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  1. A single blind randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy in a help-seeking population with an At Risk Mental State for psychosis: the Dutch Early Detection and Intervention Evaluation (EDIE-NL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delespaul Philippe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychotic disorders are a serious mental health problem. Intervention before the onset of psychosis might result in delaying the onset, reducing the impact or even preventing the first episode of psychosis. This study explores the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT in targeting cognitive biases that are involved in the formation of delusions in persons with an ultra-high risk for developing psychosis. A single blind randomised controlled trial compares CBT with treatment as usual in preventing or delaying the onset of psychosis. Method/design All help seeking patients aged 14 to 35 years referred to the mental health services in three regions in the Netherlands are pre-screened with the Prodromal Questionnaire during a period of two years. Patients with a score of 18 or more on the sub-clinical positive symptoms items (45 items in total will be assessed with the Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental State (CAARMS. In a different pathway to care model all referrals from the mental health services in Amsterdam to the specialized psychosis clinic of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam are also assessed with the CAARMS. The primary outcome is the transition rate to psychosis according to the CAARMS-criteria. Group differences will be analysed with chi-square tests and survival analyses. Discussion CBT is a highly tolerated treatment. The psycho-educational CBT approach may prove to be a successful strategy since most people with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS are distressed by odd disturbing experiences. Giving explanations for and normalising these experiences may reduce the arousal (distress and therefore may prevent people from developing a catastrophic delusional explanation for their odd experiences and thus prevent them from developing psychosis. Screening the entire help-seeking population referred to community mental health services with a two-stage strategy, as compared with traditional referral

  2. A single blind randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy in a help-seeking population with an At Risk Mental State for psychosis: the Dutch Early Detection and Intervention Evaluation (EDIE-NL) trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietdijk, J.; Dragt, S.; Klaassen, R.; Ising, H; Nieman, D.; Wunderink, L.; Delespaul, P.; Cuijpers, P.; Linszen, D.; van der Gaag, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Psychotic disorders are a serious mental health problem. Intervention before the onset of psychosis might result in delaying the onset, reducing the impact or even preventing the first episode of psychosis. This study explores the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in

  3. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  4. Evaluating biomarkers for prognostic enrichment of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kathleen F; Roth, Jeremy; Zhu, Kehao; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Meisner, Allison; Wilson, Francis Perry; Coca, Steven; Parikh, Chirag R

    2017-12-01

    A potential use of biomarkers is to assist in prognostic enrichment of clinical trials, where only patients at relatively higher risk for an outcome of interest are eligible for the trial. We investigated methods for evaluating biomarkers for prognostic enrichment. We identified five key considerations when considering a biomarker and a screening threshold for prognostic enrichment: (1) clinical trial sample size, (2) calendar time to enroll the trial, (3) total patient screening costs and the total per-patient trial costs, (4) generalizability of trial results, and (5) ethical evaluation of trial eligibility criteria. Items (1)-(3) are amenable to quantitative analysis. We developed the Biomarker Prognostic Enrichment Tool for evaluating biomarkers for prognostic enrichment at varying levels of screening stringency. We demonstrate that both modestly prognostic and strongly prognostic biomarkers can improve trial metrics using Biomarker Prognostic Enrichment Tool. Biomarker Prognostic Enrichment Tool is available as a webtool at http://prognosticenrichment.com and as a package for the R statistical computing platform. In some clinical settings, even biomarkers with modest prognostic performance can be useful for prognostic enrichment. In addition to the quantitative analysis provided by Biomarker Prognostic Enrichment Tool, investigators must consider the generalizability of trial results and evaluate the ethics of trial eligibility criteria.

  5. WP6 - Application Integration, Trials and Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Neeli R.; Cetin, Bilge Kartal; Moran, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    middleware platform during their trials. The pilots aim to cover different business sectors, scenarios and applications related to RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems, thus giving a diverse set of outcomes that will be able to provide a better perspective on how ASPIRE will help in the reduction...... of the Total cost of ownership (TCO) associated to RFID systems as well as to confirm the ease of implementation of ASPIRE open source software (OSS) components into current IT SME infrastructure.The different pilot trials described in this deliverable are the following: • A Logistics pilot for the packing...

  6. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  7. Cross-System Evaluation of Clinical Trial Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Silis Y.; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities. PMID:25954590

  8. Cross-system evaluation of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Silis Y; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities.

  9. Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    vaccines against Ebola virus disease, with a focus on those that are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. INTRODUCTION Filoviruses (the...Crucell Holland B.V. developed the Ad26-vectored EVD vaccine Ad26.ZEBOV based on extensive experience testing Ad26 and Ad35 vectors for malaria and...a vector in the development of vaccines against many diseases, including malaria , hepatitis C, influenza, and, of course, filovirus diseases

  10. Exercise on prescription: trial protocol and evaluation of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jes B; Kragstrup, Jakob; Kjaer, Kirsten; Puggaard, Lis

    2007-03-02

    In many countries exercise prescriptions are used in an attempt to initiate a physically active lifestyle in sedentary populations. Previous studies have primarily evaluated low intensive exercise prescription interventions and found moderately positive effects on physical activity and aerobic fitness. In a highly intensive Danish exercise prescription scheme called 'Exercise on Prescription' (EoP) the general practitioners can prescribe EoP to sedentary patients with lifestyle diseases. The aim of this randomized trial is to assess the short- and long-term effects of the EoP scheme. Thus, the aim of this paper is to describe the randomized controlled trial designed for evaluating effectiveness of EoP, and to present results from validations of outcome measures. EoP involves a 16-week supervised training intervention and five counselling sessions (health profiles). All patients referred to EoP were eligible for the trial and were offered participation during the baseline health profile. Comparisons between the EoP group and the control group were made at baseline, and after four and ten months. Physiological measures used were maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), bodyweight, and BMI. Patient-reported measures used were physical activity, health-related quality of life, amount and intensity of exercise, compliance with national guidelines for physical activity, and physical fitness. The validation of the cycle ergometer test found a strong correlation between maximal work capacity and VO2max, and acceptable test-retest reliability at group level. Calibration of the HbA1c apparatus was stable over ten weeks with minimal use, and test-retest reliability was good. High agreement percents were found for test-retest reliability for the self-administered questionnaire. The trial is designed to provide information about the effectiveness of the EoP scheme. The trial is part of a health technology assessment of EoP, which besides the

  11. Exercise on Prescription: trial protocol and evaluation of outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puggaard Lis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries exercise prescriptions are used in an attempt to initiate a physically active lifestyle in sedentary populations. Previous studies have primarily evaluated low intensive exercise prescription interventions and found moderately positive effects on physical activity and aerobic fitness. In a highly intensive Danish exercise prescription scheme called 'Exercise on Prescription' (EoP the general practitioners can prescribe EoP to sedentary patients with lifestyle diseases. The aim of this randomized trial is to assess the short- and long-term effects of the EoP scheme. Thus, the aim of this paper is to describe the randomized controlled trial designed for evaluating effectiveness of EoP, and to present results from validations of outcome measures. Methods/Design EoP involves a 16-week supervised training intervention and five counselling sessions (health profiles. All patients referred to EoP were eligible for the trial and were offered participation during the baseline health profile. Comparisons between the EoP group and the control group were made at baseline, and after four and ten months. Physiological measures used were maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, bodyweight, and BMI. Patient-reported measures used were physical activity, health-related quality of life, amount and intensity of exercise, compliance with national guidelines for physical activity, and physical fitness. The validation of the cycle ergometer test found a strong correlation between maximal work capacity and VO2max, and acceptable test-retest reliability at group level. Calibration of the HbA1c apparatus was stable over ten weeks with minimal use, and test-retest reliability was good. High agreement percents were found for test-retest reliability for the self-administered questionnaire. Discussion The trial is designed to provide information about the effectiveness of the EoP scheme. The trial is part of a

  12. Family presence during brain death evaluation: a randomized controlled trial*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Isaac; Brown, Lawrence H; Comfort, David; Crandall, Cameron S; West, Sonlee D; Rollstin, Amber D; Dettmer, Todd S; Malkoff, Marc D; Marinaro, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate if a family presence educational intervention during brain death evaluation improves understanding of brain death without affecting psychological distress. Randomized controlled trial. Four ICUs at an academic tertiary care center. Immediate family members of patients suspected to have suffered brain death. Subjects were group randomized to presence or absence at bedside throughout the brain death evaluation with a trained chaperone. All randomized subjects were administered a validated "understanding brain death" survey before and after the intervention. Subjects were assessed for psychological well-being between 30 and 90 days after the intervention. Follow-up assessment of psychological well-being was performed using the Impact of Event Scale and General Health Questionnaire. Brain death understanding, Impact of Event Scale, and General Health Questionnaire scores were analyzed using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests. Analyses were adjusted for within family correlation. Fifty-eight family members of 17 patients undergoing brain death evaluation were enrolled: 38 family members were present for 11 brain death evaluations and 20 family members were absent for six brain death evaluations. Baseline understanding scores were similar between groups (median 3.0 [presence group] vs 2.5 [control], p = 0.482). Scores increased by a median of 2 (interquartile range, 1-2) if present versus 0 (interquartile range, 0-0) if absent (p Family presence during brain death evaluation improves understanding of brain death with no apparent adverse impact on psychological well-being. Family presence during brain death evaluation is feasible and safe.

  13. An R package for simulation experiments evaluating clinical trial designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Day, Roger

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents an open-source application for evaluating competing clinical trial (CT) designs using simulations. The S4 system of classes and methods is utilized. Using object-oriented programming provides extensibility through careful, clear interface specification; using R, an open-source widely-used statistical language, makes the application extendible by the people who design CTs: biostatisticians. Four key classes define the specifications of the population models, CT designs, outcome models and evaluation criteria. Five key methods define the interfaces for generating patient baseline characteristics, stopping rule, assigning treatment, generating patient outcomes and calculating the criteria. Documentation of their connections with the user input screens, with the central simulation loop, and with each other faciliates the extensibility. New subclasses and instances of existing classes meeting these interfaces can integrate immediately into the application. To illustrate the application, we evaluate the effect of patient pharmacokinetic heterogeneity on the performance of a common Phase I "3+3" design.

  14. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial evaluating three implementation interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation research is concerned with bridging the gap between evidence and practice through the study of methods to promote the uptake of research into routine practice. Good quality evidence has been summarised into guideline recommendations to show that peri-operative fasting times could be considerably shorter than patients currently experience. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three strategies for the implementation of recommendations about peri-operative fasting. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised trial underpinned by the PARIHS framework was conducted during 2006 to 2009 with a national sample of UK hospitals using time series with mixed methods process evaluation and cost analysis. Hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions: standard dissemination (SD of a guideline package, SD plus a web-based resource championed by an opinion leader, and SD plus plan-do-study-act (PDSA. The primary outcome was duration of fluid fast prior to induction of anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes included duration of food fast, patients’ experiences, and stakeholders’ experiences of implementation, including influences. ANOVA was used to test differences over time and interventions. Results Nineteen acute NHS hospitals participated. Across timepoints, 3,505 duration of fasting observations were recorded. No significant effect of the interventions was observed for either fluid or food fasting times. The effect size was 0.33 for the web-based intervention compared to SD alone for the change in fluid fasting and was 0.12 for PDSA compared to SD alone. The process evaluation showed different types of impact, including changes to practices, policies, and attitudes. A rich picture of the implementation challenges emerged, including inter-professional tensions and a lack of clarity for decision-making authority and responsibility. Conclusions This was a large, complex study and one of the first

  15. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial evaluating three implementation interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Implementation research is concerned with bridging the gap between evidence and practice through the study of methods to promote the uptake of research into routine practice. Good quality evidence has been summarised into guideline recommendations to show that peri-operative fasting times could be considerably shorter than patients currently experience. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three strategies for the implementation of recommendations about peri-operative fasting. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised trial underpinned by the PARIHS framework was conducted during 2006 to 2009 with a national sample of UK hospitals using time series with mixed methods process evaluation and cost analysis. Hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions: standard dissemination (SD) of a guideline package, SD plus a web-based resource championed by an opinion leader, and SD plus plan-do-study-act (PDSA). The primary outcome was duration of fluid fast prior to induction of anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes included duration of food fast, patients’ experiences, and stakeholders’ experiences of implementation, including influences. ANOVA was used to test differences over time and interventions. Results Nineteen acute NHS hospitals participated. Across timepoints, 3,505 duration of fasting observations were recorded. No significant effect of the interventions was observed for either fluid or food fasting times. The effect size was 0.33 for the web-based intervention compared to SD alone for the change in fluid fasting and was 0.12 for PDSA compared to SD alone. The process evaluation showed different types of impact, including changes to practices, policies, and attitudes. A rich picture of the implementation challenges emerged, including inter-professional tensions and a lack of clarity for decision-making authority and responsibility. Conclusions This was a large, complex study and one of the first national randomised

  16. [LAPTOP trial--results of an health economics evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippel, F-W

    2008-08-01

    Based on the LAPTOP trial, a cost and a benefit assessment were undertaken. The cost analysis was performed as a desk-top evaluation using the cost minimization method. The benefit assessment was done as a simulation using the diabetes mellitus model (DMM). In each analysis either cost or benefit of treating diabetes mellitus with oral antidiabetic drug(s) supported by insulin glargine were compared to those with conventional insulin treatment using premixed insulin twice daily. The cost benefit analysis demonstrated that treatment with insulin glargine plus oral antidiabetics was less expensive than the conventional insulin treatment with premixed insulin. Furthermore, avoidance of diabetic complications was better with insulin glargine plus oral antidiabetics than with premixed insulin alone.

  17. Evaluation of cluster-randomized trials on maternal and child health research in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sen, Pranab Kumar

    2009-01-01

    evaluated in the eligible trials. RESULTS: Thirty-five eligible trials were identified. The majority of them were conducted in Asia, used community as randomization unit, and had less than 10,000 participants. To minimize confounding, 23 of the 35 trials had stratified, blocked, or paired the clusters...... before they were randomized, while 17 had adjusted for confounding in the analysis. Ten of the 35 trials did not account for clustering in sample size calculations, and seven did not account for the cluster-randomized design in the analysis. The number of cluster-randomized trials increased over time......To summarize and evaluate all publications including cluster-randomized trials used for maternal and child health research in developing countries during the last 10 years. METHODS: All cluster-randomized trials published between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and those that met our criteria...

  18. Meta-analysis of trials evaluating parenteral antimicrobial therapy for skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, Rebecca J; Husted, Thomas L; Hebbeler-Clark, Renee S; Solomkin, Joseph S

    2010-04-15

    Many trials have been carried out to determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents in treating skin and soft tissue infections. The results of these studies are often utilized to make determinations about the use of these antimicrobials against other types of infections. Despite the importance of these trials in determining clinical care, we hypothesized that many of these studies failed to include a variety of infections of significant enough severity to effectively draw objective conclusions about antimicrobial efficacy. We conducted a modified PubMed search to identify studies of antimicrobial agents in treating soft tissue infections that were published from 1998 through 2008. We then evaluated these trials for specific recommended study criteria, which were based on published US Food and Drug Administration guidelines for the conduct of trials of antimicrobials for soft tissue infection. Seventeen studies were identified for inclusion in the trial. Upon review, only 30% of trials required both local and systemic signs of infection for inclusion in the trial. One trial stratified results on the basis of operative intervention, less than half reported patient comorbidities, and only 53% provided a specific definition for "cure." Our meta-analysis of current trials evaluating antimicrobial therapy for skin and soft tissue infections revealed substantial shortcomings in the design of most of these trials. These data provide evidence for the importance of designing specialist panels to objectively evaluate studies and photographs of included infections to ensure that conclusions drawn from these trials concerning clinical practice are justified.

  19. Evaluating the Generalisability of Trial Results: Introducing a Centre- and Trial-Level Generalisability Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Adrian; Roberts, Tracy; Hemming, Karla; Calvert, Melanie

    2015-11-01

    Few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) recruit centres representatively, which may limit the external validity of trial results. The aim of this study was to propose a proof-of-concept method of assessing the generalisability of the clinical and cost-effectiveness findings of a given RCT. We developed a generalisability index (Gix), informed by centre-level characteristics, as a measure of centre and trial representativeness. The centre-level Gix quantifies how representative a centre is in relation to its jurisdiction, e.g. a country or health authority. The trial-level Gix quantifies how representative trial recruitment is in relation to clinical practice in the jurisdiction. Taking a real-world RCT as a case study and assuming trial-wide results to represent 'true jurisdiction values', we used simulation methods to recreate 5000 RCTs and investigate the relationship between trial representativeness, reflected by the standardised trial-Gix, and the deviation of simulated trial results from the 'true values'. The simulation study provides evidence that trial results (odds ratio for the primary outcome and incremental quality-adjusted life-years) were influenced by the representativeness of the sample of recruiting centres. Simulated RCTs with the closest results to the 'true values' were those whose recruitment closely mirrored the jurisdiction-wide context. Results appeared robust to six alternative specifications of the Gix. Our findings suggest that an unrepresentative selection of centres limits the external validity of trial results. The Gix may be a valuable tool to help facilitate rational selection of trial centres and ensure the generalisability of results at the jurisdiction level.

  20. r guidelines for the preclinical evaluation and clinical trials in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    154512;4. This short and concise book, compiled by leading authorities and researchers in the field, recommends guidelines for the design of research trials relating to bone and mineral metabolism. The type of trials covered range" from preclirucal ...

  1. Design, history and results of the Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Punthakee, Z; Bosch, J; Dagenais, G

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/OBJECTIVE: Conflicting data regarding cardiovascular effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D supported the need for a definitive trial. The Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) trial aimed to assess the effects of TZDs (rosiglit......AIMS/OBJECTIVE: Conflicting data regarding cardiovascular effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D supported the need for a definitive trial. The Thiazolidinedione Intervention with vitamin D Evaluation (TIDE) trial aimed to assess the effects of TZDs...

  2. Evaluation of a Japanese Language Trial Lesson Using FishWatchr

    OpenAIRE

    NISHITANI, Mari; IWASAKI, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    FishWatchr (FW) was developed as a discussion and observation support tool, incorporating functions of easy annotation and ability to visually access results. In this study, an experimental lesson was conducted by using FW for Japanese language trial lesson evaluation. Results showed that FW evaluation was perceived to be more beneficial than paper evaluation and evaluators took a learner perspective in paper evaluations, but took a teacher’s perspective in FW evaluations when evaluating the ...

  3. Window-of-opportunity trials to evaluate clinical activity of new molecular entities in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimelius, B; Lahn, M

    2011-08-01

    The introduction of molecular targeted agents (e.g., monoclonal antibodies or kinase inhibitors) and cancer vaccines has raised the question whether alternate clinical trial designs, including window trials, are better suited to evaluate such new molecular entities (NMEs) and improve their approval rates. In window trials, patients receive an NME for a window of time before starting standard treatment allowing the evaluation of an NME in tumors unperturbed by previous therapies. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify window trials in adult and pediatric oncology. Twenty-nine window trials were identified and reviewed, 13 in pediatric and 16 in adult oncology. Most of the trials (20/29) tested cytotoxics known to have activity in other clinical situations. In contrast to trials with pretreated patients, the window trials established the antitumor activity of melphalan, topotecan, epirubicin and etoposide in untreated patients with rhabdomyosarcoma or small-cell lung cancer. In window trials with ineffective or modestly active NMEs, we found no indication of a significant negative effect on overall survival for participating patients. Provided close safety monitoring and careful patient selection, window trials are a safe option to investigate potential clinical activity of NMEs.

  4. Evaluating the design and reporting of pragmatic trials in osteoarthritis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shabana Amanda; Kloseck, Marita; Lee, Karen; Walsh, Kathleen Ellen; MacDermid, Joy C; Fitzsimmons, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    Among the challenges in health research is translating interventions from controlled experimental settings to clinical and community settings where chronic disease is managed daily. Pragmatic trials offer a method for testing interventions in real-world settings but are seldom used in OA research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the literature on pragmatic trials in OA research up to August 2016 in order to identify strengths and weaknesses in the design and reporting of these trials. We used established guidelines to assess the degree to which 61 OA studies complied with pragmatic trial design and reporting. We assessed design according to the pragmatic-explanatory continuum indicator summary and reporting according to the pragmatic trials extension of the CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines. None of the pragmatic trials met all 11 criteria evaluated and most of the trials met between 5 and 8 of the criteria. Criteria most often unmet pertained to practitioner expertise (by requiring specialists) and criteria most often met pertained to primary outcome analysis (by using intention-to-treat analysis). Our results suggest a lack of highly pragmatic trials in OA research. We identify this as a point of opportunity to improve research translation, since optimizing the design and reporting of pragmatic trials can facilitate implementation of evidence-based interventions for OA care.

  5. Reporting and evaluation of HIV-related clinical endpoints in two multicenter international clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, A; Rahme, FS; Belloso, WH

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The processes for reporting and review of progression of HIV disease clinical endpoints are described for two large phase III international clinical trials. METHOD: SILCAAT and ESPRIT are multicenter randomized HIV trials evaluating the impact of interleukin-2 on disease progression...

  6. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  7. Folate Augmentation of Treatment--Evaluation for Depression (FolATED): randomised trial and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedson, Emma; Bell, Diana; Carr, Daniel; Carter, Ben; Hughes, Dyfrig; Jorgensen, Andrea; Lewis, Helen; Lloyd, Keith; McCaddon, Andrew; Moat, Stuart; Pink, Joshua; Pirmohamed, Munir; Roberts, Seren; Russell, Ian; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Tranter, Richard; Whitaker, Rhiannon; Wilkinson, Clare; Williams, Nefyn

    2014-07-01

    Folate deficiency is associated with depression. Despite the biological plausibility of a causal link, the evidence that adding folate enhances antidepressant treatment is weak. (1) Estimate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of folic acid as adjunct to antidepressant medication (ADM). (2) Explore whether baseline folate and homocysteine predict response to treatment. (3) Investigate whether response to treatment depends on genetic polymorphisms related to folate metabolism. FolATED (Folate Augmentation of Treatment - Evaluation for Depression) was a double-blind and placebo-controlled, but otherwise pragmatic, randomised trial including cost-utility analysis. To yield 80% power of detecting standardised difference on the Beck Depression Inventory version 2 (BDI-II) of 0.3 between groups (a 'small' effect), FolATED trialists sought to analyse 358 participants. To allow for an estimated loss of 21% of participants over three time points, we planned to randomise 453. Clinical - Three centres in Wales - North East Wales, North West Wales and Swansea. Trial management - North Wales Organisation for Randomised Trials in Health in Bangor University. Biochemical analysis - University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Genetic analysis - University of Liverpool. Four hundred and seventy-five adult patients presenting to primary or secondary care with confirmed moderate to severe depression for which they were taking or about to start ADM, and able to consent and complete assessments, but not (1) folate deficient, vitamin B12 deficient, or taking folic acid or anticonvulsants; (2) misusing drugs or alcohol, or suffering from psychosis, bipolar disorder, malignancy or other unstable or terminal illness; (3) (planning to become) pregnant; or (4) participating in other clinical research. Once a day for 12 weeks experimental participants added 5 mg of folic acid to their ADM, and control participants added an indistinguishable placebo. All participants followed

  8. Formalizalization of clinical trial eligibility criteria: Evaluation of a pattern-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milian, K.; Bucur, A.; ten Teije, A.C.M.; Gao, J.; Alhaij, R.; Dubitzky, W.; Ungar, L.; Wu, C.; Christianson, A,; Liebman, M.; Hu, X.

    2012-01-01

    The semi-automatic evaluation of eligibility criteria can facilitate the recruitment for clinical trials, timely completion of studies and generation of clinical evidence about new approaches to treatment, prevention and diagnosis. Because eligibility criteria are represented as free text,

  9. An open-label Optional Titration Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An open-label Optional Titration Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy, Tolerability and Safety of Valsartan in Patients with Mild to Moderate Essential Hypertension Treated for 8 Weeks in the Lagos University Teaching Hospita.

  10. Designing a trial to evaluate potential treatments for apathy in dementia: the Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate trial (ADMET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drye, Lea T.; Scherer, Roberta W.; Lanctôt, Krista L.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Herrmann, Nathan; Bachman, David; Mintzer, Jacobo E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on efficacious treatments for apathy in Alzheimer’s disease has been hindered by a lack of consensus diagnosis, difficulties in measurement, and studies with small sample sizes. Methods In designing the Apathy in Dementia Methylphenidate Trial (ADMET), a trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of methylphenidate for the treatment of apathy in Alzheimer’s disease, we encountered the following issues: defining and measuring apathy, distinguishing apathy and depression, determining an appropriate test treatment, selecting relevant secondary outcomes, recruiting participants, and deciding on a suitable method for treatment unmasking. ADMET is a 6-week randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical trial with two parallel treatment groups assigned in a 1:1 ratio with randomization stratified by clinical center. The recruitment goal is 60 randomized participants over 2 years. The primary outcomes are change in apathy severity as measured by the Apathy Evaluation Scale and the Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change. Conclusion The design decisions made for ADMET are important elements to be considered in trials assessing the safety and efficacy of medications for clinically significant apathy in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23567407

  11. Evaluation of Development Programs: Randomized Controlled Trials or Regressions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, C.T.M.; Gunning, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Can project evaluation methods be used to evaluate programs: complex interventions involving multiple activities? A program evaluation cannot be based simply on separate evaluations of its components if interactions between the activities are important. In this paper a measure is proposed, the total

  12. In silico imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation: initial considerations for VICTRE, a demonstration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Badal, Andreu; Glick, Stephen; Graff, Christian G.; Samuelson, Frank; Sharma, Diksha; Zeng, Rongping

    2017-03-01

    Expensive and lengthy clinical trials can delay regulatory evaluation and add significant burden that stifles innovation affecting patient access to novel, high-quality imaging technologies. In silico imaging holds promise for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of imaging technologies with much less burden than clinical trials. We define in silico imaging as a computer simulation of an entire imaging system (including source, object, task, and observer components) used for research, development, optimization, technology assessment, and regulatory evaluation of new technology. In this work we describe VICTRE (our study of virtual imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation) and the considerations for building an entire imaging pipeline in silico including device (physics), patient (anatomy, disease), and image interpretation models for regulatory evaluation using open-source tools.

  13. Control group selection in critical care randomized controlled trials evaluating interventional strategies: An ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry J; Miller, Franklin G

    2004-03-01

    Ethical concern has been raised with critical care randomized controlled trials in which the standard of care reflects a broad range of clinical practices. Commentators have argued that trials without an unrestricted control group, in which standard practices are implemented at the discretion of the attending physician, lack the ability to redefine the standard of care and might expose subjects to excessive harms due to an inability to stop early. To develop a framework for analyzing control group selection for critical care trials. Ethical analysis. A key ethical variable in trial design is the extent with which the control group adequately reflects standard care practices. Such a control group might incorporate either the "unrestricted" practices of physicians or a protocol that specifies and restricts the parameters of standard practices. Control group selection should be determined with respect to the following ethical objectives of trial design: 1) clinical value, 2) scientific validity, 3) efficiency and feasibility, and 4) protection of human subjects. Because these objectives may conflict, control group selection will involve trade-offs and compromises. Trials using a protocolized rather than an unrestricted standard care control group will likely have enhanced validity. However, if the protocolized control group lacks representativeness to standard care practices, then trials that use such groups will offer less clinical value and could provide less assurance of protecting subjects compared with trials that use unrestricted control groups. For trials evaluating contrasting strategies that do not adequately represent standard practices, use of a third group that is more representative of standard practices will enhance clinical value and increase the ability to stop early if needed to protect subjects. These advantages might come at the expense of efficiency and feasibility. Weighing and balancing the competing ethical objectives of trial design should be

  14. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohr, D.C.; Schueller, S.M.; Riley, W.T.; Brown, C.H.; Cuijpers, P.; Duan, N.; Kwasny, M.J.; Stiles-Shields, C.; Cheung, K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the limitations of traditional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodologies for the evaluation of eHealth and mHealth interventions, and in particular, the requirement that these interventions be locked down during evaluation. Locking down

  15. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other...

  16. Follow the LEADER-Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    This commentary analyzes the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results (LEADER) trial, which has reported the cardiovascular benefits of liraglutide. It places the results of this seminal trial in the context of the evolution of diabetes care, compares them with other recently published cardiovascular outcome trials, and suggests novel mechanisms to explain the benefits and properties of liraglutide. The editorial discusses the potential impact that LEADER will have on the prevention and management of diabetes and its vascular complications.

  17. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Riley, William T; Brown, C Hendricks; Cuijpers, Pim; Duan, Naihua; Kwasny, Mary J; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Cheung, Ken

    2015-07-08

    In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the limitations of traditional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodologies for the evaluation of eHealth and mHealth interventions, and in particular, the requirement that these interventions be locked down during evaluation. Locking down these interventions locks in defects and eliminates the opportunities for quality improvement and adaptation to the changing technological environment, often leading to validation of tools that are outdated by the time that trial results are published. Furthermore, because behavioral intervention technologies change frequently during real-world deployment, even if a tested intervention were deployed in the real world, its shelf life would be limited. We argue that RCTs will have greater scientific and public health value if they focus on the evaluation of intervention principles (rather than a specific locked-down version of the intervention), allowing for ongoing quality improvement modifications to the behavioral intervention technology based on the core intervention principles, while continuously improving the functionality and maintaining technological currency. This paper is an initial proposal of a framework and methodology for the conduct of trials of intervention principles (TIPs) aimed at minimizing the risks of in-trial changes to intervention technologies and maximizing the potential for knowledge acquisition. The focus on evaluation of intervention principles using clinical and usage outcomes has the potential to provide more generalizable and durable information than trials focused on a single intervention technology.

  18. Clinical psychology in general practice: a controlled trial evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earll, Louise; Kincey, John

    1982-01-01

    A controlled trial study is described in which 50 consecutive potential referrals for psychological treatment from one general practice were randomly allocated either to behavioural treatment or no-treatment conditions. Treatment-group patients received treatment from a clinical psychologist working within the practice; the control-group patients continued to be managed by their general practitioner. The patients' use of NHS resources was assessed during the treatment period (or its equivalent for the control group) and at a follow-up comparison point, when the patients' subjective ratings of their progress were also obtained. Between referral and the end of treatment the treated group received significantly less psychotropic medication than the control group. This difference was not, however, maintained at the longer-term follow-up. No differences in general practice consultation rates, in the subjective ratings of psychological distress, in control orientation or life satisfaction were found between the two groups, but the level of patient satisfaction was high. Implications for the design of future studies and for psychological health care delivery systems are discussed. PMID:7086742

  19. Evaluation of painful sensory symptoms in restless legs syndrome: experience from two clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Magdolna; Sohr, Mandy; Busse, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Although "uncomfortable and unpleasant" limb sensations are a core symptom of restless legs syndrome (RLS), change in sensory symptomatology is usually not evaluated as a treatment outcome. In two double-blind trials, patients with idiopathic RLS (n=357 in trial 615 and 398 in trial 604) were randomized to placebo or pramipexole (optimized at 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, or 0.75 mg/day). For entry, trial 604 also required at least moderate mood disturbance. In both trials, 12-week change in RLS-related limb pain was assessed using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). At baseline, approximately 75% of patients had limb-pain scores >30. Treatment with pramipexole yielded significant score reduction as early as day 5. At week 12, median score reduction for pramipexole relative to placebo was -33.5 vs. -11.0 (p<0.0001) in trial 615 and -31.0 vs. -11.0 (p<0.0001) in trial 604. Painful sensations may be more frequent in RLS than has previously been appreciated, and their amelioration may be a facet of pramipexole's benefit even in patients with concurrent mood disturbance. Limb pain assessment, e.g., by a VAS, is a useful measure of change in RLS symptom severity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementing a complex rehabilitation intervention in a stroke trial: a qualitative process evaluation of AVERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Luker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The implementation of multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation interventions is challenging, even when the intervention is evidence-based. Very little is known about the implementation of complex interventions in rehabilitation clinical trials. The aim of study was to better understand how the implementation of a rehabilitation intervention in a clinical trial within acute stroke units is experienced by the staff involved. This qualitative process evaluation was part of a large Phase III stroke rehabilitation trial (AVERT. Methods A descriptive qualitative approach was used. We purposively sampled 53 allied health and nursing staff from 19 acute stroke units in Australia, New Zealand and Scotland. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone, voice-internet, or face to face. Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed by two researchers using rigorous thematic analysis. Results Our analysis uncovered ten important themes that provide insight into the challenges of implementing complex new rehabilitation practices within complex care settings, plus factors and strategies that assisted implementation. Themes were grouped into three main categories: staff experience of implementing the trial intervention, barriers to implementation, and overcoming the barriers. Participation in the trial was challenging but had personal rewards and improved teamwork at some sites. Over the years that the trial ran some staff perceived a change in usual care. Barriers to trial implementation at some sites included poor teamwork, inadequate staffing, various organisational barriers, staff attitudes and beliefs, and patient-related barriers. Participants described successful implementation strategies that were built on interdisciplinary teamwork, education and strong leadership to ‘get staff on board’, and developing different ways of working. Conclusions The AVERT stroke rehabilitation trial required commitment to deliver

  1. Health services changes: is a run-in period necessary before evaluation in randomised clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Trishna; Belcher, John; Montgomery, Alan A; Salisbury, Chris; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-01-30

    Most randomised clinical trials (RCTs) testing a new health service do not allow a run-in period of consolidation before evaluating the new approach. Consequently, health professionals involved may feel insufficiently familiar or confident, or that new processes or systems that are integral to the service are insufficiently embedded in routine care prior to definitive evaluation in a RCT. This study aimed to determine the optimal run-in period for a new physiotherapy-led telephone assessment and treatment service known as PhysioDirect and whether a run-in was needed prior to evaluating outcomes in an RCT. The PhysioDirect trial assessed whether PhysioDirect was as effective as usual care. Prior to the main trial, a run-in of up to 12 weeks was permitted to facilitate physiotherapists to become confident in delivering the new service. Outcomes collected from the run-in and main trial were length of telephone calls within the PhysioDirect service and patients' physical function (SF-36v2 questionnaire) and Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile v2 collected at baseline and six months. Joinpoint regression determined how long it had taken call times to stabilise. Analysis of covariance determined whether patients' physical function at six months changed from the run-in to the main trial. Mean PhysioDirect call times (minutes) were higher in the run-in (31 (SD: 12.6)) than in the main trial (25 (SD: 11.6)). Each physiotherapist needed to answer 42 (95% CI: 20,56) calls for their mean call time to stabilise at 25 minutes per call; this took a minimum of seven weeks. For patients' physical function, PhysioDirect was equally clinically effective as usual care during both the run-in (0.17 (95% CI: -0.91,1.24)) and main trial (-0.01 (95% CI: -0.80,0.79)). A run-in was not needed in a large trial testing PhysioDirect services in terms of patient outcomes. A learning curve was evident in the process measure of telephone call length. This decreased during the run-in and

  2. [Evaluation of Web-based software applications for administrating and organising an ophthalmological clinical trial site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Reznicek, L; Leicht, S; Ulbig, M; Wolf, A

    2013-07-01

    The importance and complexity of clinical trials is continuously increasing, especially in innovative specialties like ophthalmology. Therefore an efficient clinical trial site organisational structure is essential. In modern internet times, this can be accomplished by web-based applications. In total, 3 software applications (Vibe on Prem, Sharepoint and open source software) were evaluated in a clinical trial site in ophthalmology. Assessment criteria were set; they were: reliability, easiness of administration, usability, scheduling, task list, knowledge management, operating costs and worldwide availability. Vibe on Prem customised by the local university met the assessment criteria best. Other applications were not as strong. By introducing a web-based application for administrating and organising an ophthalmological trial site, studies can be conducted in a more efficient and reliable manner. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Pre-trial psychiatric evaluations and ethnicity in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, David J; de Beurs, Edwin; Barendregt, Marko; Rinne, Thomas; Hoek, H Wijbrand

    2010-01-01

    Black and ethnic minorities (BME) are disproportionally represented in western prisons and forensic psychiatric facilities. The authors wished to determine whether patient-related or services-related factors account for this overrepresentation. This study examined the relationship among the assessments of psychological accountability for a crime, treatment recommendations, and ethnicity among persons accused of a crime and suspected of having a mental disorder. We examined all 21,857 pre-trial psychiatric reports requested by Dutch courts between 2000 and 2006. Ethnicity was classified as Dutch native (n=15,004), Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups (n=6202), and Whites from other western countries (n=638). Accountability assessments and treatment recommendations were compared using chi-square tests and logistic regression models, adjusted for demographic, psychiatric, and judiciary characteristics. Among BME and Whites from other western countries, accountability for the crimes committed was more often judged to be at the extreme ends of the spectrum, that is, "fully responsible" or "not responsible." Compulsory admission to a psychiatric hospital was more frequently recommended for BME persons (OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16-1.64) and Whites from other western countries (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.05-2.27), but not admission to a penitentiary hospital or use of medication. The compulsory admission findings are largely explained by a higher prevalence of psychotic disorders in BME persons (19.8%) and Whites from other western countries (19.3%) as compared to Dutch natives (9.2%). Outpatient treatment was less often recommended for BME persons (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.76-0.87) and Whites from other western countries (OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.99) than for Dutch natives. Both patient-related and services-related factors play a role in the increased admission of BME groups and Whites from other western countries to psychiatric hospitals.

  4. Evaluating adherence to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' policy of mandatory, timely clinical trial registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether two specific criteria in Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts (URM) created by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)--namely, including the trial ID registration within manuscripts and timely registration of trials, are being followed. Observational study using computerized analysis of publicly available Medline article data and clinical trial registry data. We analyzed a purposive set of five ICMJE founding journals looking at all trial articles published in those journals during 2010-2011, and data from the ClinicalTrials.gov (CTG) trial registry. We measured adherence to trial ID inclusion policy as the percentage of trial journal articles that contained a valid trial ID within the article (journal-based sample). Adherence to timely registration was measured as the percentage of trials that registered the trial before enrolling the first participant within a 60-day grace period. We also examined timely registration rates by year of all phase II and higher interventional trials in CTG (registry-based sample). To determine trial ID inclusion, we analyzed 698 clinical trial articles in five journals. A total of 95.8% (661/690) of trial journal articles included the trial ID. In 88.3% the trial-article link is stored within a structured Medline field. To evaluate timely registration, we analyzed trials referenced by 451 articles from the selected five journals. A total of 60% (272/451) of articles were registered in a timely manner with an improving trend for trials initiated in later years (eg, 89% of trials that began in 2008 were registered in a timely manner). In the registry-based sample, the timely registration rates ranged from 56% for trials registered in 2006 to 72% for trials registered in 2011. Adherence to URM requirements for registration and trial ID inclusion increases the utility of PubMed and links it in an important way to clinical trial repositories. This new integrated knowledge source can facilitate

  5. Evaluation of the Informed Consent Process of a Multicenter Tuberculosis Treatment Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberley N.; Pevzner, Eric; Mangan, Joan M.; Breese, Peter; Lamunu, Dorcas; Shrestha-Kuwahara, Robin; Nakibali, Joseph G.; Goldberg, Stefan V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ethical principles obligate researchers to maximize study participants’ comprehension during the informed consent process for clinical trials. A pilot evaluation of the consent process was conducted during an international clinical trial of treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis to assess the feasibility of conducting an evaluation in a larger population and to guide these future efforts. Methods Study staff administered an informed consent assessment tool (ICAT) to a convenience sample of trial participants, measuring comprehension of consent components as derived from the Common Rule and FDA Title 21 Part 50, and satisfaction with the process. Participating site staff completed a consent process questionnaire about consent practices at their respective sites and provided improvement recommendations. ICAT scores and corresponding practices were compared where both were completed. Results ICATs (n = 54) were submitted from one site in Spain (n = 10), one in Uganda (n = 30), and five in the United States (n = 14). Participants were primarily male (76%), born in Africa (n = 31, 57%), and had a median age of 27 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 24–42). Median ICAT scores were 80% (IQR: 67–93) for comprehension and 89% (IQR: 78–100) for satisfaction. Ugandan participants scored higher than participants from other sites on comprehension (87% vs. 64%) and satisfaction (100% vs. 78%). Staff from 14 sites completed consent process questionnaires. Median ICAT scores for comprehension and satisfaction were higher at sites that utilized visual aids. Practice recommendations included shorter forms, simpler documents, and supplementary materials. Conclusions Participants achieved high levels (≥80%) of comprehension and satisfaction with their current consent processes. Higher ICAT scores at one site suggest an additional evaluation may identify approaches to improve comprehension and satisfaction in future trials. Through this pilot evaluation, complexities

  6. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J.; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  7. The incomplete bucindolol evaluation in acute myocardial infarction Trial (BEAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Køber, Lars; Ball, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adding the beta-blocker bucindolol to standard therapy shortly after a myocardial infarction in a high-risk population with reduced left ventricular function. METHODS: The study was planned to include 2000 patients with an enzyme confirmed...... myocardial infarction and severely reduced left ventricular function determined by echocardiography (corresponding to ejection fraction ... of bucindolol 0.88 (95% confidence limits 0.5-1.5; P=0.6). There were 9/4 (bucindolol/placebo, P=0.16) heart failure events and 5/17 (P=0.01) reinfarctions in the bucindolol/placebo groups. CONCLUSION: Due to early closure it is unknown whether bucindolol changes mortality in high-risk post myocardial infarct...

  8. Factors Influencing Hand Washing Behaviour in Primary Schools: Process Evaluation within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57).…

  9. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  10. eSource for clinical trials: Implementation and evaluation of a standards-based approach in a real world trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Jean-Francois; Curcin, Vasa; McGilchrist, Mark M; Choi Keung, Sarah N Lim; Zhao, Lei; Andreasson, Anna; Bródka, Piotr; Michalski, Radoslaw; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Burgun, Anita; Delaney, Brendan C

    2017-10-01

    The Learning Health System (LHS) requires integration of research into routine practice. 'eSource' or embedding clinical trial functionalities into routine electronic health record (EHR) systems has long been put forward as a solution to the rising costs of research. We aimed to create and validate an eSource solution that would be readily extensible as part of a LHS. The EU FP7 TRANSFoRm project's approach is based on dual modelling, using the Clinical Research Information Model (CRIM) and the Clinical Data Integration Model of meaning (CDIM) to bridge the gap between clinical and research data structures, using the CDISC Operational Data Model (ODM) standard. Validation against GCP requirements was conducted in a clinical site, and a cluster randomised evaluation by site nested into a live clinical trial. Using the form definition element of ODM, we linked precisely modelled data queries to data elements, constrained against CDIM concepts, to enable automated patient identification for specific protocols and pre-population of electronic case report forms (e-CRF). Both control and eSource sites recruited better than expected with no significant difference. Completeness of clinical forms was significantly improved by eSource, but Patient Related Outcome Measures (PROMs) were less well completed on smartphones than paper in this population. The TRANSFoRm approach provides an ontologically-based approach to eSource in a low-resource, heterogeneous, highly distributed environment, that allows precise prospective mapping of data elements in the EHR. Further studies using this approach to CDISC should optimise the delivery of PROMS, whilst building a sustainable infrastructure for eSource with research networks, trials units and EHR vendors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating the PRASE patient safety intervention - a multi-centre, cluster trial with a qualitative process evaluation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; O'Hara, Jane; Armitage, Gerry; Wright, John; Cocks, Kim; McEachan, Rosemary; Watt, Ian; Lawton, Rebecca

    2014-10-29

    Estimates show that as many as one in 10 patients are harmed while receiving hospital care. Previous strategies to improve safety have focused on developing incident reporting systems and changing systems of care and professional behaviour, with little involvement of patients. The need to engage with patients about the quality and safety of their care has never been more evident with recent high profile reviews of poor hospital care all emphasising the need to develop and support better systems for capturing and responding to the patient perspective on their care. Over the past 3 years, our research team have developed, tested and refined the PRASE (Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment) intervention, which gains patient feedback about quality and safety on hospital wards. A multi-centre, cluster, wait list design, randomised controlled trial with an embedded qualitative process evaluation. The aim is to assess the efficacy of the PRASE intervention, in achieving patient safety improvements over a 12-month period.The trial will take place across 32 hospital wards in three NHS Hospital Trusts in the North of England. The PRASE intervention comprises two tools: (1) a 44-item questionnaire which asks patients about safety concerns and issues; and (2) a proforma for patients to report (a) any specific patient safety incidents they have been involved in or witnessed and (b) any positive experiences. These two tools then provide data which are fed back to wards in a structured feedback report. Using this report, ward staff are asked to hold action planning meetings (APMs) in order to action plan, then implement their plans in line with the issues raised by patients in order to improve patient safety and the patient experience.The trial will be subjected to a rigorous qualitative process evaluation which will enable interpretation of the trial results. fieldworker diaries, ethnographic observation of APMs, structured interviews with APM lead and collection

  12. The Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial: lessons from the study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, L; Gwiazda, J

    2004-01-01

    The Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET), a multicentre clinical trial based in 4 schools of optometry in the United States, evaluated the effect of progressive addition lenses versus single vision lenses on myopia progression in an ethnically diverse group of 469 myopic children aged 6 to 11 years. Completion of the clinical trial phase of the study provides an opportunity to evaluate aspects of the study design that contribute to its success. This article describes aspects of the study design that were influential in ensuring the smooth conduct of COMET. These include a dedicated team of investigators, an organisational structure with strong leadership and an independent Co-ordinating Centre, regular communication among investigators, flexible and creative approaches to recruitment and retention, sensitivity to concerns for child safety and child participation, and methods for enhancing and monitoring data reliability. The experience with COMET has provided a number of valuable lessons for all aspects of the study design that should benefit the development and implementation of future clinical trials, particularly those done in similar populations of children. The use of a carefully designed protocol using standard methods by dedicated members of the study team is essential in ensuring achievement of the study aims.

  13. The Sandia/Arzamas-16 Magazine-to-Magazine Remote Monitoring Field Trial Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkanov, Boris; Blagin, Sergei; Croessmann, Dennis; Damico, Joe; Ehle, Steve; Nilsen, Curt

    1999-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (also known as Arzamas-16) are collaborating on ways to assure the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability of fissile material. For these collaborations, sensors and information technologies have been identified as important in reaching these standards in a cost-effective manner. Specifically, Sandia and VNIIEF have established a series of remote monitoring field trials to provide a mechanism for joint research and development on storage monitoring systems. These efforts consist of the ''Container-to-Container'', ''Magazine-to-Magazine'', and ''Facility-to-Facility'' field trials. This paper will describe the evaluation exercise Sandia and VNIIEF conducted on the Magazine-to-Magazine systems. Topics covered will include a description of the evaluation philosophy, how the various sensors and system features were tested, evaluation results, and lessons learned.

  14. Systematic evaluation of the methodology of randomized controlled trials of anticoagulation in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Gabriel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that are inappropriately designed or executed may provide biased findings and mislead clinical practice. In view of recent interest in the treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications in cancer patients we evaluated the characteristics, risk of bias and their time trends in RCTs of anticoagulation in patients with cancer. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search, including a search of four electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI the Web of Science, and CENTRAL up to February 2010. We included RCTs in which the intervention and/or comparison consisted of: vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin (UFH, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, direct thrombin inhibitors or fondaparinux. We performed descriptive analyses and assessed the association between the variables of interest and the year of publication. Results We included 67 RCTs with 24,071 participants. In twenty one trials (31% DVT diagnosis was triggered by clinical suspicion; the remaining trials either screened for DVT or were unclear about their approach. 41 (61%, 22 (33%, and 11 (16% trials respectively reported on major bleeding, minor bleeding, and thrombocytopenia. The percentages of trials satisfying risk of bias criteria were: adequate sequence generation (85%, adequate allocation concealment (61%, participants’ blinding (39%, data collectors’ blinding (44%, providers’ blinding (41%, outcome assessors’ blinding (75%, data analysts’ blinding (15%, intention to treat analysis (57%, no selective outcome reporting (12%, no stopping early for benefit (97%. The mean follow-up rate was 96%. Adequate allocation concealment and the reporting of intention to treat analysis were the only two quality criteria that improved over time. Conclusions Many RCTs of anticoagulation in patients with cancer appear to use insufficiently rigorous outcome assessment methods and to have deficiencies in key methodological

  15. Research waste in diagnostic trials: a methods review evaluating the reporting of test-treatment interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Ferrante di Ruffano

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most rigorous method for evaluating the effectiveness of diagnostic tests is through randomised trials that compare test-treatment interventions: complex interventions comprising episodes of testing, decision-making and treatment. The multi-staged nature of these interventions, combined with the need to relay diagnostic decision-making and treatment planning, has led researchers to hypothesise that test-treatment strategies may be very challenging to document. However, no reviews have yet examined the reporting quality of interventions used in test-treatment RCTs. In this study we evaluate the completeness of intervention descriptions in a systematically identified cohort of test-treatment RCTs. Methods We ascertained all test-treatment RCTs published 2004–2007, indexed in CENTRAL. Included trials randomized patients to diagnostic tests and measured patient outcomes after treatment. Two raters examined the completeness of test-treatment intervention descriptions in four components: 1 the test, 2 diagnostic decision-making, 3 management decision-making, 4 treatments. Results One hundred and three trials compared 105 control with 119 experimental interventions, most commonly in cardiovascular medicine (35, 34%, obstetrics and gynecology (17%, gastroenterology (14% or orthopedics (10%. A broad range of tests were evaluated, including imaging (50, 42%, biochemical assays (21% and clinical assessment (12%. Only five (5% trials detailed all four components of experimental and control interventions, none of which also provided a complete care pathway diagram. Experimental arms were missing descriptions of tests, diagnostic-decision making, management planning and treatments (36%, 51%, 55% and 79% of trials respectively; control arms were missing the same details in 61%, 66%, 67% and 84% of trials. Conclusion Reporting of test-treatment interventions is very poor, inadequate for understanding the results of these trials, and

  16. A systematic review of adverse event reporting in companion animal clinical trials evaluating cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Michelle A

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate methods used to ascertain, define, and report adverse events (AEs) in companion animal clinical trials involving cancer treatment. DESIGN Systematic review. SAMPLE English-language articles describing prospective clinical trials involving dogs and cats with naturally occurring cancer published in peer-reviewed journals between 2008 and 2014. PROCEDURES Reports were identified via MEDLINE and CAB database searches combined with a hand-searching strategy. General article characteristics were abstracted and summarized. Data for AE reporting were collected with a 14-item checklist adapted from the 2004 CONSORT extension for reporting harms. Study characteristics associated with the AE reporting checklist score were identified by means of linear regression analysis. RESULTS 168 articles with data for 6,132 animals were included. Standardized terminology was significantly more likely to be used to describe AEs for trials that included chemotherapy (92/115 [80.0%]) than for trials that did not (16/53 [30.2%]). Median AE reporting checklist score was 5 out of 14 (range, 0 to 12). Poorly reported items included methods and time frame of AE ascertainment, AE data analysis, and reasons for treatment discontinuation and death. Trials with industry funding, a single-arm design, and treatment with chemotherapy were associated with a significantly higher quality of AE reporting. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Reporting of adverse events in veterinary clinical trials evaluating cancer treatment was selective and heterogeneous. Harms associated with cancer treatments could be underestimated because of suboptimal collection and reporting of AE data. Findings supported the adoption of a higher standard for AE surveillance and reporting in veterinary patients.

  17. Considerations in the evaluation and determination of minimal risk in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, John D; Wendler, David; Septimus, Edward; Wahba, Sarita; Madigan, Rosemary; Bliss, Geraldine

    2015-10-01

    Institutional review boards, which are charged with overseeing research, must classify the riskiness of proposed research according to a federal regulation known as the Common Rule (45 CFR 46, Subpart A) and by regulations governing the US Food and Drug Administration codified in 21 CFR 50. If an institutional review board determines that a clinical trial constitutes "minimal risk," there are important practical implications: the institutional review board may then allow a waiver or alteration of the informed consent process; the study may be carried out in certain vulnerable populations; or the study may be reviewed by institutional review boards using an expedited process. However, it is unclear how institutional review boards should assess the risk levels of pragmatic clinical trials. Such trials typically compare existing, widely used medical therapies or interventions in the setting of routine clinical practice. Some of the therapies may be considered risky of themselves but the study comparing them may or may not add to that pre-existing level of risk. In this article, we examine the common interpretations of research regulations regarding minimal-risk classifications and suggest that they are marked by a high degree of variability and confusion, which in turn may ultimately harm patients by delaying or hindering potentially beneficial research. We advocate for a clear differentiation between the risks associated with a given therapy and the incremental risk incurred during research evaluating those therapies as a basic principle for evaluating the risk of a pragmatic clinical trial. We then examine two pragmatic clinical trials and consider how various factors including clinical equipoise, practice variation, research methods such as cluster randomization, and patients' perspectives may contribute to current and evolving concepts of minimal-risk determinations, and how this understanding in turn affects the design and conduct of pragmatic clinical trials.

  18. Evaluation issues in the Swedish Two-County Trial of breast cancer screening: An historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar, Laszlo; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Beckmann, Kerri; Smith, Robert A; Duffy, Stephen W

    2017-03-01

    Objectives To summarize debate and research in the Swedish Two-County Trial of mammographic screening on key issues of trial design, endpoint evaluation, and overdiagnosis, and from these to infer promising directions for the future. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled trial of the offer of breast cancer screening in Sweden, with a single screen of the control group at the end of the screening phase forms the setting for a historical review of investigations and debate on issues of design, analysis, and interpretation of results of the trial. Results There has been considerable commentary on the closure screen of the control group, ascertainment of cause of death, and cluster randomization. The issues raised were researched in detail and the main questions answered in publications between 1989 and 2003. Overdiagnosis issues still remain, but methods of estimation taking full account of lead time and of non-screening influences on incidence (taking place mainly before 2005) suggest that it is a minor phenomenon. Conclusion Despite resolution of issues relating to this trial in peer-reviewed publications dating from years, or even decades ago, issues that already have been addressed continue to be raised. We suggest that it would be more profitable to concentrate efforts on current research issues in breast cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  19. Evaluation and registration of adverse events in clinical drug trials in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Bjarnason, N.H.; Dahlof, C.

    2008-01-01

    Tolerability of a drug should be regarded as important as its efficacy. In all four phases of drug development evaluation of adverse events is important. Recommendations for assessment of adverse events in acute and prophylactic clinical drug trials in migraine are given. Tolerability may be indi...... be indirectly assessed using measures of general well-being and eight such tools are presented. Finally, recommendations for reporting of adverse events are given Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7......Tolerability of a drug should be regarded as important as its efficacy. In all four phases of drug development evaluation of adverse events is important. Recommendations for assessment of adverse events in acute and prophylactic clinical drug trials in migraine are given. Tolerability may...

  20. Randomised controlled trial evaluation of Tweet2Quit: a social network quit-smoking intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Pechmann, C; K. Delucchi; Lakon, CM; Prochaska, JJ

    2017-01-01

    Background We evaluated a novel Twitter-delivered intervention for smoking cessation, Tweet2Quit, which sends daily, automated communications to small, private, self-help groups to encourage high-quality, online, peer-to-peer discussions. Design A 2-group randomised controlled trial assessed the net benefit of adding a Tweet2Quit support group to a usual care control condition of nicotine patches and a cessation website. Participants Participants were 160 smokers (4 cohorts of 40/cohort), age...

  1. Factors influencing hand washing behaviour in primary schools: process evaluation within a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomised controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n=16, ages 6 to 11, semi-structured interviews (n=16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n=57). Pupils and staff in intervention and control schools demonstrated a similar level of understanding of how, when and why they should wash their hands. Lack of time...

  2. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Nayiga, S; Diliberto, D; Taaka, L; Nabirye, C; Haaland, A.; Staedke, SG; Chandler, CI

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including ?patient-centred services.? A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and eval...

  3. The PD COMM trial: a protocol for the process evaluation of a randomised trial assessing the effectiveness of two types of SLT for people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson-Algar, Patricia; Burton, Christopher R; Brady, Marian C; Nicoll, Avril; Clarke, Carl E; Rick, Caroline; Hughes, Max; Au, Pui; Smith, Christina H; Sackley, Catherine M

    2017-08-29

    The PD COMM trial is a phase III multi-centre randomised controlled trial whose aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two approaches to speech and language therapy (SLT) compared with no SLT intervention (control) for people with Parkinson's disease who have self-reported or carer-reported problems with their speech or voice. Our protocol describes the process evaluation embedded within the outcome evaluation whose aim is to evaluate what happened at the time of the PD COMM intervention implementation and to provide findings that will assist in the interpretation of the PD COMM trial results. Furthermore, the aim of the PD COMM process evaluation is to investigate intervention complexity within a theoretical model of how the trialled interventions might work best and why. Drawing from the Normalization Process Theory and frameworks for implementation fidelity, a mixed method design will be used to address process evaluation research questions. Therapists' and participants' perceptions and experiences will be investigated via in-depth interviews. Critical incident reports, baseline survey data from therapists, treatment record forms and home practice diaries also will be collected at relevant time points throughout the running of the PD COMM trial. Process evaluation data will be analysed independently of the outcome evaluation before the two sets of data are then combined. To date, there are a limited number of published process evaluation protocols, and few are linked to trials investigating rehabilitation therapies. Providing a strong theoretical framework underpinning design choices and being tailored to meet the complex characteristics of the trialled interventions, our process evaluation has the potential to provide valuable insight into which components of the interventions being delivered in PD COMM worked best (and what did not), how they worked well and why. ISRCTN Registry, ISRCTN12421382 . Registered on 18 April 2016.

  4. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    × 3 Gy E will be applied. The primary endpoint in the Phase I part is toxicity, the primary endpoint in the Phase II part is progression-free survival. Discussion With conventional photon irradiation treatment of recurrent rectal cancer is limited, and the clinical effect is only moderate. With carbon ions, an improved outcome can be expected due to the physical and biological characteristics of the carbon ion beam. However, the optimal dose applicable in this clincial situation as re-irradiation still has to be determined. This, as well as efficacy, is to be evaluated in the present Phase I/II trial. Trial registration NCT01528683

  5. Evaluating and improving recruitment and retention in an mHealth clinical trial: an example of iterating methods during a trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Angela Fidler; Mitsos, Alexa; Wang, Shirlene; Hood, Susan Hammett; Spring, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    Recruitment and retention strategy investigations in mHealth clinical trials are rare. Technology presents an opportunity to intensely and remotely evaluate recruitment, use of mobile apps, and retention, leading to new insights for continuous improvement of mHealth trials. The objective of this paper is to present a case study in which a trial evaluated and changed strategies during a clinical trial to improve recruitment, adherence to study protocols, and retention in the mHealth trial. In Fall 2015, the NUYou trial enrolled 150 college freshmen in an mHealth protocol. Three months after study initiation, NUYou struggled to meet recruitment goals and maintain anticipated usage levels of the study smartphone application. Two sets of data were collected to improve recruitment and retention: a survey about recruitment was sent to the target population and surveys regarding usability of the app was sent to the study sample. Survey results informed improvements in recruitment strategies, the study retention protocol, and the smartphone application. Survey results revealed several insights including misunderstanding components of the trial by potential participants, low perceived usefulness of the app, and little recall or impact of the incentive structure. After implementation of user-centered improvements, the second cohort of NUYou recruitment in the fall of 2016 produced an equal sample size in 4 weeks less time. Winter quarter of 2016 compared to 2017 demonstrated an improvement in retention via app use and completion of weekly in-app surveys. Recruitment and retention in clinical trials continues to be a critical challenge and mHealth trials may present both unique challenges and opportunities. To our knowledge, this is the first study to describe a systematic evaluation followed by changes and further evaluation to recruitment, use of the mHealth application, adherence to study protocol, and retention during an mHealth clinical trial. Future work should adopt

  6. Reporting Quality of Randomized, Controlled Trials Evaluating Combined Chemoradiotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Lee, Anne W.M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen (China); Vermorken, Jan B. [Department of Medical Oncology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem (Belgium); Wee, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mai, Hai-Qiang [Department of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Guo, Ying [Clinical Trials Centre, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Ai-Hua [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Sun, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); and others

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To comprehensively assess the reporting quality of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to identify significant predictors of quality. Methods and Materials: Two investigators searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for RCTs published between January 1988 and December 2015 that assessed the effect of combined chemoradiotherapy for NPC. The overall quality of each report was assessed using a 28-point overall quality score (OQS) based on the 2010 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. To provide baseline data for further evaluation, we also investigated the reporting quality of certain important issues in detail, including key methodologic items (allocation concealment, blinding, intention-to-treat principle), endpoints, follow-up, subgroup analyses, and adverse events. Results: We retrieved 24 relevant RCTs including 6591 patients. Median 2010 OQS was 15.5 (range, 10-24). Half of the items in the 2010 OQS were poorly reported in at least 40% of trials. Multivariable regression models revealed that publication after 2010 and high impact factor were significant predictors of improved 2010 OQS. Additionally, many issues that we consider significant were not reported adequately. Conclusions: Despite publication of the CONSORT statement more than a decade ago, overall reporting quality for RCTs in NPC was unsatisfactory. Additionally, substantial selectivity and heterogeneity exists in reporting of certain crucial issues. This survey provides the first prompt for NPC trial investigators to improve reporting quality according to the CONSORT statement; increased scrutiny and diligence by editors and peer reviewers is also required.

