annual ET (336 mm yr-1) than the shrubland tower site (266 mm yr-1) (Pequation. The regression equation relating ET to EVI and P was used to scale ET over 25 km2 areas of grassland and shrubland around each tower site. Over the study, ratios of T to ET ranged from 0.75 to 1.0. Winter rains stimulated spring ET, and a large rain event in fall, 2000, stimulated ET above T through the following year, indicating that winter rain stored in the soil profile can be an important component of the plants' water budget during the warm season in this ecosystem. We conclude that remotely sensed vegetation indices can be used to scale ground measurements of ET over larger landscape units in semiarid ranglelands, and that the vegetation communities in this landscape effectively harvest the available precipitation over a period of years, even though precipitation patterns are variably seasonally and interannually. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Satellite-based Basal and Adjusted Evapotranspiration for Several California Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Lund, C.; Melton, F. S.

    2013-12-01

    There is a continuing need to develop new sources of information on agricultural crop water consumption in the arid Western U.S. Pursuant to the California Water Conservation Act of 2009, for instance, the stakeholder community has developed a set of quantitative indicators involving measurement of evapotranspiration (ET) or crop consumptive use (Calif. Dept. Water Resources, 2012). Fraction of reference ET (or, crop coefficients) can be estimated from a biophysical description of the crop canopy involving green fractional cover (Fc) and height as per the FAO-56 practice standard of Allen et al. (1998). The current study involved 19 fields in California's San Joaquin Valley and Central Coast during 2011-12, growing a variety of specialty and commodity crops: lettuce, raisin, tomato, almond, melon, winegrape, garlic, peach, orange, cotton, corn and wheat. Most crops were on surface or subsurface drip, though micro-jet, sprinkler and flood were represented as well. Fc was retrospectively estimated every 8-16 days by optical satellite data and interpolated to a daily timestep. Crop height was derived as a capped linear function of Fc using published guideline maxima. These variables were used to generate daily basal crop coefficients (Kcb) per field through most or all of each respective growth cycle by the density coefficient approach of Allen & Pereira (2009). A soil water balance model for both topsoil and root zone, based on FAO-56 and using on-site measurements of applied irrigation and precipitation, was used to develop daily soil evaporation and crop water stress coefficients (Ke, Ks). Key meteorological variables (wind speed, relative humidity) were extracted from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) for climate correction. Basal crop ET (ETcb) was then derived from Kcb using CIMIS reference ET. Adjusted crop ET (ETc_adj) was estimated by the dual coefficient approach involving Kcb, Ke, and incorporating Ks. Cumulative ETc

  7. Forest Surface Energy Balance and Evapotranspiration Estimated From Four Eddy Covariance Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, G. A.; Adam, J. C.; Elliot, W. J.; Liu, H.

    2016-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET), which refers to the combined effect of surface water evaporation and plant transpiration, is one of the vital elements of the global water balance. It is also an important process for plants, providing water, nutrient, and cooling needs, and helping to regulate carbon dioxide entry through open/closure of the plant's stomata. Quantifying ET in forested environments is an ongoing research area. Complex physiological responses with climatic variation, combined with difficulty in making wide-spread measurements, makes ET one of the least understood components of a forest water balance. The objective of this study is to estimate ET and energy balance closure by using flux net data from eddy covariance towers. ET is estimated for different forest types with multiple age classes during the years of 2011, 2012 and 2013. We studied two coniferous forests (F1, F2), one deciduous forest (F3) and one mixed forest (F4) in Washington, Wyoming, Wisconsin and New Jersey, respectively. Label 2 (Data checked and formatted by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center) gap filled flux data were collected from the AmeriFlux database (ameriflux.ornl.gov). Discrepancies between turbulent fluxes and available energy are investigated. Among the studied forests, the highest and lowest average monthly ET are exhibited by the mixed forest (F4) and coniferous forest (F1) in 2012 which are 2,692 and 633 mm/month, respectively. Difference in average monthly ET can be an implication of substantial age difference between these two types of forest. The regression analysis showed significant correlation between turbulent fluxes and available energy (R2=0.91) for mixed forest where the discrepancy varied from 5-11%. Conversely, for coniferous and deciduous forests, the discrepancy varied from 46-49% and 28%, respectively, with almost similar correlation between the fluxes (0.86 and 0.84, respectively). This study will facilitate an improved understanding of how forest type

  8. Topographic effects on solar radiation distribution in mountainous watersheds and their influence on reference evapotranspiration estimates at watershed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aguilar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Distributed energy and water balance models require time-series surfaces of the climatological variables involved in hydrological processes. Among them, solar radiation constitutes a key variable to the circulation of water in the atmosphere. Most of the hydrological GIS-based models apply simple interpolation techniques to data measured at few weather stations disregarding topographic effects. Here, a topographic solar radiation algorithm has been included for the generation of detailed time-series solar radiation surfaces using limited data and simple methods in a mountainous watershed in southern Spain. The results show the major role of topography in local values and differences between the topographic approximation and the direct interpolation to measured data (IDW of up to +42% and −1800% in the estimated daily values. Also, the comparison of the predicted values with experimental data proves the usefulness of the algorithm for the estimation of spatially-distributed radiation values in a complex terrain, with a good fit for daily values (R2 = 0.93 and the best fits under cloudless skies at hourly time steps. Finally, evapotranspiration fields estimated through the ASCE-Penman-Monteith equation using both corrected and non-corrected radiation values address the hydrologic importance of using topographically-corrected solar radiation fields as inputs to the equation over uniform values with mean differences in the watershed of 61 mm/year and 142 mm/year of standard deviation. High speed computations in a 1300 km2 watershed in the south of Spain with up to a one-hour time scale in 30 × 30 m2 cells can be easily carried out on a desktop PC.

  9. Modeling potential evapotranspiration of two forested watersheds in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.Y. Rao; G. Sun; C.R. Ford; J.M. Vose

    2011-01-01

    Global climate change has direct impacts on watershed hydrology through altering evapotranspiration (ET) processes at multiple scales. There are many methods to estimate forest ET with models, but the most practical and the most popular one is the potential ET (PET) based method. However, the choice of PET methods for AET estimation remains challenging. This study...

  10. Benchmark products for land evapotranspiration: LandFlux-EVAL multi-data set synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, B.; Hirschi, M.; Jimenez, C.; Ciais, P.; Dirmeyer, P.A.; Dolman, A.J.; Fisher, J.B.; Jung, M.; Ludwig, F.; Maignan, F.

    2013-01-01

    Land evapotranspiration (ET) estimates are available from several global datasets. Here, monthly global land ET synthesis products, merged from these individual datasets over the time periods 1989–1995 (7 yr) and 1989–2005 (17 yr), are presented. The 5 merged synthesis products over the shorter

  11. 1:1,000,000-scale areas of evapotranspiration in the Great Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of 1:1,000,000-scale areas where shallow ground water is consumed by evapotranspiration (ET) in the Great Basin. The source of this data set...

  12. CONTROLLING FACTORS OF POTENTIAL EVAPOTRANSPIRATION ABOVE GRASSLAND IN HUMID AND ARID AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Yanto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Potential evapotranspiration (PET is an importance process in water balance studies controlled by a number of meteorological factors such as temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, solar radiation, vapor pressure gradient, relative humidity and biological factors such as vegetation type, canopy height and plant density that varied in time-scale and in spatial scale. Of all those variables, determining the most controlling factors of evapotranspiration in humid and arid area is of interest of this paper. Two sites representing humid and arid area i.e. Fermi Prairie site in Illinois and Audubon Research Ranch in Arizona respectively were investigated in this study.  The flux data employed in this study was acquired from Ameriflux Netwotk. Penmann-Monteith formula is employed in to estimate evapotranspiration rate in both sites. The result shows that the PET is in dependence on the considered meteorological factor such as shortwave radiation, vapor pressure, air temperature, wind speed, net radiation and vapor pressure deficit. It is also can be inferred from the analysis that PET is also strongly controlled by vegetation factors represented as stomatal resistance. Keywords: Potential evapotranspiration, Penmann-Monteith, humid, arid.

  13. A comparison of two downscaling procedures to increase the spatial resolution of mapping actual evapotranspiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahour, M.; Tolpekin, V.A.; Stein, A.; Sharifi, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    This research addressed the effects of downscaling cokriging Land Surface Temperature (LST) on estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration (AET) from remote sensing images. Two procedures were followed. We first applied downscaling cokriging to a coarse resolution LST product of MODIS at 1000 m. With

  14. Simple models to predict grassland ecosystem C exchange and actual evapotranspiration using NDVI and environmental variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiarid grasslands contribute significantly to net terrestrial carbon flux as plant productivity and heterotrophic respiration in these moisture-limited systems are correlated with metrics related to water availability (e.g., precipitation, Actual EvapoTranspiration or AET). These variables are als...

  15. Analyses of Spring Barley Evapotranspiration Rates Based on Gradient Measurements and Dual Crop Coefficient Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pozníková, Gabriela; Fischer, Milan; Pohanková, Eva; Trnka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 5 (2014), s. 1079-1086 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12037; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : evapotranspiration * dual crop coefficient model * Bowen ratio/energy balance method * transpiration * soil evaporation * spring barley Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Evapotranspiration and soil moisture dynamics in a temperate grassland ecosystem in Inner Mongolia China

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Hao; Ge Sun; Yongqiang Liu; G. S. Zhou; J. H.   Wan;  L. B. Zhang; J. L. Niu; Y. H. Sang;  J. J He

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture are the key controls for the productivity and functioning of temperate grassland ecosystems in Inner Mongolia, northern China. Quantifying the soil moisture dynamics and water balances in the grasslands is essential to sustainable grassland management under global climate change. We...

  17. Evaluation of an urban canopy model in a tropical city: the role of tree evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Li, Xian-Xiang; Harshan, Suraj; Roth, Matthias; Velasco, Erik

    2017-09-01

    A single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM) with enhanced hydrologic processes, is evaluated in a tropical city, Singapore. The evaluation was performed using an 11 month offline simulation with the coupled Noah land surface model/SLUCM over a compact low-rise residential area. Various hydrological processes are considered, including anthropogenic latent heat release, and evaporation from impervious urban facets. Results show that the prediction of energy fluxes, in particular latent heat flux, is improved when these processes were included. However, the simulated latent heat flux is still underestimated by ∼40%. Considering Singapore’s high green cover ratio, the tree evapotranspiration process is introduced into the model, which significantly improves the simulated latent heat flux. In particular, the systematic error of the model is greatly reduced, and becomes lower than the unsystematic error in some seasons. The effect of tree evapotranspiration on the urban surface energy balance is further demonstrated during an unusual dry spell. The present study demonstrates that even at sites with relatively low (11%) tree coverage, ignoring evapotranspiration from trees may cause serious underestimation of the latent heat flux and atmospheric humidity. The improved model is also transferable to other tropical or temperate regions to study the impact of tree evapotranspiration on urban climate.

  18. An Integrated Model for Simulating Regional Water Resources Based on Total Evapotranspiration Control Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Total evapotranspiration and water consumption (ET control is considered an efficient method for water management. In this study, we developed a water allocation and simulation (WAS model, which can simulate the water cycle and output different ET values for natural and artificial water use, such as crop evapotranspiration, grass evapotranspiration, forest evapotranspiration, living water consumption, and industry water consumption. In the calibration and validation periods, a “piece-by-piece” approach was used to evaluate the model from runoff to ET data, including the remote sensing ET data and regional measured ET data, which differ from the data from the traditional hydrology method. We applied the model to Tianjin City, China. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (Ens of the runoff simulation was 0.82, and its regression coefficient R2 was 0.92. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (Ens of regional total ET simulation was 0.93, and its regression coefficient R2 was 0.98. These results demonstrate that ET of irrigation lands is the dominant part, which accounts for 53% of the total ET. The latter is also a priority in ET control for water management.

  19. Estimating evapotranspiration from a reed bed using the Bowen ratio energy balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, C. E.; Hess, T. M.

    2004-02-01

    An increase in demand for water for agricultural and domestic use, combined with new legislation regarding the water needs of natural habitats, has led to an increased requirement for accurate calculations of hydrological fluxes through wetlands. Evapotranspiration is one of the most important but least well understood fluxes in wetland hydrology. Research has been carried out on Stodmarsh National Nature Reserve in Kent, UK, a Ramsar site containing the largest reed beds in southern England. The objective was to quantify water loss through evapotranspiration on the site to allow more effective management of water levels and maintenance of maximum conservation potential for bird life. The Bowen ratio energy balance approach was employed, which is one of the most accurate ways of measuring evapotranspiration but has been rarely used on reed beds. These measurements were used with Penman-Monteith reference evapotranspiration in order to create crop coefficients. It was found that crop coefficients were inconsistent from day to day but were generally less than unity. The inconsistency was thought to be caused by variations in meteorological conditions: e.g. significant differences in crop coefficients were found between days with high radiation and a dry canopy, compared with days with low radiation and a wet canopy. Canopy interception of precipitation was particularly important, with crop coefficients being significantly higher on wet days, possibly due to the higher rates of evaporation of intercepted water due to the lack of stomatal resistance.

  20. Infrared thermometry and stress monitoring of corn, and sensitivity analysis of reference evapotranspiration to sensor accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for SOCR seminar: The USDA-ARS Water Management Research Unit in Fort Collins, CO is tasked with maintaining high crop yields under limited water. One focus of this project is to quantify evapotranspiration (ET) and water stress. Canopy temperature methods have been used for decades to quan...

  1. Daily reference evapotranspiration modeling by using genetic programming approach in the Basque Country (Northern Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shiri, J.; Kisi, O.; Landeras, G.; Lopez, J.J.; Nazemi, A.H.; Stuyt, L.C.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration, as a major component of the hydrological cycle, is of importance for water resources management and development, as well as for estimating the water budget of irrigation schemes. This study presents a Gene Expression Programming (GEP) approach, for estimating daily reference

  2. An overview of the Central Queensland University self-contained evapotranspiration beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kele, B; Midmore, D J; Harrower, K; McKennariey, B J; Hood, B

    2005-01-01

    The Central Queensland University (CQU) has championed a self-contained concrete lined evapotranspiration channel. Any non-transpired effluent returns to a holding tank and is recirculated through the evapotranspiration channel until it is used. This paper examines the results from the Rockhampton trial site. Nutrient ions in the effluent were quantified over time and found not to accumulate in solution. Microbial analysis of the treated effluent was performed and was found to be within the ranges required by the relevant legislative codes. Citrus fruit grown in the evapotranspiration channel were sampled and no elevated levels of faecal coliforms were recorded. Macronutrients and micronutrients of the soil in the channels were measured over a 5-year period. No toxic accumulations or nutrient deficiencies in the soil occurred. Levels of salinity and sodicity in the evapotranspiration channel soil were quantified. Salinity rose slightly, as did sodium. Concentrations of salts and sodium did not reach unsustainable levels. The aim of the trial was to develop an on-site treatment and reuse system that is sustainable and protects public and environmental health.

  3. Exceedance probability of the standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought is a common occurrence in many arid and semi-arid regions that can have large negative impacts on water resources and agricultural production. Since agricultural drought is affected by both water supply and demand (precipitation and evapotranspiration), it is beneficial to include both in a...

  4. Estimating forest ecosystem evapotranspiration at multiple temporal scales with a dimension analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoyi Zhou; Ge Sun; Xu Wang; Chuanyan Zhou; Steven G. McNulty; James M. Vose; Devendra M. Amatya

    2008-01-01

    It is critical that evapotranspiration (ET) be quantified accurately so that scientists can evaluate the effects of land management and global change on water availability, streamflow, nutrient and sediment loading, and ecosystem productivity in watersheds. The objective of this study was to derive a new semi-empirical ET modeled using a dimension analysis method that...

  5. Influence of potential evapotranspiration on the water balance of sugarcane fields in Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    The year-long warm temperatures and other climatic characteristics of the Pacific Ocean Islands have made Hawaii an optimum place for growing sugarcane; however, irrigation is essential to satisfy the large water demand of sugarcane. Under the Hawaiian tropical weather, actual evapotranspiration (A...

  6. Accuracy assessment of NOAA gridded daily reference evapotranspiration for the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference evapotranspiration (ETref) maps for the contiguous United States using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large-scale spatial representation of ETref, which i...

  7. Evapotranspiration estimates derived using multi-platform remote sensing in a semiarid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key component of the water balance, especially in arid and semiarid regions. The current study takes advantage of spatially-distributed, near real-time information provided by satellite remote sensing to develop a regional scale ET product derived from remotely-sensed ob...

  8. Testing DRAINMOD-FOREST for predicting evapotranspiration in a mid-rotation pine plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiying Tian; Mohamed A. Youssef; Ge Sun; George M. Chescheir; Asko Noormets; Devendra M. Amatya; R. Wayne Skaggs; John S. King; Steve McNulty; Michael Gavazzi; Guofang Miao; Jean-Christophe Domec

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a key component of the hydrologic cycle in terrestrial ecosystems and accurate description of ET processes is essential for developing reliable ecohydrological models. This study investigated the accuracy of ET prediction by the DRAINMOD-FOREST after its calibration/validation for predicting commonly measured hydrological variables. The model...

  9. Daily evapotranspiration over cotton by assimilating remotely sensed data with ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimation of spatially distributed evapotranspiration (ET) with remote sensing could be especially valuable for developing water management tools in arid lands. For decision support over irrigated crops, these spatial ET estimates also depend upon good spatial resolution ($<$30 m)at timely interval...

  10. Carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration, and water use efficiency of terrestrial ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingfeng Xiao; Ge Sun; Jiquan Chen; Hui Chen; Shiping Chen; Gang Dong

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude, spatial patterns, and controlling factors of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack of ecosystem-level flux observations. We synthesized flux and micrometeorological observations from 22 eddy covariance flux sites across China,and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and...

  11. Lanczos's equation to replace Dirac's equation ?

    CERN Document Server

    Gsponer, Andre; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1994-01-01

    Lanczos's quaternionic interpretation of Dirac's equation provides a unified description for all elementary particles of spin 0, 1/2, 1, and 3/2. The Lagrangian formulation given by Einstein and Mayer in 1933 predicts two main classes of solutions. (1) Point like partons which come in two families, quarks and leptons. The correct fractional or integral electric and baryonic charges, and zero mass for the neutrino and the u-quark, are set by eigenvalue equations. The electro-weak interaction of the partons is the same as with the Standard model, with the same two free parameters: e and sin^2 theta. There is no need for a Higgs symmetry breaking mechanism. (2) Extended hadrons for which there is no simple eigenvalue equation for the mass. The strong interaction is essentially non-local. The pion mass and pion-nucleon coupling constant determine to first order the nucleon size, mass and anomalous magnetic moment.

  12. Domination of growing-season evapotranspiration over runoff makes ditch network maintenance in mature peatland forests questionable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarkkola

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In Finland, ditch network maintenance (DNM is carried out annually on 60–70,000 ha of drained peatland to promote tree growth for forestry purposes. However, it is important to avoid ditching that contributes little to the stand growth and productivity, both to improve the economical profitability of forestry and to mitigate DNM-induced nutrient release to watercourses. We hypothesised that mature forest stands with substantial evapotranspiration potential do not necessarily need DNM, even if the ditch networks are in poor condition.We estimated evapotranspiration (EVT of forest vegetation during the growing seasons (June–September of 2007–2011 in four forested artificial peatland catchments dominated by Scots pine stands (Pinus sylvestris L. (stand volume 93–151 m3 ha-1 located in southern, western, central and northern Finland. Precipitation (P, runoff (R and water table level (WTL were monitored continuously in the field. The water storage change (ΔS was estimated on the basis of WTL measurements and peat pF curves determined from in situ peat samples. In addition, tree stand transpiration (T was estimated in two of the catchments using the sap flow method. EVT was estimated as the residual term of the water balance equation.During the growing season, EVT (153–295 mm was 49–161 % of the total accumulated P (155–368 mm, and decreased from south to north. Within each growing season, EVT was always largest in July or August. Tree transpiration was about 50 % of the total forest EVT in the two sites where it was measured directly. The mean WTL was at depth 36–63 cm during the growing seasons. Clear-cutting of a 100m3 ha-1 stand on one site resulted in an average rise of WTL by 18 cm.The results suggested that, in the southernmost site in particular, no drainage network management would be necessary to sustain satisfactory drainage conditions for tree growth because growing-season precipitation is transferred back to the

  13. Functional equations with causal operators

    CERN Document Server

    Corduneanu, C

    2003-01-01

    Functional equations encompass most of the equations used in applied science and engineering: ordinary differential equations, integral equations of the Volterra type, equations with delayed argument, and integro-differential equations of the Volterra type. The basic theory of functional equations includes functional differential equations with causal operators. Functional Equations with Causal Operators explains the connection between equations with causal operators and the classical types of functional equations encountered by mathematicians and engineers. It details the fundamentals of linear equations and stability theory and provides several applications and examples.

  14. Elliptic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Volpert, Vitaly

    If we had to formulate in one sentence what this book is about it might be "How partial differential equations can help to understand heat explosion, tumor growth or evolution of biological species". These and many other applications are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The theory of reaction-diffusion equations appeared in the first half of the last century. In the present time, it is widely used in population dynamics, chemical physics, biomedical modelling. The purpose of this book is to present the mathematical theory of reaction-diffusion equations in the context of their numerous applications. We will go from the general mathematical theory to specific equations and then to their applications. Mathematical anaylsis of reaction-diffusion equations will be based on the theory of Fredholm operators presented in the first volume. Existence, stability and bifurcations of solutions will be studied for bounded domains and in the case of travelling waves. The classical theory of reaction-diffusion equ...