  7. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO EXPERT EVALUATION OF PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL TRIALS OF HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the experience of Russian and leading foreign regulatory agencies in organisation and conduction of preclinical and clinical trials of human immunoglobulin products. The authors suggest a classification of human immunoglobulins and provide updated information on authorization of these products in Russia. The article summarizes methodological approaches, basic scientific principles and criteria relating to expert evaluation of preclinical and clinical trials of blood products. The authors further define the expert body’s requirements for data on preclinical and clinical trials of human normal immuniglobulins and human specific immunoglobulins for the prevention and/or treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases which are submitted as part of applications for marketing authorization or marketing authorization variation. The article suggests programs of preclinical and clinical trials for human normal immunoglobulins and human specific immunoglobulins for the prevention and/or treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases that are aligned with the Russian legislation and Eurasian Economic Union’s regulations on medicines circulation, and have been elaborated with respect to the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency.

  8. A Cluster-Randomized Trial of Restorative Practices: An Illustration to Spur High-Quality Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie D.; Chinman, Matthew; Ebener, Patricia; Phillips, Andrea; Xenakis, Lea; Malone, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Restorative practices in schools lack rigorous evaluation studies. As an example of rigorous school-based research, this article describes the first randomized control trial of restorative practices to date, the Study of Restorative Practices. It is a 5-year, cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Restorative Practices Intervention (RPI)…

  9. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzman-Ulrich Heather

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. Methods The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities. ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Results Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach. These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Conclusion Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  10. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Saunders, Ruth P; Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather; Meyers, Duncan C; Mansard, Leslie

    2009-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT) randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA) behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities). ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach). These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  11. DRIVERS' EVALUATIONS OF THE ACTIVE ACCELERATOR PEDAL IN A REAL-LIFE TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeli ADELL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large-scale field trial, conducted between 2000 and 2001, the test drivers used the Active Accelerator Pedal for between 6 and 12 months in their regular cars. The drivers' evaluations, elicited by questionnaires after one month of usage and at the end of the trial, were analysed with ANOVA (repeated-measure and compared to the objectively measured effects in the same trial. The drivers found the system to be effective in decreasing their speed and believed their risk of being fined for speeding decreased drastically. On the other hand, their workload increased and their emotional state deteriorated. They reported an increased feeling of obstructing other drivers and reduced driving enjoyment. Between-subject effects showed a different way of using the system depending on age; younger drivers used the supporting function of the system more, while older drivers found the counter force more of a command to lower their speed. Time effects showed the importance of long-term evaluations and the interaction effects demonstrated how development of driver responses over time depend on driver type and initial attitude. Comparing driver subjective experiences and objectively measured effects, discrepancies were found in the magnitude of speed changes and car-following distances. The delegation of responsibility coincided well with the objectively measured effects.

  12. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest should be further evaluated-A systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    were calculated with random- and fixed-effects models and random errors were evaluated with trial sequential analysis (TSA). RESULTS: Five randomised trials (478 patients) were included. All trials had substantial risk of bias. The relative risk (RR) for death was 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.......70 to 1.01) and for poor neurological outcome 0.78 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.95). For the two trials with least risk of bias the RR for death was 0.92 (95% CI 0.56 to 1.51) and for poor neurological outcome 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.56 to 1.50). TSA indicated lack of firm evidence for a beneficial effect...

  13. A Phase II study of olaparib in breast cancer patients: biological evaluation from a 'window of opportunity' trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Milani, Manuela; Gobbi, Angela; Dester, Martina; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Allevi, Giovanni; Aguggini, Sergio; Ravelli, Andrea; Gussago, Francesca; Cocconi, Alessandra; Zanotti, Laura; Senti, Chiara; Strina, Carla; Bottini, Alberto; Generali, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    The OLTRE trial (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02681562) is an open-label, 'window of opportunity' Phase II controlled trial to evaluate the biological activity of olaparib in locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer compared with other subtypes of locally advanced breast cancer patients carrying germinal BRCA mutation receiving olaparib with the same treatment approach. The primary end point is to investigate the correlation between baseline gene and protein expression profile in order to identify possible predictive markers of response to olaparib. The OLTRE trial is expected to identify the surrogate markers of the biological activity of olaparib in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

  14. Does Participation in a Randomized Clinical Trial Change Outcomes? An Evaluation of Patients Not Enrolled in the SPRINT Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Carol Alice; Bhandari, Mohit; Guyatt, Gordon; Walter, Stephen D.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Sanders, David; Tornetta, Paul; Sanders, David W.; Walter, Stephen; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; Jones, Alan; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Ford, Michael; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, G. Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Gagnon, Sylvain; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Poirier, Marie-France; McKee, Michael D.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Obremskey, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce A.; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Frantz-Bush, Linda; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, David E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    To determine the extent to which knowledge from clinical trial protocols is transferred to nonparticipating patients. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a large clinical trial. Six level-1 international trauma centers. We compared rates and timing of reoperation in a subset of

  15. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L; Paludan-Müller, A. S.; Laursen, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how...... the tool is applied to both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods: A review of published comments (searches in PubMed, The Cochrane Methodology Register and Google Scholar) and an observational study (100 Cochrane and 100 non-Cochrane reviews from 2014). Results: Our review included 68...... in non-Cochrane reviews (31/100). Both types of reviews frequently implemented the tool in non-recommended ways. Most Cochrane reviews planned to use risk of bias assessments as basis for sensitivity analyses (70 %), but only a minority conducted such analyses (19 %) because, in many cases, few trials...

  16. Understanding influences on teachers' uptake and use of behaviour management strategies within the STARS trial: process evaluation protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Lorraine; Sharkey, Siobhan; Edwards, Vanessa; Ukoumunne, Obioha; Byford, Sarah; Norwich, Brahm; Logan, Stuart; Ford, Tamsin

    2015-02-10

    The 'Supporting Teachers And childRen in Schools' (STARS) study is a cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management (TCM) programme as a public health intervention. TCM is a 6 day training course delivered to groups of 8-12 teachers. The STARS trial will investigate whether TCM can improve children's behaviour, attainment and wellbeing, reduce teachers' stress and improve their self-efficacy. This protocol describes the methodology of the process evaluation embedded within the main trial, which aims to examine the uptake and implementation of TCM strategies within the classroom plus the wider school environment and improve the understanding of outcomes. The STARS trial will work with eighty teachers of children aged 4-9 years from eighty schools. Teachers will be randomised to attend the TCM course (intervention arm) or to "teach as normal" (control arm) and attend the course a year later. The process evaluation will use quantitative and qualitative approaches to assess fidelity to model, as well as explore headteachers' and teachers' experiences of TCM and investigate school factors that influence the translation of skills learnt to practice. Four of the eight groups of teachers (n = 40) will be invited to participate in focus groups within one month of completing the TCM course, and again a year later, while 45 of the 80 headteachers will be invited to take part in telephone interviews. Standardised checklists will be completed by group leaders and each training session will be videotaped to assess fidelity to model. Teachers will also complete standardised session evaluations. This study will provide important information about whether the Teacher Classroom Management course influences child and teacher mental health and well-being in both the short and long term. The process evaluation will provide valuable insights into factors that may facilitate or impede any impact. The trial has been registered with ISCTRN

  17. Assessing reperfusion and recanalization as markers of clinical outcomes after intravenous thrombolysis in the echoplanar imaging thrombolytic evaluation trial (EPITHET)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Silva, Deidre A; Fink, John N; Christensen, Soren; Ebinger, Martin; Bladin, Christopher; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark; Butcher, Ken; Barber, P Alan; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    .... We aimed to prove that the beneficial impact of recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator on clinical outcomes is attributable to reperfusion in the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET...

  18. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables....

  19. Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases (TICD): a protocol for process evaluation in cluster randomized controlled trials in five European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, C.; Freund, T.; Steinhauser, J.; Aakhus, E.; Flottorp, S.; Godycki-Cwirko, M.; Lieshout, J. van; Krause, J.; Szecsenyi, J.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the 'Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases (TICD)' project, five tailored implementation programs to improve healthcare delivery in different chronic conditions have been developed. These programs will be evaluated in distinct cluster-randomized controlled trials. This protocol

  20. How to design and evaluate randomized controlled trials in immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: an ARIA-GA(2) LEN statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Schünemann, H J; Bousquet, P J

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the treatments for allergic rhinitis. However, for allergists, nonspecialists, regulators, payers, and patients, there remain gaps in understanding the evaluation of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Although treating the same diseases, RCTs in SIT...

  1. Randomized Trial of Smartphone-Based Evaluation for an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Nasim C; Fay, Emily E; Schiff, Melissa A; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Debiec, Katherine E

    2017-12-19

    We hypothesized that compared to paper evaluations, a smartphone-based quick response (QR) evaluation tool would improve timeliness of feedback, enhance efficacy of giving and receiving feedback, and be as easy to use. We performed a randomized controlled trial of student and instructor experience with two evaluation tools in the OB/GYN clerkship at University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM). Sites were randomized to the QR or paper tool; students at QR sites received individualized QR codes at the beginning of the clerkship. Instructors and students completed postintervention surveys regarding the evaluation tool and associated feedback. We compared responses between groups using chi-squared tests. Participating clerkship sites included primary, tertiary, private practice and institutional settings affiliated with the University of Washington in the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho region. Of the 29 OB/GYN UWSOM clerkship sites, 18 agreed to participate and were randomized. Of 29 eligible instructors, 25 (86%) completed the survey, with n = 18 using QR and n = 7 using paper. Of 161 eligible students, 102 (63%) completed the survey, with n = 54 using QR and n = 48 using paper. Compared to those using paper evaluations, instructors using QR evaluations were significantly more likely to agree that the evaluation tool was easy to understand (100% QR vs 43% paper, p = 0.002), the tool was effective in providing feedback (78% QR vs 29% paper, p = 0.002), and they felt comfortable approaching students with the tool (89% QR vs 43% paper, p = 0.002). Compared to those using paper evaluations, students using QR evaluations were less likely to agree the tool was effective in eliciting feedback (QR 43% vs paper 55%, p = 0.042). Instructors found QR evaluations superior to paper evaluations for providing feedback to medical students, whereas students found QR evaluations less effective for feedback. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in

  2. Criteria for evaluating response and outcome in clinical trials for children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative disease in young children. While hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative therapeutic option for most patients, children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia increasingly receive novel agents in phase I-II clinical trials as pre-transplant therapy or therapy for relapse after transplantation. However, response criteria or definitions of outcome for standardized evaluation of treatment effect in patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia are currently lacking. Here we propose criteria to evaluate the response to the non-transplant therapy and definitions of remission status after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For the evaluation of non-transplant therapy, we defined 6 clinical variables (white blood cell count, platelet count, hematopoietic precursors and blasts in peripheral blood, bone marrow blast percentage, spleen size and extramedullary disease) and 3 genetic variables (cytogenetic, molecular and chimerism response) which serve to describe the heterogeneous picture of response to therapy in each individual case. It is hoped that these criteria will facilitate the comparison of results between clinical trials in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  3. Competency to stand trial evaluations: a study of actual practice in two states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E; Waters, J; Herbert, P

    1997-01-01

    A criminal defendant must be competent to stand trial (CST) to safeguard the fundamental right to a fair trial. If there is a question as to a defendant's ability to assist in his or her own defense, a mental health professional is asked to perform a CST evaluation. Forensic assessment is a growing field, and CST is the most frequent evaluation requested. Over the years, forensic examiners' reports to the courts have been criticized for lack of relevance, insufficiency, and invading the province of the judge. If mental health professionals wish to advance the field of forensic assessment and respond to these criticisms, research on current practice with suggestions for advancement are necessary. A total of 66 CST reports conducted within the last five years in two states were compared to a proposed model for CST assessment. Results indicated that although forensic examiners are maintaining legal relevance, some CST reports may lack thoroughness and/or provide information that exceeds their role responsibilities. The findings support the need for the development of a standardized method of conducting and writing CST evaluations that should improve the quality of such reports.

  4. Protocol for economic evaluation alongside the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Joanne E

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development and publication of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs for acute low back pain (LBP has resulted in evidence-based recommendations that, if implemented, have the potential to improve the quality and safety of care for acute LBP. While a strategy has been specified for dissemination of the CPG for acute LBP in Australia, there is no accompanying plan for active implementation. Evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of active implementation of CPGs for acute LBP is sparse. The IMPLEMENT study will consider the incremental benefits and costs of progressing beyond development and dissemination to implementation. Methods/design Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses alongside the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT from a societal perspective to quantify the additional costs (savings and health gains associated with a targeted implementation strategy as compared with access to the CPG via dissemination only. Discussion The protocol provided here registers our intent to conduct an economic evaluation alongside the IMPLEMENT study, facilitates peer-review of proposed methods and provides a transparent statement of planned analyses. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN012606000098538

  5. Trials in primary care: statistical issues in the design, conduct and evaluation of complex interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, G A; Campbell, M J; Eldridge, S; Farrin, A; Marchant, M; Muller, S; Perera, R; Peters, T J; Prevost, A T; Rait, G

    2010-08-01

    Trials carried out in primary care typically involve complex interventions that require considerable planning if they are to be implemented successfully. The role of the statistician in promoting both robust study design and appropriate statistical analysis is an important contribution to a multi-disciplinary primary care research group. Issues in the design of complex interventions have been addressed in the Medical Research Council's new guidance document and over the past 7 years by the Royal Statistical Society's Primary Health Care Study Group. With the aim of raising the profile of statistics and building research capability in this area, particularly with respect to methodological issues, the study group meetings have covered a wide range of topics that have been of interest to statisticians and non-statisticians alike. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the statistical issues that have arisen over the years related to the design and evaluation of trials in primary care, to provide useful examples and references for further study and ultimately to promote good practice in the conduct of complex interventions carried out in primary care and other health care settings. Throughout we have given particular emphasis to statistical issues related to the design of cluster randomised trials.

  6. An evaluation of the effectiveness of recruitment methods: the staying well after depression randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, Adele; Rudolf von Rohr, Isabelle; Muse, Kate; Duggan, Danielle; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J Mark G

    2014-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as being the most efficient way of investigating the efficacy of psychological therapies. However, researchers conducting RCTs commonly report difficulties in recruiting an adequate sample within planned timescales. In an effort to overcome recruitment difficulties, researchers often are forced to expand their recruitment criteria or extend the recruitment phase, thus increasing costs and delaying publication of results. Research investigating the effectiveness of recruitment strategies is limited, and trials often fail to report sufficient details about the recruitment sources and resources utilized. We examined the efficacy of strategies implemented during the Staying Well after Depression RCT in Oxford to recruit participants with a history of recurrent depression. We describe eight recruitment methods utilized and two further sources not initiated by the research team and examine their efficacy in terms of (1) the return, including the number of potential participants who contacted the trial and the number who were randomized into the trial; (2) cost-effectiveness, comprising direct financial cost and manpower for initial contacts and randomized participants; and (3) comparison of sociodemographic characteristics of individuals recruited from different sources. Poster advertising, web-based advertising, and mental health worker referrals were the cheapest methods per randomized participant; however, the ratio of randomized participants to initial contacts differed markedly per source. Advertising online, via posters, and on a local radio station were the most cost-effective recruitment methods for soliciting participants who subsequently were randomized into the trial. Advertising across many sources (saturation) was found to be important. It may not be feasible to employ all the recruitment methods used in this trial to obtain participation from other populations, such as those currently unwell, or in

  7. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae) are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA) 95% CI: 85.09-117.26) more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151. PMID:22369511

  8. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Habermehl, Daniel; Weitz, Jürgen; Jäger, Dirk; Fossati, Piero; Orrechia, Roberto; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Pötter, Richard; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jäkel, Oliver; Büchler, Markus W; Debus, Jürgen

    2012-04-03

    I part is toxicity, the primary endpoint in the Phase II part is progression-free survival. With conventional photon irradiation treatment of recurrent rectal cancer is limited, and the clinical effect is only moderate. With carbon ions, an improved outcome can be expected due to the physical and biological characteristics of the carbon ion beam. However, the optimal dose applicable in this clincial situation as re-irradiation still has to be determined. This, as well as efficacy, is to be evaluated in the present Phase I/II trial. NCT01528683.

  9. A new cognitive evaluation battery for Down syndrome and its relevance for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana ede Sola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent prospect of pharmaceutical interventions for cognitive impairment of Down syndrome(DS has boosted a number of clinical trials in this population. However, running the trials has raised some methodological challenges and questioned the prevailing methodology used to evaluate cognitive functioning of DS individuals. This is usually achieved by comparing DS individuals to matched healthy controls of the same mental age. We propose a new tool, the TESDAD Battery that uses comparison with age-matched typically developed adults. This is an advantageous method for probing the clinical efficacy of DS therapies, allowing the interpretation and prediction of functional outcomes in clinical trials. In our DS population the TESDAD battery permitted a quantitative assessment of cognitive defects, which indicated language dysfunction and deficits in executive function, as the most important contributors to other cognitive and adaptive behavior outcomes as predictors of functional change in DS. Concretely, auditory comprehension and functional academics showed the highest potential as end-point measures of therapeutic intervention for clinical trials: the former as a cognitive key target for therapeutic intervention, and the latter as a primary functional outcome measure of clinical efficacy. Our results also emphasize the need to explore the modulating effects of IQ, gender and age on cognitive enhancing treatments. Noticeably, women performed significantly better than men of the same age and IQ in most cognitive tests, with the most consistent differences occurring in memory and executive functioning and negative trends rarely emerged on quality of life linked to the effect of age after adjusting for IQ and gender. In sum, the TESDAD battery is a useful neurocognitive tool for probing the clinical efficacy of experimental therapies in interventional studies in the DS population suggesting that age-matched controls are advantageous for determining

  10. A new cognitive evaluation battery for Down syndrome and its relevance for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sola, Susana; de la Torre, Rafael; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Benejam, Bessy; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; Del Hoyo, Laura; Rodríguez, Joan; Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Judit; Dueñas-Espin, Ivan; Hernandez, Gimena; Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Langohr, Klaus; Videla, Sebastia; Blehaut, Henry; Farre, Magi; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-01-01

    The recent prospect of pharmaceutical interventions for cognitive impairment of Down syndrome (DS) has boosted a number of clinical trials in this population. However, running the trials has raised some methodological challenges and questioned the prevailing methodology used to evaluate cognitive functioning of DS individuals. This is usually achieved by comparing DS individuals to matched healthy controls of the same mental age. We propose a new tool, the TESDAD Battery that uses comparison with age-matched typically developed adults. This is an advantageous method for probing the clinical efficacy of DS therapies, allowing the interpretation and prediction of functional outcomes in clinical trials. In our DS population the TESDAD battery permitted a quantitative assessment of cognitive defects, which indicated language dysfunction and deficits in executive function, as the most important contributors to other cognitive and adaptive behavior outcomes as predictors of functional change in DS. Concretely, auditory comprehension and functional academics showed the highest potential as end-point measures of therapeutic intervention for clinical trials: the former as a cognitive key target for therapeutic intervention, and the latter as a primary functional outcome measure of clinical efficacy. Our results also emphasize the need to explore the modulating effects of IQ, gender and age on cognitive enhancing treatments. Noticeably, women performed significantly better than men of the same age and IQ in most cognitive tests, with the most consistent differences occurring in memory and executive functioning and negative trends rarely emerged on quality of life linked to the effect of age after adjusting for IQ and gender. In sum, the TESDAD battery is a useful neurocognitive tool for probing the clinical efficacy of experimental therapies in interventional studies in the DS population suggesting that age-matched controls are advantageous for determining normalization of

  11. A randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of knowledge translation and exchange strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Mara Linda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Significant resources and time are invested in the production of research knowledge. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three knowledge translation and exchange strategies in the incorporation of research evidence into public health policies and programs. Methods This trial was conducted with a national sample of public health departments in Canada from 2004 to 2006. The three interventions, implemented over one year in 2005, included access to an online registry of research evidence; tailored messaging; and a knowledge broker. The primary outcome assessed the extent to which research evidence was used in a recent program decision, and the secondary outcome measured the change in the sum of evidence-informed healthy body weight promotion policies or programs being delivered at health departments. Mixed-effects models were used to test the hypotheses. Findings One hundred and eight of 141 (77% health departments participated in this study. No significant effect of the intervention was observed for primary outcome (p e.g., value placed on research evidence in decision making. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that under certain conditions tailored, targeted messages are more effective than knowledge brokering and access to an online registry of research evidence. Greater emphasis on the identification of organizational factors is needed in order to implement strategies that best meet the needs of individual organizations. Trial Registration The trial registration number and title are as follows: ISRCTN35240937 -- Is a knowledge broker more effective than other strategies in promoting evidence-based physical activity and healthy body weight programming?

  12. The practice of 'doing' evaluation: lessons learned from nine complex intervention trials in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joanna; DiLiberto, Deborah; Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Ansah, Evelyn K; Lal, Sham; Mbakilwa, Hilda; Bruxvoort, Katia; Webster, Jayne; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Yeung, Shunmay; Leslie, Toby; Hutchinson, Eleanor; Reyburn, Hugh; Lalloo, David G; Schellenberg, David; Cundill, Bonnie; Staedke, Sarah G; Wiseman, Virginia; Goodman, Catherine; Chandler, Clare I R

    2014-06-17

    There is increasing recognition among trialists of the challenges in understanding how particular 'real-life' contexts influence the delivery and receipt of complex health interventions. Evaluations of interventions to change health worker and/or patient behaviours in health service settings exemplify these challenges. When interpreting evaluation data, deviation from intended intervention implementation is accounted for through process evaluations of fidelity, reach, and intensity. However, no such systematic approach has been proposed to account for the way evaluation activities may deviate in practice from assumptions made when data are interpreted. A collective case study was conducted to explore experiences of undertaking evaluation activities in the real-life contexts of nine complex intervention trials seeking to improve appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria in varied health service settings. Multiple sources of data were used, including in-depth interviews with investigators, participant-observation of studies, and rounds of discussion and reflection. From our experiences of the realities of conducting these evaluations, we identified six key 'lessons learned' about ways to become aware of and manage aspects of the fabric of trials involving the interface of researchers, fieldworkers, participants and data collection tools that may affect the intended production of data and interpretation of findings. These lessons included: foster a shared understanding across the study team of how individual practices contribute to the study goals; promote and facilitate within-team communications for ongoing reflection on the progress of the evaluation; establish processes for ongoing collaboration and dialogue between sub-study teams; the importance of a field research coordinator bridging everyday project management with scientific oversight; collect and review reflective field notes on the progress of the evaluation to aid interpretation of outcomes; and

  13. Evaluation of Wet Cupping Therapy: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bedah, Abdullah M N; Khalil, Mohamed K M; Posadzki, Paul; Sohaibani, Imen; Aboushanab, Tamer Shaaban; AlQaed, Meshari; Ali, Gazzaffi I M

    2016-10-01

    Wet cupping is a widely used traditional therapy in many countries, which justifies a continuous scientific evaluation of its efficacy and safety. To perform a systematic review to critically evaluate and update the available evidence of wet cupping in traditional and complementary medicine. Ten electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2016. Included studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated wet cupping against any type of control interventions in patients with any clinical condition, as well as healthy individuals. Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to appraise the included RCTs. Fourteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. The included studies evaluated the following clinical conditions: nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), hypertension, brachialgia, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), chronic neck pain, metabolic syndrome, migraine headaches, oxygen saturation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease. Two RCTs evaluated physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals. Overall, 9 RCTs favored wet cupping over various control interventions in NSLBP (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), brachialgia (n = 1), CTS (n = 1), chronic neck pain (n = 2), oxygen saturation in smokers with COPD (n = 1), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease (n = 1). Five RCTs showed no statistically significant between-group differences: NSLBP (n = 1), metabolic syndrome (n = 1), migraine headaches (n = 1), and physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals (n = 2). Included RCTs had a variable risk of bias across all domains and suffered methodologic limitations. There is a promising evidence in favor of the use of wet cupping for musculoskeletal pain, specifically NSLBP, neck pain, CTS, and brachialgia. Better-quality trials are needed to generate solid evidence and firmly inform policy makers.

  14. A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of the Welsh National Exercise Referral Scheme: protocol for trial and integrated economic and process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Janine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits to health of a physically active lifestyle are well established and there is evidence that a sedentary lifestyle plays a significant role in the onset and progression of chronic disease. Despite a recognised need for effective public health interventions encouraging sedentary people with a medical condition to become more active, there are few rigorous evaluations of their effectiveness. Following NICE guidance, the Welsh national exercise referral scheme was implemented within the context of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Methods/Design The randomised controlled trial, with nested economic and process evaluations, recruited 2,104 inactive men and women aged 16+ with coronary heart disease (CHD risk factors and/or mild to moderate depression, anxiety or stress. Participants were recruited from 12 local health boards in Wales and referred directly by health professionals working in a range of health care settings. Consenting participants were randomised to either a 16 week tailored exercise programme run by qualified exercise professionals at community sports centres (intervention, or received an information booklet on physical activity (control. A range of validated measures assessing physical activity, mental health, psycho-social processes and health economics were administered at 6 and 12 months, with the primary 12 month outcome measure being 7 day Physical Activity Recall. The process evaluation explored factors determining the effectiveness or otherwise of the scheme, whilst the economic evaluation determined the relative cost-effectiveness of the scheme in terms of public spending. Discussion Evaluation of such a large scale national public health intervention presents methodological challenges in terms of trial design and implementation. This study was facilitated by early collaboration with social research and policy colleagues to develop a rigorous design which included an innovative approach

  15. Evaluating the angina plan in patients admitted to hospital with angina: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetta, Stella; Smith, Karen; Jones, Martyn; Allcoat, Paul; Sullivan, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the Angina Plan (AP), a cognitive-behavioral nurse-facilitated self-help intervention against standard care (SC). A randomized controlled trial of 218 patients hospitalized with angina assessed participants predischarge and 6 months later. Data were collected during a structured interview using validated questionnaires, self-report, and physiological measurement to assess between group changes in mood, knowledge and misconceptions, cardiovascular risk, symptoms, quality of life, and health service utilization. The intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis found no reliable effects on anxiety and depression at 6 months. AP participants reported increased knowledge, less misconceptions, reduced body mass index (BMI), an increase in self-reported exercise, less functional limitation, and improvements in general health perceptions and social and leisure activities compared to those receiving SC. Sensitivity analysis excluding participants with high baseline depression revealed a statistical significant reduction in depression levels in AP compared to the SC participants. Analysis excluding participants receiving cardiac surgery or angioplasty removed the ITT effects on physical limitation, self-reported exercise and general health perceptions and the improvements seen in social and leisure activities, while adaptive effects on knowledge, misconceptions and BMI remained and between-group changes in depression approached significance. Initiating the AP in a secondary care setting for patients with new and existing angina produces similar benefits to those reported in newly diagnosed primary care patients. Further evaluation is required to examine the extent of observed effects in the longer term. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Design and selection of soy breads used for evaluating isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Vodovotz, Yael

    2013-03-27

    To modulate isoflavone aglycone composition within a soy functional food, soy ingredients were processed and evaluated in a soy bread system intended for clinical trials. A soy flour/soy milk mixture (SM) was boiled, fermented, steamed, or roasted prior to dough preparation. The isoflavone compositions of five processed SM and their corresponding breads combined with and without β-glucosidase-rich almonds were examined using HPLC. Isoflavone malonyl-glucosides (>80%) were converted into acetyl and simple glucoside forms (substrates more favorable for β-glucosidase) in steamed and roasted SM. Their corresponding breads had isoflavones predominately as aglycones (∼75%) with soy-almond bread with steamed SM being more consumer acceptable than roasted. Isoflavone composition in soy bread was stable during frozen storage and toasting. A suitable glycoside-rich soy bread (31.6 ± 2.1 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using unprocessed SM and an aglycone-rich soy-almond bread (31.1 ± 1.9 mg aglycone equiv/slice) using steamed SM were developed to evaluate fundamental questions of isoflavone bioavailability in clinical trials.

  17. A randomized control trial evaluating fluorescent ink versus dark ink tattoos for breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeg, Steven J; Kirby, Anna M; Lee, Steven F; Bartlett, Freddie; Titmarsh, Kumud; Donovan, Ellen; Griffin, Clare L; Gothard, Lone; Locke, Imogen; McNair, Helen A

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this UK study was to evaluate interfraction reproducibility and body image score when using ultraviolet (UV) tattoos (not visible in ambient lighting) for external references during breast/chest wall radiotherapy and compare with conventional dark ink. In this non-blinded, single-centre, parallel group, randomized control trial, patients were allocated to receive either conventional dark ink or UV ink tattoos using computer-generated random blocks. Participant assignment was not masked. Systematic (∑) and random (σ) setup errors were determined using electronic portal images. Body image questionnaires were completed at pre-treatment, 1 month and 6 months to determine the impact of tattoo type on body image. The primary end point was to determine that UV tattoo random error (σsetup) was no less accurate than with conventional dark ink tattoos, i.e. tattoos. 45 patients completed treatment (UV: n = 23, dark: n = 22). σsetup for the UV tattoo group was tattoo group compared with the dark ink group at 1 month [56% (13/23) vs 14% (3/22), respectively] and 6 months [52% (11/21) vs 38% (8/21), respectively]. UV tattoos were associated with interfraction setup reproducibility comparable with conventional dark ink. Patients reported a more favourable change in body image score up to 6 months following treatment. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first to evaluate UV tattoo external references in a randomized control trial.

  18. Clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of biocompound IMMUNEPOTENT CRP in the third-molar extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moises A. Franco-Molina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A controlled, parallel, randomized and comparative trial was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory efficacy of IMMUNEPOTENT CRP versus ibuprofen in patients after third-molar surgery over seven days. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of IMMUNEPOTENT CRP was evaluated using the method of Amin and Laskin, and the analysis of cytokine production (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, INF-γ in saliva was done by flow cytometry. The swelling process after surgery was significant (p < 0.05 and the treatments with IMMUNEPOTENT CRP or ibuprofen controlled this process properly; no difference between the groups was found (p < 0.05. Both treatments were shown to modulate the cytokine production. These results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory activity of the natural compound IMMUNEPOTENT CRP and suggest it could be used in clinical dental practice.

  19. Economic support to improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes in South Africa: a qualitative process evaluation of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutge, Elizabeth; Lewin, Simon; Volmink, Jimmy

    2014-06-19

    Poverty undermines the adherence of patients to tuberculosis treatment. A pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the extent to which economic support in the form of a voucher would improve patients' adherence to treatment, and their treatment outcomes. Although the trial showed a modest improvement in the treatment success rates of the intervention group, this was not statistically significant, due in part to the low fidelity to the trial intervention. A qualitative process evaluation, conducted in the final few months of the trial, explained some of the factors that contributed to this low fidelity. In-depth interviews were conducted with patients who received vouchers, nurses in intervention clinics, personnel in shops who administered the vouchers, and managers of the TB Control Programme. These interviews were analyzed thematically. The low fidelity to the trial intervention can be explained by two main factors. The first was nurses' tendency to 'ration' the vouchers, only giving them to the most needy of eligible patients and leaving out those eligible patients whom they felt were financially more comfortable. The second was logistical issues related to the administration of the voucher as vouchers were not always available for patients on their appointed clinic dates, necessitating further visits to the clinics which they were not always able to make. This process evaluation identifies some of the most important factors that contributed to the results of this pragmatic trial. It highlights the value of process evaluations as tools to explain the results of randomized trials and emphasizes the importance of implementers as 'street level bureaucrats' who may profoundly affect the way an intervention is administered. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50689131, registered 21 April 2009. The trial protocol is available at the following web address: http://www.hst.org.za/publications/study-protocol-economic-incentives-improving-clinical-outcomes-patients-tb-south-africa.

  20. Evaluating clinical trial designs for investigational treatments of Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ben S; Boni, Maciej F; Pan-ngum, Wirichada; Day, Nicholas P J; Horby, Peter W; Olliaro, Piero; Lang, Trudie; White, Nicholas J; White, Lisa J; Whitehead, John

    2015-04-01

    Experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease (EVD) might reduce EVD mortality. There is uncertainty about the ability of different clinical trial designs to identify effective treatments, and about the feasibility of implementing individually randomised controlled trials during an Ebola epidemic. A treatment evaluation programme for use in EVD was devised using a multi-stage approach (MSA) with two or three stages, including both non-randomised and randomised elements. The probabilities of rightly or wrongly recommending the experimental treatment, the required sample size, and the consequences for epidemic outcomes over 100 d under two epidemic scenarios were compared for the MSA, a sequential randomised controlled trial (SRCT) with up to 20 interim analyses, and, as a reference case, a conventional randomised controlled trial (RCT) without interim analyses. Assuming 50% 14-d survival in the population treated with the current standard of supportive care, all designs had similar probabilities of identifying effective treatments correctly, while the MSA was less likely to recommend treatments that were ineffective. The MSA led to a smaller number of cases receiving ineffective treatments and faster roll-out of highly effective treatments. For less effective treatments, the MSA had a high probability of including an RCT component, leading to a somewhat longer time to roll-out or rejection. Assuming 100 new EVD cases per day, the MSA led to between 6% and 15% greater reductions in epidemic mortality over the first 100 d for highly effective treatments compared to the SRCT. Both the MSA and SRCT led to substantially fewer deaths than a conventional RCT if the tested interventions were either highly effective or harmful. In the proposed MSA, the major threat to the validity of the results of the non-randomised components is that referral patterns, standard of care, or the virus itself may change during the study period in ways that affect mortality. Adverse events

  1. Evaluating clinical trial designs for investigational treatments of Ebola virus disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben S Cooper

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease (EVD might reduce EVD mortality. There is uncertainty about the ability of different clinical trial designs to identify effective treatments, and about the feasibility of implementing individually randomised controlled trials during an Ebola epidemic.A treatment evaluation programme for use in EVD was devised using a multi-stage approach (MSA with two or three stages, including both non-randomised and randomised elements. The probabilities of rightly or wrongly recommending the experimental treatment, the required sample size, and the consequences for epidemic outcomes over 100 d under two epidemic scenarios were compared for the MSA, a sequential randomised controlled trial (SRCT with up to 20 interim analyses, and, as a reference case, a conventional randomised controlled trial (RCT without interim analyses. Assuming 50% 14-d survival in the population treated with the current standard of supportive care, all designs had similar probabilities of identifying effective treatments correctly, while the MSA was less likely to recommend treatments that were ineffective. The MSA led to a smaller number of cases receiving ineffective treatments and faster roll-out of highly effective treatments. For less effective treatments, the MSA had a high probability of including an RCT component, leading to a somewhat longer time to roll-out or rejection. Assuming 100 new EVD cases per day, the MSA led to between 6% and 15% greater reductions in epidemic mortality over the first 100 d for highly effective treatments compared to the SRCT. Both the MSA and SRCT led to substantially fewer deaths than a conventional RCT if the tested interventions were either highly effective or harmful. In the proposed MSA, the major threat to the validity of the results of the non-randomised components is that referral patterns, standard of care, or the virus itself may change during the study period in ways that affect mortality

  2. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  3. "Did the trial kill the intervention?" experiences from the development, implementation and evaluation of a complex intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Lydia; Arthur, Antony; Cox, Karen

    2011-03-01

    The development, implementation and evaluation of any new health intervention is complex. This paper uses experiences from the design, implementation and evaluation of a rehabilitation programme to shed light on, and prompt discussion around, some of the complexities involved in such an undertaking. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 trial participants and five members of staff at the conclusion of a trial evaluating a rehabilitation programme aimed at promoting recovery after stem cell transplantation. This study identified a number of challenges relating to the development and evaluation of complex interventions. The difficulty of providing a standardised intervention that was acceptable to patients was highlighted in the participant interviews. Trial participants and some members of staff found the concept of equipoise and randomisation challenging and there was discord between the psychosocial nature of the intervention and the predominant bio-medical culture in which the research took place. A lack of scientific evidence as to the efficacy of an intervention does not preclude staff and patients holding strong views about the benefits of an intervention. The evaluation of complex interventions should, where possible, facilitate not restrict that complexity. Within the local environment where the trial is conducted, acquiescence from those in positions of authority is insufficient; commitment to the trial is required.

  4. "Did the trial kill the intervention?" experiences from the development, implementation and evaluation of a complex intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Karen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development, implementation and evaluation of any new health intervention is complex. This paper uses experiences from the design, implementation and evaluation of a rehabilitation programme to shed light on, and prompt discussion around, some of the complexities involved in such an undertaking. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 trial participants and five members of staff at the conclusion of a trial evaluating a rehabilitation programme aimed at promoting recovery after stem cell transplantation. Results This study identified a number of challenges relating to the development and evaluation of complex interventions. The difficulty of providing a standardised intervention that was acceptable to patients was highlighted in the participant interviews. Trial participants and some members of staff found the concept of equipoise and randomisation challenging and there was discord between the psychosocial nature of the intervention and the predominant bio-medical culture in which the research took place. Conclusions A lack of scientific evidence as to the efficacy of an intervention does not preclude staff and patients holding strong views about the benefits of an intervention. The evaluation of complex interventions should, where possible, facilitate not restrict that complexity. Within the local environment where the trial is conducted, acquiescence from those in positions of authority is insufficient; commitment to the trial is required.

  5. Coronary Artery Disease Evaluation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (CADERA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhayiem, Bara; Pavitt, Sue; Baxter, Paul; Andrews, Jacqueline; Greenwood, John P; Buch, Maya H; Plein, Sven

    2014-11-08

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is increased compared to the general population. Immune dysregulation and systemic inflammation are thought to be associated with this increased risk. Early diagnosis with immediate treatment and tight control of RA forms a central treatment paradigm. It remains unclear, however, whether using tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) to achieve remission confer additional beneficial effects over standard therapy, especially on the development of CVD. Coronary Artery Disease Evaluation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (CADERA) is a prospective cardiovascular imaging study that bolts onto an existing single-centre, randomized controlled trial, VEDERA (Very Early versus Delayed Etanercept in Rheumatoid Arthritis). VEDERA will recruit 120 patients with early, treatment-naïve RA, randomized to TNFi therapy etanercept (ETN) combined with methotrexate (MTX), or therapy with MTX with or without additional synthetic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs with escalation to ETN following a 'treat-to-target' regimen. VEDERA patients will be recruited into CADERA and undergo cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) assessment with; cine imaging, rest/stress adenosine perfusion, tissue-tagging, aortic distensibility, T1 mapping and late gadolinium imaging. Primary objectives are to detect the prevalence and change of cardiovascular abnormalities by CMR between TNFi and standard therapy over a 12-month period. All patients will enter an inflammatory arthritis registry for long-term follow-up. CADERA is a multi-parametric study describing cardiovascular abnormalities in early, treatment-naïve RA patients, with assessment of changes at one year between early biological therapy and conventional therapy. This trial was registered with Current Controlled Trials (registration number: ISRCTN50167738) on 8 November 2013.

  6. Rationale and Design of the Randomized Evaluation of Default Access to Palliative Services (REDAPS) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Madden, Vanessa; Gabler, Nicole B; Cooney, Elizabeth; Small, Dylan S; Troxel, Andrea; Casarett, David; Ersek, Mary; Cassel, J Brian; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch; Escobar, Gabriel; Hill, Sarah H; O'Brien, Dan; Vogel, Mark; Halpern, Scott D

    2016-09-01

    The substantial nationwide investment in inpatient palliative care services stems from their great promise to improve patient-centered outcomes and reduce costs. However, robust experimental evidence of these benefits is lacking. The Randomized Evaluation of Default Access to Palliative Services (REDAPS) study is a pragmatic, stepped-wedge, cluster randomized trial designed to test the efficacy and costs of specialized palliative care consultative services for hospitalized patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia, or end-stage renal disease, as well as the overall effectiveness of ordering such services by default. Additional aims are to identify the types of services that are most beneficial and the types of patients most likely to benefit, including comparisons between ward and intensive care unit patients. We hypothesize that patient-centered outcomes can be improved without increasing costs by simply changing the default option for palliative care consultation from opt-in to opt-out for patients with life-limiting illnesses. Patients aged 65 years or older are enrolled at 11 hospitals using an integrated electronic health record. As a pragmatic trial designed to enroll between 12,000 and 15,000 patients, eligibility is determined using a validated, electronic health record-based algorithm, and all outcomes are captured via the electronic health record and billing systems data. The time at which each hospital transitions from control, opt-in palliative care consultation to intervention, opt-out consultation is randomly assigned. The primary outcome is a composite measure of in-hospital mortality and length of stay. Secondary outcomes include palliative care process measures and clinical and economic outcomes. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02505035).

  7. Clinical evaluation of three caries removal approaches in primary teeth: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonghanyudh, A; Phantumvanit, P; Songpaisan, Y; Petersen, P E

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical performance and radiographic outcome of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration in primary molars using three caries removal techniques. Randomised clinical controlled trial. Two standard dental clinics in 2 hospitals near Bangkok. A total of 276 children, aged 6-11, having dentinal caries on the occlusal and/or proximal surface extending at least one-third of dentine without signs and/or symptoms of irreversible pulpitis. Children were randomly allocated into 3 study groups with different caries removal techniques: Group 1, partial soft caries removal at enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) by spoon excavation; Group 2, complete soft caries removal by spoon excavation; and Group 3, conventional caries removal by steel burs. All cavity preparations were restored with GIC (Fuji IX, GC Corp., Japan). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were carried out at 6 and 12 months after restoration. After 12 months, 89, 89, and 88 restorations in Groups 1, 2 and 3 were evaluated. The cumulative survival rates of GIC restorations in Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 83%, 83%, and 89% while the cumulative survival rates of pulp were 99%, 100% and 98% respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the survival of GIC restorations or pulp in the three groups (p > 0.05). The clinical and radiographic evaluations after 12 months indicated that partial soft caries removal at EDJ followed by GIC restoration was comparable to that of ART and conventional approaches.

  8. Evaluator-blinded trial evaluating nurse-led immunotherapy DEcision Coaching In persons with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (DECIMS) and accompanying process evaluation: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Anne Christin; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Vettorazzi, Eik; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Heesen, Christoph

    2015-03-21

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological condition usually starting in early adulthood and regularly leading to severe disability. Immunotherapy options are growing in number and complexity, while costs of treatments are high and adherence rates remain low. Therefore, treatment decision-making has become more complex for patients. Structured decision coaching, based on the principles of evidence-based patient information and shared decision-making, has the potential to facilitate participation of individuals in the decision-making process. This cluster randomised controlled trial follows the assumption that decision coaching by trained nurses, using evidence-based patient information and preference elicitation, will facilitate informed choices and induce higher decision quality, as well as better decisional adherence. The decision coaching programme will be evaluated through an evaluator-blinded superiority cluster randomised controlled trial, including 300 patients with suspected or definite relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, facing an immunotherapy decision. The clusters are 12 multiple sclerosis outpatient clinics in Germany. Further, the trial will be accompanied by a mixed-methods process evaluation and a cost-effectiveness study. Nurses in the intervention group will be trained in shared decision-making, coaching, and evidence-based patient information principles. Patients who meet the inclusion criteria will receive decision coaching (intervention group) with up to three face-to-face coaching sessions with a trained nurse (decision coach) or counselling as usual (control group). Patients in both groups will be given access to an evidence-based online information tool. The primary outcome is 'informed choice' after six months, assessed with the multi-dimensional measure of informed choice including the sub-dimensions risk knowledge (questionnaire), attitude concerning immunotherapy (questionnaire), and immunotherapy uptake (telephone survey

  9. Process evaluation results of a cluster randomised controlled childhood obesity prevention trial: the WAVES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Griffin

    2017-08-01

    component was identified as the most challenging, VV the least. Median implementation score across schools was 56/75 (IQR, 51.0 - 60.8. Agreement between teacher logbooks and researcher observations was generally high, the main discrepancies occurred in session duration reporting where in some cases teachers’ estimations tended to be higher than researchers’. Conclusions The WAVES study model provides a rigorous and replicable approach to undertaking and analysing a multi-component process evaluation. Challenges to implementing school-based obesity prevention interventions have been identified which can be used to inform future trials. Trial registration ISRCTN97000586 . 19 May 2010.

  10. Women's evaluation of abuse and violence care in general practice: a cluster randomised controlled trial (weave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feder Gene

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner abuse (IPA is a major public health problem with serious implications for the physical and psychosocial wellbeing of women, particularly women of child-bearing age. It is a common, hidden problem in general practice and has been under-researched in this setting. Opportunities for early intervention and support in primary care need to be investigated given the frequency of contact women have with general practice. Despite the high prevalence and health consequences of abuse, there is insufficient evidence for screening in primary care settings. Furthermore, there is little rigorous evidence to guide general practitioners (GPs in responding to women identified as experiencing partner abuse. This paper describes the design of a trial of a general practice-based intervention consisting of screening for fear of partner with feedback to GPs, training for GPs, brief counselling for women and minimal practice organisational change. It examines the effect on women's quality of life, mental health and safety behaviours. Methods/Design weave is a cluster randomised controlled trial involving 40 general practices in Victoria, Australia. Approximately 500 women (16-50 years seen by the GP in the previous year are mailed a short lifestyle survey containing an item to screen for IPA. Women who indicate that they were afraid of a partner/ex-partner in the last year and provide contact details are invited to participate. Once baseline data are collected, GPs are randomly assigned to either a group involving healthy relationship and responding to IPA training plus inviting women for up to 6 sessions of counselling or to a group involving basic education and usual care for women. Outcomes will be evaluated by postal survey at 6 and 12 months following delivery of the intervention. There will be an economic evaluation, and process evaluation involving interviews with women and GPs, to inform understanding about implementation

  11. Assessing clinical trials of Internet addiction treatment: a systematic review and CONSORT evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel L; Delfabbro, Paul H; Griffiths, Mark D; Gradisar, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Although there is ongoing debate concerning the clinical status of Internet addiction, and the quality of the extant literature in this emerging field is not optimal, several clinical trials of both pharmacological and psychological treatments for Internet addiction have been published in recent years. A systematic review investigating the reporting quality of eight treatment studies is presented. Reporting quality was defined according to the 2010 Consolidating Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. An evaluation of the reviewed studies highlighted several key limitations, including (a) inconsistencies in the definition and diagnosis of Internet addiction, (b) a lack of randomization and blinding techniques, (c) a lack of adequate controls or other comparison groups, and (d) insufficient information concerning recruitment dates, sample characteristics, and treatment effect sizes. It is concluded that improvements in future studies' design and reporting would be of significant benefit to both researchers and clinicians, and to the overall positioning of Internet addiction in the behavioral addiction field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. INTENTION TO USE CONDOM, CUSP MODELING, AND EVALUATION OF AN HIV PREVENTION INTERVNETION TRIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinguang; Stanton, Bonita; Chen, Ding-Geng; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents are at particularly high risk to acquire HIV infection; increasing the likelihood of condom use is an effective measure to reduce the risk of such infections. Challenges in assessing actual condom use behavior among early adolescents render the precursor measure, intention to use condoms, an appealing alternative. While analyzing data from a randomized controlled trial to evaluate a theory-based intervention program to promote condom use among early adolescents, we observed a modest effect with regard to condom use intention when the linear analytical approach was used. If intention, as a measure of the readiness to perform a behavior, also contains a nonlinear discrete component, it would be more appropriately modeled using a non-linear approach. In this study, data from a randomized controlled trial (N=1360) were analyzed using the cusp catastrophe method with HIV knowledge and condom skills as the asymmetry variables and condom use self-efficacy as the bifurcation variables. Findings from concurrent and longitudinal modeling analyses indicated a much better fit of the cusp model (R2 = 0.85 and 4+ times smaller AIC and BIC) than the linear (R2 intention but did not as a bifurcation variable. In conclusion, adolescent intentions to use a condom contain both a continuous process and a discrete process and can better be modeled with cusp methods. A much greater program effect is likely from the same prevention intervention if additional measures are taken to foster sudden changes in condom intention. PMID:23735493

  13. Inter-laboratory ring trials to evaluate serological methods for dourine diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchard, Julien; Soldan, Andrew; Madeline, Anthony; Johnson, Paula; Büscher, Philippe; Petry, Sandrine

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the reproducibility of routine serological methods to detect Trypanosoma equiperdum antibodies in equine sera, two inter-laboratory ring trials were organized involving 22 European and 4 non-European reference laboratories for dourine. The serological methods were the complement fixation test (CFT; 25 laboratories) and the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT; 4 laboratories). Three of the laboratories applied both these methods. The sample panels were composed of sera that were negative, positive or suspected for dourine. Of the negative sera, one was from a donkey naturally infected with Trypanosoma evansi. This study confirmed the reliability of CFT and highlighted its inter-laboratory reproducibility for known T. equiperdum positive and negative sera. However the reproducibility was less good for sera positive for T. evansi or of unknown status, e.i. nine out of 22 laboratories observed a false-positive result with the T. evansi-positive serum, whether by CFT or IFAT. This interesting result suggests that the specificity of dourine serodiagnosis may be improved by standardizing the critical reagents, including antigens and by developing a standard T. equiperdum serum which could be used calibrate test systems across multiple laboratories. Trial data confirmed seropositivity in one of the three horses suspected of dourine. It may be beneficial to generalize the use of a suitable low-titer serum control, derived from a standard serum in order to standardize the method's detection limit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effects of Diosmin in the Treatment of Radicular Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhe Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diosmin has been widely used to treat patients with vascular pain for its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of Diosmin in the treatment of radicular pain, we conducted an investigator-initiated, randomized, active-controlled noninferiority trial between January 1, 2009, and December 1, 2010. Diosmin (50 mg/kg/day was orally administered to treat the radicular pain in 150 patients for one month. Another 150 patients with the same symptom were given 20% 250 ml mannitol (1 g/kg/day for 7 days and dexamethasone (10 mg/day for 3 days intravenously guttae. Short-term relief and long-term relief were measured. Secondary outcomes include improvement in functional and psychological status, return to work, and reduction in anti-inflammatory analgesic drugs intake. Patients treated with oral Diosmin achieved reduction in radicular pain. The total satisfaction rate of Diosmin group was 84.7% [95% confidence interval (CI: 77.9%, 90.0%], and the complete satisfaction rate was 50.7% (95% CI: 42.4%, 58.9%. No statistically significant difference was found between the Diosmin group and the active-control group regarding patient satisfaction. No adverse effects were found during the study period. Our study suggests that clinical application of Diosmin with a dose of 50 mg/kg/day might reduce the radicular pain. This trial is registered with ISRCTN97157037.

  15. Heuristic evaluation of a telehealth system from the Danish TeleCare North Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilholt, Pernille Heyckendorff; Jensen, Morten Hasselstrøm; Hejlesen, Ole K

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the usability of the design of the telehealth system, named Telekit, developed for the Danish TeleCare North Trial, early into the design process in order to assess potential problems and limitations which could hinder its successful implementation. Five experts, including one who pilot-tested the Telekit system, individually evaluated its usability and its compliance with Jakob Nielsen's ten usability heuristics for interaction design. Usability problems were categorised according to Rolf Molich's severity classification. The five experts identified a total of 152 problems in the Telekit system, each identifying 22-40 problems. 86 (57%) out of the 152 problems were identified only once. All heuristics were used, but the three most frequently used were: "Match between system and the real world" (32%), "Consistency and standards" (13%) and "Aesthetic and minimalist design" (13%). The most widely used classifications were: "Improvement" (40%) and "Minor problem" (43%). Heuristic evaluation was an effective method for uncovering and identifying problems with the system. The consistent finding of particular usability problems confirms that the development of a telehealth system should pay particular attention to user aspects. The most serious problem was the inability of the system to inform users of how to perform measurements correctly and to "speak the users' language". The problems found in the heuristic evaluation have led to several significant changes in the telehealth system. We suggest that heuristic evaluation always be followed by user tests to evaluate the design of telehealth systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winstein Carolee J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residual disability after stroke is substantial; 65% of patients at 6 months are unable to incorporate the impaired upper extremity into daily activities. Task-oriented training programs are rapidly being adopted into clinical practice. In the absence of any consensus on the essential elements or dose of task-specific training, an urgent need exists for a well-designed trial to determine the effectiveness of a specific multidimensional task-based program governed by a comprehensive set of evidence-based principles. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (ICARE Stroke Initiative is a parallel group, three-arm, single blind, superiority randomized controlled trial of a theoretically-defensible, upper extremity rehabilitation program provided in the outpatient setting. The primary objective of ICARE is to determine if there is a greater improvement in arm and hand recovery one year after randomization in participants receiving a structured training program termed Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program (ASAP, compared to participants receiving usual and customary therapy of an equivalent dose (DEUCC. Two secondary objectives are to compare ASAP to a true (active monitoring only usual and customary (UCC therapy group and to compare DEUCC and UCC. Methods/design Following baseline assessment, participants are randomized by site, stratified for stroke duration and motor severity. 360 adults will be randomized, 14 to 106 days following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke onset, with mild to moderate upper extremity impairment, recruited at sites in Atlanta, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. The Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT time score is the primary outcome at 1 year post-randomization. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS hand domain is a secondary outcome measure. The design includes concealed allocation during recruitment, screening and baseline, blinded outcome assessment and intention to treat analyses. Our primary

  17. Evaluation of NS sunflower hybrids in small-plot trials via hybrid × location interaction

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    Balalić Igor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate NS sunflower hybrids on the basis of the results of seed yield, seed oil content and oil yield obtained in a network of small-plot trials in Serbia in 2011. The trial included 9 hybrids and 14 locations. Seed yield, seed oil content and oil yield were significantly different in small-plot trials in the investigated regions of Serbia. The highest average seed yield was produced by Sremac (3.67 t ha-1, Velja (3.62 t ha-1, Duško (3.56 t ha-1 and Novosađanin (3.55 t ha-1. On the location Rimski šančevi the seed yield (4.48 t ha-1 was significantly highest. Average oil content for hybrids grown in 14 locations was 47.25%. Hybrids Baća (50.26%, NS-H-111 (48.91%, Bačvanin (48.70% and Novosađanin (47.83% showed the highest average seed oil content. The highest average oil yield was produced by Baća (1.71 t ha-1, Novosađanin (1.70, Velja (1.67 t ha-1, Sremac (1.63 t ha-1 and NS-H-111 (1.63 t ha-1. Locations with the highest oil yield were Rimski šančevi (2.03 t ha-1 and Sombor (1.96 t ha-1. In the four-year trials in Vojvodina, the average seed yield of 9 hybrids was 3.35 t ha-1. Seed yield over general mean was reached by three hybrids (Duško, Sremac and Velja. The highest seed yield was reached by hybrid Duško (3.56 t ha-1. AMMI1 biplot showed that most stable and with high seed and oil yield were the hybrids Duško, Sremac and Baća, and for oil content Baća, Bačvanin and NS-H-111.

  18. Evaluating clinical trial design: systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials for determining efficacy of benzoyl peroxide topical therapy for acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamel, Sonia A; Sivamani, Raja K; Rahvar, Maral; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-11-01

    Determined efficacies of benzoyl peroxide may be affected by study design, implementation, and vehicle effects. We sought to elucidate areas that may allow improvement in determining accurate treatment efficacies by determining rates of active treatment and vehicle responders in randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide to treat acne. We conducted a systematic review of randomized vehicle-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of topical benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of acne. We compared response rates of vehicle treatment arms versus those in benzoyl peroxide arms. Twelve trials met inclusion criteria with 2818 patients receiving benzoyl peroxide monotherapy treatment and 2004 receiving vehicle treatment. The average percent reduction in total number of acne lesions was 44.3 (SD = 9.2) and 27.8 (SD = 21.0) for the active and vehicle treatment groups, respectively. The average reduction in non-inflammatory lesions was 41.5 % (SD = 9.4) in the active treatment group and 27.0 % (SD = 20.9) in the vehicle group. The average percent decrease in inflammatory lesions was 52.1 (SD = 10.4) in the benzoyl peroxide group and 34.7 (SD = 22.7) in the vehicle group. The average percentage of participants achieving success per designated study outcomes was 28.6 (SD = 17.3) and 15.2 (SD = 9.5) in the active treatment and vehicle groups, respectively. Patient responses in randomized controlled trials evaluating topical acne therapies may be affected by clinical trial design, implementation, the biologic effects of vehicles, and natural disease progression. "No treatment" groups may facilitate determination of accurate treatment efficacies.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamuli Eugena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA 95% CI: 85.09-117.26 more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151.

  20. Evaluation and understanding of Playware Technology – trials with playful balance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due

    further studies exactly how digital technology and games can create play for the elderly, with the ambition of reaching a more substantiated understanding of this process that could then lead to a better and more calculated design of new products. The technology in focus, “MOTO Tiles”, is an example...... of “playware”, which is defined as hardware or software that aims to initiate play and playful experiences among its users. The thesis evaluates MOTO tiles as an example of a relatively new area of research, Games for Health, where digital games are seen as tools for the creation of health-promoting activities....... The thesis starts with a presentation of the results of two different pilot trials done with the MOTO tiles technology which showed remarkable development among the elderly, particularly regarding balance. It further contextualizes MOTO tiles in the research area of "games for health" by an account...

  1. Evaluation of the UCL diabetes self-management programme (UCL-DSMP): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Liz; Lankester, Jill; Barnard, Maria; Earle, Ken; Hurel, Stephen; Newman, Stanton

    2005-03-01

    Self-management has been described as the cornerstone of care for diabetes. Many self-management studies are limited by poor methodology and poor descriptions of the intervention. The current study developed a theoretically based self-management programme for patients with type 2 diabetes, which was evaluated via a randomized controlled trial. At immediate post-intervention and three-month follow-up the intervention group showed significant improvement relative to controls on self-management behaviours, quality of life and illness beliefs. A trend towards improved HbA1c was also observed. Documentation in a manual and development of a training programme for facilitators ensures the programme is replicable.

  2. A systematic review of randomized trials evaluating regional techniques for postthoracotomy analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G.P.; Bonnet, F.; Shah, R.

    2008-01-01

    of the evidence is needed to assess the comparative benefits of alternative techniques, guide clinical practice and identify areas requiring further research. METHODS: In this systematic review of randomized trials we evaluated thoracic epidural, paravertebral, intrathecal, intercostal, and interpleural analgesic...... techniques, compared to each other and to systemic opioid analgesia, in adult thoracotomy. Postoperative pain, analgesic use, and complications were analyzed. RESULTS: Continuous paravertebral block was as effective as thoracic epidural analgesia with local anesthetic (LA) but was associated with a reduced...... incidence of hypotension. Paravertebral block reduced the incidence of pulmonary complications compared with systemic analgesia, whereas thoracic epidural analgesia did not. Thoracic epidural analgesia was superior to intrathecal and intercostal techniques, although these were superior to systemic analgesia...

  3. A metabolomic evaluation of the phytochemical composition of tomato juices being used in human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2017-08-01

    Juices from the traditional red tomato and a unique tangerine tomato variety are being investigated as health promoting foods in human clinical trials. However, it is unknown how the tangerine and red tomato juices differ in biologically relevant phytochemicals beyond carotenoids. Here liquid-chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry metabolomics was used to evaluate broadly the similarities and differences in carotenoids and other phytochemicals between red and tangerine tomato juices intended for clinical interventions. This untargeted approach was successful in the rapid detection and extensive characterization of phytochemicals belonging to various compound classes. The tomato juices were found to differ significantly in a number of phytochemicals, including carotenoids, chlorophylls, neutral lipids, and cinnamic acid derivatives. The largest differences were in carotenoids, including lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, neurosporene, and ζ-carotene. Smaller, but significant, differences were observed in polar phytochemicals, such as chlorogenic acid, hydroxyferulic acid, phloretin-di-C-glycoside, and isopropylmalic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of muscle synergy models: a single-trial task decoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, Ioannis; Berret, Bastien; Pozzo, Thierry; Panzeri, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Muscle synergies, i.e., invariant coordinated activations of groups of muscles, have been proposed as building blocks that the central nervous system (CNS) uses to construct the patterns of muscle activity utilized for executing movements. Several efficient dimensionality reduction algorithms that extract putative synergies from electromyographic (EMG) signals have been developed. Typically, the quality of synergy decompositions is assessed by computing the Variance Accounted For (VAF). Yet, little is known about the extent to which the combination of those synergies encodes task-discriminating variations of muscle activity in individual trials. To address this question, here we conceive and develop a novel computational framework to evaluate muscle synergy decompositions in task space. Unlike previous methods considering the total variance of muscle patterns (VAF based metrics), our approach focuses on variance discriminating execution of different tasks. The procedure is based on single-trial task decoding from muscle synergy activation features. The task decoding based metric evaluates quantitatively the mapping between synergy recruitment and task identification and automatically determines the minimal number of synergies that captures all the task-discriminating variability in the synergy activations. In this paper, we first validate the method on plausibly simulated EMG datasets. We then show that it can be applied to different types of muscle synergy decomposition and illustrate its applicability to real data by using it for the analysis of EMG recordings during an arm pointing task. We find that time-varying and synchronous synergies with similar number of parameters are equally efficient in task decoding, suggesting that in this experimental paradigm they are equally valid representations of muscle synergies. Overall, these findings stress the effectiveness of the decoding metric in systematically assessing muscle synergy decompositions in task space.