  15. Differential equations for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The fun and easy way to understand and solve complex equations Many of the fundamental laws of physics, chemistry, biology, and economics can be formulated as differential equations. This plain-English guide explores the many applications of this mathematical tool and shows how differential equations can help us understand the world around us. Differential Equations For Dummies is the perfect companion for a college differential equations course and is an ideal supplemental resource for other calculus classes as well as science and engineering courses. It offers step-by-step techniques, practical tips, numerous exercises, and clear, concise examples to help readers improve their differential equation-solving skills and boost their test scores.

  16. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lawrence C

    2010-01-01

    This text gives a comprehensive survey of modern techniques in the theoretical study of partial differential equations (PDEs) with particular emphasis on nonlinear equations. The exposition is divided into three parts: representation formulas for solutions; theory for linear partial differential equations; and theory for nonlinear partial differential equations. Included are complete treatments of the method of characteristics; energy methods within Sobolev spaces; regularity for second-order elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations; maximum principles; the multidimensional calculus of variations; viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations; shock waves and entropy criteria for conservation laws; and, much more.The author summarizes the relevant mathematics required to understand current research in PDEs, especially nonlinear PDEs. While he has reworked and simplified much of the classical theory (particularly the method of characteristics), he primarily emphasizes the modern interplay between funct...

  17. Nonlinear Dirac Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Khim Ng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We construct nonlinear extensions of Dirac's relativistic electron equation that preserve its other desirable properties such as locality, separability, conservation of probability and Poincaré invariance. We determine the constraints that the nonlinear term must obey and classify the resultant non-polynomial nonlinearities in a double expansion in the degree of nonlinearity and number of derivatives. We give explicit examples of such nonlinear equations, studying their discrete symmetries and other properties. Motivated by some previously suggested applications we then consider nonlinear terms that simultaneously violate Lorentz covariance and again study various explicit examples. We contrast our equations and construction procedure with others in the literature and also show that our equations are not gauge equivalent to the linear Dirac equation. Finally we outline various physical applications for these equations.

  18. Epistemic Uncertainty in Evalustion of Evapotranspiration and Net Infiltration Using Analogue Meteorological Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Faybishenko

    2006-09-01

    Uncertainty is typically defined as a potential deficiency in the modeling of a physical process, owing to a lack of knowledge. Uncertainty can be categorized as aleatoric (inherent uncertainty caused by the intrinsic randomness of the system) or epistemic (uncertainty caused by using various model simplifications and their parameters). One of the main reasons for model simplifications is a limited amount of meteorological data. This paper is devoted to the epistemic uncertainty quantification involved in two components of the hydrologic balance-evapotranspiration and net infiltration for interglacial (present day), and future monsoon, glacial transition, and glacial climates at Yucca Mountain, using the data from analogue meteorological stations. In particular, the author analyzes semi-empirical models used for evaluating (1) reference-surface potential evapotranspiration, including temperature-based models (Hargreaves-Samani, Thornthwaite, Hamon, Jensen-Haise, and Turc) and radiation-based models (Priestly-Taylor and Penman), and (2) surface-dependent potential evapotranspiration (Penman-Monteith and Shuttleworth-Wallace models). Evapotranspiration predictions are then used as inputs for the evaluation of net infiltration using the semi-empirical models of Budyko, Fu, Milly, Turc-Pike, and Zhang. Results show that net infiltration ranges are expected to generally increase from the present-day climate to monsoon climate, to glacial transition climate, and then to the glacial climate. The propagation of uncertainties through model predictions for different climates is characterized using statistical measures. Predicted evapotranspiration ranges are reasonably corroborated against the data from Class A pan evaporometers (taking into account evaporation-pan adjustment coefficients), and ranges of net infiltration predictions are corroborated against the geochemical and temperature-based estimates of groundwater recharge and percolation rates through the unsaturated

  19. Evapotranspiration simulated by CRITERIA and AquaCrop models in stony soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Campi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a water balance model is also based on the ability to correctly perform simulations in heterogeneous soils. The objective of this paper is to test CRITERIA and AquaCrop models in order to evaluate their suitability in estimating evapotranspiration at the field scale in two types of soil in the Mediterranean region: non-stony and stony soil. The first step of the work was to calibrate both models under the non-stony conditions. The models were calibrated by using observations on wheat crop (leaf area index or canopy cover, and phenological stages as a function of degree days and pedo-climatic measurements. The second step consisted in the analysing the impact of the soil type on the models performances by comparing simulated and measured values. The outputs retained in the analysis were soil water content (at the daily scale and crop evapotranspiration (at two time scales: daily and crop season. The model performances were evaluated through four statistical tests: normalised difference (D% at the seasonal time scale; and relative root mean square error (RRMSE, efficiency index (EF, coefficient of determination (r2 at the daily scale. At the seasonal scale, values of D% were less than 15% in stony and on-stony soils, indicating a good performance attained by both models. At the daily scale, the RRMSE values (<30% indicate that the evapotranspiration simulated by CRITERIA is acceptable in both soil types. In the stony soil conditions, 3 out 4 statistical tests (RRMSE, EF, r2 indicate the inadequacy of AquaCrop to simulate correctly daily evapotranspiration. The higher performance of CRITERIA model to simulate daily evapotranspiration in stony soils, is due to the soil submodel, which requires the percentage skeleton as an input, while AquaCrop model takes into account the presence of skeleton by reducing the soil volume.

  20. Comparison of estimates of evapotranspiration and consumptive use in Palo Verde Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Lee H.; Owen-Joyce, Sandra J.

    1987-01-01

    Estimates of evapotranspiration and consumptive use by vegetation in Palo Verde Valley, California, were compared for calendar years 1981 to 1984. Vegetation types were classified, and the areas covered by each type were computed from Landsat satellite digital-image analysis. Evapotranspiration was calculated by multiplying the area of each vegetation type by a corresponding water use rate adjusted for year-to-year variations in climate. The vegetation classification slightly underestimates the total vegetated area when compared to crop reports, because not all multiple cropping could be identified. The accuracy of evapotranspiration calculated from vegetation classification depends primarily on the correct classification of alfalfa and cotton because alfalfa and cotton have larger acreages and use more water/acre than the other crops in the valley. Consumptive use was calculated using a water budget for each of the 4 years. Estimates of evapotranspiration and consumptive use by vegetation, respectively, were: (1) 439,400 and 483,500 acre-ft in 1981, (2) 430,700 and 452,700 acre-ft in 1982, (3) 402,000 and 364,400 acre-ft in 1983, and (4) 406,700 and 373,800 acre-ft in 1984. Evapotranspiration estimates were lower than consumptive use estimates in 1981 and 1982 and higher in 1983 and 1984. Both estimates were lower in 1983 and 1984 than in 1981 and 1982. Yearly differences in estimates correspond most closely to significant changes in stage of the lower Colorado River caused by flood control releases in 1983 and 1984 and to changes in cropping practices. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Differential equations I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Differential Equations I covers first- and second-order equations, series solutions, higher-order linear equations, and the Laplace transform.

  2. Drift-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Banoo

    1998-01-01

    equation in the discrete momentum space. This is shown to be similar to the conventional drift-diffusion equation except that it is a more rigorous solution to the Boltzmann equation because the current and carrier densities are resolved into M×1 vectors, where M is the number of modes in the discrete momentum space. The mobility and diffusion coefficient become M×M matrices which connect the M momentum space modes. This approach is demonstrated by simulating electron transport in bulk silicon.

  3. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pontryagin, Lev Semenovich

    1962-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations presents the study of the system of ordinary differential equations and its applications to engineering. The book is designed to serve as a first course in differential equations. Importance is given to the linear equation with constant coefficients; stability theory; use of matrices and linear algebra; and the introduction to the Lyapunov theory. Engineering problems such as the Watt regulator for a steam engine and the vacuum-tube circuit are also presented. Engineers, mathematicians, and engineering students will find the book invaluable.

  4. [Spatiotemporal variation characteristics and related affecting factors of actual evapotranspiration in the Hun-Taizi River Basin, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Cai, Yan-Cong; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Wu, Jia-Bing; Yuan, Feng-Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on the meteorological and hydrological data from 1970 to 2006, the advection-aridity (AA) model with calibrated parameters was used to calculate evapotranspiration in the Hun-Taizi River Basin in Northeast China. The original parameter of the AA model was tuned according to the water balance method and then four subbasins were selected to validate. Spatiotemporal variation characteristics of evapotranspiration and related affecting factors were analyzed using the methods of linear trend analysis, moving average, kriging interpolation and sensitivity analysis. The results showed that the empirical parameter value of 0.75 of AA model was suitable for the Hun-Taizi River Basin with an error of 11.4%. In the Hun-Taizi River Basin, the average annual actual evapotranspiration was 347.4 mm, which had a slightly upward trend with a rate of 1.58 mm · (10 a(-1)), but did not change significantly. It also indicated that the annual actual evapotranspiration presented a single-peaked pattern and its peak value occurred in July; the evapotranspiration in summer was higher than in spring and autumn, and it was the smallest in winter. The annual average evapotranspiration showed a decreasing trend from the northwest to the southeast in the Hun-Taizi River Basin from 1970 to 2006 with minor differences. Net radiation was largely responsible for the change of actual evapotranspiration in the Hun-Taizi River Basin.

  5. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main processes controlling peatland hydrology. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from peatlands are in turn strongly controlled by the groundwater table. Through the increasing political and scientific interest to reduce GHG emissions, monitoring and modelling strategies to optimize re-wetting strategies and to quantify GHG emissions are needed. To achieve these aims, an accurate determination of the evapotranspiration as an essential part of the water balance is required. Many different approaches are known to determine the evapotranspiration. They are mostly either expensive or hard to parameterize. Plant specific crop coefficients (Kc-values) are an option to calculate plant-specific evapotranspiration but due to the lack of Kc-values for typical peatland vegetation types more data on evapotranspiration from peatlands in the temperate zone are required. Furthermore, simple methods to estimate evapotranspiration are needed especially for monitoring projects. Diurnal groundwater table fluctuations caused by root water uptake and groundwater inflow can be used to calculate daily evapotranspiration rates. This approach was first described by White (1932) who compared groundwater recovery rates at night to the decline during daytime. Besides the groundwater table data only the specific yield (Sy) is needed to calculate evapotranspiration. However, the method has some limitations because not all days can be evaluated which leads to data gaps during rainy and very dry or very wet periods. This study presents an automated method to calculate the specific yield, evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of sites covering all major peatland types and their typical land uses in Germany. As an input for our method, only groundwater level, precipitation and grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data is required. In a first step, the groundwater level data was smoothed by a LOESS function. In a second step, site-specific SY

  6. dimensional Fokas equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    role in converting the Fokas equation into Hirota's bilinear form. Keywords. Bilinearization; multisoliton solution; Fokas equation; Hirota's bilinear method. PACS Nos 05.45.Yv; 04.20.Jb; 02.30.Jr. 1. Introduction. As pointed out by Drazin and Johnson [1], it is not easy to give a comprehensive and precise definition of a soliton.

  7. Elliptic Quadratic Operator Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Saburov, Mansoor

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper is devoted to the study of elliptic quadratic operator equations over the finite dimensional Euclidean space. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions of elliptic quadratic operator equations. The iterative Newton-Kantorovich method is also presented for stable solutions.

  8. Navier-Stokes equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelore Breckner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a stochastic equation of Navier-Stokes type containing a noise part given by a stochastic integral with respect to a Wiener process. The purpose of this paper is to approximate the solution of this nonlinear equation by the Galerkin method. We prove the convergence in mean square.

  9. Stochastic Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cecconi, Jaures

    2011-01-01

    C. Doleans-Dade: Stochastic processes and stochastic differential equations.- A. Friedman: Stochastic differential equations and applications.- D.W. Stroock, S.R.S. Varadhan: Theory of diffusion processes.- G.C. Papanicolaou: Wave propagation and heat conduction in a random medium.- C. Dewitt Morette: A stochastic problem in Physics.- G.S. Goodman: The embedding problem for stochastic matrices.

  10. On the Raychaudhuri equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Raychaudhuri equation is central to the understanding of gravitational attraction in astrophysics and cosmology, and in particular underlies the famous singularity theorems of general relativity theory. This paper reviews the derivation of the equation, and its significance in cosmology.

  11. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the ... tedious and more time saving than the classical method in the solution of the aforementioned differential equation. ... silos, pipelines, bridge arches or wind turbine towers [3]. The objective of this ...

  12. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2004-01-01

    This primer on elementary partial differential equations presents the standard material usually covered in a one-semester, undergraduate course on boundary value problems and PDEs. What makes this book unique is that it is a brief treatment, yet it covers all the major ideas: the wave equation, the diffusion equation, the Laplace equation, and the advection equation on bounded and unbounded domains. Methods include eigenfunction expansions, integral transforms, and characteristics. Mathematical ideas are motivated from physical problems, and the exposition is presented in a concise style accessible to science and engineering students; emphasis is on motivation, concepts, methods, and interpretation, rather than formal theory. This second edition contains new and additional exercises, and it includes a new chapter on the applications of PDEs to biology: age structured models, pattern formation; epidemic wave fronts, and advection-diffusion processes. The student who reads through this book and solves many of t...

  13. Dynamic evapotranspiration in tree-resolving LES - The ED2RAFLES model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, G.; Medvigy, D.

    2010-12-01

    How evapotranspiration scales from individual plants to a landscape is a critical problem in hydrology. To investigate this problem, we developed a version of the RAMS-Based Forest Large Eddy Simulations (RAFLES) which includes a dynamic, multi-layered evapotranspiration and CO2 uptake. RAFLES resolves vegetation as a heterogeneous 3D field. It can run at resolutions down to 1 m^3 and can incorporate explicit canopy representations derived from lidar. The canopy influences dynamics through a drag term, proportional to the leaf density at each numerical cell, and as a solid volume, which blocks some of the volume and apertures inside the canopy space. To calculate the exchange of scalar fluxes between the canopy and the air, the Ecosystem Demography version 2 (ED2) was coupled with RAFLES. ED2RAFLES dynamically resolves sensible heat fluxes, evapotranspiration, radiative transfer, and carbon fluxes. The surface energy budget is solved at vertical levels inside the canopy to find the skin temperature of the leaves and soil surface, and evapotranspiration rates. Evapotranspiration is also driven by frictional velocity near the leaves and is further restricted by stomatal conductance, parameterized using a Ball-Berry scheme, and by soil water availability. We tested the sensitivity of modeled evapotranspiration to the dynamic representation for a virtual canopy domain, based on the spatial structure of the forest around the Ameriflux eddy-flux tower, at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). A “test” simulation used the dynamic ED2-driven evaporation. A “control” simulation prescribed sensible and latent heat fluxes as a function of LAI and light attenuation at a rate equal to the mean heat flux from the test simulation. The simulation differed in the degree of spatial heterogeneity of fluxes across the domains and in the coherency between canopy structure and evaporation. Quantifying this coherency is important to our understanding of the

  14. Assessment of the EUMETSAT LSA-SAF evapotranspiration product for drought monitoring in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulcre-Canto, Guadalupe; Vogt, Jürgen; Arboleda, Alirio; Antofie, Tiberiu

    2014-08-01

    Evapotranspiration is a key parameter for water stress assessment as it is directly related to the moisture status of the soil-vegetation system and describes the moisture transfer from the surface to the atmosphere. With the launch of the Meteosat Second Generation geostationary satellites and the setup of the Satellite Application Facilities, it became possible to operationally produce evapotranspiration data with high spatial and temporal evolution over the entire continents of Europe and Africa. In the frame of this study we present an evaluation of the potential of the evapotranspiration (ET) product from the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF) for drought assessment and monitoring in Europe. To assess the potential of this product, the LSA-SAF ET was used as input for the ratio of ET to reference evapotranspiration (ET0), the latter estimated from the ECMWF interim reanalysis. In the analysis two case studies were considered corresponding to the drought episodes of spring/summer 2007 and 2011. For these case studies, the ratio ET/ET0 was compared with meteorological drought indices (SPI, SPEI and Sc-PDSI for 2007 and SPI for 2011) as well as with the anomalies of the fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (fAPAR) derived from remote sensing data. The meteorological and remote sensing indicators were taken from the European Drought Observatory (EDO) and the CARPATCLIM climatological atlas. Results show the potential of ET/ET0 to characterize soil moisture variability, and to give additional information to fAPAR and to precipitation distribution for drought assessment. The main limitations of the proposed ratio for drought characterization are discussed, including options to overcome them. These options include the use of filters to discriminate areas with a low percentage vegetation cover or areas that are not in their growing period and the use of evapotranspiration without water restriction (ETwwr

  15. Estimation of reference evapotranspiration using multivariate fractional polynomial, Bayesian regression, and robust regression models in three arid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshravesh, Mojtaba; Sefidkouhi, Mohammad Ali Gholami; Valipour, Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    The proper evaluation of evapotranspiration is essential in food security investigation, farm management, pollution detection, irrigation scheduling, nutrient flows, carbon balance as well as hydrologic modeling, especially in arid environments. To achieve sustainable development and to ensure water supply, especially in arid environments, irrigation experts need tools to estimate reference evapotranspiration on a large scale. In this study, the monthly reference evapotranspiration was estimated by three different regression models including the multivariate fractional polynomial (MFP), robust regression, and Bayesian regression in Ardestan, Esfahan, and Kashan. The results were compared with Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)-Penman-Monteith (FAO-PM) to select the best model. The results show that at a monthly scale, all models provided a closer agreement with the calculated values for FAO-PM ( R 2 > 0.95 and RMSE < 12.07 mm month-1). However, the MFP model gives better estimates than the other two models for estimating reference evapotranspiration at all stations.

  16. Spatially Distributed Assimilation of Remotely Sensed Leaf Area Index and Potential Evapotranspiration for Hydrologic Modeling in Wetland Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evapotranspiration (ET), a highly dynamic flux in wetland landscapes, regulates the accuracy of surface/sub-surface runoff simulation in a hydrologic model. However, considerable uncertainty in simulating ET-related processes remains, including our limited ability to incorporate ...

  17. Uncertain differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the basic concepts of and latest findings in the area of differential equations with uncertain factors. It covers the analytic method and numerical method for solving uncertain differential equations, as well as their applications in the field of finance. Furthermore, the book provides a number of new potential research directions for uncertain differential equation. It will be of interest to researchers, engineers and students in the fields of mathematics, information science, operations research, industrial engineering, computer science, artificial intelligence, automation, economics, and management science.

  18. Differential equations problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    Arterburn, David R

    2012-01-01

    REA's Problem Solvers is a series of useful, practical, and informative study guides. Each title in the series is complete step-by-step solution guide. The Differential Equations Problem Solver enables students to solve difficult problems by showing them step-by-step solutions to Differential Equations problems. The Problem Solvers cover material ranging from the elementary to the advanced and make excellent review books and textbook companions. They're perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.The Differential Equations Problem Solver is the perfect resource for any class, any exam, and

  19. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1986-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations III is a refereed journal issue that explores the applications, theory, and/or applied methods related to hyperbolic partial differential equations, or problems arising out of hyperbolic partial differential equations, in any area of research. This journal issue is interested in all types of articles in terms of review, mini-monograph, standard study, or short communication. Some studies presented in this journal include discretization of ideal fluid dynamics in the Eulerian representation; a Riemann problem in gas dynamics with bifurcation; periodic M

  20. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Richard K

    1982-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations is an outgrowth of courses taught for a number of years at Iowa State University in the mathematics and the electrical engineering departments. It is intended as a text for a first graduate course in differential equations for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Although differential equations is an old, traditional, and well-established subject, the diverse backgrounds and interests of the students in a typical modern-day course cause problems in the selection and method of presentation of material. In order to compensate for this diversity,

  1. Fully nonlinear elliptic equations

    CERN Document Server

    Caffarelli, Luis A

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the book is to extend classical regularity theorems for solutions of linear elliptic partial differential equations to the context of fully nonlinear elliptic equations. This class of equations often arises in control theory, optimization, and other applications. The authors give a detailed presentation of all the necessary techniques. Instead of treating these techniques in their greatest generality, they outline the key ideas and prove the results needed for developing the subsequent theory. Topics discussed in the book include the theory of viscosity solutions for nonlinear equa

  2. Beginning partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Peter V

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous, yet accessible, introduction to partial differential equations-updated in a valuable new edition Beginning Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive introduction to partial differential equations (PDEs) with a special focus on the significance of characteristics, solutions by Fourier series, integrals and transforms, properties and physical interpretations of solutions, and a transition to the modern function space approach to PDEs. With its breadth of coverage, this new edition continues to present a broad introduction to the field, while also addres

  3. Reference crop evapotranspiration estimate using high-resolution meteorological network's data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lussana

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Water management authorities need detailed information about each component of the hydrological balance. This document presents a method to estimate the evapotranspiration rate, initialized in order to obtain the reference crop evapotranspiration rate (ET0. By using an Optimal Interpolation (OI scheme, the hourly observations of several meteorological variables, measured by a high-resolution local meteorological network, are interpolated over a regular grid. The analysed meteorological fields, containing detailed meteorological information, enter a model for turbulent heat fluxes estimation based on Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory. The obtained ET0 fields are then post-processed and disseminated to the users.

  4. Evapotranspiration Calculation on the Basis of the Riparian Zone Water Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SZILÁGYI, József

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Riparian forests have a strong influence on groundwater levels and groundwater sustainedstream baseflow. An empirical and a hydraulic version of a new method were developed to calculateevapotranspiration values from riparian zone groundwater levels. The new technique was tested on thehydrometeorological data set of the Hidegvíz Valley (located in Sopron Hills at the eastern foothills ofthe Alps experimental catchment. Evapotranspiration values of this new method were compared tothe Penman-Monteith evapotranspiration values on a half hourly scale and to the White methodevapotranspiration values on a daily scale. Sensitivity analysis showed that the more reliable hydraulicversion of our ET estimation technique is most sensitive (i.e., linearly to the values of the saturatedhydraulic conductivity and specific yield taken from the riparian zone.

  5. Growth of soybean at future tropospheric ozone concentrations decreases canopy evapotranspiration and soil water depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, Carl J; Leakey, Andrew D B; Kimball, Bruce A; Ort, Donald R

    2011-06-01

    Tropospheric ozone is increasing in many agricultural regions resulting in decreased stomatal conductance and overall biomass of sensitive crop species. These physiological effects of ozone forecast changes in evapotranspiration and thus in the terrestrial hydrological cycle, particularly in intercontinental interiors. Soybean plots were fumigated with ozone to achieve concentrations above ambient levels over five growing seasons in open-air field conditions. Mean season increases in ozone concentrations ([O₃]) varied between growing seasons from 22 to 37% above background concentrations. The objective of this experiment was to examine the effects of future [O₃] on crop ecosystem energy fluxes and water use. Elevated [O₃] caused decreases in canopy evapotranspiration resulting in decreased water use by as much as 15% in high ozone years and decreased soil water removal. In addition, ozone treatment resulted in increased sensible heat flux in all years indicative of day-time increase in canopy temperature of up to 0.7 °C. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evapotranspiration trends over the eastern United States during the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ryan J.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert E.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thome, Kurtis; Noyce, Genevieve L.

    2015-01-01

    Most models evaluated by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate change estimate projected increases in temperature and precipitation with rising atmospheric CO2 levels. Researchers have suggested that increases in CO2 and associated increases in temperature and precipitation may stimulate vegetation growth and increase evapotranspiration (ET), which acts as a cooling mechanism, and on a global scale, may slow the climate-warming trend. This hypothesis has been modeled under increased CO2 conditions with models of different vegetation-climate dynamics. The significance of this vegetation negative feedback, however, has varied between models. Here we conduct a century-scale observational analysis of the Eastern US water balance to determine historical evapotranspiration trends and whether vegetation greening has affected these trends. We show that precipitation has increased significantly over the twentieth century while runoff has not. We also show that ET has increased and vegetation growth is partially responsible.

  7. Evapotranspiration modules for crop growth simulation. Implementation of the algorithms from Penman, Makkink and Priestley-Taylor

    OpenAIRE

    Kraalingen, van, D.W.G.; Stol, W.

    1997-01-01

    Calculation of evapotranspiration is essential for the estimation of crop water use or for studying the effect of drought stress on crop performance with simulation models. Several methods are available for calculation of evapotranspiration. This report describes three different methods : the Penman method (1948) and the approaches of Makkink (1957) and Priestley -Taylor (1972). The modules described in this report are developed for use in general crop growth models for water-limited conditio...

  8. Irrigation scheduling of grapefruit trees in a Mediterranean environment throughout evaluation of plant water status and evapotranspiration

    OpenAIRE

    ÜNLÜ, Mustafa; KANBER, Rıza; KOÇ, D. Levent; ÖZEKİCİ, Bülent; KEKEÇ, Uğur

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1 full irrigation regime (100% of crop evapotranspiration, I100) and 2 deficit irrigation regimes (70%, I70, and 50%, I50) were evaluated in a Rio Red grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macfad. 'Rio Red') orchard in Adana, Turkey. Fruit yield, leaf water potential (LWP), and soil water depletion (SWD) were measured among trees from each treatment. Actual evapotranspiration was calculated in 3 ways, using 2 energy balance methods (eddy correlation and Bowen&am...

  9. A Multiscalar Drought Index Sensitive to Global Warming: The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Begueria, Santiago; Lopez-Moreno, Juan I.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new climatic drought index: the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). The SPEI is based on precipitation and temperature data, and has the advantage of combining a multi-scalar character with the capacity to include the effects of temperature variability on drought assessment. The procedure to calculate the index is detailed, and involves a climatic water balance, the accumulation of deficit/surplus at different time scales, and adjustment to a Log-logistic ...

  10. On the hydrologic adjustment of climate-model projections: The potential pitfall of potential evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, P.C.D.; Dunne, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic models often are applied to adjust projections of hydroclimatic change that come from climate models. Such adjustment includes climate-bias correction, spatial refinement ("downscaling"), and consideration of the roles of hydrologic processes that were neglected in the climate model. Described herein is a quantitative analysis of the effects of hydrologic adjustment on the projections of runoff change associated with projected twenty-first-century climate change. In a case study including three climate models and 10 river basins in the contiguous United States, the authors find that relative (i.e., fractional or percentage) runoff change computed with hydrologic adjustment more often than not was less positive (or, equivalently, more negative) than what was projected by the climate models. The dominant contributor to this decrease in runoff was a ubiquitous change in runoff (median 211%) caused by the hydrologic model's apparent amplification of the climate-model-implied growth in potential evapotranspiration. Analysis suggests that the hydrologic model, on the basis of the empirical, temperature-based modified Jensen-Haise formula, calculates a change in potential evapotranspiration that is typically 3 times the change implied by the climate models, which explicitly track surface energy budgets. In comparison with the amplification of potential evapotranspiration, central tendencies of other contributions from hydrologic adjustment (spatial refinement, climate-bias adjustment, and process refinement) were relatively small. The authors' findings highlight the need for caution when projecting changes in potential evapotranspiration for use in hydrologic models or drought indices to evaluate climatechange impacts on water. Copyright ?? 2011, Paper 15-001; 35,952 words, 3 Figures, 0 Animations, 1 Tables.

  11. An improved constant evaporative fraction method for estimating daily evapotranspiration from remotely sensed instantaneous observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ronglin; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2017-03-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a primary mechanism for water and heat transfer between land and the atmosphere. One approach to estimate ET is from instantaneous remotely sensed data. The constant evaporative fraction (EF) method is then usually used to estimate integrated daily fluxes, which are typically underestimated values. Here we present a theoretical improvement to the conventional EF. The improved EF is shown to be robust and superior to the conventional approach, and it significantly reduces the underestimation bias.

  12. Climatic Characteristics of Reference Evapotranspiration in the Hai River Basin and Their Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the meteorological data from 46 stations in the Hai River Basin (HRB from 1961–2010, the annual and seasonal variation of reference evapotranspiration was analyzed. The sensitivity coefficients combined with the detrend method were used to discuss the dominant factor affecting the reference evapotranspiration (ETo. The obtained results indicate that the annual reference evapotranspiration is dominated by the decreasing trends at the confidence level of 95% in the southern and eastern parts of the HRB. The sensitivity order of climatic variables to ETo from strong to weak is: relativity humidity, temperature, shortwave radiation and wind speed, respectively. However, comprehensively considering the sensitivity and its variation strength, the detrend analysis indicates that the decreasing trends of ETo in eastern and southern HRB may be caused mainly by the decreasing wind speed and shortwave radiation. As for the relationship between human activity and the trend of ETo, we found that ETo decreased more significantly on the plains than in the mountains. By contrast, the population density increased more considerably from 2000 to 2010 on the plains than in the mountains. Therefore, in this paper, the correlation of the spatial variation pattern between ETo and population was further analyzed. The spatial correlation coefficient between population and the trend of ETo is −0.132, while the spatial correlation coefficient between the trend of ETo and elevation, temperature, shortwave radiation and wind speed is 0.667, 0.668, 0.749 and 0.416, respectively. This suggests that human activity has a certain influence on the spatial variation of ETo, while natural factors play a decisive role in the spatial variation of reference evapotranspiration in this area.

  13. Crop evapotranspiration estimation using remote sensing and the existing network of meteorological stations in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, G.; Hadjimitsis, D.; Michaelides, S.; Nisantzi, A.

    2011-05-01

    Cyprus is frequently confronted with severe droughts and the need for accurate and systematic data on crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is essential for decision making, regarding water irrigation management and scheduling. The aim of this paper is to highlight how data from meteorological stations in Cyprus can be used for monitoring and determining the country's irrigation demands. This paper shows how daily ETc can be estimated using FAO Penman-Monteith method adapted to satellite data and auxiliary meteorological parameters. This method is widely used in many countries for estimating crop evapotranspiration using auxiliary meteorological data (maximum and minimum temperatures, relative humidity, wind speed) as inputs. Two case studies were selected in order to determine evapotranspiration using meteorological and low resolution satellite data (MODIS - TERRA) and to compare it with the results of the reference method (FAO-56) which estimates the reference evapotranspiration (ETo) by using only meteorological data. The first approach corresponds to the FAO Penman-Monteith method adapted for using both meteorological and remotely sensed data. Furthermore, main automatic meteorological stations in Cyprus were mapped using Geographical Information System (GIS). All the agricultural areas of the island were categorized according to the nearest meteorological station which is considered as "representative" of the area. Thiessen polygons methodology was used for this purpose. The intended goal was to illustrate what can happen to a crop, in terms of water requirements, if meteorological data are retrieved from other than the representative stations. The use of inaccurate data can result in low yields or excessive irrigation which both lead to profit reduction. The results have shown that if inappropriate meteorological data are utilized, then deviations from correct ETc might be obtained, leading to water losses or crop water stress.

  14. Partitioning evapotranspiration into green and blue water sources in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Senay, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we combined two actual evapotranspiration datasets (ET), one obtained from a root zone water balance model and another from an energy balance model, to partition annual ET into green (rainfall-based) and blue (surface/groundwater) water sources. Time series maps of green water ET (GWET) and blue water ET (BWET) are produced for the conterminous United States (CONUS) over 2001–2015.

  15. Evaluating biological and physical drivers of evapotranspiration trends at northeastern US watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur; Heidi Asbjornsen; Mark B. Green; Mary Beth Adams; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2016-01-01

    Despite a general consensus that the Earth’s hydrologic cycle is intensifying as a result of anthropogenic climate forcing (e.g. Huntington 2006), there remains substantial uncertainty over the consequences of this intensification for terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET; e.g., Hobbins and others 2004, Walter and others 2004, van Heerwaarden and others 2010). Most models...

  16. Development of a Disaggregation Framework toward the Estimation of Subdaily Reference Evapotranspiration: 2- Estimation of Subdaily Reference Evapotranspiration Using Disaggregated Weather Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Parchami Araghi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subdaily estimates of reference evapotranspiration (ET o are needed in many applications such as dynamic agro-hydrological modeling. However, in many regions, the lack of subdaily weather data availability has hampered the efforts to quantify the subdaily ET o. In the first presented paper, a physically based framework was developed to desegregate daily weather data needed for estimation of subdaily reference ET o, including air temperature, wind speed, dew point, actual vapour pressure, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The main purpose of this study was to estimate the subdaily ETo using disaggregated daily data derived from developed disaggregation framework in the first presented paper. Materials and Methods: Subdaily ET o estimates were made, using ASCE and FAO-56 Penman–Monteith models (ASCE-PM and FAO56-PM, respectively and subdaily weather data derived from the developed daily-to-subdaily weather data disaggregation framework. To this end, long-term daily weather data got from Abadan (59 years and Ahvaz (50 years synoptic weather stations were collected. Sensitivity analysis of Penman–Monteith model to the different meteorological variables (including, daily air temperature, wind speed at 2 m height, actual vapor pressure, and solar radiation was carried out, using partial derivatives of Penman–Monteith equation. The capability of the two models for retrieving the daily ETo was evaluated, using root mean square error RMSE (mm, the mean error ME (mm, the mean absolute error ME (mm, Pearson correlation coefficient r (-, and Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient EF (-. Different contributions to the overall error were decomposed using a regression-based method. Results and Discussion: The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that the daily air temperature and the actual vapor pressure are the most significant meteorological variables, which affect the ETo estimates. In contrast, low sensitivity

  17. Large Scale Evapotranspiration Estimates: An Important Component in Regional Water Balances to Assess Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatuza-Payan, J.; Yepez, E. A.; Watts, C.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Valdez-Torres, L. C.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2013-05-01

    Water security, can be defined as the reliable supply in quantity and quality of water to help sustain future populations and maintaining ecosystem health and productivity. Water security is rapidly declining in many parts of the world due to population growth, drought, climate change, salinity, pollution, land use change, over-allocation and over-utilization, among other issues. Governmental offices (such as the Comision Nacional del Agua in Mexico, CONAGUA) require and conduct studies to estimate reliable water balances at regional or continental scales in order to provide reasonable assessments of the amount of water that can be provided (from surface or ground water sources) to supply all the human needs while maintaining natural vegetation, on an operational basis and, more important, under disturbances, such as droughts. Large scale estimates of evapotranspiration (ET), a critical component of the water cycle, are needed for a better comprehension of the hydrological cycle at large scales, which, in most water balances is left as the residual. For operational purposes, such water balance estimates can not rely on ET measurements since they do not exist, should be simple and require the least ground information possible, information that is often scarce or does not exist at all. Given this limitation, the use of remotely sensed data to estimate ET could supplement the lack of ground information, particularly in remote regions In this study, a simple method, based on the Makkink equation is used to estimate ET for large areas at high spatial resolutions (1 km). The Makkink model used here is forced using three remotely sensed datasets. First, the model uses solar radiation estimates obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES); Second, the model uses an Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) obtained from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized to get an estimate for vegetation amount and land use which was

  18. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the standard material usually covered in a one-semester, undergraduate course on boundary value problems and PDEs.  Emphasis is placed on motivation, concepts, methods, and interpretation, rather than on formal theory. The concise treatment of the subject is maintained in this third edition covering all the major ideas: the wave equation, the diffusion equation, the Laplace equation, and the advection equation on bounded and unbounded domains. Methods include eigenfunction expansions, integral transforms, and characteristics. In this third edition, text remains intimately tied to applications in heat transfer, wave motion, biological systems, and a variety other topics in pure and applied science. The text offers flexibility to instructors who, for example, may wish to insert topics from biology or numerical methods at any time in the course. The exposition is presented in a friendly, easy-to-read, style, with mathematical ideas motivated from physical problems. Many exercises and worked e...

  19. Applied partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    DuChateau, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Book focuses mainly on boundary-value and initial-boundary-value problems on spatially bounded and on unbounded domains; integral transforms; uniqueness and continuous dependence on data, first-order equations, and more. Numerous exercises included.

  20. Fun with Differential Equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/reso/018/06/0543-0557. Keywords. Differential equations; trigonometric functions; elliptic integrals. Author Affiliations. B V Rao1. Chennai Mathematical Institute PlotH1,SIPCOTIT Park Siruseri, Padur Post Chennai 603 103, TN, India.

  1. Modern nonlinear equations

    CERN Document Server

    Saaty, Thomas L

    1981-01-01

    Covers major types of classical equations: operator, functional, difference, integro-differential, and more. Suitable for graduate students as well as scientists, technologists, and mathematicians. "A welcome contribution." - Math Reviews. 1964 edition.

  2. The equations of CCC

    CERN Document Server

    Tod, Paul

    2013-01-01

    I review the equations of Conformal Cyclic Cosmology given by Penrose. I suggest a slight modification to Penrose's prescription and show how this works out for FRW cosmologies and for Class A Bianchi cosmologies.

  3. Geometry of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Khovanskiĭ, A; Vassiliev, V

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains articles written by V. I. Arnold's colleagues on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles are mostly devoted to various aspects of geometry of differential equations and relations to global analysis and Hamiltonian mechanics.

  4. Diophantine Equations and Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Martin

    Unless otherwise stated, we’ll work with the natural numbers: N = \\{0,1,2,3, dots\\}. Consider a Diophantine equation F(a1,a2,...,an,x1,x2,...,xm) = 0 with parameters a1,a2,...,an and unknowns x1,x2,...,xm For such a given equation, it is usual to ask: For which values of the parameters does the equation have a solution in the unknowns? In other words, find the set: \\{ mid exists x_1,ldots,x_m [F(a_1,ldots,x_1,ldots)=0] \\} Inverting this, we think of the equation F = 0 furnishing a definition of this set, and we distinguish three classes: a set is called Diophantine if it has such a definition in which F is a polynomial with integer coefficients. We write \\cal D for the class of Diophantine sets.

  5. Nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  6. Problems in differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, J L

    2013-01-01

    More than 900 problems and answers explore applications of differential equations to vibrations, electrical engineering, mechanics, and physics. Problem types include both routine and nonroutine, and stars indicate advanced problems. 1963 edition.

  7. Near Real-Time Monitoring of Global Evapotranspiration and its Application to Water Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, G. H.; Fisher, J.; Jewell, L. A.; Moore, G.; Verma, M.; McDonald, T.; Kim, S.; Muniz, A.

    2016-12-01

    Water scarcity and its impact on agriculture is a pressing world concern. At the heart of this crisis is the balance of water exchange between the land and the atmosphere. The ability to monitor evapotranspiration provides a solution by enabling sustainable irrigation practices. The Priestley-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory model of evapotranspiration has been implemented to meet this need as a daily MODIS product with 1 to 5 km resolution. An automated data pipeline for this model implementation provides daily data with global coverage and near real-time latency using the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library. An interactive map providing on-demand statistical analysis enables water resource managers to monitor rates of water loss. To demonstrate the application of remotely-sensed evapotranspiration to water resource management, a partnership has been arranged with the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE). The online water research management tool was developed to meet the specifications of NMOSE using the Leaflet, GeoServer, and Django frameworks. NMOSE will utilize this tool to monitor drought and fire risk and manage irrigation. Through this test-case, it is hoped that real-time, user-friendly remote sensing tools will be adopted globally to make resource management decisions informed by the NASA Earth Observation System.

  8. Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, W H; Steppe, K

    2012-08-01

    As evaporation of water is an energy-demanding process, increasing evapotranspiration rates decrease the surface temperature (Ts) of leaves and plants. Based on this principle, ground-based thermal remote sensing has become one of the most important methods for estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress and for irrigation. This paper reviews its application in agriculture. The review consists of four parts. First, the basics of thermal remote sensing are briefly reviewed. Second, the theoretical relation between Ts and the sensible and latent heat flux is elaborated. A modelling approach was used to evaluate the effect of weather conditions and leaf or vegetation properties on leaf and canopy temperature. Ts increases with increasing air temperature and incoming radiation and with decreasing wind speed and relative humidity. At the leaf level, the leaf angle and leaf dimension have a large influence on Ts; at the vegetation level, Ts is strongly impacted by the roughness length; hence, by canopy height and structure. In the third part, an overview of the different ground-based thermal remote sensing techniques and approaches used to estimate drought stress or evapotranspiration in agriculture is provided. Among other methods, stress time, stress degree day, crop water stress index (CWSI), and stomatal conductance index are discussed. The theoretical models are used to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the most important methods, corroborating the literature data. In the fourth and final part, a critical view on the future and remaining challenges of ground-based thermal remote sensing is presented.

  9. Global cross-station assessment of neuro-fuzzy models for estimating daily reference evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Jalal; Nazemi, Amir Hossein; Sadraddini, Ali Ashraf; Landeras, Gorka; Kisi, Ozgur; Fard, Ahmad Fakheri; Marti, Pau

    2013-02-01

    SummaryAccurate estimation of reference evapotranspiration is important for irrigation scheduling, water resources management and planning and other agricultural water management issues. In the present paper, the capabilities of generalized neuro-fuzzy models were evaluated for estimating reference evapotranspiration using two separate sets of weather data from humid and non-humid regions of Spain and Iran. In this way, the data from some weather stations in the Basque Country and Valencia region (Spain) were used for training the neuro-fuzzy models [in humid and non-humid regions, respectively] and subsequently, the data from these regions were pooled to evaluate the generalization capability of a general neuro-fuzzy model in humid and non-humid regions. The developed models were tested in stations of Iran, located in humid and non-humid regions. The obtained results showed the capabilities of generalized neuro-fuzzy model in estimating reference evapotranspiration in different climatic zones. Global GNF models calibrated using both non-humid and humid data were found to successfully estimate ET0 in both non-humid and humid regions of Iran (the lowest MAE values are about 0.23 mm for non-humid Iranian regions and 0.12 mm for humid regions). non-humid GNF models calibrated using non-humid data performed much better than the humid GNF models calibrated using humid data in non-humid region while the humid GNF model gave better estimates in humid region.

  10. Upflow Evapotranspiration System for the Treatment of On-Site Wastewater Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Curneen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Full-scale willow evapotranspiration systems fed from the base with septic tank or secondary treated domestic effluent from single houses have been constructed and instrumented in Ireland in order to investigate whether the technology could provide a solution to the problem of on-site effluent disposal in areas with low permeability subsoils. Continuous monitoring of rainfall, reference evapotranspiration, effluent flows and water level in the sealed systems revealed varying evapotranspiration rates across the different seasons. No system managed to achieve zero discharge in any year remaining at maximum levels for much of the winter months, indicating some loss of water by lateral exfiltration at the surface. Water sampling and analysis however, showed that the quality of any surface overflow from the systems was similar to rainfall runoff. The performance results have then been used to formulate design guidelines for such systems in Ireland’s temperate maritime climate. The effect of varying different combinations of design parameters (plan area, soil depth, etc. has been evaluated with respect to the simulated number of overflow days over a five-year period using a water balance model. Design guidelines have then been based upon minimising the amount of runoff, in conjunction with other practical and financial considerations.

  11. Reliability of MODIS Evapotranspiration Products for Heterogeneous Dry Forest: A Study Case of Caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Queiroga Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is normally considered as the sum of all water that evaporates from the soil and transpires from plants. However, accurately estimating ET from complex landscapes can be difficult because of its high spatial heterogeneity and diversity of driver factors, which make extrapolation of data from a point to a larger area quite inaccurate. In this paper, we hypothesize that MODIS products can be of use to estimate ET in areas of Caatinga vegetation, the hydrology of which has not been adequately studied. The experiment was conducted in a preserved level area of Caatinga in which meteorological and water flux measures were taken throughout 2012 by eddy covariance. Evapotranspiration estimates from eddy covariance were compared with remotely sensed evapotranspiration estimates from MOD16A2 and SAFER products. Correlations were performed at monthly, 8-day, and daily scales; and produced r2 values of monthly scale = 0.92, 8-day scale = 0.88, and daily scale = 0.85 for the SAFER algorithm. Monthly MOD16A2 data produced a value of r2=0.82, and they may be useful because they are free, downloadable, and easy to use by researchers and governments.