  5. Evaluation of exercise on individuals with dementia and their carers: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Claire

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost all of the 820,000 people in the UK with dementia will experience Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD. However, research has traditionally focused on treating cognitive symptoms, thus neglecting core clinical symptoms that often have a more profound impact on living with dementia. Recent evidence (Kales et al, 2007; Ballard et al, 2009 indicates that the popular approach to managing BPSD - prescription of anti-psychotic medication - can increase mortality and the risk of stroke in people with dementia as well as impair quality of life and accelerate cognitive decline. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate the impact that non-pharmacological interventions have on BPSD; we believe physical exercise is a particularly promising approach. Methods/Design We will carry out a pragmatic, randomised, single-blind controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise (planned walking on the behavioural and psychological symptoms of individuals with dementia. We aim to recruit 146 people with dementia and their carers to be randomized into two groups; one will be trained in a structured, tailored walking programme, while the other will continue with treatment as usual. The primary outcome (BPSD will be assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI along with relevant secondary outcomes at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Designing this study has been challenging both ethically and methodologically. In particular to design an intervention that is simple, measurable, safe, non-invasive and enjoyable has been testing and has required a lot of thought. Throughout the design, we have attempted to balance methodological rigour with study feasibility. We will discuss the challenges that were faced and overcome in this paper. Trial Registration ISRCTN01423159

  6. A transdisciplinary model to inform randomized clinical trial methods for electronic cigarette evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa A. Lopez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is a systematic evaluation of a novel tobacco product, electronic cigarettes (ECIGs using a two-site, four-arm, 6-month, parallel-group randomized controlled trial (RCT with a follow-up to 9 months. Virginia Commonwealth University is the primary site and Penn State University is the secondary site. This RCT design is important because it is informed by analytical work, clinical laboratory results, and qualitative/quantitative findings regarding the specific ECIG products used. Methods Participants (N = 520 will be randomized across sites and must be healthy smokers of >9 cigarettes for at least one year, who have not had a quit attempt in the prior month, are not planning to quit in the next 6 months, and are interested in reducing cigarette intake. Participants will be randomized into one of four 24-week conditions: a cigarette substitute that does not produce an inhalable aerosol; or one of three ECIG conditions that differ by nicotine concentration 0, 8, or 36 mg/ml. Blocked randomization will be accomplished with a 1:1:1:1 ratio of condition assignments at each site. Specific aims are to: characterize ECIG influence on toxicants, biomarkers, health indicators, and disease risk; determine tobacco abstinence symptom and adverse event profile associated with real-world ECIG use; and examine the influence of ECIG use on conventional tobacco product use. Liquid nicotine concentration-related differences on these study outcomes are predicted. Participants and research staff in contact with participants will be blinded to the nicotine concentration in the ECIG conditions. Discussion Results from this study will inform knowledge concerning ECIG use as well as demonstrate a model that may be applied to other novel tobacco products. The model of using prior empirical testing of ECIG devices should be considered in other RCT evaluations. Trial registration TRN: NCT02342795 , registered December 16, 2014.

  7. Evaluation of the Effects of Music and Poetry in Oncologic Pain Relief: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Maurilene Andrade Lima Bacelar; Garcia, Marília Arrais; Garcia, João Batista Santos

    2016-09-01

    Various forms of art therapy have been tested as adjuvants in the treatment of physical and emotional disorders, including music and poetry. To evaluate the effect of passive listening to music and poetry on the variation in pain, depression, and hope scores. This was a randomized trial, with multiple aspects and an allocation ratio of 1:1:1, in which one group listened to music, one group listened to poetry, and another group received no intervention over a period of three days. A total of 75 adult patients experiencing pain and hospitalized in a cancer facility were included. The study was conducted over a period of three months. The primary outcome consisted of pain evaluation using a Visual Analog Scale, and the secondary outcomes consisted of evaluations of depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and hope (Herth Hope Scale). The final sample consisted of 65 participants, with 22 in the music group, 22 in the poetry group, and 21 controls. Music promoted an improvement in pain (p pain (p music and poetry groups and the control group after the study was only observed for the pain outcome (p music and poetry produced a similar improvement in the pain intensity. The two therapies also affected depression scores, and only poetry increased hope scores. Further investigation of the effects and comparisons between the two therapies should be performed.

  8. Reaching and recruiting Turkish migrants for a clinical trial through Facebook: A process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unlu, B.; Cuijpers, P.; van t Hof, E.; Riper, H.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnic minorities are underrepresented in mental health research, especially in randomized controlled trials. Recruiting ethnic minorities is challenging and there is a need to develop effective recruitment strategies. This study used data from a randomized controlled trial examining the

  9. Informed consent in randomised controlled trials: development and preliminary evaluation of a measure of Participatory and Informed Consent (PIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Julia; Elliott, Daisy; Avery, Kerry N L; Gaunt, Daisy; Young, Grace J; Barnes, Rebecca; Paramasivan, Sangeetha; Campbell, W Bruce; Blazeby, Jane M; Birtle, Alison J; Stein, Rob C; Beard, David J; Halliday, Alison W; Donovan, Jenny L

    2017-07-17

    Informed consent (IC) is an ethical and legal prerequisite for trial participation, yet current approaches evaluating participant understanding for IC during recruitment lack consistency. No validated measure has been identified that evaluates participant understanding for IC based on their contributions during consent interactions. This paper outlines the development and formative evaluation of the Participatory and Informed Consent (PIC) measure for application to recorded recruitment appointments. The PIC allows the evaluation of recruiter information provision and evidence of participant understanding. Published guidelines for IC were reviewed to identify potential items for inclusion. Seventeen purposively sampled trial recruitment appointments from three diverse trials were reviewed to identify the presence of items relevant to IC. A developmental version of the measure (DevPICv1) was drafted and applied to six further recruitment appointments from three further diverse trials to evaluate feasibility, validity, stability and inter-rater reliability. Findings guided revision of the measure (DevPICv2) which was applied to six further recruitment appointments as above. DevPICv1 assessed recruiter information provision (detail and clarity assessed separately) and participant talk (detail and understanding assessed separately) over 20 parameters (or 23 parameters for three-arm trials). Initial application of the measure to six diverse recruitment appointments demonstrated promising stability and inter-rater reliability but a need to simplify the measure to shorten time for completion. The revised measure (DevPICv2) combined assessment of detail and clarity of recruiter information and detail and evidence of participant understanding into two single scales for application to 22 parameters or 25 parameters for three-arm trials. Application of DevPICv2 to six further diverse recruitment appointments showed considerable improvements in feasibility (e.g. time to

  10. Evaluating an audit and feedback intervention for reducing antibiotic prescribing behaviour in general dental practice (the RAPiD trial): a partial factorial cluster randomised trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    intervention. A concurrent qualitative process evaluation will apply theory-based approaches using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to explore the acceptability of the interventions and the Theoretical Domains Framework to identify barriers and enablers to evidence-based antibiotic prescribing behaviour by GDPs. Discussion RAPiD will provide a robust evaluation of A&F in dentistry in Scotland. It also demonstrates that linked administrative datasets have the potential to be used efficiently and effectively across all stages of an randomised controlled trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN49204710 PMID:24758164

  11. Early rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery is not effective or cost-effective compared to no referral: a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Oosterhuis

    2017-07-01

    Trial registration: Netherlands Trial Register NTR3156. [Oosterhuis T, Ostelo RW, van Dongen JM, Peul WC, de Boer MR, Bosmans JE, Vleggeert-Lankamp CL, Arts MP, van Tulder MW (2017 Early rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery is not effective or cost-effective compared to no referral: a randomised trial and economic evaluation. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 144–153

  12. Evaluating ureteral patency in the post-indigo carmine era: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Cara L; Patankar, Sonali; Ryntz, Timothy; Philip, Nisha; Simpson, Khara; Truong, Mireille; Young, Constance; Advincula, Arnold; Madueke-Laveaux, Obianuju S; Walters, Ryan; Ananth, Cande V; Kim, Jin Hee

    2017-11-01

    Many gynecologic, urologic, and pelvic reconstructive surgeries require accurate intraoperative evaluation of ureteral patency. We performed a randomized controlled trial to compare surgeon satisfaction with 4 methods of evaluating ureteral patency during cystoscopy at the time of benign gynecologic or pelvic reconstructive surgery: oral phenazopyridine, intravenous sodium fluorescein, mannitol bladder distention, and normal saline bladder distention. We conducted an unblinded randomized controlled trial of the method used to evaluate ureteral patency during cystoscopy at time of benign gynecologic or pelvic reconstructive surgery. Subjects were randomized to receive 200 mg oral phenazopyridine, 25 mg intravenous sodium fluorescein, mannitol bladder distention, or normal saline bladder distention during cystoscopy. The primary outcome was surgeon satisfaction with the method, assessed via a 100-mm visual analog scale with 0 indicating strong agreement and 100 indicating strong disagreement with the statement. Secondary outcomes included comparing visual analog scale responses about ease of each method and visualization of ureteral jets, bladder mucosa and urethra, and operative information, including time to surgeon confidence in the ureteral jets. Adverse events were evaluated for at least 6 weeks after the surgical procedure, and through the end of the study. All statistical analyses were based on the intent-to-treat principle, and comparisons were 2-tailed. In all, 130 subjects were randomized to phenazopyridine (n = 33), sodium fluorescein (n = 32), mannitol (n = 32), or normal saline (n = 33). At randomization, patient characteristics were similar across groups. With regard to the primary outcome, mannitol was the method that physicians found most satisfactory on a visual analog scale. The median (range) scores for physicians assessing ureteral patency were 48 (0-83), 20 (0-82), 0 (0-44), and 23 (3-96) mm for phenazopyridine, sodium fluorescein, mannitol

  13. Policy implications of adjusting randomized trial data for economic evaluations: a demonstration from the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nicole G; Castle, Philip E; Schiffman, Mark; Kim, Jane J

    2012-01-01

    Although the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is widely considered the most reliable method for evaluation of health care interventions, challenges to both internal and external validity exist. Thus, the efficacy of an intervention in a trial setting does not necessarily represent the real-world performance that decision makers seek to inform comparative effectiveness studies and economic evaluations. Using data from the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study (ALTS), we performed a simplified economic evaluation of age-based management strategies to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) among women who were referred to the study with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). We used data from the trial itself to adjust for 1) potential lead time bias and random error that led to variation in the observed prevalence of CIN3 by study arm and 2) potential ascertainment bias among providers in the most aggressive management arm. We found that using unadjusted RCT data may result in counterintuitive cost-effectiveness results when random error and/or bias are present. Following adjustment, the rank order of management strategies changed for 2 of the 3 age groups we considered. Decision analysts need to examine study design, available trial data, and cost-effectiveness results closely in order to detect evidence of potential bias. Adjustment for random error and bias in RCTs may yield different policy conclusions relative to unadjusted trial data.

  14. POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF ADJUSTING RANDOMIZED TRIAL DATA FOR ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS: A DEMONSTRATION FROM THE ASCUS-LSIL TRIAGE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nicole G.; Castle, Philip E.; Schiffman, Mark; Kim, Jane J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is widely considered the most reliable method for evaluation of health care interventions, challenges to both internal and external validity exist. Thus, the efficacy of an intervention in a trial setting does not necessarily represent the real-world performance that decision makers seek to inform comparative effectiveness studies and economic evaluations. Methods Using data from the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study (ALTS), we performed a simplified economic evaluation of age-based management strategies to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) among women who were referred to the study with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). We used data from the trial itself to adjust for 1) potential lead time bias and random error that led to variation in the observed prevalence of CIN3 by study arm, and 2) potential ascertainment bias among providers in the most aggressive management arm. Results We found that using unadjusted RCT data may result in counterintuitive cost-effectiveness results when random error and/or bias are present. Following adjustment, the rank order of management strategies changed for two of the three age groups we considered. Conclusion Decision analysts need to examine study design, available trial data and cost-effectiveness results closely in order to detect evidence of potential bias. Adjustment for random error and bias in RCTs may yield different policy conclusions relative to unadjusted trial data. PMID:22147881

  15. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L Voorn

    Full Text Available To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function.A process evaluation using data from an RCT.Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22 or usual care (n = 22.Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60-70% heart rate reserve.The attendance rate was high (median 89%. None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group.Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead.Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371.

  16. Evaluation of a parent-delivered early language enrichment programme: evidence from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Kelly; Gardner, Rachel; Whiteley, Helen; Snowling, Margaret J; Hulme, Charles

    2017-09-20

    It is widely believed that increasing parental involvement can improve children's educational outcomes although we lack good evidence for such claims. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a parent-delivered early language enrichment programme. We conducted a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 208 preschool children and their parents living in socially diverse areas in the United Kingdom. Families were allocated to an oral language programme (N = 103) or an active control programme targeting motor skills (N = 105). Parents delivered the programmes to their child at home in daily 20-min sessions over 30 weeks of teaching. Children receiving the language programme made significantly larger gains in language (d = .21) and narrative skills (d = .36) than children receiving the motor skills programme at immediate posttest. Effects on language were maintained 6 months later (d = .34), and at this point, the language group also scored higher on tests of early literacy (d values=.35 and .42). There was no evidence that the movement programme improved motor skills. This study provides evidence for the effectiveness of a parent-delivered language enrichment programme. Further large-scale evaluations of the programme are needed to confirm and extend these findings. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of a diabetes educational program: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho; Pace, Ana Emília; Chaves, Fernanda Figueredo; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Reis, Ilka Afonso

    2018-02-05

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a diabetes mellitus educational program in primary health care. This cluster randomized trial was conducted in a sample of 470 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus from eight health units, randomly assigned to two groups: intervention (n = 231) and control (n = 239). The intervention group participated in the educational program composed of three strategies: group education, home visit, and telephone intervention. Simultaneously, the control group was monitored individually. Group monitoring took place over nine months in the year 2012. Clinical evaluations were performed at the initial time (T0), three (T3), six (T6) and nine (T9) months after the beginning of the intervention. After nine months of follow-up, 341 users remained in the study, 171 in the control group and 170 in the intervention group. The average age of users was 60.6 years. In both groups, statistically significant differences were observed in mean HbA1c levels over the follow-up time (p educational program model developed was effective to improve the glycemic control of the intervention group participants.

  18. Impact evaluation of the Northern Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Programme - a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meizi; Beynon, Charlene; Sangster Bouck, Michelle; St Onge, Renée; Stewart, Susan; Khoshaba, Linda; Horbul, Betty A; Chircoski, Bill

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this impact evaluation was to measure the influence of a government of Ontario, Canada health promotion initiative, the Northern Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Programme (NFVPP), on elementary school-aged children's psychosocial variables regarding fruit and vegetables, and fruit and vegetable consumption patterns. A cluster-randomised controlled trial design was used. The NFVPP consisted of three intervention arms: (i) Intervention I: Free Fruit and Vegetable Snack (FFVS) + Enhanced Nutrition Education; (ii) Intervention II: FFVS-alone; and (iii) Control group. Using the Pro-Children Questionnaire, the primary outcome measure was children's fruit and vegetable consumption, and the secondary outcome measures included differences in children's awareness, knowledge, self-efficacy, preference, intention and willingness to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Twenty-six elementary schools in a defined area of Northern Ontario were eligible to participate in the impact evaluation. A final sample size of 1,277 students in grades five to eight was achieved. Intervention I students consumed more fruit and vegetables at school than their Control counterparts by 0.49 serving/d (P fruit and vegetables at school than Control students by 0.42 serving/d, although this difference was not statistically significant. Among students in both intervention groups, preferences for certain fruit and vegetables shifted from 'never tried it' towards 'like it'. The NFVPP resulted in positive changes in elementary school-aged children's fruit and vegetable consumption at school, and favourable preference changes for certain fruit and vegetables.

  19. Evaluating the statistical methodology of randomized trials on dentin hypersensitivity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matranga, Domenica; Matera, Federico; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2017-12-27

    The present study aimed to evaluate the characteristics and quality of statistical methodology used in clinical studies on dentin hypersensitivity management. An electronic search was performed for data published from 2009 to 2014 by using PubMed, Ovid/MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library databases. The primary search terms were used in combination. Eligibility criteria included randomized clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of desensitizing agents in terms of reducing dentin hypersensitivity. A total of 40 studies were considered eligible for assessment of quality statistical methodology. The four main concerns identified were i) use of nonparametric tests in the presence of large samples, coupled with lack of information about normality and equality of variances of the response; ii) lack of P-value adjustment for multiple comparisons; iii) failure to account for interactions between treatment and follow-up time; and iv) no information about the number of teeth examined per patient and the consequent lack of cluster-specific approach in data analysis. Owing to these concerns, statistical methodology was judged as inappropriate in 77.1% of the 35 studies that used parametric methods. Additional studies with appropriate statistical analysis are required to obtain appropriate assessment of the efficacy of desensitizing agents.

  20. Evaluation of Visual Field and Imaging Outcomes for Glaucoma Clinical Trials (An American Ophthalomological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garway-Heath, David F.; Quartilho, Ana; Prah, Philip; Crabb, David P.; Cheng, Qian; Zhu, Haogang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of various visual field (VF) analysis methods to discriminate treatment groups in glaucoma clinical trials and establish the value of time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD OCT) imaging as an additional outcome. Methods VFs and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements (acquired by TD OCT) from 373 glaucoma patients in the UK Glaucoma Treatment Study (UKGTS) at up to 11 scheduled visits over a 2 year interval formed the cohort to assess the sensitivity of progression analysis methods. Specificity was assessed in 78 glaucoma patients with up to 11 repeated VF and OCT RNFLT measurements over a 3 month interval. Growth curve models assessed the difference in VF and RNFLT rate of change between treatment groups. Incident progression was identified by 3 VF-based methods: Guided Progression Analysis (GPA), ‘ANSWERS’ and ‘PoPLR’, and one based on VFs and RNFLT: ‘sANSWERS’. Sensitivity, specificity and discrimination between treatment groups were evaluated. Results The rate of VF change was significantly faster in the placebo, compared to active treatment, group (−0.29 vs +0.03 dB/year, Pstatistical significance; sANSWERS did not discriminate treatment groups. Conclusions Although the VF progression-detection method including VF and RNFLT measurements is more sensitive, it does not improve discrimination between treatment arms. PMID:29085257

  1. Evaluation of Lay Support in Pregnant women with Social risk (ELSIPS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes are worse in families from black and ethnic minority groups and disadvantaged backgrounds. There is little evidence on whether lay support improves maternal and infant outcomes among women with complex social needs within a disadvantaged multi-ethnic population in the United Kingdom (UK. Method/Design The aim of this study is to evaluate a lay Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW service for nulliparous women identified as having social risk within a maternity service that is systematically assessing social risks alongside the usual obstetric and medical risks. The study design is a randomised controlled trial (RCT in nulliparous women assessed as having social risk comparing standard maternity care with the addition of referral to the POW support service. The POWs work alongside community midwifery teams and offer individualised support to women to encourage engagement with services (health and social care from randomisation (before 28 weeks gestation until 6 weeks after birth. The primary outcomes have been chosen on the basis that they are linked to maternal and infant health. The two primary outcomes are engagement with antenatal care, assessed by the number of antenatal visits; and maternal depression, assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 8-12 weeks after birth. Secondary outcomes include maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, routine child health assessments, including immunisation uptake and breastfeeding at 6 weeks. Other psychological outcomes (self efficacy and mother-to-infant bonding will also be collected using validated tools. A sample size of 1316 will provide 90% power (at the 5% significance level to detect increased engagement with antenatal services of 1.5 visits and a reduction of 1.5 in the average EPDS score for women with two or more social risk factors, with power in excess of this for women with any social risk factor. Analysis will

  2. Open and Calm--a randomized controlled trial evaluating a public stress reduction program in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian G; Lansner, Jon; Petersen, Anders; Vangkilde, Signe A; Ringkøbing, Signe P; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Adamsen, Dea; Knudsen, Gitte M; Denninger, John W; Hasselbalch, Steen G

    2015-12-16

    Prolonged psychological stress is a risk factor for illness and constitutes an increasing public health challenge creating a need to develop public interventions specifically targeting stress and promoting mental health. The present randomized controlled trial evaluated health effects of a novel program: Relaxation-Response-based Mental Health Promotion (RR-MHP). The multimodal, meditation-based course was publicly entitled "Open and Calm" (OC) because it consistently trained relaxed and receptive ("Open") attention, and consciously non-intervening ("Calm") witnessing, in two standardized formats (individual or group) over nine weeks. Seventy-two participants who complained to their general practitioner about reduced daily functioning due to prolonged stress or who responded to an online health survey on stress were randomly assigned to OC formats or treatment as usual, involving e.g., unstandardized consultations with their general practitioner. Outcomes included perceived stress, depressive symptoms, quality of life, sleep disturbances, mental health, salivary cortisol, and visual perception. Control variables comprised a genetic stress-resiliency factor (serotonergic transporter genotype; 5-HTTLPR), demographics, personality, self-reported inattentiveness, and course format. Intent-to-treat analyses showed significantly larger improvements in OC than in controls on all outcomes. Treatment effects on self-reported outcomes were sustained after 3 months and were not related to age, gender, education, or course format. The dropout rate was only 6 %. The standardized OC program reduced stress and improved mental health for a period of 3 months. Further testing of the OC program for public mental health promotion and reduction of stress-related illnesses is therefore warranted. A larger implementation is in progress. ClinicalTrials.gov.: NCT02140307. Registered May 14 2014.

  3. Prospective Multicenter Trial Evaluating Balloon-Catheter Partial-Breast Irradiation for Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

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    Abbott, Andrea M.; Portschy, Pamela R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Lee, Chung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Le, Chap T. [Division of Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Han, Linda K. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Washington, Tara [Vantage Oncology, Redhawk and Wildomar Centers California, Wildomar, California (United States); Kinney, Michael [Center for Advanced Breast Care, Arlington Heights, Illinois (United States); Bretzke, Margit [Surgical Specialists of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Tuttle, Todd M., E-mail: tuttl006@umn.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine outcomes of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) with MammoSite in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: We conducted a prospective, multicenter trial between 2003 and 2009. Inclusion criteria included age >18 years, core needle biopsy diagnosis of DCIS, and no prior breast cancer history. Patients underwent breast-conserving surgery plus MammoSite placement. Radiation was given twice daily for 5 days for a total of 34 Gy. Patients were evaluated for development of toxicities, cosmetic outcome, and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Results: A total of 41 patients (42 breasts) completed treatment in the study, with a median follow up of 5.3 years. Overall, 28 patients (68.3%) experienced an adverse event. Skin changes and pain were the most common adverse events. Cosmetic outcome at 6 months was judged excellent/good by 100% of physicians and by 96.8% of patients. At 12 months, 86.7% of physicians and 92.3% of patients rated the cosmetic outcome as excellent/good. Overall, 4 patients (9.8%) developed an IBTR (all DCIS), with a 5-year actuarial rate of 11.3%. All IBTRs were outside the treatment field. Among patients with IBTRs, the mean time to recurrence was 3.2 years. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using MammoSite seems to provide a safe and cosmetically acceptable outcome; however, the 9.8% IBTR rate with median follow-up of 5.3 years is concerning. Prospective randomized trials are necessary before routine use of APBI for DCIS can be recommended.

  4. Evaluation of the 'healthy start to pregnancy' early antenatal health promotion workshop: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkinson Shelley A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy is an ideal time to encourage healthy lifestyles as most women access health services and are more receptive to health messages; however few effective interventions exist. The aim of this research was to deliver a low-intensity, dietitian-led behavior change workshop at a Maternity Hospital to influence behaviors with demonstrated health outcomes. Methods Workshop effectiveness was evaluated using an RCT; ‘usual care’ women (n = 182 received a nutrition resource at their first antenatal visit and 'intervention' women also attended a one-hour ‘Healthy Start to Pregnancy’ workshop (n = 178. Dietary intake, physical activity levels, gestational weight gain knowledge, smoking cessation, and intention to breastfeed were assessed at service-entry and 12 weeks later. Intention-to-treat (ITT and per-protocol (PP analyses examined change over time between groups. Results Approximately half (48.3% the intervention women attended the workshop and overall response rate at time 2 was 67.2%. Significantly more women in the intervention met pregnancy fruit guidelines at time 2 (+4.3%, p = 0.011 and had a clinically-relevant increase in physical activity (+27 minutes/week compared with women who only received the resource (ITT. Women who attended the workshop increased their consumption of serves of fruit (+0.4 serves/day, p = 0.004, vegetables (+0.4 serves/day, p = 0.006, met fruit guidelines (+11.9%, p , had a higher diet quality score (p = 0.027 and clinically-relevant increases in physical activity (+21.3 minutes/week compared with those who only received the resource (PP. Conclusions The Healthy Start to Pregnancy workshop attendance facilitates improvements in important health behaviors. Service changes and accessibility issues are required to assist women's workshop attendance to allow more women to benefit from the workshop’s effects. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN

  5. Effects of an Advocacy Trial on Food Industry Salt Reduction Efforts-An Interim Process Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevena, Helen; Petersen, Kristina; Thow, Anne Marie; Dunford, Elizabeth K; Wu, Jason H Y; Neal, Bruce

    2017-10-17

    The decisions made by food companies are a potent factor shaping the nutritional quality of the food supply. A number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) advocate for corporate action to reduce salt levels in foods, but few data define the effectiveness of advocacy. This present report describes the process evaluation of an advocacy intervention delivered by one Australian NGO directly to food companies to reduce the salt content of processed foods. Food companies were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 22) or control (n = 23) groups. Intervention group companies were exposed to pre-planned and opportunistic communications, and control companies to background activities. Seven pre-defined interim outcome measures provided an indication of the effect of the intervention and were assessed using intention-to-treat analysis. These were supplemented by qualitative data from nine semi-structured interviews. The mean number of public communications supporting healthy food made by intervention companies was 1.5 versus 1.8 for control companies (p = 0.63). Other outcomes, including the mean number of news articles, comments and reports (1.2 vs. 1.4; p = 0.72), a published nutrition policy (23% vs. 44%; p = 0.21), public commitment to the Australian government's Food and Health Dialogue (FHD) (41% vs. 61%; p = 0.24), evidence of a salt reduction plan (23% vs. 30%; p = 0.56), and mean number of communications with the NGO (15 vs. 11; p = 0.28) were also not significantly different. Qualitative data indicated the advocacy trial had little effect. The absence of detectable effects of the advocacy intervention on the interim markers indicates there may be no impact of the NGO advocacy trial on the primary outcome of salt reduction in processed foods.

  6. Results of a curtailed randomized controlled trial, evaluating the efficacy and safety of azimilide in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: The SHIELD-2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria M; Bharucha, David B; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Dorian, Paul; Kowey, Peter R

    2017-03-01

    Frequent hospital attendances in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) result in significant morbidity and health care costs. Current drugs to reduce ICD shocks and hospital visits have limited efficacy and considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of azimilide, a novel oral class III antiarrhythmic, for use in ICD patients. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of oral azimilide 75 mg daily in ICD patients with previously documented ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, and a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%. The primary outcome metric was the adjudicated time-to-first unplanned cardiovascular (CV) hospitalization, or CV emergency department (ED) visit, or CV death. The trial was prematurely discontinued due to withdrawal of study sponsorship. Azimilide demonstrated numerical but statistically nonsignificant reductions in the primary composite outcome (odds ratio [OR] 0.79, 95% CI 0.44-1.44), unplanned CV hospitalizations (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.41-1.38), ED visits (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.35-1.31), and all-cause shocks (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.32-1.05). The incidence of adverse events was lower in the azimilide group. Neutropenia was not observed (absolute neutrophil count <1000 μ/L), and there was one possible torsade de pointes case that led to a successful ICD discharge. The SHIELD-2 trial was statistically underpowered due to early trial termination and did not meet its primary objective. Despite this limitation, azimilide showed promise as a safe and effective drug in reducing all-cause shocks, unplanned hospitalizations, and ED visits in ICD patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase II trial to evaluate the ActiGait implanted drop-foot stimulator in established hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burridge, Jane H; Haugland, Morten; Larsen, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a selective implantable drop foot stimulator (ActiGait) in terms of effect on walking and safety. DESIGN: A phase II trial in which a consecutive sample of participants acted as their own controls. SUBJECTS: People who had suffered a stroke at least 6 months prior to recrui...

  8. Return to work and occupational physicians' management of common mental health problems--process evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebergen, David S.; Bruinvels, David J.; Bos, Chris M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; van Mechelen, Willem

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of occupational physicians (OP) to the Dutch guideline on the management of common mental health problems and its effect on return to work as part of the process evaluation of a trial comparing adherence to the guideline to care as usual. The first

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial in Clinical Settings to Evaluate Effectiveness of Coping Skills Education Used with Progressive Tinnitus Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A.; Thielman, Emily J.; Zaugg, Tara L.; Kaelin, Christine; Schmidt, Caroline J.; Griest, Susan; McMillan, Garnett P.; Myers, Paula; Rivera, Izel; Baldwin, Robert; Carlson, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled trial evaluated, within clinical settings, the effectiveness of coping skills education that is provided with progressive tinnitus management (PTM). Method: At 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers, N = 300 veterans were randomized to either PTM intervention or 6-month wait-list control. The PTM intervention…

  10. One-year evaluation of the effect of physical therapy for masticatory muscle pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    Physical therapy is widely used to decrease pain and restore function in patients suffering from masticatory muscle pain. Controlled studies on its efficacy are scarce. This study evaluated the 1-year effect of a 6-week physical therapy programme in a single blind, randomized, controlled trial.

  11. Study protocol for the evaluation of an Infant Simulator based program delivered in schools: a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Michael B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a school based program developed to prevent teenage pregnancy. The program includes students taking care of an Infant Simulator; despite growing popularity and an increasing global presence of such programs, there is no published evidence of their long-term impact. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP program by investigating pre-conceptual health and risk behaviours, teen pregnancy and the resultant birth outcomes, early child health and maternal health. Methods and Design Fifty-seven schools (86% of 66 eligible secondary schools in Perth, Australia were recruited to the clustered (by school randomised trial, with even randomisation to the intervention and control arms. Between 2003 and 2006, the VIP program was administered to 1,267 participants in the intervention schools, while 1,567 participants in the non-intervention schools received standard curriculum. Participants were all female and aged between 13-15 years upon recruitment. Pre and post-intervention questionnaires measured short-term impact and participants are now being followed through their teenage years via data linkage to hospital medical records, abortion clinics and education records. Participants who have a live birth are interviewed by face-to-face interview. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and proportional hazards regression will test for differences in pregnancy, birth and abortion rates during the teenage years between the study arms. Discussion This protocol paper provides a detailed overview of the trial design as well as initial results in the form of participant flow. The authors describe the intervention and its delivery within the natural school setting and discuss the practical issues in the conduct of the trial, including recruitment. The trial is pragmatic and will directly inform those who provide

  12. Economic evaluation of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Hendriks, Jan C M; Graff, Maud J L; Adang, Eddy M M; Munneke, Marten; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-07-01

    A large randomized clinical trial (the Occupational Therapy in Parkinson's Disease [OTiP] study) recently demonstrated that home-based occupational therapy improves perceived performance in daily activities of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this intervention. We performed an economic evaluation over a 6-month period for both arms of the OTiP study. Participants were 191 community-dwelling PD patients and 180 primary caregivers. The intervention group (n = 124 patients) received 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy; the control group (n = 67 patients) received usual care (no occupational therapy). Costs were assessed from a societal perspective including healthcare use, absence from work, informal care, and intervention costs. Health utilities were evaluated using EuroQol-5d. We estimated cost differences and cost utility using linear mixed models and presented the net monetary benefit at different values for willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life-year gained. In our primary analysis, we excluded informal care hours because of substantial missing data for this item. The estimated mean total costs for the intervention group compared with controls were €125 lower for patients, €29 lower for caregivers, and €122 higher for patient-caregiver pairs (differences not significant). At a value of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained (reported threshold for PD), the net monetary benefit of the intervention per patient was €305 (P = 0.74), per caregiver €866 (P = 0.01) and per patient-caregiver pair €845 (P = 0.24). In conclusion, occupational therapy did not significantly impact on total costs compared with usual care. Positive cost-effectiveness of the intervention was only significant for caregivers. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Myopia Stabilization and Associated Factors Among Participants in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To use the Gompertz function to estimate the age and the amount of myopia at stabilization and to evaluate associated factors in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) cohort, a large ethnically diverse group of myopic children. Methods. The COMET enrolled 469 ethnically diverse children aged 6 to younger than 12 years with spherical equivalent refraction between −1.25 and −4.50 diopters (D). Noncycloplegic refraction was measured semiannually for 4 years and annually thereafter. Right eye data were fit to individual Gompertz functions in participants with at least 6 years of follow-up and at least seven refraction measurements over 11 years. Function parameters were estimated using a nonlinear least squares procedure. Associated factors were evaluated using linear regression. Results. In total, 426 participants (91%) had valid Gompertz curve fits. The mean (SD) age at myopia stabilization was 15.61 (4.17) years, and the mean (SD) amount of myopia at stabilization was −4.87 (2.01) D. Ethnicity (P myopia magnitude at stabilization. At stabilization, African Americans were youngest (mean age, 13.82 years) and had the least myopia (mean, −4.36 D). Participants with two versus no myopic parents had approximately 1.00 D more myopia at stabilization. The age and the amount of myopia at stabilization were correlated (r = −0.60, P myopia at stabilization in an ethnically diverse cohort. These findings should provide guidance on the time course of myopia and on decisions regarding the type and timing of interventions. PMID:24159085

  14. Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    amrutesh, sunita; Malini, J; Tandur, Prakash S; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal dental cream in comparison to fluoride dental cream. Objectives Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods One hundred and two patients with established dental plaque were randomly assigned to either herbal dental group or fluoride dental group for six weeks in a double-blind design. Improvement in plaque index, oral hyg...

  15. Strengthening patient-centred communication in rural Ugandan health centres: A theory-driven evaluation within a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayiga, Susan; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Nabirye, Christine; Haaland, Ane; Staedke, Sarah G; Chandler, Clare I R

    2014-10-01

    This article describes a theory-driven evaluation of one component of an intervention to improve the quality of health care at Ugandan public health centres. Patient-centred services have been advocated widely, but such approaches have received little attention in Africa. A cluster randomized trial is evaluating population-level outcomes of an intervention with multiple components, including 'patient-centred services.' A process evaluation was designed within this trial to articulate and evaluate the implementation and programme theories of the intervention. This article evaluates one hypothesized mechanism of change within the programme theory: the impact of the Patient Centred Services component on health-worker communication. The theory-driven approach extended to evaluation of the outcome measures. The study found that the proximal outcome of patient-centred communication was rated 10 percent higher ( p < 0.008) by care seekers consulting with the health workers who were at the intervention health centres compared with those at control health centres. This finding will strengthen interpretation of more distal trial outcomes.

  16. The DAMASK trial protocol: a pragmatic randomised trial to evaluate whether GPs should have direct access to MRI for patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orchard Jo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though new technologies like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI may be accurate, they often diffuse into practice before thorough assessment of their value in diagnosis and management, and of their effects on patient outcome and costs. MRI of the knee is a common investigation despite concern that it is not always appropriate. There is wide variation in general practitioners (GPs access to, and use of MRI, and in the associated costs. The objective of this study was to resolve uncertainty whether GPs should refer patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee for MRI or to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care. Methods/Design The design consisted of a pragmatic multi-centre randomised trial with two parallel groups and concomitant economic evaluation. Patients presenting in general practice with suspected internal derangement of the knee and for whom their GP was considering referral to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care were eligible for inclusion. Within practices, GPs or practice nurses randomised eligible and consenting participants to the local radiology department for an MRI examination, or for consultation with an orthopaedic specialist. To ensure that the waiting time from GP consultation to orthopaedic appointment was similar for both trial arms, GPs made a provisional referral to orthopaedics when requesting the MRI examination. Thus we evaluated the more appropriate sequence of events independent of variations in waiting times. Follow up of participants was by postal questionnaires at six, twelve and 24 months after randomisation. This was to ensure that the evaluation covered all events up to and including arthroscopy. Discussion The DAMASK trial should make a major contribution to the development of evidence-based partnerships between primary and secondary care professionals and inform the debate when MRI should enter the diagnostic pathway.

  17. (Sample) size matters! An examination of sample size from the SPRINT trial study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in patients with tibial fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Tornetta, Paul; Rampersad, Shelly-Ann; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Sanders, David W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen; Guyatt, Gordon; Buckingham, Lisa; Leece, Pamela; Viveiros, Helena; Mignott, Tashay; Ansell, Natalie; Sidorkewicz, Natalie; Agel, Julie; Bombardier, Claire; Berlin, Jesse A.; Bosse, Michael; Browner, Bruce; Gillespie, Brenda; O'Brien, Peter; Poolman, Rudolf; Macleod, Mark D.; Carey, Timothy; Leitch, Kellie; Bailey, Stuart; Gurr, Kevin; Konito, Ken; Bartha, Charlene; Low, Isolina; MacBean, Leila V.; Ramu, Mala; Reiber, Susan; Strapp, Ruth; Tieszer, Christina; Kreder, Hans; Stephen, David J. G.; Axelrod, Terry S.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Richards, Robin R.; Finkelstein, Joel; Holtby, Richard M.; Cameron, Hugh; Cameron, John; Gofton, Wade; Murnaghan, John; Schatztker, Joseph; Bulmer, Beverly; Conlan, Lisa; Laflamme, Yves; Berry, Gregory; Beaumont, Pierre; Ranger, Pierre; Laflamme, Georges-Henri; Jodoin, Alain; Renaud, Eric; Gagnon, Sylvain; Maurais, Gilles; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Latendresse, Kim; Poirier, Marie-France; Daigneault, Gina; McKee, Michael M.; Waddell, James P.; Bogoch, Earl R.; Daniels, Timothy R.; McBroom, Robert R.; Vicente, Milena R.; Storey, Wendy; Wild, Lisa M.; McCormack, Robert; Perey, Bertrand; Goetz, Thomas J.; Pate, Graham; Penner, Murray J.; Panagiotopoulos, Kostas; Pirani, Shafique; Dommisse, Ian G.; Loomer, Richard L.; Stone, Trevor; Moon, Karyn; Zomar, Mauri; Webb, Lawrence X.; Teasdall, Robert D.; Birkedal, John Peter; Martin, David Franklin; Ruch, David S.; Kilgus, Douglas J.; Pollock, David C.; Harris, Mitchel Brion; Wiesler, Ethan Ron; Ward, William G.; Shilt, Jeffrey Scott; Koman, Andrew L.; Poehling, Gary G.; Kulp, Brenda; Creevy, William R.; Stein, Andrew B.; Bono, Christopher T.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Brown, T. Desmond; Pacicca, Donna; Sledge, John B.; Foster, Timothy E.; Voloshin, Ilva; Bolton, Jill; Carlisle, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Ombremsky, William T.; LeCroy, C. Michael; Meinberg, Eric G.; Messer, Terry M.; Craig, William L.; Dirschl, Douglas R.; Caudle, Robert; Harris, Tim; Elhert, Kurt; Hage, William; Jones, Robert; Piedrahita, Luis; Schricker, Paul O.; Driver, Robin; Godwin, Jean; Hansley, Gloria; Obremskey, William Todd; Kregor, Philip James; Tennent, Gregory; Truchan, Lisa M.; Sciadini, Marcus; Shuler, Franklin D.; Driver, Robin E.; Nading, Mary Alice; Neiderstadt, Jacky; Vap, Alexander R.; Vallier, Heather A.; Patterson, Brendan M.; Wilber, John H.; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John K.; Moore, Timothy Alan; Brady, Drew; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Davis, John A.; Cureton, Beth Ann; Mandel, Scott; Orr, R. Douglas; Sadler, John T. S.; Hussain, Tousief; Rajaratnam, Krishan; Petrisor, Bradley; Drew, Brian; Bednar, Drew A.; Kwok, Desmond C. H.; Pettit, Shirley; Hancock, Jill; Cole, Peter A.; Smith, Joel J.; Brown, Gregory A.; Lange, Thomas A.; Stark, John G.; Levy, Bruce; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Garaghty, Mary J.; Salzman, Joshua G.; Schutte, Carol A.; Tastad, Linda Toddie; Vang, Sandy; Seligson, David; Roberts, Craig S.; Malkani, Arthur L.; Sanders, Laura; Gregory, Sharon Allen; Dyer, Carmen; Heinsen, Jessica; Smith, Langan; Madanagopal, Sudhakar; Coupe, Kevin J.; Tucker, Jeffrey J.; Criswell, Allen R.; Buckle, Rosemary; Rechter, Alan Jeffrey; Sheth, Dhiren Shaskikant; Urquart, Brad; Trotscher, Thea; Anders, Mark J.; Kowalski, Joseph M.; Fineberg, Marc S.; Bone, Lawrence B.; Phillips, Matthew J.; Rohrbacher, Bernard; Stegemann, Philip; Mihalko, William M.; Buyea, Cathy; Augustine, Stephen J.; Jackson, William Thomas; Solis, Gregory; Ero, Sunday U.; Segina, Daniel N.; Berrey, Hudson B.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Campbell, Lakina C.; Derting, Lynn; McAdams, June; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan; Kloen, Peter; Joosse, Pieter; Winkelhagen, Jasper; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Teague, David C.; Davey, Joseph; Sullivan, J. Andy; Ertl, William J. J.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Pasque, Charles B.; Tompkins, John F.; Gruel, Curtis R.; Kammerlocher, Paul; Lehman, Thomas P.; Puffinbarger, William R.; Carl, Kathy L.; Weber, Donald W.; Jomha, Nadr M.; Goplen, Gordon R.; Masson, Edward; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Greaves, Karen E.; Schaump, Lori N.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Goetz, David R.; Westberry, Davd E.; Broderick, J. Scott; Moon, Bryan S.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Powell, James N.; Buckley, Richard E.; Elves, Leslie; Connolly, Stephen; Abraham, Edward P.; Eastwood, Donna; Steele, Trudy; Ellis, Thomas; Herzberg, Alex; Brown, George A.; Crawford, Dennis E.; Hart, Robert; Hayden, James; Orfaly, Robert M.; Vigland, Theodore; Vivekaraj, Maharani; Bundy, Gina L.; Miclau, Theodore; Matityahu, Amir; Coughlin, R. Richard; Kandemir, Utku; McClellan, R. Trigg; Lin, Cindy Hsin-Hua; Karges, David; Cramer, Kathryn; Watson, J. Tracy; Moed, Berton; Scott, Barbara; Beck, Dennis J.; Orth, Carolyn; Puskas, David; Clark, Russell; Jones, Jennifer; Egol, Kenneth A.; Paksima, Nader; France, Monet; Wai, Eugene K.; Johnson, Garth; Wilkinson, Ross; Gruszczynski, Adam T.; Vexler, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate sample size and power in randomized trials can result in misleading findings. This study demonstrates the effect of sample size in a large clinical trial by evaluating the results of the Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial fractures (SPRINT)

  18. Evaluation of multisystemic therapy pilot services in the Systemic Therapy for At Risk Teens (START) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonagy, Peter; Butler, Stephen; Goodyer, Ian; Cottrell, David; Scott, Stephen; Pilling, Stephen; Eisler, Ivan; Fuggle, Peter; Kraam, Abdullah; Byford, Sarah; Wason, James; Haley, Rachel

    2013-08-20

    outcome is time-to-event or continuous. The START trial is a pragmatic national trial of sufficient size to evaluate multisystemic therapy, to inform policymakers, service commissioners, professionals, service users and their families about its potential in the UK. It will also provide data on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of usual services provided to youth with serious antisocial behaviour problems. ISRCTN77132214.

  19. Evaluating the feasibility of performing window of opportunity trials in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Angel; Robertson, Susan; Kuchuk, Iryna; Simos, Demetrios; Pond, Gregory R; Addison, Christina L; Namazi, Mehrzad; Clemons, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The waiting period to surgery represents a valuable "window of opportunity" to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies. Interventional studies performed during this period require significant multidisciplinary collaboration to overcome logistical hurdles. We undertook a one-year prospective window of opportunity study to assess feasibility. Eligible newly diagnosed postmenopausal, estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients awaiting primary surgery received anastrozole daily until surgery. Feasibility was assessed by (a) the proportion of patients who consented and (b) completed the study. Comparison of pre- and poststudy Ki67 labelling index and cleaved caspase 3 scores (CC3) was performed. 22/131 (16.8%) patients were confirmed eligible and 20/22 (91%) patients completed the study. 19/20 (95%) patients agreed to undergo optional additional tissue biopsies. The mean duration of anastrozole use was 24.7 (15-44) days. There were a statistically significant decline in mean Ki67 indices of 48.8% (p window of opportunity trials in breast cancer are a feasible way of assessing the biologic efficacy of different therapies in the presurgical setting. The majority of eligible women were willing to participate including undergoing additional tissue biopsies.

  20. Evaluation of a workplace treadmill desk intervention: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuna, John M; Swift, Damon L; Hendrick, Chelsea A; Duet, Megan T; Johnson, William D; Martin, Corby K; Church, Timothy S; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a 3-month treadmill desk intervention in eliciting changes in physical activity and sedentary behavior among overweight/obese office workers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among overweight/obese office workers (n = 41; mean age = 40.1 ± 10.1 years) at a private workplace. Participants were randomly assigned to a shared-treadmill desk intervention (n = 21) or a usual working condition control group (n = 20). Accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured before and after the intervention. Compared with the control group, the intervention group increased daily steps (1622 steps/day; P = 0.013) and light physical activity (1.6 minutes/hour; P = 0.008), and decreased sedentary time (-3.6 minutes/hour; P = 0.047) during working hours. Shared-treadmill desks in the workplace can be effective at promoting favorable changes in light physical activity (specifically 40 to 99 steps/minute) and sedentary behavior among overweight/obese office workers.

  1. Evaluation of preventive effects of colostrum against neonatal conjunctivitis: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Sadigheh; Navaei, Parsa; Rahimirad, Shima; Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal conjunctivitis leads to several ocular consequences in the affected neonates such as blindness. Currently available therapeutic options include NaNO3, Gentamicin, Neomycin and so on, in which each of them has their own limitations. Regarding the immunologic content of colostrum and its safety and easy accessibility, we aimed to evaluate its preventive effects against neonatal conjunctivitis. In this clinical trial, conducted from November 2011 to July 2012, 300 preterm neonates, with culture negative eye swab, were enrolled and randomly assigned into three groups. The intervention group received two drops of colostrum. Control group received no treatment and other neonates were treated with topical Erythromycin ointment (0.5%). All neonates were followed for occurrence of clinical conjunctivitis for 28 days. Data analysis were performed by Chi-square test. Our data demonstrate the beneficial preventive effects of Colostrum against neonatal conjunctivitis (P = 0.036). Colostrum is suggested as an alternative prophylactic option for antibiotics against neonatal conjunctivitis. As colostrum is easily accessible without cost, potential hazards and side effects, public education about its topical favorable effects is worthwhile.

  2. Evaluation of a nurse-led falls prevention programme versus usual care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Elizabeth; Watkins, Caroline; Leathley, Michael; Sharma, Anil; Lye, Michael

    2002-05-01

    to evaluate a nurse-led management plan and care pathway for older people discharged from an Accident and Emergency Department after a fall. randomized controlled trial. a large teaching hospital. 348 consecutive patients aged 65 or over attending the Accident and Emergency Department with a fall. we randomized patients to falls nurse intervention or usual care. Within 4 weeks, the intervention group received a home assessment to address easily modifiable risk factors for falls. This included assessments of medication, ECG, blood pressure, cognition, visual acuity, hearing, vestibular dysfunction, balance, mobility, feet and footwear. All patients were given advice and education about general safety in the home. Further falls, functional ability, re-attendance at the Accident and Emergency Department and admission to hospital. at 6 months post-Index fall, 36 patients in the intervention group and 39 patients in the control group had had 89 and 145 falls respectively. Although the intervention group had less falls, this was not significant (P>0.05). Similarly, the intervention group had fewer fall-related admissions and bed days (8 and 69 respectively) than the control group (10 and 233 respectively). The intervention group scored significantly higher in indicators of function (Pintervention group had fewer falls, less hospital attendances and spent less time in hospital. Moreover, patients in the intervention group were more functionally independent at 6 months post-Index fall.

  3. A randomized clinical trial evaluating a combined alcohol intervention for high-risk college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrisi, Rob; Larimer, Mary E; Mallett, Kimberly A; Kilmer, Jason R; Ray, Anne E; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Geisner, Irene Markman; Grossbard, Joel; Tollison, Sean; Lostutter, Ty W; Montoya, Heidi

    2009-07-01

    The current study is a multisite randomized alcohol prevention trial to evaluate the efficacy of both a parenting handbook intervention and the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) intervention, alone and in combination, in reducing alcohol use and consequences among a high-risk population of matriculating college students (i.e., former high school athletes). Students (n = 1,275) completed a series of Web-administered measures at baseline (in the summer before starting college) and follow-up (after 10 months). Students were randomized to one of four conditions: parent intervention only, BASICS only, combined (parent and BASICS), and assessment-only control. Intervention efficacy was tested on a number of outcome measures, including peak blood alcohol concentration, weekly and weekend drinking, and negative consequences. Hypothesized mediators and moderators of intervention effect were tested. The overall results revealed that the combined-intervention group had significantly lower alcohol consumption, high-risk drinking, and consequences at 10-month follow-up, compared with the control group, with changes in descriptive and injunctive peer norms mediating intervention effects. The findings of the present study suggest that the parent intervention delivered to students before they begin college serves to enhance the efficacy of the BASICS intervention, potentially priming students to respond to the subsequent BASICS session.

  4. Factors influencing hand washing behaviour in primary schools: process evaluation within a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomised controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n=16, ages 6 to 11, semi-structured interviews (n=16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n=57). Pupils and staff in intervention and control schools demonstrated a similar level of understanding of how, when and why they should wash their hands. Lack of time, poor adult modelling of regular hand washing and unattractive facilities were seen as important barriers to regular hand washing. Reminders and explanations for the importance of hand hygiene were thought to have a positive impact. Influencing individual choices about hand washing through education and information may be necessary, but not sufficient, for initiating and maintaining good hand washing practices. Structural factors, including having time to wash hands using accessible, clean facilities, and being encouraged through the existence of hand washing opportunities in the daily routine and hand washing being viewed as the social norm, will also influence hand washing behaviour. The effectiveness of educational interventions at improving hand hygiene in primary schools may be improved by changing priorities of staff and increasing accessibility to quality facilities. PMID:22623617

  5. Evaluation of herbal cannabis characteristics by medical users: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducruet Thierry

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis, in herbal form, is widely used as self-medication by patients with diseases such as HIV/AIDS and multiple sclerosis suffering from symptoms including pain, muscle spasticity, stress and insomnia. Valid clinical studies of herbal cannabis require a product which is acceptable to patients in order to maximize adherence to study protocols. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled crossover trial of 4 different herbal cannabis preparations among 8 experienced and authorized cannabis users with chronic pain. Preparations were varied with respect to grind size, THC content and humidity. Subjects received each preparation on a separate day and prepared the drug in their usual way in a dedicated and licensed clinical facility. They were asked to evaluate the products based on appearance (smell, colour, humidity, grind size, ease of preparation and overall appearance and smoking characteristics (burn rate, hotness, harshness and taste. Five-point Likert scores were assigned to each characteristic. Scores were compared between preparations using ANOVA. Results Seven subjects completed the study, and the product with highest THC content (12%, highest humidity (14% and largest grind size (10 mm was rated highest overall. Significant differences were noted between preparations on overall appearance and colour (p = 0.003. Discussion While the small size of the study precludes broad conclusions, the study shows that medical cannabis users can appreciate differences in herbal product. A more acceptable cannabis product may increase recruitment and retention in clinical studies of medical cannabis.

  6. A Scoping Review of Economic Evaluations Alongside Randomised Controlled Trials of Home Monitoring in Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Kristensen, Mie Borch Dahl

    2017-09-04

    Many countries have considered telemedicine and home monitoring of patients as a solution to the demographic challenges that health-care systems face. However, reviews of economic evaluations of telemedicine have identified methodological problems in many studies as they do not comply with guidelines. The aim of this study was to examine economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring in chronic disease management and hereby to explore the resources included in the programme costs, the types of health-care utilisation that change as a result of home monitoring and discuss the value of economic evaluation alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring on the basis of the studies identified. A scoping review of economic evaluations of home monitoring of patients with chronic disease based on randomised controlled trials and including information on the programme costs and the costs of equipment was carried out based on a Medline (PubMed) search. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies include both costs of equipment and use of staff, but there is large variation in the types of equipment and types of tasks for the staff included in the costs. Equipment costs constituted 16-73% of the total programme costs. In six of the nine studies, home monitoring resulted in a reduction in primary care or emergency contacts. However, in total, home monitoring resulted in increased average costs per patient in six studies and reduced costs in three of the nine studies. The review is limited by the small number of studies found and the restriction to randomised controlled trials, which can be problematic in this area due to lack of blinding of patients and healthcare professionals and the difficulty of implementing organisational changes in hospital departments for the limited period of a trial. Furthermore, our results may be based on assessments of older telemedicine interventions.

  7. Evaluation of exercise on individuals with dementia and their carers: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerga-Pashoja, Arlinda; Lowery, David; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Griffin, Mark; Iliffe, Steve; Lee, James; Leonard, Claire; Ricketts, Sue; Strother, Lyn; Waters, Fiona; Ritchie, Craig W; Warner, James

    2010-05-13

    Almost all of the 820,000 people in the UK with dementia will experience Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD). However, research has traditionally focused on treating cognitive symptoms, thus neglecting core clinical symptoms that often have a more profound impact on living with dementia. Recent evidence (Kales et al, 2007; Ballard et al, 2009) indicates that the popular approach to managing BPSD - prescription of anti-psychotic medication - can increase mortality and the risk of stroke in people with dementia as well as impair quality of life and accelerate cognitive decline. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate the impact that non-pharmacological interventions have on BPSD; we believe physical exercise is a particularly promising approach. We will carry out a pragmatic, randomised, single-blind controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise (planned walking) on the behavioural and psychological symptoms of individuals with dementia. We aim to recruit 146 people with dementia and their carers to be randomized into two groups; one will be trained in a structured, tailored walking programme, while the other will continue with treatment as usual. The primary outcome (BPSD) will be assessed with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) along with relevant secondary outcomes at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Designing this study has been challenging both ethically and methodologically. In particular to design an intervention that is simple, measurable, safe, non-invasive and enjoyable has been testing and has required a lot of thought. Throughout the design, we have attempted to balance methodological rigour with study feasibility. We will discuss the challenges that were faced and overcome in this paper. ISRCTN01423159.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate Extrinsic Stain Removal of a Whitening Dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terézhalmy, Géza; He, Tao; Anastasia, Mary Kay; Eusebio, Rachelle

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the extrinsic stain removal efficacy of a new whitening dentifrice containing sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) over a two-week period. This study used a controlled and randomized, examiner-blind, single-center, two-treatment, parallel group design. Subjects with visible extrinsic dental stain on facial surfaces of their anterior teeth, and meeting all study criteria, were entered into the trial. The test group received the whitening dentifrice with sodium fluoride and SHMP and an ADA reference soft manual toothbrush. Subjects in the control group received a dental prophylaxis after the initial examination at Baseline and were instructed to use their usual oral hygiene products at home. Subjects returned at Day 3 and Week 2 for re-evaluation of extrinsic dental stain. Extrinsic stain was measured using the Interproximal Modified Lobene (IML) Stain Index; safety was assessed based on clinical examination. Fifty subjects (mean age 32.0 years) completed the study, with 25 in each group. Statistically significant reductions in composite stain for whole tooth, as well as interproximal, gingival, and body surfaces were observed for both groups at Day 3 and Week 2 (p 0.3). At Day 3, median percent reductions in composite IML stain from Baseline were 98% for the prophylaxis group and 100% for the test dentifrice group. At Week 2, median percent reductions in composite IML stain were 100% compared to Baseline for both groups. No adverse events were reported for either group. The whitening dentifrice demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in IML stain after three days and two weeks of use relative to baseline. Stain reduction with the toothpaste was comparable to a dental prophylaxis.

  9. Evaluation of Visual Field and Imaging Outcomes for Glaucoma Clinical Trials (An American Ophthalomological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garway-Heath, David F; Quartilho, Ana; Prah, Philip; Crabb, David P; Cheng, Qian; Zhu, Haogang

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the ability of various visual field (VF) analysis methods to discriminate treatment groups in glaucoma clinical trials and establish the value of time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD OCT) imaging as an additional outcome. VFs and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT) measurements (acquired by TD OCT) from 373 glaucoma patients in the UK Glaucoma Treatment Study (UKGTS) at up to 11 scheduled visits over a 2 year interval formed the cohort to assess the sensitivity of progression analysis methods. Specificity was assessed in 78 glaucoma patients with up to 11 repeated VF and OCT RNFLT measurements over a 3 month interval. Growth curve models assessed the difference in VF and RNFLT rate of change between treatment groups. Incident progression was identified by 3 VF-based methods: Guided Progression Analysis (GPA), 'ANSWERS' and 'PoPLR', and one based on VFs and RNFLT: 'sANSWERS'. Sensitivity, specificity and discrimination between treatment groups were evaluated. The rate of VF change was significantly faster in the placebo, compared to active treatment, group (-0.29 vs +0.03 dB/year, P <.001); the rate of RNFLT change was not different (-1.7 vs -1.1 dB/year, P =.14). After 18 months and at 95% specificity, the sensitivity of ANSWERS and PoPLR was similar (35%); sANSWERS achieved a sensitivity of 70%. GPA, ANSWERS and PoPLR discriminated treatment groups with similar statistical significance; sANSWERS did not discriminate treatment groups. Although the VF progression-detection method including VF and RNFLT measurements is more sensitive, it does not improve discrimination between treatment arms.

  10. International Pig-a gene mutation assay trial: evaluation of transferability across 14 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Phonethepswath, Souk; Weller, Pamela; Nicolette, John; Murray, Joel; Sonders, Paul; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Shi, Jing; Krsmanovic, Ljubica; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura; Henwood, Andrew; Sweder, Kevin; Stankowski, Leon F; Roberts, Daniel J; Giddings, Amanda; Kenny, Julia; Lynch, Anthony M; Defrain, Céline; Nesslany, Fabrice; van der Leede, Bas-jan M; Van Doninck, Terry; Schuermans, Ann; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hiwata, Yoshie; Tajima, Osamu; Wilde, Eleanor; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Gunther, William C; Thiffeault, Catherine J; Shutsky, Thomas J; Fiedler, Ronald D; Kimoto, Takafumi; Bhalli, Javed A; Heflich, Robert H; MacGregor, James T

    2011-12-01

    A collaborative international trial was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility and transferability of an in vivo mutation assay based on the enumeration of CD59-negative rat erythrocytes, a phenotype that is indicative of Pig-a gene mutation. Fourteen laboratories participated in this study, where anti-CD59-PE, SYTO 13 dye, and flow cytometry were used to determine the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-)) and CD59-negative reticulocytes (RET(CD59-)). To provide samples with a range of mutant phenotype cell frequencies, male rats were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) via oral gavage for three consecutive days (Days 1-3). Each laboratory studied 0, 20, and 40 mg ENU/kg/day (n = 5 per group). Three sites also evaluated 4 mg/kg/day. At a minimum, blood samples were collected three times: predosing and on Days 15 and 30. Blood samples were processed according to a standardized sample processing and data acquisition protocol, and three endpoints were measured: %reticulocytes, frequency of RET(CD59-) , and frequency of RBC(CD59-) . The methodology was found to be reproducible, as the analysis of technical replicates resulted in experimental coefficients of variation that approached theoretical values. Good transferability was evident from the similar kinetics and magnitude of the dose-related responses that were observed among different laboratories. Concordance correlation coefficients showed a high level of agreement between the reference site and the test sites (range: 0.87-0.99). Collectively, these data demonstrate that with adequate training of personnel, flow cytometric analysis is capable of reliably enumerating mutant phenotype erythrocytes, thereby providing a robust in vivo mutation assay that is readily transferable across laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of a Physical Activity Intervention for Adults With Brain Impairment: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanchy, Kelly M; Tweedy, Sean M; Trost, Stewart G

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with brain impairment (BI) are less active than the general population and have increased risk of chronic disease. This controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of a physical activity (PA) intervention for community-dwelling adults with BI. A total of 43 adults with BI (27 male, 16 female; age 38.1 ± 11.9 years; stage of change 1-3) who walked as their primary means of locomotion were allocated to an intervention (n = 23) or control (n = 20) condition. The intervention comprised 10 face-to-face home visits over 12 weeks, including a tailored combination of stage-matched behavior change activities, exercise prescription, community access facilitation, and relapse prevention strategies. The control group received 10 face-to-face visits over 12 weeks to promote sun safety, healthy sleep, and oral health. Primary outcomes were daily activity counts and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) measured with the ActiGraph GT1M at baseline (0 weeks), postintervention (12 weeks) and follow-up (24 weeks). Between-group differences were evaluated for statistical significance using repeated-measures ANOVA. MVPA for the intervention group increased significantly from baseline to 12 weeks (20.8 ± 3.1 to 31.2 ± 3.1 min/d; P = .01), but differences between baseline and 24 weeks were nonsignificant (20.8 ± 3.1 to 25.3 ± 3.2 min/d; P = .28). MVPA changes for the control group were negligible and nonsignificant. Between-group differences for change in MVPA were significant at 12 weeks (P = .03) but not at 24 weeks (P = .49). The 12-week intervention effectively increased adoption of PA in a sample of community-dwelling adults with BI immediately after the intervention but not at follow-up. Future studies should explore strategies to foster maintenance of PA participation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Understanding the Canadian adult CT head rule trial: use of the theoretical domains framework for process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Janet A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Canadian CT Head Rule was prospectively derived and validated to assist clinicians with diagnostic decision-making regarding the use of computed tomography (CT in adult patients with minor head injury. A recent intervention trial failed to demonstrate a decrease in the rate of head CTs following implementation of the rule in Canadian emergency departments. Yet, the same intervention, which included a one-hour educational session and reminders at the point of requisition, was successful in reducing cervical spine imaging rates in the same emergency departments. The reason for the varied effect of the intervention across these two behaviours is unclear. There is an increasing appreciation for the use of theory to conduct process evaluations to better understand how strategies are linked with outcomes in implementation trials. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF has been used to explore health professional behaviour and to design behaviour change interventions but, to date, has not been used to guide a theory-based process evaluation. In this proof of concept study, we explored whether the TDF could be used to guide a retrospective process evaluation to better understand emergency physicians’ responses to the interventions employed in the Canadian CT Head Rule trial. Methods A semi-structured interview guide, based on the 12 domains from the TDF, was used to conduct telephone interviews with project leads and physician participants from the intervention sites in the Canadian CT Head Rule trial. Two reviewers independently coded the anonymised interview transcripts using the TDF as a coding framework. Relevant domains were identified by: the presence of conflicting beliefs within a domain; the frequency of beliefs; and the likely strength of the impact of a belief on the behaviour. Results Eight physicians from four of the intervention sites in the Canadian CT Head Rule trial participated in the interviews. Barriers

  13. The evaluation of subcutaneous proleukin (interleukin-2) in a randomized international trial: rationale, design, and methods of ESPRIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Sean; Abrams, Donald I; Cooper, David A; Darbyshire, Janet H; Lane, H Clifford; Lundgren, Jens D; Neaton, James D

    2002-04-01

    The Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT) is a large ongoing randomized trial of subcutaneous interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus antiretroviral therapy versus antiretroviral therapy alone in patients with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) disease and CD4 cell counts of at least 300 cells/mm(3). The primary objective is to determine whether the addition of IL-2 to combination antiretroviral therapy improves morbidity and mortality. The aim is to recruit 4000 participants and follow them for an average of 5 years. Eligible subjects will be recruited at 275 investigational sites in 23 countries around the world. Coupled with broad eligibility criteria this will ensure widely applicable results. A range of secondary objectives will also be addressed in this setting that will include the conduct of observational studies and nested substudies with a public health focus. This article describes the rationale supporting the trial in addition to reviewing the study design, coordination, and governance.

  14. Navy's "Full Ship Shock Trials" as Opportunities for USGS/CTBTO Seismic System Evaluation and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jih, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Navy conducts "full ship shock trials" (FSST) on new construction ships to validate the ability the ship to carry out assigned missions in the combat shock environment. The shock trial attempts to simulate the effects of a near-miss underwater explosion by detonating 10,000 pound high explosive charges near the ship. On June 10, June 23, and July 16, 2016, respectively, the Navy carried out three FSSTs on the Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS-6) off Florida coast. The three events were well recorded in eastern United States, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported the events as "experimental explosions", with magnitudes in 3.7-3.8; and 78, 82, and 114 associated/picked phases, respectively. The CTBTO's seismic bulletin has the first and third FSSTs reported, but not the second. CTBTO's International Monitoring Systems (IMS) stations in the United States (Tuckaleechee of TN, Lajitas of TX, Mina of NV, Eilson of AK), Canada (Lac du Bonnet), Turkey (Belbashi), Finland (Lahti), and Australia (Warramunga, Alice Springs) saw some of these events. In addition, five hydrophone channels at Ascension Island hydroacoustic array detected two events. IDC did not "screen out" the detected FSSTs as earthquakes. Both USGS and IDC locations are fairly reasonable. In the case of USGS, the events are off shore, while most of the reporting seismic stations are on land, on one side. The test area selected by the Navy for FSSTs is a narrow hexagon, bounded by two arcs: the 600-ft depth bathymetry on the west, and an arc of radius 120 nautical miles centered at Mayport Naval Station (Florida). The seismic solutions determined by USGS and IDC lie inside the hexagon, using the standard single-event location algorithm. In the seismic monitoring mission area, it has been well known that the best calibration data points are those well-recorded, controlled active-source experiments for which the Ground Truth (of the event size, origin time, and coordinates) are known - such

  15. Predictors of bacterial pneumonia in Evaluation of Subcutaneous Interleukin-2 in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, S L; Carey, C; Lin, E; Wentworth, D; Lazovski, J; Miró, J M; Gordin, F; Angus, B; Rodriguez-Barradas, M; Rubio, R; Tambussi, G; Cooper, D A; Emery, S

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial pneumonia still contributes to morbidity/mortality in HIV infection despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evaluation of Subcutaneous Interleukin-2 in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT), a trial of intermittent recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) with cART vs. cART alone (control arm) in HIV-infected adults with CD4 counts ≥300cells/μL, offered the opportunity to explore associations between bacterial pneumonia and rIL-2, a cytokine that increases the risk of some bacterial infections. Baseline and time-updated factors associated with first-episode pneumonia on study were analysed using multivariate proportional hazards regression models. Information on smoking/pneumococcal vaccination history was not collected. IL-2 cycling was most intense in years 1-2. Over ≈7 years, 93 IL-2 [rate 0.67/100 person-years (PY)] and 86 control (rate 0.63/100 PY) patients experienced a pneumonia event [hazard ratio (HR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79, 1.42; P=0.68]. Median CD4 counts prior to pneumonia were 570cells/μL (IL-2 arm) and 463cells/μL (control arm). Baseline risks for bacterial pneumonia included older age, injecting drug use, detectable HIV viral load (VL) and previous recurrent pneumonia; Asian ethnicity was associated with decreased risk. Higher proximal VL (HR for 1 log(10) higher VL 1.28; 95% CI 1.11, 1.47; P<0.001) was associated with increased risk; higher CD4 count prior to the event (HR per 100 cells/μL higher 0.94; 95% CI 0.89, 1.0; P=0.04) decreased risk. Compared with controls, the hazard for a pneumonia event was higher if rIL-2 was received <180 days previously (HR 1.66; 95% CI 1.07, 2.60; P=0.02) vs.≥180 days previously (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.70, 1.37; P=0.9). Compared with the control group, pneumonia risk in the IL-2 arm decreased over time, with HRs of 1.41, 1.71, 1.16, 0.62 and 0.84 in years 1, 2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7, respectively. Bacterial pneumonia rates in cART-treated adults with moderate

  16. A process evaluation of the Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Ball, Kylie; Abbott, Gavin; McNaughton, Sarah A; Le, Ha N D; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Pollard, Christina; Crawford, David A

    2016-02-24

    Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) was a randomized controlled trial that operationalized a socioecological approach to population-level dietary behaviour change in a real-world supermarket setting. SHELf tested the impact of individual (skill-building), environmental (20% price reductions), and combined (skill-building + 20% price reductions) interventions on women's purchasing and consumption of fruits, vegetables, low-calorie carbonated beverages and water. This process evaluation investigated the reach, effectiveness, implementation, and maintenance of the SHELf interventions. RE-AIM provided a conceptual framework to examine the processes underlying the impact of the interventions using data from participant surveys and objective sales data collected at baseline, post-intervention (3 months) and 6-months post-intervention. Fisher's exact, χ (2) and t-tests assessed differences in quantitative survey responses among groups. Adjusted linear regression examined the impact of self-reported intervention dose on food purchasing and consumption outcomes. Thematic analysis identified key themes within qualitative survey responses. Reach of the SHELf interventions to disadvantaged groups, and beyond study participants themselves, was moderate. Just over one-third of intervention participants indicated that the interventions were effective in changing the way they bought, cooked or consumed food (p < 0.001 compared to control), with no differences among intervention groups. Improvements in purchasing and consumption outcomes were greatest among those who received a higher intervention dose. Most notably, participants who said they accessed price reductions on fruits and vegetables purchased (519 g/week) and consumed (0.5 servings/day) more vegetables. The majority of participants said they accessed (82%) and appreciated discounts on fruits and vegetables, while there was limited use (40%) and appreciation of discounts on low-calorie carbonated

  17. Evaluation of Lay Support in Pregnant women with Social risk (ELSIPS): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Jolly, Kate; Hemming, Karla; Ingram, Lucy; Gale, Nicola; Dann, Sophie-Anna; Chambers, Jacky; MacArthur, Christine

    2012-02-29

    Maternal, neonatal and child health outcomes are worse in families from black and ethnic minority groups and disadvantaged backgrounds. There is little evidence on whether lay support improves maternal and infant outcomes among women with complex social needs within a disadvantaged multi-ethnic population in the United Kingdom (UK). The aim of this study is to evaluate a lay Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW) service for nulliparous women identified as having social risk within a maternity service that is systematically assessing social risks alongside the usual obstetric and medical risks. The study design is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in nulliparous women assessed as having social risk comparing standard maternity care with the addition of referral to the POW support service. The POWs work alongside community midwifery teams and offer individualised support to women to encourage engagement with services (health and social care) from randomisation (before 28 weeks gestation) until 6 weeks after birth. The primary outcomes have been chosen on the basis that they are linked to maternal and infant health. The two primary outcomes are engagement with antenatal care, assessed by the number of antenatal visits; and maternal depression, assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 8-12 weeks after birth. Secondary outcomes include maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, routine child health assessments, including immunisation uptake and breastfeeding at 6 weeks. Other psychological outcomes (self efficacy) and mother-to-infant bonding will also be collected using validated tools.A sample size of 1316 will provide 90% power (at the 5% significance level) to detect increased engagement with antenatal services of 1.5 visits and a reduction of 1.5 in the average EPDS score for women with two or more social risk factors, with power in excess of this for women with any social risk factor. Analysis will be by intention to treat. Qualitative research

  18. Evaluation of efficacy of a new hybrid fusion device: a randomized, two-centre controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewe, Jan; Bredow, Jan; Oppermann, Johannes; Koy, Timmo; Delank, Stefan; Knoell, Peter; Eysel, Peer; Sobottke, Rolf; Zarghooni, Kourosh; Röllinghoff, Marc

    2014-09-05

    of convincing data on safety or efficacy, including benefits and harms to the patients, of these systems. Health care providers are particularly interested in such data as these implants are much more expensive than conventional implants. In such a case, randomized clinical trials are the best way to evaluate benefits and risks. NCT01852526.

  19. A cluster randomised controlled effectiveness trial evaluating perinatal home visiting among South African mothers/infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to reduce poor perinatal health. We trained community health workers (CHWs as home visitors to address maternal/infant risks.In a cluster randomised controlled trial in Cape Town townships, neighbourhoods were randomised within matched pairs to 1 the control, healthcare at clinics (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 594 women, or 2 a home visiting intervention by CBW trained in cognitive-behavioural strategies to address health risks (by the Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Programme, in addition to clinic care (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 644 women. Participants were assessed during pregnancy (2% refusal and 92% were reassessed at two weeks post-birth, 88% at six months and 84% at 18 months later. We analysed 32 measures of maternal/infant well-being over the 18 month follow-up period using longitudinal random effects regressions. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated overall effectiveness over time. The 18 month post-birth assessment outcomes also were examined alone and as a function of the number of home visits received.Benefits were found on 7 of 32 measures of outcomes, resulting in significant overall benefits for the intervention compared to the control when using the binomial test (p = 0.008; nevertheless, no effects were observed when only the 18 month outcomes were analyzed. Benefits on individual outcomes were related to the number of home visits received. Among women living with HIV, intervention mothers were more likely to implement the PMTCT regimens, use condoms during all sexual episodes (OR = 1.25; p = 0.014, have infants with healthy weight-for-age measurements (OR = 1.42; p = 0.045, height-for-age measurements (OR = 1.13, p<0.001, breastfeed exclusively for six months (OR = 3.59; p<0.001, and breastfeed longer (OR = 3.08; p<0.001. Number of visits was positively associated with infant birth weight ≥2500 grams (OR = 1.07; p = 0

  20. Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Foley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH trial tested a family intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour in overweight children. The trial found no significant effect of the intervention on children’s screen-based sedentary behaviour. To explore these null findings, we conducted a pre-planned process evaluation, focussing on intervention delivery and uptake. Methods SWITCH was a randomised controlled trial of a 6-month family intervention to reduce screen time in overweight children aged 9–12 years (n = 251. Community workers met with each child’s primary caregiver to deliver the intervention content. Community workers underwent standard training and were monitored once by a member of the research team to assess intervention delivery. The primary caregiver implemented the intervention with their child, and self-reported intervention use at 3 and 6 months. An exploratory analysis determined whether child outcomes at 6 months varied by primary caregiver use of the intervention. Results Monitoring indicated that community workers delivered all core intervention components to primary caregivers. However, two thirds of primary caregivers reported using any intervention component “sometimes” or less frequently at both time points, suggesting that intervention uptake was poor. Additionally, analyses indicated no effect of primary caregiver intervention use on child outcomes at 6 months, suggesting the intervention itself lacked efficacy. Conclusions Poor uptake, and the efficacy of the intervention itself, may have played a role in the null findings of the SWITCH trial on health behaviour and body composition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12611000164998 ; registration date: 10/02/2011.

  1. An Overview of Trials´Accreditation and Recognition of Brazilian Tests Used for the Safety Evaluation of Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana dos Santos Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For some time, Brazil has been appointed as one of the greatest consumers of cosmetic products in the world. Although cosmetics may seem harmless, destined exclusively to enhance personal appearance or to clean and protect the skin, hair and nails, new studies and events are highlighting the need to evaluate the safety of such products. The present work interrelated the lifecycle of a cosmetic product with the safety trials and tests applicable to some cycle phases. From this information, a survey was made of accredited Conformity Assessment Bodies (CAB and test facilities recognized by the General Coordination for Accreditation (CGCRE which are competent respectively to carry out safety trials and tests of cosmetics. Twenty five competent laboratories were identified to carry out chemical and/or biological trials of cosmetics, according to the legislation ABNT ISO IEC 17025:2005, and 10 test facilities recognized by the Compliance Monitoring Program that can carry out tests of the development of a product for register purposes, aiming at human health and safety. It is interesting to notice that Brazil has accredited laboratories to carry out trials that are critical for the health of the population, such as the levels of heavy metals and the presence of pathogens. On the other hand, CGCRE does not have a program to recognize safety clinical trials. The importance of this kind of study is understood, considering the world history of adverse reactions and the great consumption of cosmetics in the country.

  2. Evaluation of buspirone for relapse-prevention in adults with cocaine dependence: an efficacy trial conducted in the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winhusen, Theresa; Brady, Kathleen T; Stitzer, Maxine; Woody, George; Lindblad, Robert; Kropp, Frankie; Brigham, Gregory; Liu, David; Sparenborg, Steven; Sharma, Gaurav; Vanveldhuisen, Paul; Adinoff, Bryon; Somoza, Eugene

    2012-09-01

    Cocaine dependence is a significant public health problem for which there are currently no FDA-approved medications. Hence, identifying candidate compounds and employing an efficient evaluation process is crucial. This paper describes key design decisions made for a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study that uses a novel two-stage process to evaluate buspirone (60 mg/day) for cocaine-relapse prevention. The study includes pilot (N=60) and full-scale (estimated N=264) trials. Both trials will be randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled and both will enroll treatment-seeking cocaine-dependent participants engaged in inpatient/residential treatment and scheduled for outpatient treatment post-discharge. All participants will receive contingency management in which incentives are given for medication adherence as evaluated by the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS). The primary outcome measure is maximum days of continuous cocaine abstinence, as assessed by twice-weekly urine drug screens (UDS) and self-report, during the 15-week outpatient treatment phase. Drug-abuse outcomes include cocaine use as assessed by UDS and self-report of cocaine use, other substance use as assessed by UDS and self-report of substance use (i.e., alcohol and/or illicit drugs), cocaine bingeing, HIV risk behavior, quality of life, functioning, and substance abuse treatment attendance. Unique aspects of the study include conducting an efficacy trial in community treatment programs, a two-stage process to efficiently evaluate buspirone, and an evaluation of mediators by which buspirone might exert a beneficial effect on relapse prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate ready-made spectacles in an adult population in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Gandhi, Monica; Brady, Christopher; Ali, Ferhina S; Mathur, Umang; Munoz, Beatriz; Friedman, David S

    2010-06-01

    Ready-made spectacles (RMS) have advantages; however, visual performance and satisfaction has not been evaluated. A 1-month, double-masked, randomized clinical trial comparing planned continued use and visual performance of RMS to Custom Spectacles (CS) in adults aged 18-45 years with > or =1 diopter (D) of uncorrected refractive error (URE). A total of 373 of 400 participants (93%) completed; mean age was 30 +/- 9 years, and 58% were female. Average URE was 2.21 +/- 1.31D and habitual vision was 0.58 +/- 0.21 logMAR (logarithm of Minimum Angle of Resolution, 20/63(+1) Snellen acuity). Ten participants with habitual vision better than 20/40 were excluded (3%). A lower proportion in the RMS group intended to continue to wear the study spectacles after 1 month (165/183, 90% vs 174/180, 97%, P = 0.02). Spectacle vision in the eye with lower URE was 0.08 +/- 0.15 vs 0.02 +/- 0.08, P or =2.00 D and anisometropia > or =1.00 D (74/363, 20%) found no difference in planned continued use (139/143, 97% vs 141/146, 97%, P = 1.0) for RMS vs CS. While vision is slightly better with CS, 90% of an adult population with URE planned to continue to use their RMS at 1 month. Furthermore, if those without high astigmatism or anisometropia are excluded, virtually all are satisfied with RMS and there is no difference when compared with CS. The findings of this study support the use of RMS for the delivery of refractive services in settings where there is a high level of need, limited resources and low access to refractive services.

  4. A randomized controlled trial evaluating a brief parenting program with children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellegen, Cassandra L; Sanders, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of Primary Care Stepping Stones Triple P, a brief individualized parenting program, in a sample of parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sixty-four parents of children aged 2-9 years (M = 5.67, SD = 2.14) with an ASD diagnosis participated in the study. Eighty-six percent of children were male, and 89% of parents identified their child's ethnicity as Australian/White. Families were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions (intervention or care-as-usual) and were assessed at 3 time points (preintervention, postintervention, and 6-month follow-up). Parents completed a range of questionnaires to assess changes in child behavior (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory) and parent outcomes (Parenting Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Parent Problem Checklist, Relationship Quality Inventory, Parental Stress Scale) and 30-min home observations of parent-child interactions. Relative to the care-as-usual group, significant short-term improvements were found in the intervention group on parent-reported child behavior problems, dysfunctional parenting styles, parenting confidence, and parental stress, parental conflict, and relationship happiness. No significant intervention effects were found on levels of parental depression or anxiety, or on observed child disruptive and parent aversive behavior. The effect sizes for significant variables ranged from medium to large. Short-term effects were predominantly maintained at 6-month follow-up, and parents reported high levels of goal achievement and satisfaction with the program. The results indicate that a brief low intensity version of Stepping Stones Triple P is an efficacious intervention for parents of children with ASD.

  5. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beach Kirk W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements.

  6. Healthy Foundations Study: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate biological embedding of early-life experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Andrea; Catherine, Nicole; Boyle, Michael; Jack, Susan M; Atkinson, Leslie; Kobor, Michael; Sheehan, Debbie; Tonmyr, Lil; Waddell, Charlotte; MacMillan, Harriet L

    2018-01-26

    Adverse early experiences are associated with long-lasting disruptions in physiology, development and health. These experiences may be 'biologically embedded' into molecular and genomic systems that determine later expressions of vulnerability. Most studies to date have not examined whether preventive interventions can potentially reverse biological embedding. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) is an evidence-based intervention with demonstrated efficacy in improving prenatal health, parenting and child functioning. The Healthy Foundations Study is an innovative birth cohort which will evaluate the impact of the NFP on biological outcomes of mothers and their infants. Starting in 2013, up to 400 pregnant mothers and their newborns were recruited from the British Columbia Healthy Connections Project-a randomised controlled trial of the NFP, and will be followed to child aged 2 years. Women were recruited prior to 28 weeks' gestation and then individually randomised to receive existing services (comparison group) or NFP plus existing services (intervention group). Hair samples are collected from mothers at baseline and 2 months post partum to measure physiological stress. Saliva samples are collected from infants during all visits for analyses of stress and immune function. Buccal swabs are collected from infants at 2 and 24 months to assess DNA methylation. Biological samples will be related to child outcome measures at age 2 years. The study received ethical approval from seven research ethics boards. Findings from this study will be shared broadly with the research community through peer-reviewed publications, and conference presentations, as well as seminars with our policy partners and relevant healthcare providers. The outcomes of this study will provide all stakeholders with important information regarding how early adversity may lead to health and behavioural disparities and how these may be altered through early interventions. NCT01672060; Pre-results.

  7. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Kirk W; Bergelin, Robert O; Leotta, Daniel F; Primozich, Jean F; Sevareid, P Max; Stutzman, Edward T; Zierler, R Eugene

    2010-09-07

    Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC) provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements.

  8. Evaluation of a musculoskeletal model with prosthetic knee through six experimental gait trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Stylianou, Antonis P; Guess, Trent M

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of the forces acting on musculoskeletal joint tissues during movement benefits tissue engineering, artificial joint replacement, and our understanding of ligament and cartilage injury. Computational models can be used to predict these internal forces, but musculoskeletal models that simultaneously calculate muscle force and the resulting loading on joint structures are rare. This study used publicly available gait, skeletal geometry, and instrumented prosthetic knee loading data [1] to evaluate muscle driven forward dynamics simulations of walking. Inputs to the simulation were measured kinematics and outputs included muscle, ground reaction, ligament, and joint contact forces. A full body musculoskeletal model with subject specific lower extremity geometries was developed in the multibody framework. A compliant contact was defined between the prosthetic femoral component and tibia insert geometries. Ligament structures were modeled with a nonlinear force-strain relationship. The model included 45 muscles on the right lower leg. During forward dynamics simulations a feedback control scheme calculated muscle forces using the error signal between the current muscle lengths and the lengths recorded during inverse kinematics simulations. Predicted tibio-femoral contact force, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces were compared to experimental measurements for six different gait trials using three different gait types (normal, trunk sway, and medial thrust). The mean average deviation (MAD) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) over one gait cycle are reported. The muscle driven forward dynamics simulations were computationally efficient and consistently reproduced the inverse kinematics motion. The forward simulations also predicted total knee contact forces (166Nmotor control patterns during gait. Consequently, the simulations did not accurately predict medial/lateral tibio-femoral force distribution and muscle activation timing. Copyright © 2013 IPEM

  9. Music therapy for prisoners: pilot randomised controlled trial and implications for evaluating psychosocial interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Assmus, Jörg; Hjørnevik, Kjetil; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild; Brown, Fiona Kirkwood; Hansen, Anita Lill; Waage, Leif; Stige, Brynjulf

    2014-12-01

    Mental health problems are common among prison inmates. Music therapy has been shown to reduce mental health problems. It may also be beneficial in the rehabilitation of prisoners, but rigorous outcome research is lacking. We compared group music therapy with standard care for prisoners in a pilot randomised controlled trial that started with the establishment of music therapy services in a prison near Bergen in 2008. In all, 113 prisoners agreed to participate. Anxiety (STAI-State [State-Trait Anxiety Inventory], STAI-Trait), depression (HADS-D [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale]), and social relationships (Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire [Q-LES-Q]) were assessed at baseline; every 2 weeks in the experimental group; after 1, 3, and 6 months in the control group; and at release. No restrictions were placed on the frequency, duration, or contents of music therapy. Duration of stay in the institution was short (62% stayed less than 1 month). Only a minority reached clinical cutoffs for anxiety and depression at baseline. Between-group analyses of effects were not possible. Music therapy was well accepted and attractive among the prisoners. Post hoc analysis of within-group changes suggested a reduction of state anxiety after 2 weeks of music therapy (d = 0.33, p = .025). Short sentences and low baseline levels of psychological disturbance impeded the examination of effects in this study. Recommendations for planning future studies are given, concerning the careful choice of participants, interventions and settings, comparison condition and design aspects, choice of outcomes, and integration of research approaches. Thus, the present study has important implications for future studies evaluating interventions for improving prisoners' mental health. ISRCTN22518605. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Standardized Strategy for Uveitis Etiologic Diagnosis (ULISSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Parisot, Audrey; Kodjikian, Laurent; Errera, Marie-Hélène; Sedira, Neila; Heron, Emmanuel; Pérard, Laurent; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Schneider, Christelle; Rivière, Sophie; Ollé, Priscille; Pugnet, Grégory; Cathébras, Pascal; Manoli, Pierre; Bodaghi, Bahram; Saadoun, David; Baillif, Stéphanie; Tieulie, Nathalie; Andre, Marc; Chiambaretta, Frédéric; Bonin, Nicolas; Bielefeld, Philip; Bron, Alain; Mouriaux, Frédéric; Bienvenu, Boris; Vicente, Stéphanie; Bin, Sylvie; Broussolle, Christiane; Decullier, Evelyne; Sève, Pascal

    2017-06-01

    To prospectively assess the efficiency of a standardized diagnostic approach, compared to an open strategy, for the etiologic diagnosis of uveitis. Noninferiority, prospective, multicenter, clustered randomized controlled trial. Consecutive patients with uveitis, who visited 1 of the participating departments of ophthalmology, were included. In the standardized group, all patients had a minimal evaluation regardless of the type of uveitis (complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, tuberculin skin test, syphilis serology, and chest radiograph) followed by more complex investigations according to ophthalmologic findings. In the open group, the ophthalmologist could order any type of investigation. Main outcome was the percentage of etiologic diagnoses at 6 months. Nine hundred and three patients with uveitis were included from January 2010 to May 2013 and the per-protocol population comprised 676 patients (open 373; standardized 303). Mean age at diagnosis was 46 years. Anatomic distribution of uveitis was as follows: anterior (60.8% and 72.3%, P = .0017), intermediate (11.7% and 12.3%, P = .8028), posterior (17.8% and 8.2%, P = .0004), and panuveitis (15.3% and 15.2%, P = .9596). An etiologic diagnosis was established in 54.4% of cases in the open group and 49.5% in the standardized group (P = .2029). The difference between both strategies (standardized minus open) was -4.9% (95% CI [-12.5%; 2.6%]). There were more investigations in the open group than in the standardized group (5371 vs 3759, P uveitis, although its noninferiority cannot be proved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating Smartphone-Based Virtual Reality to Improve Chinese Schoolchildren's Pedestrian Safety: A Nonrandomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C; Wu, Yue; Li, Peng; Severson, Joan; He, Yefei; Xiang, Henry; Hu, Guoqing

    2017-12-05

    This nonrandomized trial evaluated whether classroom-based training in a smartphone-based virtual reality (VR) pedestrian environment (a) teaches schoolchildren to cross streets safely, and (b) increases their self-efficacy for street-crossing. Fifty-six children, aged 8-10 years, attending primary school in Changsha, China participated. Baseline pedestrian safety assessment occurred in the VR environment and through unobtrusive observation of a subsample crossing a street for 11 days outside school. Self-efficacy was assessed through both self-report and observation. Following baseline, children engaged in the VR for 12 days in their classrooms, honing complex cognitive-perceptual skills required to engage safely in traffic. Follow-up assessment replicated baseline. Probability of crash in the VR decreased posttraining (0.40 vs. 0.09), and observational data found the odds of looking at oncoming traffic while crossing the first lane of traffic increased (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4). Self-efficacy increases occurred in self-report (proportional OR = 4.7 crossing busy streets) and observation of following crossing-guard signals (OR = 0.2, first lane). Pedestrian safety training via smartphone-based VR provides children the repeated practice needed to learn the complex skills required to cross streets safely, and also helps them improve self-efficacy to cross streets. Given rapid motorization and global smartphone penetration, plus epidemiological findings that about 75,000 children die annually worldwide in pedestrian crashes, smartphone-based VR could supplement existing policy and prevention efforts to improve global child pedestrian safety.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of cabergoline (Dostinex) on women with symptomatic myomatous uterus: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Mansureh; Kashanian, Maryam; Ghaziani, Negar; Sheikhansari, Narges

    2016-11-01

    Myoma is one of the most common benign tumors of uterus and one of the most common causes of vaginal bleeding in women. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of dopamine receptor agonist cabergoline on the size of myoma and the amount of bleeding in the women with myoma of the uterus. The study was performed as a single blind randomized clinical trial on the women with symptomatic myoma. The women were randomly assigned in 2 groups. In the case group, 0.5mg cabergoline was prescribed weekly for three months, and in the control group, nothing was prescribed and the women only had close observation for symptoms. The reduction in symptoms including pelvic pain and duration and amount of uterine bleeding, and the size of myoma, were compared between the 2 groups. 51 women finished the study (26 women in the case group and 25 women in the control group). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups according to age, gravidity, parity, history of abortion, having living children, pretreatment hemoglobin, pain and amount of uterine bleeding, uterine size, and the size of myoma. After treatment, hemoglobin levels had dropped in the control group but not in the case group (p=0.004). On the other hand, pain had also decreased significantly in the case group in comparison with the control group (p=0.001). Also, the amount of menstrual bleeding (p=0.004), uterine size (p=0.001) and the size of the largest myoma (p=0.013) showed significant reduction in the case group. Cabergoline can decrease the amount of bleeding and pain in the cases of myomatous uterus and can be used for the symptomatic women who want to preserve uterus for a certain period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Process evaluation of a cluster-randomised trial testing a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Shelley; McInnes, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Wallis, Marianne; Banks, Merrilyn; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-02-13

    As pressure ulcers contribute to significant patient burden and increased health care costs, their prevention is a clinical priority. Our team developed and tested a complex intervention, a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle promoting patient participation in care, in a cluster-randomised trial. The UK Medical Research Council recommends process evaluation of complex interventions to provide insight into why they work or fail and how they might be improved. This study aimed to evaluate processes underpinning implementation of the intervention and explore end-users' perceptions of it, in order to give a deeper understanding of its effects. A pre-specified, mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted as an adjunct to the main trial, guided by a framework for process evaluation of cluster-randomised trials. Data was collected across eight Australian hospitals but mainly focused on the four intervention hospitals. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected across the evaluation domains: recruitment, reach, intervention delivery and response to intervention, at both cluster and individual patient level. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. In the context of the main trial, which found a 42% reduction in risk of pressure ulcer with the intervention that was not significant after adjusting for clustering and covariates, this process evaluation provides important insights. Recruitment and reach among clusters and individuals was high, indicating that patients, nurses and hospitals are willing to engage with a pressure ulcer prevention care bundle. Of 799 intervention patients in the trial, 96.7% received the intervention, which took under 10 min to deliver. Patients and nurses accepted the care bundle, recognising benefits to it and describing how it enabled participation in pressure ulcer prevention (PUP) care. This process evaluation found no major failures

  14. A Cluster-Randomized Trial of Restorative Practices: An Illustration to Spur High-Quality Research and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie D; Chinman, Matthew; Ebener, Patricia; Phillips, Andrea; Xenakis, Lea; Malone, Patrick S

    2016-01-01

    Restorative Practices in schools lack rigorous evaluation studies. As an example of rigorous school-based research, this paper describes the first randomized control trial of restorative practices to date, the Study of Restorative Practices. It is a 5-year, cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Restorative Practices Intervention (RPI) in 14 middle schools in Maine to assess whether RPI impacts both positive developmental outcomes and problem behaviors and whether the effects persist during the transition from middle to high school. The two-year RPI intervention began in the 2014-2015 school year. The study's rationale and theoretical concerns are discussed along with methodological concerns including teacher professional development. The theoretical rationale and description of the methods from this study may be useful to others conducting rigorous research and evaluation in this area.

  15. A process evaluation of the Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Ball, Kylie; Abbott, Gavin; McNaughton, Sarah A; Le, Ha N D; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Pollard, Christina; Crawford, David A

    2016-01-01

    Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) was a randomized controlled trial that operationalized a socioecological approach to population-level dietary behaviour change in a real-world supermarket setting...

  16. Protocol for process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial of family-led rehabilitation post stroke (ATTEND) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hueiming; Lindley, Richard; Alim, Mohammed; Felix, Cynthia; Gandhi, Dorcas B C; Verma, Shweta J; Tugnawat, Deepak Kumar; Syrigapu, Anuradha; Ramamurthy, Ramaprabhu Krishnappa; Pandian, Jeyaraj D; Walker, Marion; Forster, Anne; Anderson, Craig S; Langhorne, Peter; Murthy, Gudlavalleti Venkata Satyanarayana; Shamanna, Bindiganavale Ramaswamy; Hackett, Maree L; Maulik, Pallab K; Harvey, Lisa A; Jan, Stephen

    2016-09-15

    We are undertaking a randomised controlled trial (fAmily led rehabiliTaTion aftEr stroke in INDia, ATTEND) evaluating training a family carer to enable maximal rehabilitation of patients with stroke-related disability; as a potentially affordable, culturally acceptable and effective intervention for use in India. A process evaluation is needed to understand how and why this complex intervention may be effective, and to capture important barriers and facilitators to its implementation. We describe the protocol for our process evaluation to encourage the development of in-process evaluation methodology and transparency in reporting. The realist and RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) frameworks informed the design. Mixed methods include semistructured interviews with health providers, patients and their carers, analysis of quantitative process data describing fidelity and dose of intervention, observations of trial set up and implementation, and the analysis of the cost data from the patients and their families perspective and programme budgets. These qualitative and quantitative data will be analysed iteratively prior to knowing the quantitative outcomes of the trial, and then triangulated with the results from the primary outcome evaluation. The process evaluation has received ethical approval for all sites in India. In low-income and middle-income countries, the available human capital can form an approach to reducing the evidence practice gap, compared with the high cost alternatives available in established market economies. This process evaluation will provide insights into how such a programme can be implemented in practice and brought to scale. Through local stakeholder engagement and dissemination of findings globally we hope to build on patient-centred, cost-effective and sustainable models of stroke rehabilitation. CTRI/2013/04/003557. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  17. Evaluation of Post-Trial Reviews of Courts-Martial within the Department of the Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    customization . We are suggesting the historic and current ad-hoc, trial-and-error method has not been effective. Processes/procedures: The RLSOs developed...enter changes/corrections, and generate custom reports; • permits Marine Corps headquarters offices and NAMARA to have system access and “see” cases in...2010, requires sending all records of trial requiring review under Articles 66 or 69 to the Office of the Judge Advocate General via FEDEX/UPS/ DHL

  18. Trial and error: evaluating and refining a community model of HIV testing in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kathleen E; Pedrana, Alisa; Leitinger, David; Wilkinson, Anna L; Locke, Peter; Hellard, Margaret E; Stoové, Mark

    2017-10-10

    The 2012 regulatory approval of HIV rapid point of care (RPOC) tests in Australia and a national strategic focus on HIV testing provided a catalyst for implementation of non-clinical HIV testing service models. PRONTO! opened in 2013 as a two-year trial delivering peer-led community-based HIV RPOC tests targeting gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBM), with the aim of increasing HIV testing frequency. Initial data suggested this aim was not achieved and, as part of a broader service evaluation, we sought to explore client acceptability and barriers to testing at PRONTO! to refine the service model. We present descriptive and thematic analyses of data from two in-depth evaluation surveys and four focus groups with PRONTO! clients focused on service acceptability, client testing history, intentions to test and barriers to testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The three novel aspects of the PRONTO! model, testing environment, rapid-testing, peer-staff, were reported to be highly acceptable among survey and focus group participants. Focus group discussions revealed that the PRONTO! model reduced anxiety associated with HIV testing and created a comfortable environment conducive to discussing sexual risk and health. However, an absence of STI testing at PRONTO!, driven by restrictions on medical subsidies for STI testing and limited funds available at the service level created a barrier to HIV testing. An overwhelming majority of PRONTO! clients reported usually testing for STIs alongside HIV and most reported plans to seek STI testing after testing for HIV at PRONTO!. When deciding where, when and what to test for, clients reported balancing convenience and relative risk and consequences for each infection as guiding their decision-making. A community-based and peer-led HIV testing model reduced previously reported barriers to HIV testing, while introducing new barriers. The absence of STI testing at PRONTO! and the need to

  19. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mackintosh Shylie F; Hill Keith D; Batchelor Frances A; Said Catherine M; Whitehead Craig H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home) project. Methods and design This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial falls prevention program for stroke survivors who are at high risk of falling when they ...

  20. Barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace dietary interventions: process evaluation results of a cluster controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; McHugh, Sheena; Perry, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ambiguity exists regarding the effectiveness of workplace dietary interventions. Rigorous process evaluation is vital to understand this uncertainty. This study was conducted as part of the Food Choice at Work trial which assessed the comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification intervention and an educational intervention both alone and in combination versus a control workplace. Effectiveness was assessed in terms of employees? dietary intakes, nutri...

  1. Three-year randomised clinical trial to evaluate the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of hybrid composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Palaniappan, Senthamaraiselvi; Elsen, Liesbeth; Lijnen, Inge; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Lambrechts, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of conventional hybrid (Tetric Ceram), micro-filled hybrid (Gradia Direct Posterior) and nano-hybrid (Tetric EvoCeram, TEC) posterior composite restorations in a 3-year randomised clinical trial. Sixteen Tetric Ceram, 17 TEC and 16 Gradia Direct Posterior restorations were placed in human molars and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36?months of clinical service according to US Public H...

  2. Content and Evaluation of the Benefits of Effective Exercise for Older Adults With Knee Pain Trial Physiotherapist Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Melanie A; Whittle, Rebecca; Healey, Emma L; Hill, Susan; Mullis, Ricky; Roddy, Edward; Sowden, Gail; Tooth, Stephanie; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-05-01

    To explore whether participating in the Benefits of Effective Exercise for knee Pain (BEEP) trial training program increased physiotherapists' self-confidence and changed their intended clinical behavior regarding exercise for knee pain in older adults. Before/after training program evaluation. Physiotherapists were asked to complete a questionnaire before the BEEP trial training program, immediately after, and 12 to 18 months later (postintervention delivery in the BEEP trial). The questionnaire included a case vignette and associated clinical management questions. Questionnaire responses were compared over time and between physiotherapists trained to deliver each intervention within the BEEP trial. Primary care. Physiotherapists (N=53) who completed the BEEP trial training program. Not applicable. Self-confidence in the diagnosis and management of knee pain in older adults; and intended clinical behavior measured by a case vignette and associated clinical management questions. Fifty-two physiotherapists (98%) returned the pretraining questionnaire, and 44 (85%) and 39 (74%) returned the posttraining and postintervention questionnaires, respectively. Posttraining, self-confidence in managing older adults with knee pain increased, and intended clinical behavior regarding exercise for knee pain in older adults appeared more in line with clinical guidelines. However, not all positive changes were maintained in the longer-term. Participating in the BEEP trial training program increased physiotherapists' self-confidence and changed their intended clinical behavior regarding exercise for knee pain, but by 12 to 18 months later, some of these positive changes were lost. This suggests that brief training programs are useful, but additional strategies are likely needed to successfully maintain changes in clinical behavior over time. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The breast reconstruction evaluation of acellular dermal matrix as a sling trial (BREASTrial): design and methods of a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Mendenhall, Shaun D; Anderson, Layla A; Ying, Jian; Boucher, Kenneth M; Liu, Ting; Neumayer, Leigh A

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature has focused on the advantages and disadvantages of using acellular dermal matrix in breast reconstruction. Many of the reported data are from low level-of-evidence studies, leaving many questions incompletely answered. The present randomized trial provides high-level data on the incidence and severity of complications in acellular dermal matrix breast reconstruction between two commonly used types of acellular dermal matrix. A prospective randomized trial was conducted to compare outcomes of immediate staged tissue expander breast reconstruction using either AlloDerm or DermaMatrix. The impact of body mass index, smoking, diabetes, mastectomy type, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on outcomes was analyzed. Acellular dermal matrix biointegration was analyzed clinically and histologically. Patient satisfaction was assessed by means of preoperative and postoperative surveys. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of complications. This article reports on the study design, surgical technique, patient characteristics, and preoperative survey results, with outcomes data in a separate report. After 2.5 years, we successfully enrolled and randomized 128 patients (199 breasts). The majority of patients were healthy nonsmokers, with 41 percent of patients receiving radiation therapy and 49 percent receiving chemotherapy. Half of the mastectomies were prophylactic, with nipple-sparing mastectomy common in both cancer and prophylactic cases. Preoperative survey results indicate that patients were satisfied with their premastectomy breast reconstruction education. Results from the Breast Reconstruction Evaluation Using Acellular Dermal Matrix as a Sling Trial will assist plastic surgeons in making evidence-based decisions regarding acellular dermal matrix-assisted tissue expander breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, II.

  4. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Frances A; Hill, Keith D; Mackintosh, Shylie F; Said, Catherine M; Whitehead, Craig H

    2009-03-31

    Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home) project. This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial falls prevention program for stroke survivors who are at high risk of falling when they return home after rehabilitation. Intervention will consist of a home exercise program as well as individualised falls prevention and injury minimisation strategies based on identified risk factors for falls. Additionally, two sub-studies will be implemented in order to explore other key areas related to falls in this population. The first of these is a longitudinal study evaluating the relationship between fear of falling, falls and function over twelve months, and the second evaluates residual impairment in gait stability and obstacle crossing twelve months after discharge from rehabilitation. The results of the FLASSH project will inform falls prevention practice for stroke survivors. If the falls prevention program is shown to be effective, low cost strategies to prevent falls can be implemented for those at risk around the time of discharge from rehabilitation, thus improving safety and quality of life for stroke survivors. The two sub-studies will contribute to the overall understanding and management of falls risk in stroke survivors. This trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN012607000398404).

  5. Intervention fidelity in the definitive cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP) trial: findings from the process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jenny; Dean, Sarah; Creanor, Siobhan; Abraham, Charles; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Ryan, Emma; Wyatt, Katrina M

    2017-11-28

    The Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP) was a novel school-located intervention for 9-10 year olds, designed to prevent obesity by changing patterns of child behaviour through the creation of supportive school and home environments using dynamic and creative delivery methods. This paper reports on both the quantitative and qualitative data regarding the implementation of the HeLP intervention in the definitive cluster randomised controlled trial, which was part of the wider process evaluation. Mixed methods were used to collect data on intervention uptake, fidelity of delivery in terms of content and quality of delivery of the intervention, as well as school and child engagement with the programme. Data were collected using registers of attendance, observations and checklists, field notes, focus groups with children and semi-structured interviews with teachers. Qualitative data were analysed thematically and quantitative data were summarized using descriptive statistics. All 16 intervention schools received a complete or near complete programme (94-100%), which was delivered in the spirit in which it had been designed. Of the 676 children in the intervention schools, over 90% of children participated in each phase of HeLP; 92% of children across the socio-economic spectrum were deemed to be engaged with HeLP and qualitative data revealed a high level of enjoyment by all children, particularly to the interactive drama workshops. Further evidence of child engagment with the programme was demonstrated by children's clear understanding of programme messages around marketing, moderation and food labelling. Thirteen of the intervention schools were deemed to be fully engaged with HeLP and qualitative data revealed a high level of teacher 'buy in', due to the programme's compatability with the National Curriculum, level of teacher support and use of innovative and creative delivery methods by external drama practitioners. Our trial shows that it is possible to

  6. A novel, nonbinary evaluation of success and failure reveals bupropion efficacy versus methamphetamine dependence: reanalysis of a multisite trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, David J; Li, Shou-Hua

    2012-05-01

    A multisite, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of bupropion for methamphetamine dependence was reanalyzed using a novel, nonbinary method of evaluating success and failure. The original analysis focused on a group response endpoint (the change in percentage of participants with methamphetamine-free urines each week over the course of the trial) and no significant bupropion effect was observed in the total population of study participants. In this reanalysis, individual participants were regarded as treatment success if they achieved multiple weeks of abstinence lasting through the end of the study, and their degree of success was quantified by calculating the number of beyond-threshold weeks of success (NOBWOS). Thus, setting the threshold at 1 week of end-of-study abstinence (EOSA), treatment successes were assigned NOBWOS values ranging from 1 to 11, with 1 corresponding to 2 weeks EOSA and 11 corresponding to abstinence throughput the entire 12-week trial. Treatment failures were assigned a value of 0. Comparison of NOBWOS values revealed a significant effect of bupropion to facilitate abstinence (P= 0.0176). In the bupropion group, 20% of participants achieved 2 or more weeks EOSA, 14% achieved 6 or more weeks EOSA, and 6% were abstinent throughout the trial; this compares with 7%, 4%, and 1% in the placebo group, respectively. On the basis of the NOBWOS analysis, bupropion seems to effectively facilitate the achievement of abstinence in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Improving Conduct and Feasibility of Clinical Trials to Evaluate Antibacterial Drugs to Treat Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Recommendations of the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Antibacterial Drug Development Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knirsch, Charles; Alemayehu, Demissie; Botgros, Radu; Comic-Savic, Sabrina; Friedland, David; Holland, Thomas L; Merchant, Kunal; Noel, Gary J; Pelfrene, Eric; Reith, Christina; Santiago, Jonas; Tiernan, Rosemary; Tenearts, Pamela; Goldsack, Jennifer C; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-08-15

    The etiology of hospital-acquired or ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) is often multidrug-resistant infections. The evaluation of new antibacterial drugs for efficacy in this population is important, as many antibacterial drugs have demonstrated limitations when studied in this population. HABP/VABP trials are expensive and challenging to conduct due to protocol complexity and low patient enrollment, among other factors. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) seeks to advance antibacterial drug development by streamlining HABP/VABP clinical trials to improve efficiency and feasibility while maintaining ethical rigor, patient safety, information value, and scientific validity. In 2013, CTTI engaged a multidisciplinary group of experts to discuss challenges impeding the conduct of HABP/VABP trials. Separate workstreams identified challenges associated with HABP/VABP protocol complexity. The Project Team developed potential solutions to streamline HABP/VABP trials using a Quality by Design approach. CTTI recommendations focus on 4 key areas to improve HABP/VABP trials: informed consent processes/practices, protocol design, choice of an institutional review board (IRB), and trial outcomes. Informed consent processes should include legally authorized representatives. Protocol design decisions should focus on eligibility criteria, prestudy antibacterial therapy considerations, use of new diagnostics, and sample size. CTTI recommends that sponsors use a central IRB and discuss trial endpoints with regulators, including defining a clinical failure and evaluating the impact of concomitant antibacterial drugs. Streamlining HABP/VABP trials by addressing key protocol elements can improve trial startup and patient recruitment/retention, reduce trial complexity and costs, and ensure patient safety while advancing antibacterial drug development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of

  8. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  9. Plant Line Trial Evaluation of Viable Non-Chromium Passivation Systems for Electrolytin Tinplate, ETP (TRP 9911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Sinsel

    2003-06-30

    Plant trial evaluations have been completed for two zirconium-based, non-chromium passivation systems previously identified as possible alternatives to cathodic dichromate (CDC) passivation for electrolytic tinplate (ETP). These trials were done on a commercial electrolytic tin plating line at Weirton Steel and extensive evaluations of the materials resulting from these trials have been completed. All this was accomplished as a collaborative effort under the AISI Technology Roadmap Program and was executed by seven North American Tin Mill Products producers [Bethlehem Steel (now acquired by International Steel Group (ISG)), Dofasco Inc., National Steel (now acquired by U.S. Steel), U.S. Steel, USS-Posco, Weirton Steel, and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel] with funding partially from the Department of Energy (DOE) and partially on an equal cost sharing basis among project participants. The initial phases of this project involved optimization of application procedures for the non-chromium systems in the laboratories at Bethlehem Steel and Betz Dearborn followed by extensive testing with various lacquer formulations and food simulants in the laboratories at Valspar and PPG. Work was also completed at Dofasco and Weirton Steel to develop methods to prevent precipitation of insoluble solids as a function of time from the zirconate system. The results of this testing indicated that sulfide staining characteristics for the non-chromium passivation systems could be minimized but not totally eliminated and neither system was found to perform quite as good, in this respect, as the standard CDC system. As for the stability of zirconate treatment, a method was developed to stabilize this system for a sufficient period of time to conduct plant trial evaluations but, working with a major supplier of zirconium orthosulfate, a method for long term stabilization is still under development.

  10. The FLASSH study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating falls prevention after stroke and two sub-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackintosh Shylie F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common in stroke survivors returning home after rehabilitation, however there is currently a lack of evidence about preventing falls in this population. This paper describes the study protocol for the FLASSH (FaLls prevention After Stroke Survivors return Home project. Methods and design This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial falls prevention program for stroke survivors who are at high risk of falling when they return home after rehabilitation. Intervention will consist of a home exercise program as well as individualised falls prevention and injury minimisation strategies based on identified risk factors for falls. Additionally, two sub-studies will be implemented in order to explore other key areas related to falls in this population. The first of these is a longitudinal study evaluating the relationship between fear of falling, falls and function over twelve months, and the second evaluates residual impairment in gait stability and obstacle crossing twelve months after discharge from rehabilitation. Discussion The results of the FLASSH project will inform falls prevention practice for stroke survivors. If the falls prevention program is shown to be effective, low cost strategies to prevent falls can be implemented for those at risk around the time of discharge from rehabilitation, thus improving safety and quality of life for stroke survivors. The two sub-studies will contribute to the overall understanding and management of falls risk in stroke survivors. Trial registration This trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN012607000398404.

  11. Evaluation of a self-management programme for congestive heart failure patients: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Eijk Jacques

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congestive heart failure (CHF has a substantial impact on care utilisation and quality of life. It is crucial for patients to cope with CHF adequately, if they are to live an acceptable life. Self-management may play an important role in this regard. Previous studies have shown the effectiveness of the 'Chronic Disease Self-Management Program' (CDSMP, a group-based cognitive behavioural programme for patients with various chronic conditions. However, the programme's effectiveness has not yet been studied specifically among CHF patients. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effects of the CDSMP on psychosocial attributes, health behaviour, quality of life, and health care utilisation of CHF patients. Methods/Design The programme is being evaluated in a two-group randomised controlled trial. Patients were eligible if they had been diagnosed with CHF and experienced slight to marked limitation of physical activity. They were selected from the Heart Failure and/or Cardiology Outpatient Clinics of six hospitals. Eligible patients underwent a baseline assessment and were subsequently allocated to the intervention or control group. Patients allocated to the intervention group were invited to attend the self-management programme consisting of six weekly sessions, led by a CHF nurse specialist and a CHF patient. Those allocated to the control group received care as usual. Follow-up measurements are being carried out immediately after the intervention period, and six and twelve months after the start of the intervention. An effect evaluation and a process evaluation are being conducted. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are self-efficacy expectancies, perceived control, and cognitive symptom management. The secondary outcome measures are smoking and drinking behaviour, Body Mass Index (BMI, physical activity level, self-care behaviour, health-related quality of life, perceived

  12. A generalized form of the Bernoulli Trial collision scheme in DSMC: Derivation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan; Shoja-Sani, Ahmad; Ejraei, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    The impetus of this research is to present a generalized Bernoulli Trial collision scheme in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Previously, a subsequent of several collision schemes have been put forward, which were mathematically based on the Kac stochastic model. These include Bernoulli Trial (BT), Ballot Box (BB), Simplified Bernoulli Trial (SBT) and Intelligent Simplified Bernoulli Trial (ISBT) schemes. The number of considered pairs for a possible collision in the above-mentioned schemes varies between N (l) (N (l) - 1) / 2 in BT, 1 in BB, and (N (l) - 1) in SBT or ISBT, where N (l) is the instantaneous number of particles in the lth cell. Here, we derive a generalized form of the Bernoulli Trial collision scheme (GBT) where the number of selected pairs is any desired value smaller than (N (l) - 1), i.e., Nsel computational efficiency of the BT-based collision models compared to the standard no time counter (NTC) and nearest neighbor (NN) collision models.

  13. Evaluating a community-based early childhood education and development program in Indonesia: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial with supplementary matched control group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradhan, M.; Brinkman, S.A.; Beatty, A.; Maika, A.; Satriawan, E.; de Ree, J.; Hasan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper presents the study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a supplementary matched control group. The aim of the trial is to evaluate a community-based early education and development program launched by the Government of Indonesia. The program

  14. Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: International Insights From the TECOS Trial (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagidipati, Neha J; Navar, Ann Marie; Pieper, Karen S; Green, Jennifer B; Bethel, M Angelyn; Armstrong, Paul W; Josse, Robert G; McGuire, Darren K; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Cornel, Jan H; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Strandberg, Timo E; Delibasi, Tuncay; Holman, Rury R; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-09-26

    Intensive risk factor modification significantly improves outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, the degree to which secondary prevention treatment goals are achieved in international clinical practice is unknown. Attainment of 5 secondary prevention parameters-aspirin use, lipid control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol diabetes mellitus and known cardiovascular disease at entry into TECOS (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between individual and regional factors and secondary prevention achievement at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline secondary prevention achievement and cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Overall, 29.9% of patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease achieved all 5 secondary prevention parameters at baseline, although 71.8% achieved at least 4 parameters. North America had the highest proportion (41.2%), whereas Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Latin America had proportions of ≈25%. Individually, blood pressure control (57.9%) had the lowest overall attainment, whereas nonsmoking status had the highest (89%). Over a median 3.0 years of follow-up, a higher baseline secondary prevention score was associated with improved outcomes in a step-wise graded relationship (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.77 for those patients achieving all 5 measures versus those achieving ≤2). In an international trial population, significant opportunities exist to improve the quality of cardiovascular secondary prevention care among patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which in turn could lead to reduced risk of downstream cardiovascular events. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00790205. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating efficacy of a smoking cessation e-‘Tabac Info Service’: ee-TIS trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, L; Bergman, P; Le Faou, Al; Vincent, I; Le Maitre, B; Pasquereau, A; Arwidson, P; Thomas, D; Alla, F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A French national smoking cessation service, Tabac Info Service, has been developed to provide an adapted quitline and a web and mobile application involving personalised contacts (eg, questionnaires, advice, activities, messages) to support smoking cessation. This paper presents the study protocol of the evaluation of the application (e-intervention Tabac Info Service (e-TIS)). The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of e-TIS. The secondary objectives are to (1) describe efficacy variations with regard to users' characteristics, (2) analyse mechanisms and contextual conditions of e-TIS efficacy. Methods and analyses The study design is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled trial including a process evaluation with at least 3000 participants randomised to the intervention or to the control arm (current practices). Inclusion criteria are: aged 18 years or over, current smoker, having completed the online consent forms, possessing a mobile phone with android or apple systems and using mobile applications, wanting to stop smoking sooner or later. The primary outcome is the point prevalence abstinence of 7 days at 6 months later. Data will be analysed in intention to treat (primary) and per protocol analyses. A logistic regression will be carried out to estimate an OR (95% CI) for efficacy. A multivariate multilevel analysis will explore the influence on results of patients' characteristics (sex, age, education and socioprofessional levels, dependency, motivation, quit experiences) and contextual factors, conditions of use, behaviour change techniques. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was reviewed by the ethical and deontological institutional review board of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance on 18 April 2016. The findings of this study will allow us to characterise the efficacy of e-TIS and conditions of its efficacy. These findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed articles. Trial registration

  16. Randomised controlled trial evaluation of Tweet2Quit: a social network quit-smoking intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechmann, Cornelia; Delucchi, Kevin; Lakon, Cynthia M; Prochaska, Judith J

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated a novel Twitter-delivered intervention for smoking cessation, Tweet2Quit, which sends daily, automated communications to small, private, self-help groups to encourage high-quality, online, peer-to-peer discussions. A 2-group randomised controlled trial assessed the net benefit of adding a Tweet2Quit support group to a usual care control condition of nicotine patches and a cessation website. Participants were 160 smokers (4 cohorts of 40/cohort), aged 18-59 years, who intended to quit smoking, used Facebook daily, texted weekly, and had mobile phones with unlimited texting. All participants received 56 days of nicotine patches, emails with links to the smokefree.gov cessation website, and instructions to set a quit date within 7 days. Additionally, Tweet2Quit participants were enrolled in 20-person, 100-day Twitter groups, and received daily discussion topics via Twitter, and daily engagement feedback via text. The primary outcome was sustained abstinence at 7, 30 and 60 days post-quit date. Participants (mean age 35.7 years, 26.3% male, 31.2% college degree, 88.7% Caucasian) averaged 18.0 (SD=8.2) cigarettes per day and 16.8 (SD=9.8) years of smoking. Participants randomised to Tweet2Quit averaged 58.8 tweets/participant and the average tweeting duration was 47.4 days/participant. Tweet2Quit doubled sustained abstinence out to 60 days follow-up (40.0%, 26/65) versus control (20.0%, 14/70), OR=2.67, CI 1.19 to 5.99, p=0.017. Tweeting via phone predicted tweet volume, and tweet volume predicted sustained abstinence (ptweeting spikes accounting for 24.0% of tweets. Tweet2Quit was engaging and doubled sustained abstinence. Its low cost and scalability makes it viable as a global cessation treatment. NCT01602536. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Bristol Girls Dance Project Feasibility Trial: outcome and process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jago Russell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adolescent girls do not engage in sufficient physical activity (PA. This study examined the feasibility of conducting a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate an after-school dance program to increase PA among 11–12 year old girls in Bristol, UK. Methods Three-arm, cluster RCT. Three secondary schools were assigned to intervention arm. Intervention participants received a 9-week dance program with 2, 90-minute dance classes per week. Participants at 2 control schools received incentives for data collection. Participants at 2 additional control schools received incentives and a delayed dance workshop. Accelerometer data were collected at baseline (time 0, during the last week of the dance program (time 1 and 20 weeks after the start of the study (time 2. Weekly attendance, enjoyment and perceived exertion were assessed in intervention participants. Post-study qualitative work was conducted with intervention participants and personnel. Results 40.1% of girls provided consent to be in the study. The mean number of girls attending at least one dance session per week ranged from 15.4 to 25.9. There was greater number of participants for whom accelerometer data were collected in control arms. The mean attendance was 13.3 sessions (maximum = 18. Perceived exertion ratings indicated that the girls did not find the sessions challenging. The dance teachers reported that the program content would benefit from revisions including less creative task time, a broader range of dance genres and improved behavioral management policies. At time 2, the 95% confidence intervals suggest between 5 and 12 minutes more weekday MVPA in the intervention group compared with the control incentives only group, and between 6 minutes fewer and 1 minute more compared with the control incentives plus workshop group. Between 14 and 24 schools would be required to detect a difference of 10 minutes in mean weekday MVPA between

  18. A phase II study in advanced cancer patients to evaluate the early transition to palliative care (the PREPArE trial): protocol study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo, Thamires Monteiro; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; de Siqueira, Milena Ruas; da Rosa, Luciana de Toledo Bernardes; de Oliveira, Cleyton Zanardo; Nascimento, Maria Salete de Angelis; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-04-12

    Previous studies have demonstrated the benefit of early integration of palliative care (PC) in oncology. However, patients continue to receive late referrals to PC even in comprehensive cancer centers. Patients and health professionals may perceive PC as 'a place to die,' and this stigma is a barrier to timely referrals and to patient acceptance of treatment. The primary objective is to evaluate the feasibility of psychosocial intervention and PC in patients with advanced cancer. The patients will be submitted to a series of brief psychosocial interventions that are based on cognitive behavioral therapy, and patient acceptance and satisfaction will be assessed. In addition, the impact of these interventions on depressive symptoms will be evaluated. A randomized, open-label, phase II trial with two intervention arms and a control group will be conducted. Patients who are started on palliative chemotherapy and who meet the inclusion criteria will be enrolled. The study participants will be recruited from the outpatient oncology clinics at Barretos Cancer Hospital and will be randomized into one of the following three treatment arms: Arm A, which will include five weekly psychosocial interventions based on CBT in combination with early PC; Arm B, which will include early PC only; and Arm C, which will include standard oncologic care. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS-br), the Family Satisfaction with End-of-Life Care (FAMCARE)-Patient scale, and the Disease Understanding Protocol will be used for data collection. The patients will answer these questionnaires at baseline and 45, 90, 120 and 180 days after randomization. Despite evidence of the positive impact of early PC, it is often provided to patients only at later stages. The inadequate awareness and stigmatization of PC as a place to die are barriers that complicate the early referral. Patients with advanced

  19. A cluster randomized trial evaluating electronic prescribing in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Sherman

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors, adverse drug events and potential adverse drug events are common and serious in terms of the harms and costs that they impose on the health system and those who use it. Errors resulting in preventable adverse drug events have been shown to occur most often at the stages of ordering and administration. This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic trial of electronic prescribing to reduce prescription error. The trial was designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Design This study was designed as a 65-week, cluster randomized, parallel study. Methods The trial was conducted within ambulatory outpatient clinics in an academic tertiary care centre in Ontario, Canada. The electronic prescribing software for the study is a Canadian electronic prescribing software package which provides physician prescription entry with decision support at the point of care. Using a handheld computer (PDA the physician selects medications using an error minimising menu-based pick list from a comprehensive drug database, create specific prescription instructions and then transmit the prescription directly and electronically to a participating pharmacy via facsimile or to the physician's printer using local area wireless technology. The unit of allocation and randomization is by 'week', i.e. the system is "on" or "off" according to the randomization scheme and the unit of analysis is the prescription, with adjustment for clustering of patients within practitioners. Discussion This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial of point-of-care electronic prescribing, which was specifically designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00252395

  20. The utility of the random controlled trial for evaluating sexual offender treatment: the gold standard or an inappropriate strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W L; Marshall, L E

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines the scientific, practical, and ethical issues surrounding the employment of the Random Controlled Trial (RCT) in the evaluation of sexual offender treatment. Consideration of these issues leads us to conclude that the RCT design is not suitable for determining the effectiveness of sexual offender treatment. We also examine the RCT study by Marques et al. (Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment and Evaluation 17:79-107, 2005) that is often held up as the model for the evaluation of sexual offender treatment. We found several problems with this study that, in our opinion, reduce its relevance for deciding whether treatment is effective with these clients. Finally, we examine two alternative strategies for evaluating treatment that may allow treatment providers to more readily examine, and report, the results of their programs.