  12. Application of Riparian Evapotranspiration Package in MODFLOW for Riparian Vegetation Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajami, H.; Maddock, T., III

    2009-04-01

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability of riparian evapotranspiration (ET) is essential in water resources management especially in management and restoration of riparian ecosystems where multiple agricultural, industrial, and domestic users may exist. To enhance riparian evapotranspiration estimation in a MODFLOW groundwater model, RIPGIS-NET, an ArcGIS custom application, was developed to derive parameters and visualize results of spatially explicit riparian evapotranspiration in groundwater flow models for ecohydrology, riparian ecosystem management, stream restoration and water resources applications. RIPGIS-NET works with RIP-ET, a modeling package for MODFLOW. RIP-ET improves riparian ET simulations by using a set of eco-physiologically based ET curves for plant functional subgroups (PFSG), and is able to separate ground evaporation and plant transpiration processes. To evaluate impact of riparian restoration scenarios on groundwater resources, the above packages were applied to MODFLOW model of hypothetical Dry Alkaline Valley area. Using riparian ET curve files which show the relation between the groundwater level and ET, aerial extent of riparian vegetation in each season and a digital elevation map, RIPGIS-NET derived RIP-ET model parameters for each season. After running MODFLOW, groundwater head dynamics and spatial variability of riparian ET were visualized in GIS environment for each restoration scenario. This study provided useful information for riparian restoration planning in this area. It further highlighted the advantage of using spatially explicit models and datasets for riparian restoration planning.

  13. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  14. Groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada, March 2009-September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Huntington, Jena M; Buto, Susan G.; Moreo, Michael T.; Smith, J. LaRue; Andraski, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    With increasing population growth and land-use change, urban communities in the desert Southwest are progressively looking toward remote basins to supplement existing water supplies. Pending applications by Churchill County for groundwater appropriations from Dixie Valley, Nevada, a primarily undeveloped basin east of the Carson Desert, have prompted a reevaluation of the quantity of naturally discharging groundwater. The objective of this study was to develop a revised, independent estimate of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (ETg) from Dixie Valley using a combination of eddy-covariance evapotranspiration (ET) measurements and multispectral satellite imagery. Mean annual ETg was estimated during water years 2010 and 2011 at four eddy-covariance sites. Two sites were in phreatophytic shrubland dominated by greasewood, and two sites were on a playa. Estimates of total ET and ETg were supported with vegetation cover mapping, soil physics considerations, water‑level measurements from wells, and isotopic water sourcing analyses to allow partitioning of ETg into evaporation and transpiration components. Site-based ETg estimates were scaled to the basin level by combining remotely sensed imagery with field reconnaissance. Enhanced vegetation index and brightness temperature data were compared with mapped vegetation cover to partition Dixie Valley into five discharging ET units and compute basin-scale ETg. Evapotranspiration units were defined within a delineated groundwater discharge area and were partitioned as (1) playa lake, (2) playa, (3) sparse shrubland, (4) moderate-to-dense shrubland, and (5) grassland.

  15. Regional probability distribution of the annual reference evapotranspiration and its effective parameters in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Neda; Rezaie, Hossein; Montaseri, Majid; Behmanesh, Javad

    2017-10-01

    The reference evapotranspiration (ET0) plays an important role in water management plans in arid or semi-arid countries such as Iran. For this reason, the regional analysis of this parameter is important. But, ET0 process is affected by several meteorological parameters such as wind speed, solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity. Therefore, the effect of distribution type of effective meteorological variables on ET0 distribution was analyzed. For this purpose, the regional probability distribution of the annual ET0 and its effective parameters were selected. Used data in this research was recorded data at 30 synoptic stations of Iran during 1960-2014. Using the probability plot correlation coefficient (PPCC) test and the L-moment method, five common distributions were compared and the best distribution was selected. The results of PPCC test and L-moment diagram indicated that the Pearson type III distribution was the best probability distribution for fitting annual ET0 and its four effective parameters. The results of RMSE showed that the ability of the PPCC test and L-moment method for regional analysis of reference evapotranspiration and its effective parameters was similar. The results also showed that the distribution type of the parameters which affected ET0 values can affect the distribution of reference evapotranspiration.

  16. Estimatation of evapotranspiration and crop coefficient of melon cultivated in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia S. Lozano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this work was to determine the water consumption and the crop coefficient of melon in a protected environment. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse at the Technical Center of Irrigation of the State University of Maringá, in Maringá, PR. The melon hybrid used was Sunrise and the irrigations were performed daily by drip irrigation. Crop water requirement was quantified based on its evapotranspiration directly measured through constant water table lysimeters. Weather information was collected in an automatic weather station, installed inside the protected environment, which allowed to calculate the reference evapotranspiration by the Penman-Monteith method. The total water consumption of the melon crop was 295 mm, reaching maximum crop evapotranspiration of 5.16 mm d-1. The phenological stages were shorter in the initial, growth and intermediate phases, compared with the data from FAO. The determined crop coefficients were 0.87, 1.15 and 0.64 for the initial, intermediate and final stages, respectively

  17. Maxwell's equations and their consequences elementary electromagnetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Kilmister, C W 0

    2013-01-01

    Elementary Electromagnetic Theory Volume 3: Maxwell's Equations and their Consequences is the third of three volumes that intend to cover electromagnetism and its potential theory. The third volume considers the implications of Maxwell's equations, such as electromagnetic radiation in simple cases, and its relation between Maxwell's equation and the Lorenz transformation. Included in this volume are chapters 11-14, which contain an in-depth discussion of the following topics: Electromagnetic Waves The Lorentz Invariance of Maxwell's Equation Radiation Motion of Charged Particles Intended

  18. Electromagnetic Interaction Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Zinoviev, Yury M.

    2009-01-01

    For the electromagnetic interaction of two particles the relativistic quantum mechanics equations are proposed. These equations are solved for the case when one particle has a small mass and moves freely. The initial wave functions are supposed to be concentrated at the coordinates origin. The energy spectrum of another particle wave function is defined by the initial wave function of the free moving particle. Choosing the initial wave function of the free moving particle it is possible to ob...

  19. Ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebl, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we provide an overview of the basic theory of ordinary differential equations (ODE). We give the basics of analytical methods for their solutions and also review numerical methods. The chapter should serve as a primer for the basic application of ODEs and systems of ODEs in practice. As an example, we work out the equations arising in Michaelis-Menten kinetics and give a short introduction to using Matlab for their numerical solution.

  20. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R. B. [PPPL; Gobbin, M. [Euratom-ENEA Association

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  1. Using precipitation, vertical root distribution, and satellite-retrieved vegetation information to parameterize water stress in a Penman-Monteith approach to evapotranspiration modeling under Mediterranean climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Sha; Koju, Upama Ashish; Yao, Fengmei; Igbawua, Tertsea

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that global Penman-Monteith equation based (PM-based) models poorly simulate water stress when estimating evapotranspiration (ET) in areas having a Mediterranean climate (AMC). In this study, we propose a novel approach using precipitation, vertical root distribution (VRD), and satellite-retrieved vegetation information to simulate water stress in a PM-based model (RS-WBPM) to address this issue. A multilayer water balance module is employed to simulate the soil water stress factor (SWSF) of multiple soil layers at different depths. The water stress factor (WSF) for surface evapotranspiration is determined by VRD information and SWSF in each layer. Additionally, four older PM-based models (PMOV) are evaluated at 27 flux sites in AMC. Results show that PMOV fails to estimate the magnitude or capture the variation of ET in summer at most sites, whereas RS-WBPM is successful. The daily ET resulting from RS-WBPM incorporating recommended VI (NDVI for shrub and EVI for other biomes) agrees well with observations, with R2=0.60 (RMSE = 18.72 W m-2) for all 27 sites and R2=0.62 (RMSE = 18.21 W m-2) for 25 nonagricultural sites. However, combined results from the optimum older PM-based models at specific sites show R2 values of only 0.50 (RMSE = 20.74 W m-2) for all 27 sites. RS-WBPM is also found to outperform other ET models that also incorporate a soil water balance module. As all inputs of RS-WBPM are globally available, the results from RS-WBPM are encouraging and imply the potential of its implementation on a regional and global scale.

  2. Changes in Reference Evapotranspiration and Its Contributing Factors in Jiangsu, a Major Economic and Agricultural Province of Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghao Chu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reference evapotranspiration (ETref is a key parameter of hydro-meteorological studies as well as water resource planning. In this study, we adopted the Penman–Monteith FAO 56 model to estimate ETref and through the differential equation and detrending method to determine sensitivities and the contributions of four meteorological parameters to ETref based on daily weather data from 60 stations of Jiangsu province during 1961–2015. Results reveal that ETref and its trends in the three sub-regions of the Jiangsu province had a significant spatial heterogeneity. A significant decreasing tendency of ETref (p < 0.001 was observed in the Huaibei region, while a slightly increasing tendency was identified in the Jianghuai and Sunan regions. These changes of ETref were caused by a significant increasing trend in air temperature (TA and significant decreasing trends in wind speed (WS, sunshine duration (SD as well as a non-significant change trend in actual vapor pressure (VP. However, the VP was the meteorological parameter to which ETref was most sensitive, whereas ETref was more sensitive to TA and SD in the summer but less so in the winter; the least sensitive factor, WS, had the opposite trend. Across the whole region, WS contributed most to ETref, followed by SD, while the positive contribution of TA to ETref could not offset the negative contributions of WS and SD. Although the effect of VP on changes in ETref is small, it could not be ignored, especially in the winter. The reverse relationship between increasing TA and decreasing ETref, namely the “evaporation paradox,” occurred in Jiangsu province. Thus, the outcomes of this study will contribute to thorough insight into the response to changes in ETref to the provincial water planning and management in eastern China.

  3. Evapotranspiration and Surface Energy Fluxes Estimation Using the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus Image over a Semiarid Agrosystem in the North-West of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehal Laounia

    Full Text Available Abstract Monitoring evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes over a range of spatial and temporal scales is crucial for many agroenvironmental applications. Different remote sensing based energy balance models have been developed, to estimate evapotranspiration at both field and regional scales. In this contribution, METRIC (Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration, has been applied for the estimation of actual evapotranspiration in the Ghriss plain in Mascara (western Algeria, a semiarid region with heterogeneous surface conditions. Four images acquired during 2001 and 2002 by the Landsat-7 satellite were used. The METRIC model followed an energy balance approach, where evapotranspiration is estimated as the residual term when net radiation, sensible and soil heat fluxes are known. Different moisture indicators derived from the evapotranspiration were then calculated: reference evapotranspiration fraction, Priestley-Taylor parameter and surface resistance to evaporation. The evaluation of evapotranspiration and surface energy fluxes are accurate enough for the spatial variations of evapotranspiration rather satisfactory than sophisticated models without having to introduce an important number of parameters in input with difficult accessibility in routine. In conclusion, the results suggest that METRIC can be considered as an operational approach to predict actual evapotranspiration from agricultural areas having limited amount of ground information.

  4. Advances in fuzzy implication functions

    CERN Document Server

    Beliakov, Gleb; Sola, Humberto; Pradera, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Fuzzy implication functions are one of the main operations in fuzzy logic. They generalize the classical implication, which takes values in the set {0,1}, to fuzzy logic, where the truth values belong to the unit interval [0,1]. These functions are not only fundamental for fuzzy logic systems, fuzzy control, approximate reasoning and expert systems, but they also play a significant role in mathematical fuzzy logic, in fuzzy mathematical morphology and image processing, in defining fuzzy subsethood measures and in solving fuzzy relational equations. This volume collects 8 research papers on fuzzy implication functions. Three articles focus on the construction methods, on different ways of generating new classes and on the common properties of implications and their dependencies. Two articles discuss implications defined on lattices, in particular implication functions in interval-valued fuzzy set theories. One paper summarizes the sufficient and necessary conditions of solutions for one distributivity equation...

  5. Application of the Artificial Neural Network model for prediction of monthly Standardized Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Index using hydrometeorological parameters and climate indices in eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C.; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    The forecasting of drought based on cumulative influence of rainfall, temperature and evaporation is greatly beneficial for mitigating adverse consequences on water-sensitive sectors such as agriculture, ecosystems, wildlife, tourism, recreation, crop health and hydrologic engineering. Predictive models of drought indices help in assessing water scarcity situations, drought identification and severity characterization. In this paper, we tested the feasibility of the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) as a data-driven model for predicting the monthly Standardized Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) for eight candidate stations in eastern Australia using predictive variable data from 1915 to 2005 (training) and simulated data for the period 2006-2012. The predictive variables were: monthly rainfall totals, mean temperature, minimum temperature, maximum temperature and evapotranspiration, which were supplemented by large-scale climate indices (Southern Oscillation Index, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode and Indian Ocean Dipole) and the Sea Surface Temperatures (Nino 3.0, 3.4 and 4.0). A total of 30 ANN models were developed with 3-layer ANN networks. To determine the best combination of learning algorithms, hidden transfer and output functions of the optimum model, the Levenberg-Marquardt and Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton backpropagation algorithms were utilized to train the network, tangent and logarithmic sigmoid equations used as the activation functions and the linear, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid equations used as the output function. The best ANN architecture had 18 input neurons, 43 hidden neurons and 1 output neuron, trained using the Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm using tangent sigmoid equation as the activation and output functions. An evaluation of the model performance based on statistical rules yielded time-averaged Coefficient of Determination, Root Mean Squared Error and the Mean Absolute

  6. Projecting the potential evapotranspiration by coupling different formulations and input data reliabilities: The possible uncertainty source for climate change impacts on hydrological regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguang; Li, Changni; Xing, Wanqiu; Fu, Jianyu

    2017-12-01

    Representing atmospheric evaporating capability for a hypothetical reference surface, potential evapotranspiration (PET) determines the upper limit of actual evapotranspiration and is an important input to hydrological models. Due that present climate models do not give direct estimates of PET when simulating the hydrological response to future climate change, the PET must be estimated first and is subject to the uncertainty on account of many existing formulae and different input data reliabilities. Using four different PET estimation approaches, i.e., the more physically Penman (PN) equation with less reliable input variables, more empirical radiation-based Priestley-Taylor (PT) equation with relatively dependable downscaled data, the most simply temperature-based Hamon (HM) equation with the most reliable downscaled variable, and downscaling PET directly by the statistical downscaling model, this paper investigated the differences of runoff projection caused by the alternative PET methods by a well calibrated abcd monthly hydrological model. Three catchments, i.e., the Luanhe River Basin, the Source Region of the Yellow River and the Ganjiang River Basin, representing a large climatic diversity were chosen as examples to illustrate this issue. The results indicated that although similar monthly patterns of PET over the period 2021-2050 for each catchment were provided by the four methods, the magnitudes of PET were still slightly different, especially for spring and summer months in the Luanhe River Basin and the Source Region of the Yellow River with relatively dry climate feature. The apparent discrepancy in magnitude of change in future runoff and even the diverse change direction for summer months in the Luanhe River Basin and spring months in the Source Region of the Yellow River indicated that the PET method related uncertainty occurred, especially in the Luanhe River Basin and the Source Region of the Yellow River with smaller aridity index. Moreover, the

  7. MACHINE MOTION EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic, original, machine motion equations. The equation of motion of the machine that generates angular speed of the shaft (which varies with position and rotation speed is deduced by conservation kinetic energy of the machine. An additional variation of angular speed is added by multiplying by the coefficient dynamic D (generated by the forces out of mechanism and or by the forces generated by the elasticity of the system. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft with inertial masses, while the dynamic coefficient introduces the variation of w with forces acting in the mechanism. Deriving the first equation of motion of the machine one can obtain the second equation of motion dynamic. From the second equation of motion of the machine it determines the angular acceleration of the shaft. It shows the distribution of the forces on the mechanism to the internal combustion heat engines. Dynamic, the velocities can be distributed in the same way as forces. Practically, in the dynamic regimes, the velocities have the same timing as the forces. Calculations should be made for an engine with a single cylinder. Originally exemplification is done for a classic distribution mechanism, and then even the module B distribution mechanism of an Otto engine type.

  8. Derivation of RCM-driven potential evapotranspiration for hydrological climate change impact analysis in Great Britain: a comparison of methods and associated uncertainty in future projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Prudhomme

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Potential evapotranspiration (PET is the water that would be lost by plants through evaporation and transpiration if water was not limited in the soil, and it is commonly used in conceptual hydrological modelling in the calculation of runoff production and hence river discharge. Future changes of PET are likely to be as important as changes in precipitation patterns in determining changes in river flows. However PET is not calculated routinely by climate models so it must be derived independently when the impact of climate change on river flow is to be assessed. This paper compares PET estimates from 12 equations of different complexity, driven by the Hadley Centre's HadRM3-Q0 model outputs representative of 1961–1990, with MORECS PET, a product used as reference PET in Great Britain. The results show that the FAO56 version of the Penman–Monteith equations reproduces best the spatial and seasonal variability of MORECS PET across GB when driven by HadRM3-Q0 estimates of relative humidity, total cloud, wind speed and linearly bias-corrected mean surface temperature. This suggests that potential biases in HadRM3-Q0 climate do not result in significant biases when the physically based FAO56 equations are used. Percentage changes in PET between the 1961–1990 and 2041–2070 time slices were also calculated for each of the 12 PET equations from HadRM3-Q0. Results show a large variation in the magnitude (and sometimes direction of changes estimated from different PET equations, with Turc, Jensen–Haise and calibrated Blaney–Criddle methods systematically projecting the largest increases across GB for all months and Priestley–Taylor, Makkink, and Thornthwaite showing the smallest changes. We recommend the use of the FAO56 equation as, when driven by HadRM3-Q0 climate data, this best reproduces the reference MORECS PET across Great Britain for the reference period of 1961–1990. Further, the future changes of PET estimated by FAO56 are within

  9. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenspan, Donald

    2000-01-01

    Designed for use in a one-semester course by seniors and beginning graduate students, this rigorous presentation explores practical methods of solving differential equations, plus the unifying theory underlying the mathematical superstructure. Topics include basic concepts, Fourier series, second-order partial differential equations, wave equation, potential equation, heat equation, approximate solution of partial differential equations, and more. Exercises appear at the ends of most chapters. 1961 edition.

  10. Stochastic porous media equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel; Röckner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on stochastic porous media equations, this book places an emphasis on existence theorems, asymptotic behavior and ergodic properties of the associated transition semigroup. Stochastic perturbations of the porous media equation have reviously been considered by physicists, but rigorous mathematical existence results have only recently been found. The porous media equation models a number of different physical phenomena, including the flow of an ideal gas and the diffusion of a compressible fluid through porous media, and also thermal propagation in plasma and plasma radiation. Another important application is to a model of the standard self-organized criticality process, called the "sand-pile model" or the "Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model". The book will be of interest to PhD students and researchers in mathematics, physics and biology.

  11. Boussinesq evolution equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Schaffer, H.; Madsen, Per A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the possibility of using methods and ideas from time domain Boussinesq formulations in the corresponding frequency domain formulations. We term such frequency domain models "evolution equations". First, we demonstrate that the numerical efficiency of the deterministic...... Boussinesq evolution equations of Madsen and Sorensen [Madsen, P.A., Sorensen, O.R., 1993. Bound waves and triad interactions in shallow water. Ocean Eng. 20 359-388] can be improved by using Fast Fourier Transforms to evaluate the nonlinear terms. For a practical example of irregular waves propagating over...... a submerged bar, it is demonstrated that evolution equations utilising FFT can be solved around 100 times faster than the corresponding time domain model. Use of FFT provides an efficient bridge between the frequency domain and the time domain. We utilise this by adapting the surface roller model for wave...

  12. Quadratic Diophantine equations

    CERN Document Server

    Andreescu, Titu

    2015-01-01

    This monograph treats the classical theory of quadratic Diophantine equations and guides the reader through the last two decades of computational techniques and progress in the area. These new techniques combined with the latest increases in computational power shed new light on important open problems. The authors motivate the study of quadratic Diophantine equations with excellent examples, open problems, and applications. Moreover, the exposition aptly demonstrates many applications of results and techniques from the study of Pell-type equations to other problems in number theory. The book is intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students as well as researchers. It challenges the reader to apply not only specific techniques and strategies, but also to employ methods and tools from other areas of mathematics, such as algebra and analysis.