  1. An Evaluation and Redesign of the Conflict Prediction and Trial Planning Planview Graphical User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudeman, Irene V.; Brasil, Connie L.; Stassart, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    The Planview Graphical User Interface (PGUI) is the primary display of air traffic for the Conflict Prediction and Trial Planning, function of the Center TRACON Automation System. The PGUI displays air traffic information that assists the user in making decisions related to conflict detection, conflict resolution, and traffic flow management. The intent of this document is to outline the human factors issues related to the design of the conflict prediction and trial planning portions of the PGUI, document all human factors related design changes made to the PGUI from December 1996 to September 1997, and outline future plans for the ongoing PGUI design.

  2. Tuning the light in senior care: Evaluating a trial LED lighting system at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Samla, Connie; Bisbee, Dave

    2016-08-31

    This report summarizes the results from a trial installation of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems in several spaces within the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) coordinated the project and invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to document the performance of the LED lighting systems as part of a GATEWAY evaluation. DOE tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct the investigation. SMUD and ACC staff coordinated and completed the design and installation of the LED systems, while PNNL and SMUD staff evaluated the photometric performance of the systems. ACC staff also track behavioral and health measures of the residents; some of those results are reported here, although PNNL staff were not directly involved in collecting or interpreting those data. The trial installation took place in a double resident room and a single resident room, and the corridor that connects those (and other) rooms to the central nurse station. Other spaces in the trial included the nurse station, a common room called the family room located near the nurse station, and the ACC administrator’s private office.

  3. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials regis...

  4. Cost-effectiveness of silver dressings for paediatric partial thickness burns: An economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, E; Stockton, K; Kimble, R M; Cuttle, L; McPhail, S M

    2017-06-01

    Partial thickness burns of up to 10% total body surface area (TBSA) in children are common injuries primarily treated in the outpatient setting using expensive silver-containing dressings. However, economic evaluations in the paediatric burns population are lacking to assist healthcare providers when choosing which dressing to use. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three silver dressings for partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA in children aged 0-15 years using days to full wound re-epithelialization as the health outcome. This study was a trial based economic evaluation (incremental cost effectiveness) conducted from a healthcare provider perspective. Ninety-six children participated in the trial investigating Acticoat™, Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ or Mepilex Ag™. Costs directly related to the management of partial thickness burns ≤10% TBSA were collected during the trial from March 2013 to July 2014 and for a one year after re-epithelialization time horizon. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios were estimated and dominance probabilities calculated from bootstrap resampling trial data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the potential effect of accounting for infrequent, but high cost, skin grafting surgical procedures. Costs (dressing, labour, analgesics, scar management) were considerably lower in the Mepilex Ag™ group (median AUD$94.45) compared to the Acticoat™ (median $244.90) and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™ (median $196.66) interventions. There was a 99% and 97% probability that Mepilex Ag™ dominated (cheaper and more effective than) Acticoat™ and Acticoat™ with Mepitel™, respectively. This pattern of dominance was consistent across raw cost and effects, after a priori adjustments, and sensitivity analyses. There was an 82% probability that Acticoat™ with Mepitel dominated Acticoat™ in the primary analysis, although this probability was sensitive to the effect of skin graft procedures. This

  5. KiVa Antibullying Program: Overview of Evaluation Studies Based on a Randomized Controlled Trial and National Rollout in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Salmivalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a Finnish national school-based antibullying program (KiVa were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (2007–2009 and during nationwide implementation (since 2009. The KiVa program is been found to reduce bullying and victimization and increase empathy towards victimized peers and self-efficacy to support and defend them. KiVa increases school liking and motivation and contributes to significant reductions in anxiety, depression, and negative peer perceptions. Somewhat larger reductions in bullying and victimization were found in the randomized controlled trial than in the broad rollout, and the largest effects were obtained in primary school (grades 1–6. The uptake of the KiVa program is remarkable, with 90 percent of Finnish comprehensive schools currently registered as program users.

  6. The OPTIMIST-A trial: evaluation of minimally-invasive surfactant therapy in preterm infants 25–28 weeks gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is now recognized that preterm infants ≤28 weeks gestation can be effectively supported from the outset with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. However, this form of respiratory therapy may fail to adequately support those infants with significant surfactant deficiency, with the result that intubation and delayed surfactant therapy are then required. Infants following this path are known to have a higher risk of adverse outcomes, including death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and other morbidities. In an effort to circumvent this problem, techniques of minimally-invasive surfactant therapy have been developed, in which exogenous surfactant is administered to a spontaneously breathing infant who can then remain on continuous positive airway pressure. A method of surfactant delivery using a semi-rigid surfactant instillation catheter briefly passed into the trachea (the “Hobart method”) has been shown to be feasible and potentially effective, and now requires evaluation in a randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This is a multicentre, randomised, masked, controlled trial in preterm infants 25–28 weeks gestation. Infants are eligible if managed on continuous positive airway pressure without prior intubation, and requiring FiO2 ≥ 0.30 at an age ≤6 hours. Randomisation will be to receive exogenous surfactant (200 mg/kg poractant alfa) via the Hobart method, or sham treatment. Infants in both groups will thereafter remain on continuous positive airway pressure unless intubation criteria are reached (FiO2 ≥ 0.45, unremitting apnoea or persistent acidosis). Primary outcome is the composite of death or physiological bronchopulmonary dysplasia, with secondary outcomes including incidence of death; major neonatal morbidities; durations of all modes of respiratory support and hospitalisation; safety of the Hobart method; and outcome at 2 years. A total of 606 infants will be enrolled. The trial will be conducted in >30 centres

  7. A national evaluation of school breakfast clubs: evidence from a cluster randomized controlled trial and an observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemilt, I; Harvey, I; Shepstone, L; Swift, L; Reading, R; Mugford, M; Belderson, P; Norris, N; Thoburn, J; Robinson, J

    2004-09-01

    To measure the health, educational and social impacts of breakfast club provision in schools serving deprived areas across England. A cluster randomized controlled trial and an observational analysis. England, the UK. funding to establish a school-based breakfast club vs. control (no funding). Intention to treat analysis showed improved concentration (Trail Making Test Part A) amongst the intervention group at 3 months. Fewer pupils within the intervention group reported having skipped classes within the last month and fewer pupils within the intervention group reported having skipped 1 or more days of school within the last month at 1 year. Observational analysis at 1 year showed a higher proportion of primary-aged breakfast club attendees reported eating fruit for breakfast in comparison to non-attendees. A higher proportion of breakfast club attendees had borderline or abnormal conduct and total difficulties scores (primary-aged pupils) and prosocial score (secondary-aged pupils). Analyses revealed a mixed picture of benefit and apparent disbenefit. This study illustrated the challenges of evaluating a complex intervention in which the evaluators had less control than is usual in randomized trials over recruitment, eligibility checking and implementation. If the impact of new policy initiatives is to be assessed using the most robust forms of evaluation, social policy needs to be organized so that evaluations can be constructed as experiments. This is likely to prove most difficult where the perceived value of implementing an intervention rapidly is high.

  8. Cost effectiveness of patient education for the prevention of falls in hospital: economic evaluation from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry P; Hill, Anne-Marie; Hill, Keith D; Brauer, Sandra G; Hoffmann, Tammy; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; McPhail, Steven M

    2013-05-22

    Falls are one of the most frequently occurring adverse events that impact upon the recovery of older hospital inpatients. Falls can threaten both immediate and longer-term health and independence. There is need to identify cost-effective means for preventing falls in hospitals. Hospital-based falls prevention interventions tested in randomized trials have not yet been subjected to economic evaluation. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken from the health service provider perspective, over the period of hospitalization (time horizon) using the Australian Dollar (A$) at 2008 values. Analyses were based on data from a randomized trial among n = 1,206 acute and rehabilitation inpatients. Decision tree modeling with three-way sensitivity analyses were conducted using burden of disease estimates developed from trial data and previous research. The intervention was a multimedia patient education program provided with trained health professional follow-up shown to reduce falls among cognitively intact hospital patients. The short-term cost to a health service of one cognitively intact patient being a faller could be as high as A$14,591 (2008). The education program cost A$526 (2008) to prevent one cognitively intact patient becoming a faller and A$294 (2008) to prevent one fall based on primary trial data. These estimates were unstable due to high variability in the hospital costs accrued by individual patients involved in the trial. There was a 52% probability the complete program was both more effective and less costly (from the health service perspective) than providing usual care alone. Decision tree modeling sensitivity analyses identified that when provided in real life contexts, the program would be both more effective in preventing falls among cognitively intact inpatients and cost saving where the proportion of these patients who would otherwise fall under usual care conditions is at least 4.0%. This economic evaluation was designed to assist

  9. Early rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery is not effective or cost-effective compared to no referral : a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, Teddy; Ostelo, Raymond W; van Dongen, Johanna M; Peul, Wilco C.; de Boer, Michiel R; Bosmans, Judith E; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L; Arts, Mark P.; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-01-01

    QUESTION: Is referral for early rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery effective and cost-effective compared to no referral? DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, controlled trial, and economic evaluation with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat-analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Adults who underwent

  10. Evaluation of effect of isoflavone on thyroid economy & autoimmunity in oophorectomised women: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittal, Niti; Hota, Debasish; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhansali, Anil; Suri, Vanita; Aggarwal, Neelam; Marwah, R K; Chakrabarti, Amitava

    2011-01-01

    ...) and estradiol levels in oophorectomised women. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 43 oophorectomised women to evaluate the effect of soy isoflavones (75 mg/day for 12 wk...

  11. Economic evaluation of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Adang, E.M.M.; Munneke, M.; Nijhuis, M.W.; Bloem, B.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large randomized clinical trial (the Occupational Therapy in Parkinson's Disease [OTiP] study) recently demonstrated that home-based occupational therapy improves perceived performance in daily activities of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to

  12. Design and trial evaluation of the user interface for MusicReader

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leoné, Marco; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and trial results of MusicReader, a networked application realizing sheet music related services for the support of ensemble and orchestra rehearsals and performances. To this end, MusicReader presents sheet music on computer screens and supports annotations, sheet

  13. Evaluation of Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Lo, Cyrus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the efficacy of the Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) program on child learning, child behavior problems, and parental stress, using randomized controlled trial design, in social services centers. Methods: Eligibility criteria were (1) children aged 2 years at program commencement, (2) low-income, new immigrant, or…

  14. Assessment of rosacea severity: A review of evaluation methods used in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Dennis; Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Alinia, Hossein; Feldman, Steven R

    2015-07-01

    Novel rosacea treatments are needed. Assessment methodologies for clinical trials of rosacea treatments are not standardized and are relatively inadequate. To determine the efficacy of new treatments, a valid and reliable assessment methodology is needed. We sought to determine the assessment methodologies used in clinical trials for rosacea treatments, to demonstrate the need for a valid and reliable assessment tool, and to describe the relevant properties of such a tool. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for clinical trials of rosacea treatments since January 1, 1985. In all, 32 clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Assessment methodologies were highly variable, and standardized assessment methodologies were used in only 3 studies. The various manifestations of rosacea were assessed inconsistently. Eighteen articles could not be included as a result of lack of access to the full text. The diverse methodologies make the assessment of novel treatments and comparison of treatments difficult. A valid and reliable assessment tool is needed to properly assess novel treatments to improve the management of rosacea. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A qualitative study evaluating causality attribution for serious adverse events during early phase oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Som D; Coombes, Megan E; Levine, Mitch; Cosby, Jarold; Kowaleski, Brenda; Arnold, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    In early phase oncology trials, novel targeted therapies are increasingly being tested in combination with traditional agents creating greater potential for enhanced and new toxicities. When a patient experiences a serious adverse event (SAE), investigators must determine whether the event is attributable to the investigational drug or not. This study seeks to understand the clinical reasoning, tools used and challenges faced by the researchers who assign causality to SAE's. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical oncologists and trial coordinators at six Canadian academic cancer centres. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Individual interview content analysis was followed by thematic analysis across the interview set. Our study found that causality assessment tends to be a rather complex process, often without complete clinical and investigational data at hand. Researchers described using a common processing strategy whereby they gather pertinent information, eliminate alternative explanations, and consider whether or not the study drug resulted in the SAE. Many of the interviewed participants voiced concern that causality assessments are often conducted quickly and tend to be highly subjective. Many participants were unable to identify any useful tools to help in assigning causality and welcomed more objectivity in the overall process. Attributing causality to SAE's is a complex process. Clinical trial researchers apply a logical system of reasoning, but feel that the current method of assigning causality could be improved. Based on these findings, future research involving the development of a new causality assessment tool specifically for use in early phase oncology clinical trials may be useful.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Garnett

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that could be delivered by an app: self-monitoring and feedback; action planning; normative feedback; cognitive bias re-training; and identity change. This protocol reports a factorial randomised controlled trial to assess the comparative potential of these five intervention modules to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Methods A between-subject factorial randomised controlled trial. Hazardous and harmful drinkers aged 18 or over who are making a serious attempt to reduce their drinking will be randomised to one of 32 (25 experimental conditions after downloading the ‘Drink Less’ app. Participants complete baseline measures on downloading the app and are contacted after 1-month with a follow-up questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is change in past week consumption of alcohol. Secondary outcome measures are change in AUDIT score, app usage data and usability ratings for the app. A factorial between-subjects ANOVA will be conducted to assess main and interactive effects of the five intervention modules for the primary and secondary outcome measures. Discussion This study will establish the extent to which the five intervention modules offered in this app can help reduce hazardous and harmful drinking. This is the first step in optimising and understanding what component parts of an app could help to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. The findings from this study will be used to inform the content of a future integrated treatment app and

  17. Bristol girls dance project feasibility study: using a pilot economic evaluation to inform design of a full trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jane E; Carroll, Fran E; Sebire, Simon J; Haase, Anne M; Jago, Russell

    2013-12-20

    There is currently little guidance for pilot trial economic evaluation where health outcomes and costs are influenced by a range of wider determinants and factors. This article presents the findings of a pilot economic evaluation study running alongside the Bristol Girls Dance Project (BGDP) feasibility study. 3-arm, cluster randomised, controlled pilot trial and economic evaluation. 7 schools (n=210) from the Bristol and greater Bristol area, UK were randomly allocated to the intervention arm 3 schools (n=90) and the control arm 4 schools (n=120). Girls aged 11-12 years with parental consent were provided with two, 90 min dance sessions per week for 9 weeks at school facilities. Programme costs and girls' preferences for attributes of dance and preferences for competing leisure time activities were measured. The mainstream average cost of the BGDP programme (not including research, control and dance teacher training costs) per school was $2126.40, £1329 and €1555 and per participant was $70.90, £44.31 and €51.84 in 2010-2011 prices. Discrete choice experiment (DCE) methods are acceptable to girls of this age indicating time available for other leisure activities on dance class days is the attribute girls valued most and 2 h leisure time remaining preferred to 3 h. This pilot study indicates that providing full cost data for a future trial of the BGDP programme is feasible and practical. There is no evidence from preference data to support adjustment to intervention design. A future economic evaluation is likely to be successful utilising the resource use checklist developed. The importance of categorising separately resources used to develop, prepare, deliver and maintain the programme to estimate mainstream costs accurately is demonstrated.

  18. Occupational therapy discharge planning for older adults: A protocol for a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wales Kylie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased functional ability is common in older adults after hospitalisation. Lower levels of functional ability increase the risk of hospital readmission and nursing care facility admission. Discharge planning across the hospital and community interface is suggested to increase functional ability and decrease hospital length of stay and hospital readmission. However evidence is limited and the benefits of occupational therapists providing this service has not been investigated. This randomised trial will investigate the clinical effectiveness of a discharge planning program in reducing functional difficulties of older adults post-discharge. This trial will also examine the cost of the intervention and cost effectiveness when compared to in-hospital discharge planning. Methods/design 400 participants admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited. Participants will be 70 years of age and over, have no significant cognitive impairment and be independently mobile at discharge. This study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of Ryde Rehabilitation Human Research Ethics Committee, Western Sydney Local Health District (Westmead Campus Human Research Ethics Committee, Alfred Health Human Research ethics committee for the randomised trial and NSW Population and Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee for data linkage. Participants will provide informed written consent. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive discharge planning therapies primarily within their home environment while the control group will receive an in-hospital consultation, both provided by trained occupational therapists. Primary outcome measures will be the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL and the Late Life Disability Index (LLDI which will measure functional independence, and participation and limitation in daily life activities

  19. Occupational therapy discharge planning for older adults: A protocol for a randomised trial and economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Decreased functional ability is common in older adults after hospitalisation. Lower levels of functional ability increase the risk of hospital readmission and nursing care facility admission. Discharge planning across the hospital and community interface is suggested to increase functional ability and decrease hospital length of stay and hospital readmission. However evidence is limited and the benefits of occupational therapists providing this service has not been investigated. This randomised trial will investigate the clinical effectiveness of a discharge planning program in reducing functional difficulties of older adults post-discharge. This trial will also examine the cost of the intervention and cost effectiveness when compared to in-hospital discharge planning. Methods/design 400 participants admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited. Participants will be 70 years of age and over, have no significant cognitive impairment and be independently mobile at discharge. This study protocol was approved by the ethics committee of Ryde Rehabilitation Human Research Ethics Committee, Western Sydney Local Health District (Westmead Campus) Human Research Ethics Committee, Alfred Health Human Research ethics committee for the randomised trial and NSW Population and Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee for data linkage. Participants will provide informed written consent. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive discharge planning therapies primarily within their home environment while the control group will receive an in-hospital consultation, both provided by trained occupational therapists. Primary outcome measures will be the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living Scale (NEADL) and the Late Life Disability Index (LLDI) which will measure functional independence, and participation and limitation in daily life activities. Discussion This trial will

  20. Evaluation of pharmacodynamic properties and safety of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) in healthy adults: a phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Jayawardena, Ranil; Pigera, Shehani; Wathurapatha, Wasundara Sevwandi; Weeratunga, Hasitha Dhananjaya; Premakumara, G A Sirimal; Katulanda, Prasad; Constantine, Godwin Roger; Galappaththy, Priyadarshani

    2017-12-28

    Cinnamon is considered as a treatment for many ailments in native medicine. Evidence suggests that Cinnamomum zeylanicum (CZ) has anti-microbial, anti-parasitic, anti-oxidant, blood glucose lowering properties and beneficial cardiovascular effects. The present study aims to evaluate Pharmacodynamic properties and safety of CZ in healthy adults using a Phase I Clinical Trial. This phase I clinical trial was conducted at the Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Thirty healthy adults were recruited for the study, conducted for a period of 3 months, with the dose of CZ (water extract) increased at monthly intervals (85 mg, 250 mg and 500 mg). Data collection was carried out at baseline and during each monthly follow up visit. Anthropometric, clinical and biochemical assessments were done at baseline and during follow up. Adverse effects and drug compliance was also evaluated. Twenty eight subjects completed the three months follow up. Mean age was 38.8 ± 10.4 years and 50% were males. There were no significant changes in the anthropometric parameters during the three months follow up. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure reduced significant during the 1st month and this reduction was sustained throughout follow up. Full blood count, renal function tests, liver function tests, fasting blood glucose, HDL-c, VLDL-d and triglycerides remained within the normal range without any significant alteration during the 3 months. A significant reduction in the TC (p < 0.05) and LDL-c (p < 0.001) was noted at the end of the 3 months follow up period. There were no serious adverse effects (including hypersensitivity) noted. In two participants dyspepsia necessitated the discontinuation of study participation. Drug compliance was between 85 and 95% during the study period. This is the first phase I clinical trial in health adults evaluating efficacy and safety of CZ. Our results demonstrate no significant side

  1. The intervention process in the European Fans in Training (EuroFIT) trial: a mixed method protocol for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Glind, I; Bunn, C; Gray, C M; Hunt, K; Andersen, E; Jelsma, J; Morgan, H; Pereira, H; Roberts, G; Rooksby, J; Røynesdal, Ø; Silva, M; Sorensen, M; Treweek, S; van Achterberg, T; van der Ploeg, H; van Nassau, F; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M; Wyke, S

    2017-07-27

    EuroFIT is a gender-sensitised, health and lifestyle program targeting physical activity, sedentary time and dietary behaviours in men. The delivery of the program in football clubs, led by the clubs' community coaches, is designed to both attract and engage men in lifestyle change through an interest in football or loyalty to the club they support. The EuroFIT program will be evaluated in a multicentre pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT), for which ~1000 overweight men, aged 30-65 years, will be recruited in 15 top professional football clubs in the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and the UK. The process evaluation is designed to investigate how implementation within the RCT is achieved in the various football clubs and countries and the processes through which EuroFIT affects outcomes. This mixed methods evaluation is guided by the Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance for conducting process evaluations of complex interventions. Data will be collected in the intervention arm of the EuroFIT trial through: participant questionnaires (n = 500); attendance sheets and coach logs (n = 360); observations of sessions (n = 30); coach questionnaires (n = 30); usage logs from a novel device for self-monitoring physical activity and non-sedentary behaviour (SitFIT); an app-based game to promote social support for physical activity outside program sessions (MatchFIT); interviews with coaches (n = 15); football club representatives (n = 15); and focus groups with participants (n = 30). Written standard operating procedures are used to ensure quality and consistency in data collection and analysis across the participating countries. Data will be analysed thematically within datasets and overall synthesis of findings will address the processes through which the program is implemented in various countries and clubs and through which it affects outcomes, with careful attention to the context of the football club. The process evaluation will

  2. Using the theory of planned behaviour as a process evaluation tool in randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies: A case study from UK primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies for professional behaviour change can provide robust estimates of effectiveness, but offer little insight into the causal mechanisms by which any change is produced. To illustrate the applicability of causal methods within randomised trials, we undertook a theory-based process evaluation study within an implementation trial to explore whether the cognitions of primary care doctors' predicted their test requesting behaviours and, secondly, whether the trial results were mediated by the theoretical constructs. Methods The process evaluation comprised a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a random 50% sample of the randomised groups of primary care practices in Grampian (NHS Grampian), UK, who took part in a trial of the effect of enhanced feedback and brief educational reminders on test requesting behaviour. The process evaluation was based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour and focussed on three of the test requesting behaviours that were targeted in the trial -- ferritin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and Helicobacter Pylori serology (HPS). Results The questionnaire was completed by 131 primary care doctors (56%) from 42 (98%) of the sampled practices. Behavioural intention, attitude, and subjective norm were highly correlated for all the tests. There was no evidence that perceived behavioural control was correlated with any of the other measures. Simple linear regression analysis of the rate of test requests on minimum behavioural intentions had R2 of 11.1%, 12.5%, and 0.1% for ferritin, FSH, and HPS requesting, respectively. Mediational analysis showed that the trial results for ferritin and FSH were partially mediated (between 23% and 78% mediation) through intentions. The HPS trial result was not mediated through intention. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a theory-based process evaluation can provide useful information on causal mechanisms that aid not only interpretation of

  3. Using the theory of planned behaviour as a process evaluation tool in randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies: A case study from UK primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Craig R; Thomas, Ruth E; Croal, Bernard L; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Eccles, Martin P

    2010-09-29

    Randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies for professional behaviour change can provide robust estimates of effectiveness, but offer little insight into the causal mechanisms by which any change is produced. To illustrate the applicability of causal methods within randomised trials, we undertook a theory-based process evaluation study within an implementation trial to explore whether the cognitions of primary care doctors' predicted their test requesting behaviours and, secondly, whether the trial results were mediated by the theoretical constructs. The process evaluation comprised a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a random 50% sample of the randomised groups of primary care practices in Grampian (NHS Grampian), UK, who took part in a trial of the effect of enhanced feedback and brief educational reminders on test requesting behaviour. The process evaluation was based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour and focussed on three of the test requesting behaviours that were targeted in the trial -- ferritin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and Helicobacter Pylori serology (HPS). The questionnaire was completed by 131 primary care doctors (56%) from 42 (98%) of the sampled practices. Behavioural intention, attitude, and subjective norm were highly correlated for all the tests. There was no evidence that perceived behavioural control was correlated with any of the other measures. Simple linear regression analysis of the rate of test requests on minimum behavioural intentions had R2 of 11.1%, 12.5%, and 0.1% for ferritin, FSH, and HPS requesting, respectively. Mediational analysis showed that the trial results for ferritin and FSH were partially mediated (between 23% and 78% mediation) through intentions. The HPS trial result was not mediated through intention. This study demonstrated that a theory-based process evaluation can provide useful information on causal mechanisms that aid not only interpretation of the trial but also inform future

  4. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P PET imaging in oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials.

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnostic evaluation of stress symptoms treated by auriculotherapy: a clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi; Juliana Rizzo Gnatta; Talita Pavarini Borges; Maria Júlia Paes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this clinical trial was to identify the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diagnoses for stress symptoms that responded to auriculotherapy. Subjects were 75 nursing professionals of a teaching hospital, with average and high stress scores according to Vasconcelos’ List of Stress Symptoms. The subjects were randomized into three groups (control without treatment, auriculotherapy with needles, and auriculotherapy with seeds), treated weekly in the Kidney, Brain stem and Shenmen...

  6. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, Irene; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...

  7. Findings of the Test and Evaluation Proof of Concept Trial at the NCOT Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    franchissons une autre etape du processus permanent visant a fournir un soutien en matiere de facteurs humains systematiques au programme CO MDA T. Ce...should be acknowledged that not having individuals with the experience requested for the POC trial may have been due to the short 4 week lead time...team, although some of the circuits were not able to be assigned their usual SHINCOMS reference. For example, the internal Above Water Warfare

  8. PROspective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of chest pain: rationale and design of the PROMISE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Hoffmann, Udo; Lee, Kerry L; Mark, Daniel B; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Anstrom, Kevin; Dolor, Rowena J; Kosinski, Andrzej; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Mudrick, Daniel W; Patel, Manesh R; Picard, Michael H; Udelson, James E; Velazquez, Eric J; Cooper, Lawton

    2014-06-01

    Suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common, potentially life-threatening diagnostic problems clinicians encounter. However, no large outcome-based randomized trials have been performed to guide the selection of diagnostic strategies for these patients. The PROMISE study is a prospective, randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 2 initial diagnostic strategies in patients with symptoms suspicious for CAD. Patients are randomized to either (1) functional testing (exercise electrocardiogram, stress nuclear imaging, or stress echocardiogram) or (2) anatomical testing with ≥64-slice multidetector coronary computed tomographic angiography. Tests are interpreted locally in real time by subspecialty certified physicians, and all subsequent care decisions are made by the clinical care team. Sites are provided results of central core laboratory quality and completeness assessment. All subjects are followed up for ≥1 year. The primary end point is the time to occurrence of the composite of death, myocardial infarction, major procedural complications (stroke, major bleeding, anaphylaxis, and renal failure), or hospitalization for unstable angina. More than 10,000 symptomatic subjects were randomized in 3.2 years at 193 US and Canadian cardiology, radiology, primary care, urgent care, and anesthesiology sites. Multispecialty community practice enrollment into a large pragmatic trial of diagnostic testing strategies is both feasible and efficient. The PROMISE trial will compare the clinical effectiveness of an initial strategy of functional testing against an initial strategy of anatomical testing in symptomatic patients with suspected CAD. Quality of life, resource use, cost-effectiveness, and radiation exposure will be assessed. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A process evaluation of the Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Olstad, Dana Lee; Ball, Kylie; Abbott, Gavin; McNaughton, Sarah A; Le, Ha N. D.; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Pollard, Christina; Crawford, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Supermarket Healthy Eating for Life (SHELf) was a randomized controlled trial that operationalized a socioecological approach to population-level dietary behaviour change in a real-world supermarket setting. SHELf tested the impact of individual (skill-building), environmental (20?% price reductions), and combined (skill-building?+?20?% price reductions) interventions on women?s purchasing and consumption of fruits, vegetables, low-calorie carbonated beverages and water. This proce...

  10. Community-based randomised controlled trial evaluating falls and osteoporosis risk management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung KM

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis-related fractures are a significant public health concern. Interventions that increase detection and treatment of osteoporosis, as well as prevention of fractures and falls, are substantially underutilized. This paper outlines the protocol for a pragmatic randomised trial of a multifaceted community-based care program aimed at optimizing the evidence-based management of falls and fractures in patients at risk. Design 6-month randomised controlled study. Methods This population-based study was completed in the Algoma District of Ontario, Canada a geographically vast area with Sault Ste Marie (population 78 000 as its main city. Eligible patients were allocated to an immediate intervention protocol (IP group, or a delayed intervention protocol (DP group. The DP group received usual care for 6 months and then was crossed over to receive the interventions. Components of the intervention were directed at the physicians and their patients and included patient-specific recommendations for osteoporosis therapy as outlined by the clinical practice guidelines developed by Osteoporosis Canada, and falls risk assessment and treatment. Two primary outcomes were measured including implementation of appropriate osteoporosis and falls risk management. Secondary outcomes included quality of life and the number of falls, fractures, and hospital admissions over a twelve-month period. The patient is the unit of allocation and analysis. Analyses will be performed on an intention to treat basis. Discussion This paper outlines the protocol for a pragmatic randomised trial of a multi-faceted, community-based intervention to optimize the implementation of evidence based management for patients at risk for falls and osteoporosis. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00465387

  11. Assessing reperfusion and recanalization as markers of clinical outcomes after intravenous thrombolysis in the echoplanar imaging thrombolytic evaluation trial (EPITHET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Deidre A; Fink, John N; Christensen, Soren; Ebinger, Martin; Bladin, Christopher; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark; Butcher, Ken; Barber, P Alan; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2009-08-01

    Reperfusion and recanalization have both been used as surrogate markers of clinical outcome in trials of stroke thrombolysis. We aimed to prove that the beneficial impact of recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator on clinical outcomes is attributable to reperfusion in the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET). EPITHET was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in the 3- to 6-hour window. Reperfusion was defined as >90% reduction in magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volume and recanalization as improvement of MR angiographic Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grading by > or =2 points from baseline to Day 3 to 5. At Day 3 to 5, reperfusion and recanalization with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator were strongly correlated. Reperfusion was associated with improved clinical outcome independent of whether recanalization occurred. In contrast, recanalization was not associated with clinical outcome when reperfusion was included as a covariate in regression analyses. Reperfusion is a surrogate marker of clinical outcomes independent of recanalization based on the criteria applied in EPITHET. The impact of recanalization on clinical outcomes was attributable to reperfusion.

  12. Evidence-based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Benedetta E; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    The NoTrap! (Noncadiamointrappola!) program is a school-based intervention, which utilizes a peer-led approach to prevent and combat both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the third Edition of the program in accordance with the recent criteria for evidence-based interventions. Towards this aim, two quasi-experimental trials involving adolescents (age M = 14.91, SD = .98) attending their first year at different high schools were conducted. In Trial 1 (control group, n = 171; experimental group, n = 451), latent growth curve models for data from pre-, middle- and post-tests showed that intervention significantly predicted change over time in all the target variables (victimization, bullying, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying). Specifically, target variables were stable for the control group but decreased significantly over time for the experimental group. Long-term effects at the follow up 6 months later were also found. In Trial 2 (control group, n = 227; experimental group, n = 234), the moderating effect of gender was examined and there was a reported decrease in bullying and cyberbullying over time (pre- and post-test) in the experimental group but not the control group, and this decrease was similar for boys and girls. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of the Safety and Benefit of Phase I Oncology Trials for Patients With Primary CNS Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounder, Mrinal M; Nayak, Lakshmi; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Muzikansky, Alona; Sanchez, Armando J; Desideri, Serena; Ye, Xiaobu; Ivy, S Percy; Nabors, L Burt; Prados, Michael; Grossman, Stuart; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-10-01

    Patients with high-grade gliomas (HGG) are frequently excluded from first-in-human solid tumor trials because of perceived poor prognosis, excessive toxicities, concomitant drug interactions, and poor efficacy. We conducted an analysis of outcomes from select, single-agent phase I studies in patients with HGG. We compared outcomes to pooled analysis of published studies in solid tumors with various molecular and cytotoxic drugs evaluated as single agents or as combinations. Individual records of patients with recurrent HGG enrolled onto Adult Brain Tumor Consortium trials of single-agent, cytotoxic or molecular agents from 2000 to 2008 were analyzed for baseline characteristics, toxicities, responses, and survival. Our analysis included 327 patients with advanced, refractory HGG who were enrolled onto eight trials involving targeted molecular (n=5) and cytotoxic (n=3) therapies. At enrollment, patients had a median Karnofsky performance score of 90 and median age of 52 years; 62% were men, 63% had glioblastoma, and the median number of prior systemic chemotherapies was one. Baseline laboratory values were in an acceptable range to meet eligibility criteria. Patients were on the study for a median of two cycles (range, Patients with HGG who meet standard eligibility criteria may be good candidates for solid tumor phase I studies with single-agent molecular or cytotoxic drugs with favorable preclinical rationale and pharmacokinetic properties in this population. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate Splenectomy in Total Gastrectomy for Proximal Gastric Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takeshi; Sasako, Mitsuru; Mizusawa, Junki; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Katai, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Nashimoto, Atsushi; Ito, Seiji; Kaji, Masahide; Imamura, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Norimasa; Fujitani, Kazumasa

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the role of splenectomy in total gastrectomy for proximal gastric cancer. Splenectomy in total gastrectomy is associated with increased operative morbidity and mortality, but its survival benefit is unclear. Previous randomized controlled trials were underpowered and inconclusive. We conducted a multiinstitutional randomized controlled trial. Proximal gastric adenocarcinoma of T2-4/N0-2/M0 not invading the greater curvature was eligible. During the operation, surgeons confirmed that R0 resection was possible with negative lavage cytology, and patients were randomly assigned to either splenectomy or spleen preservation. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) and the secondary endpoints were relapse-free survival, operative morbidity, operation time, and blood loss. The trial was designed to confirm noninferiority of spleen preservation to splenectomy in OS with a noninferiority margin of the hazard ratio as 1.21 and 1-sided alpha of 5%. Between June 2002 and March 2009, 505 patients (254 splenectomy, 251 spleen preservation) were enrolled from 36 institutions. Splenectomy was associated with higher morbidity and larger blood loss, but the operation time was similar. The 5-year survivals were 75.1% and 76.4% in the splenectomy and spleen preservation groups, respectively. The hazard ratio was 0.88 (90.7%, confidence interval 0.67-1.16) (splenectomy should be avoided as it increases operative morbidity without improving survival.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    PATKI, Pralhad; Amruthesh ,Sunita; Tandur,Prakash; Tandur,AP; Malini,

    2010-01-01

    Sunita Amrutesh1, J Malini2, Prakash S Tandur3, Pralhad S Patki41Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Department of Microbiology, 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, K.L.E. College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Bangalore, India; 4Medical Services and Clinical Trials, R&D Center, The Himalaya Drug Company, Bangalore, IndiaBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal dental cream in comparison to fluoride dental cream.Objective...

  16. Evaluation of the Family Integrated Care model of neonatal intensive care: a cluster randomized controlled trial in Canada and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Karel; Bracht, Marianne; Robson, Kate; Ye, Xiang Y; Mirea, Lucia; Cruz, Melinda; Ng, Eugene; Monterrosa, Luis; Soraisham, Amuchou; Alvaro, Ruben; Narvey, Michael; Da Silva, Orlando; Lui, Kei; Tarnow-Mordi, William; Lee, Shoo K

    2015-12-15

    Admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may disrupt parent-infant interaction with adverse consequences for infants and their families. Several family-centered care programs promote parent-infant interaction in the NICU; however, all of these retain the premise that health-care professionals should provide most of the infant's care. Parents play a mainly supportive role in the NICU and continue to feel anxious and unprepared to care for their infant after discharge. In the Family Integrated Care (FICare) model, parents provide all except the most advanced medical care for their infants with support from the medical team. Our hypothesis is that infants whose families complete the FICare program will have greater weight gain and better clinical and parental outcomes compared with infants provided with standard NICU care. FICare is being evaluated in a cluster randomized controlled trial among infants born at ≤ 33 weeks' gestation admitted to 19 Canadian, 6 Australian, and 1 New Zealand tertiary-level NICU. Trial enrollment began in April, 2013, with a target sample size of 675 infants in each arm, to be completed by August, 2015. Participating sites were stratified by country, and by NICU size within Canada, for randomization to either the FICare intervention or control arm. In intervention sites, parents are taught how to provide most of their infant's care and supported by nursing staff, veteran parents, a program coordinator, and education sessions. In control sites standard NICU care is provided. The primary outcome is infants' weight gain at 21 days after enrollment, which will be compared between the FICare and control groups using Student's t-test adjusted for site-level clustering, and multi-level hierarchical models accounting for both clustering and potential confounders. Similar analyses will examine secondary outcomes including breastfeeding, clinical outcomes, safety, parental stress and anxiety, and resource use. The trial was

  17. Evaluation of a physical activity intervention for new parents: protocol paper for a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Quinlan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying critical life transitions in people’s physical activity behaviors may illuminate the most opportune intervention apertures for chronic disease prevention. A substantive evidence base now indicates that parenthood is one of these critical transition points for physical activity decline. This study will examine whether a brief theory-based intervention can prevent a decline in physical activity among new parents over 6 months following intervention. This study protocol represents the first dyad-based physical activity initiative in the parenthood literature involving both mothers and fathers; prior research has focused on only mothers or only fathers (albeit limited, and has shown only short-term changes in physical activity. This study will be investigating whether a theory-based physical activity intervention can maintain or improve moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity measured via accelerometry of new parents over a 6 month period following intervention compared to a control group. Methods This study is a 6-month longitudinal randomized controlled trial. Parents are measured at baseline (2 months postpartum with two assessment points at 6 weeks (3.5 months postpartum and 3 months (5 months postpartum and a final follow-up assessment at 6 months (8 months postpartum. The content of the theory-based intervention was derived from the results of our prior longitudinal trial of new parents using an adapted theory of planned behavior framework to predict changes in physical activity. Results A total of 152 couples have been recruited to date. Sixteen couples dropped out after baseline and a total of 88 couples have completed their 6-month measures. Discussion If the intervention proves successful, couple-based physical activity promotion efforts among parents could be a promising avenue to pursue to help mitigate the declines of physical activity levels during parenthood. These findings could inform

  18. Weight loss versus muscle loss: re-evaluating inclusion criteria for future cancer cachexia interventional trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeland, Eric J; Ma, Joseph D; Nelson, Sandahl H; Seibert, Tyler; Heavey, Sean; Revta, Carolyn; Gallivan, Andrea; Baracos, Vickie E

    2017-02-01

    Participation in cancer cachexia clinical trials requires a defined weight loss (WL) over time. A loss in skeletal muscle mass, measured by cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) image analysis, represents a possible alternative. Our aim was to compare WL versus muscle loss in patients who were screened to participate in a cancer cachexia clinical trial. This was a single-center, retrospective analysis in metastatic colorectal cancer patients screened for an interventional cancer cachexia trial requiring a ≥5 % WL over the preceding 6 months. Concurrent CT images obtained as part of standard oncology care were analyzed for changes in total muscle and fat (visceral, subcutaneous, and total). Of patients screened (n = 36), 3 (8 %) enrolled in the trial, 17 (47 %) were excluded due to insufficient WL (20 %), and 16 (44 %) met inclusion criteria for WL. Patients who met screening criteria for WL (5-20 %) had a mean ± SD of 7.7 ± 8.7 % muscle loss, 24.4 ± 37.5 % visceral adipose loss, 21.6 ± 22.3 % subcutaneous adipose loss, and 22.1 ± 24.7 % total adipose loss. Patients excluded due to insufficient WL had 2 ± 6.4 % muscle loss, but a gain of 8.5 ± 39.8 % visceral adipose, and 4.2 ± 28.2 % subcutaneous adipose loss and 0.8 ± 28.4 % total adipose loss. Of the patients excluded due to WL 5 %. Defining cancer cachexia by WL over time may be limited as it does not capture skeletal muscle loss. Cross-sectional CT body composition analysis may improve early detection of muscle loss and patient participation in future cancer cachexia clinical trials.

  19. Exclusion of older patients from ongoing clinical trials for hematological malignancies: an evaluation of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Trial Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaker, Marije E; Stauder, Reinhard; van Munster, Barbara C

    2014-10-01

    Cancer societies, research cooperatives, and countless publications have urged the development of clinical trials that facilitate the inclusion of older patients and those with comorbidities. We set out to determine the characteristics of currently recruiting clinical trials with hematological patients to assess their inclusion and exclusion of elderly patients. The NIH clinical trial registry was searched on July 1, 2013, for currently recruiting phase I, II or III clinical trials with hematological malignancies. Trial characteristics and study objectives were extracted from the registry website. Although 5% of 1,207 included trials focused exclusively on elderly or unfit patients, 69% explicitly or implicitly excluded older patients. Exclusion based on age was seen in 27% of trials, exclusion based on performance status was seen in 16%, and exclusion based on stringent organ function restrictions was noted in 51%. One-third of the studies that excluded older patients based on age allowed inclusion of younger patients with poor performance status; 8% did not place any restrictions on organ function. Over time, there was a shift from exclusion based on age (p value for trend trials for hematological malignancies use age-based exclusion criteria. Although physiological reserves diminish with age, the heterogeneity of the elderly population does not legitimize exclusion based on chronological age alone. Investigators should critically review whether sufficient justification exists for every exclusion criterion before incorporating it in trial protocols. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. A Clustered Randomized Trial of an Educational Intervention During Transplant Evaluation to Increase Knowledge of Living Donor Kidney Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Francis L; Peipert, John D; Holland, Bart K; Brown, Diane R; Waterman, Amy D

    2017-12-01

    Maximizing education about living donor kidney transplant (LDKT) during the in-person evaluation at the transplant center may increase the numbers of kidney patients pursuing LDKT. Research Questions and Design: To test the effectiveness of a 1-time LDKT educational intervention, we performed a cluster-randomized trial among 499 patients who presented for evaluation of kidney transplant. We compared usual care education (n = 250) versus intensive LDKT education (n = 249), which was implemented only on the evaluation day and consisted of viewing a 25-minute video of information and stories about LDKT and discussion of LDKT possibilities with an educator. Our primary outcome was knowledge of LDKT, 1 week after the transplant evaluation. One week after evaluation, patients who received intensive education had higher knowledge than patients who received usual care (12.7 vs. 11.7; P = .0008), but there were no differences in postevaluation readiness for LDKT. Among patients who had not previously identified a potential living donor, receiving intensive education was associated with increased willingness to take steps toward LDKT. In conclusion, expansion of LDKT education within the evaluation day may be helpful, but interventions that are implemented at multiple times and for greater duration may be necessary to ensure larger and long-term behavioral changes in pursuit of LDKT.

  1. A cluster randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a structured training programme for caregivers of inpatients after stroke: the TRACS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, A; Dickerson, J; Young, J; Patel, A; Kalra, L; Nixon, J; Smithard, D; Knapp, M; Holloway, I; Anwar, S; Farrin, A

    2013-10-01

    The majority of stroke patients are discharged home dependent on informal caregivers, usually family members, to provide assistance with activities of daily living (ADL), including bathing, dressing and toileting. Many caregivers feel unprepared for this role and this may have a detrimental effect on both the patient and caregiver. To evaluate whether or not a structured, competency-based training programme for caregivers [the London Stroke Carer Training Course (LSCTC)] improved physical and psychological outcomes for patients and their caregivers after disabling stroke, and to determine if such a training programme is cost-effective. A pragmatic, multicentre, cluster randomised controlled trial. Stratified randomisation of 36 stroke rehabilitation units (SRUs) to the intervention or control group by geographical region and quality of care. A total of 930 stroke patient and caregiver dyads were recruited. Patients were eligible if they had a confirmed diagnosis of stroke, were medically stable, were likely to return home with residual disability at the time of discharge and had a caregiver available, willing and able to provide support after discharge. The caregiver was defined as the main person--other than health, social or voluntary care provider--helping with ADL and/or advocating on behalf of the patient. The intervention (the LSCTC) comprised a number of caregiver training sessions and competency assessment delivered by SRU staff while the patient was in the SRU and one recommended follow-up session after discharge. The control group continued to provide usual care according to national guidelines. Recruitment was completed by independent researchers and participants were unaware of the SRUs' allocation. The primary outcomes were self-reported extended ADL for the patient and caregiver burden measured at 6 months after recruitment. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, mood and cost-effectiveness, with final follow-up at 12 months. No differences in

  2. A process evaluation accompanying an attempted randomized controlled trial of an evidence service for health system policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael G; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Haynes, R Brian; Hanna, Steven E; Raina, Parminder; Gruen, Russell; Ouimet, Mathieu; Lavis, John N

    2015-12-12

    We developed an evidence service that draws inputs from Health Systems Evidence (HSE), which is a comprehensive database of research evidence about governance, financial and delivery arrangements within health systems and about implementation strategies relevant to health systems. Our goal was to evaluate whether, how and why a 'full-serve' evidence service increases the use of synthesized research evidence by policy analysts and advisors in the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care as compared to a 'self-serve' evidence service. We attempted to conduct a two-arm, 10-month randomized controlled trial (RCT), along with a follow-up qualitative process evaluation, but we terminated the RCT when we failed to reach our recruitment target. For the qualitative process evaluation we modified the original interview guide to allow us to explore the (1) factors influencing participation in the trial; (2) usage of HSE, factors explaining usage patterns, and strategies to increase usage; (3) participation in training workshops and use of other supports; and (4) views about and experiences with key HSE features. We terminated the RCT given our 15% recruitment rate. Six factors were identified by those who had agreed to participate in the trial as encouraging their participation: relevance of the study to participants' own work; familiarity with the researchers; personal view of the importance of using research evidence in policymaking; academic background; support from supervisors; and participation of colleagues. Most reported that they never, infrequently or inconsistently used HSE and suggested strategies to increase its use, including regular email reminders and employee training. However, only two participants indicated that employee training, in the form of a workshop about finding and using research evidence, had influenced their use of HSE. Most participants found HSE features to be intuitive and helpful, although registration/sign-in and some page formats

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of a smartphone app to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: protocol for a factorial randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Claire; Crane, David; Michie, Susan; West, Robert; Brown, Jamie

    2016-07-08

    Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide and interventions to help people reduce their consumption are needed. Interventions delivered by smartphone apps have the potential to help harmful and hazardous drinkers reduce their consumption of alcohol. However, there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of existing smartphone interventions. A systematic review, amongst other methodologies, identified promising modular content that could be delivered by an app: self-monitoring and feedback; action planning; normative feedback; cognitive bias re-training; and identity change. This protocol reports a factorial randomised controlled trial to assess the comparative potential of these five intervention modules to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. A between-subject factorial randomised controlled trial. Hazardous and harmful drinkers aged 18 or over who are making a serious attempt to reduce their drinking will be randomised to one of 32 (2(5)) experimental conditions after downloading the 'Drink Less' app. Participants complete baseline measures on downloading the app and are contacted after 1-month with a follow-up questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is change in past week consumption of alcohol. Secondary outcome measures are change in AUDIT score, app usage data and usability ratings for the app. A factorial between-subjects ANOVA will be conducted to assess main and interactive effects of the five intervention modules for the primary and secondary outcome measures. This study will establish the extent to which the five intervention modules offered in this app can help reduce hazardous and harmful drinking. This is the first step in optimising and understanding what component parts of an app could help to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. The findings from this study will be used to inform the content of a future integrated treatment app and evaluated against a minimal control in a definitive randomised

  4. Analysis of esophagogastric cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase 1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hideaki; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Yoshino, Takayuki; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Welch, John; Takebe, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    In phase 1 trials, an important entry criterion is life expectancy predicted to be more than 90 days, which is generally difficult to predict. The Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score that is determined by lactate dehydrogenase level, albumin level, and number of metastatic sites of disease was developed to help project patient outcomes. There have been no systematic analyses to evaluate the utility of the RMH prognostic score for esophagogastric cancer patients. All nonpediatric phase 1 oncology trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program that began between 2001 and 2013 were considered in this review. Of 4722 patients with solid tumors, 115 patients were eligible for our analysis; 54 (47 %) with cancer of the esophagus, 14 (12 %) with cancer of the esopagogastric junction, and 47 (41 %) with stomach cancer. Eighty-six patients (75 %) had a good RMH prognostic score (0 or 1) and 29 patients (25 %) had a poor RMH prognostic score (2 or 3). Disease control rates were significantly different between patients with good and poor RMH prognostic scores (49 % vs 17 %; two-sided Fisher's exact test P = 0.004). The median treatment duration and overall survival for good and poor RMH prognostic score patients were significantly different (median treatment duration 2.1 months vs 1.2 months respectively, P = 0.016; median overall survival 10.9 months vs 2.1 months respectively, P cancer patients who might participate in a phase 1 trial.

  5. Development and evaluation of a cancer-related fatigue patient education program: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Görres Stefan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF and its impact on patients' quality of life has been an increasing subject of research. However, in Germany there is a lack of evidence-based interventions consistent with the multidimensional character of fatigue. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a self-management program for disease-free cancer patients to cope with CRF. Methods Based on evidence extracted from a literature review, a curriculum for the self-management program was elaborated. The curriculum was reviewed and validated by an interdisciplinary expert group and the training-modules will be pretested with a small number of participants and discussed in terms of feasibility and acceptance. To determine the efficacy of the program a randomised controlled trial will be carried out: 300 patients will be recruited from oncological practices in Bremen, Germany, and will be allocated to intervention or control group. The intervention group participates in the program, whereas the control group receives standard care and the opportunity to take part in the program after the end of the follow-up (waiting control group. Primary outcome measure is the level of fatigue, secondary outcome measures are quality of life, depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and physical activity. Data will be collected before randomisation, after intervention, and after a follow-up of 6 months. Discussion Because there are no comparable self-management programs for cancer survivors with fatigue, the development of the curriculum has been complex; therefore, the critical appraisal by the experts was an important step to validate the program and their contributions have been integrated into the curriculum. The experts appreciated the program as filling a gap in outpatient cancer care. If the results of the evaluation prove to be satisfactory, the outpatient care of cancer patients can be broadened and supplemented. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials

  6. Re-evaluation of randomized control trials of lithium monotherapy: a cohort effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshauer, D; Fergusson, D; Duffy, A; Albuquerque, J; Grof, P

    2005-08-01

    The reported reduction of lithium's efficacy in the prophylaxis of bipolar illness has been attributed to various factors, including diagnostic changes and heterogeneous study designs. We attempted to quantify the impact of pre-randomization enrichment designs and diagnostic drift on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of lithium maintenance therapy. Using the Cochrane RCT search filter, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PSYCHINFO were searched (1966 to June 2004) for all available randomized studies using the text word 'lithium'. Studies of 1 year minimum duration in bipolar disorder involving lithium and placebo arms were identified. Superiority trials without a placebo arm, discontinuation and mirror image studies were excluded. Standardized scales were used to assess randomization and allocation concealment. Nine RCTs enrolling 1432 bipolar I and II patients, randomizing 341 to lithium and 386 to placebo were identified, with 705 reported pre-randomization dropouts. The pooled odds of remaining recurrence free in two non-enriched RCTS using Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) or Feighner criteria were 3.2:1 (95% CI 0.65--15.46) trending in favor of lithium over placebo, and 22.0:1 (95% CI 7.0--68.7) for three trials using lithium enrichment and excluding atypical bipolar disorder. The odds of remaining recurrence free using DSM-IV criteria and lamotrigine enrichment were 1.9:1 (95% CI 1.2-2.8). Lithium maintenance RCTs differ in patient selection, design, and outcome. A cohort effect can be associated with the use of pre-randomization enrichment phases and, to a lesser extent, with diagnostic drift, compromising straightforward comparisons across three decades of lithium monotherapy in bipolar illness.

  7. Community-based randomised controlled trial evaluating falls and osteoporosis risk management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaschini, P M; Straus, S E; Dolovich, L R; Goeree, R A; Leung, K M; Woods, C R; Zimmerman, G M; Majumdar, S R; Spadafora, S; Fera, L A; Lee, H N

    2008-11-04

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are a significant public health concern. Interventions that increase detection and treatment of osteoporosis, as well as prevention of fractures and falls, are substantially underutilized. This paper outlines the protocol for a pragmatic randomised trial of a multifaceted community-based care program aimed at optimizing the evidence-based management of falls and fractures in patients at risk. 6-month randomised controlled study. This population-based study was completed in the Algoma District of Ontario, Canada a geographically vast area with Sault Ste Marie (population 78,000) as its main city. Eligible patients were allocated to an immediate intervention protocol (IP) group, or a delayed intervention protocol (DP) group. The DP group received usual care for 6 months and then was crossed over to receive the interventions. Components of the intervention were directed at the physicians and their patients and included patient-specific recommendations for osteoporosis therapy as outlined by the clinical practice guidelines developed by Osteoporosis Canada, and falls risk assessment and treatment. Two primary outcomes were measured including implementation of appropriate osteoporosis and falls risk management. Secondary outcomes included quality of life and the number of falls, fractures, and hospital admissions over a twelve-month period. The patient is the unit of allocation and analysis. Analyses will be performed on an intention to treat basis. This paper outlines the protocol for a pragmatic randomised trial of a multi-faceted, community-based intervention to optimize the implementation of evidence based management for patients at risk for falls and osteoporosis. This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00465387).

  8. Quest Trial Q348: Evaluation of WaMoS II Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    page 10 The trial area of operations is a relatively flat area at the southwest end of the Emerald Basin about 8 nm square (Figure 1), located...yielded valuable new insights in the capabilities of WaMoS II to measure individual wave heights in a remote area by means of radar. The set-up of this...for each individual buoy measurement. This allowed to prove the general match of WaMoS II sea surface to the buoy and important new insights in

  9. Overview of registered studies in orthodontics: Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rampa, Sankeerth; Masoud, Mohamed I; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh; Allareddy, Veerajalandhar

    2014-11-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 made it mandatory for all phase II through IV trials regulated by this Act to be registered. After this, the National Institutes of Health created ClinicalTrials.gov, which is a registry of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants. The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of registered studies in orthodontics. The ClinicalTrials.gov Web site was used to query all registered orthodontic studies. The search term used was "orthodontics." No limitations were placed for the time period. All registered studies regardless of their recruitment status, study results, and study type were selected for analysis. A total of 64 orthodontic studies were registered as of January 1, 2014. Of these, 52 were interventional, and 12 were observational. Close to 60% of the interventional studies and 66.7% of the observational studies had sample sizes of 50 or fewer subjects. About 21.2% of the interventional studies and 16.7% of the observational studies had sample sizes greater than 100. Only 1 study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and the rest were funded by "other" or "industry" sources. Close to 87.7% of the interventional studies were randomized. Interventional model assignments included factorial assignment (3.9%), parallel assignments (74.5%), crossover assignment (7.8%), and single-group assignment (13.7%). Most studies were treatment oriented (80.4%). The types of masking used by the interventional studies included open label (28.9%), single blind (44.2%), and double blind (26.9%). Outcome assessors were blinded in only 6 studies. Orthodontic studies registered in ClinicalTrials.gov are dominated by small single-center studies. There are wide variations with regard to treatment allocation approaches and randomization methods in the studies. These results also indicate the need for multicenter clinical studies in orthodontics. Copyright © 2014

  10. Asthma control cost-utility randomized trial evaluation (ACCURATE: the goals of asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honkoop Persijn J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of effective therapies, asthma remains a source of significant morbidity and use of health care resources. The central research question of the ACCURATE trial is whether maximal doses of (combination therapy should be used for long periods in an attempt to achieve complete control of all features of asthma. An additional question is whether patients and society value the potential incremental benefit, if any, sufficiently to concur with such a treatment approach. We assessed patient preferences and cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies aimed at achieving different levels of clinical control: 1. sufficiently controlled asthma 2. strictly controlled asthma 3. strictly controlled asthma based on exhaled nitric oxide as an additional disease marker Design 720 Patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma from general practices with a practice nurse, age 18-50 yr, daily treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (more then 3 months usage of inhaled corticosteroids in the previous year, will be identified via patient registries of general practices in the Leiden, Nijmegen, and Amsterdam areas in The Netherlands. The design is a 12-month cluster-randomised parallel trial with 40 general practices in each of the three arms. The patients will visit the general practice at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At each planned and unplanned visit to the general practice treatment will be adjusted with support of an internet-based asthma monitoring system supervised by a central coordinating specialist nurse. Patient preferences and utilities will be assessed by questionnaire and interview. Data on asthma control, treatment step, adherence to treatment, utilities and costs will be obtained every 3 months and at each unplanned visit. Differences in societal costs (medication, other (health care and productivity will be compared to differences in the number of limited activity days and in quality adjusted

  11. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...... (TNG, n = 49) were randomized to (131) I either 8 days following discontinuation of methimazole (-BRT, n = 52, median dose: 5 mg) or while on a continuous block-replacement regimen (+BRT, n = 48, median dose 15 mg methimazole and 100 μg levothyroxine). Results  Patients in the +BRT group required more...

  12. Protocol for the ENCODE trial: evaluating a novel online depression intervention for persons with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Björn; Weiss, Mario; Holtkamp, Martin; Arnold, Stephan; Brückner, Katja; Schröder, Johanna; Scheibe, Franziska; Nestoriuc, Yvonne

    2017-02-07

    Depression is common among persons with epilepsy (PwE), affecting roughly one in three individuals, and its presence is associated with personal suffering, impaired quality of life, and worse prognosis. Despite the availability of effective treatments, depression is often overlooked and treated inadequately in PwE, in part because of assumed concerns over drug interactions or proconvulsant effects of antidepressants. Internet-administered psychological interventions might complement antidepressant medication or psychotherapy, and preliminary evidence suggests that they can be effective. However, no trial has yet examined whether an Internet intervention designed to meet the needs of PwE can achieve sustained reductions in depression and related symptoms, such as anxiety, when offered as adjunct to treatment as usual. This randomized controlled trial will include 200 participants with epilepsy and a current depressive disorder, along with currently at least moderately elevated depression (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) sum score of at least 10). Patients will be recruited via epilepsy treatment centers and other sources, including Internet forums, newspaper articles, flyers, posters, and media articles or advertisements, in German-speaking countries. Main inclusion criteria are: self-reported diagnosis of epilepsy and a depressive disorder, as assessed with a phone-administered structured diagnostic interview, none or stable antidepressant medication, no current psychotherapy, no other major psychiatric disorder, no acute suicidality. Participants will be randomly assigned to either (1) a care-as-usual/waitlist (CAU/WL) control group, in which they receive CAU and are given access to the Internet intervention after 3 months (that is, a CAU/WL control group), or (2) a treatment group that may also use CAU and in addition immediately receives six-month access to the novel, Internet-administered intervention. The primary outcome measure is the PHQ-9, collected

  13. Randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a chest pain observation unit compared with routine care

    OpenAIRE

    Goodacre, S; Nicholl, J; Dixon, S.; Cross, E; Angelini, K.; Arnold, J.; Revill, S.; Locker, T; Capewell, S J; Quinney, D.; Campbell, S.; Morris, F

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To measure the effectiveness and cost effectiveness\\ud of providing care in a chest pain observation unit compared\\ud with routine care for patients with acute, undifferentiated chest\\ud pain.\\ud Design Cluster randomised controlled trial, with 442 days\\ud randomised to the chest pain observation unit or routine care,\\ud and cost effectiveness analysis from a health service costing\\ud perspective.\\ud Setting The emergency department at the Northern General\\ud Hospital, Sheffield, U...

  14. Go4it; study design of a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a multidisciplinary group intervention for obese adolescents for prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijs Peter JM

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, the first adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 2 as a result of obesity have recently been diagnosed. Therefore, it is very important that programs aiming at the prevention of type 2 diabetes of obese adolescents are developed and evaluated. Methods Go4it is a multidisciplinary group treatment that focuses on: 1 increasing awareness of the current dietary and physical activity behaviour (i.e. energy balance behaviour, 2 improving diet, 3 decreasing sedentary behaviour, 4 increasing levels of physical activity, and 5 coping with difficult situations. Go4it consists of 7 sessions with an interval of 2–3 weeks. The effectiveness of the multidisciplinary group treatment compared with usual care (i.e. referral to a dietician was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. We examined effects on BMI(sds, body composition, energy expenditure, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance (primary outcome measure, as well as dietary and physical activity behaviour and quality of life. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective was conducted alongside the randomised trial to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary treatment program vs. usual care. Discussion In this paper we described a multidisciplinary treatment program (Go4it for obese adolescents and the design of a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation to evaluate its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (ISRCTN27626398.

  15. Design and analysis of Bayesian adaptive crossover trials for evaluating contact lens safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Toubouti, Youssef; Carlin, Bradley P

    2017-06-01

    A crossover study, also referred to as a crossover trial, is a form of longitudinal study. Subjects are randomly assigned to different arms of the study and receive different treatments sequentially. While there are many frequentist methods to analyze data from a crossover study, random effects models for longitudinal data are perhaps most naturally modeled within a Bayesian framework. In this article, we introduce a Bayesian adaptive approach to crossover studies for both efficacy and safety endpoints using Gibbs sampling. Using simulation, we find our approach can detect a true difference between two treatments with a specific false-positive rate that we can readily control via the standard equal-tail posterior credible interval. We then illustrate our Bayesian approaches using real data from Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. contact lens studies. We then design a variety of Bayesian adaptive predictive probability crossover studies for single and multiple continuous efficacy endpoints, indicate their extension to binary safety endpoints, and investigate their frequentist operating characteristics via simulation. The Bayesian adaptive approach emerges as a crossover trials tool that is useful yet surprisingly overlooked to date, particularly in contact lens development.