  13. Partitioning understory evapotranspiration in semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia using the isotopic composition of water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blécourt, Marleen; Gaj, Marcel; Holtorf, Kim-Kirsten; Gröngröft, Alexander; Brokate, Ralph; Himmelsbach, Thomas; Eschenbach, Annette

    2016-04-01

    In dry environments with a sparse vegetation cover, understory evapotranspiration is a major component of the ecosystem water balance. Consequently, knowledge on the size of evapotranspiration fluxes and the driving factors is important for our understanding of the hydrological cycle. Understory evapotranspiration is made up of soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Soil evaporation can be measured directly from patches free of vegetation. However, when understory vegetation is present distinguishing between soil evaporation and plant transpiration is challenging. In this study, we aim to partition understory evapotranspiration based on an approach that combines the measurements of water-vapour fluxes using the closed chamber method with measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour. The measurements were done in the framework of SASSCAL (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management). The study sites were located in three different semi-arid ecosystems in Namibia: thornbush savanna, Baikiaea woodland and shrubland. At each site measurements were done under tree canopies as well as at unshaded areas between the canopies. We measured evaporation from the bare soil and evapotranspiration from patches covered with herbaceous species and shrubs using a transparent chamber connected with an infrared gas analyser (LI-8100A, LICOR Inc.). The stable isotope composition of water vapour inside the chamber and depth profiles of soil water stable isotopes were determined in-situ using a tuneable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscope (OA-ICOS, Los Gatos Research, DLT 100). Xylem samples were extracted using the cryogenic vacuum extraction method and the isotopic composition of the extracted water was measured subsequently with a cavity-ring-down spectrometer (CRDS L2120-i, Picarro Inc.). We will present the quantified fluxes of understory evapotranspiration measured in the three different ecosystems, show the

  14. Evapotranspiration of rubber ( Hevea brasiliensis ) cultivated at two plantation sites in Southeast Asia: RUBBER EVAPOTRANSPIRATION IN SE ASIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giambelluca, Thomas W. [Department of Geography, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawai' i USA; Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya Japan; Mudd, Ryan G. [Department of Geography, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawai' i USA; Liu, Wen [Department of Geography, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawai' i USA; Ziegler, Alan D. [Department of Geography, National University of Singapore, Singapore Singapore; Kobayashi, Nakako [Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya Japan; Kumagai, Tomo' omi [Hydrospheric Atmospheric Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya Japan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki [Department of Geography, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawai' i USA; Research Institute of East Asia Environments, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Lim, Tiva Khan [Cambodian Rubber Research Institute, Phnom Penh Cambodia; Huang, Maoyi [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Fox, Jefferson [East-West Center, Honolulu Hawai' i USA; Yin, Song [Cambodian Rubber Research Institute, Phnom Penh Cambodia; Mak, Sophea Veasna [Cambodian Rubber Research Institute, Phnom Penh Cambodia; Kasemsap, Poonpipope [Department of Horticulture, Kasetsart University, Bangkok Thailand

    2016-02-01

    The expansion of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) cultivation to higher latitudes and higher elevations in southeast Asia is part of a dramatic shift in the direction of rural land cover change in the region toward more tree covered landscapes. To investigate the possible effects of increasing rubber cultivation in the region on ecosystem services including water cycling, eddy covariance towers were established to measure ecosystem fluxes within two rubber plantations, one each in Bueng Kan, northeastern Thailand, and Kampong Cham, central Cambodia. The results show that evapotranspiration (ET) at both sites is strongly related to variations in available energy and leaf area, and moderately controlled by soil moisture. Measured mean annual ET was 1128 and 1272 mm for the Thailand and Cambodia sites, respectively. After adjustment for energy closure, mean annual was estimated to be 1211 and 1459 mm yr at the Thailand and Cambodia sites, respectively. Based on these estimates and that of another site in Xishuangbanna, southwestern China, it appears that of rubber is higher than that of other tree dominated land covers in the region, including forest. While measurements by others in non rubber tropical ecosystems indicate that at high net radiation sites is at most only slightly higher than for sites with lower net radiation, mean annual rubber increases strongl with increasing net radiation across the three available rubber plantation observation sites. With the continued expansion of tree dominated land covers, including rubber cultivation, in southeast Asia, the possible association between commercially viable, fast growing tree crop species Giambelluca et al. Evapotranspiration of rubber (Havea brasiliensis) cultivated at two sites in southeast Asia and their relatively high water use raises concerns about potential effects on water and food security.

  15. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovich, M S

    2002-01-01

    Mark Vishik's Partial Differential Equations seminar held at Moscow State University was one of the world's leading seminars in PDEs for over 40 years. This book celebrates Vishik's eightieth birthday. It comprises new results and survey papers written by many renowned specialists who actively participated over the years in Vishik's seminars. Contributions include original developments and methods in PDEs and related fields, such as mathematical physics, tomography, and symplectic geometry. Papers discuss linear and nonlinear equations, particularly linear elliptic problems in angles and gener

  16. Equations of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, A N

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical physics plays an important role in the study of many physical processes - hydrodynamics, elasticity, and electrodynamics, to name just a few. Because of the enormous range and variety of problems dealt with by mathematical physics, this thorough advanced-undergraduate or graduate-level text considers only those problems leading to partial differential equations. The authors - two well-known Russian mathematicians - have focused on typical physical processes and the principal types of equations deailing with them. Special attention is paid throughout to mathematical formulation, ri

  17. Systematic Equation Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2007-01-01

    A tutorial giving a very simple introduction to the set-up of the equations used as a model for an electrical/electronic circuit. The aim is to find a method which is as simple and general as possible with respect to implementation in a computer program. The “Modified Nodal Approach”, MNA, and th......, and the “Controlled Source Approach”, CSA, for systematic equation formulation are investigated. It is suggested that the kernel of the P Spice program based on MNA is reprogrammed....

  18. Nonlinear wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tatsien

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on nonlinear wave equations, which are of considerable significance from both physical and theoretical perspectives. It also presents complete results on the lower bound estimates of lifespan (including the global existence), which are established for classical solutions to the Cauchy problem of nonlinear wave equations with small initial data in all possible space dimensions and with all possible integer powers of nonlinear terms. Further, the book proposes the global iteration method, which offers a unified and straightforward approach for treating these kinds of problems. Purely based on the properties of solut ions to the corresponding linear problems, the method simply applies the contraction mapping principle.

  19. Generalized estimating equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hardin, James W

    2002-01-01

    Although powerful and flexible, the method of generalized linear models (GLM) is limited in its ability to accurately deal with longitudinal and clustered data. Developed specifically to accommodate these data types, the method of Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) extends the GLM algorithm to accommodate the correlated data encountered in health research, social science, biology, and other related fields.Generalized Estimating Equations provides the first complete treatment of GEE methodology in all of its variations. After introducing the subject and reviewing GLM, the authors examine th

  20. Conservation laws for equations related to soil water equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalique C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain all nontrivial conservation laws for a class of ( 2+1 nonlinear evolution partial differential equations which are related to the soil water equations. It is also pointed out that nontrivial conservation laws exist for certain classes of equations which admit point symmetries. Moreover, we associate symmetries with conservation laws for special classes of these equations.

  1. Test equating methods and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kolen, Michael J

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, many researchers in the psychology and statistical communities have paid increasing attention to test equating as issues of using multiple test forms have arisen and in response to criticisms of traditional testing techniques This book provides a practically oriented introduction to test equating which both discusses the most frequently used equating methodologies and covers many of the practical issues involved The main themes are - the purpose of equating - distinguishing between equating and related methodologies - the importance of test equating to test development and quality control - the differences between equating properties, equating designs, and equating methods - equating error, and the underlying statistical assumptions for equating The authors are acknowledged experts in the field, and the book is based on numerous courses and seminars they have presented As a result, educators, psychometricians, professionals in measurement, statisticians, and students coming to the subject for...

  2. The Statistical Drake Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We provide the statistical generalization of the Drake equation. From a simple product of seven positive numbers, the Drake equation is now turned into the product of seven positive random variables. We call this "the Statistical Drake Equation". The mathematical consequences of this transformation are then derived. The proof of our results is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics. In loose terms, the CLT states that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable. This is called the Lyapunov Form of the CLT, or the Lindeberg Form of the CLT, depending on the mathematical constraints assumed on the third moments of the various probability distributions. In conclusion, we show that: The new random variable N, yielding the number of communicating civilizations in the Galaxy, follows the LOGNORMAL distribution. Then, as a consequence, the mean value of this lognormal distribution is the ordinary N in the Drake equation. The standard deviation, mode, and all the moments of this lognormal N are also found. The seven factors in the ordinary Drake equation now become seven positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be ARBITRARY. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into our statistical Drake equation by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both physically realistic and practically very useful, of course. An application of our statistical Drake equation then follows. The (average) DISTANCE between any two neighboring and communicating civilizations in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of N. Then, in our approach, this distance becomes a new random variable. We derive the relevant probability density

  3. Evaluation of evaporation-measuring equipments for estimating evapotranspiration within a greenhouse Avaliação de equipamentos de medida da evaporação para estimativa da evapotranspiração dentro de um ambiente protegido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio F. Blanco

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of evaluating the performance of simple evaporation measuring equipments in estimating the evapotranspiration in greenhouse, an experiment was conducted in Piracicaba, SP, during a tomato-growing season. Daily water evaporation rate from Piche atmometer, modified atmometer and a reduced evaporation pan installed inside the greenhouse and a Class A pan installed outside were compared to the evapotranspiration rates calculated with Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that atmometers had the best performance in estimating the crop evapotranspiration in greenhouse and could be used advantageously in relation to the evaporation pans.Conduziu-se um experimento em Piracicaba, SP, durante um cultivo de tomateiro, com o propósito de se avaliar a performance de equipamentos simples baseados na evaporação na estimativa da evapotranspiração em ambiente protegido. As taxas diárias de evaporação de um atmômetro de Piche, um atmômetro modificado e de um tanque de evaporação reduzido instalados dentro do ambiente protegido, e de um tanque Classe A instalado no ambiente externo, foram comparadas à evapotranspiração calculada com a equação de Penman-Monteith. Os resultados mostraram que os atmômetros tiveram o melhor desempenho na estimativa da evapotranspiração da cultura e podem ser utilizados com vantagens em relação aos tanques de evaporação.

  4. Calculus & ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, David

    1995-01-01

    Professor Pearson's book starts with an introduction to the area and an explanation of the most commonly used functions. It then moves on through differentiation, special functions, derivatives, integrals and onto full differential equations. As with other books in the series the emphasis is on using worked examples and tutorial-based problem solving to gain the confidence of students.

  5. Equational binary decision diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Groote (Jan Friso); J.C. van de Pol (Jaco)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe incorporate equations in binary decision diagrams (BDD). The resulting objects are called EQ-BDDs. A straightforward notion of ordered EQ-BDDs (EQ-OBDD) is defined, and it is proved that each EQ-BDD is logically equivalent to an EQ-OBDD. Moreover, on EQ-OBDDs satisfiability and

  6. Integral equations for ERG

    OpenAIRE

    Sonoda, Hidenori

    2005-01-01

    An application of the exact renormalization group equations to the scalar field theory in three dimensional euclidean space is discussed. We show how to modify the original formulation by J. Polchinski in order to find the Wilson-Fisher fixed point using perturbation theory.

  7. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  8. Equational term graph rewriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z.M. Ariola (Zena); J.W. Klop (Jan Willem)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe present an equational framework for term graph rewriting with cycles. The usual notion of homomorphism is phrased in terms of the notion of bisimulation, which is well-known in process algebra and concurrency theory. Specifically, a homomorphism is a functional bisimulation. We prove

  9. Energy master equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    1995-01-01

    energies chosen randomly according to a Gaussian. The random-walk model is here derived from Newton's laws by making a number of simplifying assumptions. In the second part of the paper an approximate low-temperature description of energy fluctuations in the random-walk model—the energy master equation...

  10. Modelling by Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  11. Dunkl Hyperbolic Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Mejjaoli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and study the Dunkl symmetric systems. We prove the well-posedness results for the Cauchy problem for these systems. Eventually we describe the finite speed of it. Next the semi-linear Dunkl-wave equations are also studied.

  12. Stochastic Einstein equations

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic Einstein equations are considered when 3D space metric $\\gamma_{ij}$ are stochastic functions. The probability density for the stochastic quantities is connected with the Perelman's entropy functional. As an example, the Friedman Universe is considered. It is shown that for the Friedman Universe the dynamical evolution is not changed. The connection between general relativity and Ricci flows is discussed.

  13. Partial differential equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of solutions in the spirit of the work of Gidas–. Ni–Nirenberg, etc. No effort is being made in this writeup to explain their significance in which case the article would go beyond resonable length. References. [1] Brezis H and Nirenberg L 1983 Positive Solutions of nonlinear elliptic equations involving critical Sobolev.

  14. Structural Equation Model Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmaier, Andreas M.; von Oertzen, Timo; McArdle, John J.; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    In the behavioral and social sciences, structural equation models (SEMs) have become widely accepted as a modeling tool for the relation between latent and observed variables. SEMs can be seen as a unification of several multivariate analysis techniques. SEM Trees combine the strengths of SEMs and the decision tree paradigm by building tree…

  15. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  16. Differential Equations as Actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkko, Mauno; Ravn, Anders P.

    1997-01-01

    We extend a conventional action system with a primitive action consisting of a differential equation and an evolution invariant. The semantics is given by a predicate transformer. The weakest liberal precondition is chosen, because it is not always desirable that steps corresponding to differential...

  17. Model Compaction Equation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compaction are two parameters that indicate the degree of compaction in sandstones. When the values are low, the sands are undercompacted, but when they are high the sands are compacted. A number of equations relating porosity and depth in sandstones have been published (Athy,. 1930; Hubbert and Rubey, 1959; ...

  18. ANTHROPOMETRIC PREDICTIVE EQUATIONS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Equations to Estimate Body Composition. Military Medicine. pp. 12-15. Chada, D.S.; Singh, G.P.; Vasdev, V. and Ganjoo, RK. 2006. Anthropometry Correlation of Lipid. Profile in Healthy Aviators. Indian Journal of. Aerospace Med 50 (2), pp. 32 - 36. Dae, J. 2003 . Bodyometryfutrex, http:// www.futrex.com/6100htm/, pp 1-3.

  19. Exciton laser rate equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garkavenko A. S.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rate equations of the exciton laser in the system of interacting excitons have been obtained and the inverted population conditions and generation have been derived. The possibility of creating radically new gamma-ray laser has been shown.

  20. The Freudenstein Equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 8. The Freudenstein Equation - Design of Four-Link Mechanisms. Ashitava Ghosal. General Article Volume 15 Issue 8 August 2010 pp 699-710. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Evapotranspiration estimate in the Mediterranean: the comparison between different methods and possible impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Mladen; Karic, Biljana; Santos Pereira, Luis; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    This work focused on the performances of different methods to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) across the Mediterranean climates. Two types of monthly weather data were used in the analysis: CLIMWAT historical database for 577 meteorological stations located in the Mediterranean countries and data derived from the ENSEMBLES project (EC-FP6-ENV) Regional Circulation Model (RCM) simulations. The performance of two temperature based approaches for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (Hargreaves-Samani - HS and the FAO Penman-Monteith with temperature data only - PMT) was assessed against the Penman-Monteith approach (PM) using a full input climate data. Data were grouped according to climate: hyper-arid, arid, semi-arid, dry sub-humid, moist sub-humid and humid zones. For almost all zones, the statistical parameters indicate slightly better performance of PMT than HS method. Both methods tend to underestimate ETo in hyper arid areas and to overestimate ETo in humid areas. The reduction of either minimum air temperature or dew temperature by 2°C under arid conditions (when the ratio between precipitation and ETo is smaller than 0.4) improves ETo estimation especially for interior locations and in hyper-arid and arid regions. The analysis performed for the future referred to the A1B SRES scenario for the period 2036-2065 using the results of RACMO2 driven by ECHAM5. The overall results indicated the redistribution of climatic zone over the Mediterranean with the further extension of arid zones towards higher altitudes. Accordingly, the variation in the performances of ET models was observed. Moreover, the climate change had an impact of the peak monthly evapotranspiration of Mediterranean crops which, in turn, affected the climatic water balance over the whole region.

  2. Analyzing Land Surface Evapotranspiration in Semi-Arid Regions Using A Modified Triangle Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Gorelick, S.; Avisse, N.; Tilmant, A.; Rajsekhar, D.; Yoon, J.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulty in estimating spatially variable actual evapotranspiration continues to pose an obstacle to regional water resources planning and management. The widely-used satellite-based triangle methods require similar elevations across the domain, an assumption that is often doubtful at the regional scale. This study presents a modified triangle method based on the discretization of digital elevation models. It disaggregates the domain into a number of overlapping elevation zones and constructs a temperature-vegetation triangle for each elevation zone. The wet edge is determined using a linear temperature lapse rate derived from annual average air temperature observations across weather stations at different elevations. Dry and wet edges are extended to a hypothetical "fully-vegetated" pixel, and evapotranspiration capacity varies on both edges. This method addresses elevation variation and water stress in semi-arid environments, without altering land surface temperature and elevation data. We demonstrate this method in northwestern Jordan with MODIS data from 2009. Results show that this method is an effective approach to correct overestimation by a traditional triangle method and underestimation by the MODIS evapotranspiration product over both natural vegetated and irrigated areas. In contrast to previous triangle algorithms in which the domain-wide lump temperature and NDVI data could mask the underlying signal and efficacy of triangle methods, this method represents a semi-distributed scheme to discretize the altitude effects on triangle methods and provides a template to address the heterogeneity of other physical factors. It constitutes an essential step towards the satellite-based quantification of irrigation water use and effective water resources management in Jordan as well as other semi-arid regions with high freshwater vulnerability.

  3. Using SEBAL to Investigate How Variations in Climate Impact on Crop Evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Papadavid

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Water allocation to crops, and especially to the most water intensive ones, has always been of great importance in agricultural processes. Deficit or excessive irrigation could create either crop health-related problems or water over-consumption, respectively. The latter could lead to groundwater depletion and deterioration of its quality through deep percolation of agrichemical residuals. In this context, and under the current conditions where Cyprus is facing effects of possible climate changes, the purpose of this study seeks to estimate the needed crop water requirements of the past (1995–2004 and the corresponding ones of the present (2005–2015 in order to test if there were any significant changes regarding the crop water requirements of the most water-intensive trees in Cyprus. The Mediterranean region has been identified as the region that will suffer the most from variations of climate. Thus the paper refers to effects of these variations on crop evapotranspiration (ETc using remotely-sensed data from Landsat TM/ETM+/OLI employing a sound methodology used worldwide, the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL. Though the general feeling is that of changes on climate will consequently affect ETc, our results indicate that there is no significant effect of climate variation on crop evapotranspiration, despite the fact that some climatic factors have changed. Applying Student’s t-test, the mean values for the most water-intensive trees in Cyprus of the 1994–2004 decade have shown no statistical difference from the mean values of 2005–2015 for all the cases, concluding that the climate change taking place in the past decades in Cyprus have either not affected the crop evapotranspiration or the crops have managed to adapt to the new environmental conditions through time.

  4. Climate trends and behaviour of drought indices based on precipitation and evapotranspiration in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Paulo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Distinction between drought and aridity is crucial to understand water scarcity processes. Drought indices are used for drought identification and drought severity characterisation. The Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI are the most known drought indices. In this study, they are compared with the modified PDSI for Mediterranean conditions (MedPDSI and the Standardised Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. MedPDSI results from the soil water balance of an olive crop, thus real evapotranspiration is considered, while SPEI uses potential (climatic evapotranspiration. Similarly to the SPI, SPEI can be computed at various time scales. Aiming at understanding possible impacts of climate change, prior to compare the drought indices, a trend analysis relative to precipitation and temperature in 27 weather stations of Portugal was performed for the period 1941 to 2006. A trend for temperature increase was observed for some weather stations and trends for decreasing precipitation in March and increasing in October were also observed for some locations. Comparisons of the SPI and SPEI at 9- and 12-month time scales, the PDSI and MedPDSI were performed for the same stations and period. SPI and SPEI produce similar results for the same time scales concerning drought occurrence and severity. PDSI and MedPDSI correlate well between them and the same happened for SPI and SPEI. PDSI and MedPDSI identify more severe droughts than SPI or SPEI and identify drought occurrence earlier than these indices. This behaviour is likely to be related with the fact that a water balance is performed with PDSI and MedPDSI, which better approaches the supply-demand balance.

  5. Climate trends and behaviour of drought indices based on precipitation and evapotranspiration in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, A. A.; Rosa, R. D.; Pereira, L. S.

    2012-05-01

    Distinction between drought and aridity is crucial to understand water scarcity processes. Drought indices are used for drought identification and drought severity characterisation. The Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) are the most known drought indices. In this study, they are compared with the modified PDSI for Mediterranean conditions (MedPDSI) and the Standardised Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). MedPDSI results from the soil water balance of an olive crop, thus real evapotranspiration is considered, while SPEI uses potential (climatic) evapotranspiration. Similarly to the SPI, SPEI can be computed at various time scales. Aiming at understanding possible impacts of climate change, prior to compare the drought indices, a trend analysis relative to precipitation and temperature in 27 weather stations of Portugal was performed for the period 1941 to 2006. A trend for temperature increase was observed for some weather stations and trends for decreasing precipitation in March and increasing in October were also observed for some locations. Comparisons of the SPI and SPEI at 9- and 12-month time scales, the PDSI and MedPDSI were performed for the same stations and period. SPI and SPEI produce similar results for the same time scales concerning drought occurrence and severity. PDSI and MedPDSI correlate well between them and the same happened for SPI and SPEI. PDSI and MedPDSI identify more severe droughts than SPI or SPEI and identify drought occurrence earlier than these indices. This behaviour is likely to be related with the fact that a water balance is performed with PDSI and MedPDSI, which better approaches the supply-demand balance.