  16. Failure to discount for conflict of interest when evaluating medical literature: a randomised trial of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Gabriel K; Loewenstein, George F; Anderson, Britta L; Ubel, Peter A; Zinberg, Stanley; Schulkin, Jay

    2010-05-01

    Physicians are regularly confronted with research that is funded or presented by industry. To assess whether physicians discount for conflicts of interest when weighing evidence for prescribing a new drug. Participants were presented with an abstract from a single clinical trial finding positive results for a fictitious new drug. Physicians were randomly assigned one version of a hypothetical scenario, which varied on conflict of interest: 'presenter conflict', 'researcher conflict' and 'no conflict'. 515 randomly selected Fellows in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network; 253 surveys (49%) were returned. MAIN OBJECT MEASURES: The self-reported likelihood that physicians would prescribe the new drug as a first-line therapy. Physicians do not significantly discount for conflicts of interest in their self-reported likelihood of prescribing the new drug after reading the single abstract and scenario. However, when asked explicitly to compare conflict and no conflict, 69% report that they would discount for researcher conflict and 57% report that they would discount for presenter conflict. When asked to guess how favourable the results of this study were towards the new drug, compared with the other trials published so far, their perceptions were not significantly influenced by conflict of interest information. While physicians believe that they should discount the value of information from conflicted sources, they did not do so in the absence of a direct comparison between two studies. This brings into question the effectiveness of merely disclosing the funding sources of published studies.

  17. A trial design for evaluation of empiric programming of implantable cardioverter defibrillators to improve patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan John M

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The delivery of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD therapy is sophisticated and requires the programming of over 100 settings. Physicians tailor these settings with the intention of optimizing ICD therapeutic efficacy, but the usefulness of this approach has not been studied and is unknown. Empiric programming of settings such as anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP has been demonstrated to be effective, but an empiric approach to programming all VT/VF detection and therapy settings has not been studied. A single standardized empiric programming regimen was developed based on key strategies with the intention of restricting shock delivery to circumstances when it is the only effective and appropriate therapy. The EMPIRIC trial is a worldwide, multi-center, prospective, one-to-one randomized comparison of empiric to physician tailored programming for VT/VF detection and therapy in a broad group of about 900 dual chamber ICD patients. The trial will provide a better understanding of how particular programming strategies impact the quantity of shocks delivered and facilitate optimization of complex ICD programming.

  18. Effectiveness and economic evaluation of self-help educational materials for the prevention of smoking relapse: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Annie; Maskrey, Vivienne; Notley, Caitlin; Barton, Garry R; Brown, Tracey J; Aveyard, Paul; Holland, Richard; Bachmann, Max O; Sutton, Stephen; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Brandon, Thomas H; Song, Fujian

    2015-07-01

    Most people who quit smoking successfully for a short period will return to smoking again in 12 months. A previous exploratory meta-analysis indicated that self-help booklets may be effective for smoking relapse prevention in unaided quitters. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a set of self-help educational booklets to prevent smoking relapse in people who had stopped smoking with the aid of behavioural support. This is an open, randomised controlled trial and qualitative process evaluation. Trial participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups, using a simple randomisation process without attempts to stratify by participant characteristics. The participant allocation was 'concealed' because the recruitment of quitters occurred before the random allocation. Short-term quitters were recruited from NHS Stop Smoking Clinics, and self-help educational materials were posted to study participants at home. A total of 1407 carbon monoxide (CO)-validated quitters at 4 weeks after quit date in NHS Stop Smoking Clinics. The trial excluded pregnant women and quitters who were not able to read the educational materials in English. Participants in the experimental group (n = 703) received a set of eight revised Forever Free booklets, and participants in the control group (n = 704) received a single leaflet that is currently given to NHS patients. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted 3 and 12 months after quit date. The primary outcome was prolonged, CO-verified abstinence from months 4 to 12 during which time no more than five cigarettes were smoked. The secondary outcomes included self-reported abstinence during the previous 7 days at 3 and 12 months, CO-verified abstinence at 12 months, costs (NHS and NHS and participant medication costs perspectives) and quality-adjusted life-years. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate effect-modifying variables. A simultaneous qualitative process evaluation was conducted to help

  19. Percentage of subjects with no heavy drinking days: evaluation as an efficacy endpoint for alcohol clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Daniel; Wang, Xin Qun; Liu, Lei; Fertig, Joanne; Mattson, Margaret; Ryan, Megan; Johnson, Bankole; Stout, Robert; Litten, Raye Z

    2010-12-01

    Percent subjects with no heavy drinking days (PSNHDDs), an efficacy end point recommended by the Food and Drug Administration, considers abstinent individuals or those engaging in low-risk drinking behavior as successful responders to treatment. As PSNHDD has been used infrequently in previous alcohol clinical trials, we evaluated the utility and validity of the PSNHDD outcome measure in 2 large alcohol clinical trials. Data sets from 2 alcohol trials, COMBINE and a multisite topiramate trial, were used to analyze PSNHDDs and other traditional end points for the topiramate, naltrexone, acamprosate, and placebo groups. Effect sizes of PSNHDDs were determined for each month of active treatment and by varying grace periods-early periods in the trial where outcome is not considered in the analysis-and were compared with that of other traditional outcome measures. Long-term outcomes were compared for groups that had no heavy drinking days versus those that had heavy drinking days during active treatment. PSNHDD effect sizes were significant for both topiramate (0.34 and 0.25 at months 2 and 3, respectively) and naltrexone (0.24 and 0.26 at months 3 and 4, respectively). Given a 2-month grace period for naltrexone, the effect size of PSNHDDs was comparable to the effect sizes using traditional outcome measures. With a 1-month grace period for topiramate, it was greater than the majority of traditional outcome measures. Little is gained by allowing up to 1, 2, or 3 heavy drinking days as an end point. Subjects with no HDDs during treatment fared better than those with some HDDs on drinking outcomes and alcohol-related consequences during a 1-year follow-up. PSNHDD appears to be a clinically informative end point measure, especially when used with a grace period, and is as sensitive as most traditional outcome measures in detecting differences between the medication and placebo groups. Nonetheless, these findings should be replicated in other clinical data sets

  20. Implementing nurse-initiated and managed antiretroviral treatment (NIMART) in South Africa: a qualitative process evaluation of the STRETCH trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Task-shifting is promoted widely as a mechanism for expanding antiretroviral treatment (ART) access. However, the evidence for nurse-initiated and managed ART (NIMART) in Africa is limited, and little is known about the key barriers and enablers to implementing NIMART programmes on a large scale. The STRETCH (Streamlining Tasks and Roles to Expand Treatment and Care for HIV) programme was a complex educational and organisational intervention implemented in the Free State Province of South Africa to enable nurses providing primary HIV/AIDS care to expand their roles and include aspects of care and treatment usually provided by physicians. STRETCH used a phased implementation approach and ART treatment guidelines tailored specifically to nurses. The effects of STRETCH on pre-ART mortality, ART provision, and the quality of HIV/ART care were evaluated through a randomised controlled trial. This study was conducted alongside the trial to develop a contextualised understanding of factors affecting the implementation of the programme. Methods This study was a qualitative process evaluation using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with patients, health workers, health managers, and other key informants as well as observation in clinics. Research questions focused on perceptions of STRETCH, changes in health provider roles, attitudes and patient relationships, and impact of the implementation context on trial outcomes. Data were analysed collaboratively by the research team using thematic analysis. Results NIMART appears to be highly acceptable among nurses, patients, and physicians. Managers and nurses expressed confidence in their ability to deliver ART successfully. This confidence developed slowly and unevenly, through a phased and well-supported approach that guided nurses through training, re-prescription, and initiation. The research also shows that NIMART changes the working and referral relationships between health staff, demands

  1. Evaluation of community level interventions to address social and structural determinants of health: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draper Alizon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In London and the rest of the UK, diseases associated with poor diet, inadequate physical activity and mental illness account for a large proportion of area based health inequality. There is a lack of evidence on interventions promoting healthier behaviours especially in marginalised populations, at a structural or ecological level and utilising a community development approach. The Well London project financed by the Big Lottery 'Wellbeing' Fund and implemented by a consortium of London based agencies led by the Greater London Authority and the London Health Commission is implementing a set of complex interventions across 20 deprived areas of London. The interventions focus on healthy eating, healthy physical activity and mental health and wellbeing and are designed and executed with community participation complementing existing facilities and services. Methods/Design The programme will be evaluated through a cluster randomised controlled trial. Forty areas across London were chosen based on deprivation scores. Areas were characterised by high proportion of Black and Minority Ethnic residents, worklessness, ill-health and poor physical environments. Twenty areas were randomly assigned to the intervention arm of Well London project and twenty 'matched' areas assigned as controls. Measures of physical activity, diet and mental health are collected at start and end of the project and compared to assess impact. The quantitative element will be complemented by a longitudinal qualitative study elucidating pathways of influence between intervention activities and health outcomes. A related element of the study investigates the health-related aspects of the structural and ecological characteristics of the project areas. The project 'process' will also be evaluated. Discussion The size of the project and the fact that the interventions are 'complex' in the sense that firstly, there are a number of interacting components with a wide

  2. Randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive therapy for low-functioning patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Paul M; Huh, Gloria A; Perivoliotis, Dimitri; Stolar, Neal M; Beck, Aaron T

    2012-02-01

    Low-functioning patients with chronic schizophrenia have high direct treatment costs and indirect costs incurred due to lost employment and productivity and have a low quality of life; antipsychotic medications and psychosocial interventions have shown limited efficacy to promote improved functional outcomes. To determine the efficacy of an 18-month recovery-oriented cognitive therapy program to improve psychosocial functioning and negative symptoms (avolition-apathy, anhedonia-asociality) in low-functioning patients with schizophrenia. Design, Setting, and A single-center, 18-month, randomized, single-blind, parallel group trial enrolled 60 low-functioning, neurocognitively impaired patients with schizophrenia (mean age, 38.4 years; 33.3% female; 65.0% African American). Cognitive therapy plus standard treatment vs standard treatment alone. The primary outcome measure was the Global Assessment Scale score at 18 months after randomization. The secondary outcomes were scores on the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms and the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms at 18 months after randomization. Patients treated with cognitive therapy showed a clinically significant mean improvement in global functioning from baseline to 18 months that was greater than the improvement seen with standard treatment (within-group Cohen d, 1.36 vs 0.06, respectively; adjusted mean [SE], 58.3 [3.30] vs 47.9 [3.60], respectively; P = .03; between-group d = 0.56). Patients receiving cognitive therapy as compared with those receiving standard treatment also showed a greater mean reduction in avolition-apathy (adjusted mean [SE], 1.66 [0.31] vs 2.81 [0.34], respectively; P = .01; between-group d = -0.66) and positive symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, disorganization) (adjusted mean [SE], 9.4 [3.3] vs 18.2 [3.8], respectively; P = .04; between-group d = -0.46) at 18 months. Age was controlled in the analyses, and there were no meaningful group differences in

  3. Method for evaluating prediction models that apply the results of randomized trials to individual patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattan Michael W

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The clinical significance of a treatment effect demonstrated in a randomized trial is typically assessed by reference to differences in event rates at the group level. An alternative is to make individualized predictions for each patient based on a prediction model. This approach is growing in popularity, particularly for cancer. Despite its intuitive advantages, it remains plausible that some prediction models may do more harm than good. Here we present a novel method for determining whether predictions from a model should be used to apply the results of a randomized trial to individual patients, as opposed to using group level results. Methods We propose applying the prediction model to a data set from a randomized trial and examining the results of patients for whom the treatment arm recommended by a prediction model is congruent with allocation. These results are compared with the strategy of treating all patients through use of a net benefit function that incorporates both the number of patients treated and the outcome. We examined models developed using data sets regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer and Dutasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy. Results For adjuvant chemotherapy, we found that patients who would opt for chemotherapy even for small risk reductions, and, conversely, those who would require a very large risk reduction, would on average be harmed by using a prediction model; those with intermediate preferences would on average benefit by allowing such information to help their decision making. Use of prediction could, at worst, lead to the equivalent of an additional death or recurrence per 143 patients; at best it could lead to the equivalent of a reduction in the number of treatments of 25% without an increase in event rates. In the Dutasteride case, where the average benefit of treatment is more modest, there is a small benefit of prediction modelling, equivalent to a reduction of

  4. The Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (Dematel and Analytic Network Process (ANP for Safety Management System Evaluation Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolita Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve airport safety management system (SMS performance, an evaluation system is required to improve on current shortcomings and maximize safety. This study suggests the integration of the DEMATEL and ANP methods in decision making processes by analyzing causal relations between the relevant criteria and taking effective analysis-based decision. The DEMATEL method builds on the ANP method in identifying the interdependencies between criteria. The input data consists of questionnaire data obtained online and then stored in an online database. Furthermore, the questionnaire data is processed using DEMATEL and ANP methods to obtain the results of determining the relationship between criteria and criteria that need to be evaluated. The study cases on this evaluation system were Adi Sutjipto International Airport, Yogyakarta (JOG; Ahmad Yani International Airport, Semarang (SRG; and Adi Sumarmo International Airport, Surakarta (SOC. The integration grades SMS performance criterion weights in a descending order as follow: safety and destination policy, safety risk management, healthcare, and safety awareness. Sturges' formula classified the results into nine grades. JOG and SMG airports were in grade 8, while SOG airport was in grade 7.

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnostic evaluation of stress symptoms treated by auriculotherapy: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this clinical trial was to identify the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM diagnoses for stress symptoms that responded to auriculotherapy. Subjects were 75 nursing professionals of a teaching hospital, with average and high stress scores according to Vasconcelos’ List of Stress Symptoms. The subjects were randomized into three groups (control without treatment, auriculotherapy with needles, and auriculotherapy with seeds, treated weekly in the Kidney, Brain stem and Shenmen, for eight sessions. Analysis of variance showed significant differences after treatment (p=0.023 only between the needle and group controls, with 21 symptoms showing differences (p<0.05 in the Student’s t-test. In conclusion, auriculotherapy reduced stress with best result for needles than seeds, and the main identified diagnoses were: Stagnation of Qi in the chest, Stagnation of the Liver and the tendinomuscular meridians, Yin Deficiency of the Liver, Kidneys and Xue (Blood. Descriptors: Nursing; Auriculotherapy; Medicine, Chinese Traditional; Diagnosis.

  6. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, I.; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    ) was assessed pre- and post-intervention from an inpatient setting where CMT was the mode of treatment. Psychopathology was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and substance abuse measured with the DrugCheck scale, breath/urine samples, and the Severity of Dependence Scale. Functioning......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...... milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136...

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of three physiotherapeutic treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Merino, L; Casajuana, M C; Bernal, G; Faba, J; Astilleros, A E; González, R; Giralt, M; Romeu, M; Nogués, M R

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether dexketoprofen administered by phonophoresis or iontophoresis is more effective for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) than conventional ultrasound therapy. Randomised clinical trial. University hospital. Ninety-nine participants with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff were assigned at random to three intervention groups. Participants received ultrasound (n=32), phonophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=33) or iontophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=34). All participants completed 20 treatment sessions plus exercise therapy and cryotherapy. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire were administered pre-treatment (baseline), post-treatment and 1 month post-treatment. At baseline, there were no differences between the groups. Post-treatment, VAS score improved by -1.2 points and CMS score improved by 8.9 points in the ultrasound group compared with the iontophoresis group [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2 to -2.2 and 95% CI 17.0 to 0.7, respectively]. CMS score improved by 7.1 points in the phonophoresis group compared with the iontophoresis group (95% CI 14.8 to -0.7). At 1 month post-treatment, no significant differences were detected between the groups. VAS, CMS and DASH scores of all groups improved post-treatment and at 1 month post-treatment. Ultrasound, iontophoresis with dexketoprofen and phonophoresis with dexketoprofen can improve pain, shoulder function, and physical functioning and symptoms in the upper limb in patients with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff. CLINICAL TRIALS. NCT01748188. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and evaluation of a web-based assent for adolescents considering an HIV vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Diane R; Lemay, Celeste A; Maranda, Louise S; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Kearney, Margaret H; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    HIV vaccine trials with minors will likely require parental permission and informed assent from adolescents. For this to be a valid process, the information needs to be presented in a manner that promotes adolescent comprehension. Previous studies suggest that adolescent comprehension of assent is often insufficient. We developed an interactive web-based assent that included interspersed quiz questions for a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial. Efficacy of the web-based assent was compared to a standard paper assent with and without interspersed questions. One hundred twenty teen participants, ages 15-17 years, from five community organizations were randomized to self-administered web-based assent (n=60) or investigator-administered paper assent with (n=29) or without (n=31) interspersed quiz questions. After reviewing the assent, participants completed a 27-item comprehension test. Comprehension scores were compared between groups. The mean number of correctly answered questions were 21.2 for the full paper group and 21.1 for the web-based group (t118=-0.08, p=0.94). Scores were 20.2 for the paper without interspersed questions sub-group and 22.1 for the paper with interspersed questions sub-group (t58=1.96, p=0.055). Participants in the web-based group performed as well on the comprehension test as those in the paper group, and those in the paper with questions sub-group performed better than those in the paper without questions sub-group, suggesting that interspersed quiz questions may improve understanding of a traditional paper assent. The minimal investigator time and standardized administration of the web-based assent as well as ability to tailor the assent discussion to topics identified by incorrect comprehension test responses are advantages worthy of further investigation.

  9. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system vs. usual medical treatment for menorrhagia: an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Sanghera

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To undertake an economic evaluation alongside the largest randomised controlled trial comparing Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device ('LNG-IUS' and usual medical treatment for women with menorrhagia in primary care; and compare the cost-effectiveness findings using two alternative measures of quality of life. METHODS: 571 women with menorrhagia from 63 UK centres were randomised between February 2005 and July 2009. Women were randomised to having a LNG-IUS fitted, or usual medical treatment, after discussing with their general practitioner their contraceptive needs or desire to avoid hormonal treatment. The treatment was specified prior to randomisation. For the economic evaluation we developed a state transition (Markov model with a 24 month follow-up. The model structure was informed by the trial women's pathway and clinical experts. The economic evaluation adopted a UK National Health Service perspective and was based on an outcome of incremental cost per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY estimated using both EQ-5D and SF-6D. RESULTS: Using EQ-5D, LNG-IUS was the most cost-effective treatment for menorrhagia. LNG-IUS costs £100 more than usual medical treatment but generated 0.07 more QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for LNG-IUS compared to usual medical treatment was £1600 per additional QALY. Using SF-6D, usual medical treatment was the most cost-effective treatment. Usual medical treatment was both less costly (£100 and generated 0.002 more QALYs. CONCLUSION: Impact on quality of life is the primary indicator of treatment success in menorrhagia. However, the most cost-effective treatment differs depending on the quality of life measure used to estimate the QALY. Under UK guidelines LNG-IUS would be the recommended treatment for menorrhagia. This study demonstrates that the appropriate valuation of outcomes in menorrhagia is crucial.

  10. Disagreement between therapist raters and independent evaluators in a controlled clinical trial of interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Margaret G; Endicott, Jean; Goetz, Raymond R

    2015-03-01

    The randomized controlled trial in which both the patient and the treating clinician are kept blinded to the treatment is the "gold standard" for treatment research assignment. However, in psychotherapy research, evaluations can only be single blind; thus, such studies are inherently more limited. A 12-week, bilingual, parallel-design, controlled clinical treatment trial compared interpersonal psychotherapy for antepartum depression (IPT-P) with a parenting education program (PEP) provided to a control group. An outpatient sample of 142 women who met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder was randomly assigned to IPT-P or PEP between September 2005 and May 2011. Only 110 cases were assessed at baseline and had at least 1 other treatment week of paired ratings by a therapist and a blinded independent evaluator (IE). The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impressions Scale were administered weekly by a therapist and every 4 weeks by a blinded IE. We examined cross-informant agreement on ratings of mood and global improvement and severity. Nonblinded therapists consistently rated the IPT-P treatment group as more improved than the PEP control group throughout treatment, whereas the ratings by the blinded IE were significantly higher than the therapist ratings, indicating less improvement in the IPT-P group compared with the control group. The ratings suggest that rater bias may have caused the therapist raters to perceive subjects as more improved because of the expectation that IPT-P would be more effective than the PEP control condition. Ratings in psychotherapy research must be made by anonymous participation in treatment and an independent clinical evaluator who is blind to all therapy.

  11. Process evaluation of the MOSAIC trial: treatment experience of two psychological therapies for out-patient treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Kelly Ann; Renwick, Beth; Keyes, Alexandra; Lose, Anna; Kenyon, Martha; DeJong, Hannah; Broadbent, Hannah; Serpell, Lucy; Richards, Lorna; Johnson-Sabine, Eric; Boughton, Nicky; Whitehead, Linette; Treasure, Janet; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study is part of a series of process evaluations within the MOSAIC Trial (Maudsley Outpatient Study of Treatments for Anorexia Nervosa and Related Conditions). This randomised controlled trial (RCT) compared two psychological treatments, the Maudsley Model for Treatment of Adults with Anorexia Nervosa (MANTRA) and Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM) for adult outpatients with Anorexia Nervosa. The present process study integrates quantitative (treatment acceptability and credibility) and qualitative (written) feedback to evaluate patients' treatment experiences. All 142 MOSAIC participants were asked to (a) rate treatment acceptability and credibility on visual analogue scales (VAS) at six and 12 months post-randomisation, and (b) provide written feedback regarding their views on their treatment at 12 months. Transcripts were first analysed thematically and then rated according to the global valence of feedback (positive, mixed/negative). 114/142 (80.3 %) MOSAIC participants provided VAS data and 82 (57.7 %) provided written feedback. At 12 months, MANTRA patients gave significantly higher acceptability and credibility ratings compared to SSCM patients. A significantly higher proportion of MANTRA patients provided written feedback. MANTRA patients also tended to write in more detail and to give globally more positive feedback when compared to individuals receiving SSCM. Qualitative themes suggest that patients experienced the two treatments differently in terms of characteristics and outcomes. This study highlights the benefits of incorporating qualitative and quantitative data into RCT process evaluations. MANTRA patients were more willing to express their views on treatment and generally felt more positively about this than those receiving SSCM.

  12. Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial of pharmacist-supervized patient self-testing of warfarin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J; Mc Carthy, S; Woods, N; Ryan, F; O' Shea, S; Byrne, S

    2015-02-01

    The increase in numbers of patients requiring oral anti-coagulation testing in outpatient clinics has focused attention on alternative flexible systems of anti-coagulation management. One option is pharmacist led patient self-testing (PST) of international normalised ratio (INR) levels. PST has demonstrated improvements in anti-coagulation control, but its cost-effectiveness is inconclusive. This study reports the first cost-effectiveness evaluation of a randomized controlled trial of an automated direct-to-patient expert system, enabling remote and effective management of patients on oral anti-coagulation therapy. We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial investigating a pharmacist led PST method. The primary outcome was to determine the cost effectiveness of PST in comparison with usual care (management in a hospital based anti-coagulation clinic). Long term anti-coagulation patients were recruited to a 6 month cross over study between PST and routine care in an anti-coagulation clinic. Economic evaluation was from the healthcare payer perspective. On a per patient basis over a 6 month period, PST resulted in an incremental cost of €59.08 in comparison with routine care. Patients achieved a significantly higher time in therapeutic range (TTR) during the PST arm in comparison with routine care, (72 ± 19.7% vs. 59 ± 13.5%). Overall cost of managing a patient through pharmacist supervised PST for a 6 month period is €226.45. Additional analysis of strategies from a societal perspective indicated that PST was the dominant strategy. Pharmacist led patient self-testing is a viable method of management. It provides significant increases in anti-coagulation control for a minimal increase in cost. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system vs. usual medical treatment for menorrhagia: an economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Sabina; Roberts, Tracy Elizabeth; Barton, Pelham; Frew, Emma; Daniels, Jane; Middleton, Lee; Gennard, Laura; Kai, Joe; Gupta, Janesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    To undertake an economic evaluation alongside the largest randomised controlled trial comparing Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device ('LNG-IUS') and usual medical treatment for women with menorrhagia in primary care; and compare the cost-effectiveness findings using two alternative measures of quality of life. 571 women with menorrhagia from 63 UK centres were randomised between February 2005 and July 2009. Women were randomised to having a LNG-IUS fitted, or usual medical treatment, after discussing with their general practitioner their contraceptive needs or desire to avoid hormonal treatment. The treatment was specified prior to randomisation. For the economic evaluation we developed a state transition (Markov) model with a 24 month follow-up. The model structure was informed by the trial women's pathway and clinical experts. The economic evaluation adopted a UK National Health Service perspective and was based on an outcome of incremental cost per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) estimated using both EQ-5D and SF-6D. Using EQ-5D, LNG-IUS was the most cost-effective treatment for menorrhagia. LNG-IUS costs £100 more than usual medical treatment but generated 0.07 more QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for LNG-IUS compared to usual medical treatment was £1600 per additional QALY. Using SF-6D, usual medical treatment was the most cost-effective treatment. Usual medical treatment was both less costly (£100) and generated 0.002 more QALYs. Impact on quality of life is the primary indicator of treatment success in menorrhagia. However, the most cost-effective treatment differs depending on the quality of life measure used to estimate the QALY. Under UK guidelines LNG-IUS would be the recommended treatment for menorrhagia. This study demonstrates that the appropriate valuation of outcomes in menorrhagia is crucial.

  14. Rationale and design of a randomized trial to evaluate an evidence-based prescription drug label on actual medication use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrank, William H; Parker, Ruth; Davis, Terry; Pandit, Anjali U; Knox, Joann P; Moraras, Pear; Rademaker, Alfred; Wolf, Michael S

    2010-11-01

    Medication errors are an important public health concern, and poor understanding of medication labels are a root cause. Research shows that labels are variable, of poor quality, and not patient-centered. No real-world trials have evaluated whether improved medication labels can affect appropriate medication use, adherence or health outcomes. We developed an evidence-based prescription label that addresses both content and format. The enhanced label includes a universal medication schedule (UMS) that standardizes the directions for use incorporating 1) standard time periods for administration (morning, noon, evening, and bedtime), 2) numeric vs. alpha characters, 3) 'carriage returns' to separate daily dose and 4) a graphic aid to visually depict dose and frequency. We will evaluate the effect of providing this label to randomly sampled patients who receive their care from free clinics, mobile vans and federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in Northern Virginia. We will recruit patients with diabetes or hypertension; these patients will be randomly assigned to receive all of their medications with improved labels or to receive prescriptions with standard labels. The primary outcome will be the patient's ability to correctly demonstrate dosing instructions. Other outcomes include adherence, error rates and health outcomes. To our knowledge, this trial is the first to evaluate the effect of prescription label improvement on understanding, medication use and outcomes in a clinical setting. If successful, these findings could be implemented broadly to promote safe and appropriate medication use and to support evidence-based standards in the development of labels. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of daily evaluation and spontaneous breathing test on the duration of pediatric mechanical ventilation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, Flávia K; Troster, Eduardo J; Farias, Julio A; Barbas, Carmen S; Ferraro, Alexandre A; Faria, Lucília S; Bousso, Albert; Panico, Flávia F; Delgado, Artur F

    2011-11-01

    To assess whether the combination of daily evaluation and use of a spontaneous breathing test could shorten the duration of mechanical ventilation as compared with weaning based on our standard of care. Secondary outcome measures included extubation failure rate and the need for noninvasive ventilation. A prospective, randomized controlled trial. Two pediatric intensive care units at university hospitals in Brazil. The trial involved children between 28 days and 15 yrs of age who were receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hrs. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two weaning protocols. In the test group, the children underwent a daily evaluation to check readiness for weaning with a spontaneous breathing test with 10 cm H2O pressure support and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O for 2 hrs. The spontaneous breathing test was repeated the next day for children who failed it. In the control group, weaning was performed according to standard care procedures. A total of 294 eligible children were randomized, with 155 to the test group and 139 to the control group. The time to extubation was shorter in the test group, where the median mechanical ventilation duration was 3.5 days (95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 4.0) as compared to 4.7 days (95% confidence interval, 4.1 to 5.3) in the control group (p = .0127). This significant reduction in the mechanical ventilation duration for the intervention group was not associated with increased rates of extubation failure or noninvasive ventilation. It represents a 30% reduction in the risk of remaining on mechanical ventilation (hazard ratio: 0.70). A daily evaluation to check readiness for weaning combined with a spontaneous breathing test reduced the mechanical ventilation duration for children on mechanical ventilation for >24 hrs, without increasing the extubation failure rate or the need for noninvasive ventilation.

  16. Analysis of the safety evaluation for premarketing clinical trials of hemodialyzer and of postmarketing safety reports of hemodialyzer in Japan and the US: insights into the construction of a sophisticated premarketing evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masami; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to conduct a scoping review of the regulations for hemodialyzers in the safety evaluation in Japan and the United States, and to evaluate the criteria for premarketing clinical trials and postmarketing safety reports to inform the development of a sophisticated premarketing evaluation in Japan. Regulations for approval of hemodialyzers were identified from the databases of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan and the Federal Drug Agency (FDA) in the United States (US). The criteria for premarket clinical trials and postmarketing safety reports were evaluated for both countries. Standards in Japan required evaluation of blood compatibility and reporting of acute adverse effects by a premarketing clinical trial in 6 of 86 applications with semipermeable membrane materials deemed to be different to those of previously approved devices from 1983 to 31 August 2015. By comparison, the clinical trial was required in one of 545 approvals in the US from 1976 to 29 January 2016, but blood compatibility was not the point. All postmarketing adverse effects identified in Japan were included in the set of 'warnings'. The more stringent requirements for evaluation of blood compatibility and acute adverse effects in Japan seemed to be related to differences in the history of quality management systems for medical devices between the two countries. This study revealed that there were differences between Japan and the US in requiring the premarketing clinical trials for the hemodialyzers. Our findings could be useful for constructing sophisticated premarketing safety evaluation.

  17. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a community mentoring service for socially isolated older people: a controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Colin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social isolation affects a significant proportion of older people and is associated with poor health outcomes. The current evidence base regarding the effectiveness of interventions targeting social isolation is poor, and the potential utility of mentoring for this purpose has not previously been rigorously evaluated. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a community-based mentoring service for improving mental health, social engagement and physical health for socially isolated older people. Methods This prospective controlled trial compared a sample of mentoring service clients (intervention group with a matched control group recruited through general practice. One hundred and ninety five participants from each group were matched on mental wellbeing and social activity scores. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at six month follow-up. The primary outcome was the Short Form Health Survey v2 (SF-12 mental health component score (MCS. Secondary outcomes included the SF-12 physical health component score (PCS, EuroQol EQ-5D, Geriatric Depression Score (GDS-10, social activity, social support and morbidities. Results We found no evidence that mentoring was beneficial across a wide range of participant outcomes measuring health status, social activity and depression. No statistically significant between-group differences were observed at follow-up in the primary outcome (p = 0.48 and in most secondary outcomes. Identifying suitable matched pairs of intervention and control group participants proved challenging. Conclusions The results of this trial provide no substantial evidence supporting the use of community mentoring as an effective means of alleviating social isolation in older people. Further evidence is needed on the effectiveness of community-based interventions targeting social isolation. When using non-randomised designs, there are considerable challenges in the recruitment of suitable

  18. A Bayesian adaptive Phase I-II clinical trial for evaluating efficacy and toxicity with delayed outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Modiano, Jaime

    2014-02-01

    In traditional Phase-I oncology trials, the safety of a new chemotherapeutic agent is tested in a dose escalation study to identify the maximum tolerated dose, which is defined as the highest dose with acceptable toxicity. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose finding to be directed by a prespecified trade-off between efficacy and toxicity. With this goal in mind, several designs have been proposed to jointly model toxicity and efficacy in a Phase I-II dose escalation study. A factor limiting the use of these designs is that toxicity and efficacy must be observed in a timely manner. One approach to overcoming this problem is to model toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. This would allow new subjects to be enrolled before full information is available for previous subjects while incorporating partial information when adaptively assigning new subjects to a dose level. We propose a Phase I-II dose escalation study for evaluating toxicity and efficacy with delayed outcomes by jointly modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. We apply our proposed design to a Phase I-II clinical trial of a novel targeted toxin for canine hemangiosarcoma. Our simulation results show that our design identifies the optimal dose at a similar rate to dose finding that treats toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but with substantial savings in study duration. Our proposed design has acceptable operating characteristics and dramatically reduces the trial duration compared to a design that considers toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but comes at the cost of enrolling additional subjects when all dose levels are unacceptable. We developed a novel Phase I-II design that accounts for delayed outcomes by modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. Our design has similar operating characteristics to efficacy/toxicity trade-off designs that consider efficacy and toxicity as binary outcomes, but with a

  19. One Year Clinical Evaluation of a Low Shrinkage Composite Compared with a Packable Composite Resin: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Hoseinifar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a packable and a low shrinkage methacrylate-based composite after one year.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 50 class I or II restorations were placed in 25 patients. Each patient received two restorations. The tested materials were: (I Filtek P60 + Single Bond 2 and (II Kalore GC + Single Bond 2. The restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners after one week (baseline, six months and one year according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS criteria. The evaluated parameters included color match, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, retention, surface texture, postoperative sensitivity, marginal staining and secondary caries. Data were then analyzed using Friedman and conditional (matched logistic regression tests at P<0.05 level of significance. Results: P60 and Kalore performed similarly at six months and one year (P>0.05. When each composite resin was evaluated independently at baseline and after one year, no statistically significant differences were found except for marginal adaptation (P60 where four restorations were rated Bravo (clinically acceptable. In 8% of restorations, patients expressed postoperative sensitivity.Conclusions: Kalore GC and Filtek P60 showed acceptance clinical performance after one year of service.Keywords: Composite Resins; Dental Marginal Adaptation; Patients

  20. Designing and evaluating the effectiveness of a serious game for safe administration of blood transfusion: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Apphia Jia Qi; Lee, Cindy Ching Siang; Lin, Patrick Yongxing; Cooper, Simon; Lau, Lydia Siew Tiang; Chua, Wei Ling; Liaw, Sok Ying

    2017-08-01

    Preparing nursing students for the knowledge and skills required for the administration and monitoring of blood components is crucial for entry into clinical practice. Serious games create opportunities to develop this competency, which can be used as a self-directed learning strategy to complement existing didactic learning and simulation-based strategies. To describe the development and evaluation of a serious game to improve nursing students' knowledge, confidence, and performance in blood transfusion. An experiential gaming model was applied to guide the design of the serious game environment. A clustered, randomized controlled trial was conducted with 103 second-year undergraduate nursing students who were randomized into control or experimental groups. After a baseline evaluation of the participants' knowledge and confidence on blood transfusion procedure, the experimental group undertook a blood transfusion serious game and completed a questionnaire to evaluate their learning experience. All participants' clinical performances were evaluated in a simulated environment. The post-test knowledge and confidence mean scores of the experimental group improved significantly (pblood transfusion practice. The features of this serious game could be further developed to incorporate additional scenarios with repetitive exercises and feedback to enhance the impact on clinical performance. Given the flexibility, practicality, and scalability of such a game, they can serve as a promising approach to optimize learning when blended with high-fidelity simulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The London Exercise And Pregnant smokers (LEAP) trial: a randomised controlled trial of physical activity for smoking cessation in pregnancy with an economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Michael; Lewis, Sarah; Aveyard, Paul; Manyonda, Isaac; West, Robert; Lewis, Beth; Marcus, Bess; Riaz, Muhammad; Taylor, Adrian H; Barton, Pelham; Daley, Amanda; Essex, Holly; Esliger, Dale; Coleman, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is the main preventable cause of poor birth outcomes. Improved methods are needed to help women to stop smoking during pregnancy. Pregnancy provides a compelling rationale for physical activity (PA) interventions as cessation medication is contraindicated or ineffective, and an effective PA intervention could be highly cost-effective. To examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a PA intervention plus standard behavioural support for smoking cessation relative to behavioural support alone for achieving smoking cessation at the end of pregnancy. Multicentre, two-group, pragmatic randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation with follow-up at the end of pregnancy and 6 months postnatally. Randomisation was stratified by centre and a computer-generated sequence was used to allocate participants using a 1 : 1 ratio. 13 hospitals offering antenatal care in the UK. Women between 10 and 24 weeks' gestation smoking five or more cigarettes a day before pregnancy and one or more during pregnancy. Participants were randomised to behavioural support for smoking cessation (control) or behavioural support plus a PA intervention consisting of supervised treadmill exercise plus PA consultations. Neither participants nor researchers were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was self-reported, continuous smoking abstinence between a quit date and end of pregnancy, validated by expired carbon monoxide and/or salivary cotinine. Secondary outcomes were maternal weight, depression, birth outcomes, withdrawal symptoms and urges to smoke. The economic evaluation investigated the costs of the PA intervention compared with the control intervention. In total, 789 women were randomised (n = 394 PA, n = 395 control). Four were excluded post randomisation (two had been enrolled twice in sequential pregnancies and two were ineligible and randomised erroneously). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 785 participants (n

  2. Multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating implementation of a fire prevention Injury Prevention Briefing in children's centres: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deave, Toity; Towner, Elizabeth; McColl, Elaine; Reading, Richard; Sutton, Alex; Coupland, Carol; Cooper, Nicola; Stewart, Jane; Hayes, Mike; Pitchforth, Emma; Watson, Michael; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-22

    The UK has one of the highest fatality rates for deaths from fire-related injuries in children aged 0-14 years; these injuries have the steepest social gradient of all injuries in the UK. Children's centres provide children under five years old and their families with a range of services and information, including home safety, but their effectiveness in promoting injury prevention has yet to be evaluated. We developed a fire prevention intervention for use in children's centres comprising an Injury Prevention Briefing (IPB) which provides evidence on what works and best practice from those running injury prevention programmes, and a facilitation package to support implementation of the IPB. This protocol describes the design and methods of a trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the IPB and facilitation package in promoting fire prevention. Pragmatic, multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial, with a nested qualitative study, in four study centres in England. Children's centres in the most disadvantaged areas will be eligible to participate and will be randomised to one of three treatment arms comprising: IPB with facilitation package; IPB with no facilitation package; usual care (control). The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of families who have a fire escape plan at follow-up. Eleven children's centres per arm are required to detect an absolute difference in the percentage of families with a fire escape plan of 20% in either of the two intervention arms compared with the control arm, with 80% power and a 5% significance level (2-sided), an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.05 and assuming outcomes are assessed on 20 families per children's centre. Secondary outcomes include the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, other fire safety behaviours and factors associated with degree of implementation of the IPB. This will be the first trial to develop and evaluate a fire prevention intervention for

  3. Characterization of renal biomarkers for use in clinical trials: biomarker evaluation in healthy volunteers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brott, David A; Adler, Scott H; Arani, Ramin; Lovick, Susan C; Pinches, Mark; Furlong, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    ..., and this study was designed to characterize some of the novel clinical renal biomarkers. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical renal biomarkers in a typical Phase I healthy volunteer population to determine confidence intervals...

  4. Fractional nonablative 1,540-nm laser resurfacing of atrophic acne scars. A randomized controlled trial with blinded response evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, Lene; Moreau, Karen Estell R; Beyer, Ditte M

    2010-01-01

    fractional laser treatment of acne scars. Ten patients with acne scars were included. Two intraindividual areas of similar size and appearance within contralateral anatomical regions were randomized to (1) 3-monthly laser treatments with a StarLux 1,540-nm fractional handpiece, and (2) no treatment. Blinded...... appeared more even and smooth than untreated control areas (4.5, 2-6.5, versus 6.5, 4.5-8, P=0.0156, at 4 weeks; 4.5, 2.5-6.5, versus 6.5, 4.5-8, at 12 weeks; P=0.0313). Patients were satisfied with the treatment (5.5, 1-7, after 12 weeks) and five of the ten patients evaluated their acne scars......The efficacy of nonablative fractional laser resurfacing of acne scars has been described in case reports and uncontrolled trials. The present study is the first randomized controlled trial in this field. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and adverse effects of 1,540-nm nonablative...

  5. Evaluation of efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine in prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Basudev; Vaswani, Narain Das; Sharma, Deepak; Chaudhary, Uma; Lekhwani, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of skin cleansing with chlorhexidine (CHD) in the prevention of neonatal nosocomial sepsis - a randomized controlled trial. This study design was a randomized controlled trial carried out in a tertiary care center of north India. About 140 eligible neonates were randomly allocated to either the subject area group (wiped with CHD solution till day seven of life) or the control group (wiped with lukewarm water). The primary outcome studied was to determine the decrease in the incidence of neonatal nosocomial sepsis (blood culture proven) in the intervention group. Out of 140 enrolled neonates, 70 were allocated to each group. The ratio of positive blood culture among the CHD group was 3.57%, while the ratio of positive blood culture among the control group was 6.85%. There was trending towards a reduction in blood culture proven sepsis in the intervention group, although the remainder was not statistically significant. A similar decreasing trend was observed in rates of skin colonization, duration of hospital stay, and duration of antibiotic treatment. CHD skin cleansing decreases the incidence of blood culture sepsis and could be an easy and cheap intervention for reducing the neonatal sepsis in countries where the neonatal mortality rate is high because of sepsis.

  6. Effectiveness evaluation of a health promotion programme in primary schools: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Grillich

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmes based on the World Health Organization’s Health Promoting Schools framework (HPS have been implemented in several countries but for evidence-based policy-making more research is required to determine the effectiveness of the HPS approach. Methods We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial. The units of randomisation were primary school classes recruited in May 2010. Eligible participants were Year 3 primary school classes in Lower Austria that had not participated in a similar programme during the last two years. After baseline assessment in September 2010, 53 classes from 45 primary schools in Lower Austria were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 26 classes, 432 children or waiting control arm (n = 27 classes, 493 children aged 8.7 years +/- 4 months. Over the course of 1.5 academic years, participating teachers received on-the-job training (20 h and two workshops (8 h to promote health related behaviour in students such as physical activity during the school day and to improve the quality of regular physical education classes. We assessed 15 outcomes grouped into five categories: Emotional and Social Experience in School, Physical Activity, Well-being, and Attention Performance measured by validated and standardised questionnaire and Motor Skills measured by validated and standardised motoric and coordination tests in the school gym. The primary outcome was Classroom Climate and part of the outcomecategory Emotional and Social Experience in School. The final assessment took place in April 2012. All assessors were blinded to the allocation of classes. Multilevel growth modelling was used to investigate programme effectiveness. Results We could not detect any statistically significant differences between groups for the outcomecategories Emotional and Social Experience in school (p = 0.22 to 0.78, Physical Activity, Well-being, and Attention Performance. Significant differences

  7. Study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial evaluating efficacy of a smoking cessation e-'Tabac Info Service': ee-TIS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, L; Bergman, P; Le Faou, Al; Vincent, I; Le Maitre, B; Pasquereau, A; Arwidson, P; Thomas, D; Alla, F

    2017-02-24

    A French national smoking cessation service, Tabac Info Service, has been developed to provide an adapted quitline and a web and mobile application involving personalised contacts (eg, questionnaires, advice, activities, messages) to support smoking cessation. This paper presents the study protocol of the evaluation of the application (e-intervention Tabac Info Service (e-TIS)). The primary objective is to assess the efficacy of e-TIS. The secondary objectives are to (1) describe efficacy variations with regard to users' characteristics, (2) analyse mechanisms and contextual conditions of e-TIS efficacy. The study design is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled trial including a process evaluation with at least 3000 participants randomised to the intervention or to the control arm (current practices). Inclusion criteria are: aged 18 years or over, current smoker, having completed the online consent forms, possessing a mobile phone with android or apple systems and using mobile applications, wanting to stop smoking sooner or later. The primary outcome is the point prevalence abstinence of 7 days at 6 months later. Data will be analysed in intention to treat (primary) and per protocol analyses. A logistic regression will be carried out to estimate an OR (95% CI) for efficacy. A multivariate multilevel analysis will explore the influence on results of patients' characteristics (sex, age, education and socioprofessional levels, dependency, motivation, quit experiences) and contextual factors, conditions of use, behaviour change techniques. The study protocol was reviewed by the ethical and deontological institutional review board of the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance on 18 April 2016. The findings of this study will allow us to characterise the efficacy of e-TIS and conditions of its efficacy. These findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed articles. NCT02841683; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  8. How should the impact of different presentations of treatment effects on patient choice be evaluated? A pilot randomized trial.

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    Cheryl Carling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different presentations of treatment effects can affect decisions. However, previous studies have not evaluated which presentations best help people make decisions that are consistent with their own values. We undertook a pilot study to compare different methods for doing this. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted an Internet-based randomized trial comparing summary statistics for communicating the effects of statins on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. Participants rated the relative importance of treatment consequences using visual analogue scales (VAS and category rating scales (CRS with five response options. We randomized participants to either VAS or CRS first and to one of six summary statistics: relative risk reduction (RRR and five absolute measures of effect: absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat, event rates, tablets needed to take, and natural frequencies (whole numbers. We used logistic regression to determine the association between participants' elicited values and treatment choices. 770 participants age 18 or over and literate in English completed the study. In all, 13% in the VAS-first group failed to complete their VAS rating, while 9% of the CRS-first group failed to complete their scoring (p = 0.03. Different ways of weighting the elicited values had little impact on the analyses comparing the different presentations. Most (51% preferred the RRR compared to the other five summary statistics (1% to 25%, p = 0.074. However, decisions in the group presented the RRR deviated substantially from those made in the other five groups. The odds of participants in the RRR group deciding to take statins were 3.1 to 5.8 times that of those in the other groups across a wide range of values (p = 0.0007. Participants with a scientific background, who were more numerate or had more years of education were more likely to decide not to take statins. CONCLUSIONS: Internet-based trials comparing different presentations

  9. Evaluation of immediate and 12-week effects of a smartphone sun-safety mobile application: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile applications on smartphones can communicate a large amount of personalized, real-time health information, including advice on skin cancer prevention, but their effectiveness may be affected by whether recipients can be convinced to use them. To evaluate a smartphone mobile application (Solar Cell) delivering real-time advice about sun protection for a second time in a randomized clinical trial. A previous trial conducted in 2012 used a randomized pretest-posttest design. For the present trial, we collected data from a volunteer sample of 202 adults 18 years or older who owned a smartphone. Participants were recruited nationwide through online promotions. Screening procedures and a 3-week run-in period were added to increase the use of the mobile application. We conducted follow-ups at 3 and 8 weeks after randomization to examine the immediate and the longer-term effects of the intervention. Use of the mobile application. The application gave feedback on sun protection (ie, sun-safety practices and the risk for sunburn) and alerted users to apply or to reapply sunscreen and to get out of the sun. The application also displayed the hourly UV Index and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, time, and location. Percentage of days with the use of sun protection, time spent outdoors in the midday sun (days and hours), and the number of sunburns in the last 3 months. Participants in the intervention group used wide-brimmed hats more at 7 weeks than control participants (23.8% vs 17.4%; F = 4.07; P = .045). Women who used the mobile application reported using all sun protection combined more than men (46.4% vs 43.3%; F = 1.49; P = .04), whereas men and older individuals reported less use of sunscreen (32.7% vs 35.5%; F = 5.36; P = .02) and hats (15.6% vs 17.9%; F = 4.72; P = .03). The mobile application initially appeared to confer weak improvement of sun protection. Use of the mobile application was greater than in a previous trial and was

  10. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course

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    Mittal Suneeta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for incorporation of evidence provided through the WHO RHL. The hypothesis is that the RHL-EBM (clinically integrated e-learning course will improve participants' knowledge, skills and attitudes, as well as institutional practice and educational environment, as compared to the use of standard postgraduate educational resources for EBM teaching that are not clinically integrated. Methods The study will be a multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial, carried out in seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, involving 50-60 obstetrics and gynaecology teaching units. The trial will be carried out on postgraduate trainees in the first two years of their training. In the intervention group, trainees will receive the RHL-EBM course. The course consists of five modules, each comprising self-directed e-learning components and clinically related activities, assignments and assessments, coordinated between the facilitator and the postgraduate trainee. The course will take about 12 weeks, with assessments taking place pre-course and 4 weeks post-course. In the control group, trainees will receive electronic, self-directed EBM-teaching materials. All data collection will be online. The primary outcome measures are gain in EBM knowledge, change in attitudes towards EBM and competencies in EBM measured by multiple choice questions (MCQs and a skills-assessing questionniare administered eletronically. These

  11. How pragmatic or explanatory is the randomized, controlled trial? The application and enhancement of the PRECIS tool to the evaluation of a smoking cessation trial

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    Selby Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous explanatory randomized trials support the efficacy of chronic disease interventions, including smoking cessation treatments. However, there is often inadequate adoption of these interventions for various reasons, one being the limitation of generalizability of the explanatory studies in real-world settings. Randomized controlled trials can be rated as more explanatory versus pragmatic along 10 dimensions. Pragmatic randomized clinical trials generate more realistic estimates of effectiveness with greater relevance to clinical practice and for health resource allocation decisions. However, there is no clear method to scale each dimension during the trial design phase to ensure that the design matches the intended purpose of the study. Methods We designed a pragmatic, randomized, controlled study to maximize external validity by addressing several barriers to smoking cessation therapy in ambulatory care. We analyzed our design and methods using the recently published ‘Pragmatic–Explanatory Continuum Indicatory Summary (PRECIS’ tool, a qualitative method to assess trial design across 10 domains. We added a 20-point numerical rating scale and a modified Delphi process to improve consensus in rating these domains. Results After two rounds of review, there was consensus on all 10 domains of study design. No single domain was scored as either fully pragmatic or fully explanatory; but overall, the study scored high on pragmatism. Conclusions This addition to the PRECIS tool may assist other trial designers working with interdisciplinary co-investigators to rate their study design while building consensus.

  12. Design and implementation of a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of routine opt-out rapid human immunodeficiency virus screening in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukoos, Jason S; Hopkins, Emily; Byyny, Richard L; Conroy, Amy A; Silverman, Morgan; Eisert, Sheri; Thrun, Mark; Wilson, Michael; Boyett, Brian; Heffelfinger, James D

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released revised recommendations for performing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in health care settings, including implementing routine rapid HIV screening, the use of an integrated opt-out consent, and limited prevention counseling. Emergency departments (EDs) have been a primary focus of these efforts. These revised CDC recommendations were primarily based on feasibility studies and have not been evaluated through the application of rigorous research methods. This article describes the design and implementation of a large prospective controlled clinical trial to evaluate the CDC's recommendations in an ED setting. From April 15, 2007, through April 15, 2009, a prospective quasi-experimental equivalent time-samples clinical trial was performed to compare the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of routine (nontargeted) opt-out rapid HIV screening (intervention) to physician-directed diagnostic rapid HIV testing (control) in a high-volume urban ED. In addition, three nested observational studies were performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and patient and staff acceptance of the two rapid HIV testing methods. This article describes the rationale, methodologies, and study design features of this program evaluation clinical trial. It also provides details regarding the integration of the principal clinical trial and its nested observational studies. Such ED-based trials are rare, but serve to provide valid comparisons between testing approaches. Investigators should consider similar methodology when performing future ED-based health services research.

  13. Effect Evaluation of a Randomized Trial to Reduce Infectious Illness and Illness-Related Absenteeism Among Schoolchildren

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denbæk, Anne Maj; Andersen, Anette; Bonnesen, Camilla Thørring

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous school-based hand hygiene interventions have reported to successfully reduce infectious illness among schoolchildren. But few studies have tested the effect in large populations with adequate statistical power and analyses. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a school......-based multi-component intervention to improve hand washing among schoolchildren, the Hi Five study, succeeded in reducing infectious illness and illness-related absenteeism in schools. METHODS: The Hi Five study was a three-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 43 randomly selected Danish...... with control schools. It is noteworthy that one of the main components in the intervention, a mandatory daily hand washing before lunch, was only implemented by 1/3 of teachers in intervention schools....

  14. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Ida Kappel; Gerster, Sarah; Delorenzi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. RESULTS: There was no statistically...... patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer...... to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences between the two study cohorts, the present results should be further validated....

  15. An evaluation of methods for testing hypotheses relating to two endpoints in a single clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ting-Li; Glimm, Ekkehard; Whitehead, John; Branson, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The issues and dangers involved in testing multiple hypotheses are well recognised within the pharmaceutical industry. In reporting clinical trials, strenuous efforts are taken to avoid the inflation of type I error, with procedures such as the Bonferroni adjustment and its many elaborations and refinements being widely employed. Typically, such methods are conservative. They tend to be accurate if the multiple test statistics involved are mutually independent and achieve less than the type I error rate specified if these statistics are positively correlated. An alternative approach is to estimate the correlations between the test statistics and to perform a test that is conditional on those estimates being the true correlations. In this paper, we begin by assuming that test statistics are normally distributed and that their correlations are known. Under these circumstances, we explore several approaches to multiple testing, adapt them so that type I error is preserved exactly and then compare their powers over a range of true parameter values. For simplicity, the explorations are confined to the bivariate case. Having described the relative strengths and weaknesses of the approaches under study, we use simulation to assess the accuracy of the approximate theory developed when the correlations are estimated from the study data rather than being known in advance and when data are binary so that test statistics are only approximately normally distributed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. History on Trial: Evaluating Learning Outcomes through Audit and Accreditation in a National Standards Environment

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    Sean Brawley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a trial audit of history programs undertaken in 2011-2012 to explore issues surrounding the attainment of Threshold Learning Outcomes (TLOs in an emerging Australian national standards environment for the discipline of history. The audit sought to ascertain whether an accreditation process managed by the discipline under the auspices of the Australian Historical Association (AHA could be based on a limited-intervention, “light-touch” approach to assessing attainment of the TLOs. The results of the audit show that successful proof of TLO attainment would only be possible with more active intervention into existing history majors and courses. Assessments across all levels of history teaching would have to be designed, undertaken, and marked using a rubric matched to the TLOs. It proved unrealistic to expect students to demonstrate acquisition of the TLOs from existing teaching and assessment practices. The failure of the “light-touch” audit process indicates that demonstrating student attainment under a national standards regime would require fundamental redevelopment of the curriculum. With standards-based approaches to teaching and learning emerging as international phenomena, this case study resonates beyond Australia and the discipline under investigation.

  17. On Some Aspects of Conditional Power Evaluation In Two-phase Clinical Trials Under Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Hedayat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} We investigate the conditional power under the framework of linear regression models so that it can be applied to most actual clinical trials in which multiple treatment effects and covariate effects are included. It is well known that the standard power of a regular test for a treatment contrast depends on unknown parameters only through the contrast itself. However it is not true in general for conditional power. Conditions for this to happen are established here and some instances are illustrated. We also show that similar arguments can be made about the sufficient statistics for the conditional power.

  18. Independent evaluation of a clinical prediction rule for spinal manipulative therapy: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Mark J; Maher, Christopher G; Latimer, Jane; Herbert, Robert D; McAuley, James H

    2008-07-01

    A clinical prediction rule to identify patients most likely to respond to spinal manipulation has been published and widely cited but requires further testing for external validity. We performed a pre-planned secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial investigating the efficacy of spinal manipulative therapy in 239 patients presenting to general practice clinics for acute, non-specific, low back pain. Patients were randomised to receive spinal manipulative therapy or placebo 2 to 3 times per week for up to 4 weeks. All patients received general practitioner care (advice and paracetamol). Outcomes were pain and disability measured at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks. Status on the clinical prediction rule was measured at baseline. The clinical prediction rule performed no better than chance in identifying patients with acute, non-specific low back pain most likely to respond to spinal manipulative therapy (pain P = 0.805, disability P = 0.600). At 1-week follow-up, the mean difference in effect of spinal manipulative therapy compared to placebo in patients who were rule positive rather than rule negative was 0.3 points less on a 10-point pain scale (95% CI -0.8 to 1.4). The clinical prediction rule proposed by Childs et al. did not generalise to patients presenting to primary care with acute low back pain who received a course of spinal manipulative therapy.

  19. Evaluation of duration of antibiotic therapy in neonatal bacterial meningitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, N B; Kharod, Prarthana; Kumar, Surinder

    2015-04-01

    To compare the effect of 10 days versus 14 days of antibiotic therapy in neonatal meningitis on treatment failure rate. The study was a randomized controlled trial conducted at a referral neonatal unit. The participants were 70 neonates with meningitis randomized to receive 10 days (study group) or 14 days (control group) of antibiotics. The primary outcome measure studied was treatment failure in each group within 28 days of enrolment. None of the neonates among either of the groups had occurrence of meningitis during follow-up. Occurrence of sepsis was observed after discharge in three neonates in the control group and none in the study group. Brainstem-evoked response audiometry was abnormal in one neonate in the study group. Adverse effects of drugs and neurological deficits were not observed in the study population. Short course of antibiotic therapy (10 days) is effective, with potential benefits of shorter hospital stay. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The application of AMMI model for barley cultivars evaluation in multi-year trials

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    Mirosavljević Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of new varieties performance is disturbed under the influence of genotype-by-environment interaction. Among several methods used for understanding this effect, one of the most frequently used methods is Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI analysis. In this study we used AMMI method with the aim to estimate the genotype - environment interaction of 14 barley genotypes, and to identify barley genotypes that have high and stable performance in different environments. The trials were conducted during 11 growing seasons (1995/96 - 2005/06, arranged in a randomized complete block (RCB design with four replications in location Rimski Šančevi. The results showed that the influence of environment (seasons, genotypes and their interaction on barley grain yield were significant (p < 0.01. Based on AMMI method, two-rowed variety Novosadski 317 and the six-rowed variety Novosadski 331 can be distinguished due their high and stable yields. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31066

  1. Cluster randomized trial to evaluate the impact of team training on surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, A; Peix, J L; Piriou, V; Occelli, P; Denis, A; Bourdy, S; Carty, M J; Gawande, A A; Debouck, F; Vacca, C; Lifante, J C; Colin, C

    2016-12-01

    The application of safety principles from the aviation industry to the operating room has offered hope in reducing surgical complications. This study aimed to assess the impact on major surgical complications of adding an aviation-based team training programme after checklist implementation. A prospective parallel-group cluster trial was undertaken between September 2011 and March 2013. Operating room teams from 31 hospitals were assigned randomly to participate in a team training programme focused on major concepts of crew resource management and checklist utilization. The primary outcome measure was the occurrence of any major adverse event, including death, during the hospital stay within the first 30 days after surgery. Using a difference-in-difference approach, the ratio of the odds ratios (ROR) was estimated to compare changes in surgical outcomes between intervention and control hospitals. Some 22 779 patients were enrolled, including 5934 before and 16 845 after team training implementation. The risk of major adverse events fell from 8·8 to 5·5 per cent in 16 intervention hospitals (adjusted odds ratio 0·57, 95 per cent c.i. 0·48 to 0·68; P training programme appears to require modification and adaptation of its principles in the context of the the surgical milieu. Registration number: NCT01384474 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis evaluation using cardiac magnetic resonance T1 mapping: sample size considerations for clinical trials

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    Liu Songtao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR T1 mapping has been used to characterize myocardial diffuse fibrosis. The aim of this study is to determine the reproducibility and sample size of CMR fibrosis measurements that would be applicable in clinical trials. Methods A modified Look-Locker with inversion recovery (MOLLI sequence was used to determine myocardial T1 values pre-, and 12 and 25min post-administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent at 3 Tesla. For 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 29 ± 6 years, two separate scans were obtained a with a bolus of 0.15mmol/kg of gadopentate dimeglumine and b 0.1mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine, respectively, with averaged of 51 ± 34 days between two scans. Separately, 25 heart failure subjects (12 men; 63 ± 14 years, were evaluated after a bolus of 0.15mmol/kg of gadopentate dimeglumine. Myocardial partition coefficient (λ was calculated according to (ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood, and ECV was derived from λ by adjusting (1-hematocrit. Results Mean ECV and λ were both significantly higher in HF subjects than healthy (ECV: 0.287 ± 0.034 vs. 0.267 ± 0.028, p=0.002; λ: 0.481 ± 0.052 vs. 442 ± 0.037, p Conclusion ECV and λ quantification have a low variability across scans, and could be a viable tool for evaluating clinical trial outcome.

  3. The evaluation of the risks and benefits of phase II cancer clinical trials by institutional review board (IRB) members: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijn, H E M; Aaronson, N K; Keus, R B; Musschenga, A W

    2006-03-01

    There are indications that institutional review board (IRB) members do not find it easy to assess the risks and benefits in medical experiments, although this is their principal duty. This study examined how IRB members assessed the risk/benefit ratio (RBR) of a specific phase II breast cancer clinical trial. The trial was evaluated by means of a questionnaire administered to 43 members of IRBs at six academic hospitals and specialised cancer centres in the Netherlands. The questionnaire addressed: identification and estimation of inconvenience, toxicity, psychosocial distress, and benefits of trial participation to patients; identification and estimation of benefits to future patients and medical science; assessment of the trial's RBR; and assessment of its ethical acceptability. Most IRB members expected trial participation to involve fairly or very serious inconvenience, fairly severe to sometimes life-threatening toxicity, and serious psychological and social consequences. Conversely, the perceived likelihood of benefits to patients was modest. Most regarded the study as important, and the balance between risks and benefits to be favourable, and believed that the protocol should be approved. The IRB members' final judgement on the trial's ethical acceptability was significantly correlated with their RBR assessment of the protocol. Because most patients who participate in clinical trials hope this will prolong their lives, it is suggested that patient information should better describe the anticipated benefits-for example, the likelihood of prolonging life. This would allow patients to make decisions regarding participation based on realistic expectations.

  4. Characteristics and outcomes of breast cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase I clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynce, Filipa; Blackburn, Matthew J; Cai, Ling; Wang, Heping; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Isaacs, Claudine; Pohlmann, Paula R

    2017-11-08

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women. Given the availability of approved therapies and abundance of phase II and III clinical trials, historically few BC patients have been referred for consideration of participation on a phase I trial. We were interested in determining whether clinical benefit rates differed in patients with BC from other patients enrolled in phase I trials. We performed a retrospective analysis of all Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) sponsored phase I trials from 1993 to 2012. We report an analysis of demographic variables, rates of response to treatment, grade 4 toxicities, and treatment-related deaths. De-identified data from 8087 patients were analyzed, with 1,376 having a diagnosis of BC. The median time from initial cancer diagnosis to enrollment in a CTEP-sponsored phase I clinical trial was 614 days for all patients. Breast cancer patients were enrolled on average 790 days after initial diagnosis, while non-BC patients had a median enrollment time of 582 days (p enrolled on phase I clinical trials, BC patients tend to derive clinical benefit from these therapies with similar toxicity profile. This evidence further supports enrollment of BC patients on phase I trials.

  5. Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrutesh, Sunita; Malini, J; Tandur, Prakash S; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal dental cream in comparison to fluoride dental cream. Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. One hundred and two patients with established dental plaque were randomly assigned to either herbal dental group or fluoride dental group for six weeks in a double-blind design. Improvement in plaque index, oral hygiene status, bleeding index, and gingival index was evaluated in these patients along with microbiological study. Results indicated a significant reduction in plaque index, gingival index, oral hygiene index, and microbial growth in both groups. Difference between the groups was not significant. There was no significant change in bleeding index. No adverse events were reported and both the dental creams were well tolerated. The finding of this preliminary study indicates that herbal dental cream is as safe and effective as fluoride dental cream, but not superior to it.

  6. Discrepancies between qualitative and quantitative evaluation of randomised controlled trial results: achieving clarity through mixed methods triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Anthierens, Sibyl; Hood, Kerenza; Yardley, Lucy; Cals, Jochen W L; Francis, Nick A; Coenen, Samuel; van der Velden, Alike W; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Llor, Carl; Butler, Chris C; Verheij, Theo J M; Goossens, Herman; Little, Paul

    2016-05-12

    Mixed methods are commonly used in health services research; however, data are not often integrated to explore complementarity of findings. A triangulation protocol is one approach to integrating such data. A retrospective triangulation protocol was carried out on mixed methods data collected as part of a process evaluation of a trial. The multi-country randomised controlled trial found that a web-based training in communication skills (including use of a patient booklet) and the use of a C-reactive protein (CRP) point-of-care test decreased antibiotic prescribing by general practitioners (GPs) for acute cough. The process evaluation investigated GPs' and patients' experiences of taking part in the trial. Three analysts independently compared findings across four data sets: qualitative data collected view semi-structured interviews with (1) 62 patients and (2) 66 GPs and quantitative data collected via questionnaires with (3) 2886 patients and (4) 346 GPs. Pairwise comparisons were made between data sets and were categorised as agreement, partial agreement, dissonance or silence. Three instances of dissonance occurred in 39 independent findings. GPs and patients reported different views on the use of a CRP test. GPs felt that the test was useful in convincing patients to accept a no-antibiotic decision, but patient data suggested that this was unnecessary if a full explanation was given. Whilst qualitative data indicated all patients were generally satisfied with their consultation, quantitative data indicated highest levels of satisfaction for those receiving a detailed explanation from their GP with a booklet giving advice on self-care. Both qualitative and quantitative data sets indicated higher patient enablement for those in the communication groups who had received a booklet. Use of CRP tests does not appear to engage patients or influence illness perceptions and its effect is more centred on changing clinician behaviour. Communication skills and the patient

  7. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate tooth stain reduction with nicotine replacement gum during a smoking cessation program

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelton, Helen

    2012-06-13

    AbstractBackgroundIn addition to its general and periodontal health effects smoking causes tooth staining. Smoking cessation support interventions with an added stain removal or tooth whitening effect may increase motivation to quit smoking. Oral health professionals are well placed to provide smoking cessation advice and support to patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nicorette® Freshmint Gum used in a smoking cessation programme administered in a dental setting, on extrinsic stain and tooth shade among smokers.MethodsAn evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-week parallel-group controlled trial was conducted among 200 daily smokers motivated to quit smoking. Participants were randomised to use either the Nicorette® Freshmint Gum or Nicorette® Microtab (tablet). Tooth staining and shade were rated using the modified Lobene Stain Index and the Vita® Shade Guide at baseline, weeks 2, 6 and 12. To maintain consistency with other whitening studies, the primary end-point was the mean change in stain index between baseline and week 6. Secondary variables included changes in stain measurements and tooth shade at the other time points the number of gums or tablets used per day and throughout the trial period; and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Treatments were compared using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using treatment and nicotine dependence as factors and the corresponding baseline measurement as a covariate. Each comparison (modified intention-to-treat) was tested at the 0.05 level, two-sided. Within-treatment changes from baseline were compared using a paired t-test.ResultsAt week 6, the gum-group experienced a reduction in mean stain scores whilst the tablet-group experienced an increase with mean changes of -0.14 and +0.12 respectively, (p = 0.005, ANCOVA). The change in mean tooth shade scores was statistically significantly greater in the gum-group than in the tablet group at 2 (p = 0.015), 6 (p = 0

  8. A randomized trial evaluating Prosaptide for HIV-associated sensory neuropathies: use of an electronic diary to record neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Evans

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the efficacy and safety of Prosaptide (PRO for the treatment of painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathies (HIV-SN. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in participants with sensory neuropathy. Pain modulating therapy was discontinued prior to baseline. Participants were stratified by sural sensory nerve action potential (SNAP amplitude. Participants were trained to use an electronic diary (ED to record pain. SETTING: Peripheral neuropathies are common complications of HIV infection. The pathogenesis is unknown and currently treatments are restricted to symptomatic measures. We examined PRO against placebo (PBO for treatment of painful HIV-SN and performed a post-hoc evaluation of an electronic diary (ED to record HIV-associated neuropathic pain. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants included adults with neurologist-confirmed painful HIV-SN. INTERVENTIONS: 2, 4, 8, or 16 mg/d PRO or PBO administered via subcutaneous (SC injection for six weeks. Neurotoxic antiretroviral drug usage was held constant. OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes from baseline in the weekly average of evaluable daily random prompts measuring pain using the Gracely pain scale and adverse events. RESULTS: 237 participants were randomized. The study was stopped after a planned futility analysis. There were no between-group differences in the frequency of adverse events or laboratory toxicities. The 6-week mean (sd Gracely pain scale changes were -0.12 (0.23, -0.24 (0.35, -0.15 (0.32, -0.18 (0.34, and -0.18 (0.32 for the 2, 4, 8, 16 mg, and PBO arms respectively. A similar variability of pain changes recorded using the ED were noted compared to previous trials that used paper collection methods. CONCLUSIONS: 6-week treatment with PRO was safe but not effective at reducing HIV-associated neuropathic pain. Use of an ED to record neuropathic pain is novel in HIV-SN, resulted in reasonable compliance in recording pain data, but did

  9. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate tooth stain reduction with nicotine replacement gum during a smoking cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelton Helen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to its general and periodontal health effects smoking causes tooth staining. Smoking cessation support interventions with an added stain removal or tooth whitening effect may increase motivation to quit smoking. Oral health professionals are well placed to provide smoking cessation advice and support to patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nicorette® Freshmint Gum used in a smoking cessation programme administered in a dental setting, on extrinsic stain and tooth shade among smokers. Methods An evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-week parallel-group controlled trial was conducted among 200 daily smokers motivated to quit smoking. Participants were randomised to use either the Nicorette® Freshmint Gum or Nicorette® Microtab (tablet. Tooth staining and shade were rated using the modified Lobene Stain Index and the Vita® Shade Guide at baseline, weeks 2, 6 and 12. To maintain consistency with other whitening studies, the primary end-point was the mean change in stain index between baseline and week 6. Secondary variables included changes in stain measurements and tooth shade at the other time points the number of gums or tablets used per day and throughout the trial period; and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Treatments were compared using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, using treatment and nicotine dependence as factors and the corresponding baseline measurement as a covariate. Each comparison (modified intention-to-treat was tested at the 0.05 level, two-sided. Within-treatment changes from baseline were compared using a paired t-test. Results At week 6, the gum-group experienced a reduction in mean stain scores whilst the tablet-group experienced an increase with mean changes of -0.14 and +0.12 respectively, (p = 0.005, ANCOVA. The change in mean tooth shade scores was statistically significantly greater in the gum-group than in the tablet group at 2 (p = 0

  10. In-vitro Acaricidal efficacy evaluation trial of Ixodid ticks at Borana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cattle. These ticks were placed individually in different plastic flasks prelabeled with time, date, place of collection and code number. Afterwards the ticks were transported to Yabello Regional Veterinary Laboratory within 24 hours of collection for the in-vitro acaricidal efficacy evaluation using modified adult immersion test ...

  11. Single-tooth implants with different neck designs : a randomized clinical trial evaluating the aesthetic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Laurens den; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Huddleston Slater, James J.R.; Stellingsma, Kees; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Hendrikus

    Aim: To evaluate the aesthetic outcome of single-tooth implants in the aesthetic zone with different neck designs from a professional's and patient's perception. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three patients with a missing anterior tooth in the maxilla were randomly assigned to be treated with an

  12. Pilot trial evaluating maternal docosahexaenoic acid consumption during pregnancy: Decreased postpartum depressive symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P. Judge

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Women in the DHA intervention group had fewer symptoms of postpartum depression compared to the placebo group. These results support the notion that the consumption of DHA by pregnant women can be efficacious in preventing depressive symptoms and highlight a need for further larger-scale investigations using the PDSS in tandem with a diagnostic evaluation.

  13. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. Part I - Clinical Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oepkes, Dick; Page-Christiaens, Lieve C; Bax, Caroline J; Bekker, Mireille N; Bilardo, Catia M; Boon, Elles M J; Schuring-Blom, G Heleen; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; Galjaard, Robert-Jan H; Go, Attie T; Henneman, Lidewij; Macville, Merryn V E; Pajkrt, Eva; Suijkerbuijk, Ron F; Huijsdens-vanAmsterdam, Karin; Van Opstal, Diane; Verweij, E J Joanne; Weiss, Marjan M; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical impact of nationwide implementation of genome-wide Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) in pregnancies at increased risk for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. METHOD: Women with elevated risk based on first trimester combined testing (FCT ≥ 1:200) or medical history,

  14. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068392087; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481816X; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at

  15. Trial by Dutch Laboratories for Evaluation of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing. : Part II - Women's Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schendel, Rachel V; Page-Christiaens, Lieve; Beulen, Lean; Bilardo, Catia M; de Boer, Marjon A; Coumans, Audrey B C; Faas, Brigitte H; van Langen, Irene M; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; van Maarle, Merel C; Macville, Merryn V E; Oepkes, Dick; Pajkrt, Eva; Henneman, Lidewij

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate preferences and decision-making amongst high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. METHODS: Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at

  16. Evaluation of the FilmArray Blood Culture Identification Panel: Results of a Multicenter Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimnia, Hossein; Fairfax, Marilynn R; Lephart, Paul R; Schreckenberger, Paul; DesJarlais, Sharon M; Johnson, J Kristie; Robinson, Gwen; Carroll, Karen C; Greer, Amy; Morgan, Margie; Chan, Raymond; Loeffelholz, Michael; Valencia-Shelton, Frances; Jenkins, Stephen; Schuetz, Audrey N; Daly, Judy A; Barney, Trenda; Hemmert, Andrew; Kanack, Kristen J

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased medical expense. Rapid diagnosis improves outcomes and reduces costs. The FilmArray blood culture identification panel (BioFire Diagnostics LLC, Salt Lake City, UT), a highly multiplexed PCR assay, can identify 24 etiologic agents of sepsis (8 Gram-positive, 11 Gram-negative, and 5 yeast species) and three antimicrobial resistance genes (mecA, vanA/B, and blaKPC) from positive blood culture bottles. It provides results in about 1 h with 2 min for assay setup. We present the results of an eight-center trial comparing the sensitivity and specificity of the panel with those of the laboratories' standard phenotypic identification techniques, as well as with molecular methods used to distinguish Acinetobacter baumannii from other members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and to detect antimicrobial resistance genes. Testing included 2,207 positive aerobic blood culture samples, 1,568 clinical and 639 seeded. Samples were tested fresh or were frozen for later testing within 8 h after the bottles were flagged as positive by an automated blood culture system. At least one organism was detected by the panel in 1,382 (88.1%) of the positive clinical specimens. The others contained primarily off-panel organisms. The panel reported multiple organisms in 81 (5.86%) positive clinical specimens. The unresolved blood culture identification sensitivity for all target detections exceeded 96%, except for Klebsiella oxytoca (92.2%), which achieved 98.3% sensitivity after resolution of an unavoidable phenotypic error. The sensitivity and specificity for vanA/B and blaKPC were 100%; those for mecA were 98.4 and 98.3%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Salimnia et al.

  17. Evaluation of supercritical extracts of algae as biostimulants of plant growth in field trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Michalak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur. As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed – Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear and shank length. The ear number per square meter was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences. Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences.Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha. The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences. Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  18. Evaluation of Supercritical Extracts of Algae as Biostimulants of Plant Growth in Field Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Izabela; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Dmytryk, Agnieszka; Wilk, Radosław; Gramza, Mateusz; Rój, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the field trials was to determine the influence of supercritical algal extracts on the growth and development of winter wheat (variety Akteur). As a raw material for the supercritical fluid extraction, the biomass of microalga Spirulina plantensis, brown seaweed - Ascophyllum nodosum and Baltic green macroalgae was used. Forthial and Asahi SL constituted the reference products. It was found that the tested biostimulants did not influence statistically significantly the plant height, length of ear, and shank length. The ear number per m(2) was the highest in the group where the Baltic macroalgae extract was applied in the dose 1.0 L/ha (statistically significant differences). Number of grains in ear (statistically significant differences) and shank length was the highest in the group treated with Spirulina at the dose 1.5 L/ha. In the group with Ascophyllum at the dose 1.0 L/ha, the highest length of ear was observed. The yield was comparable in all the experimental groups (lack of statistically significant differences). Among the tested supercritical extracts, the best results were obtained for Spirulina (1.5 L/ha). The mass of 1000 grains was the highest for extract from Baltic macroalgae and was 3.5% higher than for Asahi, 4.0% higher than for Forthial and 18.5% higher than for the control group (statistically significant differences). Future work is needed to fully characterize the chemical composition of the applied algal extracts. A special attention should be paid to the extracts obtained from Baltic algae because they are inexpensive source of naturally occurring bioactive compounds, which can be used in sustainable agriculture and horticulture.

  19. Physical activity for osteoarthritis management: a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating hydrotherapy or Tai Chi classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Marlene; Nairn, Lillias; Winstanley, Julie; Lam, Paul; Edmonds, John

    2007-04-15

    To determine whether Tai Chi or hydrotherapy classes for individuals with chronic symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) result in measurable clinical benefits. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among 152 older persons with chronic symptomatic hip or knee OA. Participants were randomly allocated for 12 weeks to hydrotherapy classes (n = 55), Tai Chi classes (n = 56), or a waiting list control group (n = 41). Outcomes were assessed 12 and 24 weeks after randomization and included pain and physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), general health status (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 Health Survey [SF-12], version 2), psychological well-being, and physical performance (Up and Go test, 50-foot walk time, timed stair climb). At 12 weeks, compared with controls, participants allocated to hydrotherapy classes demonstrated mean improvements (95% confidence interval) of 6.5 (0.4, 12.7) and 10.5 (3.6, 14.5) for pain and physical function scores (range 0-100), respectively, whereas participants allocated to Tai Chi classes demonstrated improvements of 5.2 (-0.8, 11.1) and 9.7 (2.8, 16.7), respectively. Both class allocations achieved significant improvements in the SF-12 physical component summary score, but only allocation to hydrotherapy achieved significant improvements in the physical performance measures. All significant improvements were sustained at 24 weeks. In this almost exclusively white sample, class attendance was higher for hydrotherapy, with 81% attending at least half of the available 24 classes, compared with 61% for Tai Chi. Access to either hydrotherapy or Tai Chi classes can provide large and sustained improvements in physical function for many older, sedentary individuals with chronic hip or knee OA.

  20. Evaluation of the interdisciplinary PSYMEPHY treatment on patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Josune; Torre, Fernando; Aguirre, Urko; González, Nerea; Padierna, Angel; Matellanes, Begoña; Quintana, José Ma

    2014-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disorder that can have a devastating effect on patients' lives. This study assessed the efficacy of a 6-week interdisciplinary treatment that combines coordinated PSYchological, Medical, Educational, and PHYsiotherapeutic interventions (PSYMEPHY) compared with standard pharmacologic care. The study was a randomized controlled trial (54 participants in the PSYMEPHY group and 56 in the control group [CG] ) with follow-up at 6 months. PSYMEPHY patients were also assessed at 12 months. The main outcomes were changes in total Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, pain, fatigue, morning tiredness, anxiety, and use of pain coping strategies as measured by the FIQ, the visual analog scale, and the Coping with Chronic Pain Questionnaire. After the 6-month assessment, patients in the CG were offered the PSYMEPHY treatment, and completed all of the instruments immediately after treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up visits (N = 93). Subjects received therapy at two different outpatient clinical locations. Fibromyalgia patients. Six months after the intervention, significant improvements in total FIQ score (P = 0.04), and pain (P = 0.03) were seen in the PSYMEPHY group compared with controls. Twelve months after the intervention, all patients in the PSYMEPHY group maintained statistically significant improvements in total FIQ score, and pain, and showed an improvement in fatigue, rested, anxiety, and current pain compared with baseline. Data from the control patients who underwent the PSYMEPHY intervention corroborated the initial results. This study highlights the beneficial effects of an interdisciplinary treatment for FM patients in a hospital pain management unit. A 6-week interdisciplinary intervention showed significant improvement in key domains of fibromyalgia, as quality of life, pain, fatigue, rested, and anxiety at 12 months. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Five-Kilometers Time Trial: Preliminary Validation of a Short Test for Cycling Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Jose Luiz; Pereira, Gleber; Nakamura, Fabio Yuzo

    2015-09-01

    The five-kilometer time trial (TT5km) has been used to assess aerobic endurance performance without further investigation of its validity. This study aimed to perform a preliminary validation of the TT5km to rank well-trained cyclists based on aerobic endurance fitness and assess changes of the aerobic endurance performance. After the incremental test, 20 cyclists (age = 31.3 ± 7.9 years; body mass index = 22.7 ± 1.5 kg/m(2); maximal aerobic power = 360.5 ± 49.5 W) performed the TT5km twice, collecting performance (time to complete, absolute and relative power output, average speed) and physiological responses (heart rate and electromyography activity). The validation criteria were pacing strategy, absolute and relative reliability, validity, and sensitivity. Sensitivity index was obtained from the ratio between the smallest worthwhile change and typical error. The TT5km showed high absolute (coefficient of variation 0.95) reliability of performance variables, whereas it presented low reliability of physiological responses. The TT5km performance variables were highly correlated with the aerobic endurance indices obtained from incremental test (r > 0.70). These variables showed adequate sensitivity index (> 1). TT5km is a valid test to rank the aerobic endurance fitness of well-trained cyclists and to differentiate changes on aerobic endurance performance. Coaches can detect performance changes through either absolute (± 17.7 W) or relative power output (± 0.3 W.kg(-1)), the time to complete the test (± 13.4 s) and the average speed (± 1.0 km.h(-1)). Furthermore, TT5km performance can also be used to rank the athletes according to their aerobic endurance fitness.

  2. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Zwerenz

    Full Text Available Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress.In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG. The control group (CG received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE, and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months and at follow-up (12 months. We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group.N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74% and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG.Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  3. Evaluating a Website to Teach Children Safety with Dogs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Schwebel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dog bites represent a significant threat to child health. Theory-driven interventions scalable for broad dissemination are sparse. A website was developed to teach children dog safety via increased knowledge, improved cognitive skills in relevant domains, and increased perception of vulnerability to bites. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 69 children aged 4–5 randomly assigned to use the dog safety website or a control transportation safety website for ~3 weeks. Assessment of dog safety knowledge and behavior plus skill in three relevant cognitive constructs (impulse control, noticing details, and perspective-taking was conducted both at baseline and following website use. The dog safety website incorporated interactive games, instructional videos including testimonials, a motivational rewards system, and messaging to parents concerning child lessons. Our results showed that about two-thirds of the intervention sample was not adherent to website use at home, so both intent-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were conducted. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded mostly null results. Per-protocol analyses suggested children compliant to the intervention protocol scored higher on knowledge and recognition of safe behavior with dogs following the intervention compared to the control group. Adherent children also had improved scores post-intervention on the cognitive skill of noticing details compared to the control group. We concluded that young children’s immature cognition can lead to dog bites. Interactive eHealth training on websites shows potential to teach children relevant cognitive and safety skills to reduce risk. Compliance to website use is a challenge, and some relevant cognitive skills (e.g., noticing details may be more amenable to computer-based training than others (e.g., impulse control.

  4. Evaluation of a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to support return to work: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerenz, Rüdiger; Becker, Jan; Gerzymisch, Katharina; Siepmann, Martin; Holme, Martin; Kiwus, Ulrich; Spörl-Dönch, Sieglinde; Beutel, Manfred E

    2017-01-01

    Given their flexibility, online interventions may be useful as an outpatient treatment option to support vocational reintegration after inpatient rehabilitation. To that purpose we devised a transdiagnostic psychodynamic online intervention to facilitate return to work, focusing on interpersonal conflicts at the workplace often responsible for work-related stress. In a randomized controlled trial, we included employed patients from cardiologic, psychosomatic and orthopedic rehabilitation with work-related stress or need for support at intake to inpatient rehabilitation after they had given written consent to take part in the study. Following discharge, maladaptive interpersonal interactions at the workplace were identified via weekly blogs and processed by written therapeutic comments over 12 weeks in the intervention group (IG). The control group (CG) received an augmented treatment as usual condition. The main outcome, subjective prognosis of gainful employment (SPE), and secondary outcomes (psychological complaints) were assessed by means of online questionnaires before, at the end of aftercare (3 months) and at follow-up (12 months). We used ITT analyses controlling for baseline scores and medical group. N = 319 patients were enrolled into IG and N = 345 into CG. 77% of the IG logged in to the webpage (CG 74%) and 65% of the IG wrote blogs. Compared to the CG, the IG reported a significantly more positive SPE at follow-up. Measures of depression, anxiety and psychosocial stressors decreased from baseline to follow-up, whereas the corresponding scores increased in the CG. Correspondingly, somatization and psychological quality of life improved in the IG. Psychodynamic online aftercare was effective to enhance subjective prognosis of future employment and improved psychological complaints across a variety of chronic physical and psychological conditions, albeit with small effect sizes.

  5. Evaluating a Website to Teach Children Safety with Dogs: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwebel, David C.; Li, Peng; McClure, Leslie A.; Severson, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Dog bites represent a significant threat to child health. Theory-driven interventions scalable for broad dissemination are sparse. A website was developed to teach children dog safety via increased knowledge, improved cognitive skills in relevant domains, and increased perception of vulnerability to bites. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 69 children aged 4–5 randomly assigned to use the dog safety website or a control transportation safety website for ~3 weeks. Assessment of dog safety knowledge and behavior plus skill in three relevant cognitive constructs (impulse control, noticing details, and perspective-taking) was conducted both at baseline and following website use. The dog safety website incorporated interactive games, instructional videos including testimonials, a motivational rewards system, and messaging to parents concerning child lessons. Our results showed that about two-thirds of the intervention sample was not adherent to website use at home, so both intent-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were conducted. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded mostly null results. Per-protocol analyses suggested children compliant to the intervention protocol scored higher on knowledge and recognition of safe behavior with dogs following the intervention compared to the control group. Adherent children also had improved scores post-intervention on the cognitive skill of noticing details compared to the control group. We concluded that young children’s immature cognition can lead to dog bites. Interactive eHealth training on websites shows potential to teach children relevant cognitive and safety skills to reduce risk. Compliance to website use is a challenge, and some relevant cognitive skills (e.g., noticing details) may be more amenable to computer-based training than others (e.g., impulse control). PMID:27918466

  6. Randomized, placebo controlled, double blind trial evaluating early pregnancy phytonutrient supplementation in the prevention of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, M R; Martin, J N; Lamarca, B B; Ellis, B; Parrish, S A; Owens, M Y; May, W L

    2013-08-01

    Daily provision of pregnant patients with dietary supplements containing antioxidants and phytonutrients, if initiated in the first trimester of pregnancy and continued throughout the gestation, may significantly decrease the incidence of preeclampsia. We conducted a single center, randomized, placebo-controlled investigation in which women were randomized by their risk status and assigned to daily ingestion of a supplement consisting primarily of a blended fruit and vegetable juice powder concentrate or placebo. Of the 684 patients randomized to the trial, 267 (39.0%) completed it. The final analysis is based on those participants who completed the study. For the primary outcome of preeclampsia, there was no difference observed between the phytonutrient supplement group and the placebo group: 15.9% vs 16.3%, respectively, (R.R. 0.97 (0.56-1.69)). Non-significant trends toward lower placenta-related obstetrical complications were observed in the supplement group compared with the placebo cohort (8.3% vs 15.5%, respectively, (R.R. 0.57 (0.29-1.14). Those infants born to mothers taking the supplement in the high-risk stratified group demonstrated non-significant trends toward lower rates of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS); 5.3% in the supplement group vs 15.4% in the placebo group: R.R. 0.34 (0.12-1.01). Initiation of antioxidant/phytonutrient supplementation in the first trimester did not decrease rates of preeclampsia. Non-significant trends toward lower incidences of placental derived morbidity in those mothers taking the supplement in addition to decreased rates of RDS in infants born to supplemented mothers considered to be high-risk for preeclampsia, warrant further investigation.

  7. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro Daniel E; Weydert Joy A; Acra Sari A; Monheim Cynthia J; Chambers Andrea S; Ball Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, an...

  8. Characterization of renal biomarkers for use in clinical trials: biomarker evaluation in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brott, David A; Adler, Scott H; Arani, Ramin; Lovick, Susan C; Pinches, Mark; Furlong, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    Background Several preclinical urinary biomarkers have been qualified and accepted by the health authorities (US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency) for detecting drug-induced kidney injury during preclinical toxicologic testing. Validated human assays for many of these biomarkers have become commercially available, and this study was designed to characterize some of the novel clinical renal biomarkers. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical renal biomarkers in a typical Phase I healthy volunteer population to determine confidence intervals (pilot reference intervals), intersubject and intrasubject variability, effects of food intake, effect of sex, and vendor assay comparisons. Methods Spot urine samples from 20 male and 19 female healthy volunteers collected on multiple days were analyzed using single analyte and multiplex assays. The following analytes were measured: α-1-microglobulin, β-2-microglobulin, calbindin, clusterin, connective tissue growth factor, creatinine, cystatin C, glutathione S-transferase-α, kidney injury marker-1, microalbumin, N-acetyl-β-(D) glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, osteopontin, Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, trefoil factor 3, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Results Confidence intervals were determined from the single analyte and multiplex assays. Intersubject and intrasubject variability ranged from 38% to 299% and from 29% to 82% for biomarker concentration, and from 24% to 331% and from 10% to 67% for biomarker concentration normalized to creatinine, respectively. There was no major effect of food intake or sex. Single analyte and multiplex assays correlated with r2≥0.700 for five of six biomarkers when evaluating biomarker concentration, but for only two biomarkers when evaluating concentration normalized to creatinine. Conclusion Confidence intervals as well as

  9. A multicenter prospective trial evaluating fetal bovine dermal graft (Xenform? Matrix) for pelvic reconstructive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Oscar A; Naughton Martin J; Maccarone Joseph; Goldstein Howard B; Patel Rakesh C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A prospective multicenter clinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a bovine dermal graft (Xenform® Matrix, Boston Scientific, Natick, MA, USA) during vaginal reconstructive surgery. Methods Forty-five women with ICS stage 2 or higher pelvic organ prolapse (POP) were enrolled at 4 centers. POP-Q, pelvic floor function (PFDI-20), sexual function (PISQ-12), and patient satisfaction tools were used to assess subjects at baseline, and at 2 and 6 weeks...

  10. Evaluating pelvic examination training: does faculty involvement make a difference? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Archana; Ebert, Gary; Brug, Pamela; Swee, David; Ananth, Cande V

    2010-10-01

    As medical schools continue to strive to deliver high quality education with diminishing resources, the need to evaluate long-standing teaching techniques becomes imperative. The use of gynecological teaching associates to teach pelvic exam skills to medical students is an example of an education intervention that deserves thorough evaluation. The objective was to evaluate effects of two pelvic examination training methods on OB/GYN clerkship students with respect to costs, students' performance, and perception. During the academic year 2007-08, 106 medical students were randomized to receive either pelvic examination training by a gynecological teaching associate (GTA) alone or a standardized patient (SP) accompanied by an obstetrics and gynecology faculty member. Students participated in an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) and completed questionnaires regarding the educational intervention at the end of the clerkship. The two training methods produced comparable OSCE scores, and students in both groups felt more confident after training and found the training sessions to be valuable. There was a significant cost-savings associated with using GTAs for pelvic exam training. Faculty time and effort need not be utilized for pelvic exam training exercises, since using GTAs for pelvic exam training produces comparable results.

  11. Interrupted or continuous slowly absorbable sutures – Design of a multi-centre randomised trial to evaluate abdominal closure techniques INSECT-Trial [ISRCTN24023541

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büchler Markus W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The closure of the abdomen after median laparotomy is still a matter of debate among surgeons. Further well designed and performed randomised controlled trials determining the optimal method of abdominal fascial closure are needed. Design This is a three armed, multi-centre, intra-operatively randomised, controlled, patient blinded trial. Over 20 surgical departments will enrol 600 patients who are planned for an elective primary abdominal operation. The objective of this study is to compare the frequency of abdominal incisional hernias between two continuous suture techniques with different, slowly absorbable monofilament materials and an interrupted suture using an absorbable braided suture material at one year postoperatively. Conclusion This trial will answer the question whether the continuous abdominal wall closure with a slowly absorbable material with longitudinal elasticity is superior to the continuous suture with a material lacking elasticity and to interrupted sutures with braided thread.

  12. Economic evaluation of an extended nutritional intervention in older Australian hospitalized patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Thompson, Campbell; Miller, Michelle; Shahi, Rashmi; Hakendorf, Paul; Horwood, Chris; Kaambwa, Billingsley

    2018-02-05

    Prevalence of malnutrition in older hospitalized patients is 30%. Malnutrition is associated with poor clinical outcomes in terms of high morbidity and mortality and is costly for hospitals. Extended nutrition interventions improve clinical outcomes but limited studies have investigated whether these interventions are cost-effective. In this randomized controlled trial, 148 malnourished general medical patients ≥60 years were recruited and randomized to receive either an extended nutritional intervention or usual care. Nutrition intervention was individualized and started with 24 h of admission and was continued for 3 months post-discharge with a monthly telephone call whereas control patients received usual care. Nutrition status was confirmed by Patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was measured using EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D-5 L) questionnaire at admission and at 3-months follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted for the primary outcome (incremental costs per unit improvement in PG-SGA) while a cost-utility analysis (CUA) was undertaken for the secondary outcome (incremental costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained). Nutrition status and HRQoL improved in intervention patients. Mean per included patient Australian Medicare costs were lower in intervention group compared to control arm (by $907) but these differences were not statistically significant (95% CI: -$2956 to $4854). The main drivers of higher costs in the control group were higher inpatient ($13,882 versus $13,134) and drug ($838 versus $601) costs. After adjusting outcomes for baseline differences and repeated measures, the intervention was more effective than the control with patients in this arm reporting QALYs gained that were higher by 0.0050 QALYs gained per patient (95% CI: -0.0079 to 0.0199). The probability of the intervention being cost-effective at willingness to pay values as low as $1000 per unit

  13. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

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    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  14. Evaluation of the "Early" Use of Albumin in Children with Extensive Burns: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Müller Dittrich, Maria Helena; Brunow de Carvalho, Werther; Lopes Lavado, Edson

    2016-06-01

    To compare early versus delayed albumin resuscitation in children with burns in terms of clinical outcome and response. Randomized controlled trial. Burn center at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Forty-six children aged 1-12 years with burns greater than 15-45% total body surface area admitted within 12 hours of burn injury. Fluid resuscitation was based on the Parkland formula (3 mL/kg/% total body surface area), adjusted according to urine output. Patients received 5% albumin solution between 8 and 12 hours post burn in the intervention group (n = 23) and 24 hours post burn in the control group (n = 23). Both groups were assessed for reduction in crystalloid fluid infusion during resuscitation, development of fluid creep, and length of hospital stay. There was no difference between groups regarding age, weight, sex, % total body surface area, cause of burn, or severity scores. The median crystalloid fluid volume required during the first 3 days post burn was lower in the intervention than in the control group (2.04 vs 3.05 mL/kg/% total body surface area; p = 0.025 on day 1; 1.2 vs 1.71 mL/kg/% total body surface area; p = 0.002 on day 2; and 0.82 vs 1.3 mL/kg/% total body surface area; p = 0.002 on day 3). The median urine output showed no difference between intervention and control groups (2.1 vs 2.0 mL/kg/hr; p = 0.152 on day 1; 2.58 vs 2.54 mL/kg/hr; p = 0.482 on day 2; and 2.9 vs 3.0 mL/kg/hr; p = 0.093 on day 3). Fluid creep was observed in 13 controls (56.5%) and in one patient (4.3%) in the intervention group. The median length of hospital stay was 18 days (range, 15-21 d) for controls and 14 days (range, 10-17 d) in the intervention group (p = 0.004). Early albumin infusion in children with burns greater than 15-45% total body surface area reduced the need for crystalloid fluid infusion during resuscitation. Significantly fewer cases of fluid creep and shorter hospital stay were also observed in this group of patients.

  15. Looking inside the black box: results of a theory-based process evaluation exploring the results of a randomized controlled trial of printed educational messages to increase primary care physicians' diabetic retinopathy referrals [Trial registration number ISRCTN72772651].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Presseau, Justin; Tetroe, Jacqueline; Eccles, Martin P; Francis, Jill J; Godin, Gaston; Graham, Ian D; Hux, Janet E; Johnston, Marie; Légaré, France; Lemyre, Louise; Robinson, Nicole; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-08-06

    Theory-based process evaluations conducted alongside randomized controlled trials provide the opportunity to investigate hypothesized mechanisms of action of interventions, helping to build a cumulative knowledge base and to inform the interpretation of individual trial outcomes. Our objective was to identify the underlying causal mechanisms in a cluster randomized trial of the effectiveness of printed educational materials (PEMs) to increase referral for diabetic retinopathy screening. We hypothesized that the PEMs would increase physicians' intention to refer patients for retinal screening by strengthening their attitude and subjective norm, but not their perceived behavioral control. Design: A theory based process evaluation alongside the Ontario Printed Educational Material (OPEM) cluster randomized trial. Postal surveys based on the Theory of Planned Behavior were sent to a random sample of trial participants two months before and six months after they received the intervention. Setting: Family physicians in Ontario, Canada. Participants: 1,512 family physicians (252 per intervention group) from the OPEM trial were invited to participate, and 31.3% (473/1512) responded at time one and time two. The final sample comprised 437 family physicians fully completing questionnaires at both time points. Main Outcome Measures: Primary: behavioral intention related to referring patient for retinopathy screening; secondary: attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control. At baseline, family physicians reported positive intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control to advise patients about retinopathy screening suggesting limited opportunities for improvement in these constructs. There were no significant differences on intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control following the intervention. Respondents also reported additional physician- and patient-related factors perceived to influence whether patients received

  16. Systematic review of the methodological quality of controlled trials evaluating Chinese herbal medicine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Song, Juhee; Pratt, Gregory; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We appraised the methodological and reporting quality of randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design For this systematic review, electronic databases were searched from inception until June 2015. The search was limited to humans and non-case report studies, but was not limited by language, year of publication or type of publication. Two independent reviewers selected RCTs, evaluating CHM in RA (herbals and decoctions). Descriptive statistics were used to report on risk of bias and their adherence to reporting standards. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine study characteristics associated with high or unclear risk of bias. Results Out of 2342 unique citations, we selected 119 RCTs including 18 919 patients: 10 108 patients received CHM alone and 6550 received one of 11 treatment combinations. A high risk of bias was observed across all domains: 21% had a high risk for selection bias (11% from sequence generation and 30% from allocation concealment), 85% for performance bias, 89% for detection bias, 4% for attrition bias and 40% for reporting bias. In multivariable analysis, fewer authors were associated with selection bias (allocation concealment), performance bias and attrition bias, and earlier year of publication and funding source not reported or disclosed were associated with selection bias (sequence generation). Studies published in non-English language were associated with reporting bias. Poor adherence to recommended reporting standards (<60% of the studies not providing sufficient information) was observed in 11 of the 23 sections evaluated. Limitations Study quality and data extraction were performed by one reviewer and cross-checked by a second reviewer. Translation to English was performed by one reviewer in 85% of the included studies. Conclusions Studies evaluating CHM often fail to

  17. Characterization of renal biomarkers for use in clinical trials: biomarker evaluation in healthy volunteers

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    Brott DA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available David A Brott,1 Scott H Adler,1 Ramin Arani,2 Susan C Lovick,3 Mark Pinches,4 Stephen T Furlong1 1Translational Patient Safety and Enabling Sciences, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 2AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE, USA; 3AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 4Global Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Macclesfield, Cheshire, UK Background: Several preclinical urinary biomarkers have been qualified and accepted by the health authorities (US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency for detecting drug-induced kidney injury during preclinical toxicologic testing. Validated human assays for many of these biomarkers have become commercially available, and this study was designed to characterize some of the novel clinical renal biomarkers. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical renal biomarkers in a typical Phase I healthy volunteer population to determine confidence intervals (pilot reference intervals, intersubject and intrasubject variability, effects of food intake, effect of sex, and vendor assay comparisons. Methods: Spot urine samples from 20 male and 19 female healthy volunteers collected on multiple days were analyzed using single analyte and multiplex assays. The following analytes were measured: α-1-microglobulin, β-2-microglobulin, calbindin, clusterin, connective tissue growth factor, creatinine, cystatin C, glutathione S-transferase-α, kidney injury marker-1, microalbumin, N-acetyl-β-(D glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, osteopontin, Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1, trefoil factor 3, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Results: Confidence intervals were determined from the single analyte and multiplex assays. Intersubject and intrasubject variability ranged from 38% to 299% and from 29% to 82% for biomarker concentration, and from 24% to 331% and from 10% to 67% for

  18. Barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace dietary interventions: process evaluation results of a cluster controlled trial.

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    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; McHugh, Sheena; Perry, Ivan J

    2016-04-21

    Ambiguity exists regarding the effectiveness of workplace dietary interventions. Rigorous process evaluation is vital to understand this uncertainty. This study was conducted as part of the Food Choice at Work trial which assessed the comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification intervention and an educational intervention both alone and in combination versus a control workplace. Effectiveness was assessed in terms of employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status in four large manufacturing workplaces. The study aimed to examine barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace interventions, from the perspectives of key workplace stakeholders and researchers involved in implementation. A detailed process evaluation monitored and evaluated intervention implementation. Interviews were conducted at baseline (27 interviews) and at 7-9 month follow-up (27 interviews) with a purposive sample of workplace stakeholders (managers and participating employees). Topic guides explored factors which facilitated or impeded implementation. Researchers involved in recruitment and data collection participated in focus groups at baseline and at 7-9 month follow-up to explore their perceptions of intervention implementation. Data were imported into NVivo software and analysed using a thematic framework approach. Four major themes emerged; perceived benefits of participation, negotiation and flexibility of the implementation team, viability and intensity of interventions and workplace structures and cultures. The latter three themes either positively or negatively affected implementation, depending on context. The implementation team included managers involved in coordinating and delivering the interventions and the researchers who collected data and delivered intervention elements. Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefits of participating, which facilitated implementation, included managers' desire to improve company

  19. Randomized controlled trials and real-world observational studies in evaluating cardiovascular safety of inhaled bronchodilator therapy in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Peter; Worsley, Sally; Singh, Dave; Román-Rodríguez, Miguel; Newby, David E; Müllerová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) or long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) bronchodilators and their combination are recommended for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although the efficacy of LAMAs and LABAs has been well established through randomized controlled trials (RCTs), questions remain regarding their cardiovascular (CV) safety. Furthermore, while the safety of LAMA and LABA monotherapy has been extensively studied, data are lacking for LAMA/LABA combination therapy, and the majority of the studies that have reported on the CV safety of LAMA/LABA combination therapy were not specifically designed to assess this. Evaluation of CV safety for COPD treatments is important because many patients with COPD have underlying CV comorbidities. However, severe CV and other comorbidities are often exclusion criteria for RCTs, contributing to a lack in external validity and generalizability. Real-world observational studies are another important tool to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of COPD therapies in a broader population of patients and can improve upon the external validity limitations of RCTs. We examine what is already known regarding the CV and cerebrovascular safety of LAMA/LABA combination therapy from RCTs and real-world observational studies, and explore the advantages and limitations of data derived from each study type. We also describe an ongoing prospective, observational, comparative post-authorization safety study of a LAMA/LABA combination therapy (umeclidinium/vilanterol) and LAMA monotherapy (umeclidinium) versus tiotropium, with a focus on the relative merits of the study design.

  20. The evolving design and methods for trials evaluating the safety of candidate vaginal microbicides: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespers, Vicky; Millwood, Iona Y; Poynten, I Mary; Van Damme, Lut; Kaldor, John M

    2013-09-01

    Vaginal preexposure prophylaxis is a promising biomedical tool for HIV prevention. Although guidelines for the clinical assessment of microbicides are available, validated markers for product safety are lacking. To inform future microbicide and multipurpose vaginal product research, we reviewed the current and past safety methods used. We searched the Cochrane, EMBASE, and Ovid MEDLINE databases for clinical studies of vaginal products for the prevention of HIV that included safety evaluations. Ninety-seven clinical studies involving 21 products were identified: 63 lasted 14 days or less, 19 were longer in duration, and 15 were effectivess studies that included also safety as an outcome. Median sample size in the safety studies was 48 participants (range, 10-799). All studies reported on urogenital endpoint, 71% included colposcopy, and 67% assessed the vaginal microflora. Markers of vaginal epithelial inflammation, systemic absorption, and systemic toxicology assessments were evaluated in 29%, 26%, and 43% of studies, respectively. Excluding the effectiveness studies, these same assessments were done before 1998 in 33%, 7%, and 27% and after 2001 in 38%, 44%, and 60% of studies, respectively. Soluble inflammatory markers were introduced after 2001. Adverse event collection was reported in 73% of studies before 1998 and in 98% after 2001. In a previous review, we recommended that larger and longer safety studies were necessary to detect clinically important toxicities and to provide assurance that agents are ready for large-scale effectiveness trials. Here, we propose a stepwise clinical assessment that can be used for future guidance.

  1. Evaluating research and impact: a bibliometric analysis of research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

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    Scott R Rosas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006-2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed.

  2. Evaluating Research and Impact: A Bibliometric Analysis of Research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Scott R.; Kagan, Jonathan M.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Slack, Perry A.; Trochim, William M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006–2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a) presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b) performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c) impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed. PMID:21394198

  3. Health economic evaluation of acupuncture along meridians for treating migraine in China: results from a randomized controlled trial

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    Deng Zhu-qing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate different types of acupuncture treatment for migraine in China from the perspective of health economics, particularly the comparison between treatment of specific acupoints in Shaoyang meridians and penetrating sham acupoints treatment. Methods Data were obtained from a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of acupuncture treatment in patients with migraine. Four-hundred eighty migraineurs were randomly assigned to 3 arms of treatment with genuine acupoints and 1 arm of penetrating sham acupoints. The primary outcome measurement was the cost-effectiveness ratio (C/E, expressed as cost per 1 day reduction of headache days from baseline to week 16. Cost-comparison analyses, differences in the migraine-specific quality of life questionnaire (MSQ, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were taken as secondary outcome measurements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results The total cost per patient was ¥1273.2 (95% CI 1171.3-1375.1 in the Shaoyang specific group, ¥1427.7 (95% CI 1311.8-1543.6 in the Shaoyang non-specific group, ¥1490.8 (95% CI 1327.1-1654.6 in the Yangming specific group, and ¥1470.1 (95% CI 1358.8-1581.3 in the sham acupuncture group. The reduced days with migraine were 3.972 ± 2.7, 3.555 ± 2.8, 3.793 ± 3.6, and 2.155 ± 3.7 in these 4 groups (P  Conclusions Treatment of specific acupoints in Shaoyang meridians is more cost-effective than that of non-acupoints, representing a dramatic improvement in the quality of life of people with migraine and a significant reduction in cost. Compared with the other 3 groups, Shaoyang-specific acupuncture is a relatively cost-effective treatment for migraine prophylaxis in China. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT00599586

  4. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

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    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  5. A cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinically integrated RHL evidence -based medicine course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulier, Regina; Khan, Khalid S; Gulmezoglu, A Metin; Carroli, Guillermo; Cecatti, Jose G; Germar, Maria J; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Mittal, Suneeta; Pattinson, Robert; Wolomby-Molondo, Jean-Jose; Bergh, Anne-Marie; May, Win

    2010-05-14

    Evidence-based health care requires clinicians to engage with use of evidence in decision-making at the workplace. A learner-centred, problem-based course that integrates e-learning in the clinical setting has been developed for application in obstetrics and gynaecology units. The course content uses the WHO reproductive health library (RHL) as the resource for systematic reviews. This project aims to evaluate a clinically integrated teaching programme for incorporation of evidence provided through the WHO RHL. The hypothesis is that the RHL-EBM (clinically integrated e-learning) course will improve participants' knowledge, skills and attitudes, as well as institutional practice and educational environment, as compared to the use of standard postgraduate educational resources for EBM teaching that are not clinically integrated. The study will be a multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial, carried out in seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand), involving 50-60 obstetrics and gynaecology teaching units. The trial will be carried out on postgraduate trainees in the first two years of their training. In the intervention group, trainees will receive the RHL-EBM course. The course consists of five modules, each comprising self-directed e-learning components and clinically related activities, assignments and assessments, coordinated between the facilitator and the postgraduate trainee. The course will take about 12 weeks, with assessments taking place pre-course and 4 weeks post-course. In the control group, trainees will receive electronic, self-directed EBM-teaching materials. All data collection will be online.The primary outcome measures are gain in EBM knowledge, change in attitudes towards EBM and competencies in EBM measured by multiple choice questions (MCQs) and a skills-assessing questionniare administered eletronically. These questions have been developed by using questions from

  6. Enhanced depression care for patients with acute coronary syndrome and persistent depressive symptoms: coronary psychosocial evaluation studies randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W; Rieckmann, Nina; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E; Shimbo, Daichi; Medina, Vivian; Albanese, Gabrielle; Kronish, Ian; Hegel, Mark; Burg, Matthew M

    2010-04-12

    Depressive symptoms are an established predictor of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (defined as nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization for unstable angina or urgent/emergency revascularizations) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study was conducted to determine the acceptability and efficacy of enhanced depression treatment in patients with ACS. A 3-month observation period to identify patients with ACS and persistent depressive symptoms was followed by a 6-month randomized controlled trial. From January 1, 2005, through February 29, 2008, 237 patients with ACS from 5 hospitals were enrolled, including 157 persistently depressed patients randomized to intervention (initial patient preference for problem-solving therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, then a stepped-care approach; 80 patients) or usual care (77 patients) and 80 nondepressed patients who underwent observational evaluation. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with depression care. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptom changes (assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory), major adverse cardiac events, and death. At the end of the trial, the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their depression care was higher in the intervention group (54% of 80) than in the usual care group (19% of 77) (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-12.9 [P < .001]). The Beck Depression Inventory score decreased significantly more (t(155) = 2.85 [P = .005]) for intervention patients (change, -5.7; 95% CI, -7.6 to -3.8; df = 155) than for usual care patients (change, -1.9; 95% CI, -3.8 to -0.1; df = 155); the depression effect size was 0.59 of the standard deviation. At the end of the trial, 3 intervention patients and 10 usual care patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events (4% and 13%, respectively; log-rank test, chi(2)(1) = 3.93 [P = .047]), as well as 5 nondepressed patients (6%) (for the intervention vs nondepressed cohort, chi(2)(1) = 0

  7. Comparison of 2 manual therapy and exercise protocols for cervical radiculopathy: a randomized clinical trial evaluating short-term effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Pierre; Desmeules, François; Lamothe, Mélanie; Robitaille, Simon; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Participant- and assessor-blinded randomized clinical trial. To compare a rehabilitation program thought to increase the size of the intervertebral foramen (IVF) of the affected nerve root to a rehabilitation program that doesn't include any specific techniques thought to increase the size of the IVF in patients presenting with cervical radiculopathy (CR). Clinical approaches for the treatment of CR commonly include exercises and manual therapy techniques thought to increase the size of the IVF, but evidence regarding the effectiveness of these specific manual therapy techniques is scarce. Thirty-six participants with CR were randomly assigned either to a group that received a manual therapy and exercise program aimed at increasing the size of the IVF of the affected nerve root (experimental group, n=18) or to a group that received a manual therapy and exercise program without the specific goal of increasing the size of the IVF of the affected level and side (comparison group, n=18). Primary (Neck Disability Index) and secondary (shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire [QuickDASH] and numeric pain-rating scale) outcomes were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the 4-week program (week 4), and 4 weeks later (week 8). A mixed-model, 2-way analysis of variance was used to analyze treatment effects. No significant group-by-time interaction or group effect was observed for Neck Disability Index, QuickDASH, and numeric pain-rating scale scores (P≥.14) following the intervention. However, both groups showed statistically and clinically significant improvement from baseline to week 4 and to week 8 in Neck Disability Index, QuickDASH, and numeric pain-rating scale scores (Pmanual therapy and exercises are effective in reducing pain and functional limitations related to CR. The addition of techniques thought to increase the size of the IVF of the affected nerve root yielded no significant additional benefits. Given the absence of

  8. A multicenter prospective trial evaluating fetal bovine dermal graft (Xenform® Matrix for pelvic reconstructive surgery

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    Aguirre Oscar A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prospective multicenter clinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a bovine dermal graft (Xenform® Matrix, Boston Scientific, Natick, MA, USA during vaginal reconstructive surgery. Methods Forty-five women with ICS stage 2 or higher pelvic organ prolapse (POP were enrolled at 4 centers. POP-Q, pelvic floor function (PFDI-20, sexual function (PISQ-12, and patient satisfaction tools were used to assess subjects at baseline, and at 2 and 6 weeks, and 3, 6 and 12 months post surgery. The significance of symptom score changes at 6 months and 1 year were determined by the t-test for paired data. Forty-three of the 45 patients completed the 12 month study. Results The majority of the subjects had cystocele (98% and/or rectocele (84% defects at study entry. At 12 months, 74% of the defects had improved to a stage 0 or 1. Mean PFDI-20 scores improved by 72% (p ®. One subject had severe pyelonephritis resulting in dialysis. This subject had a previous history of pyelonephritis, sepsis and acute renal failure. The third subject had a reported recurrent cystocele of moderate severity, possibly related to the device. No graft related erosions or pain lasting more than 30 days were reported. No subjects withdrew due to an adverse event. Conclusion This study is the first to investigate the use of Xenform® Matrix in vaginal reconstructive surgery among patients with POP. Significant improvement was maintained at 12 months utilizing both objective and subjective assessment tools, confirming the safety and efficacy of this material in vaginal surgery. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01244165

  9. Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial: baseline evaluation of selected nutrients and food group intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitolins, Mara Z; Anderson, Andrea M; Delahanty, Linda; Raynor, Hollie; Miller, Gary D; Mobley, Connie; Reeves, Rebecca; Yamamoto, Monica; Champagne, Catherine; Wing, Rena R; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    Little has been reported regarding food and nutrient intake in individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and most reports have been based on findings in select groups or individuals who self-reported having diabetes. To describe the baseline food and nutrient intake of the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial participants, compare participant intake to national guidelines, and describe demographic and health characteristics associated with food group consumption. The Look AHEAD trial is evaluating the effects of a lifestyle intervention (calorie control and increased physical activity for weight loss) compared with diabetes support and education on long-term cardiovascular and other health outcomes. Participants are 45 to 75 years old, overweight or obese (body mass index [BMI] > or = 25), and have type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional analysis, baseline food consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire from 2,757 participants between September 2000 and December 2003. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize intake by demographic characteristics. Kruskal-Wallis tests assessed univariate effects of characteristics on consumption. Multiple linear regression models assessed factors predictive of intake. Least square estimates were based on final models, and logistic regression determined factors predictive of recommended intake. Ninety-three percent of the participants exceeded the recommended percentage of calories from fat, 85% exceeded the saturated fat recommendation, and 92% consumed too much sodium. Also, fewer than half met the minimum recommended servings of fruit, vegetables, dairy, and grains. These participants with pre-existing diabetes did not meet recommended food and nutrition guidelines. These overweight adults diagnosed with diabetes are exceeding recommended intake of fat, saturated fats, and sodium, which may contribute to increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases.

  10. A phase I, dose-escalation trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of emulsified isoflurane in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Li, Rui; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Wensheng; Liao, Tianzhi; Yi, Xiaoqian

    2014-03-01

    This first-in-human volunteer phase I clinical trial aimed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and anesthesia efficacy of emulsified isoflurane (EI), an intravenously injectable formulation of isoflurane. Seventy-eight healthy volunteers were recruited in this open-label, single-bolus, dose-escalation, phase I trial and were allocated into 16 cohorts. Each volunteer received a single bolus injection of EI. The dose started with 0.3 mg/kg (for isoflurane) and was planned to end with 64.6 mg/kg. Postdose vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, 12-lead electrocardiogram, and development of any adverse event were closely monitored as safety measurements. Effectiveness in producing sedation/anesthesia was assessed by Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation and Bispectral Index. The dose escalation ended as planned. The most common adverse events associated with EI were injection pain (77 of 78, 98.7%) and transient tachycardia (22 of 78, 25.6%). Only at high doses (≥38.3 mg/kg) did EI cause transient hypotension (5 of 78, 6.4%) or apnea (11 of 78, 14.1%), but all the affected volunteers recovered uneventfully. Fast onset of unconsciousness (typically 40 s after injection) was developed in all volunteers receiving doses of 22.6 mg/kg or greater. Waking-up time and depression in Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation correlated well with EI dose. None of the postdose tests revealed any abnormal result. EI is safe for intravenous injection in human volunteers in the dose range of 0.3 to 64.6 mg/kg. At doses of 22.6 mg/kg or higher, EI produced rapid onset of unconsciousness in all volunteers followed by fast, predictable, and complete recovery.

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Nebulized N-Acetylcysteine on Respiratory Secretions in Mechanically Ventilated Patients: Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoom Masoompour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of our study was to evaluate an inexpensive and available method to reduce mucous impactions in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 40 mechanically ventilated patients aged 15-90 years. The patients were randomly allocated into two arms; 20 cases and 20 controls. The cases received N-acetylcysteine via their nebulizers, and the control group received normal saline three times a day for one day. We measured the density of respiratory secretion, plateau and peak airway pressures, and O2 saturation at baseline, 12 and 24 hours later. Results: Although the mean secretion density was significantly lower in the NAC group (F (1, 38=8.61, P=0.006, but a repeated measures ANOVA with a Greenhouse-Geisser correction determined that the effect of NAC on mean secretion density did not differ significantly between time points (F (1, 38=3.08, P=0.087. NAC increased O2 saturation significantly between time points (F (1.92, 73.1=4.6, P=0.014. The plateau airway pressures were relatively stable throughout the study in the normal saline and NAC groups (F (1.95, 37.1=0.67, P=0.513. The peak airway pressure did not change significantly during the study in the normal saline and NAC groups (F (1.52, 56.4=0.91, P=0.384. Conclusion: Considering the limitations of the study, nebulized NAC in mechanically ventilated patients was not effective more than normal saline nebulization in reducing the density of mucous plugs. The peak and plateau airway pressures were relatively stable throughout the study in both groups. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201104276312N1.

  12. Early versus late initiation of rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V; Bünger, Cody E; Fruensgaard, Soeren; Sogaard, Rikke

    2013-11-01

    Economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. To examine the cost-effectiveness of initiating rehabilitation 6 weeks after surgery as opposed to 12 weeks after surgery. In a previously reported randomized controlled trial, we assessed the impact of timing of rehabilitation after a lumbar spinal fusion and found that a fast-track strategy led to poorer functional ability. Before making recommendations, it seems relevant to address the societal perspective including return to work, quality of life, and costs. A cost-effectiveness analysis and a cost-utility analysis were conducted. Eighty-two patients undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion due to degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis (grade I or II) were randomized to an identical protocol of 4 sessions of group-based rehabilitation and were instructed in home exercises focusing on active stability training. Outcome parameters included functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index) and quality-adjusted life years. Health care and productivity costs were estimated from national registries and reported in euros. Costs and effects were transformed into net benefit. Bootstrapping was used to estimate 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The fast-track strategy tended to be costlier by €6869 (95% CI, -4640 to 18,378) while at the same time leading to significantly poorer outcomes of functional disability by -9 points (95% CI, -18 to -3) and a tendency for a reduced gain in quality-adjusted life years by -0.04 (95% CI, -0.13 to 0.01). The overall probability for the fast-track strategy being cost-effective does not reach 10% at conventional thresholds for cost-effectiveness. Initiating rehabilitation at 6 weeks as opposed to 12 weeks after surgery is on average more costly and less effective. The uncertainty of this result did not seem to be sensitive to methodological issues, and clinical managements who have already adapted fast-track rehabilitation

  13. Evaluation of the making sense of brain tumor program: a randomized controlled trial of a home-based psychosocial intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Tamara; Chambers, Suzanne; Damborg, Ea; Casey, Leanne; Walker, David G; Shum, David H K

    2015-05-01

    Despite significant psychosocial morbidity, there are few controlled trials of psychological support for people with brain tumor. This study evaluated the efficacy of the Making Sense of Brain Tumor (MSoBT) program, a home-based psychosocial intervention. A randomized controlled trial with a wait list condition Fifty participants aged 17-82 years with brain tumor (54% benign) were randomly allocated to immediate treatment (n = 27) or a waitlist (n = 23). Measures included Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), McGill Quality of Life (MQOL) Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br). The immediate treatment group received the 10-session MSoBT program, while the waitlist group received usual care for 10 weeks and were then re-assessed before receiving the MSoBT program. A 6-month post-intervention follow-up was conducted. Analysis of covariance adjusting for baseline functioning identified that the immediate treatment group reported significantly lower levels of depression on the MADRS (η(p)(2)  = .19) and higher levels of existential well-being on the MQOL (η(p)(2)  = .13) and functional well-being (η(p)(2)  = .21) and global quality of life on the FACT-Br (η(p)(2)  = .12) at post-assessment than the waitlist group. At 6-month follow-up participants reported significantly lower levels of depression and stress and higher existential well-being and quality of life relative to pre-intervention. The MSoBT program appears to have efficacy for enhancing psychological well-being and quality of life after brain tumor. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Randomized trial to evaluate indinavir/ritonavir versus saquinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients: the MaxCmin1 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Court

    2003-01-01

    This trial assessed the rate of virological failure at 48 weeks in adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients assigned indinavir/ritonavir (Idv/Rtv; 800/100 mg 2 times daily) or saquinavir/ritonavir (Sqv/Rtv; 1000/100 mg 2 times daily) in an open-label, randomized (1:1...

  15. Clinical trial methodology and clinical cohorts: the importance of complete follow-up in trials evaluating the virological efficacy of anti-HIV medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: It has been common practice in randomized trials of HIV medicines to classify switches away from the original therapy as failures in analyses of virological effect, in line with an HIV-RNA measurement above a given level of quantification. This approach precludes the ability...

  16. Evaluation of Isosorbide Mononitrate for Preinduction of Cervical Ripening: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Krishnamurthy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Isosorbide mononitrate (IMN as a cervical ripening agent prior to induction of labour in term pregnant women.A randomized placebo-controlled study was conducted on 100 term singleton pregnancies planned for induction of labour. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received 40 mg IMN and the other group received 40mg of placebo kept vaginally. The main outcome of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of IMN in cervical ripening based on the change in modified Bishop score and the effect on time duration between the drug insertion and delivery. Safety of isosorbide mononitrate was assessed by measuring variables related to maternal and neonatal outcomes.Baseline demographic characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean change in modified Bishop score after 2 doses of 40mg IMN was insignificant when compared to placebo. Though IMN shortened the time duration between the drug insertion to delivery when compared to placebo, it was statistically insignificant. The need for oxytocin and 2(nd ripening agent was less in IMN group when compared to placebo group but statistically this also proved to be insignificant. It was noted that there was an increase in caesarean deliveries in IMN than in placebo group. IMN did not cause any significant change in maternal hemodynamics and adverse side effects. Though NICU admission and stay was less in IMN than in placebo group, it was statistically insignificant.Though IMN did not cause any maternal and neonatal adverse effects, it was found to be inefficient in comparison to placebo as a cervical ripening agent.