  6. Evaluating Soil Health Using Remotely Sensed Evapotranspiration on the Benchmark Barnes Soils of North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Meyer; Hopkins, David; Steele, Dean; Tuscherer, Sheldon

    2017-04-01

    The benchmark Barnes soil series is an extensive upland Hapludoll of the northern Great Plains that is both economically and ecologically vital to the region. Effects of tillage erosion coupled with wind and water erosion have degraded Barnes soil quality, but with unknown extent, distribution, or severity. Evidence of soil degradation documented for a half century warrants that the assumption of productivity be tested. Soil resilience is linked to several dynamic soil properties and National Cooperative Soil Survey initiatives are now focused on identifying those properties for benchmark soils. Quantification of soil degradation is dependent on a reliable method for broad-scale evaluation. The soil survey community is currently developing rapid and widespread soil property assessment technologies. Improvements in satellite based remote-sensing and image analysis software have stimulated the application of broad-scale resource assessment. Furthermore, these technologies have fostered refinement of land-based surface energy balance algorithms, i.e. Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) algorithm for evapotranspiration (ET) mapping. The hypothesis of this study is that ET mapping technology can differentiate soil function on extensive landscapes and identify degraded areas. A recent soil change study in eastern North Dakota resampled legacy Barnes pedons sampled prior to 1960 and found significant decreases in organic carbon. An ancillary study showed that evapotranspiration (ET) estimates from METRIC decreased with Barnes erosion class severity. An ET raster map has been developed for three eastern North Dakota counties using METRIC and Landsat 5 imagery. ET pixel candidates on major Barnes soil map units were stratified into tertiles and classified as ranked ET subdivisions. A sampling population of randomly selected points stratified by ET class and county proportion was established. Morphologic and chemical data will

  7. Evapotranspiration estimates using remote-sensing data, Parker and Palo Verde valleys, Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Lee H.; Rezin, Kelly V.

    1989-01-01

    In 1981 the U.S. Geological Survey established an experimental project to assess the possible and practical use of remote-sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration as an approximation of consumptive use of water in the lower Colorado River flood plain. The project area was in Parker Valley, Arizona. The approach selected was to measure the areas covered by each type of vegetation, using remote-sensing data in various types of analyses, and to multiply each area by a predetermined water-use rate. Two calibration and six remote-sensing methods of classifying crop types were compared for cost, accuracy, consistency, and labor requirements. Included were one method each for field reconnaissance using 1982 data, low-altitude (less than 5,000 feet) aerial photography using 1982 data, and visual photointerpretation of Landsat satellite images using 1981 and 1982 data; two methods for medium-altitude (15,000-18,000 feet) aerial photography using 1982 data; and three methods for digital Landsat satellite images using 1981 data. A test of the most promising digital-processing method, which used three image dates, was made in part of Palo Verde Valley, California, where 1981 crop data were more complete than in Parker Valley. Of the eight methods studied, the two-date digital-processing method was the most consistent and least labor intensive for identifying two or three major crops; visual photointerpretation of Landsat images was the least expensive. Evapotranspiration estimates from crop classifications by all methods differed by a maximum of 6 percent. Total evapotranspiration calculated from crop data and phreatophyte maps in 1981 ranged from 11 percent lower in Palo Verde Valley to 17 percent lower in Parker Valley than consumptive use calculated by water budgets. The difference was greater in Parker Valley because the winter crop data were not included.

  8. Ecohydrology of Graciosa semi-natural grasslands: water use and evapotranspiration partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paço, Teresa A.; Paredes, Paula; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Madruga, João S.; Pereira, Luís S.

    2016-04-01

    Semi-natural grasslands are a main landscape of Graciosa and other Islands of Azores. The present study aims at calibrate and validate the soil water balance model SIMDualKc for those grasslands aiming at assessing the dynamics of soil water and evapotranspiration. This objective relates with the need to improve knowledge on the ecohydrology of grasslands established in (volcanic) Andosols. This model adopts the dual crop coefficient approach to compute daily crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and to perform its partition into transpiration (T) and soil evaporation (Es). The application refers to a semi-natural grassland sporadically sowed with ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Model calibration and validation were performed comparing simulated against observed grassland evapotranspiration throughout two periods in consecutive years. Daily ET values were derived from eddy covariance data collected at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), at Graciosa, Azores (Portugal). Various statistical performance indicators were used to assess model accuracy and results show a good adequacy of the model for predicting vegetation ET in such conditions. Surface flux energy balance was also evaluated throughout the observation period (2014-2016). The ratio Es/ET shows that soil evaporation is much small than T/ET due to high soil cover by vegetation. The model was then applied to contrasting climatic conditions (dry vs. wet years) to assess related impacts on water balance components and grassland transpiration.

  9. Evapotranspiration from agricultural plant communities in the high rainfall zone of the southwest of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P. R.; Sudmeyer, R. A.

    1993-06-01

    The clearing of native vegetation and its replacement with shallow rooted, annual crops and pastures has resulted in rising groundwater levels and concentration of salts in the surface soils of resulting groundwater discharge areas in the southwest of Western Australia. The potential to manipulate the recharge rates to groundwaters by using agronomic techniques to change catchment evapotranspiration ( Et), has been the subject of much discussion. From 1986 to 1989, annual Et was estimated from daytime measurements of Et from annual pasture (existing pasture, subterranean clover, Medicago murex), crops (lupins, oats, rape, barley and wheat) and two perennial pastures (lucerne and phalaris) at a site near Collie in the southwest of Western Australia. The ventilated chamber technique was used to measure Et rates, together with ancillary measurements of above ground biomass and rooting depth. Seasonal values of Et are presented and combined to allow a boundary analysis of annual Et for each species. Et was found to be influenced by the amount and timing of biomass production, and by the rooting depth. The median annual evapotranspiration of annual pasture was shown to be the least (339 mm), and lupins the most (471 mm). The site environment combined high rainfall and low evaporative demand in winter, and low moisture-holding capacity of duplex soils with preferred pathways through subsoil clays. In this context, the potential of deeper rooted, perennial species to use more water, was apparent. It is argued that the smaller the difference in annual evapotranspiration between alternative and current agricultural practice (annual pasture), the larger the proportion of a catchment likely to be required for treatment to affect groundwater levels. Recharge manipulation alone, using the species tested, may not be sufficient for catchment salinity control. A wide range of other strategies exist; a combination of these, to suit the practical and economic constraints of the

  10. Problems in Hydrodynamics and Partial Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CALCULUS OF VARIATIONS, RESEARCH MANAGEMENT ), NONLINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS, EQUATIONS, INEQUALITIES, MEASURE THEORY , INTEGRALS, ABSTRACTS

  11. Lectures on partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovsky, I G

    1992-01-01

    Graduate-level exposition by noted Russian mathematician offers rigorous, transparent, highly readable coverage of classification of equations, hyperbolic equations, elliptic equations and parabolic equations. Wealth of commentary and insight invaluable for deepening understanding of problems considered in text. Translated from the Russian by A. Shenitzer.

  12. Evapotranspiration (ET) data at Immokalee row crop site, Collier County, Florida, September 22, 2008 - January 8, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swancar, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Immokalee row crop climate station beginning September 22, 2008 and ending January 8, 2009. Daily evapotranspiration rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget varied from 0.1 millimeter (9/28/2008) to 3.3 millimeters (9/24/2008). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above an experimental field planted in green peppers to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and ground-water level. Data were collected at 30-minute resolution, with evapotranspiration corrected to the near-surface energy-budget at that timescale. The study was conducted at an experimental field on the University of Florida Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC) in Immokalee, Florida (Latitude 26 27 40 North Longitude 81 26 24 West, in degrees minutes seconds, North American Datum 83, Section 20, Township 46S, Range 29E). The full data release associated with this site consists of: 1.  Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, 30-minute data, from September 22, 2008 through January 8, 2009 (comma delimited text format) 2. Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, daily data, from September 23, 2008 through January 7, 2009 (comma delimited text format) including an ancillary file: Vegetation and equipment photographs (zipped jpeg files).

  13. Estimation of Actual Evapotranspiration by Remote Sensing: Application in Thessaly Plain, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Mamassis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing can assist in improving the estimation of the geographical distribution of evapotranspiration, and consequently water demand in large cultivated areas for irrigation purposes and sustainable water resources management. In the direction of these objectives, the daily actual evapotranspiration was calculated in this study during the summer season of 2001 over the Thessaly plain in Greece, a wide irrigated area of great agricultural importance. Three different methods were adapted and applied: the remotesensing methods by Granger (2000 and Carlson and Buffum (1989 that use satellite data in conjunction with ground meteorological measurements and an adapted FAO (Food and Agriculture Organisation Penman-Monteith method (Allen at al. 1998, which was selected to be the reference method. The satellite data were used in conjunction with ground data collected on the three closest meteorological stations. All three methods, exploit visible channels 1 and 2 and infrared channels 4 and 5 of NOAA-AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor images to calculate albedo and NDVI (Normalised Difference Vegetation Index, as well as surface temperatures. The FAO Penman-Monteith and the Granger method have used exclusively NOAA-15 satellite images to obtain mean surface temperatures. For the Carlson-Buffum method a combination of NOAA-14 and ΝΟΑΑ-15 satellite images was used, since the average rate of surface temperature rise during the morning was required. The resulting estimations show that both the Carlson-Buffum and Granger methods follow in general the variations of the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method. Both methods have potential for estimating the spatial distribution of evapotranspiration, whereby the degree of the relative agreement with the reference FAO Penman-Monteith method depends on the crop growth stage. In particular, the Carlson- Buffum

  14. Elements of partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, Ian N

    2006-01-01

    Geared toward students of applied rather than pure mathematics, this volume introduces elements of partial differential equations. Its focus is primarily upon finding solutions to particular equations rather than general theory.Topics include ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differential equations of the first and second orders, Laplace's equation, the wave equation, and the diffusion equation. A helpful Appendix offers information on systems of surfaces, and solutions to the odd-numbered problems appear at the end of the book. Readers pursuing independent st

  15. Elements of partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, Ian Naismith

    1957-01-01

    Geared toward students of applied rather than pure mathematics, this volume introduces elements of partial differential equations. Its focus is primarily upon finding solutions to particular equations rather than general theory.Topics include ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differential equations of the first and second orders, Laplace's equation, the wave equation, and the diffusion equation. A helpful Appendix offers information on systems of surfaces, and solutions to the odd-numbered problems appear at the end of the book. Readers pursuing independent st

  16. Stochastic differential equations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This text develops the theory of systems of stochastic differential equations, and it presents applications in probability, partial differential equations, and stochastic control problems. Originally published in two volumes, it combines a book of basic theory and selected topics with a book of applications.The first part explores Markov processes and Brownian motion; the stochastic integral and stochastic differential equations; elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations and their relations to stochastic differential equations; the Cameron-Martin-Girsanov theorem; and asymptotic es

  17. Partial difference equations arising from the Cauchy-Riemann equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haruki

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider some functional equations arising from the Cauchy-Riemann equations, and certain related functional equations. First we propose a new functional equation (E.1 below, over a $2$-divisible Abelian group, which is a discrete version of the Cauchy-Riemann equations, and give the general solutions of (E.1. Next we study a functional equation which is equivalent to (E.1. Further we propose and solve partial difference-differential functional equations and nonsymmetric partial difference equations which are also arising from the Cauchy--Riemann equations. [ f(x+t,y- f(x-t,y = - i [f(x,y+t- f(x,y-t].    (E.1

  18. Classical Diophantine equations

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The author had initiated a revision and translation of "Classical Diophantine Equations" prior to his death. Given the rapid advances in transcendence theory and diophantine approximation over recent years, one might fear that the present work, originally published in Russian in 1982, is mostly superseded. That is not so. A certain amount of updating had been prepared by the author himself before his untimely death. Some further revision was prepared by close colleagues. The first seven chapters provide a detailed, virtually exhaustive, discussion of the theory of lower bounds for linear forms in the logarithms of algebraic numbers and its applications to obtaining upper bounds for solutions to the eponymous classical diophantine equations. The detail may seem stark--- the author fears that the reader may react much as does the tourist on first seeing the centre Pompidou; notwithstanding that, Sprind zuk maintainsa pleasant and chatty approach, full of wise and interesting remarks. His emphases well warrant, ...

  19. Numerical Solution of Heun Equation Via Linear Stochastic Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Rezazadeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we intend to solve special kind of ordinary differential equations which is called Heun equations, by converting to a corresponding stochastic differential equation(S.D.E.. So, we construct a stochastic linear equation system from this equation which its solution is based on computing fundamental matrix of this system and then, this S.D.E. is solved by numerically methods. Moreover, its asymptotic stability and statistical concepts like expectation and variance of solutions are discussed. Finally, the attained solutions of these S.D.E.s compared with exact solution of corresponding differential equations.

  20. Geometric wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Shatah, Jalal

    2000-01-01

    This volume contains notes of the lectures given at the Courant Institute and a DMV-Seminar at Oberwolfach. The focus is on the recent work of the authors on semilinear wave equations with critical Sobolev exponents and on wave maps in two space dimensions. Background material and references have been added to make the notes self-contained. The book is suitable for use in a graduate-level course on the topic.

  1. Differential equations with Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Abell, Martha L

    2004-01-01

    The Third Edition of the Differential Equations with Mathematica integrates new applications from a variety of fields,especially biology, physics, and engineering. The new handbook is also completely compatible with recent versions of Mathematica and is a perfect introduction for Mathematica beginners.* Focuses on the most often used features of Mathematica for the beginning Mathematica user* New applications from a variety of fields, including engineering, biology, and physics* All applications were completed using recent versions of Mathematica

  2. Simulating Crop Evapotranspiration Response under Different Planting Scenarios by Modified SWAT Model in an Irrigation District, Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    Full Text Available Modelling crop evapotranspiration (ET response to different planting scenarios in an irrigation district plays a significant role in optimizing crop planting patterns, resolving agricultural water scarcity and facilitating the sustainable use of water resources. In this study, the SWAT model was improved by transforming the evapotranspiration module. Then, the improved model was applied in Qingyuan Irrigation District of northwest China as a case study. Land use, soil, meteorology, irrigation scheduling and crop coefficient were considered as input data, and the irrigation district was divided into subdivisions based on the DEM and local canal systems. On the basis of model calibration and verification, the improved model showed better simulation efficiency than did the original model. Therefore, the improved model was used to simulate the crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios in the irrigation district. Results indicated that crop evapotranspiration decreased by 2.94% and 6.01% under the scenarios of reducing the planting proportion of spring wheat (scenario 1 and summer maize (scenario 2 by keeping the total cultivated area unchanged. However, the total net output values presented an opposite trend under different scenarios. The values decreased by 3.28% under scenario 1, while it increased by 7.79% under scenario 2, compared with the current situation. This study presents a novel method to estimate crop evapotranspiration response under different planting scenarios using the SWAT model, and makes recommendations for strategic agricultural water management planning for the rational utilization of water resources and development of local economy by studying the impact of planting scenario changes on crop evapotranspiration and output values in the irrigation district of northwest China.

  3. Operational Actual Wetland Evapotranspiration Estimation for South Florida Using MODIS Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristobal N. Ceron

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration is a reliable indicator of wetland health. Wetlands are an important and valuable ecosystem on the South Florida landscape. Accurate wetland Actual Evapotranspiration (AET data can be used to evaluate the performance of South Florida’s Everglades restoration programs. However, reliable AET measurements rely on scattered point measurements restricting applications over a larger area. The objective of this study was to validate the ability of the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB approach and the Simple Method (also called the Abtew Method to provide large area AET estimates for wetland recovery efforts. The study used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor spectral data and South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD solar radiation data to derive weekly AET values for South Florida. The SSEB-Simple Method approach provided acceptable results with good agreement with observed values during the critical dry season period, when cloud cover was low (rave (n = 59 = 0.700, pave < 0.0005, but requires further refinement to be viable for yearly estimates because of poor performance during wet season months, mainly because of cloud contamination. The approach can be useful for short-term wetland recovery assessment projects that occur during the dry season and/or long term projects that compare site AET rates from dry season to dry season.

  4. Comparative Analysis of METRIC Model and Atmometer Methods for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Reyes-González

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of crop evapotranspiration (ET is a key factor in agricultural water management including irrigated agriculture. The objective of this study was to compare ET estimated from the satellite-based remote sensing METRIC model to in situ atmometer readings. Atmometer readings were recorded from three sites in eastern South Dakota every morning between 8:15 and 8:30 AM for the duration of the 2016 growing season. Seven corresponding clear sky images from Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 (Path 29, Row 29 were processed and used for comparison. Three corn fields in three sites were used to compare actual evapotranspiration (ETa. The results showed a good relationship between ETa estimated by the METRIC model (ETa-METRIC and ETa estimated with atmometer (ETa-atm (r2 = 0.87, index of agreement of 0.84, and RMSE = 0.65 mm day−1. However, ETa-atm values were consistently lower than ETa-METRIC values. The differences in daily ETa between the two methods increase with high wind speed values (>4 m s−1. Results from this study are useful for improving irrigation water management at local and field scales.

  5. Soil water dynamics and evapotranspiration of forage cactus clones under rainfed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thieres George Freire da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this work was to evaluate soil water dynamics in areas cultivated with forage cactus clones and to determine how environmental conditions and crop growth affect evapotranspiration. The study was conducted in the municipality of Serra Talhada, in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Crop growth was monitored through changes in the cladode area index (CAI and through the soil cover fraction, calculated at the end of the cycle. Real evapotranspiration (ET of the three evaluated clones was obtained as the residual term in the soil water balance method. No difference was observed between soil water balance components, even though the evaluated clones were of different genus and had different CAI increments. Accumulated ET was of 1,173 mm during the 499 days of the experiment, resulting in daily average of 2.35 mm. The CAI increases the water consumption of the Orelha de Elefante Mexicana clone. In dry conditions, the water consumption of the Miúda clone responds more slowly to variation in soil water availability. The lower evolution of the CAI of the IPA Sertânia clone, during the rainy season, leads to a higher contribution of the evaporation component in ET. The atmospheric demand controls the ET of clones only when there is higher soil water availability; in this condition, the water consumption of the Miúda clone decreases more rapidly with the increase of atmospheric demand.

  6. Identification of trend in long term precipitation and reference evapotranspiration over Narmada river basin (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Brij Kishor; Khare, Deepak

    2018-02-01

    Precipitation and reference evapotranspiration are key parameters in hydro-meteorological studies and used for agricultural planning, irrigation system design and management. Precipitation and evaporative demand are expected to be alter under climate change and affect the sustainable development. In this article, spatial variability and temporal trend of precipitation and reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were investigated over Narmada river basin (India), a humid tropical climatic region. In the present study, 12 and 28 observatory stations were selected for precipitation and ETo, respectively of 102-years period (1901-2002). A rigorous analysis for trend detection was carried out using non parametric tests such as Mann-Kendall (MK) and Spearman Rho (SR). Sen's slope estimator was used to analyze the rate of change in long term series. Moreover, all the stations of basin exhibit positive trend for annual ETo, while 8% stations indicate significant negative trend for mean annual precipitation, respectively. Change points of annual precipitation were identified around the year 1962 applying Buishand's and Pettit's test. Annual mean precipitation reduced by 9% in upper part while increased maximum by 5% in lower part of the basin due temporal changes. Although annual mean ETo increase by 4-12% in most of the region. Moreover, results of the study are very helpful in planning and development of agricultural water resources.

  7. Ecological restoration of groundwater-dependent vegetation in the arid Ejina Delta: evidences from satellite evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Lu; Garcia, Monica; Yu, Jingjie; Zhang, Yichi; Wang, Ping; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    The ecological water conveyance project (EWCP) in the Ejina delta, a typical hyper-arid area of China, aimed to restore degraded phreatophytic ecosystems. We assessed the degree of ecosystem recovery using as an ecohydrological indicator a ratio between actual and potential evapotranspiration derived from MODIS since the beginning of the project in 2001. The selected indicator was the Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI) which was validated with Eddy covariance (EC) data confirming its applicability to monitor groundwater dependent vegetation. The spatial analyses of the evapotranspiration ratio show drying trends (2000-2015) which are stronger and also cover larger extensions than the wetting trends. Thus, the condition of key riparian areas relying mostly on surface water improved since the project began. However, groundwater dependent ecosystems located in lower river Xihe reaches present drying trends. It seems that despite of the runoff supplemented by the EWCP project, there is nowadays more inequality in the access to water by groundwater dependent ecosystems in the Ejina Delta. The study shows that energy-evaporation indices, relying on radiometric satellite temperature like the TVDI, can detect degradation signals that otherwise might go undetected by NDVI analyses especially in arid regions, where vegetation indices are greatly affected by the soil background signals. Additionally, they can provide timely information to water managers on how much water to allocate for a sustainable restoration program.

  8. Comparison of different methods in estimating potential evapotranspiration at Muda Irrigation Scheme of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobri Harun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is a complex process in the hydrological cycle that influences the quantity of runoff and thus the irrigation water requirements. Numerous methods have been developed to estimate potential evapotranspiration (PET. Unfortunately, most of the reliable PET methods are parameter rich models and therefore, not feasible for application in data scarce regions. On the other hand, accuracy and reliability of simple PET models vary widely according to regional climate conditions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance of three temperature-based and three radiation-based simple ET methods in estimating historical ET and projecting future ET at Muda Irrigation Scheme at Kedah, Malaysia. The performance was measured by comparing those methods with the parameter intensive Penman-Monteith Method. It was found that radiation based methods gave better performance compared to temperature-based methods in estimation of ET in the study area. Future ET simulated from projected climate data obtained through statistical downscaling technique also showed that radiation-based methods can project closer ET values to that projected by Penman-Monteith Method. It is expected that the study will guide in selecting suitable methods for estimating and projecting ET in accordance to availability of meteorological data.

  9. Satellite-Derived Spatiotemporal Variations in Evapotranspiration over Northeast China during 1982–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilin Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is a critical process for the climate system and water cycles. However, the spatiotemporal variations in terrestrial ET over Northeast China over the past three decades calculated from sparse meteorological point-based data remain large uncertain. In this paper, a recently proposed modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor (MS–PT algorithm was applied to estimate ET of Northeast China during 1982–2010. Validation results show that the square of the correlation coefficients (R2 for the six flux tower sites varies from 0.55 to 0.88 (p < 0.01, and the mean root mean square error (RMSE is 0.92 mm/d. The ET estimated by MS–PT has an annual mean of 441.14 ± 18 mm/year in Northeast China, with a decreasing trend from southeast coast to northwest inland. The ET also shows in both annual and seasonal linear trends over Northeast China during 1982–2010, although this trend seems to have ceased after 1998, which increased on average by 12.3 mm per decade pre-1998 (p < 0.1 and decreased with large interannual fluctuations post-1998. Importantly, our analysis on ET trends highlights a large difference from previous studies that the change of potential evapotranspiration (PET plays a key role for the change of ET over Northeast China. Only in the western part of Northeast China does precipitation appear to be a major controlling influence on ET.

  10. FAO-56 Dual Model Combined with Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing for Regional Evapotranspiration Estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Amri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to evaluate the potential of the FAO-56 dual technique for the estimation of regional evapotranspiration (ET and its constituent components (crop transpiration and soil evaporation, for two classes of vegetation (olives trees and cereals in the semi-arid region of the Kairouan plain in central Tunisia. The proposed approach combines the FAO-56 technique with remote sensing (optical and microwave, not only for vegetation characterization, as proposed in other studies but also for the estimation of soil evaporation, through the use of satellite moisture products. Since it is difficult to use ground flux measurements to validate remotely sensed data at regional scales, comparisons were made with the land surface model ISBA-A-gs which is a physical SVAT (Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer model, an operational tool developed by Météo-France. It is thus shown that good results can be obtained with this relatively simple approach, based on the FAO-56 technique combined with remote sensing, to retrieve temporal variations of ET. The approach proposed for the daily mapping of evapotranspiration at 1 km resolution is approved in two steps, for the period between 1991 and 2007. In an initial step, the ISBA-A-gs soil moisture outputs are compared with ERS/WSC products. Then, the output of the FAO-56 technique is compared with the output generated by the SVAT ISBA-A-gs model.

  11. Accuracy assessment of NOAA gridded daily reference evapotranspiration for the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Jerry; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Hobbins, Michael; Senay, Gabriel; Paul, George; Marek, Thomas; Porter, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference evapotranspiration (ETref) maps for the contiguous United States using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large-scale spatial representation of ETref, which is essential for regional scale water resources management. Data used in the development of NOAA daily ETref maps are derived from observations over surfaces that are different from short (grass — ETos) or tall (alfalfa — ETrs) reference crops, often in nonagricultural settings, which carries an unknown discrepancy between assumed and actual conditions. In this study, NOAA daily ETos and ETrs maps were evaluated for accuracy, using observed data from the Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (TXHPET) network. Daily ETos, ETrs and the climatic data (air temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation) used for calculating ETref were extracted from the NOAA maps for TXHPET locations and compared against ground measurements on reference grass surfaces. NOAA ETrefmaps generally overestimated the TXHPET observations (1.4 and 2.2 mm/day ETos and ETrs, respectively), which may be attributed to errors in the NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed, to which reference ETref is most sensitive. Therefore, a bias correction to NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed data, or adjustment to the resulting NOAA ETref, may be needed to improve the accuracy of NOAA ETref maps.

  12. Surface Energy Balance Based Evapotranspiration Mapping in the Texas High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Prasanna H; Chávez, José L; Howell, Terry A; Marek, Thomas H; New, Leon L

    2008-08-28

    Agriculture on the Texas High Plains (THP) uses approximately 89% of groundwater withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer. Consequently, groundwater levels are declining faster than the recharge rate. Therefore, efficient agricultural water use is essential for economic viability and sustainability of the THP. Accurate regional evapotranspiration (ET) maps would provide valuable information on actual crop water use. In this study, METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution using Internalized Calibration), a remote sensing based ET algorithm, was evaluated for mapping ET in the THP. Two Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper images acquired on 27 June (DOY 178) and 29 July (DOY 210) 2005 were used for this purpose. The performance of the ET model was evaluated by comparing the predicted daily ET with values derived from soil moisture budget at four commercial agricultural fields. Daily ET estimates resulted with a prediction error of 12.7±8.1% (mean bias error ± root mean square error) on DOY 178 and -4.7±9.4% on DOY 210 when compared with ET derived from measured soil moisture through the soil water balance. These results are good considering the prevailing advective conditions in the THP. METRIC have the potential to be used for mapping regional ET in the THP region. However, more evaluation is needed under different agroclimatological conditions.

  13. An Interactive Real-time Decision Support System for Leachate Irrigation on Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Landfill disposal is still the most common and economical practice for municipal solid waste in most countries. However, heavily polluted leachate generated by excess rainwater percolating through the landfill waste is the major drawback of this practice. Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used as alternative cover systems to minimize percolation by evapotranspiration. Leachate recirculation is one of the least expensive options for leachate treatment. The combination of ET cover systems and leachate recirculation can be an economical and environment-friendly practice for landfill leachate management. An interactive real-time decision support system is being developed to better manage leachate irrigation using historical and forecasting weather data, and real time soil moisture data. The main frame of this system includes soil water modules, and plant-soil modules. An inverse simulation module is also included to calibrate certain parameters based on observed data when necessary. It would be an objectives-oriented irrigation management tool to minimize landfill operation costs and negative environmental impacts.

  14. Estimating root-zone moisture and evapotranspiration with AVHRR data[Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08

    The parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) model uses satellite data and limited surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution over extended terrestrial areas. The ultimate goal of this work is to produce estimates of water loss by evapotranspiration, for application in hydrological models. The major advantage to the method is that it can be applied to areas having diverse surface characteristics where direct surface flux measurements either do not exist or are not feasible and where meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The emphasis of this work with the PASS model is on improving (1) methods of using satellite remote sensing data to derive the essential parameters for individual types of surfaces over large areas, (2) algorithms for describing the interactions of near-surface atmospheric conditions with surface processes, and (3) algorithms for computing surface energy and water vapor flux at a scale close to the size of a satellite-derived image pixel. The PASS approach is being developed and tested further with observations from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) site in the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), an area of about 5,000 km{sup 2} in southern Kansas. Here the authors describe some of the progress made since the previous report.

  15. REMOTE SENSING AND SURFACE ENERGY FLUX MODELS TO DERIVE EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND CROP COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing techniques using high resolution satellite images provide opportunities to evaluate daily crop water use and its spatial and temporal distribution on a field by field basis. Mapping this indicator with pixels of few meters of size on extend areas allows to characterize different processes and parameters. Satellite data on vegetation reflectance, integrated with in field measurements of canopy coverage features and the monitoring of energy fluxes through the soil-plant-atmosphere system, allow to estimate conventional irrigation components (ET, Kc thus improving irrigation strategies. In the study, satellite potential evapotranspiration (ETp and crop coefficient (Kc maps of orange orchards are derived using semi-empirical approaches between reflectance data from IKONOS imagery and ground measurements of vegetation features. The monitoring of energy fluxes through the orchard allows to estimate actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa using energy balance and the Surface Renewal theory. The approach indicates substantial promise as an efficient, accurate and relatively inexpensive procedure to predict actual ET fluxes and Kc from irrigated lands.

  16. Benchmarking NLDAS-2 Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration to Separate Uncertainty Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey S.; Mocko, David M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Xia, Youlong

    2016-01-01

    Model benchmarking allows us to separate uncertainty in model predictions caused 1 by model inputs from uncertainty due to model structural error. We extend this method with a large-sample approach (using data from multiple field sites) to measure prediction uncertainty caused by errors in (i) forcing data, (ii) model parameters, and (iii) model structure, and use it to compare the efficiency of soil moisture state and evapotranspiration flux predictions made by the four land surface models in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2 (NLDAS-2). Parameters dominated uncertainty in soil moisture estimates and forcing data dominated uncertainty in evapotranspiration estimates; however, the models themselves used only a fraction of the information available to them. This means that there is significant potential to improve all three components of the NLDAS-2 system. In particular, continued work toward refining the parameter maps and look-up tables, the forcing data measurement and processing, and also the land surface models themselves, has potential to result in improved estimates of surface mass and energy balances.

  17. Sensitivity of MODIS evapotranspiration algorithm (MOD16) to the acuracy of meteorological data and land use and land cover parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhoff, Anderson; Santini Adamatti, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    MODIS evapotranspiration (MOD16) is currently available with 1 km of spatial resolution over 109.03 Million km2 of vegetated land surface areas and this information is widely used to evaluate the linkages between hydrological, energy and carbon cycles. The algorithm is driven by meteorological reanalysis data and MODIS remotely-sensed data, which include land use and land cover classification (MCD12Q1), leaf area index (LAI) and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) (MOD15A2) and albedo (MOD43b3). For calibration and parameterization, the algorithm uses a Biome Property Look-up Table (BPLUT) based on MCD12Q1 land cover classification. Several studies evaluated MOD16 accuracy using evapotranspiration measurements and water balance analysis, showing that this product can reproduce global evapotranspiration effectively under a variety climate condition, from local to wide-basin scale, with uncertainties up to 25%. In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of MOD16 algorithm to land use and land cover parameterization and to meteorological data. Considering that MCD12Q1 has an accuracy between 70 and 85% at continental scale, we changed land cover parametererization to understand the influence of land use and land cover classification on MOD16 evapotranspiration estimations. Knowing that meteorological reanalysis data also have uncertainties (mostly related to the coarse spatial resolution), we compared MOD16 evapotranspiration driven by observed meteorological data to those driven by the reanalysis data. Our analysis were carried in South America, with evapotranspiration and meteorological measurements from the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) at 8 different sites, including tropical rainforest, tropical dry forest, selective logged forest, seasonal flooded forest and pasture/agriculture. Our results indicate that land use and land cover classification has a strong influence on MOD16 algorithm. The use of

  18. Accuracy of the Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index using MODIS under water-limited vs. energy-limited evapotranspiration conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Monica; Fernández, N.; Villagarcía, L.

    2014-01-01

    Water deficit indices based on the spatial relationship between surface temperature (Ts) and NDVI, known as triangle approaches, are widely used for drought monitoring. However, their application has been recently questioned when the main factor limiting evapotranspiration is energy. Even though...... water is the main control in dryland ecosystems, these can also undergo periods of energy and temperature limitation. In this paper we aimed to: (i) evaluate the TVDI (Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index) to estimate water deficits (e.g. ratio between actual and potential evapotranspiration), and heat...

  19. Equation with the many fathers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    1984-01-01

    In this essay I discuss the origin and early development of the first relativistic wave equation, known as the Klein-Gordon equation. In 1926 several physicists, among them Klein, Fock, Schrödinger, and de Broglie, announced this equation as a candidate for a relativistic generalization of the us......In this essay I discuss the origin and early development of the first relativistic wave equation, known as the Klein-Gordon equation. In 1926 several physicists, among them Klein, Fock, Schrödinger, and de Broglie, announced this equation as a candidate for a relativistic generalization...

  20. Equations of the mixed type

    CERN Document Server

    Bitsadze, A V

    1963-01-01

    Equations of the Mixed Type compiles a series of lectures on certain fundamental questions in the theory of equations of mixed type. This book investigates the series of problems concerning linear partial differential equations of the second order in two variables, and possessing the property that the type of the equation changes either on the boundary of or inside the considered domain. Topics covered include general remarks on linear partial differential equations of mixed type; study of the solutions of second order hyperbolic equations with initial conditions given along the lines of parab

  1. Reference evapotranspiration from coarse-scale and dynamically downscaled data in complex terrain: Sensitivity to interpolation and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Courtenay; Khatri, Krishna B.; Kochanski, Adam K.; Lewis, Clayton S.; Allen, L. Niel

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate whether dynamically downscaled high resolution (4-km) climate data from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provide physically meaningful additional information for reference evapotranspiration (E) calculation compared to the recently published GridET framework that uses interpolation from coarser-scale simulations run at 32-km resolution. The analysis focuses on complex terrain of Utah in the western United States for years 1985-2010, and comparisons were made statewide with supplemental analyses specifically for regions with irrigated agriculture. E was calculated using the standardized equation and procedures proposed by the American Society of Civil Engineers from hourly data, and climate inputs from WRF and GridET were debiased relative to the same set of observations. For annual mean values, E from WRF (EW) and E from GridET (EG) both agreed well with E derived from observations (r2 = 0.95, bias < 2 mm). Domain-wide, EW and EG were well correlated spatially (r2 = 0.89), however local differences ΔE =EW -EG were as large as +439 mm year-1 (+26%) in some locations, and ΔE averaged +36 mm year-1. After linearly removing the effects of contrasts in solar radiation and wind speed, which are characteristically less reliable under downscaling in complex terrain, approximately half the residual variance was accounted for by contrasts in temperature and humidity between GridET and WRF. These contrasts stemmed from GridET interpolating using an assumed lapse rate of Γ = 6.5 K km-1, whereas WRF produced a thermodynamically-driven lapse rate closer to 5 K km-1 as observed in mountainous terrain. The primary conclusions are that observed lapse rates in complex terrain differ markedly from the commonly assumed Γ = 6.5 K km-1, these lapse rates can be realistically resolved via dynamical downscaling, and use of constant Γ produces differences in E of order as large as 102 mm year-1.

  2. Estimation of Daily Reference Evapotranspiration using Temperature Based Models and Remotely Sensed Data over Indian River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Shwetha H.; D, Nagesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Reference evapotranspiration (ETo) is the most significant component of the hydrological budget. Accurate quantification of ETo is vital for proper water management, efficient agricultural activities, irrigation planning and irrigation scheduling. FAO Penman Montieth (FAO-PM) is the widely accepted and used method for the ETo estimation under all climatic conditions, but needs numerous inputs which are difficult to acquire in developing countries. In such conditions, temperature based models such as Hargreaves-Samani (HS) equation and Penman Montieth temperature (PMT) can be used, where only maximum and minimum temperatures are required. Spatial interpolation of meteorological parameters to calculate spatial variation of ETo results in inaccurate estimations at lowly densed weather stations. Hence, there is a necessity of simple and easy method to estimate spatial distribution of ETo. In this regard, remotely sensed data provides viable alternative approach to obtain continuous spatio-temporal ETo. In this study, we used temperature based ETo models with remotely sensed LST data to estimate spatio-temporal variation of ETo. Day and night LST (MYD11A1) data of the year 2010 for the Cauvery basin on a daily basis were obtained from MODIS sensor of Aqua satellite. Firstly, day and night land surface temperatures (LST) with HS and PMT methods were applied to estimate ETo. Secondly, maximum and minimum air temperatures were estimated from day and night LST respectively using simple linear regression and these air temperature data were used to estimate ETo. Estimated results were validated with the ETo calculated using meteorological data obtained from Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) by applying standard FAO-PM. The preliminary results revealed that, HS method with LST overestimated ETo in the study region. Statistical analysis showed PMT method with both LST and air temperatures performed better than the HS method. These two temperature based methods are often used for

  3. Coupled Higgs field equation and Hamiltonian amplitude equation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various methods for obtaining exact travelling wave solutions to nonlinear equations, such as the homogeneous ... Once one has determined the symmetry group of a system of differential equations, a number of applications ... Here, we shall perform Lie symmetry analysis for the Higgs field equation. As u is a complex ...

  4. Coupled Higgs field equation and Hamiltonian amplitude equation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... involving parameters of the coupled Higgs equation and Hamiltonian amplitude equation using (′/)-expansion methodc, where = () satisfies a second-order linear ordinary differential equation (ODE). The travelling wave solutions expressed by hyperbolic, trigonometric and the rational functions are obtained.

  5. Plants Growth Rate in Evapotranspiration continuous system reactors as the 2nd Treatment at Anaerobic-evapotranspiration system with High Strength Ammonium in Leachate Influent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrus Zaman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium is one of parameter which responsible to leachate toxicity. Preliminary research was shown that the Fimbristylis globulosa (water plant, Alocasia macrorrhiza (terrestrial plant and Eleusine indica (terrestrial grass were potential plants for used as object in evaporation reactor system with high strength ammonium  concentration in leachate treatment. This research was integrated of anaerobic system with evapotranspiration system with continuous influent using ammonium concentration in leachate was 2000 mg/l NH4-N. Plants growth rate was analyzed for 25 days operated. The result shown that average of thallus growth rate of Fimbristylis globulosa was 17,5 cm d-1. The average of leaf and thallus growth rate of Alocasia macrorrhiza was 18,1 cm d-1 and 3,2 cm d-1 respectively. The average of blade and thallus of Eleusine indica were same that was 4,7 cm d-1.This research conclude that integration system of anaerobic and evpotranspiration was be potential used for high strength ammonium in leachate treatment.

  6. Evaluation of the Penman-Monteith (FAO 56 PM Method for Calculating Reference Evapotranspiration Using Limited Data: Application to the Wet Páramo of Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Córdova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Reference evapotranspiration (ETo is often calculated using the Penman-Monteith (FAO 56 PM; Allen et al 1998 method, which requires data on temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation. But in high-mountain environments, such as the Andean páramo, meteorological monitoring is limited and high-quality data are scarce. Therefore, the FAO 56 PM equation can be applied only through the use of an alternative method suggested by the same authors that substitutes estimates for missing data. This study evaluated whether the FAO 56 PM method for estimating missing data can be effectively used for páramo landscapes in the high Andes of southern Ecuador. Our investigation was based on data from 2 automatic weather stations at elevations of 3780 m and 3979 m. We found that using estimated wind speed data has no major effect on calculated ETo but that if solar radiation data are estimated, ETo calculations may be erroneous by as much as 24%; if relative humidity data are estimated, the error may be as high as 14%; and if all data except temperature are estimated, errors higher than 30% may result. Our study demonstrates the importance of using high-quality meteorological data for calculating ETo in the wet páramo landscapes of southern Ecuador.

  7. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Harold

    1997-01-01

    The subject matter, partial differential equations (PDEs), has a long history (dating from the 18th century) and an active contemporary phase. An early phase (with a separate focus on taut string vibrations and heat flow through solid bodies) stimulated developments of great importance for mathematical analysis, such as a wider concept of functions and integration and the existence of trigonometric or Fourier series representations. The direct relevance of PDEs to all manner of mathematical, physical and technical problems continues. This book presents a reasonably broad introductory account of the subject, with due regard for analytical detail, applications and historical matters.

  8. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, William

    1995-01-01

    Building on introductory calculus courses, this text provides a sound foundation in the underlying principles of ordinary differential equations. Important concepts, including uniqueness and existence theorems, are worked through in detail and the student is encouraged to develop much of the routine material themselves, thus helping to ensure a solid understanding of the fundamentals required.The wide use of exercises, problems and self-assessment questions helps to promote a deeper understanding of the material and it is developed in such a way that it lays the groundwork for further

  9. Elliptic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Elliptic Partial Differential Equations by Qing Han and FangHua Lin is one of the best textbooks I know. It is the perfect introduction to PDE. In 150 pages or so it covers an amazing amount of wonderful and extraordinary useful material. I have used it as a textbook at both graduate and undergraduate levels which is possible since it only requires very little background material yet it covers an enormous amount of material. In my opinion it is a must read for all interested in analysis and geometry, and for all of my own PhD students it is indeed just that. I cannot say enough good things abo

  10. Hyperbolic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Lax, Peter D

    2006-01-01

    The theory of hyperbolic equations is a large subject, and its applications are many: fluid dynamics and aerodynamics, the theory of elasticity, optics, electromagnetic waves, direct and inverse scattering, and the general theory of relativity. This book is an introduction to most facets of the theory and is an ideal text for a second-year graduate course on the subject. The first part deals with the basic theory: the relation of hyperbolicity to the finite propagation of signals, the concept and role of characteristic surfaces and rays, energy, and energy inequalities. The structure of soluti

  11. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloan, D; Süli, E

    2001-01-01

    /homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html7-Volume Set now available at special set price ! Over the second half of the 20th century the subject area loosely referred to as numerical analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs) has undergone unprecedented development. At its practical end, the vigorous growth and steady diversification of the field were stimulated by the demand for accurate and reliable tools for computational modelling in physical sciences and engineering, and by the rapid development of computer hardware and architecture. At the more theoretical end, the analytical insight in

  12. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  13. Análise de sensibilidade dos métodos de estimativa da evapotranspiração de referência e razão de Bowen em cultura da cana-de-açúcar Sensitivity analysis of methods for estimating reference evapotranspiration and sugarcane evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce K. N Silva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A técnica de análise de sensibilidade de modelos foi aplicada nos dados obtidos em experimento de campo conduzido no ano de 2009, na Destilaria Miriri, localizada no município de Capim, PB, e aos dados de evapotranspiração de referência (ETo, obtidos pela equação de Penman-Monteith (FAO/56, e da evapotranspiração da cultura da cana-de-açúcar (ETc, obtidos pelo balanço de energia com base na razão de Bowen. As análises de sensibilidade e de erros foram aplicadas ao método da razão de Bowen para os intervalos de medição de 15, 30, 60 e 120 minutos enquanto o método de Penman-Monteith foi aplicado para a escala diária durante o ano de 2009. Os resultados evidenciam que o saldo de radiação é a variável mais sensitiva no cálculo do balanço de energia, enquanto o fluxo de calor no solo oferece a menor contribuição; já os erros relativos de todas as variáveis envolvidas do cálculo balanço de energia baseado na razão de Bowen aumentaram significativamente com o aumento do intervalo de amostragem. A variável mais sensível na determinação da ETo pelo método de Penman-Monteith é o saldo de radiação seguida da umidade relativa, velocidade do vento a 2m de altura e a temperatura média do ar.The sensitivity analysis technique of models was applied to the data obtained from field experiment carried out during 2009 at Distillery Miriri, Capim, PB. This technique was applied to the reference evapotranspiration (ETo by Penman-Monteith (FAO/56 and the sugarcane evapotranspiration (ETc by energy balance equation based on Bowen ratio. The sensitivity analysis and errors were applied to the Bowen ratio method in measurement intervals of 15, 30, 60 and 120 min; however Penman-Monteith approach was applied on daily basis throughout the 2009 year. Results showed that the net radiation is the most sensitive variable in the energy equation balance and soil heat flux offers the lowest contribution. On the other hand, the relative

  14. Assessing the performance of two models on calculating maize actual evapotranspiration in a semi-humid and drought-prone region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Wang, J. L.; Zhao, C. X.; McGiffen, M. E.; Liu, J. B.; Wang, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    The two-step and one-step models for calculating evapotranspiration of maize were evaluated in a semi-humid and drought-prone region of northern China. Data were collected in the summers of 2013 and 2014 to determine relative model accuracy in calculating maize evaopotranspiration. The two-step model predicted daily evaoptranspiration with crop coefficients proposed by FAO and crop coefficient calibrated by local field data; the one-step model predicted daily evapotranspiration with coefficients derived by other researcher and coefficients calibrated by local field data. The predicted daily evapotranspiration in 2013 and 2014 growing seasons with the above two different models was both compared with the observed evapotranspiration with eddy covariance method. Furthermore, evapotranspiration in different growth stages of 2013 and 2014 maize growing seasons was predicted using the models with the local calibrated coefficients. The results indicated that calibration of models was necessary before using them to predict daily evapotranspiration. The model with the calibrated coefficients performed better with higher coefficient of determination and index of agreement and lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than before. And the two-step model better predicted daily evapotranspiration than the one-step model in our experimental field. Nevertheless, as to prediction ET of different growth stages, there still had some uncertainty when predicting evapotranspiration in different year. So the comparisons suggested that model prediction of crop evapotranspiration was practical, but requires calibration and validation with more data. Thus, considerable improvement is needed for these two models to be practical in predicting evapotranspiration for maize and other crops, more field data need to be measured, and an in-depth study still needs to be continued.