  17. Evaluation of Acid Digestion Procedures to Estimate Mineral Contents in Materials from Animal Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. N. Palma

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rigorously standardized laboratory protocols are essential for meaningful comparison of data from multiple sites. Considering that interactions of minerals with organic matrices may vary depending on the material nature, there could be peculiar demands for each material with respect to digestion procedure. Acid digestion procedures were evaluated using different nitric to perchloric acid ratios and one- or two-step digestion to estimate the concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in samples of carcass, bone, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Six procedures were evaluated: ratio of nitric to perchloric acid at 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 v/v in a one- or two-step digestion. There were no direct or interaction effects (p>0.01 of nitric to perchloric acid ratio or number of digestion steps on magnesium and zinc contents. Calcium and phosphorus contents presented a significant (p0.01 calcium or phosphorus contents in carcass, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Number of digestion steps did not affect mineral content (p>0.01. Estimated concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in carcass, excreta, concentrated, forage, and feces samples can be performed using digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 4:1 v/v in a one-step digestion. However, samples of bones demand a stronger digestion solution to analyze the mineral contents, which is represented by an increased proportion of perchloric acid, being recommended a digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 2:1 v/v in a one-step digestion.

  18. GATEWAY Report: Tuning the Light in Classrooms: Evaluating Trial LED Lighting Systems in Three Classrooms at the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-29

    The GATEWAY program evaluated a trial installation of tunable-white LED lighting systems in three classrooms in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX. The report provides valuable insights into the use of this technology in a real-world setting.

  19. Effect of early intervention on functional outcome at school age : Follow-up and process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial in infants at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Hielkema, Tjitske; Bos, Arend F.; Dirks, Tineke; Hooijsma, Siebrigje; Reinders-Messelink, Heelen; Toonen, Rivka F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background: The long-term effect of early intervention in infants at risk for developmental disorders is unclear. The VIP project (n = 46, originally) evaluated by means of a randomised controlled trial the effect of the family centred early intervention programme COPCA (Coping with and Caring for

  20. Does physiotherapeutic intervention affect motor outcome in high-risk infants? An approach combining a randomized controlled trial and process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hielkema, Tjitske; Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H.; Dirks, Tineke; Drijver-Messelink, Marieke; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    AIM The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intervention in infants at risk of developmental disorders onmotor outcome, as measured by the InfantMotor Profile (IMP) and using the combined approach of a randomized controlled trial and process evaluation. METHOD At a corrected age of 3

  1. Pragmatic Pilot Cluster Randomised Control Trial of a School-Based Peer-Led Anti-Smoking Intervention for 13-14 Year Olds in Malaysia: Process Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, Elniee; Bridle, Christopher; Markham, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the process evaluation of a pilot randomised control trial of an anti-smoking intervention for Malaysian 13-14-year olds, conducted in 2011/2012. It was hypothesised that trained peer supporters would promote non-smoking among classmates through informal conversations. Design/methodology/approach:…

  2. Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Intervention Delivered by Educators for Children with Speech Sound Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Baker, Elise; McCormack, Jane; Wren, Yvonne; Roulstone, Sue; Crowe, Kathryn; Masso, Sarah; White, Paul; Howland, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-assisted input-based intervention for children with speech sound disorders (SSD). Method: The Sound Start Study was a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Seventy-nine early childhood centers were invited to participate, 45 were recruited, and 1,205 parents and educators of 4- and…

  3. Lessons learnt from a cluster-randomised trial evaluating the effectiveness of Self-Management Support (SMS) delivered by practice nurses in routine diabetes care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.; van Bokhoven, M.A.; Winkens, B.; Terluin, B.; Knottnerus, J.A.; van der Weijden, T.; van Eijk, J.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of biopsychosocial Self-Management Support (SMS) delivered by practice nurses in routine diabetes care. Design: A pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial within a hybrid effectiveness-implementation study design. Practice nurses were cluster-randomised.

  4. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin (interleukin-2) in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT): geographical and gender differences in the baseline characteristics of participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pett, S. L.; Wand, H.; Law, M. G.; Arduino, R.; Lopez, J. C.; Knysz, B.; Pereira, L. C.; Pollack, S.; Reiss, P.; Tambussi, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ESPRIT, is a phase III, open-label, randomized, international clinical trial evaluating the effects of subcutaneous recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) plus antiretroviral therapy (ART) versus ART alone on HIV-disease progression and death in HIV-1-infected individuals with CD4+ T-cells >

  5. GATEWAY Report Brief: Tuning the Light in Classrooms: Evaluating Trial LED Lighting Systems in Three Classrooms at the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-29

    Summary of GATEWAY report evaluating a trial installation of tunable-white LED lighting systems in three classrooms in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District in Carrollton, TX. The report provides valuable insights into the use of this technology in a real-world setting.

  6. Effect of early intervention on functional outcome at school age: Follow-up and process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial in infants at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, E.G.; Hielkema, T.; Bos, A.F; Dirks, T.; Hooijsma, S.J.; Reinders-Messelink, H.A.; Toonen, R.F.; Hadders-Algra, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The long-term effect of early intervention in infants at risk for developmental disorders is unclear. The VIP project (n=46, originally) evaluated by means of a randomised controlled trial the effect of the family centred early intervention programme COPCA (Coping with and Caring for

  7. Exploiting the intra-subject latency variability from single-trial event-related potentials in the P3 time range: A review and comparative evaluation of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Guang; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong

    2017-04-01

    The intra-subject variability (ISV) in brain responses during cognitive processing across experimental trials has been recognised as an important facet of neural functionality reflecting an intrinsic neurophysiological characteristic of the brain. In recent decades, ISV in behaviour has been found to be significantly associated with cognitive functioning varying across individuals, development, ages, and pathological conditions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) measured in single trials are important tools for characterizing ISV at the neural level. However, due to the overlapping spectra of noise and signals, the retrieval of information from single-trial ERPs related to cognitive processing has been a challenge. We review the major problems that researchers face in the estimation of ISV in single-trial ERPs. Then, we present an extensive evaluation of several methods of single-trial latency estimation based on both simulated and real data. The relationships of ISV in ERPs and reaction times are compared between the different single-trial methods to assess their relative efficiency in predicting task performance from neural signals. The pros and cons of the methods are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A comprehensive evaluation of the impact of telemonitoring in patients with long-term conditions and social care needs: protocol for the whole systems demonstrator cluster randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Peter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is expected that increased demands on services will result from expanding numbers of older people with long-term conditions and social care needs. There is significant interest in the potential for technology to reduce utilisation of health services in these patient populations, including telecare (the remote, automatic and passive monitoring of changes in an individual's condition or lifestyle and telehealth (the remote exchange of data between a patient and health care professional. The potential of telehealth and telecare technology to improve care and reduce costs is limited by a lack of rigorous evidence of actual impact. Methods/Design We are conducting a large scale, multi-site study of the implementation, impact and acceptability of these new technologies. A major part of the evaluation is a cluster-randomised controlled trial of telehealth and telecare versus usual care in patients with long-term conditions or social care needs. The trial involves a number of outcomes, including health care utilisation and quality of life. We describe the broad evaluation and the methods of the cluster randomised trial Discussion If telehealth and telecare technology proves effective, it will provide additional options for health services worldwide to deliver care for populations with high levels of need. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN43002091

  9. Within-trial economic evaluation of diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes and subthreshold depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohmann Christian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high prevalence of subthreshold depression in patients with type 2 diabetes, evidence on cost-effectiveness of different therapy options for these patients is currently lacking. Methods/Design Within-trial economic evaluation of the diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour therapy for subthreshold depression. Patients with diabetes and subthreshold depression are randomly assigned to either 2 weeks of diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour group therapy (n = 104 or to standard diabetes education programme only (n = 104. Patients are followed for 12 months. During this period data on total health sector costs, patient costs and societal productivity costs are collected in addition to clinical data. Health related quality of life (the SF-36 and the EQ-5D is measured at baseline, immediately after the intervention, at 6 and at 12 months after the intervention. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs, and cumulative costs will be estimated for each arm of the trial. Cost-effectiveness of the diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour group therapy will be analysed from the perspective of the German statutory health insurance and from the societal perspective. To this end, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER in terms of cost per QALY gained will be calculated. Discussion Some methodological issues of the described economic evaluation are discussed. Trial registration The trial has been registered at the Clinical Trials Register (NCT01009138.

  10. Manufacturing and use of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials: Establishment and evaluation of a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been utilised in many clinical trials as an experimental treatment in numerous clinical settings. Bone marrow remains the traditional source tissue for MSCs but is relatively hard to access in large volumes. Alternatively, MSCs may be derived from other tissues including the placenta and adipose tissue. In an initial study no obvious differences in parameters such as cell surface phenotype, chemokine receptor display, mesodermal differentiation capacity or immunosuppressive ability, were detected when we compared human marrow derived- MSCs to human placenta-derived MSCs. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a protocol and related processes for preparation placenta-derived MSCs for early phase clinical trials. Methods. A full-term placenta was taken after delivery of the baby as a source of MSCs. Isolation, seeding, incubation, cryopreservation of human placentaderived MSCs and used production release criteria were in accordance with the complex regulatory requirements applicable to Code of Good Manufacturing Practice manufacturing of ex vivo expanded cells. Results. We established and evaluated instructions for MSCs preparation protocol and gave an overview of the three clinical areas application. In the first trial, MSCs were co-transplanted iv to patient receiving an allogeneic cord blood transplant as therapy for treatmentrefractory acute myeloid leukemia. In the second trial, MSCs were administered iv in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and without serious adverse effects. In the third trial, MSCs were injected directly into the site of tendon damage using ultrasound guidance in the treatment of chronic refractory tendinopathy. Conclusion. Clinical trials using both allogeneic and autologous cells demonstrated MSCs to be safe. A described protocol for human placenta-derived MSCs is appropriate for use in a clinical setting, relatively inexpensive and can be

  11. Evaluation of levetiracetam as adjunctive treatment for refractory canine epilepsy: a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñana, K R; Thomas, W B; Inzana, K D; Nettifee-Osborne, J A; McLucas, K J; Olby, N J; Mariani, C J; Early, P J

    2012-01-01

    There is little evidence-based information available to guide treatment of refractory epilepsy in dogs. The antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (LEV) is administered to dogs, although its safety and efficacy are unknown. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of LEV as adjunctive therapy for refractory epilepsy in dogs. Thirty-four client-owned dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Randomized, blinded trial involving dogs resistant to phenobarbital and bromide. Dogs received LEV (20 mg/kg PO q8h) or placebo for 16 weeks, and after a 4-week washout were crossed over to the alternate treatment for 16 weeks. Owners kept records on seizure frequency and adverse events. Hemogram, chemistry profile, urinalysis, and serum antiepileptic drug concentrations were evaluated at established intervals. Twenty-two (65%) dogs completed the study. Weekly seizure frequency during the 1st treatment period decreased significantly during LEV administration relative to baseline (1.9 ± 1.9 to 1.1 ± 1.3, P = .015). The reduction in seizures with LEV was not significant when compared to placebo (1.1 ± 1.3 versus 1.5 ± 1.7, P = .310). The most common adverse event was ataxia, with no difference in incidence between LEV and placebo (45 versus 18%, P = .090). No changes in laboratory parameters were identified and owners reported an improved quality of life (QOL) with LEV compared to placebo (QOL score 32.7 ± 4.3 versus 29.4 ± 4.5, P = .028). Adjunctive treatment with LEV appears safe in epileptic dogs. Efficacy of LEV over placebo was not demonstrated, although the power of the study was limited. Further evaluation of LEV as treatment for epilepsy in dogs is warranted. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Evaluation of two vaccine education interventions to improve pertussis vaccination among pregnant African American women: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, Jennifer L; Frew, Paula M; Cortes, Marielysse; Malik, Fauzia A; Chamberlain, Allison T; Seib, Katherine; Flowers, Lisa; Ault, Kevin A; Howards, Penelope P; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B

    2017-03-13

    Vaccination coverage with tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine in pregnancy or immediately postpartum has been low. Limited data exist on rigorously evaluated interventions to increase maternal vaccination, including Tdap. Tailored messaging based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) framework has been successful in improving uptake of some public health interventions. We evaluated the effect of two ELM-based vaccine educational interventions on Tdap vaccination among pregnant African American women, a group of women who tend to have lower vaccine uptake compared with other groups. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial to pilot test two interventions - an affective messaging video and a cognitive messaging iBook - among pregnant African American women recruited during routine prenatal care visits. We measured Tdap vaccination during the perinatal period (during pregnancy and immediately postpartum), reasons for non-vaccination, and intention to receive Tdap in the next pregnancy. Among the enrolled women (n=106), 90% completed follow-up. Tdap vaccination in the perinatal period was 18% in the control group; 50% in the iBook group (Risk Ratio [vs. control group]: 2.83; 95% CI, 1.26-6.37), and 29% in the video group (RR: 1.65; 95% CI, 0.66-4.09). From baseline to follow-up, women's reported intention to receive Tdap during the next pregnancy improved in all three groups. Among unvaccinated women, the most common reason reported for non-vaccination was lack of a recommendation for Tdap by the woman's physician. Education interventions that provide targeted information for pregnant women in an interactive manner may be useful to improve Tdap vaccination during the perinatal period. However, larger studies including multiple racial and ethnic groups are needed to evaluate robustness of our findings. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01740310. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of the 'Families for Health' programme to reduce obesity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wendy; Fleming, Joanna; Kamal, Atiya; Hamborg, Thomas; Khan, Kamran A; Griffiths, Frances; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Petrou, Stavros; Simkiss, Douglas; Harrison, Elizabeth; Kim, Sung Wook; Thorogood, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 'Families for Health V2' (FFH) compared with usual care (UC). Multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) (investigators blinded, families unblinded) and economic evaluation. Stratified randomisation by family; target of 120 families. Three National Health Service Primary Care Trusts in West Midlands, England. Overweight or obese (≥91st or ≥98th centile body mass index (BMI)) children aged 6-11 years and their parents/carers, recruited March 2012-February 2014. FFH; a 10-week community-based family programme addressing parenting, lifestyle change and social and emotional development. UC; usual support for childhood obesity at each site. Primary outcomes were 12-months change in children's BMI z-score and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained (QALY). Secondary outcomes included changes in children's physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption and quality of life, parents' BMI and mental well-being, family eating/activity, parent-child relationships and parenting style. 115 families (128 children) were randomised to FFH (n=56) or UC (n=59). There was no significant difference in BMI z-score 12-months change (0.114, 95% CI -0.001 to 0.229, p=0.053; p=0.026 in favour of UC with missing value multiple imputation). One secondary outcome, change in children's waist z-score, was significantly different between groups in favour of UC (0.15, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.29). Economic evaluation showed that mean costs were significantly higher for FFH than UC (£998 vs £548, pobesity compared with UC. ISRCTN45032201. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Evaluation and validation of social and psychological markers in randomised trials of complex interventions in mental health: a methodological research programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Graham; Emsley, Richard; Liu, Hanhua; Landau, Sabine; Green, Jonathan; White, Ian; Pickles, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The development of the capability and capacity to evaluate the outcomes of trials of complex interventions is a key priority of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and the Medical Research Council (MRC). The evaluation of complex treatment programmes for mental illness (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression or psychosis) not only is a vital component of this research in its own right but also provides a well-established model for the evaluation of complex interventions in other clinical areas. In the context of efficacy and mechanism evaluation (EME) there is a particular need for robust methods for making valid causal inference in explanatory analyses of the mechanisms of treatment-induced change in clinical outcomes in randomised clinical trials. The key objective was to produce statistical methods to enable trial investigators to make valid causal inferences about the mechanisms of treatment-induced change in these clinical outcomes. The primary objective of this report is to disseminate this methodology, aiming specifically at trial practitioners. The three components of the research were (1) the extension of instrumental variable (IV) methods to latent growth curve models and growth mixture models for repeated-measures data; (2) the development of designs and regression methods for parallel trials; and (3) the evaluation of the sensitivity/robustness of findings to the assumptions necessary for model identifiability. We illustrate our methods with applications from psychological and psychosocial intervention trials, keeping the technical details to a minimum, leaving the reporting of the more theoretical and mathematically demanding results for publication in appropriate specialist journals. We show how to estimate treatment effects and introduce methods for EME. We explain the use of IV methods and principal stratification to evaluate the role of putative treatment effect mediators and therapeutic process measures. These results are

  15. Preclinical evaluation of [ 111 In]-DOTA-trastuzumab for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Alirezapour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herceptin and its fragments have been radiolabeled and used in the imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu-positive tumors and development of diagnostic kits is of great importance in radiopharmacy. Aims: In this study, 111 In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-trastuzumab ( 111 In-DOTA-trastuzumab was successively prepared and evaluated for ultimate use in the HER2 antigen imaging in oncology. Settings and Design: The conjugate was prepared, labeled and evaluated using in vitro (radioimmunoassay [RIA], enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, stability, binding, internalization/in vivo (bio-distribution, single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] experiments. Materials and Methods: 111 In-DOTA-trastuzumab was prepared followed by determination of radiochemical purity (RCP, integrity of protein, immunoreactivity of radiolabeled antibody with HER2/neu antigen (by SkBr3 cell line binding and RIA methods were determined followed by stability tests, internalization studies and the tissue bio-distribution determination in wild-type rats as well as SPECT imaging in SkBr3-bearing mice. Statistical Analysis Used: All values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (mean ± SD and the data were compared using Student′s t-test. Statistical significance was defined as P 95 ± 0.5%, S.A. 5.3 μCi/μg with the average number of chelators per antibody of 6:1 showing significant immune-reactivity retention using ELISA. In vitro stability was >90% in phosphate buffered saline and 80 ± 0.5% in serum over 48 h. Cell binding was significant (>0.79. In vitro internalization reached up to %12-13 in 10 h. Significant tumor uptake was observed. Conclusions: In vitro and in vivo/SPECT imaging in SkBr3-bearing mice demonstrated that 111 In-DOTA-trastuzumab is a potential compound for molecular imaging of SPECT for diagnosis and follow-up of HER2 expression in oncology.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of [¹¹¹ In]-DOTA-trastuzumab for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirezapour, Behrouz; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Rajabifar, Saeed; Mirzaii, Mohammad; Moradkhani, Sedigheh; Pouladi, Mehraban; Aslani, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Herceptin and its fragments have been radiolabeled and used in the imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu-positive tumors and development of diagnostic kits is of great importance in radiopharmacy. In this study, ¹¹¹ In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-trastuzumab (¹¹¹ In-DOTA-trastuzumab) was successively prepared and evaluated for ultimate use in the HER2 antigen imaging in oncology. The conjugate was prepared, labeled and evaluated using in vitro (radioimmunoassay [RIA], enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), stability, binding, internalization)/in vivo (bio-distribution, single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) experiments. ¹¹¹ In-DOTA-trastuzumab was prepared followed by determination of radiochemical purity (RCP), integrity of protein, immunoreactivity of radiolabeled antibody with HER2/neu antigen (by SkBr3 cell line binding and RIA methods) were determined followed by stability tests, internalization studies and the tissue bio-distribution determination in wild-type rats as well as SPECT imaging in SkBr3-bearing mice. All values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (mean ± SD) and the data were compared using Student's t-test. Statistical significance was defined as P 95 ± 0.5%, S.A. 5.3 μCi/μg) with the average number of chelators per antibody of 6:1 showing significant immune-reactivity retention using ELISA. In vitro stability was >90% in phosphate buffered saline and 80 ± 0.5% in serum over 48 h. Cell binding was significant (>0.79). In vitro internalization reached up to %12-13 in 10 h. Significant tumor uptake was observed. In vitro and in vivo/SPECT imaging in SkBr3-bearing mice demonstrated that ¹¹¹ In-DOTA-trastuzumab is a potential compound for molecular imaging of SPECT for diagnosis and follow-up of HER2 expression in oncology.

  17. Protocol for an economic evaluation of the randomised controlled trial of culprit lesion only PCI versus immediate multivessel PCI in acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock: CULPRIT-SHOCK trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quayyum, Zahidul; Briggs, Andrew; Robles-Zurita, Jose; Oldroyd, Keith; Zeymer, Uwe; Desch, Steffen; Waha, Suzanne de; Thiele, Holger

    2017-08-18

    Emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the culprit lesion for patients with acute myocardial infarctions is an accepted practice. A majority of patients present with multivessel disease with additional relevant stenoses apart from the culprit lesion. In haemodynamically stable patients, there is increasing evidence from randomised trials to support the practice of immediate complete revascularisation. However, in the presence of cardiogenic shock, the optimal management strategy for additional non-culprit lesions is unknown. A multicentre randomised controlled trial, CULPRIT-SHOCK, is examining whether culprit vessel only PCI with potentially subsequent staged revascularisation is more effective than immediate multivessel PCI. This paper describes the intended economic evaluation of the trial. The economic evaluation will be conducted using a pre-trial decision model and within-trial analysis. The modelling-based analysis will provide expected costs and health outcomes, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio over the lifetime for the cohort of patients included in the trial. The within-trial analysis will provide estimates of cost per life saved at 30 days and in 1 year, and estimates of health-related quality of life. Bootstrapping and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves will be used to address any uncertainty around these estimates. Different types of regression models within a generalised estimating equation framework will be used to examine how the total cost and quality-adjusted life years are explained by patients' characteristics, revascularisation strategy, country and centre. The cost-effectiveness analysis will be from the perspective of each country's national health services, where costs will be expressed in euros adjusted for purchasing power parity. Ethical approval for the study was granted by the local Ethics Committee at each recruiting centre. The economic evaluation analyses will be published in peer-reviewed journals of

  18. Evaluating acupuncture and standard care for pregnant women with back pain: the EASE Back pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN49955124).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Annette; Ogollah, Reuben; Bartlam, Bernadette; Barlas, Panos; Holden, Melanie A; Ismail, Khaled M; Jowett, Sue; Lewis, Martyn; Lloyd, Alison; Kettle, Christine; Kigozi, Jesse; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and pelvic girdle pain (PGP) during pregnancy are common and often accepted as a 'normal' part of pregnancy. Many women receive little in the way of treatment, and yet pain interferes with sleep, daily activities and work and leads to increasing requests for induction of labour or elective caesarean section. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a full RCT evaluating the benefit of acupuncture for pregnancy-related back pain. This study is a single-centre, three-arm pilot RCT in one large maternity unit and associated antenatal and physiotherapy clinics. Women were eligible if they had pregnancy-related LBP with or without PGP. Exclusions included a history of miscarriage, high risk of early labour or pre-eclampsia, PGP only and previous acupuncture. Interventions were standard care (SC): a self-management booklet with physiotherapy if needed. SC+TA: the booklet and physiotherapy comprising true (penetrating) acupuncture, advice and exercise. SC+NPA: the booklet and physiotherapy comprising non-penetrating acupuncture, advice and exercise. Remote telephone randomisation used a 1:1:1 allocation ratio stratified by gestational weeks. Three measures of pain/function were compared to inform the primary outcome measure in a full RCT: the Pelvic Girdle Questionnaire (PGQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and 11-point 0-10 numerical rating scale for pain. Analysis focused on process evaluation of recruitment, retention, descriptive information on outcomes, adherence to treatment, occurrence of adverse events and impact of physiotherapist training. One hundred twenty-five women were randomised (45% of those eligible) between April and October 2013; 73% (n = 91) provided 8-week follow-up data. Three of six recruitment methods accounted for 82% of total uptake: screening questionnaire at the 20-week scan, community midwives issuing study cards, and self-referral following local awareness initiatives. Physiotherapists' self

  19. Evaluating a collaborative smoking cessation intervention in primary care (ENTER): study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härter, Martin; Bartsch, Anna-Lena; Egger, Nina; König, Hans-Helmut; Kriston, Levente; Schulz, Holger; Tiemann, Michael; Brütt, Anna Levke; Buchholz, Angela

    2015-10-09

    Tobacco consumption is a preventable risk factor for chronic disease and complicates the treatment of medical conditions. Therefore, the German health insurance company AOK NORDWEST has developed a collaborative smoking cessation intervention for individuals with cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heavy smokers, with the aim of reducing tobacco consumption. The objective of the study ENTER is to evaluate the effectiveness of the collaborative smoking cessation intervention and determine its cost-effectiveness. This study is a cluster-randomized controlled trial conducted with 40 medical practices that are being selected from different geographic regions in Germany. Participating medical practices will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or control group. Within the medical practices, a total of 800 patients will be recruited for participation in the study and blinded to group assignment. Patients are included in the study if they are 18 years or older, insured by AOK, heavy smokers (smoke at least 20 cigarettes per day) and/or suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cardiovascular disease. Exclusion criteria are patients who are nonsmokers, who have cognitive impairments or who are illiterate. Physicians from medical practices in the intervention group will motivate patients to participate in a smoking cessation program offered by the health insurance, refer them to the program and ask about their program participation. Physicians from medical practices in the control group will provide usual care. Data collection will take place on the date of study inclusion and after 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is the amount of cigarettes consumed during the past 30 days, 12 months after the initial medical consultation. Secondary outcomes are abstinence from smoking, health-related quality of life and respiratory complaints. Moreover, a process evaluation and health economic analysis will be performed. The

  20. Evaluation of the quality of informed consent in a vaccine field trial in a developing country setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Informed consent is an ethical and legal requirement for research involving human participants. However, few studies have evaluated the process, particularly in Africa. Participants in a case control study designed to identify correlates of immune protection against tuberculosis (TB in South Africa. This study was in turn nested in a large TB vaccine efficacy trial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality of consent in the case control study, and to identify factors that may influence the quality of consent. Cross-sectional study conducted over a 4 month period. Methods Consent was obtained from parents of trial participants. These parents were asked to complete a questionnaire that contained questions about the key elements of informed consent (voluntary participation, confidentiality, the main risks and benefits, etc.. The recall (success in selecting the correct answers and understanding (correctness of interpretation of statements presented were measured. Results The majority of the 192 subjects interviewed obtained scores greater than 75% for both the recall and understanding sections. The median score for recall was 66%; interquartile range (IQR = 55%–77% and for understanding 75% (IQR = 50%–87%. Most (79% were aware of the risks and 64% knew that they participated voluntarily. Participants who had completed Grade 7 at school and higher were more likely (OR = 4.94; 95% CI = 1.57 – 15.55 to obtain scores greater than 75% for recall than those who did not. Participants who were consented by professional nurses who had worked for more than two years in research were also more likely (OR = 2.62; 95% CI = 1.35–5.07 to obtain such scores for recall than those who were not. Conclusion Notwithstanding the constraints in a developing country, in a population with low levels of literacy and education, the quality of informed consent found in this study could be considered as building blocks for establishing

  1. Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated sludge from a soil washing process: evaluation of bioremediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, F J García; Pérez, R; Escolano, O; Rubio, A; Gimeno, A; Fernandez, M D; Carbonell, G; Perucha, C; Laguna, J

    2012-01-15

    The usual fate of highly contaminated fine products (silt-clay fractions) from soil washing plants is disposal in a dump or thermal destruction (organic contaminants), with consequent environmental impacts. Alternative treatments for these fractions with the aim of on-site reuse are needed. Therefore, the feasibility of two technologies, slurry bioremediation and landfarming, has been studied for the treatment of sludge samples with a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content of 2243 mg/kg collected from a soil washing plant. The treatability studies were performed at the laboratory and pilot-real scales. The bioslurry assays yielded a TPH reduction efficiency of 57% and 65% in 28 days at the laboratory and pilot scale, respectively. In the landfarming assays, a TPH reduction of 85% in six months was obtained at laboratory scale and 42% in three months for the bioremediation performed in the full-scale. The efficiency of these processes was evaluated by ecotoxicity assessments. The toxic effects in the initial sludge sample were very low for most measured parameters. After the remediation treatments, a decrease in toxic effects was observed in earthworm survival and in carbon mineralisation. The results showed the applicability of two well known bioremediation technologies on these residues, this being a novelty. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A clinical trial evaluating the laryngeal mask airway-Supreme in obese children during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yue; Wu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Lu; Ma, Ling; Li, Yun-Feng

    2017-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA)-Supreme is a disposable double-lumen laryngeal mask airway that is widely used in clinical practice. However, its use in obese children has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine whether the LMA-Supreme could perform equally as well as endotracheal intubation in obese children having a minor surgical procedure. After ethical board approval, 100 obese male children receiving non-emergent appendectomy for chronic appendicitis or surgery to correct concealed penis were randomly divided into an endotracheal intubation group and an LMA-Supreme group. Endotracheal intubation was performed under direct vision laryngoscopy. In the LMA group, a size-3 LMA-Supreme was placed and a stomach tube inserted via the drainage tube of the mask. Cardiovascular and respiratory parameters, time taken for placement, placement attempts, time to removal of the endotracheal tube/LMA, length of stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), and complications were recorded. Insertion time was significantly longer ( p airway pressure was significantly higher, and pulmonary compliance and PACU stay time lower in the LMA-Supreme group. No significant differences between endotracheal intubation and the LMA-Supreme were seen in other parameters, except for a higher incidence of coughing in the endotracheal intubation group. The LMA-Supreme can be easily inserted and effectively used for airway management in obese children undergoing minor surgery.

  3. Randomized noninferiority clinical trial evaluating 3 commercial dry cow mastitis preparations: I. Quarter-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, A G; Godden, S; Rapnicki, P; Gorden, P; Timms, L; Aly, S S; Lehenbauer, T W; Champagne, J

    2013-07-01

    The study objective was to compare the efficacy of 3 commercial dry cow mastitis formulations regarding quarter-level prevalence of intramammary infections (IMI) postcalving, cure of preexisting infections over the dry period, prevention of new infections during the dry period, and risk for a clinical mastitis case between calving and 100d in milk (DIM). A total of 1,091 cows (4,364 quarters) from 6 commercial dairy herds in 4 different states (California, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin) were enrolled and randomized to 1 of the 3 treatments at dry-off: Quartermaster (QT; 1,000,000 IU of procaine penicillin G and 1 g of dihydrostreptomycin; Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY), Spectramast DC (SP; 500 mg of ceftiofur hydrochloride; Pfizer Animal Health), or ToMorrow Dry Cow (TM; 300mg of cephapirin benzathine; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO). Quarter milk samples were collected for routine bacteriological culture before dry cow therapy treatment at dry-off, 0 to 6 DIM, and 7 to 13 DIM and an on-farm record-keeping system was used to retrieve data on clinical mastitis cases. Noninferiority analysis was used to evaluate the effect of treatment on the primary outcome, risk for a bacteriological cure during the dry period. Multivariable logistic regression techniques were used to describe the effect of treatment on risk for presence of IMI postcalving and risk of a new IMI during the dry period. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to describe the effect of treatment on the risk and time for quarters to experience an episode of clinical mastitis between calving and 100 DIM. The overall crude quarter-level prevalence of infection at dry-off was 19.2%. The most common pathogen isolated from milk samples at dry-off was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, followed by Aerococcus spp. and other Streptococcus spp. Noninferiority analysis showed no effect of treatment on risk for a cure between dry-off and calving [least squares means (LSM): QT=93

  4. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  5. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydert, Joy A; Shapiro, Daniel E; Acra, Sari A; Monheim, Cynthia J; Chambers, Andrea S; Ball, Thomas M

    2006-11-08

    Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. 22 children, aged 5-18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04). There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05), and two (82% vs. 45%, P children who had learned guided imagery met the threshold of children who learned only the breathing exercises. The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  6. Evaluation of injection techniques in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okçu, Güvenir; Erkan, Serkan; Sentürk, Mehmet; Ozalp, R Taçkın; Yercan, H Serhat

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to compare the efficacy of two different injection techniques of local corticosteroid and local anesthetic in the management of lateral epicondylitis. This prospective study followed 80 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with lateral epicondylitis at our hospital outpatient clinic between 2005 and 2006. Patients were randomly assigned into two equal groups. Group 1 received a single injection of 1 ml betamethasone and 1 ml prilocaine on the lateral epicondyle at the point of maximum tenderness. Group 2 patients received an injection of the same drug mixture. Following the initial injection, the needle tip was redirected and reinserted down the bone approximately 30 to 40 times without emerging from the skin, creating a hematoma. Patients were evaluated with the Turkish version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire before injection and at the final follow-up. The unpaired t-test and chi-square tests were used to compare results. Sixteen patients in Group 1 and 15 patients in Group 2 were lost during follow-up. The average follow-up period of the remaining 49 patients was 21.6 months. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to gender, age, follow-up period, symptom duration, involvement side and number of dominant limbs. The Turkish DASH scores of Group 2 were significantly lower than those of Group 1 (p=0.017). Long-term clinical success in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis depends on the injection method. The peppering technique appears to be more effective than the single injection technique in the long-term.

  7. Studies on the traditional herbal anthelmintic Chenopodium ambrosioides L.: ethnopharmacological evaluation and clinical field trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliks, M M

    1985-01-01

    Infusions and decoctions of the leaves, roots and inflorescences of the herbaceous shrub Chenopodium ambrosioides (American wormseed, goosefoot, epazote, paico) and related species indigenous to the New World have been used for centuries as dietary condiments and as traditional anthelmintics by native peoples for the treatment of intestinal worms. Commercial preparations of oil of chenopodium and its active constituent, ascaridol, obtained by steam distillation, have been and continue to be, used with considerable success in mass treatment campaigns. Ethnopharmacological studies in a community of Mayan subsistence farmers in Chiapas, Mexico, confirmed that decoctions containing up to 300 mg of dry plant material per kg body weight (MGKGW) were widely used and traditionally highly regarded in the treatment of ascariasis. However, therapeutic doses of up to 6000 MGKGW of powdered, dried plant had no significant anthelmintic effect on the adults of Necator, Trichuris of Ascaris. Gas-liquid chromatographic analyses of plant samples used consistently demonstrated the presence of ascaridol in the expected amounts. Possible origins of subjective belief in the efficacy of C. ambrosioides as used, may be related to the positive association of spontaneous, or peristalsis-induced passage of senescent worms immediately following a therapeutic episode. It is also possible that in the past varieties of the plant containing much more ascaridol were used. The results of these controlled field studies did not sustain widely held traditional beliefs, nor the value of therapeutic practices regarding this plant. It is, therefore, essential that all indigenous ethnomedical practices be objectively evaluated for efficacy and safety using appropriate protocols before being considered for adoptation or promotion in health care programs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Developing a complex intervention for diet and activity behaviour change in obese pregnant women (the UPBEAT trial); assessment of behavioural change and process evaluation in a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Lucilla; Briley, Annette L; Barr, Suzanne; Bell, Ruth; Croker, Helen; Coxon, Kirstie; Essex, Holly N; Hunt, Claire; Hayes, Louise; Howard, Louise M; Khazaezadeh, Nina; Kinnunen, Tarja; Nelson, Scott M; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Robson, Stephen C; Sattar, Naveed; Seed, Paul T; Wardle, Jane; Sanders, Thomas A B; Sandall, Jane

    2013-07-15

    Complex interventions in obese pregnant women should be theoretically based, feasible and shown to demonstrate anticipated behavioural change prior to inception of large randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The aim was to determine if a) a complex intervention in obese pregnant women leads to anticipated changes in diet and physical activity behaviours, and b) to refine the intervention protocol through process evaluation of intervention fidelity. We undertook a pilot RCT of a complex intervention in obese pregnant women, comparing routine antenatal care with an intervention to reduce dietary glycaemic load and saturated fat intake, and increase physical activity. Subjects included 183 obese pregnant women (mean BMI 36.3 kg/m2). Compared to women in the control arm, women in the intervention arm had a significant reduction in dietary glycaemic load (33 points, 95% CI -47 to -20), (p change. Physical discomfort and sustained barriers to physical activity were common at 28 weeks' gestation. Process evaluation identified barriers to recruitment, group attendance and compliance, leading to modification of intervention delivery. This pilot trial of a complex intervention in obese pregnant women suggests greater potential for change in dietary intake than for change in physical activity, and through process evaluation illustrates the considerable advantage of performing an exploratory trial of a complex intervention in obese pregnant women before undertaking a large RCT. ISRCTN89971375.

  9. Process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers toPrevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-09-01

    Family-and-home-based interventions are an important vehicle for preventing childhood obesity. Systematic process evaluations have not been routinely conducted in assessment of these interventions. The purpose of this study was to plan and conduct a process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial. The trial was composed of two web-based, mother-centered interventions for prevention of obesity in children between 4 and 6 years of age. Process evaluation used the components of program fidelity, dose delivered, dose received, context, reach, and recruitment. Categorical process evaluation data (program fidelity, dose delivered, dose exposure, and context) were assessed using Program Implementation Index (PII) values. Continuous process evaluation variables (dose satisfaction and recruitment) were assessed using ANOVA tests to evaluate mean differences between groups (experimental and control) and sessions (sessions 1 through 5). Process evaluation results found that both groups (experimental and control) were equivalent, and interventions were administered as planned. Analysis of web-based intervention process objectives requires tailoring of process evaluation models for online delivery. Dissemination of process evaluation results can advance best practices for implementing effective online health promotion programs. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Twisting of the spermatic cord: ischemia and reperfusion, toxicogenetic evaluation, and the effects of phosphatidylcholine in pre-clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, H R S; Berno, C R; Falcão, G R; Hildebrand, C R; Oliveira, R J; Antoniolli-Silva, A C M B

    2016-08-29

    Phosphatidylcholine is the main phospholipid present in cell membranes and in lipoproteins, and can interfere with various biological processes. This lipid also has antioxidant activity, and protects against damage caused by free radicals under conditions of ischemia/reperfusion. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate toxicogenetic damage caused by twisting of the spermatic cord in ischemia/reperfusion, and whether phosphatidylcholine plays a role in conditions of ischemia/reperfusion in preclinical trials. The results indicate that spermatic cord torsion does not cause genotoxic damage or mutagenesis. A dose of 300 mg/kg of phosphatidylcholine is toxic and is thus not recommended. However, a dose of 150 mg/kg does not promote toxicogenetic damage, and though it does not statistically prevent tissue damage occurring from lack of oxygenation and nutrition of testicular cells, it has a tendency to reduce this damage. Therefore, this research suggests that further studies should be conducted to clarify this tendency and to provide a better explanation of the possible therapeutic effects of phosphatidylcholine in cytoprotection of germ cells affected by ischemia/reperfusion.

  11. Evaluation of clinical safety and tolerance of a Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242 supplement capsule: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mitchell L; Martoni, Christopher J; Di Pietro, E; Simon, Ryan R; Prakash, Satya

    2012-07-01

    A significant number of human clinical trials have reported no adverse effects associated with consumption of Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri). In the present study, the clinical safety and toxicology of oral ingestion of supplement capsules containing L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 was investigated. A randomized group of 131 subjects received a dose of 2.9×10⁹ CFU L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 capsules (n=67) or placebo capsules (n=64) twice daily for 9 weeks. Clinical chemistry and hematological parameters of safety were analyzed. The frequency, duration and intensity of adverse events (AE)s and clinical significance of safety parameters were recorded for both groups. No clinically significant differences between the probiotic capsule and placebo capsule treated groups were detected in either the blood clinical chemistry or hematology results. The frequency and intensity of AEs was similar in the two groups. These results demonstrate that administration of a twice daily dose of 2.9×10⁹ CFU was safe and well tolerated in the population evaluated over 9 weeks. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A randomized trial to evaluate the risk of gastrointestinal disease due to consumption of drinking water meeting current microbiological standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payment, P; Richardson, L; Siemiatycki, J; Dewar, R; Edwardes, M; Franco, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This project directly and empirically measured the level of gastrointestinal (GI) illness related to the consumption of tapwater prepared from sewage-contaminated surface waters and meeting current water quality criteria. METHODS: A randomized intervention trial was carried out; 299 eligible households were supplied with domestic water filters (reverse-osmosis) that eliminate microbial and chemical contaminants from their water, and 307 households were left with their usual tapwater without a filter. The GI symptomatology was evaluated by means of a family health diary maintained prospectively by all study families over a 15-month period. RESULTS: The estimated annual incidence of GI illness was 0.76 among tapwater drinkers compared with 0.50 among filtered water drinkers (p less than 0.01). These findings were consistently observed in all population subgroups. CONCLUSION: It is estimated that 35% of the reported GI illnesses among the tapwater drinkers were water-related and preventable. Our results raise questions about the adequacy of current standards of drinking water quality to prevent water-borne endemic gastrointestinal illness. PMID:2029037

  13. Evaluation of empowerment model on indicators of metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, a randomized clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amanpour, Farzaneh; Vahedi, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education is a major subject in achieving optimal glycemic control. Effective empowerment approach can be beneficial for improving patients' health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of empowerment model on indicators of metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. a randomized controlled trial of 103 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to either the intervention (empowerment approach training) or the control group (conventional training) 2014. Empowerment approach training were performed for the experimental group for eight weeks. Data collection tool included demographic information form and indicators of metabolic control checklist. Analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance, chi-square test, paired t-test, independent t-test and multiple linear regression. Before the intervention, two groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic variables, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), and other indicators of metabolic control. After the intervention, average HbA1C and other metabolic indicators except for LDL showed significant differences in the experimental group compared to the control group. study results indicated the positive effects of applying the empowerment model on the metabolic control indicators. Therefore, applying this model is recommended to nurses and the relevant authorities in order to improve clinical outcomes in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating the impact of feedback on elementary aged students' fluency growth in written expression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmiller, Adrea J; Eckert, Tanya L; Codding, Robin S; Petscher, Yaacov

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate elementary-aged students' writing fluency growth in response to (a) instructional practices, (b) sex differences, and (c) student's initial level of writing fluency. Third-grade students (n=133) in three urban elementary schools were randomly assigned to either an individualized performance feedback condition (n=46), a practice-only condition (i.e., weekly writing practice; n=39), or an instructional control condition (n=48) for 8weeks. Findings included support for use of performance feedback as an instructional component in general education classrooms (Hedges' g=0.66), whereas simple practice with curriculum-based measurement in written expression did not produce growth significantly greater than standard instructional practices. The hypothesis that girls write significantly more than boys was supported. However, girls and boys did not differ in their rate of growth. Finally, students' initial risk status in writing fluency did not differentially predict growth in writing fluency over the course of the study. Implications for incorporating feedback as a basic component of intervention in writing are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Immediate Loaded Dental Implants With Local Application of Melatonin: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gammal, Mona Y; Salem, Ahmed S; Anees, Mohamed M; Tawfik, Mohamed A

    2016-04-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants in situations where low bone density exist, such as the posterior maxillary region, became possible recently after the introduction of biomimetic agents. This 1-year preliminary clinical trial was carried out to clinically and radiographically evaluate immediate-loaded 1-piece implants with local application of melatonin in the osteotomy site as a biomimetic material. 14 patients with missing maxillary premolars were randomized to receive 14 implants of 1-piece type that were subjected to immediate loading after 2 weeks of initial placement. Group I included 7 implants with acid-etched surface while group II included 7 implants with acid-etched surface combined with local application of melatonin gel at the osteotomy site. Patients were recalled for follow up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after loading. All implants were considered successful after 12 months of follow-up. Significant difference (P implant loading when considering the implant stability. At 1 and 3 months there were significant differences in the marginal bone level between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the local application of melatonin at the osteotomy site is associated with good stability and minimal bone resorption. However, more studies for longer follow-up periods are required to confirm the effect of melatonin hormone on osseointegration of dental implants.

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Feedback on Elementary Aged Students’ Fluency Growth in Written Expression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmiller, Adrea J.; Eckert, Tanya L.; Codding, Robin S.; Petscher, Yaacov

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate elementary-aged students’ writing fluency growth in response to (a) instructional practices, (b) sex differences, and (c) student’s initial level of writing fluency. Third-grade students (n=133) in three urban elementary schools were randomly assigned to either an individualized performance feedback condition (n=46), a practice-only condition (i.e., weekly writing practice; n = 39), or an instructional control condition (n = 48) for 8 weeks. Findings included support for use of performance feedback as an instructional component in general education classrooms (Hedges’ g = 0.66), whereas simple practice with curriculum-based measurement in written expression did not produce growth significantly greater than standard instructional practices. The hypothesis that girls write significantly more than boys was supported. However, girls and boys did not differ in their rate of growth. Finally, students’ initial risk status in writing fluency did not differentially predict growth in writing fluency over the course of the study. Implications for incorporating feedback as a basic component of intervention in writing are discussed. PMID:25432270

  17. A randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate blood pressure changes in patients undergoing extraction under local anesthesia with vasopressor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzeda, Marcelo José; Moura, Brenda; Louro, Rafael Seabra; da Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; Calasans-Maia, Mônica Diuana

    2014-05-01

    The control of hypertensive patients' blood pressure and heart rate using vasoconstrictors during surgical procedures under anesthesia is still a major concern in everyday surgical practice. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the variation of blood pressure and heart rate in nonhypertensive and controlled hypertensive voluntary subjects undergoing oral surgery under local anesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride and epinephrine at 1:100,000 (Alphacaine; DFL, Brazil), performed in the Oral Surgery Department, Dentistry School, Fluminense Federal University. In total, 25 voluntary subjects were divided into 2 groups: nonhypertensive (n = 15) and controlled hypertensives (n = 10). Blood pressure and heart rate were measured at 4 different times: T0, in the waiting room; T1, after placement of the surgical drapes; T2, 10 minutes after anesthesia injection; and T3, at the end of the surgical procedure. A statistically significant difference (P 0.05) between the amount administered to nonhypertensive and hypertensive subjects. It was concluded that the local anesthetics studied could safely be used in controlled hypertensive and nonhypertensive patients in compliance with the maximum recommended doses.

  18. Evaluation of Valerians’ effect on sleep quantity and quality of menopausal women: cross-over clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Mirmohammadali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause causes poor sleep quality in women, so that great throngs of menopausal women experience menopause-induced sleep disorders. This study was conducted to determine the effects of valerian extract on sleep quantity and quality of postmenopausal women. Methods: This triple-blind, randomized, cross-over clinical trial was performed on 144 eligible postmenopausal women. Participants were randomly classified into two groups to use either 700 mg valerian extract (group A or a placebo (group B for one month. After a 2-week washout period, the treatment regimens were reversed. Sleep quantity and quality were evaluated using Pittsburgh and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI questionnaires at baseline and after both phases of intervention. Results: Mean score of Pittsburgh scale was 10.93.6 at baseline. Valerian reduced this score to 7.83.4 and 7.43 at the first and the second phase of intervention, respectively (P<0.001. After the first phase of intervention, ISI score was reduced to 2.870.62 in group A (P<0.001. It was reduced to 4.020.5 in group B after the second phase of intervention (P<0.001. Conclusion: Daily consumption of 700 mg valerian improved sleep quantity and quality in postmenopausal women

  19. Three-year randomised clinical trial to evaluate the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of hybrid composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Senthamaraiselvi; Elsen, Liesbeth; Lijnen, Inge; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Lambrechts, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical performance, quantitative and qualitative wear patterns of conventional hybrid (Tetric Ceram), micro-filled hybrid (Gradia Direct Posterior) and nano-hybrid (Tetric EvoCeram, TEC) posterior composite restorations in a 3-year randomised clinical trial. Sixteen Tetric Ceram, 17 TEC and 16 Gradia Direct Posterior restorations were placed in human molars and evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months of clinical service according to US Public Health Service criteria. The gypsum replicas at each recall were used for 3D laser scanning to quantify wear, and the epoxy resin replicas were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the qualitative wear patterns. After 3 years of clinical service, the three hybrid restorative materials performed clinically well in posterior cavities. Within the observation period, the nano-hybrid and micro-hybrid restorations evolved better in polishability with improved surface gloss retention than the conventional hybrid counterpart. The three hybrid composites showed enamel-like vertical wear and cavity-size dependant volume loss magnitude. Qualitatively, while the micro-filled and nano-hybrid composite restorations exhibited signs of fatigue similar to the conventional hybrid composite restorations at heavy occlusal contact area, their light occlusal contact areas showed less surface pitting after 3 years of clinical service.

  20. Phase IV: randomized controlled trial to evaluate lot consistency of trivalent split influenza vaccines in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Lee, Jacob; Wie, Seong-Heon; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Kee, Sae Yoon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-01-01

    Influenza vaccines are the primary method for preventing influenza and its complications. Considering the increasing demand for influenza vaccines, vaccine manufacturers are required to establish large-scale production systems. This phase IV randomized trial was conducted to evaluate the lot consistency of trivalent split influenza vaccines regarding immunogenicity and safety. A total of 1,023 healthy adults aged 18-64 y were enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive the GC FLU® Prefilled Syringe or the GC FLU® Injection, and they were further randomized to one of 3 lots of each vaccine in a 1:1:1 ratio. In both GC FLU® Injection and GC FLU® Prefilled Syringe groups, immune responses were equivalent between lots for each of the 3 vaccine strains on day 21. The 2-sided 95% CI of GMT ratios between pairs of lots were between 0.67 and 1.5, meeting the equivalence criteria. After vaccination, all 3 criteria of the European Medicines Agency were met in both GC FLU® Injection and GC FLU® Prefilled Syringe groups. The vaccines showed tolerable safety profiles without serious adverse events. The demonstration of lot consistency, robust immunogenic responses and favorable safety profiles support the reliability of mass-manufacturing systems for the GC FLU® Injection and GC FLU® Prefilled Syringe.

  1. Rationale and design of the SMaRT trial: A randomised, prospective, parallel, non-blinded, one-centre trial to evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging in acute setting in patients presenting with suspected scaphoid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rua, Tiago; Vijayanathan, Sanjay; Parkin, David; Goh, Vicky; McCrone, Paul; Gidwani, Sam

    2017-12-01

    Background Wrist injury is a common presentation to the Emergency Department in the United Kingdom. Among these injuries, the scaphoid is the most common fractured carpal bone. However, given the limited ability of conventional radiography to accurately diagnose a suspected scaphoid fracture on presentation, its diagnosis and management remain challenging. Despite the vast clinical evidence supporting the superior accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging, there is little to no evidence around the real-world clinical and economic impact of immediate magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected scaphoid fractures. Methods Review of design and implementation challenges associated with the identification and subsequent recruitment of eligible patients, implementation of a novel clinical pathway in an acute setting, rationale behind the primary and secondary outcomes selected and measurement of the primary outcome. Results The Scaphoid Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Trauma trial is a single-site prospective, randomised, non-blinded, parallel design trial that aims to evaluate the use of immediate magnetic resonance imaging in the management of patients presenting to the acute setting with suspected scaphoid fractures. The primary outcome is the total 3-month cost per patient associated with the diagnosis and treatment of suspected scaphoid fractures. It is hypothesised that the immediate use of magnetic resonance imaging, a more accurate but expensive imaging modality, in patients with negative findings in the initial four-view radiography, will reduce the overall National Health Service costs by promoting definitive care and avoiding unnecessary diagnostic and treatment procedures. Other rationale design considerations in the recruitment, randomisation, data acquisition and intervention implementation are also discussed. Several of these challenges derive from real-world operational issues associated with the provision of magnetic resonance imaging in an

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Commiphora Mukul, a Botanical resin, in the Management of Hemorrhoids: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza Vaez; Hosseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Bahrami, Abdollah; Davati, Ali; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faghihzadeh, Sograt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhoids complaint is one of the most common problems in most society, especially in Asian countries. Current drug treatment protocols cannot cure the disease, and they are palliative. According to Persian traditional medicine, Commiphora Mukul (CM) resin is a medication choice. Aim: This randomized study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of crude CM resin compared to a combination of lactolose and anti-hemorrhoid (LandA) in patients with uncomplicated hemorrhoids grade 1 and 2. Materials and Methods: This trial was carried out on 99 patients with hemorrhoids, in Ghaem and Imam Reaza Hospitals of the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. They randomly received CM 3 g/d for 4 weeks (as study group) or LandA (Lactolose syrup in laxative dose for 1 month and anti-hemorrhoid suppository daily for 10 days) as control group. Subjective and objectives variables including painful defecation, flatulence, constipation, gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), dyspepsia, proctorrhagia, anal protrusion, and colonoscopic grading were assessed before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after the treatment period. An intent-to-treat analysis was used. Safety was assessed with evaluation of clinical adverse effects by common toxicity criteria version 4.0. Forty-nine patients were assigned randomly to receive LandA and 50 to receive CM. After 4 weeks, flatulence, dyspepsia, GER, and colonoscopic grading scores significantly decreased in study group, whereas in control group constipation, painful defecation, and proctorrhagia showed better but not significant improvement. After 4-weak follow-up, the rate of constipation, and proctorrhagia also showed significantly improvement in study group. Constipation and proctorrhagia in control group recurred significantly in 4-week follow-up than after the treatment, whereas this recurrence in test group was not seen. Conclusion: CM was more effective than LandA in 4-week treatment of patients with uncomplicated

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Tong Len Meditation Practice in Cancer Patients: Evaluation of a Distant Psychological Healing Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, Gioacchino; Pandolfi, Paolo; Collina, Natalina; Frezza, Giovanni; Brandes, Alba; Galli, Margherita; Avventuroso, Federica Marzocchi; De Lisio, Sara; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Franceschi, Enrico; Esposti, Roberta Degli; Lombardo, Laura; Cavallo, Giovanna; Di Battista, Monica; Rimondini, Simonetta; Poggi, Rosalba; Susini, Cinzia; Renzi, Rina; Marconi, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Tong Len meditation is an important therapeutic tool in the Tibetan medicine, and it can be used for self-healing and/or to heal others. Currently, in the West, there is no scientific study concerning the efficacy of a Tong Len distant healing effect on psychological disorders in cancer patients. To evaluate a distant healing effect of Tong Len meditation on stress, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and self-perceived quality of life in cancer patients. These psychological objectives were chosen as a consequence of the limited scientific literature of present day. We performed a double-blind randomized controlled trial on 103 cancer patients with tumors. Overall, 12 meditators used Tong Len in aid of 52 patients randomly selected as experimental group, while the remaining 51 patients constituted the control group. Patients and meditators did not know each other. All patients completed profile of mood states (POMS) and European Quality of Life-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaires before treatment (T0), after two (T1) and three months of treatment (T2), and one month after treatment cessation (T3). With regard to the parameters related to depression, a statistically significant improvement (P = .003) was observed in the treatment group compared to controls. On the other hand, the vigor/activity parameter saw significant improvements in the control group (P = .009). Both groups exhibited significant improvements in the other factors assessed in the POMS and EQ-5D questionnaires. This study did not provide sufficient evidence supporting an efficacy of Tong Len meditation in distant psychological healing as compared to a control condition. The research highlighted some psychological improvements through Tong Len distant meditation in a group of patients unknown to meditators. Therefore, the enhancement detected in most parameters in both treatment and control groups raises interest on in-depth analysis and evaluation of distant meditation on cancer patients to mitigate

  4. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A. R.; Karuna, Y. M.; Yavagal, C.; Deepak, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before going ahead with the restoration. Thus, use of naturally occurring disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary minimum intervention dentistry. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of hand instruments in excavating dental caries and comparatively evaluate the roles of Aloe vera and propolis as potential cavity disinfecting agents after minimally invasive hand excavation of dental caries. Settings and Designs: Experimental, in vivo intergroup split mouth, randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: The study included Group I (Control), Group II (A. vera) and Group III (propolis). Ten patients with three teeth each have occlusal/occlusoproximal lesions suitable for ART were selected. Dentinal samples were collected three times from each tooth viz., preexcavation, postexcavation and postdisinfection of the cavities. These dentinal samples were subjected to microbiological analyses for total viable count. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. Results: In all the three groups, significant amount of bacteria were left behind after hand excavation. Group II and Group III, in which cavities were treated with A. vera and propolis extracts respectively, showed a significant reduction in the bacterial counts when compared to control the group. Conclusions: Hand excavation alone does not completely eliminate bacteria, which may predispose treated teeth to secondary caries. Both propolis and A. vera extracts can be used as potential natural disinfecting agents, thereby embracing the concept of phytotherapy in minimum intervention dentistry. PMID:25821369

  5. Applying decision trial and evaluation laboratory as a decision tool for effective safety management system in aviation transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeanyichukwu Ebubechukwu Onyegiri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in the aviation industry, the weak engineering controls and lapses associated with safety management systems (SMSs are responsible for the seemingly unprecedented disasters. A previous study has confirmed the difficulties experienced by safety managers with SMSs and the need to direct research to this area of investigation for more insights and progress in the evaluation and maintenance of SMSs in the aviation industry. The purpose of this work is to examine the application of Decision Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL to the aviation industry in developing countries with illustration using the Nigerian aviation survey data for the validation of the method. The advantage of the procedure over other decision making methods is in its ability to apply feedback in its decision making. It also affords us the opportunity of breaking down the complex aviation SMS components and elements which are multi-variate in nature through the analysis of the contributions of the diverse system criteria from the perspective of cause and effects, which in turn yields easier and yet more effective aviation transportation accident pre-corrective actions. In this work, six revised components of an SMS were identified and DEMATEL was applied to obtain their direct and indirect impacts and influences on the overall SMS performance. Data collection was by the survey questionnaire, which served as the initial direct-relation matrix, coded in Matlab software for establishing the impact relation map (IRM. The IRM was then plotted in MS Excel spread-sheet software. From our results, safety structure and regulation has the highest impact level on an SMS with a corresponding positive relation level value. In conclusion, the results agree with those of previous researchers that used grey relational analysis. Thus, DEMATEL serves as a great tool and resource for the safety manager.

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Commiphora Mukul, a Botanical resin, in the Management of Hemorrhoids: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Mohammad Reza Vaez; Hosseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Bahrami, Abdollah; Davati, Ali; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faghihzadeh, Sograt

    2013-10-01

    Hemorrhoids complaint is one of the most common problems in most society, especially in Asian countries. Current drug treatment protocols cannot cure the disease, and they are palliative. According to Persian traditional medicine, Commiphora Mukul (CM) resin is a medication choice. This randomized study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of crude CM resin compared to a combination of lactolose and anti-hemorrhoid (LandA) in patients with uncomplicated hemorrhoids grade 1 and 2. This trial was carried out on 99 patients with hemorrhoids, in Ghaem and Imam Reaza Hospitals of the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. They randomly received CM 3 g/d for 4 weeks (as study group) or LandA (Lactolose syrup in laxative dose for 1 month and anti-hemorrhoid suppository daily for 10 days) as control group. Subjective and objectives variables including painful defecation, flatulence, constipation, gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), dyspepsia, proctorrhagia, anal protrusion, and colonoscopic grading were assessed before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after the treatment period. An intent-to-treat analysis was used. Safety was assessed with evaluation of clinical adverse effects by common toxicity criteria version 4.0. Forty-nine patients were assigned randomly to receive LandA and 50 to receive CM. After 4 weeks, flatulence, dyspepsia, GER, and colonoscopic grading scores significantly decreased in study group, whereas in control group constipation, painful defecation, and proctorrhagia showed better but not significant improvement. After 4-weak follow-up, the rate of constipation, and proctorrhagia also showed significantly improvement in study group. Constipation and proctorrhagia in control group recurred significantly in 4-week follow-up than after the treatment, whereas this recurrence in test group was not seen. CM was more effective than LandA in 4-week treatment of patients with uncomplicated hemorrhoids grade 1 and 2.

  7. The Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation provisional criteria for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J; Giannini, Edward H; Gare, Boel Andersson; Martini, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) based on the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation juvenile DM core set of variables. Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patient's rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians' consensus ratings as the "gold standard measure," chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false-positive and-negative rates, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa values >0.8 were multiplied by the face validity score to select the top definitions. The top definition of improvement was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second-highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3 of 6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength (definition P1 selected by the International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies group). The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. We propose a provisional data-driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite end point for the evaluation of global response to therapy in juvenile DM. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Evaluation of time, attendance of medical staff, and resources during interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer. DEGRO-QUIRO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, N.; Zamboglou, N. [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Maurer, U. [St.-Antonius-Hospital, Strahlentherapie, Eschweiler (Germany); Popp, W. [Prime Networks AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sack, H. [University of Essen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The German Society of Radiation Oncology initiated a multicenter trial to evaluate core processes and subprocesses of radiotherapy by prospective evaluation of all important procedures in the most frequent malignancies treated by radiation therapy. The aim of this analysis was to assess the required resources for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy (BRT) based on actual time measurements regarding allocation of personnel and room occupation needed for specific procedures. Two radiotherapy centers (community hospital of Offenbach am Main and community hospital of Eschweiler) participated in this prospective study. Working time of the different occupational groups and room occupancies for the workflow of prostate BRT were recorded and methodically assessed during a 3-month period. For HDR and LDR BRT, a total of 560 and 92 measurements, respectively, were documented. The time needed for treatment preplanning was median 24 min for HDR (n=112 measurements) and 6 min for LDR BRT (n=21). Catheter implantation with intraoperative HDR real-time planning (n=112), postimplantation HDR treatment planning (n=112), and remotely controlled HDR afterloading irradiation (n=112) required median 25, 39, and 50 min, respectively. For LDR real-time planning (n=39) and LDR treatment postplanning (n=32), the assessed median duration was 91 and 11 min, respectively. Room occupancy and overall mean medical staff times were 194 and 910 min respectively, for HDR, and 113 and 371 min, respectively, for LDR BRT. In this prospective analysis, the resource requirements for the application of HDR and LDR BRT of prostate cancer were assessed methodically and are presented for first time. (orig.)

  9. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A R Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity clean