  15. Evaluating the role of evapotranspiration remote sensing data in improving hydrological modeling predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Matthew R.; Nejadhashemi, A. Pouyan; Abouali, Mohammad; Hernandez-Suarez, Juan Sebastian; Daneshvar, Fariborz; Zhang, Zhen; Anderson, Martha C.; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Hain, Christopher R.; Sharifi, Amirreza

    2018-01-01

    As the global demands for the use of freshwater resources continues to rise, it has become increasingly important to insure the sustainability of this resources. This is accomplished through the use of management strategies that often utilize monitoring and the use of hydrological models. However, monitoring at large scales is not feasible and therefore model applications are becoming challenging, especially when spatially distributed datasets, such as evapotranspiration, are needed to understand the model performances. Due to these limitations, most of the hydrological models are only calibrated for data obtained from site/point observations, such as streamflow. Therefore, the main focus of this paper is to examine whether the incorporation of remotely sensed and spatially distributed datasets can improve the overall performance of the model. In this study, actual evapotranspiration (ETa) data was obtained from the two different sets of satellite based remote sensing data. One dataset estimates ETa based on the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model while the other one estimates ETa based on the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model. The hydrological model used in this study is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which was calibrated against spatially distributed ETa and single point streamflow records for the Honeyoey Creek-Pine Creek Watershed, located in Michigan, USA. Two different techniques, multi-variable and genetic algorithm, were used to calibrate the SWAT model. Using the aforementioned datasets, the performance of the hydrological model in estimating ETa was improved using both calibration techniques by achieving Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) values >0.5 (0.73-0.85), percent bias (PBIAS) values within ±25% (±21.73%), and root mean squared error - observations standard deviation ratio (RSR) values model performance for estimating the streamflow (NSE: 0.32-0.52, PBIAS: ±32.73%, and RSR: 0.63-0.82). Meanwhile, using the

  16. Evapotranspiration and water use efficiency in maize-soybean crops in the US Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M. Z.; Hamilton, S. K.; Bhardwaj, A. K.; Basso, B.; Thelen, K.; Robertson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration from maize and soybean crops is an important component of terrestrial water balance in the US Midwest. In this study we examine water use in continuous maize (corn) vs. maize-soybean rotations, with cover crops planted in some years. From 2010-14, we continuously measured growing season evapotranspiration (ET) based on daily drawdown of soil moisture content using TDR (time-domain reflectometry) probes installed throughout the root zone. Treatments included continuous maize (CM), continuous maize with cover crops (CMC) and maize-soybean rotation with cover crops (MSC), all grown without irrigation in a temperate humid climate (Michigan, USA). Cover crops were planted in the autumn after harvest of the main crop and harvested in spring prior to planting of the next main crop during 2012-2013 (2013) and 2013-2014 (2014). Four study years (2010, 2011, 2013 and 2014) had normal growing season rainfall (568, 555, 445, and 472 mm) while 2012 was an extreme drought season with a growing-season rainfall deficit of ~50% (210 mm below average). Growing season ET in CM, CMC and MSC during years of normal rainfall averaged 517, 433, and 443 mm, respectively, compared to 455, 374 and 304 mm in the 2012 drought year. Cover crop ET was inconsequential to the subsequent main crops due to abundant rainfall in the spring periods; soils held as much water as they could at the transition from cover crops to main crops. Grain yield in years of normal rainfall for CM, CMC and MSC averaged 12.6, 8.4 and 7.8 Mg ha-1, respectively, compared to 4.9, 4.0, and 4.0 Mg ha-1 in the 2012 drought year. Maximum biomass in years of normal rainfall averaged 38, 30 and 21 Mg ha-1 compared to 19, 13, and 13 Mg ha-1 in the drought year. Water use efficiencies, defined as ratio of maximum standing-stock biomass to growing season evapotranspiration, were 74, 69, and 47 kg ha-1 mm-1 for CM, CMC and MSC in years of normal rainfall, while values in the drought year were 41, 34 and 46 kg ha

  17. Singularity: Raychaudhuri equation once again

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    quantum cosmology as obtained when Raychaudhuri discovered his celebrated equation. We thus need a new analogue of the Raychaudhuri equation in quantum gravity. Keywords. Cosmology; Raychaudhuri equation; Universe; quantum gravity; loop quan- tum gravity; loop quantum cosmology. PACS Nos 04.20.Jb; 04.2 ...

  18. Successfully Transitioning to Linear Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Connie; Smith, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSI 2010) asks students in as early as fourth grade to solve word problems using equations with variables. Equations studied at this level generate a single solution, such as the equation x + 10 = 25. For students in fifth grade, the Common Core standard for algebraic thinking expects them to…

  19. Solution of Finite Element Equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    An important step in solving any problem by the finite element method is the solution of the global equations. Numerical solution of linear equations is a subject covered in most courses in numerical analysis. However, the equations encountered in most finite element applications have some special...

  20. Daily Landsat-scale evapotranspiration estimation over a forested landscape in North Carolina, USA, using multi-satellite data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun Yang; Martha C. Anderson; Feng Gao; Christopher R. Hain; Kathryn A. Semmens; William P. Kustas; Asko Noormets; Randolph H. Wynne; Valerie A. Thomas; Ge Sun

    2017-01-01

    As a primary flux in the global water cycle, evapotranspiration (ET) connects hydrologic and biological processes and is directly affected by water and land management, land use change and climate variability. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective means for diagnosing ET patterns over heterogeneous landscapes; however, limitations on the spatial and temporal...

  1. Estimating daily Landsat-scale evapotranspiration over a managed pine plantation in North Carolina, USA using a data fusion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a primary flux in the global water cycle, evapotranspiration (ET) connects hydrologic and biological processes and is directly affected by water management, land use change and climate change. The two source energy balance (TSEB) model has been widely applied to quantify field scale ET using sate...

  2. Monthly land cover-specific evapotranspiration models derived from global eddy flux measurements and remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan Fang; Ge Sun; Peter Caldwell; Steven G. McNulty; Asko Noormets; Jean-Christophe Domec; John King; Zhiqiang Zhang; Xudong Zhang; Guanghui Lin; Guangsheng Zhou; Jingfeng Xiao; Jiquan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is arguably the most uncertain ecohydrologic variable for quantifying watershed water budgets. Although numerous ET and hydrological models exist, accurately predicting the effects of global change on water use and availability remains challenging because of model deficiency and/or a lack of input parameters. The objective of this study was to...

  3. Effects of invasive insects and fire on energy exchange and evapotranspiration in the New Jersey pine lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Clark; Nicholas Skowronski; Michael Gallagher; Hedi Renninger; Karina. Schafer

    2012-01-01

    We used eddy covariance and meteorological measurements to quantify energy exchange and evapotranspiration (Et) in three representative upland forest stands in the New Jersey Pinelands that were either defoliated by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) or burned in prescribed fires during the study period. Latent (λE) and sensible heat (H)...

  4. Response of evapotranspiration to changes in land use and land cover and climate in China during 2001–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gen Li; Fangmin Zhang; Yuanshu Jing; Yibo Liu; Ge Sun

    2017-01-01

    Land surface evapotranspiration (ET) is a central component of the Earth's global energy balance and water cycle. Understanding ET is important in quantifying the impacts of human influences on the hydrological cycle and thus helps improving water use efficiency and strengthening water use planning and watershed management. China has experienced tremendous land...

  5. Thermal and visible remote sensing for estimation of evapotranspiration of rainfed agrosystems and its impact on groundwater in SE Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Rakhshan; Webb, John A.

    2016-05-01

    Rainfed agrosystems are important components of the world's food production system and account for 65-95% of total agriculture. In contrast to irrigated production systems, relatively little attention has been paid to understanding the hydrological interactions between the components of rainfed agrosystems and their impact on water resources, especially groundwater. A new model, the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Rainfed Agriculture (SEBARA), has been developed to estimate the spatial pattern of evapotranspiration in these agrosystems using satellite images (thermal, infrared and visible spectra). The model was calibrated for two competing land uses (Eucalyptus globules tree plantations and pastures) in adjacent catchments in western Victoria, southeastern Australia. Using measurements from a flux tower in the pasture catchment and adjusted sapflow measurements in the plantation catchment, an estimation accuracy of 95% was achieved. The tree plantations had higher available net radiation, lower soil heat flux and higher latent heat flux, resulting in 15-20% higher evapotranspirative demand than the pasture, depending upon the age and canopy of plantations. The evapotranspiration rate of plantations declines where groundwater depth is >12m or where shallow groundwater is saline. The shallow root system of the pasture means that it relies solely on soil moisture to meet its water requirements and thus has lower evapotranspiration, which varies according to the pasture species.

  6. Trend analysis and forecast of precipitation, reference evapotranspiration and rainfall deficit in the Blackland Prairie of eastern Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend analysis and estimation of monthly and annual precipitation, reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and rainfall deficit are essential for water resources management and cropping system design. Rainfall, ETo, and water deficit patterns and trends in eastern Mississippi USA for a 120-year period (1...

  7. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, G.W.; Ho, A.; Kim, P.J.; Kim, Sang Yun

    2016-01-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to

  8. Evapotranspiration and land surface process responses to afforestation in western Taiwan: A comparison between dry and wet weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Liu; L.B. Zhang; L. Hao; Ge Sun; S.-C. Liu

    2016-01-01

    An afforestation project was initiated in the western plain of Taiwan to convert abandoned farming lands into forests to improve the ecological and environmental conditions. This study was conducted to understand the potential impacts of this land cover change on evapotranspiration (ET) and other land surface processes and the...

  9. Assessing actual evapotranspiration via surface energy balance aiming to optimize water and energy consumption in large scale pressurized irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Maltese, A.; Moreno Hidalgo, M. A.; Provenzano, G.; Còrcoles, J. I.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite imagery provides a dependable basis for computational models that aimed to determine actual evapotranspiration (ET) by surface energy balance. Satellite-based models enables quantifying ET over large areas for a wide range of applications, such as monitoring water distribution, managing irrigation and assessing irrigation systems' performance. With the aim to evaluate the energy and water consumption of a large scale on-turn pressurized irrigation system in the district of Aguas Nuevas, Albacete, Spain, the satellite-based image-processing model SEBAL was used for calculating actual ET. The model has been applied to quantify instantaneous, daily, and seasonal actual ET over high- resolution Landsat images for the peak water demand season (May to September) and for the years 2006 - 2008. The model provided a direct estimation of the distribution of main energy fluxes, at the instant when the satellite overpassed over each field of the district. The image acquisition day Evapotranspiration (ET24) was obtained from instantaneous values by assuming a constant evaporative fraction (Λ) for the entire day of acquisition; then, monthly and seasonal ET were estimated from the daily evapotranspiration (ETdaily) assuming that ET24 varies in proportion to reference ET (ETr) at the meteorological station, thus accounting for day to day variation in meteorological forcing. The comparison between the hydrants water consumption and the actual evapotranspiration, considering an irrigation efficiency of 85%, showed that a considerable amount of water and energy can be saved at district level.

  10. Spatially distributed evapotranspiration estimation using remote sensing and ground-based radiometers over cotton at Maricopa, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatially distributed estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over agricultural lands could be valuable for water management in arid environments and for monitoring irrigated croplands. In recent year various ET estimation approaches have been developed that utilize remote sense data to provide the nee...

  11. Calibration of a large-scale hydrological model using satellite-based soil moisture and evapotranspiration products

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, Patricia; Sutanudjaja, Edwin H.; Schellekens, Jaap; Sterk, Geert; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-06-01

    A considerable number of river basins around the world lack sufficient ground observations of hydro-meteorological data for effective water resources assessment and management. Several approaches can be developed to increase the quality and availability of data in these poorly gauged or ungauged river basins; among them, the use of Earth observations products has recently become promising. Earth observations of various environmental variables can be used potentially to increase knowledge about the hydrological processes in the basin and to improve streamflow model estimates, via assimilation or calibration. The present study aims to calibrate the large-scale hydrological model PCRaster GLOBal Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB) using satellite-based products of evapotranspiration and soil moisture for the Moroccan Oum er Rbia River basin. Daily simulations at a spatial resolution of 5 × 5 arcmin are performed with varying parameters values for the 32-year period 1979-2010. Five different calibration scenarios are inter-compared: (i) reference scenario using the hydrological model with the standard parameterization, (ii) calibration using in situ-observed discharge time series, (iii) calibration using the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) actual evapotranspiration time series, (iv) calibration using ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) surface soil moisture time series and (v) step-wise calibration using GLEAM actual evapotranspiration and ESA CCI surface soil moisture time series. The impact on discharge estimates of precipitation in comparison with model parameters calibration is investigated using three global precipitation products, including ERA-Interim (EI), WATCH Forcing methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis data (WFDEI) and Multi-Source Weighted-Ensemble Precipitation data by merging gauge, satellite and reanalysis data (MSWEP). Results show that GLEAM evapotranspiration and ESA CCI soil moisture may be used for model calibration resulting in

  12. Discovering evolution equations with applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKibben, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Most existing books on evolution equations tend either to cover a particular class of equations in too much depth for beginners or focus on a very specific research direction. Thus, the field can be daunting for newcomers to the field who need access to preliminary material and behind-the-scenes detail. Taking an applications-oriented, conversational approach, Discovering Evolution Equations with Applications: Volume 2-Stochastic Equations provides an introductory understanding of stochastic evolution equations. The text begins with hands-on introductions to the essentials of real and stochast

  13. Comparing Landsat-7 ETM+ and ASTER Imageries to Estimate Daily Evapotranspiration Within a Mediterranean Vineyard Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Carlo; Jacob, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    We compared the capabilities of Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imageries for mapping daily evapotranspiration (ET) within a Mediterranean vineyard watershed. We used Landsat and ASTER data simultaneously collected on four dates in 2007 and 2008, along with the simplified surface energy balance index (S-SEBI) model. We used previously ground-validated good quality ASTER estimates as reference, and we analyzed the differences with Landsat retrievals in light of the instrumental factors and methodology. Although Landsat and ASTER retrievals of S-SEBI inputs were different, estimates of daily ET from the two imageries were similar. This is ascribed to the S-SEBI spatial differencing in temperature, and opens the path for using historical Landsat time series over vineyards.

  14. Vegetation Greening and Climate Change Promote Multidecadal Rises of Global Land Evapotranspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Kimball, John S; Nemani, Ramakrishna R; Running, Steven W; Hong, Yang; Gourley, Jonathan J; Yu, Zhongbo

    2015-10-30

    Recent studies showed that anomalous dry conditions and limited moisture supply roughly between 1998 and 2008, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, led to reduced vegetation productivity and ceased growth in land evapotranspiration (ET). However, natural variability of Earth's climate system can degrade capabilities for identifying climate trends. Here we produced a long-term (1982-2013) remote sensing based land ET record and investigated multidecadal changes in global ET and underlying causes. The ET record shows a significant upward global trend of 0.88 mm yr(-2) (P Continuation of these trends will likely exacerbate regional drought-induced disturbances, especially during regional dry climate phases associated with strong El Niño events.

  15. Direct measurement of evapotranspiration from a forest using a superconducting gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, Michel; Viron, Olivier; Pajot-Métivier, Gwendoline; Casenave, Fabien; Watlet, Arnaud; Dassargues, Alain; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2016-10-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) controls the flux between the land surface and the atmosphere. Assessing the ET ecosystems remains a key challenge in hydrology. We have found that the ET water mass loss can be directly inferred from continuous gravity measurements: as water evaporates and transpires from terrestrial ecosystems, the mass distribution of water decreases, changing the gravity field. Using continuous superconducting gravity measurements, we were able to identify daily gravity changes at the level of, or smaller than, 10-9 nm s-2 (or 10-10 g) per day. This corresponds to 1.7 mm of water over an area of 50 ha. The strength of this method is its ability to enable a direct, traceable and continuous monitoring of actual ET for years at the mesoscale with a high accuracy.

  16. Global Ecosystem Response Types Derived from the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index and FPAR3g Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivits, Eva; Horion, Stéphanie Marie Anne F; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    -temporal patterns in time-series of Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) and FPAR3g anomalies (1982–2011) by using an extended Principal Component Analysis. The ERTs represent region specific spatio-temporal patterns of ecosystems responding to drought or ecosystems with decreasing severity...... in drought events as well as ecosystems where drought was not a dominant factor in a 30-year period. Highest explanatory values in the SPEI12-FPAR3g anomalies and strongest SPEI12-FPAR3g correlations were seen in the ERTs of Australia and South America whereas lowest explanatory value and lowest correlations......Observing trends in global ecosystem dynamics is an important first step, but attributing these trends to climate variability represents a further step in understanding Earth system changes. In the present study, we classified global Ecosystem Response Types (ERTs) based on common spatio...

  17. Monitoring the variations of evapotranspiration due to land use/cover change in a semiarid shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tingting; Lei, Huimin; Yang, Dawen; Jiao, Yang; Yang, Hanbo

    2017-02-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important process in the hydrological cycle, and vegetation change is a primary factor that affects ET. In this study, we analyzed the annual and inter-annual characteristics of ET using continuous observation data from eddy covariance (EC) measurement over 4 years (1 July 2011 to 30 June 2015) in a semiarid shrubland of Mu Us Sandy Land, China. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was demonstrated as the predominant factor that influences the seasonal variations in ET. Additionally, during the land degradation and vegetation rehabilitation processes, ET and normalized ET both increased due to the integrated effects of the changes in vegetation type, topography, and soil surface characteristics. This study could improve our understanding of the effects of land use/cover change on ET in the fragile ecosystem of semiarid regions and provide a scientific reference for the sustainable management of regional land and water resources.

  18. Effects of Spatial Heterogeneity in Rainfall and Vegetation Type on Soil Moisture and Evapotranspiration

    CERN Document Server

    Puma, Michael J; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Nordbotten, Jan M; Guswa, Andrew J; Kavetski, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear plant-scale interactions controlling the soil-water balance are generally not valid at larger spatial scales due to spatial heterogeneity in rainfall and vegetation type. The relationships between spatially averaged variables are hysteretic even when unique relationships are imposed at the plant scale. The characteristics of these hysteretic relationships depend on the size of the averaging area and the spatial properties of the soil, vegetation, and rainfall. We upscale the plant-scale relationships to the scale of a regional land-surface model based on simulation data obtained through explicit representation of spatial heterogeneity in rainfall and vegetation type. The proposed upscaled function improves predictions of spatially averaged soil moisture and evapotranspiration relative to the effective-parameter approach for a water-limited Texas shrubland. The degree of improvement is a function of the scales of heterogeneity and the size of the averaging area. We also find that single-valued functi...

  19. Modeling landscape evapotranspiration by integrating land surface phenology and a water balance algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Gabriel B.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an improved modeling technique called Vegetation ET (VegET) that integrates commonly used water balance algorithms with remotely sensed Land Surface Phenology (LSP) parameter to conduct operational vegetation water balance modeling of rainfed systems at the LSP’s spatial scale using readily available global data sets. Evaluation of the VegET model was conducted using Flux Tower data and two-year simulation for the conterminous US. The VegET model is capable of estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) of rainfed crops and other vegetation types at the spatial resolution of the LSP on a daily basis, replacing the need to estimate crop- and region-specific crop coefficients.

  20. Use of Willows in Evapotranspirative Systems for Onsite Wastewater Management – Theory and Experiences from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Hans; Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    of the nutrients can be recycled via the plant biomass, and the harvested biomass can serve as a source of bio-energy. In Denmark more than 500 ET systems planted with willows are in operation. The systems generally consist of a 1.5 m deep high-density polyethylene-lined basin filled with soil and planted...... dimensioning parameter. Settled sewage is dispersed underground into the bed under pressure. The stems of the willows are harvested on a regular basis to stimulate the growth of the willows and to remove some nutrients and heavy metals. In this paper, the theory behind the operation of willow based ET systems......Evapotranspiration (ET) is a method of onsite wastewater treatment and disposal that is an alternative to conventional soil absorption systems, particularly for sites where protecting surface water and ground water is essential or where soil infiltration is not possible. One of the most important...